Page 1

APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

2:10 PM

Page 1


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:22 PM

APME NEWS

Page 2

APME-ASNE CONFERENCE RECAP

From the Editor

Andrew Oppmann

O

ur cover story on the new digs for The Dailas Morning News resonates on a couple of levels with me. I was an intern for The News during one magnificent summer in 1984, working in the newsroom at the Rock of Truth on Young Street. Legendary editor and APME icon Stuart Wilk ran the City Desk back then – and, man, he taught me more about journalism in that summer than I had picked up in three years of classes. I fell in love with newspapering there.

12

Fast forward a few years later, when I welcomed a rising star, Robyn Tomlin, as an intern at the Lexington (Kentucky) Herald-Leader, where I worked as an assistant metro editor. Today, she’s the managing editor of The News and played a big role in the design of her organization’s new home in the old Dallas Public Library. She’s helping interns fall in love with platforms and reporting tools beyond my wildest dreams when I was there. Read all about The News, and other points of interest from our industry, in this last issue of 2017.

inside Winter.2017

A P M E - A S N E

3 4 7 8 11 12 16 17 18 20 21 22 23 24 27 28 30 32 35

16

30

C O N F E R E N C E

R E C A P

The President’s Corner: NewsTrain is essential to APME’s mission Ken Paulson: Recently launched First Amendment databases are a true gift Meet Paula Froke: APME executive director brings experience, enthusiasm A New Space: Dallas Morning News sets up new shop and a new culture Social Shift: Facebook explores surfacing local news for local audiences Award Season: Journal Sentinel wins innovation honor; award winners list Impact in Indiana: Ball State meth project captures college innovation prize Ideas & Ideals: Leonard Pitts urges journalists to take a strong stance Great Ideas: Creative new features, web projects and social media tools Welcome Aboard: APME board welcomes new members Drone Zone: Looking to the sky for ways to enhance news coverage Truth Seekers: Fake news, politics and reporting in the age of Trump Miles to Go?: Speakers urge more progress in diversity coverage The Youth Beat: Students provide sights and sounds of D.C. conference Conference Briefs: APME accepting entries for award competitions Editors in the News: Promotions, appointments and awards NewsTrain: Program spans the country for last three workshops of 2017 Member showcase: APME recognizes contributions to the AP photo report 2018 APME Officers: Roster of APME Board of Directors

EDITOR Andrew Oppmann Adjunct Professor of Journalism Middle Tennessee State University Andrew.Oppmann@mtsu.edu DESIGNER Steve Massie smassie@crain.com

APME News is the quarterly magazine of the Associated Press Media Editors, a professional, nonprofit organization founded in 1933 in French Lick, Indiana. Its members include senior editors and leaders from news operations in the United States and Canada who are affiliated with The Associated Press, including more than 1,400 newspapers and online sites and about 2,000 broadcast outlets. The group also includes college journalism educators and college student media editors. APME works with AP to support and recognize journalism excellence and the First Amendment. To learn more about APME’s programs and activities, visit apme.com.

2 WINTER

2017

APME NEWS


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:22 PM

Page 3

APME NEWS n APME’s NewsTrain spans the country for last three workshops in 2017 I PAGE 30 I

The President’s Corner

Jim Simon

On the right track

NewsTrain remains essential to APME’s mission

N

ewsTrain was my gateway into APME. Nearly 15 years ago, when I knew almost nothing about APME, I attended one of the earlier NewsTrains in Seattle. Newsroom finances were a bit more robust in those days, so it was multi-day affair with a plentiful outlay of food. As a fairly green city editor, I learned valuable tools for leading a reporting team and managing projects, and was introduced to a network of fellow editors around the Northwest. Much has changed in the news industry since then. But NewsTrain, under the strong leadership of Linda Austin and more recently, Laura Sellers, is more essential to APME’s mission and to local journalists than ever. It offers a valuable resource that suits the needs of today’s newsrooms: top-notch, affordable training that goes to where the journalists are at – places like Norman, Oklahoma; Greenville, South Carolina; and Columbus, Ohio. Local organizing committees design the programing to fit their needs, and NewsTrain brings in some of the best trainers and coaches around. The hunger for what NewsTrain provides is obvious from the attendance numbers. This year’s Seattle event sold out its 108 seats quickly, with a long waiting list. The three other 2017 NewsTrains were sellouts or near sellouts (For a fuller report on NewsTrain's 2017 programs, read related articles by Linda and Laura on pages 30-31.))

For APME, much of this year will be spent charting the organization’s future. A top priority in that process is finding ways to grow NewsTrain in new directions and ensure its financial sustainability. A lot of innovative ideas for growth have been floated by board members. As part of a Reynolds Journalism Institute fellowship, Linda is researching and developing mobile micro-trainings that can be distributed on phones. Others have discussed adding to some NewsTrain events a parallel leadership development track for upand-coming editors or deeper data training, potentially in partnership with other organizations. But as Linda told me, if we’re going to expand or even maintain our current program in the long run, “The biggest challenge NewsTrain faces is funding, pure and simple.” There’s obviously stiff competition for dollars from foundations and other journalism funders. APME’s NewsTrain committee, led by Alan Miller, Anne Brennan and Cate Barron, is compiling a list of potential funders to pursue in 2018. Any other funding ideas are welcome. Fortunately, NewsTrain has a great story to share with potential donors: a 15-year track record of success that now includes training more than 7,300 journalists from around North America. n APME President Jim Simon, managing editor of Honolulu Civil Beat, can be reached at jsimon@civilbeat.com

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

3


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:22 PM

Page 4

APME NEWS

So what do you do when one of the most valuable books in your library goes out of print? You buy the rights.

By Ken Paulson

The First Amendment gift

W

e almost reflexively say “Happy holidays” this time of year. It’s a handy catch-all for referring to Christmas, Hanukkah and Kwanzaa, but there was another holiday this month that deserved its own celebration. Dec. 15 was the 226th birthday of the Bill of Rights, President Franklin Roosevelt even declared the Bill of Rights Day a national day for celebration in 1941, but it’s largely faded over the past 76 years. That means schools largely don’t acknowledge it and we keep turning out citizens who consistently misunderstand our most fundamental freedoms. Turning that around can only come through information and education, and there are many organizations working to restore civic and constitutional literacy. For members of the news media and other fans of the First Amendment there was particularly good news in recent months with the launch of two extraordinary databases about the First Amendment. One is the First Amendment Library presented by the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education. At the helm is legal scholar Ron Collins, who developed the library as a member of the First Amendment Center staff in Nashville. He’s updated and expanded it with information on every Supreme Court case involving the First Amendment. You’ll find it at https://www.thefire.org/ first-amendment-library/. The other new First Amendment database is a little closer to home. I receive a good number of press calls about First Amendment issues and there are times when I need a refresher on the state of the law. I have often turned to the two-volume Encyclopedia of the First Amendment. The 2009 publication was the single most comprehensive and readable one-stop guide on First Amendment issues. Sadly, the encyclopedia went out of print. Apparently, there was limited appetite for a First Amendment reference book priced at $355. So what do you do when one of the most valuable books in your library goes out of print? You buy the rights. The John Seigenthaler Chair for Excellence in First Amendment Studies at Middle Tennessee State University (where I serve as dean) purchased and completely updated the encyclopedia, with the assistance of original editors Dr. John Vile and David Hudson, and under the guidance of chair director Deborah Fisher.

4

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

The relaunched First Amendment Encyclopedia, which contains more than 1,500 articles, along with news and commentary, is now online at http://mtsu.edu/first-amendment/ at a new price: free. Together, the two sites can be tremendously helpful to reporters and editors across the country. For example, the First Amendment library will show you the Supreme Court’s majority, dissenting and concurring opinions in First Amendment cases, along with related cases, while the First Amendment Encyclopedia will provide concise and easily understood explanations of hate speech, campaign finance laws, funeral protests and other topics straight out of your headlines. It’s the perfect primer for a reporter writing a local story with a First Amendment element Each year, the Newseum Institute’s First Amendment Center gauges public awareness of First Amendment freedoms and typically finds that just two percent can name the five freedoms and about one American in five believes there’s too much freedom guaranteed by the First Amendment. The goal for every public-spirited citizen ---- particularly those of us who rely on the First Amendment for our livelihoods ---- should be to remind all Americans of the extraordinary gift we have in the First Amendment. That would be something to celebrate. n Ken Paulson is the President of the Newseum Institute’s First Amendment Center and Dean of the College of Media and Entertainment at Middle Tennessee State University.


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:22 PM

Page 5


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:22 PM

Page 6


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:22 PM

Page 7

APME NEWS

APME’s new executive director brings a wealth of experience, expertise and enthusiasm to her new role

By Paula Froke

New stories and a new path

A

s I pack up my belongings in preparation for a crosscountry move, I pause to reflect on one of my most cherished possessions: an autographed picture of Terry Steinbach, who in the mid-1980s was a catcher for the Oakland A’s. “To Paula,” Steinbach had written on the picture. “Thank you for helping out Mike and Dave at The New Ulm Journal with Steinbach’s Box!” Steinbach was a hometown hero in New Ulm, Minnesota. His fans relied on The Journal to keep them updated on his performance in the big leagues. But in those days of 66-words-per-minute transmissions, Journal sports editors Mike and Dave couldn’t get the AP’s baseball boxes over the wire. So they turned to me. Each night when the A’s box score arrived over the highspeed wire, I called The Journal with Steinbach’s stats so Mike and Dave could create Steinbach’s Box. Three decades later, the picture reminds yet again me of how important AP is to you – though typically with more substantial journalism – and how important you are in your communities. It’s one of the many reasons I am thrilled to become APME’s executive director. Here’s another reason: A month after I was appointed to the APME role, I had the great privilege of attending NewsTrain in Seattle. I experienced in person the phenomenal benefits that we provide to so many journalists, at a time when the need is so much greater and the results more essential than ever before. I heard participants talking about how the training was inspiring and invigorating them with skills they badly need in these challenging times. APME’s vital role came alive for me.

I’m excited about working with President Jim Simon and the rest of the board in pushing NewsTrain to even greater heights as we spread this training throughout the country. Jim’s goals of working with local news organizations on news literacy and community engagement, upgrading diversity initiatives, and developing more of a mentoring program for up-and-coming newsroom leaders are close to my own heart as well. And of course, our partnership with ASNE on First Amendment issues is significant and essential. APME, and AP customers in general, have been central to my AP upbringing from the beginning. Back in my Minneapolis days, I devoured newsroom copies of APME News for insights on the industry and our members and customers. As AP news editor in Detroit, I worked closely with our very active Michigan AP Editorial Association. At AP headquarters in New York, I scooped up a dozen old issues of the APME Red Book dating to 1949, a year after APME’s founding. And for the past five years I’ve gotten a first-hand view of customer perspectives while working as AP’s liaison with MSN News. Of course, a guiding light in this new role will always be memories of Sally Jacobsen. Sally was a friend and mentor throughout my time in New York, and she brought me to the AP Stylebook team when she was lead editor. I wish she were here now as I follow the path she forged with both the Stylebook and APME. I know she would be delighted – in part at the chance to relive her APME days through the stories that I now will be able to tell. n APME Executive Director Paula Froke can be reached at pfroke@ap.org

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

7


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:22 PM

Page 8

APME NEWS The exterior of the newly completed Dallas Morning News building in the old Dallas Public Library.

TOM FOX / THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS

After 68 years on Young Street, The Dallas Morning News sets up shop in a redeveloped space on the other side of town

A NEW SPACE By Karen Robinson-Jacobs The Dallas Morning News

A

fter 68 years on the western edge of downtown Dallas, The Dallas Morning News is in a new home. The crosstown move to the erstwhile Dallas Public Library makes The News the latest in a string of major daily newspapers to shed their longtime headquarters in search of a more suitable launchpad for a digital future. Newspapers across the U.S are looking to attract more digital subscribers and advertisers as print revenue falters. To pursue that goal, papers are camping out in new, usually smaller, digs that are less expensive to operate. The new homes can be configured with more open, collaborative spaces, where new technology can be embedded and a new mind-set can be nurtured. “There’s an intangible benefit to a new space that feels more upto-date and more forward-looking that will energize this newsroom in a way I’m really excited about,” said Mike Wilson, editor of The News. “The building itself won’t drive our culture, but it’ll create the possibility for a change in culture and some new traditions that I think can drive our digital progress forward.” From an organizational perspective, “the space that you live in and the space that you show the public is a clear definition of the >> Continued on next page

8

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

TOM FOX / THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS

The Dallas Morning News editorial department gathered before The Rock of Truth inscription on the building to celebrate the decades of journalism memories on the last day at 508 Young St.


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:22 PM

Page 9

APME NEWS

>> Continued from previous page

direction that you’re going in,” said Katy Murray, senior vice president and chief financial officer of A. H. Belo Corp., parent company of The News. The new space, attached to the newly revamped Statler Dallas hotel, “shows that we’re clearly focused on digital transformation,” Murray said. “I think it really will bring some energy and just some excitement to the organization.” And it will bring cash. The company is leaving an 8-acre campus on Young Street, near the city’s convention center and across from Union Station, that’s worth an estimated $25 million to $30 million. The buildings on Young, encompassing 325,000 square feet, once held newspaper presses. Those moved in the mid-1980s to a 25-acre spread in Plano. The downtown property, designed by noted architect George Dahl, has not been listed for sale yet. It has been mentioned, though, as a potential component in several development plans, The first floor and mezzanine newsrooms including the quest to lure Jeff Bezos at the newly completed Dallas Morning and his $5 billion second Amazon headNews building in the old Dallas Public quarters. Library offer a radically different look Murray estimates that, operationally, from that of the office the organization the company will save about $1 million just vacated on Young Street. a year in the rented space, which measTOM FOX / THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS ures about 90,000 square feet. In December 2015, The Washington people they have and the way that people work together. Post left the home known in part for the story of All The President’s “So if you need less space and you need to redraw your space so that it Men — a 400,000-square-foot complex that it moved into in 1972, meets the needs especially of digital publishing … it has been a priority of the same year as the Watergate break-in that brought down many companies to sell their old headquarters building and take that cash President Richard Nixon. The former Post headquarters was built at a time that they need it and to move to quarters that they can reconfigure large enough to accommodate printing presses, which were moved in a way that fits their business today.” n from the building by 1999. Its new headquarters on K Street is about 242,000 square feet, but Follow Karen Robinson-Jacobs on Twitter at @krobijake. includes a central, open two-floor section in the newsroom that is designed to boost the kind of collaboration that is central to papers’ accelerating digital drive. Design firm Gensler worked on both The Post’s and The News’ new newsrooms. Since 2010, several large newspapers have moved into smaller “Journalism today is not a solitary venture,” Martin Baron, The Post’s spaces. Below is a list of notable publications and the reduction in executive editor, said in a 2015 article about the move. “Reporters and size (in thousands of square feet) from their old space to their new, their editors work intimately with videographers, photo editors, interacalong with the date of their move: tive graphics specialists, designers and technologists.” PUBLICATION OLD NEW YEAR Papers from the Minneapolis Star Tribune to the Salinas Atlanta Journal-Constitution 435 130 2010 Californian, which describes itself as the oldest continually pubPhiladelphia Inquirer 525 125 2012 lished newspaper in California, have been on the move. “I began to notice and hear reports of it happening maybe almost Miami Herald 750 160 2013 10 years ago, but it’s picked up in pace since then,” said Rick San Jose Mercury News 312 33 2014 Edmonds, a media business analyst with the Poynter Institute for Washington Post 400 242 2015 Media Studies, a nonprofit school for journalism in St. Petersburg, San Diego Union-Tribune 160 60 2016 Fla. “Some companies gave it a higher, quicker priority, and some Boston Globe 815 75 2017 waited longer.” The hulking newspaper edifice “fits a different time, fits a bigger Note: Square footage of new locations does not include off-site printing facilities. company,” said media analyst Ken Doctor. “Almost all these compaSOURCES: ajc.com; philly.com; miamiherald.com; mercurynews.com; washingtonpost.com; sandiegouniontribune.com; bostonglobe.com nies have been downsized significantly in terms of the number of

Downsizing

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

9


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

APME NEWS

1:22 PM

Page 10

APME-ASNE CONFERENCE RECAP

Major Garrett, chief White House correspondent for CBS (right), said journalists should stay committed to the values underpinning their work.

TEFLON TRUMP

Panelists discuss the state of White House media relations

F

By Maddie Biertempfel Penn State University

ive panelists with experience covering the White House discussed the positives and negatives of covering President Donald J. Trump’s administration compared with past administrations to about 50 people at the APME-ASNE conference. Moderated by Tom Rosenstiel, executive director of the American Press Institute, the panelists began by discussing how journalists should address accusations of “fake news,” and being referred to as an “enemy of the people.” Major Garrett, chief White House correspondent for CBS, said journalists shouldn’t be emotionally invested in being labeled enemies of the people but should stay committed to the values underpinning their work. “We have a professional and constitutional set of responsibilities and privileges,” he said. “Our job is to devote ourselves to those privileges and those responsibilities and nothing else.” Jeff Ballou, news editor for the Al Jazeera Media Network and president of the National Press Club, echoed a similar sentiment, adding that name calling has provided the opportunity to remind the public of the vital role journalists play. “We’ve played civics teacher… for almost the past 10 months now to remind everybody, ‘No, we’re not an enemy, we’re in the First Amendment,’” Ballou said. Although the panelists stressed the important role of journalists in a time of eroding trust in the news media, several said there have been positive changes in the new administration, notably an increase in access to cabinet secretaries.

10

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

“I’ll take access to a cabinet secretary over a press secretary every day of the week and twice on Sunday,” Garrett said. Garrett, who has covered six presidential campaigns and five White Houses, said Trump is also more comfortable with “the daily interaction of beat reporters” during chance encounters. From a photojournalist’s perspective, the “access to him visually is actually better than it’s been for previous administrations,” said J. David Ake, deputy chief of bureau for visual journalism at the Associated Press in Washington. “They do several photo ops a day usually. They add them at the last minute if the president is rested or something comes up,” Ake said. But some of the challenges with the new administration, including what Garrett called the divide between the president’s narrative and the underlying facts, have required journalists to adapt, for better or worse. “I think there’s a lot more fatigue, a lot more short tempers, and a lot more people have been performing remarkably at least for the first 10 months, said Steve Herman, White House bureau chief for Voice of America. Greg Korte, White House correspondent for USA Today, agreed that the challenges have improved the way journalists work. “We are faster, we’re working harder, we’ve had to figure out new and better ways of doing things. I think the ultimate test is, is the public better served?” A question-and-answer segment followed, during which the panelists fielded questions about the use of anonymous sources, Trump’s Twitter feeds and how to regain public trust from those who deem factual stories “fake news.” Maddie Biertempfel is a sophomore at Penn State University.


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

APME NEWS

1:22 PM

Page 11

APME-ASNE CONFERENCE RECAP

Jason White, manager of U.S. news media partnerships at Facebook (right), spoke with former APME President Bill Church, senior vice president for news at GateHouse Media.

Facebook investigates how to surface local news for local audiences

SOCIAL SHIFT

F

APME News Report

acebook is experimenting with how to connect local audiences with more local news and information on their newsfeed. “We’re interested in how to surface local news for local audiences,” said Jason White, manager of the U.S. News Media Partnership, during a keynote conversation at the News Leadership Conference 2017. White joined Bill Church, outgoing president of the Associated Press Media Editors, in a post-luncheon conversation. “We are looking how can we better connect them to news and information in that community. We’re hoping that it bears fruit. Not everything does.” White discussed the new Journalism Project, launched in January and designed to help Facebook create deeper ties with news publishers by collaborating on publishing tools and features before they are released. It’s just one way Facebook continues to test the waters about how its role in the news and local media can evolve. “We want to keep you informed about what we’re doing,” explained White, who has a bachelor’s degree from Northwestern and a graduate degree from Yale University. “We want to learn more about how what we do might align with your business.” In an effort to address false news, White described an “article eye” button that lets users find out more about the source of information. “We want to empower users with more information so they can make more informed decisions about content they are seeing.” White told publishers there would be more chances to interact

and give feedback on Facebook products. “We haven’t been very public and there is an increasing demand for us to be that,” he said. “We’re going to be more intentional and you can hold us accountable.” White said Facebook expects to work with publishers on subscription-based products, as well as monetizing video. “We’ve heard that you want your brands to have a higher profile,” White said. With two billion daily users, White said Facebook must find more ways to automate some of which it does, especially when it comes to monitoring the site for false news. “We’re in a fact-checking partnership with the Associated Press, as well as others – PolitiFact, Snopes and ABC News,” White said, adding that the feature is available now only to users in the U.S., France, Germany and Netherlands. “We’ve gotten faster but we can do better. We need some automation to our process; it’s high-touch work. This won’t solve the problem of propaganda sites or websites who do it for financial gain. We will always look for ways to reiterate.” On the question of Russian advertising, White said Facebook admits it made mistakes and has announced changes to avoid future abuse. One, he said, on the front-end will be that advertising that is politically oriented or socially oriented will require a layer of human review. Two, on the back end, Facebook will require political parties and candidates a higher level of transparency. “We’re responding to needs. We know this is what we want to learn about and we’re figuring it out.” n

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

11


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

APME NEWS

1:23 PM

Page 12

APME-ASNE CONFERENCE RECAP

The Journal Sentinel’s “Just the FAQs” feature explored weighty topics, such as the April 2016 dehydration death of a Milwaukee County Jail inmate.

‘JUST THE FAQs’

Journal Sentinel wins 2017 APME Innovator of the Year Award Other winners announced at the News Leadership Conference were: News Reporting ilwaukee Journal Sentinel’s “Just the FAQs” The Grand Prize Award sponsored by Middle Tennessee State was named winner of the 2017 APME InnovaUniversity, went Oregonian/Oregonlive.com for “Oregon Militia tor of the Year Award. Standoff and subsequent shooting,” which also won the 40,000 to The Journal Sentinel developed short, snap149,999 circulation category. The judges said, “Despite competition py and sharable videos that allow viewers to from national news outlets, OregonLive was the go-to source during cut through a fog of information available in the 41-day standoff and subsequent shooting, providing constant social media and online. “Just the FAQs” uses updates on all platforms. The coverage kept people at the center of a new Wochit video-editing tool. the story and provided unbiased context that helped Anyone in the newsroom can create clean, appealreaders understand the motivations of those ing and informative videos in less than an hour, usualinvolved.” ly after just one training session. The new video-editing tool has helped drive In the 150,000 and up circulation category, traffic. Video views in the last quarter of 2016 the winner was the Dallas Morning News, for “Covwere 1.14 million. In the first quarter of 2017, ering the Chaos of the Dallas Police Shooting.” The video traffic increased to 1.44 million, and in the judges said the Morning News “provided the model second quarter of 2017, video views jumped to for owning a big breaking news story. The staff did a 2.75 million. Judges said: “This is a great idea on first-rate job of making sense of events that created several levels. Not only does it work for the short chaos in the streets and left police, marchers and attention spans of readers in the era of social readers unsure what would happen next.” media and the smartphone, but also it repurposIn the under-40,000 category, the winner is the es existing content. St. Cloud Times, for “Mall stabbings.” According to “Very clever to have a tool that cuts down on the judges: “The staff of the St. Cloud Times preINNOVATOR JUDGES the production and editing time; it appears simserved nuance, context and humanity in covering a ple enough for just about anyone in the newsmajor breaking news story that had potential for dividing the comroom to use. This is certainly an idea that could be used by other munity. We hear from all sides in quick order after 10 people were news organizations.” stabbed at a mall by a 20-year-old Somali refugee.” Competition for the 2017 Innovator of the Year award started with Storytelling three finalists that pushed their relevancy and their limits. The winThe winner in the large-circulation category is Christopher Gofner was announced at the News Leadership Conference in Washfard of the Los Angeles Times, for “Framed.” The judges called this ington. The Journal Sentinel won $1,000 for its work. >> Continued on next page

M

APME News Report

“Very clever to have a tool that cuts down on the production and editing time; it appears simple enough for just about anyone in the newsroom to use.”

12

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

APME NEWS

1:23 PM

Page 13

APME-ASNE CONFERENCE RECAP

“Border Bodies: The Grim Mysteries of Southern California”

>> Continued from previous page

“beat reporting at its finest, a great example of what happens when a diligent reporter with sharp news judgment realizes he has struck gold. The result is a story that reads like a crime novel, rich in details that expose the evil committed by a wealthy couple bent on the destruction of a less-well-off member of the community.” In the 40,000 to 149,999 category, the winner is Frank Main of the Chicago Sun-Times for “Life on the Ledge,” the story of a woman who jumped to her death in the reporter’s own neighborhood. According to the judges, Main’s story was characterized by “great writing, smart organization, thoughtful interviews and great reporting. . . . His story revealed a woman who overcame significant challenges yet couldn’t outrun the mental illness that drove her to take her own life. Effortless online story form complements the spare writing, moving the story forward.” In the under-40,000 circulation category, the winners were Brett Kelman and Gustavo Solis of The Desert Sun of Palm Springs, California, for “Border Bodies: The Grim Mysteries of Southern California.” The judges said: “This was a unique approach to covering problems on the border. The project presentation included good integration of video tools into the vertical progression of the story and “Somalis in made for a riveting experience. Minnesota” One entry in the Storytelling category stood out from the rest. Not because of its digital wizardry or “aha” value. But because of the old-fashioned eloquence and the courage of the man who wrote it, Bill Lyon, a retired Philadelphia Inquirer sports columnist, who for more than a year has been chronicling his experience of Alzheimer’s disease. For his work, the APME board is honoring Lyon with a one-time Special Achievement in Storytelling Award. Mobile Platform Award The winner was The Dallas Morn-ing News for the redesign of DallasNews.com. Commenting on the success of the redesign, the judges said: “The site provided fast load time, easy access and operation and the slide-out menu made it extremely easy to navigate. It was visually attractive with the big photos and headlines. The redesign made the DallasNews.com site a nice way to increase readership and reader traffic. Nicely done!”

Community Engagement Award The APME Community Engagement Award, in the 75,000 and up category, went to the Star Tribune of Minneapolis, for “Somalis in Minnesota.” The newspaper’s work stood out in a category of outstanding entries. According to the judges: “The Star Tribune’s series on the struggles of the city’s Somali Americans, some labeled unfairly as extremists, rises to the top as the best example of engaging a community on a complex topic. The newspaper gained the trust of this community and told the hard, honest truth that, while most Somali Americans live normal lives, there are some whose singular goal is to join terrorist organizations... The newspaper not only produced content that engaged with the community, but deepened its credibility by enlisting a Somali journalist who eventually was hired... Great work.” In the under-75,000 category, the winner is the Peoria Journal Star, for “City of Disparity.” The judges said the “project shows what can be accomplished by a small local staff with deep commitment to community engagement. An impressive turnaround for the paper’s image and meaning to the local community... The project’s success rests in the community learning troubling facts about itself.” The Gannett Foundation is the sponsor of the Al Neuharth Award for Investigative Reporting. This year’s winner in the 75,000 and up category was “Shocking Force,” by Mark Puente and Doug Donovan of The (Baltimore) Sun. According to the judges, their work combined database work with shoe-leather reporting and outstanding storytelling.

“All the Governor’s Men”

In the under-75, 000 circulation category, the award went to The Flint Journal, for “All the Governor’s Men.” The judges called this “dogged watchdog work from a staff that wouldn’t accept what they were hearing from the governor’s office. This team was way ahead of the national media on the investigative work and finding the faces and voices of those who were affected as contaminated water put the population at risk.” First Amendment Award In the 150,000 and up circulation category, the award went to Glenn Smith and Andrew Knapp, The (Charleston, South Carolina) Post and Courier, for “Watched.” After discovering that police in Charleston had conducted nearly 100,000 field interviews with “suspicious” citizens that didn’t result in arrests, Knapp and Smith requested records from departments across the state and from the nation’s 50 largest police agencies to determine how widespread the practice was. They found that police forces across the United States have stockpiled huge databases with personal information from millions of Americans who simply crossed paths with officers. Their three-part series produced results in Charleston, >> Continued on next page

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

13


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

APME NEWS

1:23 PM

Page 14

APME-ASNE CONFERENCE RECAP

>> Continued from previous page

where the police chief announced an initiative to purge innocent people from the department’s database, and won praise from civil libertarians and police alike for shedding light on surveillance techniques often hidden from public view. The winner in the 40,000 to 150,000 category was the Quad-City Times, for “Steady Drumbeat.” The newspaper changed a political culture in Davenport, Iowa, in which the business of the people was conducted in informal closed meetings of small groups of aldermen that didn’t constitute a quorum. The City Council called it “reaching consensus.” The newspaper saw it for what it was: a cynical means of bypassing open government laws. After a steady drumbeat from the newspaper, the new mayor relented and opened the meetings to the public. The judges said, “The Quad-City Times’ efforts epitomized the goals of First Amendment journalism and brought about change in the public interest.” In the under-40,000 category, the winner is the Peoria Journal Star, for “Police Report Unmasked.” The newspaper waged a two and a half year battle with the city of Peoria to obtain a police officer’s report about her colleagues’ and supervisors’ misuse of on-theclock time litigating the case to the appellate level and winning at every turn. The result was an investigative report that revealed how officers went home or did other personal activities while they were on the taxpayer-funded clock. The police chief and many other department leaders ultimately left the city or were reassigned. Public Service Award The winner in the 150,000 and up category were the Chicago Tribune and reporters Ray Long, Karisa King and Sam Roe, for “Dangerous Doses.” Working with the Columbia University Medical Center, the newspaper found that all too often, pharmacists miss dangerous, potentially fatal, drug interactions. The judges said the project was characterized by its journalistic sophistication and novel approach and noted that it changed rules and laws governing pharmacists and their training. In short, judges said, this is journalism that undoubtedly has saved lives and will continue to do so. The winner of the Public Service Award in the 40,000 to 150,000 category was the Herald-Tribune of Sarasota, for “Bias on the Bench.” The newspaper analyzed the sentencing patterns of trial judges across Florida and found that blacks frequently received far longer sentences than whites convicted of similar crimes. In the under-40,000 circulation category, the winner is the State Journal-Register of Springfield, Illinois, for “Enough.” As Illinois lawmakers’ inability to agree on a state budget made the state a national laughingstock, the State Journal-Register led a collaborative statewide effort to show the impact of the budget stalemate. Newspapers across Illinois decried the legislative inaction through stories, editorials and columns, prompting tens of thousands citizens to respond. Said the judges: “This was a strong example of leadership, determination and ingenuity.” Associated Press staff award winners in the Feature Writing category were Sharon Cohen, Martha Irvine and Charles Rex Arbogast, for “Beyond the Bullet.” The judges called their work “A compassionate, yet insightful look at one boy’s adjustment to a new life in the aftermath of being shot, apparently randomly, on the streets of Chicago during a time when escalating gun violence in that city treats these individual tragedies more often as statistics.” The AP staff award for Best Use of Video went to Martha Irvine for “Ben’s Voice,” a compelling look at how parents cope with adult

14

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

“Dangerous Doses” children with autism. The judges noted, “As the reporter focuses on Ben’s successes, she also shows a clear and sobering picture of his dependence on his parents for his most basic needs.” In Best Digital Storytelling, winners were Martha Irvine, Jonathan Bachman and Roque Ruiz, for “Ben’s Voice.” Judges said: “Although Ben is voiceless, relying on a computer to speak for him, there would be a temptation to tell his story for him. In this winning entry, however, Ben is allowed to tell his own compelling story of the effects of autism and how one family chose to face it head on. The viewer is drawn into Ben’s Voice through the linear progression in which the story unfolded and through Ben’s own words, which seem perfectly chosen. In this amazing story, we learn that Ben carried a 3.7 grade point average at Tulane University, even as his mother had to brush his teeth.” The Charles Rowe Award recognizes an AP staff journalist for excellence in state news reporting. This year’s winner was Mark Scolforo, for “Pennsylvania Open Records.” The judges called this “diligent, exhaustive and relentless work” and said, “This ambitious report leveraging the power of the Associated Press and more than 100 journalists from 19 newspapers across Pennsylvania found that government offices are not applying the state's Right-to-Know Law uniformly and sometimes scrub critical details from records they turn over.” Other winners in their categories were: The Samuel G. Blackman Award for Enterprise Reporting Hannah Dreier, for “Venezuela Undone.” Hannah received $1,000 sponsored by Ann Blackman and Michael Putzel. The John Winn and Margo C. Miller Award is given annually to an AP staffer 30 years old or younger. This year’s winner was Hannah Dreier. The AP staff award for Global Sports Accountability Reporting went to John Leicester, Eddie Pells, Ben Curtis, John Minchillo and Roque Ruiz, for “Global Doping Impact.” In the awards for AP staff photography, the winner in the News Single Shot category is Burhan Ozbilici, for “Turkey: And Assassination,” the iconic image that captured a gunman’s assassination of Russia’s ambassador to Turkey. >> Continued on next page


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

APME NEWS

1:23 PM

Page 15

APME-ASNE CONFERENCE RECAP

>> Continued from previous page

In the Photography-News Story category, the winner was Felipe Dana, for “The Battle in Mosul.” The winner in the Feature Single Shot category was Rodrigo Abd, for “Ray of Light.” The winner in the Photography-Feature Story category was A.M. Ahad, for “Bangladesh: Migrant Worker Life.”

ASNE Awards Each year, the American Society of News Editors recognizes excellence in journalism. Inspired by former ASNE President Eugene Patterson and started in 1979, the contest is open to all newspapers, news services and news websites across the United States. The awards honor excellence in 10 categories. ASNE Breaking News Writing The winner was the staff of the East Bay Times (Bay Area News Group) for its strong and comprehensive coverage of the Ghost Ship fire in Oakland. The judges said in part: “East Bay Times' hustling, comprehensive and rapid-fire digital coverage of the Oakland warehouse fire captured every available detail of this horrendous tragedy in the first 18 hours, including quickly breaking investigative reporting on failures by fire inspectors.” The ASNE Photojournalism Award The winner was the staff of The Dallas Morning News for a compelling entry titled “July 7th shooting.” The judges said, in part, “The Dallas Morning News' 'July 7th Shooting' is a showcase of compelling breaking news photography woven with poignant, touching imagery that documents the aftermath. The viewer is placed in the middle of a breaking news situation, a harrowing, horrific shooting playing out in the streets of Dallas, despite incredible danger and unknown circumstances and personal risk to the photographer.” The ASNE Mike Royko Award for Commentary/ ColumnWriting This year’s recipient was Stephen Henderson, Detroit Free Press for a series of editorial and columns including ones about Flint’s long miser and one titled “Invisible in Trump’s America” and another, “Police shootings of black men: Haven’t we seen enough?” The judges said, in part: “Stephen Henderson writes with grace, clarity and humanity, an exceptional combination at any point in time but one that is especially valued amid the unspooling tumult of BAKER 2016. That he writes with such experience and insight about his native Detroit in no way diminishes his ability to write about the national political scene and the human condition, both of which he did in this year's extraordinary entry.” The Frank A. Blethen Award for Local Accountability Award recognizes outstanding work done by a news organization that holds important local institutions accountable for their actions. The winner was the staff of The Salt Lake Tribune for “Campus sexual assault in Utah,” reporting that spurred change and charges.” The judges cited The Salt Lake Tribune’s “relentless coverage of how Brigham Young University and Utah State University botched investigations into sexual abuse complaints. Their reporting highlighted example after example of how victims were vilified. ASNE Burl Osborne Award for Editorial Leadership The winner was Brian Colligan, The Virginian-Pilot for “The Jailhouse Death of Jamycheal Mitchell” The judges said, in part: “Brian Colligan led The Virginian-Pilot’s editorial campaign on ‘The

Ghost Ship fire coverage by East Bay Times Jailhouse Death of Jamycheal Mitchell’ with passion and grit. He took up the mantle of a mentally ill man, jailed for stealing $5 of snacks from a convenience store, who never got his court-ordered psychological evaluation but rather was found dead in his cell 101 days later. Colligan pressed for investigations and transparency and reminded readers at every turn of the injustice done to this man. ASNE Deborah Howell Award for Writing Excellence went to Billy Baker, The Boston Globe for the beautifully written and dramatic story, “The Power of Will.” The judges said, in part, “In ‘The Power of Will,’ Billy Baker used detailed reporting, beautiful writing and dramatic tension to craft a compelling narrative that holds its audience rapt until the very end. Baker tells the story of Will Lacey, a boy diagnosed with neuroblastoma, a rare childhood cancer that typically kills. ASNE Punch Sulzberger Award for Online Storytelling went to Malia Politzer and Emily Kassie, The Huffington Post for the entry, “The 21st Century Gold Rush.” The judges said, in part: “Visually stunning, cleverly presented and richly reported, ‘The 21st Century Gold Rush' is a masterstroke in high-end digital storytelling that is easy to navigate and understand. Not only were the reporters able to capture readers in a delicate story via the written word, but also the interwoven photos, facts and widgets led the readers' attention by the hand, winding them through the story. The O'Brien Fellowship Award for Impact in Public Service Journalism went to the Panama Papers reporting team, The Center for Public Integrity's International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, McClatchy, the Miami Herald and more than 100 other media partners The entry: “The Panama Papers: Politicians, Criminals and the Rogue Industry that Hides Their Cash.” The judges said, in part: “The Panama Papers is recognized with the inaugural O'Brien Fellowship Award for Impact in Public Service Journalism because of the breadth of its reporting, the strength of the partnership that yielded this effort and the global impact that resulted.” n

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

15


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

APME NEWS

1:23 PM

Page 16

APME-ASNE CONFERENCE RECAP

IMPACT IN INDIANA

Ball State’s meth project wins APME college innovator honors

B

“Terrific multi-media series produced by Ball State University’s Unified Media program. Their work clearly and dramatically demonstrated the impact that meth had in Indiana’s Muncie and Delaware County, and dug deep to put a face on drug addiction.” INNOVATOR JUDGES

16

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

APME News Report

all State University’s semester-long project, “Unmasked: The stigma of meth,” won the Associated Press Media Editors 2017 Innovator of the Year Award for College Students. Winners were recognized at the annual News Leadership Conference, a combined conference of APME, American Society of News Editors and Associated Press Photo Managers, held in Washington, D.C. “Unmasked: The stigma of meth” was an interdisciplinary, cross-platform student-led immersive class experience that explored methamphetamine use in the university’s home county, which has led the state and even the nation in recent years in the number of methamphetamine drug busts. It is a graduation requirement that journalism majors at Ball State participate in at least one immersive learning class. Twenty-seven students worked with two professors over 15 weeks to produce the work. Under the direction of Professors Terry Hefeitz, who teaches in the Department of Telecommunications, and Juli Metzger, who teaches in the Department of Journalism, the project includes a 30-minute documentary for public television, a series of radio broadcasts for Indiana Public Radio, a website with podcasts and web video at www.stigmaunmasked.com, and a 40-page highend, glossy magazine. Judges said: “Terrific multi-media series produced by Ball State University’s Unified Media program. Their work clearly and dramatically demonstrated the impact that meth had in Indiana’s Muncie and Delaware County, and dug deep to put a face on drug addiction. Stories about how one gent caught fire cooking meth, and others that explored the number of babies born addicted were particularly compelling. “No doubt why their work was picked up by public television and radio, and even the Associated Press. A tour de force on all platforms.” Metzger, along with Ball State journalism students attending the News Leadership Conference, accepted the award. The project also won Mark of Excellence awards in the Society of Professional Journalists competition, including first place in feature photography, and television in-depth reporting. It also won SPJ first place regional awards in student television documentary, and student continuing coverage. Previous winners of the APME Innovator of the Year have included Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and Marquette University’s Diederich College of Communication, Marquette Wire. n


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

APME NEWS

1:23 PM

Page 17

APME-ASNE CONFERENCE RECAP

Veteran journalist Leonard Pitts calls on colleagues to take a strong stance in Trump era

IDEAS & IDEALS

M

By Robby General Ball State University

iami Herald Columnist Leonard Pitts told journalists that they needed to be tougher about reporting the truth and to stop wimping out when it comes to covering President Trump. Pitts argued that truth has become distorted in the eyes of some in this generation, and he said it was the job of the journalist to set them straight. “We are witnessing nothing less than a sucession from reality by a large portion of our fellow citizens,” Pitts told journalists during his keynote address at the 2017 News Leadership Conference. He said the American public is witnessing, “A civil war of ideas and ideals in which the brazen lie carries the same weight as the actual fact, provided it is said loudly enough and satisfies the listeners emotional need.” Pitts said while most journalists strive to be objective, that goal is simply not possible today and never really has been. “You are not objective. You have never been objective. You will never be objective,” Pitts said. “To be objective is to act without human emotion. No one is capable of meeting that standard. Objectivity is neither possible nor desirable in journalism because journalism is, by definition, human experiences as processed by human beings.” Pitts' conversation titled “Guts: False Objectivity and the Danger of Truth” stemmed from the type of polite euphemisms he saw during the presidential campaign coverage. “I was troubled by how often we, in the news business, seem to go out of our way to pretend that there was some rough similarity in the shortcomings in the two candidates for presidency,” Pitts said. Pitts said urged editors to be "brave" and not accept "lies" as "untruths" but to call them what they are. He said he's recognized the same tendency by today's media to soften its coverage on difficult subjects like the Charleston marches, when those acts were described as “racially charged.” Instead of trying to be “fair” so to avoid judgment of the American public, Pitts encouraged journalists to strive for fairness and balance over objectivity. Pitts said that the use of “weasel words” news media use in the name of objectivity is a disservice to the public and ignores one of the primary tools of journalism - judgment. Too often journalists tend to sit on the fence and not appear to lean one way or the other, which is a dangerous game to play, according to Pitts. “Why do we draw up short when circumstances require us to be definitive?” Pitts asked. “I think we got in this trouble with the best of intentions. I think we got into this trouble to be objective.” The story is all too often the same. News organizations report controversial topics so they pursue one source that leans to the right and another who leans to the left. Somehow, organizations believe that that balance in coverage is

“Objectivity is neither possible nor desirable in journalism because journalism is, by definition, human experiences as processed by human beings.” LEONARD PITTS

at the same time unobjective and fair, when Pitts believes that organizations are doing it for a different reason. “Many extreme news mediums seemed to embrace, instead, to embrace false equivalencies and polite euphemisms in hopes of avoiding anything like judgement,” Pitts said. “Judgement, we have come to believe is a bad thing. Judgment wasn’t in our job description.” The mentality of having “two sides to every story” isn’t always the case, Pitts said, referencing stories like when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor or when Martin Luther King walked through Birmingham or Hitler and the Holocaust. Restoring truth in news media begins by educating the youth on how to gather facts rather than simply ignore them. He also said journalists need to tell their facts in a way that serves the reader. In the Civil War, newspapers were definitive. They saw injustices and said it the way they judged to be correct. That’s the type of definitiveness Pitts said journalists need today. “Today, I am calling you to be definitive,” Pitts said. “Exercise your best judgment, to be fair and balanced and as impartial as you can and most of all to be brave. The people we serve need that from us now more than they ever have, whether they know it or not. “The facts need someone to defend them and the truth needs somebody to tell it," he said. "I can’t think of anyone better qualified than us.” n

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

17


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 18

APME NEWS

2017 APME/ASNE WASHINGTON CONFERENCE

great ideas ROUNDTABLE FOLLOW-UPS Boston Herald, Boston Joe Sciacca WHAT THEY DID: Following up special reports on important issues with roundtable discussions of next steps in dealing with problems raised has been a very effective way to push our coverage ahead while engaging the communities we serve. Too often, important coverage fades away after the day of publication. This new roundtable protocol keeps the conversation going - and the Herald’s continuing reporting front and center in the quest to find solutions.

18

WINTER 2017

GOING TO THE DOGS The Daily Astorian, Astoria, Oregon Laura Sellers WHAT THEY DID: In the second year of our salute to National Dog Day, we doubled the reader photos and nearly quintupled the revenue on this all-dog photo section. It grew from five broadsheet pages to 24 tab pages, fully sponsored and very loved in the community. This one is a keeper. Rules were simple: Dog’s name, age and breed, people’s names and town and contact info. If you played last year, we need a different photo.

APME NEWS


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 19

GREAT IDEAS

MUSIC WEDNESDAYS

FINISHED BUSINESS: STATE CHAMPS The Daily Astorian, Astoria, Oregon Laura Sellers WHAT THEY DID: One of our towns had both boys and girls in the state basketball championships after storied seasons. The boys won it all; the girls took third. We planned a special four-page section in advance, advertising found sponsors (win or lose) and it created a memorable keepsake with poster-worthy front and back pages and a recap of the seasons inside.

THE HOUSING CRUNCH The Daily Astorian, Astoria, Oregon Laura Sellers WHAT THEY DID: Clatsop County has a housing crunch that touches all income levels, from low-wage workers to six-figure executives, from renters just starting out to would-be homeowners looking to plant roots. The shortage has no easy solutions, in part because it arose from a perfect storm of trends. The Daily Astorian examined the housing crunch through the eyes of elected officials, economic experts, real-estate professionals, developers, homeowners and renters. The series explored the forces driving the issue, along with what is and is not possible for the North Coast to achieve. This turned out to be an ongoing, occasional series as it remains a key topic in our area.

Chattanooga Times Free Press, Chattanooga, Tennessee Alison Gerber WHAT THEY DID: The Chattanooga Times Free Press launched “Music Wednesdays” in August 2016 to tap into the growing local music scene in our city through the newly introduced Facebook Live platform. At first, we wanted to see whether 30 to 45 minutes of music and conversation during the city’s lunch break would make an impact on the newspaper’s readership. More than 30 shows later, the popular weekly performance has grown to encompass genres ranging from opera to bluegrass and has expanded the newspaper’s profile among younger demographics and non-readers. We have broadcast live from our newspaper; on location from performance venues across the city; and once from a popular pedestrian bridge. The broadcasts also have raised the profile of our entertainment reporter and our news broadcaster, who host “Music Wednesdays.” Full disclosure: We were inspired to created “Music Wednesdays” after seeing a “Great Ideas” about “Windows on the World” by the Columbus Dispatch.

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

19


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

APME NEWS

1:23 PM

Page 20

APME-ASNE CONFERENCE RECAP

WELCOME ABOARD Two editors and an educator were elected to the Associated Press Media Editors Board during the News Leadership Conference in Washington. They are:

Kathy Best Editor, Missoulian in Missoula, Montana, and the Ravalli Republic in the nearby Bitterroot Valley Small market • Two-year term Kathy Best is the editor of the Missoulian in Missoula, Montana, and the Ravalli Republic in the nearby Bitterroot Valley. She was previously the editor and vice president for news at The Seattle Times and served as the newsroom’s managing editor for digital news and content creation. In those roles, she helped lead the Times newsroom to two Pulitzer Prizes and two Online Journalism Awards for breaking news and explanatory projects. Best also has held senior editing positions at The Baltimore Sun, St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. She spent most of her reporting career covering government and politics in Illinois and Washington, D.C. She previously served on the APME Board as its digital representative and is eager to rejoin her colleagues in confronting the challenges we all face.

Juli Metzger Journalism Instructor, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana Educator • Three-year term Juli Metzger is an Instructor of Journalism at Ball State University, and most recently oversaw students in the Unified Media Lab, a $4 million multimedia, crossplatform space for students to practice journalism in print, on the air and online. Before joining the academy in 2011, Metzger was executive editor for digital at the Indianapolis Star, where she also served as Gannett's group director of niche publications in the Midwest. She’s been the top editor of newspapers in Indiana, Ohio and Louisiana, and was president and publisher of three others. She's worked in nine newsrooms in four states and led staffs to win national journalism honors, including the APME Public Service Award. From 2005 to 2009, Metzger served on the Indiana APME Board of Directors. She was Gannett's Editor of the Year in 2000. Last spring, Metzger received Ball State University's 2017 Immersive Learning Faculty Award for work with students on a semesterlong, multimedia project “Unmasked: The stigma of meth.” The project also won the 2017 Associated Press Media Editors Innovator of the Year Award for College Students. In 2016, Metzger was an Entrepre-neurial Institute Fellow at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University where she developed a course in Entrepreneurial Journalism, which she now teaches. In 2015, Metzger and her students participated in the inaugural Associated

20

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

Press Media Editors “Editor Educator Exchange,” a newsroom-to-classroom exchange program. Metzger and Ball State will kick off the APME NewsTrain season with a workshop on campus in March 2018. Metzger has recruited college students to cover the Associated Press Media Editors/American Society of News Editors conferences every year since 2013. Besides Ball State students, Metzger recruits area students from other colleges near the venue to participate in the conference coverage team, a boots-on-the-ground reporting staff producing real-time, multiplatform content. Ball State students have worked with students from Indiana University, Columbia College, Stanford University, San Jose State University, Penn State and this year Howard University will join the coverage team.

Sally Stapleton Managing Editor, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette At-Large • Three-year term Sally Stapleton is the managing editor of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Stapleton is a former deputy executive photo editor of The Associated Press. During her tenure as the AP Interna-tional Photo Editor, Stapleton led a team of photographers to two Pulitzer Prizes in Photography for Africa coverage in 1995 for the Rwanda genocide and in 1999 for the simultaneous U.S. Embassy bombings by al-Qaeda in Kenya and Tanzania. Previous to the AP, she worked as a photo editor at The Boston Globe, The Miami Herald and the Minneapolis Star Tribune. From 2008 to 2016, Stapleton was the managing editor/online at The Day in New London, Ct. Prior to joining the Post-Gazette, she was named the T. Anthony Pollner Distinguished Professor for spring 2016 at the University of Montana School of Journalism. In 2002 she received a Fulbright scholarship to work with local journalists in Rwanda. As a result, she developed a relationship with local media owners, journalism academics, journalists and media association leaders whose objective was to elevate the quality of journalism in the country and the Great Lakes region. In 2008, the Great Lakes Media Center was established as an educational institute for Rwandan working journalists. She received her undergraduate and graduate journalism degrees from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism. n Lane Michaelsen, group news director of the Sinclair Broadcast Group in Maryland, was appointed to fill an open broadcaster slot. More about Michaelsen in the next edition of APME News.


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

APME NEWS

1:23 PM

Page 21

APME-ASNE CONFERENCE RECAP

DRONE ZONE

Experts discuss best practices for enhancing news coverage By Katie DeFiore Penn State University

W

hen automobiles first came out, there was no infrastructure in place — no paved roads, no idea what side of the road to drive on and no regulations for speed and traffic patterns. Dave Russell, a member of the Safety and Operations Branch of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in the Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration Office, said the drone is at the same place now as the car was then. During the 2017 News Leadership conference in Washington, three drone experts discussed best practices for drone use in news coverage. “There’s more to flying a UAS than just buying the thing from Costco,” Russell said. “There’s a lot of danger one can do if one does this improperly.” Here is a list of the top five things for news editors to know about drone use: 1. You can’t fly a drone over people. Panel member Matt Waite, a journalism professor at the University of Nebraska, said he has seen that in other countries that allow drones to fly over people, they require a parachute system in case of an accident. “Where that bogs down here is: How do you certify those? How do you make sure they work every time?” Waite said. He said he was skeptical that flights over people would be allowed for some time. 2. A member of the flight crew must maintain a visual line of sight with the drone at all times. 3. The person operating the drone for a news organization needs to be Part 107 certified (the FAA certification for commercial use of drones, including by news outlets).

4. As of now, state and local agencies can only regulate where you take off and land, not where you fly. “In America, outside, as soon as you leave the ground, you’re in the air space, and the FAA is responsible for covering that air space,” Russell said. “The intent of Congress as we see it now is they would like to see a little more empowerment of state and local agencies to be able to do that.” 5. Always give a heads-up to local police if you are going to be using a drone. “I early on learned that’s all well and good, teaching journalists about what their rights are, but if the police don’t know or don’t care what those rights are, it’s not going to matter,” said panel member Mickey Osterreicher, general counsel of the National Press Photographers Association. “There’s both the privacy issue and the safety issue…we are all pioneers in the use of drones. Which side to put the steering wheel on is pretty much exactly that.” Waite showed a video captured by a drone of a Rohingya refugee camp in Myanmar on the border of Burma to exemplify the possibilities with drone news coverage. “I wanted to show this because I think sometimes we think, oh my God, we can have our own flying robot. This is the coolest thing ever,” Waite said. “What they are really good for is showing scale and scope. That shot right there is breathtaking, and it’s impossible to show this on the ground.” Russell also mentioned that, as of now, there are a lot of heavy regulations that may restrict what is possible to cover with drones. “I think as time goes on and we figure out how to safely integrate drones into the national airspace, we’ll be able to do much more than we can now in a manner that requires much less prior coordination,” Russell said. n Katie DeFiore is a junior at Penn State University.

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

21


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

APME NEWS

1:23 PM

Page 22

APME-ASNE CONFERENCE RECAP

ROBERT C. McGRUDER DIVERSITY LEADERSHIP AWARD

Saluting John Quinn’s dedication to diversity

WALK THE WALK

The late John C. Quinn was awarded the Robert C. McGruder Diversity Leadership Award by APME and ASNE. His friend and colleague, Phil Currie, retired senior vice president for news at Gannett Co., Inc., delivered these remarks in accepting the award for the Quinn family:

O

n behalf of John Quinn and his family, I am honored to accept this prestigious award. All who knew John sincerely thank you for recognizing his outstanding and longstanding diversity leadership. John Collins Quinn was a personally delightful and professionally dedicated newsman with a great heart. He made his mark on the industry as chief news executive of the Gannett Company and later as editor of USA TODAY. I had the privilege of working directly with him for some 20 years. I saw how the diversity seeds he sowed blossomed and spread throughout the company and the country. He and Al Neuharth, who at that time headed Gannett, were firmly committed to diversity – certainly because it was the right thing to do but also because it was the smart thing to do. The Gannett directive that “Our leadership should reflect our readership” was one John not only talked about frequently but believed in deeply and — most importantly — executed faithfully. Under John and his successors, the Gannett Company’s diversity numbers were usually the best in the business. He even encouraged a bit of competition with our friends from KnightRidder, who also were committed to the cause. That rivalry helped boost diversity efforts nationwide. It also should be noted that building diverse staffs was often especially challenging on small community newspapers, of which Gannett had many. But John’s insistence that all voices be represented made a difference everywhere. So did an All-American review that John began in Gannett with the help of Jay Harris, a national leader in building diversity. The aim was not simply to have minority members on news staffs but to have diverse voices in news columns. That meant that experts of color in various fields were called on for comments along with the usual white counterparts. Newsroom staffs developed diverse source lists, and content was expected to reflect many voices. When Gannett launched USA TODAY as the nation’s newspaper, it also sought to make staffing and content represent all aspects of our society. Some argued that this was “formula journalism.” John saw it as making sure the newspaper was reflecting the full spectrum of our country. This firm belief in the value of diversity — demonstrated by both

22

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

Phil Currie, retired Gannett senior vice president for news, accepted the McGruder Award on behalf of the late John C. Quinn.

his corporate commitment and his personal approaches — was reflected throughout the company in its newsroom leadership and in its publications. A culture developed that inspired many of us working with John. His diversity aims became shared by a great number of Gannett editIt is significant, I think, that since the McGruder Award’s inauguration in 2002, eight Gannett editors and two Gannett newspapers are among the winners. All can thank John. Finally, as the video noted, after his retirement in 1990 and the death of his son Chips (who also was an editor), John and his late wife Loie established the Chips Quinn Scholars Program to provide journalism training, internships and ongoing mentoring to college students of color. More than 1,400 have gone through that program. It continues today, with nearly half of its graduates still in news careers. John Quinn died July 11 at age 91. He was a man who cared deeply, inspired broadly and made good things happen nationally. He was, indeed, a Diversity Leader. As for this award, I know John would have been thrilled to receive it. And as a past president of both APME and ASNE, he would be very pleased to know that this topic still matters to these organizations. On his behalf, for that I also say thank you. n


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

APME NEWS

1:23 PM

Page 23

APME-ASNE CONFERENCE RECAP

Richard Prince moderated a panel discussion that included (from left, seated) Paul Delaney, retired senior editor, The New York Times; Charlayne Hunter-Gault, PBS NewsHour; Dorothy Gilliam, retired, The Washington Post; and Al Fitzpatrick, former vice president at Knight Ridder.

PHOTO / CHEYENNE MAJEED, HOWARD UNIVERSITY

MILES TO GO?

Speakers: More progress to be made in diversity coverage

F

By Alison Kuznitz Penn State University

ifty years have passed since the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, known as the Kerner Commission, shook the news media with its declaration that “the journalistic profession has been shockingly backward in seeking out, hiring, training and promoting Negroes.” Several African-American journalists who spoke at the 2017 ASNE-APME-APPM News Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C. discussed how the news industry has incorporated the commission’s recommendations. Speakers said the media still have some of the same problems in covering issues like Black Lives Matter, and there is still more progress to be made. The meeting preceded the announcement that the American Society of News Editors Foundation landed a $300,000 grant from

the Democracy Foundation to create a more comprehensive and data-driven survey that catalogues newsroom diversity numbers for U.S. print and online publications. ASNE launched the annual Newsroom Employment Diversity Survey in 1978, which measures the success of ASNE’s goal of having the percentage of minorities working in newsrooms nationwide equal to the percentage of minorities in the nation’s population by 2025. An ASNE press release stated that the Democracy Fund’s grant will allow ASNE, in collaboration with Google, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and a university research team, to develop the survey into a world-class resource to support newsroom diversity efforts. Grant funds will help invigorate the survey’s design and data collection methodologies, establish a comprehensive view of the state of diversity in media and raise awareness through the dissemination of data collected. n

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

23


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 24

APME NEWS

The

YOUTH BEAT

Students provide sights and sounds of APME-ASNE conference APME and ASNE would like to thank journalism faculty Juli Metzger of Ball State University, Milbert O. Brown of Howard University and John Beale and John Dillon of Pennsylvania State University, as well as all of their student journalists, for covering the conference across all platforms. You can see all of their work online at https://newsleaders2017.wordpress.com.

F

or the fifth consecutive year Ball State University led a team of students to cover the APME-ASNE News Leadership Conference. This year, students and their advisers from Penn State and Brown University assisted in covering the conference events and captured the sights and sounds of the convention. Students were paired with mentor editors and editors and got a chance to see firsthand how tomorrow's journalists respond in a multimedia, cross-platform, digital-first environment. You can see the student work at apme.com Student work also is in this issue of APME News.

BALL STATE UNIVERSITY Juli Metzger Juli Metzger, M.S., is an Instructor with the Department of Journalism at Ball State University. As Coordinator of Ball State's Unified Media program until summer of 2017, Juli oversaw the build-out of the $4 million renovation of the Unified Media Lab, creating a unique space promoting cross-platform storytelling and establish emerging media protocols. Previously, she was Executive Editor for Digital at the Indianapolis Star from 2009-2011. She’s worked in nine newsrooms in four states and led staffs to win national journalism honors, as well as top awards in each of those states. She’s been a reporter, section editor, executive editor of three newspapers and president and publisher of three other media companies. She owns a boutique content marketing agency specializing in niche publications. Juli is immediate past president for the Boys & Girls Club of Muncie and is board vice president of Project Leader-ship, a mentoring program designed to get students to and through college or post-secondary education. In January 2016, she was a Fellow for the Entrepreneurial Institute at Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University. In fall of 2016, Women In Business Unlimited awarded her the Athena Leadership Award. In spring 2017, she was awarded Ball State's Immersive Learning Faculty Award for her work with students on “Unmasked: The Stigma of Meth,” a multimedia, multiplatform immersion class examining drug addiction in Delaware County. “Unmasked” won the APME's 2017 Innovator of the Year for College Students award. Juli was recently named to the Board of Directors of the Indiana Youth Institute and the national Board of Directors of Associated Press Media Editors. You can reach Juli at jmetzger@bsu.edu.

Robby General Robby General is a senior journalism and telecommunications major with a minor in sports studies at Ball State University. Robby

24

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

writes, but also spends his time filming, taking photos, anchoring, coding and recording a pair of newly created sports podcasts. Robby’s previous work includes stints as editor-in-chief, managing editor and sports editor for the Ball State Daily News. In 2016, Robby was one of 10 students, the only sophomore, selected to participate in Hoosier State Press Association Pulliam Fellowship, where he was assigned to work at the Washington TimesHerald as a sports reporter and editor. In the past, he has traveled to Olympic media events, Rio de Janeiro for the 2016 summer games and Florida to cover Major League Baseball spring training. Currently, Robby writes for The Daily News, works as an anchor for Newslink Indiana and is the creator/co-host of two sports podcasts. You can reach Robby on Twitter @rgeneraljr or via email at robbygeneraljr@gmail.com.

Allie Kirkman Allie Kirkman is a junior journalism and telecommunications major with a minor in professional writing and emerging media at Ball State University. This summer, she interned at The Commercial Review, where she pitched ideas, wrote stories and took photos for the online and print publication. She has previously worked as a stringer reporter for The Lebanon Reporter and The Herald Bulletin newspapers. Allie is the managing editor of the Ball State Daily News and the event coordinator of Online News Association at Ball State. Currently, she is also working as a reporter for The Commercial Review. In her free time Allie enjoys being outdoors and exploring new places. You can reach Allie on Twitter @alliekirkman15 or via email at alliekirkman15@gmail.com.

Ryan Shank Ryan Shank is a senior majoring in telecommunications digital video production and history at Ball State University. He’s an early career documentary filmmaker, having broadcasted three full-length documentaries to date, with a fourth in production and a fifth in planning. Ryan’s previous works have been recognized with Regional Emmy nominations, Auroras and National Broadcaster Association awards. Ryan spent >> Continued on next page


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 25

APME NEWS

>> Continued from previous page

his summer as a video production intern at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, where he planned, directed and edited video packages and live productions. He has also worked as a video reporter for the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C. for the past two years. Currently, Ryan is a multimedia and curatorial intern at Ball State’s David Owsley Museum of Art and the senior video editor at the Daily News and the Unified Media Lab at Ball State. You can reach Ryan at rjshank@bsu.edu.

Casey Smith Casey Smith is a senior majoring in journalism, telecommunications and anthropology with a minor in Spanish at Ball State University. This summer, she interned at National Geographic Magazine by way of the American Society of Magazine Editors internship program, where she pitched and produced stories for print and digital mediums. She has previously interned in the multimedia department at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian and worked as a correspondent through the USA TODAY College program. She also was part of Ball State’s BSU at the Games immersive learning experience, covering the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio. Casey is the Editor-inChief at The Daily News, Ball State’s campus newspaper, where she oversees a staff of more than 100 students. Currently, she is also a freelance writer at National Geographic and a digital producer for the National Parks Service. You can reach Casey at smith.ann.casey@gmail.com or visit her website at www.caseyannsmith.com.

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY John Beale John Beale teaches photojournalism courses at Penn State. He previously worked as a staff photographer and chief photographer for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Beale’s work has been honored with numerous regional and national awards, including the Community Service Photojournalism Award from the American Society of News Editors. He may be reached at jhb169@psu.edu.

www.linkedin.com/in/emilykohlman, and her personal website is www.emilykohlman.weebly.com.

Katie DeFiore Katie DeFiore is a Penn State junior majoring in print/digital journalism with a double minor in psychology and entrepreneurship. She is the founder, executive producer and host of the Daily Collegian’s podcast Voices of Penn State. She also hosts her own podcast entitled An Entrepreneurial State of Mind. She writes columns for the Daily Collegian and interned over the summer with WPSU as a radio reporter. She is also the public relations executive for Passion With Purpose, a Penn State student organization. You can listen to her podcast on iTunes or Soundcloud by searching An Entrepreneurial State of Mind. You can reach her at kdefiore45@gmail.com.

Maddie Biertempfel Maddie Biertempfel is a sophomore at Penn State double majoring in broadcast journalism and political science. Her work has been published in the student-run newspaper The Daily Collegian, and she currently contributes to the Centre Daily Times as part of a select class. She is also an anchor for PSN News, a live studentrun news show; a package producer for 46 LIVE, a broadcast for Penn State's dance marathon; and a newscast member for CommRadio, a student-run radio organization. She expects to graduate in May 2020. You can reach her at biertempfelm@gmail.com.

Alison Kuznitz Alison Kuznitz is a junior majoring in print/digital journalism and marketing at Penn State and the Schreyer Honors College. She is an investigative reporter at The Daily Collegian, with previous coverage spanning mental health, Greek life and student government. She has interned for Hearst Connecticut Media Group and freelanced for local news outlets. She is currently the executive producer of a weekly student-run telecast and a communications intern at Penn State. This fall, she is also a collegiate correspondent for USA TODAY College. You can reach her at azk5578@psu.edu.

Emily Kohlman Emily Kohlman is a senior in the Schreyer Honors College who is double-majoring in journalism and Russian and double-minoring in political science and media studies. She has interned with WPSU and Calkins Media. During the U.S. presidential election season, she studied in the nation's capital and interned with Czech Television's U.S. correspondent. She covered the 2016 Republican National Convention for McClatchy and the Pennsylvania NewsMedia Association. In March, she traveled to Panama to report on the migrant crisis. Emily's dream is to become a foreign correspondent. After studying abroad in St. Petersburg and continuing her Russian studies at Middlebury College's summer program, she aspires to combine her interests and report from Eastern Europe. She can be reached at emk222@psu.edu or on LinkedIn at

HOWARD UNIVERSITY Milton O. Brown Jr. Milbert O. Brown Jr. is an Assistant Professor in Howard University’s School of Communications. He teaches courses in multi-media, photojournalism and VR360 video. Before joining the faculty, Brown worked as a photojournalist and picture editor at two major newspapers, the Chicago Tribune and the Boston Globe. While at the Tribune, Brown shared the Pulitzer Prize in Journalism for Explanatory Reporting as a contributing staff member in 2001. You can email him at Milbert.brown@howard.edu >> Continued on next page

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

25


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 26

APME NEWS

>> Continued from previous page

Blairre Perriatt Blairre Perriatt is a senior at Howard University’s School of Communications. The Film major serves as a videographer for the school’s student media projects. She is also a member of Howard University’s Student Chapter of the National Press Photographers Association.

Thao Hoang Thao Hoang is a film major in the School of Communications at Howard University. The National Press Photographers Association’s Student Chapter member has produced several student films.

Cydney Stephens Cydney Stephens is a broadcast journalism major at Howard University’s School of Communications. The junior was the recipient of the “2017 Photojournalist of the Year,” Award

26

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

presented by Howard University’s Student Chapter of the National Press Photographers Association.

Katherine Gilyard Katherine Gilyard is a senior journalism major at Howard University’s School of Communications. Gilyard is the National Student Representative for the National Press Photographers Association (NPPA). She is also a founding member and the first president of Howard’s NPPA Student Chapter. Under her leadership, the student group was awarded the “2016 NPPA Student Chapter of the Year.” Last summer, Gilyard served as a photojournalist for the National Association Black Journalists (NABJ) Student Projects. She was also active with NABJ’s Visual Task Force as the student representative and social media chair. n


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 27

APME NEWS

briefs C O N F E R E N C E

APME accepting entries for awards competitions The Associated Press Media Editors is now accepting entries to its annual awards competition, which honors excellence and innovation in newspapers, radio, television and digital news sites. The deadline for entries is March 1, 2018. Eligible work must have been posted, published or launched between Jan. 1, 2017, and Dec. 31, 2017. News organizations are allowed to submit the same entry in up to two categories. There are two notable changes in this year’s contest. First, several awards are divided into categories based on size. In the past, size was determined by circulation or DMA ranking. Now, size is determined by the number of full-time-equivalent employees in a newsroom – all those involved in reporting, editing, visuals, multimedia, design and production. See specific award descriptions for details. Second, the contest used to be open only to Associated Press and Canadian Press members. Now, it is open to all AP and CP customers, as well as members. The fee remains $75 per entry for APME members, $100 per entry for non-APME members. For those who submit three or more

entries, the fee is discounted to $60 per entry for members, and $85 per entry for non-members. For universities and college students, the fee remains $25 per entry. Entries should include electronic files in PDF format of stories, series, visuals and/or editorials and community reaction. Up to 20 electronic files may be submitted, as well as a cover letter outlining the background, execution and accomplishments of the effort. The entry should address significant challenges to accuracy, and all published corrections or clarifications. Awards will be presented at the 2018 APMEASNE Conference, Sept. 11-12, in Austin, Texas. A highlight of the conference: Finalists for the Innovator of the Year Award will make presentations, with the winner selected on-site by attendees. The first step in entering is signing up as an “entrant” at the APME contest site at http://bit.ly/2018APMEawards. Please keep your entrant username and password. You will need it to return to the site to edit or add more entries before submitting them for judging. Submit all entries before accessing the payment page to check out. n

Austin to host 2018 APME-ASNE conference Mark your calendar! We are heading to Austin, Texas, Sept. 11-12, 2018, for the fifth annual APME-ASNE News Leadership Conference. The Associated Press Photo Managers will once again join us. Plan early to spend two full days next fall in one of the most creative and innovative cities in the US, the capital of Texas! We will begin on the morning of Tuesday, Sept. 11, and conclude on the evening of Wednesday, Sept. 12. It will be short but packed with programming. Our conference hotel is the AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center. We have a nightly rate of $219. Immediately following the 2018 ASNE-APME conference will be the Online News Association conference Sept. 13-15 at the JW Marriott Austin. We'll build on the success we had at this year's conference in Washington, D.C. A committee representing both organizations already has started planning the2018conference, including programming and fundraising. We'll have more details soon on conference registration and hotel reservations. n

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

27


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 28

APME NEWS

editors in the news

Industry’s promotions, appointments, awards and recognition Associated Press names Brad Foss as its new global business editor Brad Foss, a former reporter and deputy business editor at The Associated Press, has been named the cooperative’s global business editor. In his new role, Foss will guide AP's coverage of business, industry and finance around the world and in all media formats. Foss has driven change in several leadership roles in AP's business news department during the past decade. He played key roles in expanding financial news coverage out of states and statehouses, created a real-time economic data product and launched AP's automated journalism initiative.

Associated Press names Josh Hoffner as news editor for national beats Josh Hoffner, a longtime news editor and breaking news manager at The Associated Press, has been named the cooperative's news editor for national beats. Hoffner will guide five teams of journalists who cover race and ethnicity, education, immigration, state government and the environment. He will also be responsible for exploring the possibility of creating new coverage teams.

AP taps Smith as Venezuela correspondent as news editor for national beats The Associated Press has named Scott Smith, a cross-format journalist from California, as its new correspondent in Caracas, Venezuela. The appointment was announced Oct. 23, by Paul Haven, the AP’s news director for Latin America and the Caribbean. Smith joins a staff in Venezuela of award-winning journalists covering one of the world's most complex stories at a time of fast-moving change following an unprecedented economic downfall, months of deadly street protests and heightened international pressure against President Nicolas Maduro's socialist government.

El Paso Times editor Moore quits to save newsroom jobs The executive editor of the El Paso Times is leaving the newspaper after being directed by its parent company to cut newsroom staff. Robert Moore stepped down in October in an effort to preserve reporting positions at the paper His resignation coincided with the departure of Lilia Castillo Jones, the president

28

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

of the Times and several sister properties in New Mexico, whose position was eliminated by the USA Today Network, a division of the Gannett publishing company. The Times has eliminated several positions in the past year, and layoffs have occurred this week at other Gannett papers nationally.

Fresno Bee editor Mahan joins Rep. Jim Costa’s office as district director Longtime Fresno Bee editor Kathy Mahan is the new district director for Rep. Jim Costa, D-Fresno. Mahan worked at The Bee for more than 17 years, starting as an assistant local news editor. She became local news editor in 2005, was named features editor in 2008 and earlier this year became audience editor, helping all of The Bee's journalists better focus their stories.

AP names Hudson new investigative editor The Associated Press has named Michael Hudson, a senior editor at the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists whose work probed offshore financial secrecy and the origins of the 2008 economic crisis, as its new global investigations editor. Hudson and ICIJ shared the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for explanatory reporting with McClatchy and the Miami Herald for their work on the Panama Papers project. He will guide AP’s teams of investigative journalists around the world in his new role.

Detroit Free Press appoints veteran journalist Peter Bhatia as new editor A veteran journalist has been hired as the new editor at the Detroit Free Press. Peter Bhatia has been editor at The Cincinnati Enquirer, a newspaper also owned by Gannett Co. The 64-year-old says it's a “tremendous honor” to lead the Free Press newsroom. Before working in Ohio, Bhatia was director of the Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism at Arizona State University. He also was editor at The Oregonian, executive editor at The Fresno Bee, managing editor at The Sacramento Bee and managing editor at the Dallas Times Herald. The Free Press says Bhatia has helped lead newsrooms that have won nine Pulitzer Prizes. >> Continued on next page


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 29

APME NEWS

>> Continued from previous page

Times-Tribune and Sentinal-Echo announce new editorial leadership There is new leadership for the newsrooms of the Times-Tribune, of Corbin, Ky, and the Sentinel-Echo, of London, Ky. Regional Publisher Dave Eldridge announced Erin Cox was named editor of both publications effective in August. Denis House, the former Sentinel-Echo sports editor, has been promoted to managing editor at the Sentinel-Echo. House will now oversee the daily news operation. Cox, who will now manage the news operations of both publications, was previously editor of The Times Bulletin, a daily newspaper in Van Wert, Ohio.

Astorian names Jim Van Nostrand as new managing editor Jim Van Nostrand has joined The Daily

Astorian in Astoria, Oregon, as managing editor. He is a veteran journalist with more than 30 years of experience as a reporter and editor. Most recently, he was the digital editor at the Tri-City Herald in Kennewick, Washington. He replaces Laura Sellers, who is retiring from full-time work after 25 years with the Astorian and its parent company, EO Media Group. Sellers is the past president of the Associated Press Media Editors..

Santa Fe New Mexican hires longtime journalist Phill Casaus as new editor A longtime journalist and Albuquerque native has been hired as the new editor at The Santa Fe New Mexican. The newspaper announced that Phill Casaus will replace Ray Rivera, who departed for a job as deputy managing editor for investigations and enterprise with The Seattle Times. Casaus, a former editor at The Albuquerque Tribune and The Rocky Mountain News, currently works as the director of the Education Foundation for Albuquerque Public Schools, the state’s largest school district.

Daniels is new editor of Ohio newspapers Ted Daniels has been named editor of The Daily Record in Wooster, Ohio, and and Times-Gazette in Ashland, Ohio. “After nearly a quarter of a century working at The Indianapolis Star in a variety of senior editing roles, I returned home to Ashland County in 2002 to become the editor of the Times-Gazette, the newspaper I grew up reading,” he wrote.

Poynter names Tampa Bay editor Neil Brown as the institute’s president The Poynter Institute has announced that its new president will be Neil Brown, the editor and vice president of The Tampa Bay Times. “I am honored to join Poynter, where imagination and integrity have been hallmarks in helping journalists get better at what they do and stay relevant in how they do it,” Brown said. Brown, 59, started at The Tampa Bay Times — then St. Petersburg Times — as world editor in 1993. He was promoted to a series of leadership roles, including managing editor and executive editor. He became the paper’s editor in 2010.

AP names Asher to news editor position The Associated Press has named award-winning journalist James Asher as a news editor in its Washington bureau, where he will oversee coverage of the investigations into interference in the 2016 election and other key elements of President Donald Trump's administration. Asher is the former Washington bureau chief for McClatchy. His work on the worldwide Panama Papers investigation with a team at McClatchy was awarded the 2017 Pulitzer Prize in journalism for explanatory reporting.

Vicksburg Post names Rob Sigler new editor The Vicksburg (Mississippi) Post has a new editor, Rob Sigler. For the past two years, he has been managing editor of another Mississippi newspaper, The Oxford Eagle. Both papers are owned by Boone Newspapers Inc. Jan Griffey, who previously served as editor, has been named the newspaper's general manager.

Towner named Times West Virginian editor Tiffany Towner, former editor at The Daily News in Batavia, New York, has been appointed editor of the Times West Virginian in Fairmont, West Virginia. She was honored earlier this year by Editor & Publisher, an industry magazine, as one of 25 news executives in the country under the age of 35 to make her mark and to watch in the future.

New metro editor named for The Monitor in McAllen, Texas Michael Rodriguez, an editor with extensive knowledge of the Rio Grande Valley, has been named metro editor of The Monitor. Rodriguez, who has been editor of the Mid-Valley Town Crier for the past three years, will oversee a staff of 10 editors and reporters whose coverage primarily is focused on Hidalgo County and all of its municipalities. The Monitor and the Mid-Valley Town Crier are both AIM Media Texas publications.

Brian Tolley named executive editor at The State in Columbia, South Carolina Brian Tolley, executive editor of The Island Packet in Hilton Head Island and The Beaufort Gazette, has been named to the same position at The State in Columbia, South Carolina. Tolley, 54, is a former assistant managing editor at The State. “It's a wonderful chance for somewhat of a homecoming for me,” said Tolley, who worked at The State for seven years before leaving in 2005. Tolley succeeds Mark E. Lett, who retired last month.

Jeff Brown named new editor at The News in Shelbyville, Indiana Jeff Brown has been named editor the Shelbyville (Indiana) News. He had worked as the paper’s sports editor. Brown has worked for the paper since 1999. n

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

29


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 30

APME NEWS

PHOTO/E.W. SCRIPPS SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM

Doug Haddix of Investigative Reporters & Editors asks questions of Columbus, Ohio, NewsTrain attendees in his “Using Social Media as Powerful Reporting Tools” session in October.

NewsTrain spans the country for last three workshops of 2017

N

By Laura Sellers-Earl APME News

ewsTrain hit full speed this fall with three workshops – New England; Columbus, Ohio; and Seattle – in four weeks. Starting its 15th year in 2018, APME’s program provides regional training for journalists for $75 to $85. This big-bang-for-the-training-buck means workshops often sell out; the Seattle NewsTrain was full weeks early. With more than 7,300 journalists served, NewsTrain is on the right track with rising registrations, this year attracting 13 percent more. NewsTrain Program Assistant Laura Sellers said “It was an amazing, intense experience to witness great journalism training at these three top-notch sites.” Sellers was on-site while Program Director Linda Austin coordinated and also taught during the fall semester in the Global Business Journalism Program at Tsinghua University in Beijing. Austin returns for the Muncie, Indiana, NewsTrain at Ball State University on March 24. AUSTIN Registration is open for Muncie at bit.ly/MuncieNewsTrain. Other upcoming NewsTrain stops include Phoenix on April 6-7; Greenville, South Carolina; Denton, Texas; and Toronto. To learn when details are set for these workshops, please provide an email at bit.ly/NT2018-19. Sessions this year — including a March NewsTrain in Norman, Oklahoma — covered myriad topics, including data-driven enterprise, SELLERS social media in reporting and engagement, viral video, virtual reality and 360-video, mobile-first breaking news, and mobile storytelling and newsgathering.

NewsTrain: New England Hosted by Endicott College in Beverly, Massachusetts, the New England NewsTrain on Oct. 14 featured trainers Theodore Kim from

30

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

PHOTO/E.W. SCRIPPS SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM

Q. McElroy, director of engagement and optimization for Cox Media Group, discusses storytelling on mobile and how to make smart choices at the Columbus NewsTrain. The New York Times, Cindy E. Rodriguez from Emerson College in Boston, Daniel Victor from The New York Times and Todd Wallack of The Boston Globe Spotlight team. New England NewsTrain attendee Heather Beasley Doyle of the Lexington Minuteman said, “I liked that I could dive into a day focused on digital; for me, this helps to fill a gap in my skill and knowledge set.” An attendee all the way from New Orleans said she had wanted to >> Continued on next page


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 31

APME NEWS

>> Continued from previous page

experience NewsTrain for awhile, and she was very glad she came.

NewsTrain: Columbus, Ohio The Dublin Integrated Education Center at Ohio University was the site for the Columbus NewsTrain on Oct. 21. Columbus attendee Michaela Sumner of the Chillicothe Gazette said, “I liked the meaningful, useful skills learned that we can practically incorporate into our daily schedules.…It was very educational and a good way to network with fellow journalists.” Coaching for this workshop was done by Doug Caruso of The Columbus Dispatch, Doug Haddix of Investigative Reporters & Editors, Q. McElroy of Cox Media Group, Sue Morrow of The Sacramento Bee and Ohio University’s E.W. Scripps School of Journalism, and Jeremy Pelzer of Cleveland.com.

NewsTrain: Seattle Attendees saw a bit of the campus on Nov. 11 at the University of Washington with two venues offering both classroom training and two general sessions. Guiding the way were P. Kim Bui of NowThis News; Laura E. Davis of the Annenberg Media Center at the University of Southern California; Stephen K. Doig of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University; Mike Fancher, retired editor of The Seattle Times; and Angela Galloway, a lawyer and former journalist. About Seattle, Denver Pratt of The Bellingham Herald wrote, “I

liked that NewsTrain exposed me to other professionals working in my region, as well as new topics/platforms/ways to tell and report my stories. This conference was extremely useful!” Learn more at bit.ly/NewsTrain.

Help keep NewsTrain on track In 2018, NewsTrain begins its 15th year of serving journalists with affordable, high-quality training in the communities where they live. More than 7,300 journalists, journalism students and journalism educators have attended NewsTrain’s 88 workshops since our inception in 2003. Our upcoming stops include Muncie, Indiana, March 24; Phoenix, April 6-7; Greenville, South Carolina; Denton, Texas; and Toronto. Please provide an email at bit.ly/NT2018-19 to learn when details are set for these workshops. NewsTrain’s top-notch training and low tuition — $85 ($75 for early birds) — is made possible by donors, big and small. We thank our generous donors and would welcome additional financial support. The need for low-cost, cutting-edge journalism training has never been greater. To keep NewsTrain on the road, please donate at bit.ly/NewsTraindonate and claim your tax deduction. Every dollar helps! n — Linda Austin, NewsTrain project director, laustin.newstrain@gmail.com

NewsTrain in Muncie, Indiana, opens for registration

N

ewsTrain in Muncie, Indiana, opens for registration; learn digital skills for just $75. Join professionals, students and educators for a full day of digital-journalism training in social, video, mobile, data and beat mapping on Saturday, March 24, at Ball State University. The Associated Press Media Editors’ 89th NewsTrain offers early-bird registration of $75, including meals, until Feb. 24. Sessions include: • Mobile newsgathering: better reporting with your smartphone, • Using social media as powerful reporting tools, • Shooting short, shareable smartphone video, • Better time management with beat mapping, and • Producing data-driven enterprise stories off your beat. Experience NewsTrain’s highly rated training; attendees regularly judge sessions as 4.5, with 5 as highly useful and highly effective. “This is the best hands-on collection of practical sessions with knowledgeable ‘in-the-field’ instructors I’ve experienced,” said 2016 attendee Kelly Shiers. The accomplished trainers include: • Linda Austin, project director for NewsTrain, a training initiative of Associated Press Media Editors (APME). • Amy Bartner, downtown reporter for The Indianapolis Star and its former social media editor and engagement manager. • John Russell, investigative reporter at the Indianapolis Business Journal. • Val Hoeppner, director of the Center for Innovation in Media at Middle Tennessee State University. Attendee Heather Beasley Doyle said of the NewsTrain outside Boston in October: “All of the sessions were very direct and relevant.

Ball State University

I feel like I’m going to use a lot of what I learned to do a better job and enjoy it more.” Register today at bit.ly/MuncieNewsTrain. NewsTrains often sell out. Plus, the first 20 registrants receive a free AP Stylebook. Competitive diversity scholarships are available to journalists, journalism students and journalism educators from diverse backgrounds. Apply by Feb 12. Discounted hotel rooms on campus start at $68 a night, plus tax. APME organized Muncie NewsTrain in collaboration with a host committee of local journalists, who identified regional training needs. The nonprofit organization of newsroom leaders has sponsored NewsTrain since 2003, training more than 7,300 journalists in cities across the United States and Canada. Learn more and register at bit.ly/MuncieNewsTrain. Questions? Email Linda Austin, NewsTrain project director, at laustin.newstrain@gmail.com. n

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

31


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 32

APME NEWS

member

showcase

APME recognizes contributions to the AP photo report through the Showcase Photo of the Month Award. The competition is judged by AP and member photo editors. The monthly winners are displayed at the annual conference and a Showcase Photo of the Year Award is presented.

JUNE AP Photo/The Orange County Register

Sam Gangwear Bethany Webb, sister of Laura Webb Elody, one of eight people killed by Scott Dekraai at a Seal Beach, Calif., hair salon in 2011, gestures toward Dekraai as she gives a statement to the court during a hearing in Santa Ana, Calif., on June 15, 2017.

JULY AP Photo/Los Angeles Daily News

Sarah Reingewirtz An unidentified woman touches Aramazd Andressian Jr's coffin after his funeral at Holy Family Church in South Pasadena, Calif., on July 18, 2017. A funeral was held Tuesday for the 5-year-old Southern California boy whose father is charged with killing him after a trip to Disneyland.

32

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 33

APME NEWS

member showcase

AUGUST AP Photo/The Daily Progress

Ryan M. Kelly People fly into the air as a vehicle drives into a group of protesters demonstrating against a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., Aug. 12, 2017. The nationalists were holding the rally to protest plans by the city of Charlottesville to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. There were several hundred protesters marching in a long line when the car drove into a group of them.

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

AP Photo/The Orange County Register

AP Photo/The Press Democrat

Watchara Phomicinda

Kent Porter

Firefighters battle to save homes as the Canyon fire continues to burn in the 4200 block of San Ramon Drive in Corona, Calif., Sept . 25, 2017.

Gordon Easter and fiancee Gail Hale embrace as they return to their home on Hopper Lane in Coffey Park, Oct. 20, 2017, in Santa Rosa, Calif. Northern California residents who fled a wildfire in the dead of night returned to their neighborhoods or the first time in nearly two weeks.

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

33


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 34


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 35

APME NEWS

2018

Our communication vehicles

APME BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Officers President: Jim Simon, Managing Editor, Honolulu Civil Beat, @jsimon88 Vice President: Angie Muhs, Editor, State Journal-Register, Springfield, Illinois, @amuhs Secretary: Michael Days, Editor, Philadelphia Daily News, Philadelphia, @mikedays Leadership Initiatives Chair: Mark Baldwin, Executive Editor, Rockford (Ill.) Register Star, @MarkFBaldwin Treasurer: Alison Gerber, Editor, Chattanooga Times Free Press, Tennessee, @aligerb

Executive Committee (officers above plus) Past President: Bill Church, Senior Vice President | News, GateHouse Media, Austin, Texas, @BillChurchMedia APME Executive Director: Paula Froke, The Associated Press @PaulaFroke AP Ex-Officio: Sally Buzbee, Executive Editor and Senior Vice President, The Associated Press, New York, @SallyBuzbee AP Ex-Officio: Sarah Nordgren, Deputy Managing Editor, The Associated Press, New York, @sarahnordgren Program Co-Chair: Bill Church, Senior Vice President | News, GateHouse Media, Austin, Texas, @BillChurchMedia Program Co-Chair: Sandra Clark, Vice President for News and Civic Dialogue, WHYY, Philadelphia, @SandraSWClark Program Co-Chair: Traci Bauer, Executive Editor, Lohud.com and The Journal News, New York, @tbauer Marketing/Engagement Co-Chair: Summer Moore, Digital and Audience Engagement Editor, The Times of Northwest Indiana, @summerNWI Marketing/Engagement Co-Chair: Maria Caporizzo, Managing Editor-Digital, The Providence Journal, ?@projo?

Directors (Terms expiring in 2018) Ronnie Agnew, Executive Director, Mississippi Public Broadcasting, @ronagnew Michael Anastasi, Executive Editor, The Tennessean, @ma_anastasi Tom Arviso, Publisher, Navajo Times, Window Rock, Arizona

www.apme.com www.facebook.com/APMEnews www.twitter.com/APME www.facebook.com/NewsTrain https://twitter.com/NewsTrain and, APME Update: www.apme.com/?page=Newsletters

Traci Bauer, Executive Editor, Lohud.com and The Journal News, New York, @tbauer Anne Brennan, Project Manager/Editor, Cape Cod Times, Maine @AnneBrennanCCT Alison Gerber, Editor, Chattanooga Times Free Press, Tennessee Lane Michaelsen, Group News Director, Sinclair Broadcast Group, Hunt Valley, MD, @lanetv Carlos Sanchez, Executive Editor, The Monitor, McAllen, Texas, @CarlosASanchez (Terms Expiring in 2019) Dennis Anderson, Executive Editor, Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star, @dennisedit Kathy Best, Editor, The Missoulian, Missoula, Mont., @kbest Sandra Clark, Vice President for News and Civic Dialogue, WHYY, Philadelphia, @SandraSWClark Katrice Hardy, Executive Editor, The Greenville (S.C.) News and GreenvilleOnline.com, @kkatgurll1 Thomas Koetting, Deputy Managing Editor, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, @tkoetting Summer Moore, Digital and Audience Engagement Editor, The Times of Northwest Indiana, @summerNWI Autumn Phillips, Editor, The Quad City Times, Davenport, Iowa, @AutumnEdit (Terms expiring in 2020) Maria Caporizzo, Managing Editor-Digital, The Providence Journal Matt Christensen, Editor, Twins Falls (Idaho) Times-News, @TimesNewsEditor Kurt Franck, Executive Editor/Vice-President, The Blade, Toledo, Ohio, @KGFranck_Blade Juli Metzger, Journalism Instructor, Ball State University, Toledo, Ohio, @julimetzger George Rodrigue, Editor, The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, @gprodrigue3 Sally Stapleton, Managing Editor, The Pittsburgh Post Gazette, @sestapleton

APME News Editor Andrew Oppmann, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, @aoppmann

WINTER 2017

APME NEWS

35


APME.DEC.2017.qxp

12/22/2017

1:23 PM

Page 36

2018 APME-ASNE NEWS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

AUSTIN

see you in

September 11-12, 2018

Winter 2017 APME News  
Winter 2017 APME News  

Read all about The Dallas Morning News' move to new digs, and other points of interest from our industry, in this last issue of 2017.

Advertisement