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From the Editor

Andrew Oppmann

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elcome to this special conference edition of APME News! Ten years ago, we debuted the Innovator of the Year award at the APME Conference in Washington. Judges pick three finalists from entries submitted by editors and news directors from organizations across the nation. I’m happy that this conference innovation that celebrates innovation is alive and well – and on deck for another APME gathering in Washington. This issue of APME News includes articles written by the nominees about their innovations: • Los Angeles Times for "SNAP" (Simple News

Assembly Platform) • Milwaukee Journal Sentinel for "Just the FAQs" • WBUR Boston for its website redesign and associated audience engagement efforts Another great conference is in store for 2017, thanks to our ongoing partnerships with the American Society of News Editors and the Associated Press Photo Managers. My congratulations and thanks to Conference Program Committee Co-Chairs Mark Russell, ASNE board member and executive editor of The Memphis Commercial Appeal, and Mark Baldwin, APME executive committee member and executive editor of the Rockford (Illinois) Register Star.

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The President’s Corner: Thanks, AP and APME. You have become family. Ken Paulson: Recently, courts have been tough on American journalists Simon says: APME president-elect to push for free press and news literacy Capital Ideas: Exploring the intersection of journalism and citizenship Off the trail: AP D.C. metro reporter offers advice on touring the capital D.C. to-do list: Take time to remind yourself of the greatness of D.C. Speaker: What to expect at “A Conversation with Leonard Pitts Jr.” Speaker: Rochelle Riley discusses what it’s like to be a “jane-of-all-trades” The schedule: Your guide to conference meetings, events and more Speaker: Q&A with outgoing ASNE president Mizell Stewart III Innovator of the Year: Nominees from L.A., Milwaukee and Boston Conference Briefs: Carbajal to serve as new ASNE president APME Officers: Roster of APME Board of Directors

EDITOR Andrew Oppmann Adjunct Professor of Journalism Middle Tennessee State University Andrew.Oppmann@mtsu.edu DESIGNER Steve Massie smassie@crain.com

APME News is the quarterly magazine of the Associated Press Media Editors, a professional, nonprofit organization founded in 1933 in French Lick, Indiana. Its members include senior editors and leaders from news operations in the United States and Canada who are affiliated with The Associated Press, including more than 1,400 newspapers and online sites and about 2,000 broadcast outlets. The group also includes college journalism educators and college student media editors. APME works with AP to support and recognize journalism excellence and the First Amendment. To learn more about APME’s programs and activities, visit apme.com.

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The President’s Corner

Bill Church

APME is in good hands Thanks, AP and APME. You have become family

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’ve known Andrew Oppmann, editor of this wonderful magazine, for 21 years. I was there when he announced to a group of Gannett editors that he and wife, Elise, were about to have a baby. Their first child now is a freshman at Middle Tennessee State University. Facebook has allowed us to track Emily’s accomplishments from precocious child to amazing young woman. Dad and Mom have reasons to be proud through all those years. Andrew, though, hasn’t changed. He remains -- to many of us, at least -- the Most Interesting Man in our World. Our conference’s V.O.G (Voice of God). Marketing guru. Accomplished journalist. Loving Dad. Totally fun guy (and source of many stories that can only be repeated in places involving dingy lighting, bar stools and multiple TV monitors). I’m not leading this column with Andrew-isms because it’s a clever diversion tactic in case my copy is late. Andrew stared at me during an APME meeting break a few years ago, and pronounced: “We need to get you on the ladder.” I stared back. “I have no interest.” I’m still puzzled why. Laura Sellers called in 2010, inviting me to join the board. I was tracking Laura’s work in Oregon and had been a fan. No way was I worthy of joining the board. Alan Miller called four years later, inviting me to join the ladder. Alan is one of the few people I worry about disappointing. No way

was I qualified to be a future APME president. But our organization is different. APME always has been a let’s-do-it group of editors who care about journalism and share The Associated Press’s commitment to excellence. We’ve been a support group in the best of ways; colleagues who have become friends. At APME, the president is no different than the newest board member. Our mission to lead, nurture and innovate is driven by a common commitment to treat everyone as an equal. APME is in good hands. Jim Simon will be a wonderful president. He’s thoughtful and caring. The description fits so many on our board. Darla looks forward to the APME meetings in New York because it’s a chance to play tourist (again). But the highlight of our weekend tends to be the APME dinner, where board members treat her like a lifelong friend. Many became Facebook friends when they first met my darling wife. The truth is Darla is the one who keeps me informed on Gary Graham’s travels, Laura and Carl Earl’s adventures, Angie Muhs’ precocious children … and Andrew’s most interesting life. Thank you, APME and AP. You have become family. Bill Church is senior vice president for news at GateHouse Media and is concluding his term as APME president at this conference.

Bill Church, center, with APME board members.

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Will thin-skinned targets with deep pockets chill reporting on public health, safety and other matters of public interest?

By Ken Paulson

Bar lowering for journalists?

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hese have not been good times for America’s journalists – not on the business side, not in the court of public opinion and recently not in the courtroom. For decades, we’ve felt pretty confident that by adhering to professional standards and reasonable care, we didn’t have to worry about a damaging lawsuit from powerful people or companies. After all, the Supreme Court decision in New York Times v. Sullivan in 1964 established that plaintiffs could only recover against news media defendants if there is evidence of actual malice or reckless disregard for the truth. Then came the news in August that the Walt Disney Co. had settled a defamation lawsuit filed by Beef Products Inc., at a cost of $177 million dollars. That’s a stunning figure, particularly when you realize that ABC News – a subsidiary of Disney – reported on the company’s controversial meat product in standard broadcast fashion and that the network continues to stand by its coverage. Like The New York Times and other news media, ABC raised questions about a beef product that was widely derided as “pink slime” for its beef-trimmings content and consistency. This being television, ABC News really went to town against Beef Products, Inc., running multiple reports about the product and asking whether it was safe for consumers. That sounds a lot like journalism, doesn’t it? The drumbeat about “pink slime” led to the lawsuit, and even though the Constitution would seem to be on ABC’s side, it folded rather than have its fate decided in an agriculture-friendly state with a potentially hostile jury. Making it even tougher was South Dakota’s law lowering the bar for a suit against anyone who falsely undercuts the reputation of an agricultural food product. Of course, it’s not just about pink slime. Murray Energy, one of the nation’s biggest coal mining companies, is suing John Oliver for his lampooning of the company and its chief executive. Oliver suggested that the company was guilty of mistreating its workers and used a giant squirrel to make his point. Oliver would seem to be on firm legal ground, but the Disney surrender has to make the folks at HBO a little uneasy. So is that it? Will thin-skinned targets with deep pockets chill reporting on public health, safety and other matters of public interest? Not while judges still apply the Constitution. A recent decision involving Sarah Palin attests to that. Palin sued The New York Times after an editorial made a connection between a map put out by her political action committee showing targeted electoral districts and the 2011 shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. When challenged, the Times quickly published a correction. Federal Judge Jed S. Rakof threw out Palin’s suit, concluding that The New York Times may have been sloppy or negligent, but that there was no evidence of actual malice or recklessness. “Nowhere is political journalism so free, so robust, or perhaps so

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rowdy as in the United States,” Rakof wrote. “In the exercise of that freedom, mistakes will be made some of which will be harmful to others. Responsible journalists will promptly correct their errors; others will not. “But if political journalism is to achieve its constitutionally endorsed role of challenging the powerful, legal redress by a public figure must be limited to those cases where the public figure has a plausible factual basis for complaining that the mistake was made maliciously.” Wealthy plaintiffs are getting more aggressive and juries are seemingly more hostile to the news media, but Judge Rakof’s decision is a heartening reminder of the essential protections afforded a free press and the importance of its role in a free society. Ken Paulson is the president of the Newseum Institute’s First Amendment Center and dean of the College of Media and Entertainment at Middle Tennessee State University.


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SIMON SAYS ...

President-elect to push for a robust free press, news literacy

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By Autumn Phillips APME News

im Simon believes it’s more important than ever for APME, as a premier news leadership organization, to be outward facing. During his term as president of APME, Simon hopes to expand its public role as an advocate for a robust, free press and news literacy. “I think, given the political climate in this country, where there are relentless efforts to attack and undermine the press, the role of APME in standing up for journalism and educating the public is more essential than ever,” he said. Some ways to expand that role include supporting media literacy efforts, as well as developing partnerships with other news leadership organizations, Simon said. “For example, we are working more closely with ASNE, having recently merged our First Amendment committees. We can speak more powerfully on these issues with a collective voice.” Simon’s other priorities for his year as president include ensuring APME is doing all it can to help its members navigate the enormous changes and challenges in their newsrooms, helping facilitate mentoring relationships and stepping up diversity initiatives. As training resources are cut in newsrooms across the country, Simon sees APME strengthening the already robust NewsTrain program and connecting experienced editors to emerging leaders. >> Continued on next page

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Jim Simon in the Honolulu Civil Beat newsroom.


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Simon’s career, the state of journalism and APME plans

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By Robby General Ball State University

im Simon is managing editor of Honolulu Civil Beat. He will take the baton as president of the Associated Press Media Editors at the 2017 Leadership Conference in Washington in October. Before relocating to Honolulu, Jim spent more than 30 years as a reporter and editor at The Seattle Times. He held several leadership positions there, including managing editor. He helped lead Seattle Times teams that won two Pulitzer Prizes for breaking news — the first in 2010 for coverage of the killing of three suburban police officers and the second in 2015 for reporting on a deadly landslide in Northwest Washington. In a recent interview, he was asked to talk about his career and the state of journalism and his plans for APME. Q: What do you want to accomplish in your term as president of APME? A: I think it’s essential that APME, working with other organizations like ASNE, serve as a strong and outspoken advocate on behalf of journalism - and the vital role of the press in a democracy. Given the current political climate and assaults on our credibility, those collective efforts are needed now more than ever. I'd also like to see APME serve as a resource for local news organizations on media literacy and community engagement initiatives. Another priority is reinvigorating APME's work on diversity issues. Through our joint First Amendment work with ASNE, I also hope we can provide increased support and advice for members on public records and access issues. Q: What is something that APME has done well in the past that you would like to build upon? A: On a personal level, serving on the APME board has provided me with an invaluable network of colleagues around the country who I

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“I’d love to see us helping develop new newsroom leadership, particularly on the metro editor and producer levels. It’s more important than ever, as top-level positions disappear, for APME to be relevant to that tier of editors working in the trenches.” A third priority during Simon’s APME presidency is to continue and expand efforts in newsroom diversity. “We need to make sure that our newsrooms. and our coverage, are reflective of the communities we serve,” he said. “That affects our credibility.” At a time when government officials are making it more and more difficult to get information, Simon said, the joint work of ASNE and APME can support local editors in their efforts to combat the erosion of public records laws and push for open government. To his year as president of APME, Simon will bring years of experience as a Pulitzer Prize-winning editor and reporter at The Seattle Times, and he will offer fresh insights from his new role as managing editor of the online Honolulu Civil Beat. He made the move to the 6-year-old news organization earlier this year after 32 years at The Seattle Times. The nonprofit Civil Beat is a public affairs and investigative news site based in Hawaii and published by Pierre Omidyar, philan-

can turn to for advice, ideas and guidance. Providing that kind of support and mentoring remains essential as editors deal with the unprecedented pace of change in their newsrooms and growing pressures in their jobs. APME's popular NewsTrain program can also serve as a model for affordable, local training around the country. Q: You spent more than 30 years at The Seattle Times. What took you to Honolulu working with Civil Beat? A: I was drawn by the new challenge of working in the nonprofit, online news world, where there is a lot of innovation and fresh energy. As someone who spent nearly all his career in local journalism, I was also attracted by Civil Beat's commitment to high-impact reporting and a belief that can make Hawaii a better place. And it's a newsroom eager to try new things, such as taking a deep dive into podcasting. That said, it has definitely been a steep learning curve for me. My wife is from Hawaii and has lots of family around the islands, so there also was a big personal lure for us. Q: How is your work at Honolulu Civil Beat different from your previous work organizations? A: Because it's a relatively small news organization, where most of us wear a lot of hats, I'm involved in everything from hosting coffees for our readers to fundraising to planning community events. Q: What's the best way you've found for reporters to balance breaking news and investigative work? A: Always have multiple threads going. Even as you're working on breaking news or shorter enterprise pieces, you should have a least one big, ambitious story idea in your pocket and be stealing time to work on it. Also, keep an eye out for the watchdog possibilities that might emerge from routine stories or out of data. Robby General is a senior at Ball State University. He graduates in May 2018.

thropist and founder of eBay. “It’s fun to work at a place that is growing, doing a lot of experimentation,” Simon said. “While we’re digital-only, Civil Beat still has striking similarities to where I came from. At its core, it’s about doing journalism that impacts the community.” Finding new ways to produce ambitious journalism and highend enterprise has been a marker of Simon’s career. Simon helped co-found The Seattle Times’ Education Lab, which was funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project focused on indepth solutions reporting and engagement efforts around education in the Northwest. “It’s been much more difficult for newspapers to pull off these bigger projects as staffs shrink and that’s why getting outside philanthropic investment is important,” he said. As president of APME, Simon believes the organization can help local editors by providing ideas and templates of how to engage the community and how to best be a public voice in their communities for a free press. “The interesting thing about this period, despite the challenges, is the rallying by many readers to our side. There’s a renewed interest in what we do.”

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News Leadership Conference focus: Exploring the intersection of journalism and citizenship

CAPITAL IDEAS

And for the first time, we’ll offer a full day of preconference programming on Sunday ahead of the official opening reception at the National Zoo. elcome to the 2017 News Leadership ConThe result? A program constructed to allow you to pick and ference. Ready to rock the nation’s capital? choose the sessions that are best suited to your interests and the Over four days, you’ll experience great proneeds of your news organizations. gramming and the best networking opportuThe distinctive contours of the 2017 News Leadership Conference nities in American journalism — and have reflect the state of the industry. some fun along they way. “The conference reflects the realities and opportuThis is the fourth consecutive nities that face news leaders and our teams,” said Bill year that APME has collaborated with the American Church, this year’s APME president and senior vice Society of News Editors and Associated Press Photo president for news at GateHouse Media. “Economic Managers to plan the conference program and challenges in our industry remain daunting, but we secure sponsors. should be invigorated by our journalism.” The vision for this conference was to explore the This conference came together because of the intersection of journalism and citizenship — a focus hard work of board members from all three organidesigned to get at the nation’s heart and soul at an zations who have spent hours since January crafting unsettled time. Large portions of the program reflect the conference theme, wrangling speakers and that vision. attending to the thousand and one details that make For instance, you’ll hear from journalists charged for a successful event. with covering the Trump White House, a challenge On the APME side, Church, President-elect Jim unlike anything they’ve seen before. You’ll hear from Simon and program co-chair Angie Muhs have gone BILL CHURCH Pulitzer-winning columnist Leonard Pitts, who will above and beyond the call of duty, offering ideas lead a discussion titled “Guts: False Objectivity and and, most of all, their time. Cate Barron, a former APME board the Danger of Truth,” an argument that when news media embrace member, worked the phones to pull in sponsors. polite euphemism — “racially charged” as a description for the Mark Russell, executive editor of The Commercial Appeal in Charlottesville marches, for example, or “misleading” for governMemphis, Tennessee, has been a sturdy partner in his role as ASNE’s ment lies — they fail to serve the public. program chair, as has Mizell Stewart, ASNE’s president. But the conference also offers highly practical leadership developAPPM President Patrick Traylor, Vice President Jeremy Harmon ment sessions with practical solutions that you can implement in and board member Barry Arthur assembled a strong program sure your newsroom immediately. APPM will offer its customary mix of

technical advice and wisdom from can’t-miss speakers.

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“Economic challenges in our industry remain daunting, but we should be invigorated by our journalism.”

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By Mark Baldwin APME News

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OFF THE TRAIL IN D.C.

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By Ashraf Khalil The Associated Press

Municipal Fish Market

P turned to me, its D.C. metro reporter, to offer insider tips to visiting the city – places that go beyond obvious offerings like Segway tours, the Newseum, the Lincoln Memorial or Ben’s Chili Bowl. Problem is I’m a newcomer to DC and the metro beat. So I turned to the public servants of AP’s D.C. bureau for their expert advice. Here are some of their best off-the-beaten-path suggestions:

Eat steamed crabs at one of the country’s oldest outdoor fish markets. The Municipal Fish Market on Maine Avenue is home to a string of iconic outdoor seafood restaurants, including Jessie Taylor Seafood, The Virgo Fish House and Captain White’s Seafood City. All offer outdoor dining with a view of the water. The wharf district is currently undergoing extensive renovations, but the restaurants remain open.

Attend a taping of the “The Tony Kornheiser Show” The famed Pardon the Interruption host and former Washington Post sports columnist has carved out a niche as a radio and podcast host, with a global audience of dedicated fans who call themselves the “Littles.” Earlier this year, Kornheiser became part-owner of a bar in Friendship Heights called Chatter and opened up a recording studio inside. Now crowds gather each weekday morning before 8 a.m. to order breakfast and watch the taping. Kornheiser’s KORNHEISER shows veer widely between sports, rants about local traffic and weather and political analysis segments with locally based pundits like CNN’s Chris Cillizza and the Huffington Post’s Howard Fineman. Here’s the show’s website: http://www.tonykornheisershow.com/ And here’s the website for Chatter: https://www.chatterdc.com/

Catch a free Kennedy Center concert The famed performance space hosts a free concert every day at 6 p.m. as part of its Millennium Stage series. The type of music on offer varies wildly from day to day, so check out the program in advance. http://www.kennedy-center.org/video/upcoming

Kayak down the Potomac For the outdoors enthusiasts, kayaks and paddleboards can be

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to interest all conference attendees, including conversations with David Hume Kennerly, White House photographer under President Gerald Ford, and Richard Tsong-Taatarii, a staff photographer for the Minneapolis Star Tribune who covered the Dakota Access pipeline protests and will talk about creative solutions for working in remote locations with limited communication to the outside world. But the biggest thanks to all has to go to the staffs of the two organizations. Sarah Nordgren of AP is an organizational dynamo

rented at Thompson’s Boathouse. You can explore the waterfront and experience a unique view of the Monumental D.C. http://boatingindc.com/boathouses/thompson-boat-center/

Comedy tonight? The District is home to multiple improv troupes and comedy clubs, all of them seeking to mine a few laughs from a modern news cycle that almost defies parody. Here are a few choices: http://witdc.org/ https://www.facebook.com/dcimprovcomedyclub/?ref=py_c http://drafthousecomedy.com/

Take a “scandal tour” Washington is littered with addresses tied to famously unsavory behavior. There’s the Washington Westin Hotel, where then-Mayor Marion Barry was videotaped smoking crack and the Mayflower where Elliott Spitzer met a high-priced call girl and where Donald Trump Jr. sat down with a certain Russian lawyer. For the real history buffs, there’s the red brick home in Georgetown where FBI agents pulled off the ABSCAM sting operation against several congressmen. Here’s two of the more prominent scandal tour options: http://dcwalkabout.com/americanscandal.php http://www.freetoursbyfoot.com/washington-dc-tours/walkingtours/secrets-and-scandals/

who helped pull the conference together while assuming new duties for the AP. (She’s also uncommonly kind.) She’ll be leaving her job as association executive director after the conference but plans to stay close. Brooke Lansdale of AP was a constant presence. ASNE Executive Director Teri Hayt, a former APME board colleague, was by turns a den mother, a taskmaster and a saleswoman — someone has to find those sponsors, after all. Through it all, she proved again and again to be a good friend to APME.

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Washington National Cathedral

D.C. TO-DO LIST

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ttendees to the 2017 ASNE-APME Leadership Conference will find a jam-packed schedule, with award-winning journalists and panels discussing the latest tools and trends in newsrooms that are fueling innovative work. If you find yourself with some time either before or after the conference events, take time to remind yourself of the greatness of Washington D.C. and the beauty of the nation's capital. All of these are near the Marriott Wardman Park, the conference venue.

United States Naval Observatory

Smithsonian’s National Zoo offers daily programs include animal training, feeding demonstrations and keeper talks. Some programs that change from week to week. Zoo educators and volunteers strive to keep this schedule up-to-date, but due to weather and the needs of the animals, activity times can change. Please be sure to consult a schedule at the zoo on the day of your visit. Admission: Free Address: 3001 Connecticut Ave., N.W. Hours: Sunday-Saturday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Washington National Cathedral is dedicated to serve as a house of prayer for all people and is considered the spiritual home for the nation. Admission: $12 (free on Sundays) Address: Wisconsin Avenue and Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. Hours: Monday-Friday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.- 4 p.m., Sunday 12:45 p.m.- 4 p.m.

The United States Naval Observatory (USNO) provides a wide range of astronomical data and products, and serves as the official source of time for the U.S. Department of Defense and a standard of time for the entire United States.

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Admission: Free, and there limited tours with reservation Address: 3450 Massachusetts Ave, NW Hours: Vary

Rock Creek Park is a 1,754-acre city park officially authorized in 1890, making it the third national park to be designated by the federal government. It offers visitors the opportunity to escape the bustle of the city and find a peaceful refuge, recreation, fresh air, majestic trees, wild animals, and thousands of years of human history. It's immediately adjacent to the National Zoo. Admission: Free Hours: Daylight The Woodrow Wilson House is the historic home of our 28th president, where he resided after his time in office. The President Woodrow Wilson House gives a special glimpse into the private life of Woodrow Wilson while preserving his important legacy for future generations. After serving as the 28th president of the United States, where he led the nation through World War I, won the >> Continued on next page


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Nobel Peace Prize and created the League of Nations, Woodrow Wilson moved to S Street in 1921 to reflect on his career as educator, president and world statesman. Admission: $10 Address: 2340 S Street, N.W. Hours: Wednesday-Sunday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

The Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection supports research and learning internationally in Byzantine, Garden and Landscape, and Pre-Columbian studies through fellowships and internships, meetings, and exhibitions. Located in residential Georgetown, Dumbarton Oaks welcomes researchers at all career stages that come to study its books, objects, images, and documents. Admission: Free Address: 1703 32nd Street, NW Hours: Sunday-Saturday 11:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

tion and furnishings are still on display. Guided tours begin at 15 minutes past each hour. Anderson House also offers a changing exhibition gallery, a research library, and an active calendar of public programs. Admission: Free Address: 2118 Massachusetts Ave., N.W. Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., Sunday 12 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Tudor Place is a historic home and has the largest collection of George Washington materials outside of Mount Vernon. Tudor Place Historic House and Garden connects the public to American history through the personal experiences of those who lived and worked on the estate and encourages everyone to know their own story and recognize their role in shaping history. Admission: $10 Address: 1644 31st Street N.W. Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., Sunday 12 p.m. - 4 p.m.

Kreeger Museum is one of the greatest legacies of David and Explore the Society of the Cincinnati's historic headquarters, Anderson House, a National Historic Landmark that has been the Society's home since 1938. The Society and its American Revolution Institute work to honor the men and women who won American independence in the Revolutionary War by supporting advanced study, presenting exhibitions and other public programs, advocating preservation, and providing resources to teachers and students. Tours of Anderson House reveal the history of the Society of the Cincinnati, the significance of the American Revolution, and the lives and collections of the home's first owners, Larz and Isabel Anderson. The mansion was completed in 1905 for the Andersons, a wealthy couple who devoted their lives to public service, travel, entertaining, collecting, and philanthropy --- interests and activities that are reflected in Anderson House, where much of the couple's art collec-

Carmen Kreeger. In 1959, Mr. and Mrs. Kreeger began to amass a formidable collection of modern art. For the next 15 years they assembled most of the museum's holdings. The collection of The Kreeger Museum reflects the spirit of the Kreegers. Admission: $10 Address: 2401 Foxhall Road, N.W., Washington, D.C., 20007 Hours: Tuesday-Friday 10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m., Saturday 10:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Kramerbooks & Afterwords first opened its doors amid the Bicentennial celebrations of 1976. At the time of its opening it was the first bookstore/cafĂŠ in Washington. Kramerbooks & Afterwords stages hundreds of book-related events each year, both in the store and elsewhere. Address: 1517 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036 Hours: 7:30 a.m. to 1 a.m. daily Fridays and Saturdays until 3 a.m.

Tudor Place

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“There’s a fear in news media for calling things out. The sort of squeamishness in calling the truth what the truth actually is, is ultimately more damaging and is a disservice to our readers to a very large degree.” LEONARD PITTS, JR.

TRUTH SEEKER What to expect at “A Conversation with Leonard Pitts Jr.”

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By Robby General Ball State University

merican commentator, journalist and novelist Leonard Pitts Jr. will help kick off the 2017 APME-ASNE News Leadership Conference with a discussion of today’s news media embracing polite euphemism. The 2004 Pulitzer Prize winner will present “A Conversation with Leonard Pitts Jr.,” on the first full day of the conference. For more than 35 years Pitts has worked in media and the basis of his session stems from his observation of a false equivalency in news reporting today. “There’s a fear in news media for calling things out,” Pitts said. “The sort of squeamishness in calling the truth what the truth actually is, is ultimately more damaging and is a disservice to our readers to a very large degree.” These issues, as Pitts puts it, stem from media members describing national news stories, like the Charlottesville marches as “racially charged” and calling President Trump’s lies “misstatements.” Pitts said such descriptions are attempts at unbiased reporting. Pitts says the public sees through that and the weak-kneed journalism ultimately damages the reputation of the press. Throughout his career, Pitts has been accustomed to calling it as it is and has even received death threats over some of his columns. For him, the criticism is all part of the job. “The thing about opinion, the moment you start giving opinion about anybody or anything, it’s a very divisive thing to do,” Pitts said. “We [column writers] talk about things that are on everybody’s minds, but they don’t generally discuss unless they are talking to someone who will generally agree with them from the beginning. “It’s expected that there’s going to be some pushback and if you’re not receiving pushback, you’re probably not saying anything that’s worth saying.” Pitts says that column writing gives him a voice in this “pivotal time in our national history.” Having that voice is important for him to discuss the issues in society, but he also admits that column writing, like most professions, has its ups and downs. “There are days where you’re pulling your hair, or what’s left of your hair in my case, looking for something to write about,” Pitts said. “Then there’s days where you’re thankful to have a column because if you didn’t you know your blood pressure would spike through the roof because there’s so much craziness going on.” Pitts described the location of this year’s conference in Washington, D.C. as being “in the belly of the beast.” During his career, Pitts has written a number of books and has been a columnist, college professor, radio producer and lecturer. Even with a wide-ranging background, Pitts defines himself as a

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writer, something he's done since age 5, he said. Pitts' session — from noon to 1:30 at the Washington Marriott on Oct. 9 — will discuss the trends he has seen in national media, talking to members of the media about false objectivity and the danger of truth. Robby General is a senior at Ball State University. He will graduate in May 2018.


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I’m an American woman. We have been juggling things for centuries. The biggest thing is just making the decision about what things you want to do and then figuring out where it all fits. It’s like a puzzle.” ROCHELLE RILEY

MULTIPLE HATS Meet award-winning journalist Rochelle Riley

S

By Allie Kirkman Ball State University

ince she was 15 years old, all Rochelle Riley ever wanted was to be a journalist. The award-winning columnist is among a distinguished list of speakers at the 2017 APME-ASNE News Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C. Riley has worked as a columnist for the Detroit Free Press for 17 years. Previously, she worked for The Washington Post, The Dallas Morning News and The Courier-Journal in Louisville.

Working for the Detroit Free Press Riley started her career with the Detroit Free Press in 2000. Since then she's written about social, political and cultural issues. “I write about whatever I want and what I want is to make sure that I am writing about what is current and necessary,” she said. “Lately that has been a lot about race and politics, but sometimes it could just be about some kid who helped raise money for another kid by selling ice cream. It’s different every day.” During her time with the paper and through interactions with others, Riley said she has learned a lot about what it means to be a journalist. “I have learned that people are people no matter where you are or where you work,” she said. “They are an audience you need to respect and inform as well as entertain. A lot of people want to be your friend, some want to be your enemy but the main thing is that you treat them all with respect.” “Jane-of-all-trades” Riley wears multiple hats and is not just well known for her award-winning columns in the Detroit Free Press. The multimedia journalist is active across all platforms. Riley hosts a weekday radio talk show on WFDF-AM in Detroit, makes occasional television appearances on MSNBC as well as local stations and is author of four books: “The Burden: African Americans and the Enduring Impact of Slavery,” “Raising A Parent: Lessons My Daughter Taught Me While We Grew Up Together,” “Life Lessons” and “From The Heart.” So how does she do it? “I’m an American woman. We have been juggling things for centuries,” Riley said. “The biggest thing is just making the decision about what things you want to do and then figuring out where it all fits. It’s like a puzzle.” Riley also attributes “being a jane-of-all-trades” to the 21st century. “No journalist is just one thing. You can’t work in American jour-

nalism now and not do videos and social media,” she said. “I am on Twitter almost as much as Donald Trump and I like it. I like the conversation. I like the urgency. I like the sense of now-ness that you get from being able to communicate at all times.” Her views on the future With President Donald Trump attacking the media, calling journalists “dumb” and “enemies of the American people,” Riley said now is the time for journalists to continue to fight for press freedom. “We have to look out for each other as journalist no matter where we are in the world,” Riley said. “If we are not paying attention to what is happening to other journalists and allowing erosion of freedom anywhere, when it happens to us, we don’t have anyone to fight for us.” Riley said there might be no more important time than now to work in journalism. “I think that if we really, really don’t work very hard to stop it, people really are not going to understand the difference between journalism and some of the things that pass for journalism,” she said. “We have allowed it to become dangerously diluted. We have to really work at that. “If we want journalism to survive then we have to do exactly what ASNE is doing, making sure that we have young journalists coming behind us who are kicking butt.” Allie Kirkman is a junior at Ball State University. She will graduate in May 2019.

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Find session details and speaker biographies on the online schedule at asneapme2017.sched.com

APME-ASNE CONFERENCE EDITION

THE SCHEDULE

APME-ASNE-APPM News Leadership Conference program Saturday, Oct. 7 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. ASNE Emerging Leaders Institute Location: McKinley 9 a.m-4:30 p.m. International Press Institute meeting Location: Coolidge

Sunday, Oct. 8 8 a.m.-4:45 p.m. ASNE Emerging Leaders Institute Location: McKinley

8 a.m.-5 p.m. Pre-conference session: Quality journalism in support of strong societies Location: Madison A

2-5 p.m. Pre-conference workshop: Knight's "Table Stakes" project Location: Hoover

10 a.m.-2 p.m. Pre-conference workshop: Building trust through community engagement Location: Madison B

2-4 p.m. ASNE Foundation Board meeting

10-10:15 a.m. Welcome Location: Madison B

6-9 p.m. Opening reception Location: Smithsonian National Zoo (3001 Connecticut Ave NW)

10:15-11 a.m. Worried about trust? Let's do something about it: Keynote by Joy Mayer Location: Madison B 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Doing journalism, regaining trust, building community Location: Madison B 12:30-1 p.m. Lunch Location: Madison B

2:30-4 p.m. APME Board meeting

Monday, Oct. 9 7:30-8:45 a.m. ASNE Board meeting 9 a.m.-9:30 a.m. Welcome Location: Salon 1 9:45-10:55 a.m. Leadership Development Track: Reimagining your newsroom Location: Salon 1

1-2 p.m. Can I do this? Location: Madison B

9:45-10:55 a.m. APPM: Covering the Trump White House. Panel includes: Jeff Ballou of Al Jazeera, J. David Ake of AP; Major Garrett of CBS; Greg Korte, USA Today; Steve Herman, Voice of America; Tom Rosenstiel (moderator), American Press Institute Location: Hoover

Major Garrett

11-11:55 a.m. Leadership Development Track: Digital storytelling in your newsroom -- even on a limited budget Location: Marriott Balcony A 11-11:55 a.m. White House-media relations Location: Marriott Balcony B 11-11:55 a.m. APPM: Connecting with readers through photos and video

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>> Continued from previous page

Location: Hoover Noon-1:30 p.m. A conversation with Leonard Pitts Jr. Location: Salon 1 1:45-2:55 p.m. Leadership Development Track: Fake news, politics and reporting in the age of Trump Location: Marriott Balcony A 1:45-2:55 p.m. APPM: Dakota Pipeline coverage Location: Hoover 3-4:15 p.m. How the world sees U.S. press freedom in Trump era Location: Marriott Balcony B 3-4:15 p.m. Leadership Development Track: Table talks learning and networking session Location: Marriott Balcony A 3-4:15 p.m. APPM: The president's photographer Location: Hoover 4:20-5:25 p.m. Innovator of the Year presentations Location: Salon 1

Location: Hoover

Location: Marriott Balcony B 3:15-4:15 p.m.

7 p.m. APME Board dinner

11-11:55 a.m. Trump's America: Inside and outside the beltway Location: Marriott Balcony A

7-9 p.m. APPM: Portfolio Review Location: Hoover

11-11:55 a.m. APPM: Verse interactive Location: Hoover

Tuesday, Oct. 10

Noon-1:30 In conversation with Facebook Journalism Project's Aine Kerr Location: Salon 1

6:30 p.m. ASNE Board dinner

8:30-9 a.m. APPM: Nikon Location: Hoover 8:30-9:40 a.m. Leadership Development Track: Becoming a two-track leader — the power of relationships Location: Salon 1 9:05-9:35 a.m. APPM: Canon Location: Hoover 9:45-10:55 a.m. Turning the page: How four journalists reinvented their careers Location: Marriott Balcony A 9:45-10:55 a.m. Kerner Commission, 50 years later Location: Salon 1 9:45-10:55 a.m. APPM: Drones and news coverage

1:40-3 p.m. What does it mean to be an opinion editor today? Location: Marriott Balcony A 1:40-3 p.m. Diversity recruitment and retention Location: Marriott Balcony B 1:40-3 p.m. APPM: National Geographic's Your Shot photo community Location: Hoover 3:15-4:25 p.m. Watchdog journalism on a shoestring Location: Marriott Balcony A 3:15-4:25 p.m. What we missed: Covering economic diversity

APPM: Diversity in hiring Location: Hoover 4:45-6:15 p.m. Awards ceremony Location: Salon 1 5:30-6:15 p.m. APPM Board meeting 6:30-8:30 p.m. Reception with the Australian ambassador Location: Ambassador's residence

Wednesday, Oct. 11 7:30-8:30 a.m. ASNE Board meeting 8-8:45 a.m. Coffee with counsel Location: Marriott Balcony A 8 a.m.-3 p.m. U.S. Department of State briefing Location: State Department 9-9:45 a.m. CrowdTangle Location: Marriott Balcony B 10 a.m.-Noon After the Storms: Lessons learned from Hurricanes Harvey and Irma Location: Salon 1

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Outgoing ASNE president Mizell Stewart III continues to advocate for leaders and press freedom

TAKE THE LEAD

A

By Allie Kirkman Ball State University

fter spending his presidency advocating for diversity, newsroom leadership and First Amendment rights, Mizell Stewart III will be handing his role at the American Society of News Editors to someone new. Stewart will step down and former ASNE vice president Alfredo Carbajal will begin his tenure at the annual APME-ASNE News Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C in October. Stewart is the vice president of news operations for the USA Today Network and a member of the adjunct faculty of The Poynter Institute for Media Studies. Previously, Stewart was the managing editor and chief content officer of Journal Media group and vice president of content, newspaper division for E.W. Scripps Co. In a recent interview, Stewart talked about his expectations for the upcoming conference, what ASNE accomplished during his tenure and his own personal goals.

contemporary newsroom leadership issues. Things like the way newsrooms are organized to reflect the focus on mobile and other digital platforms – the kind of leadership that is necessary to transform newsrooms, particularly legacy newsrooms, from traditional platforms to fully digital. We have speakers coming from The Washington Post, Poynter Institute and other organizations to really bring those tools and lessons home to those who attend the convention.

Q: Would you say this year’s convention is focused on the digital, multimedia aspect of journalism? A: Our conventions have been focused on that for quite some time. I wouldn’t say that this conference is different from that standpoint – we always try to blend digital innovation, leadership, diversity and First Amendment issues. Those are the core elements of all of our organizations because let’s not forget we have three organizations coming together for the conference between the American Society of News Editors, Associated Press Media Editors and the Associated Press Photo Managers. All three organizations are working together to really underscore those priorities.

& QA

Q: Which sessions and speakers do you look forward to hearing at this year’s conference? A: The element of this year’s conference that I’m really excited about that we put in place is leadership development track. We have a number of members who have said if they are going to make the time and effort to come to a conference, they want to come away with strategies and tools they can take back to their newsroom. We created a track on the first day of the convention to really focus on

Q: What do you believe are some of the benefits in holding this year’s conference in Washington D.C.? A: Being in Washington has enabled us to bring a unique set of speakers – people who have experience covering issues at both the local and national scale. Being in Washington in this particular point >> Continued on next page

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>> Continued from previous page

of time, given what is happening in national politics and the relationship between the White House and media, makes Washington really a perfect location for us to be. We did invite the president and vice president to address the conference. They declined to do so, but we wanted to extend that opportunity. We have a number of speakers who will be part of our gathering who will bring that perspective. Q: What are some things that ASNE focused on or accomplished this past year of which you are proud? A: We will be announcing a couple of very significant grants at the conference to support our First Amendment work and our diversity work. Cultivating those partnerships and getting those resources in place has really been a major focus of our efforts over the last year. The other piece that I am very proud of is that we have continued to grow our leadership training and leadership development efforts with the ASNE Emerging Leaders Institute. For the first time a group will go through the Emerging Leader Institute and right up until the conference, and will also have the opportunity to take advantage of the Online News Association conference. Q: What is something that you hope ASNE continues to do well or focus on in the upcoming year? A: I am going to defer the upcoming year to the incoming president Alfredo Carbajal. Alfredo has been among other things, a driving force behind the Emerging Leadership Institute and I look forward to his leadership of the organization. A big part of our force is and will continue to be diversifying the leadership of news organizations around the country. Q: Where do you see journalism going in the future? A: I think what we have learned over the past several months with the change in the White House is the vital role journalists play in explaining what is happening in areas where some would rather journalists would not be poking around. The watchdog function of journalists has gained a new prominence as we explore the new administration and the approach to govern. To watch major news organizations, such as The Washington Post and New York Times, my own USA Today network, battle for the scoop of the day in terms of the news coming out of the White House and Congress is a very spirited competition. I think the other thing that this year has taught us is that with the dramatic increase in the quantity of distribution of platforms for information, how we convey it is for people to be influenced by less than credible news. We really need to reinforce how important values that are exemplified by the work of journalists who work for serious news organizations. We have standards in practice that validate their work, which are also accountable to the public. Q: What advice do you give to young journalists? A: Remember what drew you to journalism in the first place. Most journalist are drawn to the work because they want to tell stories, they want to be engaged in the search for truth. Given all of the rhetoric surrounding the work of journalists, it can be discouraging. If it's discouraging at moments for people like me who have 30 years in the business, I can imagine the effect that it has on young people trying to figure out if they want to pursue journalism as a career. Many always look at journalism as a calling – a calling because you enjoy storytelling. A calling because there is a love for uncovering the facts. A calling because the desire to be the first to know and

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the first to inform others. I think focusing on those reasons for answering that call to be a journalist and not allowing the criticism of those who don’t like having journalism done is important. Q: What some of your personal goals in your post-presidency year? A: My focus during my presidency and beyond is really focus on two things: one is that there are a number of organizations focused on the same goals of ASNE when it comes to diversity, quality journalism, defense of the First Amendment and growth with the next generation of newsroom leaders. What I intend to do is continue advocating for those issues but also championing organizations that have the same priorities and value to work more closely together. In a perfect world, we would continue growing, changing, even combining so that we are not in a competition for resources. The second thing, as always, is funding the mission. I have been very fortunate under the leadership of our executive director; we have brought new partners in to help fund critical ASNE programs. We want to continue that momentum. This piece has been edited for brevity.


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INNOVATOR NOMINEE: LOS

S

ANGELES

ometimes newsrooms just need to help themselves. Like many legacy newspapers, our old workflow reinforced the division between print and digital. It was prone to error because it relied too heavily on manual updates like copy and pasting text in both the digital and print production environments. And it offered no true editing trail for stories that started online, an ever-increasing portion of the daily

report. In addition, communicating updates and story ideas in the newsroom frequently involved ponderously long email chains between multiple writers and editors. Critical information was often lost in these correspondences and unread emails piled up in staff member’s inboxes. At the same time, the top editors at The Times were challenging the staff to think more creatively about storytelling online. However, the reality was that under our existing CMS it was virtually impossible to do anything creative unless you could write HTML. Our solution was to fix it from the ground up. To this end, we created the Simple News Assembly Platform (SNAP). SNAP was built in the newsroom, for the newsroom. Its new workflow encourages a digital-first mindset and offers dynamic storytelling templates that allow our reporters to tell incremental stories in visually appealing formats. SNAP’s robust editing tools allow reporters and editors to include inline notes, CQ name spellings, strike through bad copy, and track changes with colored text. These edits help keep workflow in one place and are invisible

OF THE YEAR TIMES

both in the preview and to our readers. Since SNAP was built as a web application, journalists in the field can easily file, update and publish stories from their laptops or mobile devices. This has expanded our ability to cover events more quickly and effectively. SNAP is integrated with the Slack team messaging platform. Once a story is ready to be copy edited, SNAP can automatically notify specific copy-edit channels in Slack or even individual staff members to push the story through the proper workflows for editing and publishing while avoiding the massive email chains of the past. SNAP is also integrated with our photo system, MediaServer, and our print platform, NewsGate. Journalists are able to create a story, search and embed photos, and publish the story for digital and print in the same application. Changes to the copy are reflected in both versions, which keeps reporters and editors focused on writing a great story, not keeping copy in sync. How successful has it been? What started out as an L.A. Times newsroom initiative has been adopted at the corporate level and is in active use across all of tronc’s newsrooms. We’ve established a support system of superusers in each newsroom that can escalate bugs and feature requests directly to our team. SNAP’s greatest strength is that it was built with immediate feedback from our users and those channels remain open today. The SNAP team is committed to making the production of great journalism easier. We will continue to streamline workflows and reduce the friction between journalists and great stories.

Since SNAP was built as a web application, journalists in the field can easily file, update and publish stories from their laptops or mobile devices.

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N O M I N E E : M I LW A U K E E J O U R N A L S E N T I N E L

Mike DeSisti of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel puts together a Just the FAQs video. MICHAEL SEARS

I

t’s been three years since a pair of Milwaukee-area girls captured attention worldwide for stabbing a classmate 19 times to appease the mythical character Slender Man. This fall, juries finally will decide the girls’ fate. The challenge: Re-introduce our audience to the crime and bring them up to speed on what has happened in the intervening years, without diverting from the issues that will shape the trials. The answer: A “Just the FAQs” video. These days you can’t go to Facebook or other social networks without being overwhelmed by videos. Trouble is, many are shoddily produced or just click bait. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel wanted to capture that growing video audience, and make the experience meaningful. We created Just the FAQs – short, snappy and shareable videos that allow viewers to cut through the fog. The videos answer key questions about emerging stories, or synopsize continuing stories like the Slender Man case, in a couple of minutes or less. They combine text and visuals, and can be watched with the sound on or off, making them easy to view, whether someone is in an office or a grocery line. For many news organizations, the concern with videos has been that the time and skill needed to do them right creates an impediment to efficient, newsroom-wide use. To remedy that, Just the FAQs uses the new Wochit video editing tool. Anyone in the newsroom can create clean, appealing and informative videos in less than an

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hour, usually after just one short training session. In addition to social media, Just the FAQs videos are posted on the Journal Sentinel desktop and mobile sites. And they can be inventoried, and then repurposed or updated later. Further, in conjunction with the Journal Sentinel advertising team, reporters and editors have been working to take content already being produced – in such areas as travel, health and sports – and package it to appeal to new advertisers. Standing video features are a central part of the platforms. To get a sense of how effective this innovation has been, video views in the last quarter of 2016 were 1.14 million. In the first quarter of 2017 they increased to 1.44 million. In the recently completed second quarter of 2017, they jumped to 2.75 million. Just the FAQs videos get about 30% more views than our site wide average for all videos. They are shared more, and engagement is higher. And each video directs viewers to other sources for more information. Our most popular Just the FAQs video so far – comparing Aaron Rodgers to Brett Favre – reached 1.4 million people, had more than 500,000 views and got 30,000 reactions, comments and shares. Other videos have topped 100,000 views. The need for such an innovation is clear. Video ad spending is projected to more than double in the next four years. By 2020, video traffic is expected to be more than 80% of all internet traffic. Just the FAQs gives the Journal Sentinel a powerful tool to harness and monetize that growth.


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NOMINEE:WBUR

W

hen WBUR decided to rebuild its digital platforms, we asked this radical question first: Could audio be a ‘first-class citizen’ on the web? Instead of approaching the design of the site from the perspective of a text-based reading experience, what might it look like if WBUR made visual browsing and listening a primary experience, instead of an afterthought? News audio is usually experienced as a clunky player box embedded in a page designed for reading, a virtual dead-end with a frustrating user experience on mobile. The old wbur.org didn’t serve the audience on all devices, allow for discovery of important journalistic work, or support audio in all forms. Now, after you finish each audio story, you are seamlessly directed back to the WBUR live stream; the website is responsively designed so it works more like an app on any mobile device, with the player anchored at the bottom of the screen; and audio buttons allow for direct play anywhere you encounter them. But this wasn’t just an exercise in pretty design or cutting edge technology (even though it has all that, built with react.js on the front-end to make it superfast on mobile). We wanted to make this new endeavor more about the public, our audience of listeners and readers, and our members. That’s at the heart of public radio’s mission, after all, and we’re tasked with interpreting that mission for digital audiences. We felt the best way to do this is to design and build out in the open, showing our work, and having the public weigh in. We released the site in beta, tracking all feedback through Google forms, social media, email and comments. We created a newsletter for updates, and we responded personally and in detail to the feedback we received. Without a doubt, this process made our site better, more useful, and more delightful for our audience. We made major changes based on that feedback and have more in the pipeline.

Key highlights: A celebration of audio: You can listen live or on-demand while browsing the site, and the audio will stay with you. We wanted to infuse the digital experience with some of the serendipity found in the best of radio. Rolling improvements, station transformation: With this new site, we introduced Agile development to our newsroom. We embedded developers with our design firm to ensure seamless integration of our systems and API. We’re continuously working on it and offering new features and fixes every two weeks. Showcase the in-depth, incisive and wide-ranging journalism WBUR is known for. Vibrant reporting in audio, text and visuals. Original podcasts and long-running, nationally syndicated broadcast news shows. WBUR online now gives a sense of the breadth and depth of our journalistic work. Outpouring of support: Users gave us constructive criticism and but also noted what they liked. One favorite: “I feel like I have been given a gift rather than lumbered with yet another website ‘improvement’ that merely reorders and complicates.”

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briefs C O N F E R E N C E

Carbajal to serve as ASNE president

Members of the American Society of News Editors have elected Alfredo Carbajal to serve as the organization’s next board president for 2018. He'll take the helm from outgoing president, Mizell Stewart III at the ASNE-APME News Leaders Conference in Washington, D.C. Carbajal is the managing editor of the Al Día at The Dallas Morning News where he practices journalism in English and Spanish. He previously worked as editor of La Presna, a publication of The Press-Enterprise in Riverside, California.

He received a journalism degree from the University of Texas at El Paso in 1998 and was a 2009 fellow at the Punch Sulzberger Executive News Media Program at Columbia University. Having served on the ASNE board since 1999, Carbajal has led the ASNE Minority Leadership Institute as well as the ASNE Leadership Committee. Carbajal is also a lifetime member of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the Inter American Press Association.

The auction will go on! After a little to and fro, APME will have a silent auction with captivating, compelling and cash-producing items. Here are just a few of the items already donated: • A perennial favorite is Annette McGruder’s hand-painted scarves. Priceless. • Play on the Jersey shore: One-bedroom condo for five nights in May or June. Value is $1,000 from Bob Heisse, NWI.com. • Four box seats to see the Chicago Bulls play Friday, Nov. 17, vs. Charlotte Hornets. Dinner and drinks in the suite and parking are all included. Value is $600 from Bob Heisse, NWI.com. • Two tickets to a Red Sox game (date to be mutually determined), plus dinner and hotel. Value $600 from Anne Brennan, GateHouse Media New England. • CANDY! A basket of Albanese candy from Northwest Indiana. Bring it to your newsroom and be the most popular editor ever. Value $150 from Summer Moore, NWI.com. • One year’s subscription to BarkBox, a monthly toy and treat delivery that is guaranteed to keep your pooch playful.Value $249 from Laura Sellers and Carl Earl, EO Media Group. • A Pendleton gift certificate and a bottle of Pendleton Whisky and one of Snake River Stampede Whisky. Value $250 from Laura Sellers and Carl Earl, EO Media Group. Look for items to be displayed near the registration table.

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Fenway Park

Survey: Journalists’ most urgent training needs are mobile, data and video

Three-fourths of respondents to a June survey conducted by the Information Experience Lab at the University of Missouri about digital-journalism training said they would likely try learning such skills on their phone in bite-size lessons.

The skills they most urgently want to learn are related to mobile, data and video journalism. Linda Austin, project director of APME NewsTrain and an RJI Fellow, said, “These results — and those from two follow-up focus groups totaling 11 survey respondents — will figure heavily in the design of the first course, due to be delivered on your smartphone next year. Thanks to everyone who participated in the survey.”


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2016 2017

APME BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Officers

Directors

President: Bill Church, GateHouse Media, @BillChurchMedia Vice President: Jim Simon, Honolulu Civil Beat, @jsimon88 Secretary: Angie Muhs, State Journal-Register, Springfield, Illinois, @amuhs Leadership Chair: Michael Days, Philadelphia Media Network, Philadelphia, @mikedays Treasurer: Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star, @dennisedit

(Terms expiring in 2017) Eric Ludgood, Fox 5 News, Atlanta, @EricLudgoodFOX5 George Rodrigue, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, @gprodrigue3 Kurt Franck, The Blade, Toledo, Ohio, @KGFranck_Blade Matt Christensen, Twin Falls (Idaho) Times-News, @TimesNewsEditor Maria Caporizzo, The Providence Journal, @mariacap

Executive Committee (officers above plus) Past President: Laura Sellers-Earl, The Daily Astorian, Astoria, Oregon, @lsellersearl Director: Sarah Nordgren, The Associated Press, New York, @SarahNordgren AP Executive Editor and Senior Vice President: Sally Buzbee, New York, @SallyBuzbee AP Managing Editor: Brian Carovillano, New York, @bcarovillano Program Chair: Mark Baldwin, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star, @MarkFBaldwin Program Co-Chair: Angie Muhs, State Journal-Register, Springfield, Illinois, @amuhs Marketing Chair: Jim Simon, Honolulu Civil Beat, @jsimon88 Marketing Co-Chair: Summer Moore, The Times of Northwest Indiana, @summerNWI

Our communication vehicles www.apme.com www.facebook.com/APMEnews www.twitter.com/APME www.facebook.com/NewsTrain https://twitter.com/NewsTrain and, APME Update: www.apme.com/?page=Newsletters

(Terms expiring in 2018) Carlos Sanchez, The Monitor, McAllen, Texas, @CarlosASanchez Michael Anastasi, The Tennessean, @ma_anastasi Traci Bauer, The Journal News, New York, @tbauer Anne Brennan, Cape Cod Times, Maine @annebrennanMWDN Ronnie Agnew, Mississippi Public Broadcasting, @ronagnew Tom Arviso, Navajo Times, Window Rock, Arizona Alison Gerber, Chattanooga Times Free Press, Tennessee (Terms expiring in 2019) Dennis Anderson, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star, @dennisedit Mark Baldwin, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star, @MarkFBaldwin Katrice Hardy, The Greenville (S.C.) News and GreenvilleOnline.com, @kkatgurll1 Thomas Koetting, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, @tkoetting Summer Moore, The Times of Northwest Indiana, @summerNWI Autumn Phillips, The Quad City Times, Davenport, Iowa, @AutumnEdit Sandra Clark, WHYY, Philadelphia, @SandraSWClark

APME News Editor Andrew Oppmann, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, @aoppmann

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Fall 2017 APME News  
Fall 2017 APME News  

Inside this issue: The President s Corner: Thanks, AP and APME. You have become family. Ken Paulson: Recently, courts have been tough on Ame...

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