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thedesıgner ASSOCIATION OF

PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS

Winter 2016

Adding Fire to the Garden

Light it Up! ■ WANDER.LUST: VISIT TO THE MIDWEST ■ SECLUDED SERENITY IN SPAIN


editor’sletter Hunkering Down

W

inter is here. My challenge is to use these short, dark days to reflect, to plan, to create something new, not to fritter away the time wishing I were on a sandy beach elsewhere, fretting about the return of the light.

That being said, a little sun never hurt anyone. Lucky for us, in this issue Nan Sterman takes us on an armchair tour to Spain. That’ll warm you up. So will Joshua Gillow’s Design 101 feature on fire pits and fireplaces.

End-of-year holidays loom large—one last bout of frantic activity before we can tune out and settle in. Nancy Wallace has tips for decking the halls with what’s in your backyard in this issue’s “Plant App(lication)s” and we’ve gathered a stellar gift list for the design-minded, in case you’re in panic mode.

Finally, I just made a bunch of blanket statements about this time of year, and really, I could stand a change of perspective. After all, “winter,” to me means 55-degree days and drizzle, conditions I now, having relocated to coastal North Carolina, detest. My previous Midwestern-dwelling self would have openly welcomed such a “heat wave.” In this issue’s “In the Field,” Daniel Lowery APLD, Elizabeth Pryzgoda-Montgomery APLD, and Daniel Peterson open our eyes to what winter’s like where they live. I might have to join Elizabeth in Arizona. On the way, I’m going to need to complete Tina Krug’s Wander.Lust. itinerary through the prairie landscape of Des Moines, Iowa, and surrounds. Here’s to finding new horizons in 2017!

KATIE ELZER-PETERS

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EDITOR@APLD.ORG


Little Quick Fire Hydrangea ®

It’s Quick Fire® hydrangea….only smaller! Like the original Quick Fire® Hydrangea paniculata, Little Quick Fire® is early to bloom, with its white flowers maturing to pink before other varieties even start to bloom. Since it’s smaller than most other H. paniculata it fits well into smaller landscapes, even containers. Little Quick Fire® hydrangea is a durable, adaptable little plant that is ideal for both residential and commercial landscapes. www.provenwinners-shrubs.com

Available from Proven Winners® ColorChoice® growers.

LITTLE QUICK FIRE® Hydrangea paniculata ‘SMHPLQF’, pp#25,136, cbraf FULL SUN / PART SHADE USDA ZONE 3, AHS 8 3-5’ TALL AND WIDE


W IN T ER 2016 11 PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 12 DESIGN ROUNDUP Listen, Read, Shop, Grow 26 WANDER.LUST. Des Moines, Iowa BY T I N A K R UG

38 PL ANT APP( L ICATION )S Holiday Greenery BY N A N CY WALLACE

46 IN THE FIELD Winter Pacific Northwest BY DA N I E L LOWE RY, AP LD

49 Southwest BY E L I Z A B E T H P RZ YGO DAM O N TG O M E RY, AP LD

52 Upper Midwest BY DA N I E L PETERS O N

56 DESIGN 101 Light it Up! BY J OSH UA GILLOW

64 TRAVEL INSPIRATION Secluded Serenity in Spain BY N A N ST E RM AN

O N T H E COV ER: 2 016 AP LD B R O N Z E W I N NING D ES IGN BY C H E R I ST R INGER, AP LD, P H OTO G R A P H BY DAVID WINGE R T H I S SP R E A D : P H OTO G R A P H BY TIM H EELAN

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contents

Tim Heelan of Stonepocket, Inc. design with fire feature won bronze in the 2016 APLD design awards. For more on fire features see page 56. apld.org

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thedesıgner EDITOR IN CHIEF Katie Elzer-Peters ART DIRECTOR

Marti Golon COPY EDITOR

Claire Splan EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Denise Calabrese, CAE ASSOCIATE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Lisa Ruggiers MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR

Angela Burkett COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR

Michelle Keyser EVENTS DIRECTOR

Lori Zelesko MEMBERSHIP, CERTIFICATION & CHAPTER ASSOCIATE

Kelly Clark COMMUNICATIONS ASSOCIATE

Courtney Kuntz FINANCE ADMINISTRATOR

Jennifer Swartz DATABASE MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATOR

Leona Wagner EVENT SPECIALIST

Jamie Hoffman OFFICE SPECIALIST

Joci Sykes

>>Click name to email us! For information on advertising in The Designer, contact communications@apld.org >>Click here for our submission guidelines

Andrew Wilson and Gavin McWilliams' Sacred Grove Singapore project was a 2016 APLD Gold award winner. PHOTOGR A PH BY W I LSON MCWI LLI A M STU DI O


contributors Josh Gillow

TIna Krug

Daniel Lowery

Design 101: Light it Up!

Wander.Lust. Des Moines, Iowa

p. 56

p. 26

APLD In the Field: Winter Pacific Northwest

p. 46

Joshua Gillow is the founder of MasterPLAN Landscape Design in Eastern Pennsylvania. Joshua first realized his love of nature when he started working at his parents’ garden center at age 5. Backed by his degree in architectural design and engineering, Joshua’s love of plants, the outdoors, and helping people inspires his passion for design and intricate construction. “Nothing brings me more pleasure than working with my clients to discover the true potential of their properties.”

Tina Krug owns Red Fern Landscape Design, a residential design-only firm based in the greater Des Moines, Iowa, area. No stranger to learning about new places, she’s been digging and drawing across the eastern half of the U.S. for more than 15 years. A plant geek at heart, she holds a master’s degree in horticulture from North Carolina State University and will talk to anybody about design and plants. Her favorite thing about Iowa? The sunrises.

A Detroit native with 35-year-old roots in Seattle, Daniel has practiced landscape design nearly 40 years. He visited the Pacific Northwest after unloading untold numbers of semis filled with conifers from the region of Cascadia at Wiegand’s Nursery, where he created landscape designs among other retail nursery tasks. He was certified by APLD in 2001 and still enjoys plant procurement/ placement/ installation and construction supervision as well as landscape design with his company, Queen Anne Gardens.

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contributors Daniel Peterson In the Field: Winter. Upper Midwest p.52

Daniel Peterson is a landscape designer focusing on adapting landscapes to meet the habitat requirements for native life, domestic life, and human interactions. All of Daniel’s designs and projects incorporate permaculture design principles to work with nature rather than against nature. He has a passion for traditional construction techniques including dry stone walling and Japanese garden design. Daniel’s company, HabAdapt Landscape Design, was formed in 2005.

Nancy Wallace Elizabeth Przygoda- Nan Sterman Montgomery APLD Travel inspiration: Plant Apps: In the Field: Winter. Southwest

p. 49

p. 64

Elizabeth is an award-winning landscape designer and the founder and principal designer at Boxhill in Tucson, Arizona. She is a creative stylist, an educator, a public speaker, and a product designer whose line of fire pits has received national acclaim. Educated in Fine Arts from the University of Arizona, Elizabeth also draws on her travels to the Caribbean, Turkey, Thailand, France, and South America to inspire her signature designs.

Nan Sterman is a garden designer, garden communicator, author, writer, speaker, and host of the public TV show A Growing Passion which is online at www. agrowingpassion. com. She also leads international garden tours, too. Learn more about Nan at www. PlantSoup.com.

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Secluded Serenity Rain Gardens p.38 in Spain

Nancy Wallace is the proprietor of Wallace Gardens, a garden design and installation business located in north Atlanta, specializing in container gardens, garden design, landscape renovation implementation, and personal plant services.


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designs


president’smessage Finish Strong

M

y beloved Seattle Seahawks won their 11th straight Monday Night Football game the night before I wrote this letter, securing a new NFL record right in the last 40 seconds of the game. Coach Pete Carroll always talks about how “it’s not how you start, it’s how you finish” that results in a positive outcome, and, I can tell you, they finish strong most weekends. One thing is certain: they don’t give up, they don’t walk away, and they don’t hang up the towel. They finish strong.

Gardens are kind of like that too. While landscapes are never “finished,” the seasons lead us down a path that crescendos in the fall. Color explodes, flowers fade, leaves fall, and the garden is spent, giving up everything right down to the wire, to the first frost, to that very first dusting of winter’s snow.

Where I live in the Pacific Northwest, we have sort of a soft close to the landscape season, as projects are installed year-round, despite the weather, and we don’t ever quit designing and installing gardens. As long as the soil is not too waterlogged with storm water and the frosts are short-lived, our work continues. Colleagues around the country speak of the fall rush to finish strong, completing projects before the ground is frozen solid and unworkable. Regardless of where you live, the early winter feels a bit like an imaginary finish line. As a designer, you might ask yourself the question, “Did the garden finish strong this year?”

In the profession of landscape design, gardens are never truly “finished.” They are living, breathing, growing, dying entities that evolve and transform constantly. It is a profession of peaks and valleys, through the seasons, through the years, and over generations. One must have the courage to ask questions, evaluate one’s accomplishments, and vow to change pieces that are not working. Having the courage to ask questions, evaluate outcomes, and make changes is one of the strongest arguments I can make for hiring and working with a professional landscape designer. Find your designer here with APLD—and finish strong.

LISA PORT APLD

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designroundup SHOP:

APLD's It List

BY KATIE ELZER-PETERS

What are designers lusting after this holiday season? The theme seems to be “Go big or go home!” What’s a gift, if not something you wouldn’t get for yourself. Here’s our “it list.” Now you’re covered, inside and out.

BLACK SWAN GARDEN HOSE FROM GARDEN GLORY There’s plenty of eye- and gardencandy at Garden Glory, created and curated from Sweden by Linda Brattlöf. The Black Swan Garden Hose, which looks more like a handbag than a garden tool, was their first development. They also have mail boxes, watering cans, and wall mounts that escape the ordinary and caught the attention of APLD members of Alterra Landscape Architects in San Francisco. Buy out the whole catalog for the glam gardener in your life. >>Click here to buy

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CASE STUDY PLANTER FROM BOXHILL DESIGN This super chic and sturdy planter is perfect for displaying smaller specimens indoors or out. A high-fire stoneware ceramic vessel sits in a stand made from waterproof Brazilian walnut. Available in multiple colors. >>Click here to buy

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designroundup SHOP:

APLD's It List

>>Click here for pencil sets

PENCILS & ACCESSORIES FROM CW ENTERPRISE For those times when you still want to draw by hand, a perfect pencil set, sharpener, and eraser are indispensible. CW Pencils has a huge array, and everything is top quality. It all comes neatly wrapped in their signature yellow paper, tied with a string and accompanied by a handwritten note. In pencil, of course.

>>Click here for sharpener 14

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>>Click here for eraser


TRAVEL WITH APLD “The more I see in the world, the more I’m inspired, recharged, relaxed, and ready to dive into something new and inspirational for my clients,” said member Robin Haglund. APLD has several members who lead garden and design-focused trips, including Carolyn Mullet, through Carex Tours and Nan Sterman, author of this issue’s “Travel Inspiration” article. >>Click on bold name for website

From Carex Tours' Paris and Normandy gardens trip summer 2016 apld.org

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designroundup APLD's It List SHOP:

GIN & JUICE The Botanist Gin is made from 22 foraged botanicals from the Scottish Isle of Islay. The website is a wealth of information on foraged cocktails and the bottle is, itself, a keepsake. Use it for pouring sparkling water at your next dinner party. It’s a conversation starter.

>>Click here to learn more

Floral elixirs are cocktail and soda mixers made from pure, distilled botanical ingredients. They’ll add color and sparkle to your holiday libations. >>Click here to buy 16

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TABLEWARE FROM TERRAIN APLD member Hayden Regina wrote, “THIS! It has literally been on my mind all week,” in response to our gift list call. Pretty and practical, when it isn’t in use, the Oak Leaf serving spoon has sculptural appeal for the dining room. Coordinating pieces include a Walnut Shell Spoon Set, a Leafy Branch Salad Server Set, and other pieces. >>Click here to buy

NUT BUTTER FROM BIG SPOON ROASTERS Afternoon snack: activated. If you’re working from home and trying to avoid the munchies, or you want to give a truly luxurious, yet affordable gift to your fellow freelance designer, shop the Big Spoon Roasters website. Located in Durham, North Carolina, the company has harnessed peanut power from their surrounding agricultural fields and created a treat unmatched for health plus deliciousness. (Almonds, cashews, cocoa, sorghum, and other artisan ingredients also make an appearance in their offerings.) You can eat this nut butter with one of your fancy Terrain spoons. >>Click here to buy

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designroundup SHOP:

APLD's It List PLANT POTION FROM HORTICULTURE The designers at Arterra also swear by Horticulture Plant Potion, made by hand in small batches by Juree Sondker (familiar to many as an editor for Timber Press). It’s an all-natural alternative to anti-aging products such as Retinol. >>Click here to buy

LASER DISTANCE METER FROM LEICA All play and no work makes a landscape designer, well, broke. If your business is booming and this handy tool would make for more clients and billable hours, put a bug in your best gift-giver’s ear. Kelly Kilpatrick hopes to find this Leica Laser Distance Meter in her stocking this year. (HINT!)

>>Click here to buy 18

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LEARN MORE AT VECTORWORKS.NET/LANDMARK.

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designroundup READ:

Books

PHOTO: FR OM THE B OOK THE B OLD DRY GA RDEN

Winter is the perfect time to curl up with a good book. It’s a cliché, but it’s a true cliché. Consider this short list a supplement to the gift guide, because each of these books is guaranteed to be a hit if given to a dear friend or designer.

>>Click here to buy book 20

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Plant nerds will appreciate the new book by Noel Kingsbury, full of lush drawings and photos illustrating the historical path that 133 common garden plants took from their native habitats to cultivation in landscapes. Far from an encyclopedia, Garden Flora is a bedtime, coffee table, and reference book rolled into one.

B OOK S PHOT O : IST OCK

GARDEN FLORA THE NATURAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY OF THE PLANTS IN YOUR GARDEN Noel Kingsbury TIMBER PRESS, 2016


THE BOLD DRY GARDEN Johanna Silver TIMBER PRESS, 2016 Susan Morrison, former Editor in Chief of The Designer, says, “In The Bold Dry Garden, Lessons from the Ruth Bancroft Garden, author Johanna Silver showcases one of the most beloved public gardens in the western United States. Beginning with garden creator Ruth Bancroft’s inspiring story—she began collecting succulents in her sixties and now at age 107 still spends time in the garden—the book goes on to detail the garden’s transition from private to public under the aegis of the Garden Conservancy. >>Click here to buy book It concludes with in-depth plant profiles of the incredible variety of succulents, cacti, and other dry-adapted plants that flourish in the garden. Lushly photographed by Marion Brenner, The Bold Dry Garden is sumptuous enough to be a coffee table book, while also packing in thoughtful design in➸ spiration certain to appeal to succulent fans.” apld.org

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designroundup Books

PHOTO: I STOCK

READ:

>>Click here to buy book

OUTSTANDING AMERICAN GARDENS The Garden Conservancy and Page Dickey ABRAHMS, 2015 APLD member Hilarie Holdsworth of Walker Creek Design in Gloucester, Massachusetts, says, “I reckon one of the best things on a gift-giving list this season would be the book Outstanding American Gardens, a joint project including the Garden Conservancy and Page Dickey.” The book showcases 50 gardens that have welcomed the public during Open Days, including 8 gardens the Conservancy has helped preserve. Designers in all habitats and regions will find inspiring images to inform their work throughout the seasons.

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LISTEN:

Playlist

What’s on repeat while APLD designers work? Quite a diverse list of tunes, including British rock, Vivaldi, new-age instrumental, and pop standards. You’re sure to find some new jams. Thanks to the APLD members for sending in their recommendations.

Arterra Landscape Architects in San Francisco was so inspired by the call for tunes that they created a virtual rain dance for anyone needing extra support to encourage this meteorological phenomenon. Listen to the rain playlist. If designers are one thing, it’s resourceful!

>>Click herefor winter playlist >>Click herefor rain playlist

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SOUTHER N LI VI N G PLA N T COL L ECTION

designroundup

‘Sunshine’ Ligustrum GROW:

BY KATIE ELZER-PETERS

Here’s one that should be on your list for lightening up the garden during the winter: ‘Sunshine’ Ligustrum (Ligustrum sinense ‘Sunshine’), selected by North Carolina–based breeder Pat McCracken and licensed by Plant Development Services, Inc. through the Southern Living Plant Collection and the Sunset Western Garden Collection.

Yep, this is a privet, but it’s non-flowering and sterile (observed during a decade of evaluation), so there’s no chance it will escape and take over the world. As far as privets go, it’s also relatively compact, topping out, after years of growth, at 3–6’ tall by 3–4’ wide. PDSI encourages using it in containers.

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DA L L A S A RB ORET U M

I did not understand the horticultural obsession with chartreuse-leafed plants until I spent a dreary summer day wandering around a plant nursery near Seattle. The bright spot in every picture I took that day was a plant with yellow leaves or flowers. And who KNEW there were so many from which to choose?


FAST FACTS SUN: Full sun to part shade HARDINESS ZONES: 6–10 (hardy to –10°F) WATER: Medium COLOR: Chartreuse evergreen foliage FLOWERS: None

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wander.lust.

Iowa

Explore Des Moines and the Surrounding Areas BY TINA KRUG

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C

ornfields and livestock are most likely what come to mind when you hear somebody talk about Iowa. It’s certainly what I thought of when I first got to know my farm boy husband! Twelve years later, I find myself living on an acreage about 20 minutes outside of Des Moines, Iowa, surrounded by chickens, sheep, and tractors—just down the road from a great city and some amazing gardens. As a landscape designer recently relocating my business to this area, I made it a priority to track down local landscapes to visit, photograph, and learn from. As a native North Carolinian coming to Iowa from New Hampshire, I also needed a crash-course in the right plants and design styles to fit projects in my new surroundings. My list of gardens to visit grew quickly and I love returning to these beautiful, inspiring sites. When you visit, you will, too! I love to eat, and Des Moines doesn’t disappoint, so I’ve also included dining suggestions. ➸

PHOTO CR EDIT : IST OCK

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PHOTO CR EDI T: KEL L Y N ORRIS/G DM

Downtown Des Moines The entire Des Moines metro area has over 550 miles of bike trails, making it incredibly easy to get around without a car. Start off your tour by renting a bike at the B-cycle station at 13th and Grand Ave. Head west just a bit to the Better Homes and Gardens Test Garden, where the garden editors of my favorite magazine showcase their design efforts. Staff are constantly changing out the 22 distinct garden areas to test plants, display a variety of design styles and features, and set up photos that you’ll see in future publications. You’ll feel like you’re standing in someone’s expansive backyard; there are loads of ideas tucked into this little urban oasis. Pay attention to the gingko allée as you enter the garden from Locust Street, and make a note to return in the fall! >>Click bold black names for link to website

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wander.lust.

M B OTANI C AL G A R D E N ’ S F B P A GE

The next block over, take your time going through the Pappajohn Sculpture Park, a four-acre, open park spanning a large city block right in the middle of downtown. Twenty-eight different large sculptures will inspire your artistic creativity and get you thinking about garden art.

FAR LEFT: Annuals and grasses display along the entrance to the Better Homes and Gardens Test Gardens. ABOVE: The Vegetable and Herb Garden at the BHG Test Gardens, with the Principal Building in the background.

EATS: If it’s a Saturday, eat your way though the Des Moines Farmers’ Market along Court Avenue. If not, consider Fong’s Pizza, a unique Asian-influenced pizza and tiki bar. Try the General Tso’s Chicken pizza or the Fongolian Beef.

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Cross the Des Moines River and ride along the riverwalk toward the beautiful Chinese pavilion that crowns the Robert D. Ray Asian Gardens. Packed into this tiny riverfront space you’ll find many elements of classic Asian garden design—maybe not what you’d expect in this corn-fed Midwestern town.

Continue up the riverwalk to the Des Moines Botanical Garden, a treasure inside and out. The conservatory is a welcome respite during the long winter, but even in the growing season you’ll find a global perspective from tropical and desert plants. Outdoors, features like the rose garden, hillside garden, and water garden offer great ideas for designers in the Midwest and beyond. EATS: Consider stopping in at Zombie Burger if you haven’t hit any of the other food suggestions thus far. The long wait will be worth it for a wild selection of burgers fit for monsters. 30

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wander.lust.

PHOTO CREDIT : IST OCK

Roll up the hill toward the golden dome of the FAR LEFT: The Rutledge Conifer Garden’s crunchy Iowa Capitol Building. The building itself path at the Greater Des is lovely and tours are free from 9:00–4:00, Moines Botanical Garden. Monday through Saturday. Outside, you can ABOVE: The beautiful Iowa take in the view and appreciate the grand way Capitol Building which that local landscape architecture firm Confludates from 1884. ence redesigned the Capitol’s west terrace. The pedestrian-oriented public space manages 33 feet of grade change over about 10 acres using multiple terraces. Intentionally designed transitions influence visitors’ experiences as they move through the mall. The grand connection between the Capitol and downtown houses many seating areas, grand legacy trees, native plantings, and contemplative spaces.

>>Click bold black names for link to website

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“

Climb inside one of the egg-shaped hollows of the intriging sculpture called the Three Cairns.

�

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wander.lust. Back in the car, head west on Grand Avenue. One more sculpture awaits, along with a colorful oasis. Pull in to the Des Moines Art Center, located in Greenwood Park at 4700 Grand Avenue. If you have allowed time, head into the Art Center for some inspiration (free admission!) or walk around the building to the south side. Here, surrounded by mature oak trees, stands Andy Goldsworthy’s massive and intriguing sculpture “Three Cairns.” The installation in Des Moines is part of a trio of stone markers across the United States, with identical structures in New York City and La Jolla, California. Goldsworthy was fascinated by the Midwest’s connection to the country and its two coasts, and his dry-stacked, eggshaped cairn surrounded by three massive walls carved from Iowa limestone is breathtaking. After climbing inside one of the egg-shaped hollows (everyone wants to!), continue into the Clare and Miles Mills Rose Garden. This historic garden has been a favorite spot since the 1930s, and it boasts more than 200 rose varieties in its role as an All-American Rose Selection Public Display Gardens. With color from May into November, the traditional layout and wooded surroundings will inform your next elegant project. EATS: Stop for a sweet treat at Crème Cupcakes + Dessert before heading out of town. ➸

>>Click bold black names for link to website apld.org

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Day Trips (or Just out of Town)

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Passing quintessential Iowa cornfields, our next stop is the Brenton Arboretum, just outside of Dallas Center, Iowa. This 140-acre arboretum will celebrate its twentieth year in 2017, and already showcases more than 460 different species, hybrids, and cultivars of trees and shrubs, grouped for comparison. With two small ponds, broad expanses of native prairies, and rolling hills as the backdrop for their extensive tree and shrub collections, the sweeping terrain epitomizes Iowa for me. I’m often inspired to incorporate a strong sense of place in my designs after spending some time out there. A few highlights: apld.org


wander.lust. The St. Francis sculpture on the Conifer, Crabapple and Maple Trail at the Brenton Arboretum.

■ The crabapple collection, located on a gently sloping hillside and blazing pink and white in the spring, has over 90 trees on display. With a wide range of sizes, habits, and colors, the tree collection is a great laboratory for me to select the right plant for a client.

■ The nationally recognized and ever-expanding Kentucky coffee tree collection houses wildcollected and propagated plants with a mission to promote this underused native Midwestern tree.

■ The O’Brien Nature Play Area is a must-see if you work with families or municipalities designing play areas. Children create, imagine, climb, and move as they play with natural structures on the site, like tree branches, hay bales, and tree stumps. EATS: Tuck into the Cheeseburger with a “Skirt” from The Longest Yard, a typical small-town sports grill right on the main square in tiny Dallas Center.

Continue through rural Iowa with a stop just north of Madrid, Iowa, a little town between Ames and Des Moines. The Iowa Arboretum is a great place to stretch your legs and enjoy woodland and prairie trails. Check out their collection of hostas bred or named by Iowans and come in May and June to see the peony labyrinth. With a long history (for Iowa) dating back 150 years, the Arboretum serves as an outdoor laboratory to showcase plants best adapted to the soils and climate found in Iowa, and to learn the hardiness and adaptability of newly introduced plants. Waking from the nap you might need following that cheeseburger, head north to Ames, Iowa, home of Iowa State University and Reiman Gardens. The 17-acre teaching and display gardens feature a wide range of styles. The Town and ➸

>>Click bold black names for link to website apld.org

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wander.lust.

Country Garden provides ideas for use in home and ABOVE: Bald cypress allée at Reiman Gardens. business landscapes, from an outdoor living room to a RIGHT: Enjoy the shade home production garden. An enchanting bald cypress under the pergola near allée leads to a formal rose and herb garden, complete the Rose and Herb with fountains and boxwoods. Be sure to explore all Gardens at Reiman the way to the giant sycamores in the wooded area Gardens. near the Hillside Garden, and don’t miss the world’s largest concrete gnome! Before leaving Ames, explore a little of ISU’s gorgeous central campus, which was designed by the Olmstead brothers in 1906. EATS: Bar La Tosca downtown has Italian small plates and excellent cocktails.

West of Des Moines about 45 minutes, you’ll find the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge, a gem of a destination near Prairie City. Spanning 5,600 acres, the refuge’s impressive mission is to restore three distinct ecosystems that were present in Iowa before settlement: tallgrass prairie, oak savanna, and sedge meadow. To that end, there are huge swaths of prairie to walk through; a 700-acre buffalo and elk enclosure; and miles of trails for birding, biking, and hiking. The visitor center will school you on how farming and development have affected Iowa’s native ecosystems. As with some of our other destinations, any designer will leave with a plant palette that speaks to a Midwestern landscape.

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plantapps Holiday Greenery BY NANCY WALLACE

W

hat a better way to tackle winter than with green? Take a survey of what’s growing in your yard this season. You may be surprised by the number of plants that can be incorporated into seasonal and holiday decorating activities.

Get the whole family involved collecting bare branches and lush evergreen stems from the landscape, for the satisfaction of using locally grown “ingredients.” If you’re bringing gifts to friends and neighbors, wrap them in plain brown paper and attach a few cones or acorn sprays and some freshly clipped evergreens bound with a natural twine bow. To expand your home decorating palette, consider a visit to the local garden center. Some plants can be placed in decorative containers and used through the holidays (lenten roses, ‘Shooting Star’ hydrangeas, dwarf boxwoods), then planted into the landscape or used in spring container gardens after all danger of frost has passed.

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On the following pages are some of my favorite backyard plants that I use during the holidays. ➸ apld.org

Everything you need to make a beautiful planter might be in your backyard or nearby landscape. Grab the kids and some gloves and snippers and get to work making a holiday beauty. PHOTOGR A PHY B Y N A N CY WA LLA CE


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plantapps Holly Fern Botanical Name: Cyrtomium falcatum Hardiness Zones: 6–10 Light: Part to full shade Water: Supplemental water during drought Uses: Hardy evergreen fern. Cut stems to the base and tuck them into mixed greenery wreaths. Bundle several together at the base and add to holiday container gardens.

Winterberry Holly Botanical Name: Ilex serrata x vertcillata ‘Sparkleberry’ Hardiness Zones: 5–9 Light: Part sun to part shade Water: Regular water, not drought tolerant, useful in rain gardens Uses: Branches are loaded with berries in winter. Use long stems for winter container garden arrangements and mantle decorations. Place in a vase with other evergreens to create tabletop arrangements during the holidays.

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Coral Bark Maple Botanical Name: Acer palmatum ‘Beni kawa’ Hardiness Zones: 5–9 Light: Sun to part shade Water: Medium Uses: Clip the branches of this remarkable winter-interest tree to tuck into container gardens and Christmas planters.

Alaskan Weeping Cedar or Nootka Cypress Botanical Name: Xanthocyparis nootkatensis ‘Pendula’ (formerly Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) Hardiness Zones: 4–7 Light: Full sun, enjoys afternoon shade in hot climates Water: Medium Uses: Use 3–4’ lengths and bundle together to create a mantle garland or tabletop swag. Not only is the greenery very fragrant, but it is long-lasting through the holidays. Branches can also be used in Christmas planters because of its elegant draping habit.

P H O T O G R A P H Y BY NANCY W ALLACE

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plantapps Rose Hips Botanical Name: Rosa spp. (Many produce beautiful rose hips: climbers, rugosas, and common landscape shrub roses.) Hardiness Zones: 5–10 (depending on the variety) Light: Full sun Water: Medium Uses: Don’t dead-head the roses after mid-August if you want to harvest those pretty, plump rose hips. Cut 2–3’ stem lengths and carefully remove the thorns. Use the branches as accent points in winter container gardens and Christmas planters.

Southern Magnolia Botanical Name: Magnolia grandiflora ‘Bracken’s Brown Beauty’ Hardiness Zones: 5–9 (Bracken’s Brown Beauty is particularly cold hardy) Light: Full sun to part shade Water: Medium Uses: Branches are longlasting when used in winter container gardens, wreaths, and Christmas planters. They can be bound together with other evergreens for mantle garlands and tabletop swags.

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Variegated Algerian Ivy Botanical Name: Hedera algeriensis ‘Gloire de Marengo’ Hardiness Zones: 7–10 Light: Part sun to shade Water: Medium, drought tolerant once established Uses: Whether you grow this in a hanging basket or as a ground cover, the trailing, variegated foliage is a perfect complement to other greenery from the garden. Use it in garlands and mantle decorations combined with Alaskan Weeping Cedar, or place long strands in a vase with other evergreens for a tabletop display during the holidays.

American Boxwood Botanical Name: Buxus sempervirens Hardiness Zones: 5–8 Light: Sun to part shade Water: Medium Uses: Boxwood branches combine beautifully with all things “holiday.” They have stiff stems that can be cut to any length depending on the purpose. The branches are long-lasting, so they are suitable to use in garlands, mantle decorations, and wreaths, or added to Christmas planters with other evergreens and cones.

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plantapps Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick Botanical Name: Corylus avellana ‘Contorta’ Hardiness Zones: 4–8 Light: Full sun to part shade Water: Drought tolerant once established Uses: Clearly a “winter interest” plant, the contorted branches can be cut in varying lengths and used as vertical accents in winter

Lenten Rose Botanical Name: Helleborus niger ‘HGC Snow Frills’ Hardiness Zones: 4–8 Light: Shade Water: Drought tolerant once established Uses: Many lenten roses bloom in December, so they are perfect for use in Christmas planters with other dwarf evergreens. The flowers can be clipped at the base and floated in a clear bowl of water for a tabletop display amid a garland of fresh evergreens. Local garden centers carry plants that are already in bloom, terrific for tabletop displays in decorative pots over the holidays. They make a lovely gift for friends and neighbors of any denomination. 44

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Plum Yew Botanical Name: Cephalotaxus harringtonia ‘Duke Gardens’ Hardiness Zone: 6–9 Light: Shade Water: Drought tolerant once established Uses: Yews can be cut on 2–4’ stems and incorporated into winter container gardens as accent points. Because they are long-lasting, they can also be bound together in bunches for garlands and wreaths. Their dark green needles are an exceptional contrast to other holiday evergreens.

Heavenly Bamboo Botanical Name: Nandina domestica Hardiness Zones: 6–9 Light: Sun to part shade Water: Medium to low Uses: Berries appear on shrubs in late fall, and by December they are bright red. As the weather becomes colder, the evergreen foliage turns to deep shades of red and burgundy as an additional bonus. Branches can be uses in tabletop arrangements with other evergreens, or bound into bunches and tucked into garlands and wreaths.

P H O T O G R A P H Y BY NANCY W ALLACE

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The architecture of bare trees stands out during the winter. 46

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inthefield

Winter

IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

C

BY DANIEL LOWERY, APLD

lients react to the lengthening of daylight hours with enthusiasm (“This must be your busy season!”) and to the shortening of days with lethargy (“Is this your slow season?”). To support regularly occurring income similar to that produced in corporate cubicles, networking and education by landscape designers have to be consistent.

I field questions about seasons every week while educating my clients all year long. Because we normally have only a few days of freezing weather each winter, I encourage my clients to remember that winter is one of the best times of the year to plant trees and large shrubs. Clients are surprised when they hear this. ➸

➸ A L L P H O TO GRAP H S BY D ANIE L LOWER Y

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Quercus ‘Crimson Spire’ is a favorite tree. It has a narrow habit, wonderful fall color, and holds its leaves all winter.

Cool weather and natural rainfall provide the opportunity for the least amount of transplant shock and allow them to develop fine root hairs and settle in before spring. The nurseries from British Columbia down through Oregon grow every type of tree that I may desire for my clients’ gardens. After the leaves drop, the nurseries start to dig trees that I’ve selected earlier in the year. Nurseries closer to town that are brokers stock up on inventory, so selection is marvelous. Seattle is famous for rain and a large portion of our annual rainfall happens in winter. I’m careful not to tread on wet soils to prevent compaction. Some of my peers even go as far as wearing snowshoes to avoid compressing soils, particularly while they’re constructing rain gardens.

Winter provides an opportunity to slow down and sync with the rhythm of nature, a natural shifting of focus to pruning and maintenance rather than new construction. I watch the weather forecast, barometers, thermometers and try to work inside during wet weather and outside during breaks between storms. That strategy works 50 percent of the time.

Winter is also the best time to go away on vacation. Travel after Thanksgiving Day and before St. Patrick’s Day—a week or two in a warm and sunny climate—can help dry out a dampened spirit, infuse a tired body and stop the webbing from forming between our fingers and toes.

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inthefield

Winter IN THE SOUTHWEST

BY ELIZABETH PRZYGODAMONTGOMERY, APLD

I

happily represent the Southwest region for design! Many designers who have grown up in a fourseason region incorrectly assume that this time of year would be very limiting for them here.  No es cierto! The culture and style of the desert southwest is both heart-warming and traditional.  Strongly rooted in authentic materials and rich plant designs, this comforting style lends itself well to celebrating the holiday season.  Our iconic images of the holidays are much like those found in the rest of the country, but with a multicultural twist.  We wait for Santa with plates of Mexican wedding cookies and churros, along with steaming mugs of cinnamondusted hot chocolate.  Holidays are spent with a house full of family, and a generous supply of green corn tamales, handmade in a process that takes ➸ apld.org

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inthefield

an entire day. Holiday house lights are very popular here, and you’ll often see them paired with luminarias— small, brown paper bags weighted with sand and lit with a tealight for a heavenly glow.

Our design is geared toward enabling meaningful gatherings.  With our long, Indian summers and pleasant temperatures that extend well into November, there is a broad appeal for al fresco–style living.  Gathering around a fire pit is a favorite pastime at home, as well as at local restaurants and entertaining venues.  Outdoor weddings, quinceañeras, and holiday parties demand features such as outdoor kitchens, sound systems, and dining tables that encourage everyone to dine under the stars. 50

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Cinnamon-dusted The holiday season has hot chocolate pairs us sprucing up our entryways with hanging bunch- nicely with Mexican wedding cookies es of bright red chile and churros ristras, and garlands fashioned from olive branches and nopales.  While there is plenty of red, green, and white to use in our color palette, we will also kick our décor up a notch with vibrant fiesta colors—just to keep it merry and bright!  Hanging string lights and landscape lighting help us keep the party going well into the late evening hours.  We raise a glass of sangria as we toast to friends near and far, and we await the arrival of La Noche Buena.

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“

Planning for an accumulation and melt of a six-inch snowfall is important in the Minnesota landscape.

�

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inthefield

Winter

IN THE UPPER MIDWEST BY DANIEL PETERSON

A

s a formally educated agroecologist and horticulturalist with training in permaculture design, I take a “full systems” approach in my Minnesota landscape rather than designing for each individual season. That said, winter offers special treats—along with challenges— design-wise. One treat is witnessing the seasonal transformation of a landscape—particularly when you can appreciate the strength and sinew of solid woody plants. Suddenly, evergreens that offered a living privacy screen in the summer are a welcome windbreak in the winter.

Winter snow has a unique way of taming the wild growth of summer into the sleepy fold of its blanket. Echinacea seed heads are metronomes in the landscape until they’re consumed by the wintering songbirds. Little bluestem, along with groundcover plants, captures the snow, creating undulating graceful mounds of cover. Snow also showcases evidence of life continuing—marked by footprints of small mammals or churned up from their herbaceous grazing.

Frozen soil under the snow does not allow for percolation. Planning for a two-inch rainfall is one design consideration; planning for the accumulation and melt of a six-inch snowfall is different. One must consider place- ➸ apld.org

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inthefield Pruning ahead of winter snow and ice gives plants the best chance to make it through the season unscathed.

ment and ease of placement of snow when facilitating human and companion animal movement around structures and frequently traveled paths.

Ice can be beautiful. It can also create safety issues for humans and plants. Strategies to mitigate ice are important as salt use or road spray can be damaging. Further, ice can be heavy and result in “unintended pruning.� Prepare for this by appropriately pruning plants before winter to support their natural resiliency, to highlight the unique textures of the plants, and to enhance their winter beauty. Winter is a season during which we scurry from one destination to another, sometimes without appreciation for its offerings. A well-designed and appropriately maintained landscape can draw us back to the gifts of nature.

â?§

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Low maintenance AZEK. Looks like wood, lasts a lifetime.

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design101

ADDING FIRE TO THE GARDEN

Light it Up! BY JOSHUA GILLOW

Set-in-place fire pits can be relocated to make more room in your outdoor living space, if needed. PHOTOGR A PHY B Y J TA YLOR DESI GN

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Masonry fireplaces make the perfect focal point, conversation piece, and gathering spot in outdoor living spaces.

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hen the temperature and the leaves start to fall, you and your clients don’t have to wave the white flag and surrender any hope of outdoor enjoyment. Light it up! Outdoor fire pits and fireplaces summon people outdoors, keeping everyone warm while encouraging a myriad of activities from laughter and story-telling to cuddles and relaxation. So how do you start to build a fire feature that is alluring, safe, and functional? Begin by discussing the following factors with your homeowner client. PHOTOGR A PHY B Y J TA YLOR DESIG N

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design101 Budget

Gas fireplaces provide warmth and ambience without the hassle of constant cleanup.

One of the main hurdles facing homeowners is budget and they are often blown away when they find out that the backyard they have always dreamed of comes with a hefty price tag. However, when it comes to fire features, there are options. Both fire pits and fireplaces can work within different budget levels, depending on size, materials, and fuel sources. There’s a scale of good–better–best, when it comes to fire pits and fireplaces. Portable units are good; modular units, better; and full-on masonry features are best (or longest-lasting). Homeowners need to be honest with their designer when it comes to budget, so try to get an accurate picture when meeting with clients.

Fuel Source

Homeowners need to carefully consider the fuel source for the fire feature. Some people opt for wood-burning features—really, the smell of the firewood burning and the crackling of the logs just can’t be beat. However, gathering the wood, starting the fire, and keeping it fed throughout an evening’s entertainment requires planning and energy. On the other hand, if a homeowner doesn’t want the hassle of wood, a natural gas– or propane-fueled fire feature offers flames at the flip of a switch or the touch of a hand-held device. Gas fire features do require direct underground piping for installation, but the result of this effort is quick, simple, and clean on-demand heat at any time of day. ➸ apld.org

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A natural gas or propanefueled fire feature offers flames at the flip of a switch or the touch of a hand-held device.

�

Portable fire pits are a great accent that can be relocated to accommodate any outdoor situation.

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design101 Regulations Seasoned landscape designers provide their expertise, not only in design, but also in following specific safety precautions and utilizing the assistance of outside licensed professionals. Insured and licensed technicians are the key to proper installation, as they are up to date on new rules and regulations for safety and compliance. For example, buried gas lines require mechanical permits and inspections, and masonry fireplaces require plans drafted by a licensed engineer that include proper ventilation. Providing engineered plans to townships for permits is one way to expedite projects and to obtain the proper paperwork to start construction. Without the appropriate installation and authorization, you may end up with fines and issues down the line. Doing it right the first time will save everyone money, time, and frustration. Follow local codes to ensure proper planning and placement within the space and to guarantee the safety and comfort of the homeowner. Fire features are classified as accessory structures, and can only be sited within so many feet of a structure, fuel source, and the perimeter property lines.

SAFETY FIRST!

Avoid installation mistakes that could burn down the house or trigger an explosion. Then educate your clients on how to use their fire feature safely. ■ Do not install any gas lines by yourself; employ a licensed professional. ■ Build woodburning fire pits with at least a two-foot diameter burning area.

■ Do not install wood-burning fire features on decks; this is not regulation and is a true fire hazard. ■ Do not start wood-burning fires with combustible materials like oil or kerosene.

■ Do not leave fires unattended or burn on windy days. ■ Do not install natural rocks around fire pits. It may look great, but over time the fire will crack the rocks, creating a hazard. ➸

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design101 Fire pits are perfect for outdoor entertainment in the cooler weather.

TRICKS OF THE TRADE ■ Use fire-friendly materials to fill fire features. Lava rock is known to explode under intense heat; opt for fire glass instead. ■ Most municipalities need zoning permits for built-in fire features, so consult the local governing agency for rules and regulations.

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■ Take all factors into consideration when installing your fire feature: property setbacks, prominent wind direction, and surrounding structures all play a part in proper placement. ■ Make sure there is proper height clearance from trees and overhangs.

■ Accessories such as spark arrestors can be used to give that extra layer of safety to your fire features. ■ If the local municipality will allow, gas-fueled fire pits can be installed on decks! Don’t feel that you always need to be on ground level. Be creative!


Beautiful spaces. Intelligent design. Experienced professionals.

We define landscape design!

Find YOUR landscape designer at www.apld.org. apld.org

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travelinspiration

The beauty of this courtyard comes from a single color scheme for the pottery. This blue is the most common color but we also saw patios with red pots, green pots, and unpainted terra cotta.

Secluded Sere

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ALL P H O TO GRAP H S B Y N A N SHER MA N

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enity in Spain

BY NAN STERMAN apld.org

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travelinspiration

W

hen he traveled, my dad always visited grocery stores. His first job was as a box boy at a mom and pop market his aunt and uncle owned in Minneapolis. Though he grew up to be a CPA, Dad loved the bounty of a market. Whatever city he visited, Dad strolled store aisles, looking at the product mix and buying locally-made sauces or condiments that were new to him. It was his way of understanding local peoples and places.

I visit gardens and nurseries the way my father visited markets. I’ve traveled to gardens across the U.S. and around the world. The combination of each garden’s layout, design elements, and plants tell me about the people, the place, and the climate. Last year, for example, I took a group to visit gardens in Spain. We started in the coastal town of Malaga and did a circle through the country’s Andalusia region. This area’s gardening climate is similar to that of Southern California where I live. Both are Mediterranean climates, characterized by precipitation from fall through early spring, followed by long, warm, dry summers.

It’s a great climate for people but take a minute to imagine being a plant trying to survive the hottest, sunniest season with no moisture. Amazingly, even in this difficult (for plants) climate, the world’s five Mediterranean regions (the Mediterranean basin including Spain, California, the west coast of Chile, the southern tip of South Africa, and Tile floors and pebble mosaics are important components of the patios’ designs. A LL PHOTOGR A PHS B Y N A N SHER MA N

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Normally, gardens are private, mostly hidden behind ornate wrought iron gates. Only during the Patio Festival are visitors welcomed inside.

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travelinspiration

Seeing plants in their natural habitat helped me understand how they grow.

Southern and Southwestern Australia)—which comprise just 2.2 percent of its – land surface—gave rise to 20 percent of the world’s plant biodiversity.

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One of my goals is to visit plants in their natural habitat and in gardens in every Mediterranean region. Seeing plants in their home territory helps me understand how they grow, the soils they grow in, the elevation, temperature range, soil pH, and so forth. Seeing their natural plant allies influences the ways I combine plants in gardens. Seeing gardens in places I visit inspires me with new

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travelinspiration Geraniums are the most common plants. They are the toughest plants for Cordoba’s Mediterranean climate, which is very hot in summer and cool in winter.

“ ideas for plants: layouts, uses, approaches, and design elements. I also love to visit local nurseries and garden centers to see the plants and tools that gardeners in those areas use.

Spain has one of the richest cultural histories in Europe, thanks to invasions by Celtics, Phoenicians, Visigoths, Moors, Romans, and more. Its history of Pagan, Christian, Muslim, and Jewish residents each made an indelible mark in the ➸ country and its culture.

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travelinspiration The Persians, for example, brought to Andalusia the idea of homes designed as a square, most often two stories tall, surrounding a protected, open courtyard. Rooms are organized toward the outside of the square, with windows and doors opening into the courtyard and accessed by an outdoor stairway. Each protected patio had a well for washing and cooking water, along with a place to grow herbs, fruits, and vegetables for the family.

Furniture outdoors enhances the feeling of indoor/outdoor living.

Stroll the streets of Cordoba and you see nothing but sheer white walls with glimpses of beautiful patios beyond ornamental wrought iron gates. In May, however, the residents of old Cordoba open their gates and invite the public in to show off their patios. My group of garden writers, garden lovers, and garden designers visited this past May during the annual Patio Festival, which starts with a competition. Seventy or more prize-winning patios are open for two weeks.

Because each courtyard is entered through a gate and vestibule, there is a very real sense of transition from street to courtyard. Each courtyard feels like an outdoor living room. The floors are typically pebble mosaics or patterned, colored cement tiles. There is usually a well (now ornamental rather than functional), or sometimes a wall-mounted fountain, and often indoor furniture set under broad eaves for protection. Potted plants lined the walls, all the way up to the roofline. In every patio, the pots are a single color, sometimes red or green but most often a particular shade of blue. And each overflows with flowers, primarily red, pink, and white geraniums. 70

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The patios are beyond gorgeous. And once my group was past being imapld.org

➸


Each courtyard feels like an outdoor living room.


travelinspiration Tools and other accessories contribute to the overall design of the displays.

pressed by their sheer beauty, we wanted to know how the heck the potted displays are made and maintained. There were no obvious irrigation systems, no hoses, not even a hose bib. With the crowds and the language barrier, it was hard to ask questions but we soon noticed many details. The pots weren’t glazed; instead they were painted terra cotta. They were attached to the walls with mounting hardware we’d never seen before. And in some, a cork between the wall and the base of the pot kept the pot’s paint and any extra moisture off the wall. It also changed the pot’s angle for its best viewing.

We oohed and aahed in each garden, pointing out interesting details and clever ideas to each other. We visited other famous garden sites in Spain, including the Alhambra and the Alcazar in Seville (my favorite). We saw private villa gardens as well as big municipal gardens, all of which we loved. Yet those patio gardens, while the most modest, remain the gardens that fill my dreams.

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2016 board of directors PRESIDENT Lisa Port, APLD Banyon Tree Design Studio 3630 Northeast 123rd Street Seattle, WA 98125 (206) 383-5572 PRESIDENT-ELECT Danilo Maffei, APLD Maffei Landscape Design LLC 202 N. Garfield Street Kennett Square, PA 19348 (610) 357-9700 SECRETARY/TREASURER Jock Lewendon, APLD Outdoor Living Spaces, LLC 766 Schoolhouse Lane Bound Brook, NJ 08805 (732) 302-9632 IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT Colleen Hamilton, APLD Bloomin' Landscape Designs 7122 Willey Way Carmichael, CA 95608 (916) 961-0191 ADVOCACY DIRECTOR Richard Rosiello Rosiello Designs & Meadowbrook Gardens 159 Grove Street New Milford, CT 06776 (860) 488-6507 CERTIFICATION DIRECTOR Maryanne Quincy, APLD Q Gardens PO Box 2746 Sunnyvale, CA 94087 (408) 739-5493

COMMUNICATIONS & OUTREACH DIRECTOR Nick McCullough, APLD McCullough’s Landscape & Nursery 14401 Jug Street New Albany, OH 43054 EDUCATION DIRECTOR Ellen Johnston, APLD ETJ Designs 5543 Wateka Drive Dallas, TX 75209 (469) 628-3321 GOVERNANCE DIRECTOR Eric Gilbey Vectorworks 7150 Riverwood Drive Columbia, MD 21046 (443) 542-0658

CONNECT WITH US!

MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR Paul Connolly, APLD Sundrea Design Studio 4999 North Sabino Canyon Road Tucson, AZ 85750 (520) 302-7441 RESOURCE DIRECTOR Joe Salemi DynaSCAPE Software 3426 Harvester Road Burlington, ON L7N3N1 (800) 710-1900

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The Designer is an official publication and member service of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD), 2207 Forest Hills Drive, Harrisburg, PA 17112. Ph: 717-238-9780 Fax: 717-238-9985. Disclaimer: Mention of commercial products in this publication is solely for information purposes; endorsement is not intended by APLD. Material does not reflect the opinions or beliefs of APLD. APLD is not responsible for unsolicited freelance manuscripts and photographs. All printed articles become the copyright of APLD.

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thedesÄągner wants you!

The only magazine written by designers for designers, The Designer is looking for talented members like you to share your stories, teach new techniques, and inspire with your designs.

calling all writers

All submissions from APLD members are considered, but The Designer is particularly interested in articles that fit the issue’s editorial theme or are appropriate for one of the magazine’s regular columns spotlighting technology or business strategies. Learn more about the submissions process and view the 2017 editorial calendar here.

Not sure if your story is a good fit? 2017 Editor in Chief Katie Elzer-Peters is happy to discuss your idea with you. Reach her at editor@apld.org.


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The Designer – Winter 2016  

The Designer – Winter 2016  

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