The Designer – Fall 2021

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thedesıgner ASSOCIATION OF

PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS

Fall 2021

2021 Design Awards APLD INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE

Designer of the Year Susan Cohan, FAPLD Susan Cohan Gardens Bio-Pool Landscape in Mendham, NJ


editor’sletter Now, More Than Ever

I

s landscape design essential? I think over the past eighteen months we’ve found that, yes, it is. Access to beautiful, functional, safe, and welcoming outdoor spaces has been the—let’s face it—sanity saver for most of us. If anything, after eighteen months into a worldwide pandemic, there’s now an even greater appreciation for the work APLD members do in designing those spaces. There’s also greater awareness of a need to continue to create such spaces and make them accessible to individuals and communities of every ethnic background, socioeconomic level, physical ability, and age. That work will never end, thank goodness. We do take a moment, though, to pause and celebrate your achievements each fall as we present the 2021 APLD International Design Award winners. The entries are diverse in style, size, and location, literally and figuratively. Susan Cohan, FAPLD, the APLD International Designer of the Year, created her winning entry, Bio-pool Landscape, for clients in New Jersey who wanted to feel as if they were camping in Wisconsin (a favorite spot). Though Susan had never been camping in Wisconsin, it’s safe to say she nailed it. Gavin McWilliam and Andrew Wilson’s “Best in Show” entry, Longwood, is situated outside of London and is meant to be a place of retreat and relaxation for its owners. I feel relaxed just looking at the clean design lines and vibrant meadow flowers. Regardless of where you’re designing or the size of your projects, I know you’ll find plenty of inspiration in this year’s award winners. Enjoy! KATIE ELZER-PETERS EDITOR@APLD.ORG

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PHOTOGR A PH BY KI R STEN B OEHMER PHOTOGR A PH Y


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contents

A benefit of the naturalistic planting schemes (shown here for the lower pool) is that wildlife has returned in the form of butterflies, birds, dragonflies, frogs, and fish.

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PH OTOG R A P H BY PAT R ICIA BURK E

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2021 A PL D I n te r n a ti ona l L a n dsc a pe De si gn A wa rd s 8

PRESIDENT ’S MESSAGE

A W A RDS B Y C A TE GO RY 14 DESIGNER OF

THE YEAR

24 BEST OF SHOW

RESIDENTIAL 34 GOLD 62 SILVER 120 BRONZE 128 PLANTING

DESIGN

134 SMALL

GARDEN

144 DETAILS 148 SPECIALTY

PROJECTS

162 SHOW

GARDEN

ON THE COVER A N D THI S SPR E A D: DESI GN ER OF THE YEA R SU SA N COHA N , FA PLD OF SU SA N COHA N GA R DEN S' B I O- POOL LA N DSCA PE I N MEN DHA M, N J COVER PHOTOGR A PH BY PATR I CI A B U R KE

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president’sletter Award-Winning

T

he meaning of “award-winning” differs depending on how it’s applied. After all, award-winning can be used to describe cars, wine, and books, and clearly those don’t have the same characteristics. Awardwinning has become a marketing term, as customers expect products and services to be tested, scrutinized, and even elevated by recognition. Products and services without a “stamp of approval” or recognition can then be perceived as not worth one’s time or money. I am, however, gratified and excited to see my peers recognized for their professional accomplishments. Recognizing professional landscape design projects shows that our peers had a chance to immerse themselves in the projects. Whether the designer could enter the outdoor space physically, or enter it virtually via plans and photos, these designers took the time to get to know the wishes of the client and the challenges of the site and then made those visions a reality. I say all of this because as we take a look at these recognized landscapes, each project represents more than a newly finished area of beauty. These clients now have new regenerative respites, sustainable sites, recreational spaces, and most of all, an elevated value in being outdoors. The term “award-winning” should always be a goal for expressing our professional approach to every site, and it should inspire us all to share our solutions each time the call for entries is made. No matter how large or small, elaborate or efficient, our approaches to meet our clients’ needs, care for the earth, and foresight to advocate for wellness can make every site award-winning.

ERIC GILBEY, PLA

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thedesıgner wants you! The only magazine written by designers for designers, The Designer is looking for talented members like you to share your stories, teach new techniques, and inspire with your designs. All submissions from APLD members are considered, but The Designer is particularly interested in articles that fit the issue’s editorial theme or are appropriate for one of the magazine’s regular columns spotlighting technology or business strategies.

calling all writers

Seeking pitches for articles. We're always looking for writers for regular features including Wander.Lust., Travel Inspiration, Plant App(lication)s, Design 101, and Design Masterclass articles.

Is your story idea a good fit? Please email editor@apld.org to discuss. 10

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PLATINUM

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the judges 2021 APLD International Landscape Design

Bruce Crawford

Duncan Heather

Vanessa Gardner Nagel, FAPLD, NCIDQ


Awards Distinguished Judges

Tina Nyce, FAPLD

Greg Pierceall

2022 international landscape

design awards

E N TER TO D AY Deadline for Submissions is November 15, 2021.

Enter at www.apld.org/design-awards

Kathy Stokes-Shaffer, FAPLD

(Retired)


2021 APLD INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE

Designer of the

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No longer disparate objects in the landscape, the two bio-pools, sauna, and deck are integrated into the landscape. PHOTOGR A PH BY PAT RICIA B U RK E

Year

SUSAN COHAN, FAPLD

SUSAN COHAN GARDENS Boonton, NJapld.org |

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designeroftheyear BIO-POOL LANDSCAPE Residential Category Over $100,000 Project Location: Mendham, NJ

Susan Cohan, FAPLD susancohangardens.com Firm Location: Boonton, NJ Zone: 6

As originally built, the upper pool was 2 feet higher than was indicated on the permitted grading plan, which left a steep slope between the pools. Regrading was the first step of the redesign.

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designeroftheyear JUDGES’ FEEDBACK:

This was a very sensitive solution to multiple problems of an interesting and elaborate project. The complexity of grading and materials is well executed. Excellent work unifying a difficult situation connecting the elements of sauna, dock, pools, and pool works. Functional aspects are spot on, and the massing and composition of the plantings work. The planting plan shows sensitivity to the environment and allows nature to take its course. The white clover makes for a soft flowing lawn. The plant list is very appropriate for deer resistance and the numbers scale well to the site.

This “Before” shot (far left) shows some of the complexity of the elevation changes. This “After” shot (left) demonstrates how it all fits together: the boulder wall, natural bluestone coping, and naturalistic plantings. P H OTOGR A PHS BY SUSA N COHA N , FA PLD

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PH OTO G R A P H BY PATRICIA BU RK E

Have a design vision of what you want the end result to be, however long it may take. Start with some idea, especially with projects like this. Instead of a beautiful drystack stone wall, I used boulders. [For the] lower pool, [I filled it] with sand and plants and a sand-filled shelf in the larger pool. Sand and specific plants help clean the water, which filters the system that feeds it back. Now [there are] frogs, fish, baby turtles, pollinator plants. The homeowners didn’t add them; it’s become an ecosystem unto itself. 20

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W

hen APLD Landscape Designer of the Year Susan Cohan arrived on the scene of this now awardwinning project, she was greeted by cost overruns caused by elements not included in the original proposal (and thus not approved by clients) and “creative” (unapproved) approaches to grading, among other issues. Her goal was to get the project back on track, make the various elements functional, and help the clients realize their vision of a naturalistic home retreat that reminded them of camping trips to Wisconsin. “I’ve never been


designeroftheyear STEAL THIS:

Plants that spread rapidly were specified to dominate specific areas or control erosion. The plant list was highly edited due to the area’s extreme deer pressure and because the intent was for little intervention beyond basic weeding. A white clover lawn was specified and has been allowed to “invade” the planting beds. This landscape fends for itself the way a wild landscape would with no supplemental water beyond the first season.

camping in Wisconsin,” Susan said. She still knocked it out of the park, turning the mess she inherited into a beautiful, calming oasis using her trademark design aesthetic, “Formal structure planted with abandon.” A sauna building is now surrounded by a deck, from which a dock juts into the larger, top plunge pool. The lower pool acts as a filtering pool and pumps recirculated water back to the top. Plantings soften the defined pool edges and a clover lawn adds a naturalistic feel. Grasses help screen the poolworks below. Susan said, “The

A benefit of the naturalistic planting schemes (shown here for the lower pool) is that wildlife has returned in the form of butterflies, birds, dragonflies, frogs, and fish (left).

Transitional plantings below the lower pool include swales to direct water away from the pools (below).

PHOTOGR A PH BY SU SA N COHA N

upper pool sits about 20 feet from neighbor’s fence, but it doesn’t feel that way. It feels like it is in a much larger open space. “There are fish and frogs in the lower pond now,” Susan said. “And nobody put them there.” Turtles have taken up residence, and pollinators flock to the flowers. This designed landscape has evolved, in the three years since completion, into its own ecosystem. “Would I have been able to do this ten years ago? Probably not,” she said. “A project such as this takes experience—with drainage, with plants, with many ➸ apld.org

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The completed project is on five levels: the sauna, deck, upper and lower pools, and the poolworks (not shown).

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designeroftheyear things to make it successful. You have to learn all those “little” pieces first.” There’s also the experience needed to wrangle multiple contractors, some of whom have all but ignored their clients. “When righting a project that has gone off the rails, you must always be the clients’ advocate to make sure they’re getting what they’re paying for and help the clients understand what they’re paying for.” That’s especially important when you enter an overbudget project midstream. She said that anything new she suggested had to be clearly related to the end game and longevity of the project. “Always start with a vision of what you want the end result to be, however long it might take to get there,” she said. Susan is happy to share some tips from

the experience she’s gained along the way. First: Do business in writing; get cost projections for everything. Second: Know your clients; these had been prior clients, so Susan knew picking tough-as-nails plants was important. Third: Learn from more experienced people—from lighting designers to nursery staff, contractors, and electricians—learn by keeping your eyes open, asking questions, and letting people answer. Let people give you what you’ve asked for. Fourth: Be flexible—not a dictatorial designer. When you build on this scale, you have to roll with the punches. And last: There is always something you could do better or differently. Be patient with yourself and the design. It will all pay off in the end.

The cedar dock was designed to be a wraparound (below left). The path behind the sauna to the deck below is bordered by stunning grasses in a colorful yet restful hue. The smaller plants were planted as plugs and pints in the first season to fill in as they mature and multiply (below right). PHOTOGR A PHS BY SU SA N COHA N


2021 APLD INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE

Best of Show

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PH OTOGRA PH B Y MA R IA N NE MA J ERU S

GAVIN MCWILLIAM & ANDREW WILSON MCWILLIAM STUDIO

Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, UK apld.org | 25


bestofshow

LONGWOOD Residential Category Over $100,000 Project Location: Chorleywood

Gavin McWilliam & Andrew Wilson mcwilliamstudio.com

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Firm Location: Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, UK Zone: 9 apld.org


Liquidamber trees were tabletop-pruned to echo the flat roof of the nearby building. PHOTOGR A PH B Y MA R IA N N E MA J ERU S

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bestofshow JUDGES’ FEEDBACK:

Wow, the before and after are dramatic. A unique site and implemented plantings. The flow onto and within the site is unique. The plantings are striking contrasts to the house. Given the home’s mid-century modern design, this garden could easily have become too severe in keeping with the lines of the house. However, the simplicity of the layout and the wonderful softness from the selection of plants prevented that from happening. The managed sweetgums are a specimen form and structure creating that “table” within the plantings. A composed site and residence that work well. ➸

The Hartley Botanic greenhouse has a slightly industrial feel (far left). The studio balanced cost with aesthetics to select paving materials that would serve the site well, long-term. P HOTOGR A PHS BY MCWI LLI A M STUDI O

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“O

ur job is to inspire people,” said Best of Show award-winning designer Gavin McWilliam during an interview about his project, “Longwood.” “People have been removed from the natural world around them, but gardens are an accessible way to reintroduce people to nature on a scale they can enjoy. Once you’ve stimulated that, interest in nature can grow.” It’s a tactic Gavin uses while designing gardens growing in the heart of London. “We work within traditional

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landscapes and pull natives back into the city.” He had a bit more elbow room when working on Longwood, located in Chorleywood, United Kingdom. In fact, that was the entire point of the project. The owners of Longwood are longstanding clients of the firm, which designed the main house and garden twelve years ago. This new design was commissioned in 2015 when the clients purchased the property adjacent to their main home for use as a recreational space. “Our design goal was to connect


bestofshow STEAL THIS:

Large-unit pavers of charcoal precast concrete form the main terrace, primary paths, and steps. The material is appropriate to the style and era of the original house, complementing the interior concrete finishing to the indoor pool.

A blooming meadow of annuals and perennials adds color throughout the growing season. P H OTO GRAP H S BY M CW ILLIAM STU D IO

the landscape spaces so they would flow into each other and create a new garden, not just replicate the other.” He said that the second space is more relaxed, more informal, and more about play. “The connections feel spiritual and relaxing, holistically, so when you come off the street through one of the multiple points of entry, it’s very calm and peaceful.” It’s a big site, and the clients invested a lot into the existing house and garden. Gavin said, “We had to ask ourselves, ‘What is a sensible paving material?’ It

was important to balance aesthetics with cost.” The architecture is hardscapes balanced by soft planting schemes, such as using the grass Deschampsia. Natural stone and boulders reconnect one with the landscape. Key views draw visitors through the property, and pops of color punctuate the landscape. “I love seasonal color in planting so for the pictorial meadows, we used a company that specializes in meadow mixes of annuals and perennials. But you could just do an annual mix and replant ➸ apld.org

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The studio’s design trademark of architectural hardscape paired with soft plantings is on full display in this vignette. P HOTOGRA PH BY MCW IL L IA M ST U DIO

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bestofshow every year.” He instructs that you would prepare the ground, seed by March, water, and the meadow would perform through September. Gavin earned a master’s in landscape architecture from Greenwich University and has been designing since 2005 and with his design partner, Andrew Wilson, through McWilliams Studio, since 2018. “We’re specialists in high-end commercial and residential schemes, and pride ourselves on immaculate detailing and experimenting with materials and plantings.” One example of that is the Liquidamber trees, which have been “tabletopped” (horizontal pleaching)

to echo the lines of the house. “We’re always asking what can we do differently, how can we recombine plants,” Gavin said. At Longwood, Silver Birch, Pines, and naturalistic heathland provide screening and work in the sandy soil plant community. “We encourage people to connect with the life around them and creatively work with nature. If we look at time and look at life and look at seasons, we slow down,” he said. “Nature will succeed one year and not the next, which is not a bad thing. Our goal is to really focus on creativity—the beautiful, memorable, and important— and enjoy it.”

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2021 APLD INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN

Residential Gold Awards Bridle Trails Garden Spring Greenworks, LLC

Bohemian Rhapsody Laura Morton Design

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Laguna Charm Sacha McCrae, Living Gardens Landscape Design

McCloskey Residence ALA, Artistic Landscape Architecture, LLC

Elegant Fun Andrea Wilson Mueller, Inside Out Design, LLC

Meadow View Jim Douthit, a Blade of Grass apld.org

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gold award MEADOW VIEW Residential Category Over $100,000 Project Location: Wayland, MA

a Blade of Grass, Jim Douthit abladeofgrass.com Firm Location: Sudbury, MA Zone: 6a

A “Before” photo of fire pit area and view toward the meadow (above left). A “Before” shot from the lower lawn showing the bare slope—so much opportunity! (left) This “After” shot of the fire pit area looking out toward the meadow perfectly showcases the dramatic views (above). PHOTOGR A PHS BY J I M DOUTHI T (2)

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PHOTOGR A PH BY PET E CA DIEUX

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

The designer did a great job allowing the outdoor living areas to avoid competing with the views. The hardscape is well laid out and in relationship to the architectural lines and scale of the house. The selected furnishings are cohesive and add a pop of color that fit naturally in the spaces and connects the separate rooms. The process between the before and after represents an understanding of home, views, topography, and needs. The spaces and places defined within the landscape provide a unified and composed outdoor space. We appreciate the simplicity of the plantings. Nicely done. apld.org

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gold award

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STEAL THIS:

The back yard was inspired by a Spanish painting of a sunflower meadow inside the clients’ home. Borrowed views of the abutting conservation land mimic the painting’s meadow while masses of native Rudbeckia substitute for the sunflowers.

A diversity of low plantings screens the edges of the gathering rooms, which satisfied the clients’ wish for intimacy as well as preservation of the expansive views. PHOTOGR A PH BY PETE CA DI EUX

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gold award

Looking across the fire pit patio to the dining patio (above). Bridging the divide between the indoors and out, picturesque views of the conservation land are framed by strategically placed trees and plant selections (right). Reclaimed granite step-curbing provides a rustic transition from the lower meadow and lawn area to the home (far right). PH OTO G R A P H S BY PE TE C A D IE UX

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The intimate sitting area in autumn still has loads of color.

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The frequent activity of butterflies brings the space to life and the many flowering plants, such as these Damianita Daisies, transport visiting guests to the nearby mountains as they enter the home from the bustling city nearby (right). The spectacular Santa Catalina Mountains greet the client daily (above). PH OTOG R A P H S BY JOS H G O R M A L LY

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gold award

The designed flagstone entry, highlighted by massive splitface granite boulders native to this area, suggests the streams and washbeds found in the nearby Santa Catalina Mountains. It is bordered by low-maintenance desert butterfly- and hummingbird-attracting plants and creates a welcoming ambiance for visitors (above).

MCCLOSKEY RESIDENCE Residential Category $25,000–$100,000 Project Location: Tucson, AZ

ALA, Artistic Landscape Architecture, llc artlandarch.com

The existing entry to this property was bland and drab as demonstrated by this “Before” photo. It consisted of a straight sidewalk and a long, straight front-entry drive.

Firm Location: Tucson, AZ Zone: 9b apld.org

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During construction, tons of cut flagstone were overlaid onto a wire mesh and concrete subgrade. Metal mesh was specified to prevent any cracking of the surface; the drive remains crack-free (right).

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What a view! Looking to the east with the Santa Catalina Mountains in the background.

gold award JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

What a tremendous improvement over the very bland drive. The walkway width is much appreciated and allows people to walk side by side to the front door. The plantings and appearance blend beautifully with surrounding mountainous area. This is beautiful rockwork. Nicely done!

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A large, decorative planting mound was designed for the center of the new, much smaller driveway roundabout. This element is visible in the foreground of the nearby Santa Catalina Mountains and serves as a reminder of the mountains located behind arriving visitors.

Damianita Daisy and Desert Marigold carry out the predominantly yellow flower theme as most of the surrounding natural desert blooms are yellow. Chocolate Flower, heavily planted along the edges of the flagstone entry, serves a dual purpose as its wonderful and powerful fragrance helps create the transformative feel of the space (below). Complementary colors of browns, yellows, and golds blend together (middle below). PHOTOGR A PHS BY J OSH GOR MA LLY

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gold award

The 18x36-foot pool features 3 waterfalls out of a stepped wall with columns on each end. The paver and brick details create a unified feel and play off the home’s architecture (above).

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“Before” showing the overstructured and awkwardly divided space, which lacked transitions (right). Hidden drainage on the pool deck as well as hidden access for the automatic cover keep the design simple and clean. Mature trees give the space an organic feel (top right).


gold award

ELEGANT FUN Residential Category Over $100,000 Project Location: Lexington, KY

Inside Out Design, llc, Andrea Wilson Mueller insideout-design.org Firm Location: Frankfort, KY Zone: 6b JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

This design does a good job of respecting the existing architecture and the clients’ taste. The plant palette is constrained, lending cohesion to the plantings while still creating interest. The entire project is simple in appearance, yet well thought out. This is an excellent job with the pavilion and repeating the brick. The paving details are excellent. The overall addition of this pool and garden enhances the inside out spaces and beauty. A well-executed and very classic simple design. It’s solid in form and function. P H OTO GRAP H S BY AND REA WI LSON MUELLER

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gold award

The home’s interesting arch window architectural feature inspired the Roman arch paver detailing at the rear elevation (above). The waterfalls’ stone coping matches the pavilion columns, further enhancing architectural connections (right).

PH OTO G R A P H S BY A N DR E A W IL S O N M U ELLE R

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The clients wish: Create an elegant, yet simple detailed pool area with a pavilion.

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Simplicity is anything but simple; it’s all in the details. What appears very simple required lots of design and installation forethought. From hidden paver drainage, hidden automatic pool cover, pavement color selections, and more— it’s the details that make a project. apld.org

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gold award

PHOTOGR A PH BY J EFF DUN AS

Before: The landscape was flat and sandy; only the Palm trees and a couple of cacti survived after this 1934 house was abandoned and the water shut off for two years.

B O H E M I A N R H A P S O DY Residential Category over $100,000 Project Location: Palm Springs, CA

Laura Morton Design LauraMortonDesign.com Firm Location: Los Angeles, CA Zone: 9b JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

What a colorful project and so well suited to Palm Springs! Good use of space and environmentally appropriate plants. Wonderful mix of thoughtful spaces create warm and diverse outdoor living. The retro RV is an excellent disguised storage shed. The plantings work well to provide shade and privacy with architectural scale and size. The drama of the Yuccas along the pool and their reflection is captivating while not overwhelming the space. The trio of Olive trees around the fire corner really help soften the space, which could be overwhelming in scale. The color selection throughout is mindful and harmonious. It’s an obvious evening space to entertain and enjoy the sunsets. 50

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The setback wall with berms on both sides was planted with cactus and desert plants to provide privacy and allure. A wider flagstone walkway leads to an enclosed courtyard (above). At night the lighting and mood become romantic when the outdoors become dining and entertaining space as well as looking-at-the-stars space. The pool serves as a reflecting pond for the Agaves (left). PHOTOGR A PHS BY R OSS W HITA KER

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gold award

The horizontal palm trunk/cobble planter with sculptural Agave gently separates the pool area. Clockwise around the pool: the casita has its own dining terrace, a new Date Palm, the tiled fountain, seating with the fire pit, and pool loungers (above). Before: This view from the second floor steps shows the casita and pool as a blank canvas. The pool is elevated from house grade (right). P H OTOG R A P H S BY J E F F DUN AS

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STEAL THIS:

Vibrant paint colors and vintage furnishings were used to manage the clients’ budget and add high style. For this project, the purplebrown mountains, flagstones, and aqua trim echo the pool and pebbles; the casita is a pulsing violet with fuchsia trim; and the masonry walls are a deep terracotta with colorful Bougainvillea as informal espalier against them.

From the dining terrace a series of layers creates depth and a sense of spaciousness. Patio, plantings, pool, and more plantings … with functional spaces sheltered by trees and surrounded by shapes and colors (above). PHOTOGR A PH BY R OSS WHITA KER

A trio of Olives create a natural high canopy of lacy shade for the pool-adjacent seating area. The green upholstery was selected to enhance their lushness (left). PHOTOGR A PH BY J E F F DU N AS

The original Palm trees were a perfect place to anchor a duo of hammocks, both of which enjoy views of the San Jacinto Mountains. The aqueous tones in the sculptural Euphorbia and Yucca provide accents without high maintenance. PHOTOGR A PH BY R OSS WHITA KER

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gold award LAGUNA CHARM Residential Category Over $100,000 Project Location: Laguna Niguel, CA

Living Gardens Landscape Design, Sacha McCrae livinggardenslandscapedesign.com Firm Location: San Clemente, CA Zone: 10a

P H OTOGR A PH BY SACHA MCCR A E

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

This design made a dramatic improvement to the entire garden surrounding the house. From “Brady Bunch” to elegant, the project looks established and settled. It’s a place that has space to enjoy inside and out. The use of white and its repetition accents nicely. The use of gravel and its color blends well. Great materials, surfaces, and layers of plantings. The plantings support the look of the home and work with the environment. Such a wonderful, sweet character has transformed this home. Well done! 54

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PHOTOGR A PHS BY B R E T T HILTON ( 4 )

The front yard “Before” the renovation. All existing hardscape except the rear yard retaining wall was removed (left page). The same front yard “After” the renovation. It looks like a different home! The arbor over the entry steps was added to frame the entry and create a sense of scale with the house (above). The front yard slope was graded to accommodate the new entry arbor steps and pathway to the front door (far left). A flagstone pathway leads to an additional seating area and a fountain located off the dining room (left). apld.org

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The back yard “After” the renovation. With a four-tree bosque and overhead string lights, it’s elegant and inviting. The trees will provide shade as they grow in.

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The hardscape material selection was inspired by European gardens and was designed to feel intimate and elegant while being durable. Gravel, cobble, wood, and natural stone were used— restrained materials that created a desired sense of timelessness.

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The back yard “Before” the renovation. High on the clients’ wish list was space for a dining table that could seat 8–10 as well as a water feature, fire feature, BBQ, and shade. PHOTOGR A PH BY SACHA MCCRA E


gold award

The new BBQ counter has an arbor overhead for shade while cooking. The graveled seating area can seat 10 (above). A selection of lowwater plants included grasses for softness and movement, succulents and evergreen plants for structure, and longblooming perennials for year-round interest and color (left). PHOTOGR A PH S BY B R ETT HI LTON ( 3)

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gold award

BRIDLE TRAILS GARDEN Residential Category Over $100,000 Project Location: Bellevue, WA

Spring Greenworks, llc springgreenworks.com Firm Location: Kirkland, WA Zone: 8b

Masses of ‘Annabelle’ and ‘Limelight’ Hydrangeas combined with Stewartia create sight lines down the lawn (above). PHOTOGR A PHS BY DOR EEN WYN JA

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

This is a really spectacular planting scheme! Good use of materials and cohesive design, while meeting the clients’ needs. A great example of function meets form to become fun—as in fundamental. The house garden and the guest house are both beautiful. Love the drainage detail and the use of steel walls. The clients desired a vegetable garden, and they have been given a lovely space for that. We love the rectangular spaced pavers and stone inserts. Looking at the big picture, the varied sides of the guest house have very different areas; the pieces and elements work. It’s such a lush and textured tapestry of plantings. 58

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The Outdeco panel fence (left) was designed to serve as a screen and transition from the garden entry path leading to the main deck. apld.org

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gold award

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This project’s vision was to expand the home to include an outdoor lifestyle merging nature and reflecting the clients’ modern aesthetic. Contemporary materials included dimensional concrete pavers, high Cascade granite boulders, curving steel walls, and polished pebbles in the patio and retaining walls. 60

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P H OTO GRAP H S BY D OR EEN WYN JA (3)


The light requirements of the garden directed the design toward drought-tolerant plantings and modern grasses grouped to minimize water needs and soften hardscapes. These stunning plantings create a rich wall of color, texture, and continuity (above). Modern ornamental grasses were grouped to minimize water needs and soften hardscapes. Here they border the upper and lower garden terraces in a lovely burgundy theme (left). PHOTOGR A PH BY R OB I N PA RSON S

The clients wanted a place to grow their own produce. These stylish, steel raised bed planters provide that plus they separate the upper and lower gardens (top left). A parting landscape shot of the Outdeco screen (which hides utilities) and adjacent path (far left).

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2021 APLD INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN

Residential Silver Awards

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The client’s architect directed the cement landing to be clad in Ipe (above). The existing outdoor space featured an uninviting raised cement landing, an overgrown garden, dilapidated fencing, and a faux “pond” made from blue tarps (right). It’s clear how the design broke spaces into separate areas all on the same level. The artificial lawn features bluestone as centrally placed inset stepping-stones, which help to direct a viewer’s eye forward (top right).

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silver award

CITY GARDEN MID-CENTURY MODERN HOME Residential Category Under $25,000 Project Location: Jersey City, NJ

A Small Green Space, Emma Lam asmallgreenspace.com Firm Location: Jersey City, NJ Zone: 7b JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

The design is very clean and crisp, which works well with the interior design and clearly brings the indoors outdoors. An outstanding creative solution to a narrow space; nicely done. P H OTO GR A PHS BY MEGA N MA LOY (2)

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To combat the “bowling alley” effect of the long, narrow space and individualize the areas, two different styles—horizontal and tongue-andgroove—of cedar fencing were installed. The design capitalizes on the visual impact the outdoor space has through the interior living room’s floor-to-ceiling glass wall and created an outdoor living space that reflects and complements the midcentury modern mood of the home (top).

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P H OTO GRAP H BY MEGA N MA LOY

Another “Before” image showing the cement landing with steps in background and the existing mature trees, which create an archway. The clients were persuaded to keep the mature trees (above).


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Low-voltage inset pavers and landscape lighting were installed throughout, such as to the edges of the bluestone patio. The bluestone patio was laid in a horizontal runningboard pattern, visually widening the space (above). PHOTOGR A PH BY MEGA N MA LOY

Two seasons after installation, the plantings have matured. The garden area incorporates a large, open, mulched space and includes a simple automatic dripline irrigation system that helps conserve water (left). PHOTOGR A PH BY EMMA L A M

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silver award

One of the goals was to design a welcoming entrance with a low-maintenance, urban-hardy perennial planting plan including aromatics and grasses that complement the architectural style of the 100-year-old home (left). PHOTOGR A PH BY MEG A N MA LOY

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

CLIFFSIDE CITY HOME Residential Category $25,000 – $100,000 Project Location: Weehawken, NJ

A Small Green Space, Emma Lam asmallgreenspace.com Firm Location: Jersey City, NJ Zone: 7b

Beautifully done. The alteration to the back yard was fantastic. Very clean. We love the deck solution in the back with the spaces divided by the orientation of the decking boards. The front looks lovely; it was a challenge since the area to work within was limited. The simple containers with grasses maintain the modern feel. BEFORE: The clients’ beautiful historic urban home featured a generously sized front garden bed devoid of plants (left). PHOTOGR A PH BY EMMA L A M

Grasses add movement and the beautiful entryway is flanked by simple planters. The clients wanted curb appeal but also desired a manageable level of maintenance (right). PHOTOGR A PH BY MEG A N MA LOY

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Low-maintenance composite decking created level surfaces over the cement foundation. Switching the directions of the decking and adding “tiers” helped define individual spaces.

The sunken backyard was covered by unsightly concrete on an uneven slope that dropped off dramatically to the cliff beyond. The back yard was separated from the drop-off by a 3-foot-tall, rusted chain link fence.

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The “Dining Room” has an 8x8 expandable table and pre-fab outdoor kitchen including a sink, prep-station, and storage. PHOTOGR A PHS BY MEGA N MA LOY (2)


silver award The sloped site, which sits on edge of steep cliff, presented a significant design challenge. PH OTO G R A P H BY E MMA L A M

PHOTOGR A PHS BY MEG A N MA LOY ( 2 )

Low-voltage inset deck and fence lighting sets the mood for entertaining.

The decking pattern defines “rooms,” including the Spa (a hot tub screened by perennial grasses in trough planters); the Lounge (featuring a fire pit); and the Living Room (sectional seating).

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Changing the direction of the decking materials and adding tiers help define individual spaces by physically and psychologically guiding the eye.

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silver award

WEBER PROJECT Residential Category $25,000 – $100,000 Project Location: San Diego, CA

AnandaScapes llc, Joel Berlin AnandaScapes.com Firm Location: San Diego, CA Zone: 10b PH OTO G R A P H S BY JANE T BARK P H OTO GRAP H Y

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JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

This is a beautiful transformation of the back. The fence in the back yard provides good screening while not appearing to be overwhelming. As well, the new bench and fire pit mimic the shapes and materials of the existing bar and retaining wall. We love the plant choices and how they were put together; nice textural differences. We also love the fire and water features, which are beautifully combined. Great job. The clients two toy poodles have a bit of lawn for their potty space (left).

The revamped patio area is large enough to put out 5 or 6 tables for small dining events under the stars. It also showcases new fire and water features (above). apld.org

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silver award

Phase Two was the front yard, whose brief included keeping the budget low but finding a way to have an enclosed yet open space for the toy poodles (left).

The clients directed all the existing backyard patio be retained and to give a “face-lift” to the old BBQ area. The BBQ’s new counter really gives it a lift (right).

This existing Jacaranda tree is one the clients wanted to keep and incorporate into the new design (below). A “Before” shot of the north side of the property on a south-facing hillside; all existing plants were removed (below).

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The clients wanted to keep some of the hardscapes (organic shapes) but also wanted a more modern, contemporary, clean look. These shapes were used to design the new areas of the backyard and a yin-and-yang effect was built into the design.

PHOTOGR A PHS BY A N A N DASCA PES LLC (3)

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PHOTOGR A PHS BY JA N ET B A R K PHOTOGRA PHY ( 2 )

Interestingly, the prior owners had left an antique claw-foot tub that had to be incorporated into the new design. Voila! A succulent planter.

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silver award

The waterfront property is located on a pond on a small island off the Maine coast. Its character was of singular importance to the clients.

The herbaceous perennial garden lines the perimeter. The design aimed to capitalize on a “green” natural space, with a variety of textures and form and only splashes of color.

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Rows of stark boulders on a slope were located on the waterside of the camp, making the space unusable.


With the home situated on a beautiful body of water with views, abundant wildlife, and mature forest, the clients envisioned revamping the landscape for family gatherings. Looks like success.

LONG POND CAMP Residential Category over $100,000 Project Location: Mt. Desert, ME

Burdick & Associates, Bobbie Burdick burdickassociates.com Firm Location: Ellsworth, ME Zone: 5

The original driveway footprint between structures; the steep driveway was poorly situated.

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

The designer integrated the spirit of the place with the landscape. We appreciate the restraint for a large, high-end home to have a much more natural-looking environment while meeting the needs of the owners. Plenty of foliage color and sufficient flowers throughout the season provide a unified planting scheme. The diverse plantings work well. Great job transitioning the slope. Good paths and planting masses; great texture and colors. The lake to site view is perfect. Nicely composed to look native and naturalized; with time it will become a woodland wonder. PH OTO G R A P H S BY B O BBIE BU RD IC K

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Changing the grade of the slope from 20% to 4% at the restored boulder wall prevented any further erosion into the pond.

A progress photo shows the path and garden installations.

The path to the main camp from guest house is now bordered by swaths of groundcover.

The petite garden pathway and raised vegetable beds.

The entrance to the petite garden, which is a place for the grandchildren to experience growing vegetables.

A dry stream bed manages runoff from the meadow; solving drainage issues was a client request.

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silver award Lupines bloom in the wildflower meadow in June. The landscape elements were designed to soften and tie spaces together and link to the undisturbed forest.

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The new design included a fence surrounding the 6-acre property, as well as a custom deer grate to allow the gate to remain open, if desired.

The new landscape design welcomes everyone, in all seasons. The bright fall color and lush planting illustrate the soft transitions. PH OTO G R A P H S BY B O BBIE BU RD IC K

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silver award

As visitors approach the oxblood red main door, new broad steps invite the eyes for a stroll The flowing visual of the through a seasonally pool is matched in the changing loose romantic adjacent granite spa, border withblack flowering which reflects the nearby perennials, Iris, and islands(top owned by the client. topiary right).

OLD QUARRY RESIDENCE Residential Category over $100,000 Project Location: Guilford, CT

Christensen Landscape Services, Donna Christensen christensenlandscape.com Firm Location: Northford, CT Zone: 7a

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JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

A very interesting and diverse site. This landscape connects unique living spaces with nature. The use of stone and its scale are in keeping with the site. The vanishing edge pool to Long Island Sound is stunning. Wow! This is a picture-perfect view from the infinity pool view onto the water. The black granite spa adds a crisp human element of art and defined space. The new stone columns and gate are lovely. The plant palette is appropriate and provides nice diversity. Overall a good composition and organization. Incredible setting for a potentially incredible garden scheme. The view from the pool area of lower native stone fire pit and pollinator garden is wonderful. The design includes special spots to take in the views, swim, soak, gather with friends around a fire, and stroll through the gardens (right). PHOTOGR A PH BY N EI L LA N DI N O PHOTO


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silver award

With a stunning vista and unique typography, the landscape is designed to pull people into the environment and connect them to nature (below).

PHOTOGR A PH BY N EI L L A N DIN O PHOTO

Given its quarry heritage, the property’s existing boulders and ledges were incorporated into the design. To echo them, locally sourced fieldstone and granite were added. These lower steps, walls, and columns were built with native stone (above).

Blues from the water were carried throughout the landscape with bluestone paving, gravel driveway, and plants such as Colorado Spruce, Russian Sage, and Hydrangeas (above).

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Due to the scarcity of fresh water, large inground cisterns to collect rainwater from gutters were buried in the lawn. These irrigate the front and upper pool gardens, preserving the small well for house use. The new pool wall was incorporated into the existing site’s retaining walls composed of native stone (above).

A winter view of the walk from the dock through the native grass meadow (below).

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BEFORE: The 1,200 sq. ft. natural setting is comprised of level areas and varying slopes with lovely views of distant hillsides. Old, tired plants and several unstable hardscape elements were present. The site combines full sun and shady areas that transition to dappled shade beneath mature Oaks.

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The side pathway employs travertine stepping stones set amid gravel. Gravel was used in other pathways/areas and transitions to natural mulched pathways below the Oaks (above).


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Plants were chosen to thrive under the Oaks with minimal irrigation in summer; some were chosen to visually echo the natural surroundings and tones seen in the distant hillsides.

SERENE OUTDOOR LIVING AMONGST THE OAKS Residential Category Over $100,000 Project Location: Novato, CA

Dig Your Garden Landscape Design, Eileen Kelly digyourgarden.com Firm Location: San Anselmo, CA Zone: 10a JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

This project is dreamy. From the layout of the hardscape, use of space, multiple levels, how the space is integrated with the oak trees, combined colors of the hardscape, furnishings, plants, and sensitively lit at night—this project has it all. With an established site canopy, ground layer development is the key to function and forms. The constructed surfaces and forms float well in the spaces. A cable railing on the new deck opens up this space to its surroundings. Love the plant palette; plantings are ordered as to light and aspect. This composition will mature and fill in the gaps. PH OTO G R A P H S BY E ILEEN K E LLY, D IG YO U R GARD EN LA N DSCA PE DESI GN

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Concrete retaining walls were stained to complement the stone, stairways, and pathways with a combination of stone and gravel, providing fluid transitions from one area to the next. PH OTO G R A P H S BY EILE EN K E LLY, D IG YOUR G A R D E N L A N DS C AP E D E S IGN

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The design goal was to complement the architecture of the home, address the environment, and protect the ecosystem below the Oak trees. Stained retaining walls and travertine steps lead up to patio areas (above). Low-voltage lighting highlights the trees, creates a wonderful ambiance, and provides a measure of safety (right).


silver award The plant palette combines siteappropriate natives and plants from other Mediterranean regions, succulents, flowering plants, and others that provide yearround appeal.

The plants were chosen to complement the natural environment and provide biodiversity and an ecosystem for birds, bees, and butterflies. Note the gorgeous succulent bowl.

The painted galvanized troughs for edibles were located on the sunny side of the property. Painting these a uniform color enhances their integration into the design.

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silver award

SOUTHWOOD Residential Category Over $100,000 Project Location: Orinda, CA

Envision Landscape Studio

The established lawn area uses a board form retaining wall. Note the color repetition from the hanging chair’s seat cushion and the container planting.

envisionlandscapestudio.com Firm Location: Walnut Creek, CA Zone: 9b A Corten steel sculpture and raised Corten planters add warmth and interest to a linear entryway. Drought-tolerant and California natives reduce water consumption (above).

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PHOTOGR A PHS BY J OE DODD

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A sense of unfolding into nature occurs by seamlessly blending the interior and exterior when the large sliding door is used as a gateway.

Plantings were used to soften transitions and blend the interior and exterior. These containers along the foundation bring nature right up to the house.

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

This project is well executed technically. The connection and increased usable space around the pool work well. The pool emphasis is good, and it stages well. The repetition of the linear layout with the shapes, deck boards, and cable railing is very successful. It’s a good space and a good place to entertain. PHOTOGR A PH BY J ER I KOEGEL

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Usable space was established with the use of decking material to expand outdoor living around an existing pool, turning previously unusable space into functional space (above). A row of Lomandra defines an upper terrace and softens the transition between the elevations.

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silver award STEAL THIS:

The design uses linear alignment and repetition in the plantings to create connection between multiple spaces throughout the yard.

Linear cable railings mirror the lines of the decking while allowing maximum views (below).

The clients requested more connection with nature and to dissolve the barriers between manmade items and natural elements. Terraces create multiple outdoor destinations. PHOTOG RA PHS BY J OE D ODD

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silver award HUNTLEIGH WOODS Residential Category Over $100,000 Project Location: Frontenac, MO

Frisella Landscape Group, Tony Frisella Jr. frisellalandscapegroup.com Firm Location: Defiance, MO Zone: 6

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

An outstanding site, structure, and landscape composition. From the entry to motor court to gardens — all are works of art. The house has incredible scale, and the initial paver drive and plantings soften the approach and welcome you on a human scale. 92

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The homeowners gave the designer free rein to create the entire landscaping plan for the approximately 126,000 sq. ft. property (above). PHOTOGR A PH BY MOSES UKOH (2)


Both residence and landscaping are lit to perfection, highlighting the structure and beauty of angles and features. PHOTOGR A PH BY B RIA N COL L IN S

Individual spaces include a variety of geometric shapes that blend seamlessly from one area to the next, while complementing the architecture of the home (left). Before, the home under construction (above). PHOTOGR A PH BY TON Y FR I SE L L A J R.

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silver award Raised planters add dimension and interest, balancing the scale of the residence to the expanse of surrounding property. PHOTOGR A PH BY MOSES U KOH

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The goal of Huntleigh Woods was to accent the home’s geometry without blocking windows or views, while also reflecting the owners’ love of art and providing them with serene places to relax. The overall effect is stunningly creative, livable, and site appropriate. The Zen Garden provides a serene space to relax (right). Rear terraces and planters offer a transition from the residence to the gardens. Boxwoods accent the formal stone planters (far right). P H OTO GRAP H BY ALIS E O ’BRIE N P H OTO GRAP H Y PHOTOGR A PH BY M OSES U KOH

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Low landscaping frames the putting green (by others). PHOTOGR A P H BY MOSES U KO H

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silver award POOL HOUSE LANDSCAPE Residential Category over $100,000 Project Location: Washington, CT

Haver & Skolnick Architects with Wesley Stout Associates haverskolnickarchitects.com Firm Location: Roxbury, CT Zone: 6

Lush tropical plantings provide unexpected colorful accents flanking the pool house entrance. Unifying color repetition is also found in the seat cushions, pillows, and towels.

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

The simple elegance of this project is marvelous. The tropical feel by the shower is a fun and refreshing change on a manageable scale. The details are gorgeous, and expanses flow well. The large drifts of plants are very appropriate to the property. This is a great collaboration between the architecture and landscape. It’s very structured and, yes, feels like a resort. Nicely established and detailed. The colors in the fabrics of the furnishings are the highlight of the pool area. 96

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PHOTOGR A PHS BY R OB ERT B EN SON PHOTOGR A PHY


The design of the swimming pool and terrace is an extension of a simple, classical plan of the pool house, with symmetrical elements organized on a central axis.

The designed landscape contrasts formal and romantic geometries. The hilltop site has views of distant rolling hills and a backdrop of ancient Spruces and rustic stone walls.

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silver award

The bluestone terrace extends into the building. Overall, the design includes a pool with integral spa, a lounging terrace, outdoor shower, and a series of planting environments that serve as backdrops (above). A sweep of Fountain Grass leads to the entry. Sunny areas were largely planted with droughtresistant grasses with the lush tropical plantings limited to the shady north end (far right).

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The bluestone pavers leading to the shower float in a sea of polished black beach stones.


Beyond the pool, a hammock hangs above a crescent of Russian Sage, Black-eyed Susans, and Maiden Grass, providing a favorite shady destination and vantage point to appreciate the distant hillside views (above left).

The design goal was to create a lush resort-like atmosphere that would contrast the experience of the site’s traditional “gentleman’s” farm setting of 70 acres (above).

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A copper outdoor shower is nestled in a jungle of Bamboo and Elephant Ears, alluding to the experience of showering in a tropical rain forest. PHOTOGR A PHS BY R OB ERT B EN SON PHOTOG RA PHY

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silver award MODERN AND MODEST Residential Category Under $25,000 Project Location: Frankfort, KY

Inside Out Design, llc, Andrea Wilson Mueller insideout-design.org Firm Location: Frankfort, KY Zone: 6b

Landscaped beds provide depth and add interesting curb appeal while the new circular driveway is a big hit with the clients and visitors alike (above). BEFORE: The site consisted of a boring, uninspired lawn; overgrown landscape; broken sidewalk; dated fence; and out-of-scale columns (left). PH OTOG R A P H S BY A N D R E A W ILS O N M U ELLER

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Threadleaf Bluestar, American Aloe, and Prairie Dropseed provide texture and interest.

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

Exquisite transformation. Lovely use of plant material with repetition and interest. Very interesting transition from before to after. On the planting design sheet, an image of what looks like Stipa ‘Pony Tails’ aligns with the concrete pieces, which reinforces the walk very nicely. The fence is an unusual and artistic addition to this house makeover. The metal screening to the back yard is genius—very nice. An outstanding project. Wow! Lasered pattern on Corten panels accommodates a refined space transition. They offer an aesthetically pleasing, simple, and interesting screen solution (left). apld.org

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silver award

Plants were selected based on their drought resistance and ability to withstand the cobblestone mulch with an eye toward low maintenance. Concrete slabs serving as walkways add a fresh look and contrast nicely with the 1- to 2-inch cobblestone mulch in-between. Containers add accents (right).

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PHOTOGR A PHS BY A N DR EA WI LSON MU EL L ER

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The tiny 4x4-inch columns were replaced by beefy 10-inch columns to complete the look and bring the porch to scale. The traditional dentil fascia board was replaced with a plain board for a cleaner look (right).

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Although this design isn’t the typical landscape aesthetic, it was about expressing the clients’ aesthetic and creating a statement curb appeal.

Prairie Dropseed, Weeping Pussy Willow, columnar Yew, and Threadleaf Bluestar add multiseasonal interest. The Hosta and Dogwood were the only plants allowed to remain (above).

The Corten steel panels and cedar posts create architectural interest and screening (right). apld.org

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The new garden conveys a deliberate sense of stewardship, connecting the past, present, and future.

MONUMENT STREET GARDEN Residential Category over $100,000 Project Location: Concord, MA

Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design llc matthew-cunningham.com Firm Location: Stoneham, MA Zone: 6a JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

Built in 1820, the Bartlett-Emerson House epitomizes classic Colonial architectural forms of the period. The site’s sloped 3/4-acre lot is positioned in the heart of the Monument Square Historic District.

The mature plant material really grounds the landscape and rose to the historic connections. The repeated and varying uses and sizes of Boxwood is great. The entry gate is lovely and very fitting to this site. The rear walls scale well with the site and the plantings. The design looks to be well established and fits the plantings in the hillside in the rear. Great staging and the compositions are appropriate for the site and historic time frame. Overall, the landscape and gardens look “original” for today. 104

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Subtle bronze and granite detailing build upon the property’s history.

silver award

Reclaimed granite stepping stones lead to a gravel auto court softened by Viburnum, Itea, and Hayscented Fern (above). Permeable gravel paving allows water to return to the local watershed (left).

PHOTOGR A P H S BY M AT TH E W J. C U NNINGH AM

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A richly textured antique brick terrace is nestled beneath fieldstone walls, and a terraced landform is revealed. Lush shrubs soften the space.

Despite being new, the garden already feels remarkably well established. The project navigated strict historic preservation guidelines (right).

A century-old Beech provides invaluable scale and context. With an eye toward preserving mature canopy trees, the new masterplan choreographs circulation throughout the site (middle right).

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PHOTOGR A PHS BY MATTHEW J. CU N N IN G HA M

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silver award Layers of plants and masonry create a terraced hillside garden. Hydrangea, Boxwood, Liriope, Geranium, and Ferns create a gorgeous atmosphere.

New and established plantings complement and frame the antique barn (below).

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A single granite hitching post marks the driveway, beckoning a subtle connection to the past when visitors would have tied their horses for the duration of a short stay.

Indoor and outdoor spaces merge to allow for flexible programming. Stone stairs connect the main outdoor living area to an upper lawn where children and pets can run freely (left). apld.org

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Inspired by the horizontal lines of the clients’ home and knowing the topography of the rear yard, two levels of outdoor living space were integral to the design (above).

“Before” photo showing the existing patio and retaining wall, which were removed.

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The lower level is home to a 35x15-foot Gunnite swimming pool that was engineered to serve as a retaining wall to assist with the challenging topography of the back yard (right).


silver award BROOKS-EAKERS RESIDENCE Residential Category over $100,000 Project Location: Louisville, KY

Myers + Co. Landscape Architecture, Josh Myers myersandcompanyla.com Firm Location: Louisville, KY Zone: 6b

The concrete steppers that connect the upper and lower levels were planted with Blue Star Creeper. The design purposely used a modest palette of hardscape materials and plant materials so that the landscape works with the home instead of overshadowing it (above).

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

A good before and after showing a tight site and space designed well. The function and form of the space works. Solid and simple; maybe some pots could have pops of color, yet green is often the choice. Like the effect that the grasses bring to soften the hardscape. The clear site plan presented the project well. P H OTO GR A PHS BY J OSH MYER S, M YERS + CO. LA N DSCA PE A R CHI TECTUR E

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silver award

The two patio spaces are separated by plantings behind the retaining wall that serve as a soft filtered screen. On either end of the pool are small patios surrounded by ‘Hameln’ Dwarf Fountain Grass to provide texture and screening (above). BEFORE: An existing neglected raised plant bed was used to negotiate the slope from the concrete patio to the back yard and served as a retaining wall. Its exposed, bright red brick contrasted sharply with the cool, dark tones of the home (right).

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The site is located adjacent to Cherokee Park, which is a Frederick Law Olmstead-designed park. The goal was to create an outdoor space that worked with the mid-century modern aesthetic of the clients’ home, but that uses plantings that blend with the larger park setting too. P H OTO GRAP H S BY J OSH MYER S, MYER S + CO. LA N DSCA PE A R CHI TECTUR E

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Looking down a stepper path off the upper patio under the existing deck stairs one sees opportunity for shade plantings and possibly a hideaway nook.

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silver award C O N T E M P O R A R Y E S TAT E Residential Category Over $100,000 Project Location: Philadelphia, PA

Robinson Anderson Summers Inc. Landscape Architects raslainc.com Firm Location: Media, PA Zone: 7b The pool garden, spa, and outdoor dining area by night exude a sense of serenity. P H OTO G R A P H BY LI SA RO P ER

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A notable feature of the pool pavilion, shown here at night, is the transparent nature of its walls (left). PHOTOGR A PH BY LI SA ROPER

BEFORE: With the exception of a few existing Walnut trees, the site was cleared of vegetation and topsoil by the developer (below).

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

The project is striking and, as stated, exuberant. It’s a noteworthy space with the design of the pool and pavilion, which are fabulous and grounded with good plantings. The green roof adds a nice environmental touch as does the meadow. The space was used well, and the plants balance the amount of hardscape. apld.org

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Long views are selectively maintained to include the borrowed landscape. The sophisticated planting combinations include native and non-native plants to create a highly ornamental garden for all seasons.

What a lovely framed view toward the garden through a side window in the pool pavilion (left). The pool pavilion green roof slows the release of stormwater into a sculptural rain barrel and lessens the heat island effect.

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An aerial view of the pool. The pool pavilion provides shelter from all types of weather and includes a contemporary fireplace (above). PHOTOGR A PH BY LI SA R OPER

The side entrance gate is adjacent to the master suite courtyard, which is surrounded by a distinctive contemporary fence and hedges for privacy (left).

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silver award Concrete step pads, set in gravel, lead the way to the family pool.

S TA R V I E W R E S I D E N C E Residential Category over $100,000 Project Location: Danville, CA

Zacate Landscape Design, Mario Herrada zacld.com Firm Location: San Francisco, CA Zone: 9b PH OTO G R A P H S BY M ARIO H ERRADA

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A synthetic sod lawn provides a break in the hardscapes by introducing color and texture (right).


An austere design creates a calm setting for outdoor living. The clients use these spaces for family gatherings as well as work-related events (below).

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

The individuality of working with two pools is unique. The Acanthus in the gravel garden shot is great; perhaps mass more of these for a fuller effect in the overall scheme. The layout certainly works with the house and a constrained plant palette seems to work for this project and its inhabitants. Using the edge as a seat wall definitely enhances the usable space and gives variation. The use of low walls and the curved corner nicely frames the views beyond. This modern garden’s layout and colors complement the modern lines of the clients’ chic California home (above). apld.org

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The color scheme of the hardscape was chosen to complement the surrounding hillsides. The client-requested 75foot lap pool connects the flagstone patio to the gravel patio. At certain locations the lap pool is flush with the patios, and at others it’s 18 inches taller and acts as a seat wall (above). The garden planting is rich in colors, textures, and forms. A low-water-use drip irrigation system keeps them looking good (right).

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The drought-tolerant Mediterranean plant selections soften the gabion seat walls, which offer extra seating plus visual interest. Plants were selected for their strong architectural forms as well as flower color (above).

Heritage Oak trees provide shade and a backdrop to the gravel patio (top).

P H OTO GRAP H S BY M AR I O HER R A DA

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Residential Bronze Awards


GRANITE MODERN Residential Category over $100,000 Project Location: Montclair, NJ

Wow! What a difference in the back yard after the project’s completion. The deck landing was replaced with stone to match the patio.

M. ERBS Fine gardens m-erbs.com Firm Location: Denville, NJ Zone: 6 JUDGES' FEEDBACK: A sitting wall was installed to frame the custom, Good work opening up the living reclaimed granite curbstone firepit. space and developing beautiful, easy stairs into it. The granite curbing makes a nice fire pit. The space transition is good; very simple and composed. We love the structure and asymmetry of the granite in the lawn, plus the drone view is great. PH OTO G R A P H BY M . ERBS

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The clients wanted to address soil and drainage issues within the lawn, primarily, as well as install an irrigation system to sustain watering the plants and lawn. The solution: An app-based irrigation system makes sure overwatering does not occur in the future.

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bronze award This aerial view of the redesigned outdoor living area shows its great flow yet cozy areas. Note the IPE panel screening around the AC unit, which introduces a warm organic layer (left).

The large cloud-pruned Ilex hedge allows a sculptural backdrop to the lawn area and living space while maintaining privacy from the neighbors, which is important to the clients.

BEFORE: The backyard site had a poorly established and wet lawn as well as a bluestone patio and wooden deck landing off the house. Site conditions included highly compacted clay soil with poor drainage. Light exposure is a mix of sun and shade (left). The custom Ipe panel behind the outdoor kitchen provides a backdrop to these hydrangeas. Plantings were designed to have seasonal flowering interest while providing a tidy, year-round look. Landscape lighting was installed for evening enjoyment (right). P H OTO GRAPHS BY M. ER B S

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bronze award The natural, irregularly shaped stone steps along the waterfall complement the large limestone boulders in the water feature and retaining walls.

SUNSET HILLS Residential Category Over $100,000 Project Location: Sunset Hills, MO

Frisella Landscape Group, Tony Frisella Jr. frisellalandscapegroup.com Firm Location: Defiance, MO Zone: 6 PH OTO G R A P H S BY KI M DI L LO N P H OTO G R AP H Y (3)

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JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

This is an attractive project. Not only is the waterfall beautiful, it seems well thought-out and works well with the site. Overall, the views are good with the flow of the water. The materials in the outdoor kitchen fit in well and the plant list provides diversity. The extensive use of stone is good. The lighting illustrates another dimension.


The tranquil sounds of the waterfall accompany evenings around the fire pit, one of several areas for entertaining.

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If only all clients were like this. “We loved the designer’s vision, energy, and passion. The smartest thing we did was say, “ ‘Let us see your vision.’ ” This exquisite backyard oasis is illuminated by the LED lighting, also part of the design.

The sunken outdoor masonry kitchen and pergola both have counter seating on one side and a swim up bar on the other. It’s perfect for gatherings and is the entertainment hub (left).

PHOTOGR A PH BY B RIA N COL L IN S

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bronze award SYMPHONY HILLS RESIDENCE Residential Category $25,000 - $100,000 Project Location: Chaska, MN

The site was presented as you see it in this photo—a modern farmhouse-style suburban home on an empty lot with only a construction driveway, rough grade, and zero trees. It was a blank slate.

BlueOx PM blueoxpm.com Firm Location: Raleigh-Durham, NC & Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN Zone: 4b

The front yard water feature causes drivers to stop, gaze, and listen to the trickling water.

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

Overall, this design is well-presented and cohesive. A nice transition from “Before” to “After.” We love the angled low wall tying the front together and having a more unusual entry to the front door. Great idea. The columns are a nice touch to accent entering the front of the house. We like the stone with a reveal used as the step to the front porch. The bi-level deck in the back yard is a very nice touch with the arbor providing some screening from the adjacent homes. The plant choices offer a nice contrast and seasonal interest. Love the look of the Weeping White Pine. 126

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PHOTOGR A PHS BY TR ACY B O RCHA RDT

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Rather than have the driveway be a distraction, make it an attraction! With subtle details and color changes a utilitarian feature is now an asset. With its commanding view of the pond the multilevel terraced deck seamlessly transitions from the house to the yard creating unique rooms along the way (top). Not only is the deck material maintenance-free, with a view like this, the clients feel as if they live at their vacation home every day (middle right). This detail of a driveway column features a seasonal container that draws the eye. With varying heights, textures, colors, and seasonality, the plantings provide unlimited experiences as one views them from different places (right). The Chilton stone wall planter uses angles to create subtle drama through the garden (far right).

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Planting Design Awards

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bronze award

SEA LOFT Planting Design Category Project Location: Rockport, ME

Burdick & Associates, Bobbie Burdick burdickassociates.com Firm Location: Ellsworth, ME Zone: 5 PH OTOG R A P H S BY B O BBIE BU RD IC K

Original and new plantings can be seen on the steep slope of the property’s east side. Note the design detail in the fence (top).

The existing landscape of the clients’ arts-and-craftsstyle home exhibited severely overgrown and poorly designed plantings. apld.org

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bronze award PHOTO G R A P H BY R OB C A R D IL LO

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

This is a large project with many challenging areas, but there’s a very nice use of a diversity of plants with a sequence of bloom and autumn color. The design shows a good choice of site-appropriate planting material with good grouping in scale with the site. It was very nice to see that the design was several years old and has had time to mature. We are sure the homeowners love looking at the garden that was created for them.

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The plant material was organized around existing mature species so that there would be a hierarchy of heights. Whenever color is somewhat consistent, it’s all about texture! P HOTOGR A PHS BY B OB B I E B UR DI CK

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The property’s character was very important to the clients as they enjoy their views out to Penobscot Bay. Scaling the plantings appropriately with the home maximizes those views.

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The clients’ home is situated on a slope with a large stone ledge on the water side of the house. Fall color enhances its appearance to make the ledge a design element.

The design goal was to create a unified palette to weave existing and new plantings together so the house feels as if it were dropped into a greater landscape. As many existing plants as possible were used while additional species were added to achieve interest in three seasons. Large, overlapping masses were incorporated to give it an established look overall. apld.org

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bronze award T I LT O N P O O L G A R D E N Planting Design Category Project Location: Santa Fe, NM

Living Water Irrigation & Landscape, llc, Mark G. Brotton livingwaterSF.com Firm Location: Santa Fe, NM Zone: 6b

Plant design was critical for this project to encourage a rainbow of colors with evergreen accents for fall and winter garden elements (right). PH OTOG RA PH BY M A RK G . B ROT TON ( 2 )

The pool deck garden is populated primarily with summer-blooming plantings since this is a summer home. However, some fall and winter seasonal accent plantings were added for the clients’ occasional visits outside summer. Variegated Maiden Grasses boasting lovely plumes are a feature. P H OTO GRAP H BY CHA R LES MA N N

JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE:

This is an excellent makeover of an existing garden. The plant choices are lovely, and we especially like the color echoes and repetition of Miscanthus. Reducing the rock accent was a good idea, and the plants do a nice job of softening it. 132

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Compare this photo (shot by drone) above the pool to the original design—the valuable real estate has been repurposed to serve as a garden rather than a resting spot for rocks. PHOTOGR A PH BY KE EG A N M. B ROT TON

The pool deck garden before the redesign shows the preponderance of enormous boulders (most of which were removed by crane), as well as a planting void.

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Sometimes less is more. The original boulder water feature wasn’t highly visible and was obstructed by the pool and hot tub enclosure. To view as well as hear it one had to be close to the lower tile level. To remedy this design, the large, car-sized boulders incorporated into the water feature were removed, which opened up much-needed garden space. apld.org

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Small Garden Awards



silver award PETWORTH GARDEN MAKEOVER Small Gardens Category Project Location: Washington, DC

Lynley Ogilvie Landscape Design llc lynleyogilvie.com Firm Location: McLean, VA Zone: 7b

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

Beautiful concept with a very nice transition from before to after. The dark fence did make the space look bigger! The plant materials look great in the images and we loved how the plants are elevated to be out of the way of the dog. There’s a nice texture difference with the plants. Spaces are nicely divided and we like the gravel base of the area. Nice job. 136

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BEFORE: The site was a 20x28-foot fenced back yard in Washington, DC, filled with compacted soil, construction debris, and weeds. Access was limited through the townhouse basement and a back alley (above left).


A custom cedar pergola with a louvered canopy screens the views from neighboring townhouses. The fence was stained black and large black planters divide the space in half (above). apld.org

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silver award Large ceramic urns add color and texture; the containers were filled with plants selected for their dramatic foliage.

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Rather than paving the yard, which the client originally requested, a oneinch layer of small river gravel set on a stone dust base was installed, creating a dog-friendly and entirely permeable floor.

Matching black storage bins with cedar-slat lids provide extra seating and space to store cushions and small garden tools. The Panicum are droughttolerant and low maintenance (above) .

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The simple and affordable flooring of river rock is dog friendly and adds an organic element across the entire yard (above). The client, a young woman with a large dog, wanted a lush but lowmaintenance outdoor space for relaxing and entertaining as well as space for her dog. Neighboring townhouses looked directly onto the yard, so privacy was important (left). The black-stained fence serves as a foil for the bright color of the Japanese Maple. Container plantings offer surprising pops of color among shades of green (left). apld.org

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S M A L L YA R D S A N C T U A R Y Small Gardens Category Project Location: Moraga, CA

Secret Garden Landscapes, Laura Osteen secretgarden-landscapes.com Firm Location: Moraga, CA Zone: 9b JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE:

What a lovely solution to a very tight space. The addition of the wall along the side of the home with the arbor was a very nice design detail, as were the wire panels on the fence for vines. The wall is also a nice spot for additional seating. The fireplace fits the design well and the dining area is equally as comfortable. The pergola over the narrow walkway adds depth to the space and makes it feel different. Overall—a nice job!

Uneven concrete, awkward planting beds, and a run-down pergola added to the feeling of an uninspiring space.

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The spacious side yard provides ample play area. To provide privacy and shade during summer, a large pergola extends along the south side of the home. PHOTOGR A PHS BYLAU R A OSTEEN , SECR ET GA R DEN LA N DSCA PES LLC


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Six freestanding lattices placed along the fence line have espaliered plants growing on them, adding color and depth.

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The design blends outdoor space seamlessly with indoor living as well as making every inch of space functional and family friendly. The addition of a gas fireplace in the corner created a focal point that helps draw visitors outside and gives a feeling of a much larger indoor/ outdoor living space. A mix of hardscape materials (poured concrete and synthetic grass) creates dimension and usability. The kids can roll around on the grass, but the concrete makes it feel larger. Bocce anyone? apld.org

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PROSPECT LEFFERTS GARDENS LANDSCAPE Small Gardens Category Project Location: Brooklyn, NY

Staghorn NYC, Katherine Aul Cervoni staghornnyc.com Firm Location: Brooklyn, NY Zone: 6b Lighting combines the practical and ambient. New wall sconces provide light for outdoor dining. Low-voltage fixtures nestled among the plants highlight their forms and masses. The IPE steps are inlaid with flush-mounted LED fixtures to offer safe passage after dark (top).

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The dark, cramped, nearly bare back yard was mostly unusable. It was composed of a small lawn and a horizontal fence that encroached into the space to hide the HVAC (above).

Classic bluestone was selected for the dining area and gray-toned pea gravel was selected for the more casual lounge area (top middle).

PHOTOGR A PHS BY A N THO N Y CRISA F U L L I


bronze award

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

What a nice job. The addition of the wood fence in front of the other fence connects to the IPE steps and unifies the small space. The patio stone feathering into the nice use of gravel is a nice design touch and provides both paving and drainage. It is a great, relaxing space in the late afternoon. The simple plant material adds layers to the patio area. A staggered border allows the patio proportions to feel more harmonious. All rainwater is contained and absorbed onsite via grading toward the pea gravel and plantings (right).

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With a site measuring less than 700 square feet, practicing restraint in everything from colors to plants was essential to avoid visually overwhelming the space. To reduce waste, a portion of the original privacy fencing was kept. A solid stain in medium gray was applied to tie in with the new elements (top). apld.org

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Details Design Award

Colorful custom shade sails provide compression and intimacy. The lowvoltage lighting maintains the ambience of the space outside of daylight hours.

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silveraward

MESA FIRE Project Location: Boulder, CO

TLC Gardens tlcgardens.com Firm Location: Longmont, CO Zone: 5a One of the clients’ needs was to be able to view their new outdoor space from their second story. Their indoor kitchen features bright red cabinets and royal blue countertops, thus connecting the home in function and style from the inside out (top). PH OTOG R A P H S BY DAV ID W INGE R

The custom-formed fire pit includes built-in ventilation and sleeving. Its focal point within the patio helps fulfill the clients’ wish for a functional outdoor space for adults and teenagers alike (above).

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JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

A very beautiful and creative solution to a small space. We really enjoyed the colorful hanging tarps above the seating area and the use of old barnwood to create the panels that help produce more 3-D in a very tight space. The blue sails contrast nicely with the orange seating and pick up the color of the blue spruce. The plant material changed but the added grasses soften the hardscapes of this project. Nice job! The plant palette features native varieties selected specifically to suit the region and for long-lasting success in limited spaces (below).

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No drainage existed on site, resulting in water routinely pooling under the deck. A linear drain was incorporated in the gravel section underneath, directing waterflow away from the home to planted areas where it can be absorbed purposefully (above).


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The distinctive wood utilized on the barnwood screens was repurposed from a dismantled barn. The screens also complement the fire pit by framing it in the desired color palette (above). PH OTO G R A P H S BY DAV I D W IN G E R

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The distinctive wood utilized on the barnwood screens was sourced from a dismantled barn and repurposed to create the screens. But it’s the fire pit that is the central element of Mesa Fire, creating a timeless, inviting outdoor space for family and friends to come together. The playful circular steppers at each entrance accentuate the lifelines of the design. They were tested for optimal rhythm and flow. apld.org

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Specialty Projects Awards



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silver award M A N H AT TA N S U N S E T T E R R A C E Specialty Project Category Project Location: New York, NY

Dimastery Studio, Dima Rumiantcev dimastery.com Firm Location: Brooklyn, NY Zone: 6b JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

Gorgeous! Given the very restrictive site, the solution is very successful! A tricky space has been transformed, and what a transformation. Nice plant choices; the trees and plantings look great. The Birch trees will need replacing on a regular basis, but they’re an improvement on what was there before.

The bespoke planters (above) with built-in lounge seating are ready for custom cushions—and visitors! The western terrace lounge space can be viewed from the home office. The lounge chairs and low pots are strategically placed to allow unimpeded views (left). The design challenge was how best to utilize an ultra-long and narrow (8’ by 100’) space running through the center of the terrace. The center corridor now allows easy indoor/outdoor entertaining (far left). PHOTOGR A PHS BY MA R K A N DR EW PHOTO

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Bespoke planters and seating units with built-in storage enable cushions, irrigation, and lighting equipment to be inconspicuously stashed. Placed throughout the terrace are colorfully planted pots that help to round out and soften the severe, straight lines of the terrace. 152

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To the west, the terrace overlooks lower Manhattan’s skyline and provides an opportunity to enjoy spectacular sunsets. Strategically placed plantings frame the views (above). PHOTOGR A PH BY MA R K A N DR EW PHOTO These “Before” images show some of the challenges of the long, narrow, and uninviting space, which was totally lacking privacy. P H OTO GRAP H S BY D IM A RU M IANTC EV

Uninterrupted sunset and skyline views are offered from the west-facing terrace. And this is one of the reasons we love New York (above). PH OTOG R A P H BY MA RK AN D R E W P H OTO

Custom cedar woodwork with removable screens conceals HVAC equipment while allowing maintenance access. Intentional latticework ensures airflow around the units, as well as storage and privacy (left). PH OTOG R A P H BY DI MA RUM IA N TC E V

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silver award ARCH GARDEN Specialty Project Category Project Location: Frontenac, MO

Frisella Landscape Group, Tony Frisella Jr. frisellalandscapegroup.com Firm Location: Defiance, MO Zone: 6

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Made of Indiana limestone, the keystone arch is the portal into the garden. The arch itself was a design challenge to ensure it was structurally sound while keeping the intended look and feel. Wing walls help stabilize the arch. PHOTOGR A PHS BY MOSES U KOH

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JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

Stunning! This entry is similar to the Rockefeller Garden in Bar Harbor, Maine. The repetition of the form with steel trellises is a lot of fun. The high beds are so the gardener does not have to bend over, a plus. The clients originally had in mind four simple cedar boxes for the raised beds. But the designer’s creativity and vision evolved into a stunning destination of the “Arch Garden” of four masonry raised beds and five grapevine trellises (top).

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Steel trellises support the five grapevines (above). PHOTOGR A PHS BY MOSES UKOH (3)


silver award Grasses, sedges, and low-lying shrubs, trees, and native perennials dot the landscape of the 20- by 40-foot recreation pond that is home to dragonflies, monarch butterflies, and beneficial insects.

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The intent of the Arch Garden was to provide ergonomic gardening beds while creating a unique, sculptural space for entertaining and showcasing the grapevine trellises. The designer-created lighting plan for the Arch Garden features lighted grapevine trellises for evening ambiance and entertaining.

The tall raised beds encourage ergonomic gardening. It’s such high, formal design that this is entertaining space as well (above). A masonry raised planter with a Seven-sons Flower tree serves as a focal point beyond the grapevine trellis walkway at the crossroad where the path continues to the back of the house. The bluestone stepping-stones are paired with permeable trap gravel (left). PHOTOGR A PH BY TON Y FR I SELLA J R.

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silver award SÖNG RANCH Specialty Project Category Project Location: Hygiene, CO

TLC Gardens tlcgardens.com Firm Location: Longmont, CO Zone: 5a

The historical silo was preserved and incorporated into the design. Söng Ranch itself is a historical homestead where the clients cultivate and harvest fresh food from their gardens (right). PHOTOGR A PH BY CHER I STR I N GER

JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

A very interesting design and mission. Certainly, it’s a calming walk from the parking area to the teaching patio area. The interesting water feature should generate calming sounds during training sessions. The planting by the training area is colorful and bold. It’s a very creative use of existing space. The huge rocks add a wonderful element to the experience of practicing Tai Chi there. We like the repetition of them along the path from the parking lot to the building and to the house. The water trickling out of the rock is delightful. Nice choice of plant material. 158

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The journey begins with the first step from the parking area through the outer garden. The outer garden topography frames this journey and facilitates water management (left). The custom water feature mirrors the natural sounds of the adjacent creek and adds soundscaping to the overall therapeutic experience. PHOTOGR A PHS BY DAVI D WI N GE R ( 2 )


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The design intent was to use the building blocks of Tai Chi—flow, balance, and the path of least resistance— to inform the geometry, architecture, and experience of the landscape.

A trifecta of elements came together to create an intimate space for clients and students to experience peaceful practice. Entrance to the studio space is accented by native plantings. Part of the design’s stated environmental responsibility was to source native plantings suited to the region. PHOTOGR A PHS BY DAVI D WI N GER (3)

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The design intent was t use the building blocks of Tai Chi—flow, balanc and the path of least resistance—to inform th geometry, architecture and experience of the


to s ce,

he e,

Reframed and reimagined, the studio is connected to its space. Boulders form a grounding wall 3–5 feet tall (above). P H OTO GRAP H BY C H ER I STR I N GER

The patio space outside the Tai Chi studio is defined by the shade shack, moon gate, and a grounding wall of boulders (top).

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Show Garden Award

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gold award

DISCOVERY GARDEN Project Location: RHS Chelsea Flower Show, London, UK

Gavin McWilliam & Andrew Wilson mcwilliamstudio.com Firm Location: Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, UK Zone: 9 JUDGES' FEEDBACK:

Beautifully done and totally breathtaking! We like the packed earthen walls, the overhead structure, and the cantilevered concrete deck. It’s been masterfully constructed. The angles are also very imaginative. These are interesting treatments to the upper lengths of the pipes.

The garden was designed as the last area of a private garden to be developed along a quiet stream. Gravel planting gave the space a relaxed quality with mossy boulders emerging along the water’s edge (far left). This detail of the GRP roof structure and copper supports one of the designer’s thought processes, that of concentrating on ordinary elements made extraordinary (above). PHOTOGR A PHS BY PAUL CHI LDS

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gold award Iris, Camassia, Euphorbia, and Sesleria provide informal planting groups with Mathiasella and Aquilegia providing jewel-like spots of colour. Pachystegia insignis, the Marlborough rock daisy, was also featured (opposite page). PH OTO G R A P H BY PAU L CH ILDS

Berberis and Buxus in the foreground of the rammed wall detail. The walls along with the concrete paving had to be constructed off-site and transported to the show grounds without sustaining damage (below).

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Planting was challenging the winter preceding the show as temperatures were well below seasonal norms. As a result, flowers were in short supply and many substitutions were made. The structural planting relied on three rescued apple trees, gnarled and full of character; low, organic forms of an unusual Buxus, ‘Varder Valley’, which created a shaggy, organic quality with specimens of the rare; and silver-leafed Berberis temolaica (shown here) providing contrast (right).

PHOTOGR A PHS BY MCWI LLIA M ST U DIO ( 2 )

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gold award

A cantilevered polished concrete terrace overhung the stream providing a location to sit and relax while dangling one’s feet in the water (below). PHOTOGR A PH BY MCWI LLI A M ST U DIO

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The concrete terrace was partially covered by an elegant pavilion supported on copper poles (simple pipes, in reality) that emerged through the roof to spire upward, catching the light. The delicate forms of Iris ‘Sable’ and Iris sibirica ‘Shirley Pope’ in this planting detail contrast to the strong, bold lines of the concrete (below). PH OTO G R A P H BY PAU L C H ILDS

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2021

board of directors

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE PRESIDENT Eric Gilbey, PLA Vectorworks, Inc. 7150 Riverwood Drive Columbia, MD 21046 (443) 542-0658 PRESIDENT-ELECT Richard Rosiello Rosiello Designs & Meadowbrook Gardens 159 Grove Street New Milford, CT 06776 (860) 488-6507 TREASURER Wickie Rowland, APLD Design & Landscape (Div of Labrie Associates) PO Box 635 New Castle, NH 03854 (603) 828-8868 IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT Danilo Maffei, FAPLD Maffei Landscape Design, LLC 202 N. Garfield Street Kennett Square, PA 19348 (610) 357-9700

DIRECTORS Linda Middleton, FAPLD Terralinda Design 1839 Ygnacio Valley Rd., #150 Walnut Creek, CA 94598 (925) 448-2441

CONNECT WITH US!

Lynley Ogilvie Lynley Ogilvie Landscape Design 1636 Madux Lane McLean, VA 22101 (703) 864-9628 Bill Ripley, FAPLD Stride Studios 8525 Miami Road Cincinnati, OH 45243 (513) 984-4882 Katie Weber, APLD Katie Weber Landscape Design 5637 45th Avenue SW Seattle, WA 98136 (206) 391-8894

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The Designer is an official publication and member service of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD), 2207 Forest Hills Drive, Harrisburg, PA 17112. Ph: 717-238-9780 Fax: 717-238-9985 Disclaimer: Mention of commercial products in this publication is solely for information purposes; endorsement is not intended by APLD. Material does not reflect the opinions or beliefs of APLD. APLD is not responsible for unsolicited freelance manuscripts and photographs. All printed articles become the copyright of APLD. apld.org

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A Tour of European Gardens Designing with Tropical Plants

Growing Your Design Business 2021 RE S I D E N T I A L GOLD AWA R D B R I D L E TRA IL S G A R D E N BY SPR I N G G RE E N WO R KS, L LC IN BE LL E V U E , WA