Page 1

thedesıgner ASSOCIATION OF

PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS

Fall 2016

2016 APLD INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN

Awards


editor’sletter Problem? Solved! MEMO: To: Designer From: Client Re: Project Needs

Hello! We are looking forward to working with you! Before we have our meeting, we just wanted to let you know about a few things we really want to make sure to incorporate. So, we have a pool, but we don’t want an ugly fence. There’s also a big hill in the backyard between the pool house and the house, and oh right, our dog sometimes gets stuck under the pool house—we’d like a workaround. The only space we have for our vegetable garden/outdoor dining room/ swing set measures 20 × 20, but that’s enough, right? You’re a pro! We know you can handle it. We want big areas to feel small and small areas to feel big, we have elderly parents, we can’t violate any of our HOA codes re: trees, and there’s also the neighborhood historical society—can’t forget about them! We went to Spain last year and shipped back a sculpture, so gotta squeeze that in. And if you think there’s room, we want a petanque court. OK! Can’t wait!

A

fter looking through photographs of the 2016 APLD International Design Award winners, I’m convinced that, along with the professional distinction designers receive upon winning an award, they should also get one of those tshirts that says “I’m a Designer—because ‘Miracle Worker’ isn’t a real job description.”

Rochelle Greayer said something to me this spring that came raging back to the front of my mind while I was reading the design briefs for these award-winning gardens. She said, “So many civil problems could be solved with good design.” That’s essentially what these award-winning designers have done—with ingenuity and style. It’s too bad we can’t turn you loose with free reign to re-organize your home cities.

My thanks to Jane Berger, FAPLD, Kelly Kilpatrick, and Vanessa Nagel, APLD, for highlighting the key takeaways and stories behind this year’s award-winning designs. Keep your notebooks handy while you read. I’m sure you’ll find some new ideas and inspiration for your own work. Congratulations to all of the winners!

KATIE ELZER-PETERS

2

|

apld.org

EDITOR@APLD.ORG


SONIC B LOOM ® PEAR L

S O N I C BL OOM ® PIN K

Sonic Bloom Reblooming Weigela ®

SONIC BLOOM ® RED

These varieties have the strongest reblooming ever seen in weigelas, with loads of flowers in May followed by waves of blooms until frost. Sonic Bloom weigela are perfect for mass plantings, mixed borders, and foundation planting.

Sonic Bloom® is a registered trademark of Syngenta Group Company.

www.provenwinners-shrubs.com

Available from Proven Winners® ColorChoice® growers.

4 - 5’ TALL & WIDE USDA ZONE 4, AHS 8 FULL SUN TO PART SHADE


contents

Charles Hess' Bryn Mawr project takes GOLD 4

|

apld.org


FALL 2016 6 PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 7 JUDGES 8 CONTRIBUTORS 12 2016 APLD INTERNATIONAL DESIGNER OF THE YEAR Carrie Preston of Studio TOOP 18 GOLD AWARDS Matthew Cunningham (2) Katherine Field Charles Hess (3) Shannon Mohr (2) Andrew Wilson & Gavin McWilliam 46 SILVER AWARDS John Beaudry Matthew Cunningham Margie Grace Hilarie Holdsworth Kimberly Mercurio (2) Colin Miller (3) Leslie Needham Carrie Preston Kathryn Prideaux, APLD (2) Patricia St. John, APLD Cheri Stringer, APLD (2) 125 BRONZE AWARDS 140 STUDENT AWARD Jane Finlay ON THE COVER : 2016 A PLD DESI GN ER OF THE YEA R W I N N ER CA R R I E PR ESTO N OF STU DI O TOOP. PHOTOGR A PH BY OLGA VA N SA N N E ON THI S PAGE: 2016 A PLD GOLD WI N N ER DESI G N BY CHA R LES HESS. PHOTOGR A PH BY STEPHEN GOVEL PHOTOGR A PHY

apld.org

|

5


thedesıgner EDITOR IN CHIEF Katie Elzer-Peters ART DIRECTOR

Marti Golon COPY EDITOR

Claire Splan PROOFREADER

Billie Brownell EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Denise Calabrese, CAE ASSOCIATE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Lisa Ruggiers MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR

Angela Burkett COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR

Michelle Keyser EVENTS DIRECTOR

Lori Zelesko MEMBERSHIP, CERTIFICATION & CHAPTER ASSOCIATE

Kelly Clark COMMUNICATIONS ASSOCIATE

Courtney Kuntz FINANCE ADMINISTRATOR

Jennifer Swartz DATABASE MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATOR

Leona Wagner OFFICE SPECIALIST

Jamie Hoffman

Charles Hess' Buttonwood project is a 2016 APLD Gold award winner. PHOTO G RA PH BY STEPHEN GOV EL PHOTO G RA PHY

>>Click name to email us! For information on advertising in The Designer, contact communications@apld.org >>Click here for our submission guidelines


thejudges

Carolyn Mullet

Julie Moir Messervy

Carolyn Mullet is an awardwinning designer who received formal training in residential landscape design from George Washington University following her first career as a potter. After more than two decades as a landscape designer for prominent design/build firms, Carolyn now provides design services through Carex: Garden Design by Carolyn Mullet and hosts European garden travel experiences through carexTours. Whether working as a designer or hosting tours to exemplary European gardens, Carolyn is driven to connect people with nature and the outdoors through garden spaces. She serves as the APLD DC/MD/VA chapter president and board member, a Garden Conservancy regional representative, and volunteers with the Takoma Park Open Space Committee. She has received five Grand Awards and two Awards of Distinction from the Landscape Contractors Association.

Author and landscape designer Julie Moir Messervy’s vision for composing landscapes of beauty and meaning is furthering the evolution of landscape design and changing the way people create and enjoy their outdoor surroundings. Julie is the principal designer of JMMDS, a landscape architecture and design firm in Saxtons River, Vermont, creators of parks and residential gardens around the country. Her best- known work, the three-acre Toronto Music Garden, was designed in collaboration with noted cellist Yo-Yo Ma and received the Leonardo da Vinci Award for innovation and creativity. She is a distinguished lecturer and the author of eight books on landscape design, including Landscaping Ideas That Work; Home Outside: Creating the Landscape You Love; and Outside the Not So Big House with Sarah Susanka. She has written numerous articles, including the popular long-running “Inspired Design” column for Fine Gardening magazine, and gives lectures and workshops around North America. Julie has a mission to use digital technologies to bring great design to anyone, anywhere. She created the Home Outside® online design service and Home Outside® Palette landscape design app to do just that. For more information, please visit www. jmmds.com.

Gregory M. Pierceall ASLA

Greg Pierceall is a Professor Emeritus of Purdue Landscape Architecture, where he taught for 29 years. He has been involved with APLD for 20-plus years and is the recipient of the International Award of Excellence from APLD in 2003. As a site and landscape designer, Greg’s philosophy is that landscape design should reflect the space, place, case, taste, and time, as well as the individual, personal aspects associated with the design context and program. As an educator, Greg works to take landscape design issues and simplify them to their elemental parts and components. Greg has authored numerous books on landscape design and interiorscapes, including Residential Landscapes, one of the first landscape texts written for the industry. He has been extensively involved with the Illinois Landscape Contractors Association, and was the recipient of their Service Award in 2004 and the Man of the Year Award in 2008. He currently is a consulting educator and lectures nationally and internationally on landscape design.

apld.org

|

7


contributors Flexible seating options allows garden visitors to follow the sun or shade throughout the garden.

Shannon Mohr's Mansion in Ann Arbor, Michigan

Katherine Field's Bridge House, Jamestown, Rhode Island

Leslie Needham's River Hills estate, Bedford, New York

2016 APLD INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE

Colin Miller's Conner Residence, Orinda, California

2016 APLD INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE

Gold Award Winners

Silver Award Winners

2016 APLD INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE

12

|

Designer of the Year

THE INCLUSIVE GARDEN BY STUDIO TOOP IN THE NETHERLANDS

apld.org

Kelly Kilpatrick International Designer of the Year

apld.org

|

Shannon Mohr's Turtle Lake House in Location, TK 13

18

|

|

|

Kathryn Prideaux's Spicy, Tuscan, Arizonia 19

60

|

apld.org

Jane Berger FAPLD

Gold Award Winners

p. 46

p. 12

p. 18

Kelly Kilpatrick has been creating plantalicious gardens in the San Francisco Bay Area since 2000. She is the owner of Floradora Garden Design and keeps a garden journal at the blog Floradora.

Vanessa is the owner of Seasons Garden Design LLC in Vancouver, Washington, and the author of Understanding Garden Design and The Designer’s Guide to Garden Furnishings. She is a director on APLD’s international board, and has won numerous awards for her designs, including an APLD Merit Award and an Award of Excellence from Sunset magazine’s Landscape Design Competition.

apld.org

apld.org

Vanessa Gardner Nagel APLD, NCIDQ

>>Click bold names for link to website 8

Charles Hess' Philadelphia Farm to Forest, Philadelphia, PA

apld.org

Cheri Stringer's Red Renaissance Residence, Boulder, Colorado apld.org

Silver Award Winners

Jane Berger, FAPLD, has been designing gardens for the past 20 years and writing about them even longer, for Landscape Architecture Magazine, The American Gardener, The Associated Press, and others. After a career as a radio news correspondent in Washington DC, Jane graduated from the Landscape Design Program at George Washington University. She served on the Board of Directors at APLD as Communications Chair and was editor of The Designer from 2009 to 2013.

|

61


thank you to our

sponsors GOLD

SILVER

BRONZE

>>Click logos for link to their website


Spectacular

information-rich

dynascape.com 1.800.710.1900

Landscape designs


president’smessage Courage!

I

have spent a few available moments over the last month taking photos of gardens that were installed this last year. It is educational, enjoyable, and advantageous for me to see the gardens grow and expand since their beginnings. I study the images, judging what needs adjusting, what I should do differently next time and relishing in a splendid detail that was borne from a drawing and is now real life. Largely, these images are for me to ponder, share with new clients, or post to my website. But I’m not really taking it to the next level.

Every year APLD hosts the APLD International Landscape Design Awards highlighting the best of the best from designers just like you and me who have had the courage to take the plunge and submit their installed gardens for evaluation and assessment. The APLD International Landscape Design Awards Program honors the best in landscape design from around the world. The program brings exceptional talent to the attention of peers, potential clients, and the world of design. Entry categories include non-residential, residential, small gardens, planting design, show gardens, specialty projects and details. Over the years, award recipients have received far-reaching notoriety outside of the organization after receiving an APLD Design Award.

Within APLD, award recipients receive featured coverage in The Designer magazine and extensive public relations dissemination. 2017 winners will be honored at the APLD International Design Conference in Boston next July.

It takes courage to share your work in this way, but doing so has the potential for huge rewards! Clients both past and present, your peers and colleagues, and the collective “we” the audience are the real winners here; just take a look through this issue for pages and pages of award winners demonstrating exacting designs and unscrupulous attention to detail. Deadline for submission for 2017 is October 31, 2016. Isn’t it time to schedule that photography session in your favorite garden now? LISA PORT APLD

apld.org

|

11


Flexible seating options allow garden visitors to follow the sun or shade throughout the garden.

2016 APLD INTERNA

12

|

Designer o

apld.org


ATIONAL LANDSCAPE

of the Year

T H E IN C LUSIVE G A R DEN BY STUDI O TOOP I N THE NETHER L ANDS apld.org

|

13


designeroftheyear A simple path becomes an adventure.

14

|

apld.org


SHOW GARDEN The Inclusive Garden, Appeltern, the Netherlands

Carrie Preston

Studio TOOP Amersfoort, the Netherlands JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: Very

well-thought-out green design. Excellent creative use of available space and materials. Inspirational in its thoughtful approach to using accessible and inexpensive materials. A warm, peoplefriendly design. Pleasing proportions between planting and hardscape. Brilliantly conceived, perfectly created and realized. I’m so impressed.

C

arrie Preston of Studio TOOP, based in Amersfoort, the Netherlands, has created a show garden called “The Inclusive Garden” that aims to provide an example to homeowners on how to create a green, wildlife-inclusive space. The project is a permanent show garden located at the model garden complex in the town of Appeltern.

Originally approached by the garden magazine Groei & Bloei (Grow and Bloom) and the Dutch TV nature program “Vroege Vogels” (Early Birds), Studio TOOP was charged with giving readers and visitors an example of how individual residential gardens can combine to create a larger ecosystem for birds, insects, and other creatures. In addition, Studio TOOP wished to provide an antidote to the long-term trend of “exclusive gardens” in the Netherlands. These exclusive gardens were full of expensive paving and furniture, with little space left for plantings or wildlife. The Inclusive Garden acts as a remedy to this trend and is inviting and accessible not only to people, but also to wildlife that is struggling to find connected spaces of habitat. In the short time it has been installed, the Inclusive Garden has become ➸ PH OTO GRAP H Y BY JO LANTH E LA LKEN S

apld.org

|

15


Concrete pavers and natural materials create textural interest and nooks for insects.

home to many kinds of birds, frogs, dragonflies, bees, and hedgehogs.

Inclusiveness also extends to the garden owners, most notably by using humble hardscape materials for creating inviting living spaces, so that homeowners could afford to create similar structures in their own gardens. Benches and walls are created with inexpensive precast cement pavers stacked with openings to allow space for natural materials that can then become habitat for beneficial insects.

The space in the Inclusive Garden is laid out to allow the visitor freedom and choice within the garden. Which path to take? Where to sit? What to investigate, discover, and experience? The bench and walls create a rhythm that defines and links together separate garden spaces. They give a visual definition and contrast to the loose, natural plantings. The plantings make use of a Groei & Bloei plant list consisting of dependable, available, easy-care selections. The list follows along with the idea put forth by Mein Ruys, a Dutch 20th-century landscape architect, who suggested that if language can be created from the 26 letters of the alphabet, then beautiful gardens can be created out of a selection of 26 plants. The Inclusive Garden shows homeowners how something exceptional can be made from simple components.

APLD International Designer of the Year Carrie Preston has honed her craft from a young age by spending time analyzing public spaces wherever she travels, deciphering the success or failure of how these spaces function. Preston’s analytical eye allows her to see the power of slight grade changes and how spatial modifications can be transformative on the landscape. The Inclusive Garden allows people to enjoy the garden in a variety of ways while still allowing space for other garden users such as birds and insects. It truly is an inclusive garden.

â?§

16

|

apld.org

PHOTOGR A PHY BY J OLA N THE LA LK EN S


designeroftheyear

Some plantings provide food for humans too!

apld.org

|

17


Shannon Mohr's Ann Arbor in Plymouth, Michigan

2016 APLD INTERNAT

Gold Awar Shannon Mohr's Turtle Lake House in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 18

|

apld.org


Katherine Field's Bridge House, Jamestown, Rhode Island

TIONAL LANDSCAPE

rd Winners Charles Hess' Philadelphia Farm to Forest, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania apld.org

|

19


20

|

apld.org


goldaward

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000 Cambridge Garden, Cambridge, MA

Matthew Cunningham

Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design, LLC Stoneham, MA U S D A Z O N E : 6B JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Simple

and stunning! Modern, fresh, and above all, local. Clear, sensitive, sustainable ideas executed with verve. A wonderful, un-fussy garden for a busy family.” P H OTO G R A P H Y BY M ATTH E W CU NNINGH AM

apld.org

|

21


goldaward Cunningham brought a woodland plant palette to this urban garden. A bit of country in the city.

D

riven by their love of the outdoors, this forward-thinking family wanted to bring the best elements from their coastal woodland weekend home to their totally urban home just outside Harvard Square. But to do that, the designer would have to resolve severely poor-draining soils surrounding the original 1960s home—now dilapidated, dark, dank, and unsafe. Could creative storm water redesign coupled with new, low-care plantings and vibrant, flexible private/play areas bring about this transformation for a meaningful garden-focused lifestyle? Yes. The landscape surrounding this new contemporary home stands out among its Cambridge neighbors. It is on a uniquely perched hydrologic table and the lot is adjacent to a busy pedestrian and bicycle route, both of which required a thoughtful approach. Moisture-loving plantings that absorb the abundant water and a new auto court that uses charcoal-colored porous unit pavers above an 18-inch bed of crushed stone were incorporated to manage the critical issue of storm water. The master plan’s success hinged on these storm water solutions and the rugged, adaptive plants that thrive with minimal care.

22

|

Because the modern, active family so loves the outdoor lifestyle of their weekend home, designer Matthew Cunningham created a natural landscape that suits the context outwardly and works inside-out to soften the contemporary lines of the house. A 6-foot-tall wood wall stands prominently along the eastern edge of the property, buffering it from the hectic streetscape. Multi-seasonal trees and shrubs combine with lush swaths of ferns, woodland asters, and sedges to soften

PHOTOGR A PHY BY MATTHEW CUN N I N GH A M

apld.org


edges of a carefully composed matrix of reclaimed, hand-picked granite slabs (some more than 12 feet long) embedded in the earth to create new terraces and walks. A continuous lawn and stone staircase spans the entire width of the rear yard, forming impromptu seating opportunities above an activity lawn.

Cunningham carved out the flexible outdoor spaces to create privacy as well as space for active play and entertaining while simultaneously relating to interior spaces and contributing to the vibrancy of the neighborhood. A few dramatic specimen linden trees along the perimeter were preserved and enhanced by gorgeous new cedars, viburnums, rhododendrons, and witch hazels dancing beneath the canopy and under-planted with perennials, mosses, and groundcovers. It’s a stunner.

â?§

STEAL THIS: Focus

on environmentally friendly products and repurposed materials whenever possible. Create privacy buffers for garden spaces adjacent to busy streetscapes.

apld.org

|

23


goldaward

SMALL GARDEN DESIGN Beacon Hill Courtyard, Boston, MA

Matthew Cunningham

Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design, LLC Stoneham, MA U S D A Z O N E : 6B JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “A

stellar design that fits client needs and the context. Well executed and detailed. Loving the moss strip accent and detail. A solid and well-thought-out design. A work of landscape art and function.”

24

|

apld.org

PHOTOGR A PHY BY MATTHEW CUN N I N GHA M


Delicate-looking, but sturdy furnishings add function to the small space without being visually overwhelming.

apld.org

|

25


goldaward

B

eacon Hill’s historic legacy envelops this private 775-square-foot garden in an affluent Boston neighborhood. Antique brick walls dating to the mid-1800s enclose a flat southwest-facing court at the base of a fourstory brick mansion, which boasts a rare, L-shaped, garden-level courtyard with a mature canopy tree.

Designer Matthew Cunningham aimed to bring calm and tranquility to an otherwise hectic place. His clients, accomplished aesthetes, have an appreciation for minimalism and contemporary art and thrive on the juxtaposition of old and new. They required a crisp garden with soothing views from every vantage point, and a courtyard that could support a range of outdoor activities, from casual dining to black-tie events with dignitaries. Cunningham met those expectations of precision, sophisticated detailing, and low maintenance appropriate to urban dwelling by creating a garden that balances hard and soft, new and old, living and inanimate.

26

|

The garden’s centerpiece, a contemporary, sand-blasted and acid-dipped, stainless steel fountain, spills into a basin to throttle urban chatter with white noise. The fountain’s blackened patina is mirrored elsewhere in sliding doors, a barbecue, and cabinetry. A new steel-capped brick wall, borrowing from patterns observed on the existing house, incorporates a pocket apld.org

PHOTOGR A PH BY MATTHEW CUN N I N GHA M


door, making excellent use of limited space, and minimizes noise disruptions made by adjacent utilities. Linear bands of granite register cleanly with the antique brick wall behind the fountain. The alternating floor pattern features stones of varying widths, and graphically distinct voids are planted with durable mosses. Owners enjoy the garden year-round. The planting palette is intentionally simple, and therefore easy to maintain. Amelanchier trees mixed with Ilex and Fothergilla provide year-round interest; the ground plane is planted densely with a monocultural carpet of liriope. This project reinforces the fact that even the smallest spaces can become powerful and meaningful landscapes.

Limiting the color palette makes a space calm and serene. The smaller the space and the more limited the palette, the more important it is to focus on exquisite details. STEAL THIS:

one resource F O R DESIGN | PRODUCTS | MATERIALS | AVAILABILITY

P l a n t e r s • F o u n t a i n s • Ta b l e s • B e n c h e s • P o t t e r y • A c c e n t s

apld.org

|

27


goldaward

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000 Bridge House, Jamestown, RI

Katherine Field Katherine Field and Associates Newport, RI

P H OTO G R A P H BY RI C H ARD M AND E LKO RN

28

|

apld.org


U S D A Z O N E : 7A

design presented the full potential of the site and its utility as an entertaining space. Excellent form and structure with an established planting.�

JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “This

apld.org

|

29


goldaward

B

orrowing the breathtaking views surrounding this property, designer Katherine Field took multiple challenges, including a moderate-to-steep sloping gradient along a rocky coastal shoreline, coastal feature setback lines, orientation of the house, and a limited envelope, and created a magical space for entertaining.

30

|

Luxurious furnishings enhance an entertaining space for intimate family groups up to 150 people, including open play space for teenagers. Constant breezes and windborne salt dictate the use of long-term, easy-to-maintain materials. Field repeated handsome, angled granite blocks in the design of the central terrace between the pool and main seating terrace to express and resolve the three site geometries. PHOTOGR A PHY BY R I CHA R D MA N DELKOR N

apld.org


Field turned the unusual geometry of the lot into a design asset.

Lighting is a major feature of this project. Going beyond the normal use for safety and security, the designer used fiber-optic lighting at the bottom of the pool to create constellations overhead on the clients’ wedding anniversary. Handmade Italian glass tile in a custom radial pattern clads the bottom of the pool, which is punctuated with 100 fiber-optic stars, each encircled with 24-carat gold tiles.

Native and hardy plants with a focus on summer interest were matched to the coastal environment and used to restore property borders. Efforts to preserve and restore the native coastal buffer will help to maintain the natural significance of the site.

â?§

Use off-site elements to a project’s advantage. Resolve a difficult site geometry and create design cohesion through the use of angled stone blocks as a major site element. STEAL THIS:

apld.org

|

31


goldaward RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000 Bryn Mawr Residence, Bryn Mawr, PA

Charles Hess Hess Landscape Architects

Lansdale, PA

U S D A Z O N E : 7A JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Grand

landscape for a grand new home. Very appealing Koi pond skillfully designed and executed. Lush plantings appropriate to a traditional East Coast landscape design. Good to see outdoor living spaces scaled for comfort with such a large home.” PH OTO G R A P H BY ST EP H EN GOVE L P H OTO GRAP H Y

32

|

apld.org


apld.org

|

33


I

n order to create a habitable dwelling, the owners made the difficult decision to remove an unsalvageable historic residence, but retained remnants of the former home, where feasible. Designer Charles Hess skillfully coordinated these historic elements with new garden spaces, including the lower wall, wisteria arbor, and grand stairway. The pergola and retaining wall, bordering the main terrace spaces, were refurbished with some materials being replaced to match the new home’s vernacular.

34

|

The siting of the new dwelling takes advantage of existing views, while establishing privacy from neighbors and spaces suitable for raising a young family, as well as preserving important natural features. Hess created distinct garden rooms outside of the new home, including a formal arrival motor court, a main terrace with outdoor kitchen, a soccer field for the clients’ children, and a Koi pond. Additional new features such as a spa, a fire pit, ➸ PHOTOGR A PHY BY STEPHEN GOVEL PHOTOGR A PHY

apld.org


goldaward

apld.org

|

35


and a separate pool house are centered around the new swimming pool.

36

|

The owners’ favored style involved less formal structure, with the incorporation of layers of loose plantings bordering open spaces. The backdrop for all spaces includes many different types of plants, which have been selected and used in specific combinations to provide a succession of seasonal bloom and attractive textures. An existing rock outcrop became a garden feature with its own unique palette of plantings. Amsonia spills over the walls in the vegetable garden created to meet the clients’ ecofriendly ambitions, which included raising their own household vegetables and culinary herbs.

PHOTOGR A PH BY STEPHEN GOVEL PHOTOGR A PHY

apld.org


Deed restrictions that limited the availability of building sites and impervious coverage require stormwater runoff to be retained and directed back into the ground on site.

â?§

Respect and refurbish history, but don’t be a slave to it. Coordinate new finishes with old and assure that spaces function appropriately to a contemporary lifestyle. Consider the scale of architecture and landscape creating proportionately sized spaces.

STEAL THIS:

apld.org

|

37


38

|

apld.org


goldaward RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000 Buttonwood Residence, Bryn Mawr, PA

Charles Hess Hess Landscape Architects Lansdale, PA

PHOTOGR A PH BY CHA R LES E. HESS, J R.

apld.org

|

39


goldaward U S D A Z O N E : 7A JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Magnificent

project, superbly designed in all its detail. Particularly love the hillside plantings, the secret garden, and the cherry allée.”

T

such a large home.” he clients had repurchased their childhood home, which, after a decade of minimal maintenance, presented an exciting opportunity to transform the place into a refreshed and modernized version of its former identity. While the existing late successional stage woodland canopy was intact, it lacked any credible understory plant layer. Enter designer Charles Hess, whose task it was to create environmentally sensitive, historically appropriate, and elegant garden spaces, including designing a new pool and spa, reconfiguring the driveway, increasing property security, and developing gathering spaces for events. Detailing is traditional to complement the historic architecture, while the underlying infrastructure remains thoroughly modern. Hess created thematically designed outdoor rooms including a formal garden, a woodland garden, a pool garden, a hillside garden, and a secret garden, among others that were developed to indulge a diverse range of sensory experiences.

40

|

The formal garden is planted with a carpet of low-cut bluegrass and accentuated by an antique fountain, while the woodland garden has a newly established understory plant layer beneath its existing trees. Plants that bloom during the

PHOTOGR A PHY BY STEPHEN GOVEL PHOTOGR A PHY

apld.org


Adding understory plants turned a neglected woodland into a garden.

pool’s season of heaviest use are featured in the pool garden. Two heirloom katsura trees flanking the front door were planted by the clients’ father decades before. Meeting the challenge to preserve them involved adjusting the grade across the entire courtyard and even air spading to reduce impact. Installing structural soil beneath nearby paving minimized root disturbance. Field-grown azaleas create a stunning spring display at the hillside garden and bulbs set in artistic patterns suggest rhythmic movement. The old driveway was removed and replaced by a cobble lane to minimize hardscape while maintaining service access. Reclaimed and locally sourced building materials give the project a genteel appearance.

â?§

STEAL THIS: Design

a garden to align with its peak use, if it has a time-sensitive period of use. Consider using themes for outdoor rooms that coordinate with the context of the environment.

apld.org

|

41


goldaward

S P E C I A LT Y P R O J E C T S Philadelphia Farm to Forest, Philadelphia, PA

Charles Hess Hess Landscape Architects

Lansdale, PA

U S D A Z O N E : 7A JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “The

designer used a thoughtful approach to this restoration and showed a deep respect for the site. Excellent use of native plants. Fine masonry materials and craftsmanship.�

T 42

he same family has owned this former farm property, bisected by a damaged, flood-prone stream corridor, for three generations. They watched the landscape gradually deteriorate as silt accumulated into a spring-fed pond, rendering it too shallow to support much aquatic life.

|

apld.org

PHOTOGR A PHY BY STEPHEN GOVEL PHOTOGR A PHY


Canopy trees of dubious quality had sprouted and clogged former pastures, while invasive exotic plant species dominated the forest floor.

To create a casual and comfortable spot for family reunions so their grown children could return and reminisce about past experiences at the property, they hired designer Charles Hess to restore the stream valley and pond. The resulting environmentally sensitive and sustainable design brought to life by Hess resolved the riparian corridor issues by diminishing fluvial velocity and erosion and completely repairing the stream and pond.

Hess used indigenous rocks and native plants to line the watercourse and allowed the adjacent springs to flow unencumbered into the pond, increasing water turnover rate. Removing years of accumulated sediment from the pond created an opportunity for stocked game fish and aquatic plants to thrive. The ruin of a bygone structure now serves as the base for a new springhouse and dock. Ecologically appropriate native plants were selected for deer-resistance and their ability to outcompete ➸ apld.org

|

43


goldaward

invasive exotic species. In addition to restoring the aquatic features of the property, Hess also overseeded the upland meadow adjacent to the wooded stream area with native wildflowers and warm-season grasses to bolster an already strong, established meadow plant community. The existing tree canopy was largely preserved, but Hess also planted new, desirable native species of canopy trees that will grow and reforest the site. Clear circulation patterns were established around the site. Recycled schist stone from a nearby demolished church was used in all of the walls and buildings. Reclaimed and sustainably sourced lumber was used to construct the springhouse, dock, and bridge.

â?§

Diminish the velocity of water to minimize erosion and sediment accumulation. Use indigenous rocks with native plants to create a more realistic, natural setting. STEAL THIS:

44

|

PHOTOGR A PHY BY STEPHEN GOVEL PHOTO G RA PHY

apld.org


The restored stream is aesthetically pleasing and functional, slowing the velocity of water moving around the site, thus decreasing erosion problems. apld.org

|

45


goldaward

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000

Ann Arbor, Plymouth, MI

Shannon Mohr Zaremba & Company, Inc. Clarkston, MI P HOTO G R A P H BY G E O R G E DZAH RISTOS

46

|

apld.org


Skillful design divides the landscape into a series of garden rooms without sacrificing expansive views.

apld.org

|

47


goldaward U S D A Z O N E : 6A JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “A

difficult problem solved collaboratively and creatively by the professionals involved. I am particularly impressed by the working through of the geometries and in the large and small spaces that sing so eloquently.”

A

significant slope separated the home from the pool, apple orchard, and woods on this large Michigan estate. Challenged to connect the spaces, designer Shannon Mohr incorporated new and existing elements, seamlessly merging two separate sections of the landscape into an entertaining and relaxing space. Simple, bold forms anchor the design into its context (surrounded by the house) and instill a sense of composed scale and order.

Regrading1,500 cubic yards of earth created an elegant multilevel space for an infinity-edge pool and a new pool house, each poised along the natural backdrop of the orchard and woods beyond. Skillful use of materials and excellent detailing creates a style that manages to be both modern and traditional.

48

|

The new pool is at the same elevation as the residence’s walkout level. When viewed from the home, the surface of the infinity-edge pool virtually floats above the landscape beyond, easing the transition from residence to outdoor space. Residence, lawn, and infinity pool are on one level, while more active spaces are below. Natural boulders and a waterslide form a ring around the smaller pool, and the new pool house provide both social and technological functions. Retaining walls of PHOTOGR A PHY BY GEOR GE DZA HR I STOS

apld.org


split Cornelian granite with a fireplace hidden in one of these walls provides a central location to experience both the natural charm of the small pool and the continuous wall of water cascading over the infinity edge. Granite pavers unite both levels while the concrete slab and pedestal system eliminate the need for visually intrusive deck drains and mortar joints. Single-stem birches in a grid pattern among sweeping masses of white pine, low-growing sumac butterbur, hydrangea, blue oat grass, and creeping thyme soften the strong lines of the hardscape.

â?§

Keep design strategies uncomplicated to incorporate a project into its environment and create calm equilibrium, particularly when you need to harmonize different styles.

STEAL THIS:

apld.org

|

49


goldaward

50

|

apld.org


RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000 Turtle Lake, Bloomfield Hills, MI

Shannon Mohr Zaremba & Company, Inc. Clarkston, Michigan

PHOTOGR A PH BY GEOR GE DZA HR I STOS

apld.org

|

51


goldaward

U S D A Z O N E : 6A

“Masterful and confident use of materials, plants, and objects. Well-nuanced spaces. This designer understands how to create comfortable sitting areas. Lighting very well done ... understated with a hint of drama. In the pool area, although there’s a lot going on, the designer managed to keep it from feeling too busy. Planted paving joints are particularly well done.” JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE:

52

|

PHOTOGR A PHY BY GEOR GE DZA HR I STOS

apld.org


W

orking around a pie-shaped lot, designer Shannon Mohr managed to create a balance between the formal garden around a rejuvenated pool and existing pergola and the neighboring wetlands. This residential landscape renovation blends rich details and innovative solutions while transforming the site. In the front, a driveway and large entry court are laid with cobblestones reclaimed from the streets of Philadelphia. They’re bordered with charcoal granite stones that recall a romantic past. Surrounding the court, colorful plantings provide a full range of texture and seasonal interest. Formal masses of pachysandra, crimson barberry, azalea, and oak leaf hydrangea flow among sculpted boxwood hedges, sugar maples, and spruce. Four limestone planters atop stone pedestals create a formal elegance and a stage for color accents. Two custom copper-clad planters hold specimen Japanese maples that stand sentry beside the main entrance.

Transformed from an undeveloped hillside, the spacious lawn terrace was designed for maximum flexibility and functionality such as hosting large social events in tents. In the side yard, a multi-level garden separated by dry stack

➸

apld.org

|

53


goldaward

walls offers a vantage point to appreciate the beauty of the space. Fond du Lac stone steps in line with a large sculpture lead down to the lawn terrace. Fond du Lac steppers with saw-cut edges form a lively border running around the rich green grass and complements the house. The steppers become a stone path with moss joints and lead down to the pool terrace. This space is intimate and versatile with a soft lighting scheme, a covered barbeque area, and several conversation areas. Lush masses of ‘Limelight’ hydrangeas, Russian sage, and Shenandoah grasses spill over the cool stone and create a tapestry of color to ease the transition from the formal terrace into the wetlands beyond.

â?§

Use native stone to create a space that feels like it belongs to the surrounding environment. Include outdoor lighting to add considerable drama to a garden at night. STEAL THIS:

54

|

apld.org


Farlow Hill Residence image courtesy of Matthew J. Cunningham

TRANSFORM

THE WORLD DESIGN WITH VECTORWORKS 2017

Matthew Cunningham of MCLD uses Vectorworks Landmark design software to easily transition client projects from design intent to APLD awardwinning installations. Learn about our latest 2017 release at vectorworks.net/landmark.

Vectorworks, Inc. is a proud sponsor of APLD and will be at APLD’s 2016 International Landscape Design Conference on September 15-18, 2016.

apld.org

|

55


goldaward

56

|

apld.org

PHOTOGR A PH BY WI LSON MCWI LLI A M STUDI O


SHOW GARDENS Sacred Grove, Singapore

Andrew Wilson & Gavin McWilliam Wilson McWilliam Studio London, England U S D A Z O N E : 14 JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Modern

sculptural space that is both dramatic and restrained. Creative minimalist design where every element matters. Sophisticated planting design. Excellent execution.”

D

esigned for the Singapore Garden Festival 2014, the conceptual intent of this show garden was to combine reflecting pools, sky, light, tree canopies, level changes, plantings, and materials to enclose, refresh, and uplift the spirit. The design explored the concept by conjugating simple elements composed to create focus and meaning. The garden also explored planting on roofs, terraces, and facades, which Singapore encourages and incentivizes.

The garden began as a 9- by 9-meter plot with no excavation allowed due to existing irrigation on the show site. Influenced by the environment, the garden ➸ apld.org

|

57


goldaward

58

|

apld.org


incorporates popular shade spaces to minimize the effects of heat and humidity, while using a roof planting to slow the passage of rain water. The central opening, with a rain pool beneath, exploits the tremendous force of Singaporean rain. Thus the pool would be in turmoil during a deluge and at other times still and reflective.

The relationship of the man-made to the natural environment is also an essential aspect of the design. Elegant poles in rusted steel, creating asymmetrical patterns, support the raised garden, allowing the space below to be explored and used with flexibility. These forms are repeated in the grove of Schizolobium parahyba trees. The designers, Gavin McWilliam and Andrew Wilson, translated a native English meadow into tropical form with grass or grasslike species such as Ophiopogon interplanted with orchids and exotic flowering species such as Oncidium and Hymenocallis. Asparagus fern and scented jasmine tumble over the edges to soften the architectural line. The sculptural Spun chair by British designer Thomas Heatherwick is both playful and functional. Lighting is also used to create a seductive atmosphere after dark with individual trunks emphasized and spot lights creating ambient light around the pool.

â?§

STEAL THIS: Advance

the design concept with compatibly designed furnishings. Consider what a garden will be like in all kinds of weather. Visually edit elements from a design to determine whether a missing element enhances or diminishes the essence of the design.

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY W ILS O N M CW ILLIAM STUDI O

apld.org

|

59


Leslie Needham's River Hills estate, Bedford, New York

2016 APLD INTERNAT

Silver Awar Kathryn Prideaux's Spicy, Tucson, Arizona 60

|

apld.org


Colin Miller's Conner Residence, Orinda, California

TIONAL LANDSCAPE

rd Winners Cheri Stringer's Red Renaissance, Boulder, Colorado apld.org

|

61


S P E C I A LT Y P R O J E C T S Walking Meditation Garden, El Cajon, CA

John Beaudry

John Beaudry Landscape Design

La Mesa, CA 62

|

apld.org

P H OTO GRAP H BY JO H N BEAU DRY


silveraward

apld.org

|

63


silveraward

64

|

apld.org

P H OTO GR A PH BY LUI S CER DA


U S D A Z O N E : 5B JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Good

selection of low-water plants with interesting textures and colors … A handsome design full of beautiful plantings … lovely curved walkways that are enticing and take you on a journey through abundant flowers.”

I TOP RI GHT: PHOTOGRA PH BY JO HN B EAU DRY

t’s said there is no rose without the thorn. That may be, as the impetus for this garden’s transformation was mandatory water restrictions by the city of San Diego, which limits landscape watering to a maximum of two days a week, five minutes per day if using standard sprinkler systems. Out with the turf and most of the junipers and palms! But there was a twist—in addition to incorporating all low-water-use plants, the clients had opposite ideas for plantings: the wife desired soft, Mediterranean plantings while the husband preferred cacti and succulents. John Beaudry found a way to make it work.

Now, meandering paths inspired by a river’s flow lead the homeowners and visitors away from the existing pool area to secluded spaces. On one path, a dry waterfall with large boulders serves as the focal point. The waterfall is crafted from existing rock outcroppings excavated on site, and it leads into a dry streambed that brings structure to the placement of succulents and cacti within a Mediterraneanstyle landscape. (Yes, you can kill two birds with one stone.) Paths wind through areas of sun and shade, ending at a hidden seating area with a fire pit. Colorful plantings, including birds of paradise and palms, take the eye through the landscape and create a tropical aura. Lattice panels were added to an existing shade structure, and vines that climb upon it help soften the hardscape. Large-format pavers replaced concrete to provide better drainage. The new, climate-ready plantings are watered with inline drip irrigation, and were selected to attract butterflies and hummingbirds. In addition, shrubbery provides cover for wildlife, making this garden a respite for humans and nature alike.

apld.org

|

65


silveraward Easy-care perennials form a loose border along a path leading to the waterside lawn.

66

|

apld.org


R E S I D E N T I A L D E S I G N O V E R $ 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 Clamshell Alley, Lamoine, ME

Matthew Cunningham Matthew Cunningham Landscape Design, LLC Stoneham, MA

U S D A Z O N E : 5B JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “This

designer shows deep respect for the site (both water and woods) and equal respect for the homeowner’s desire for low maintenance. Bravo! … Love the exuberant plantings here and the attention to creating artful pathways and seat walls … A handsome project, simple and unadorned.”

T

he owners, retired, formerly urban-dwelling Texans, wanted to transform their land into a summer retreat for family and friends. They told designer Matthew Cunningham that they hoped to “fulfill their dream of building a modern summer home with rustic finishes within the context of a national ➸ PH OTO G R A P H Y BY MATTH E W CU NNINGH AM

apld.org

|

67


silveraward

treasure to celebrate the brevity of life� and feature low-maintenance plantings that would adapt to the local weather conditions without an irrigation system. This coastal Maine waterfront property with its dramatic views of Acadia National Park presented a number of difficult design challenges, from extreme weather with bitter winter cold to salt-laden fog and humidity in summer. The solution? Design two separate garden areas. The first is a northern woodland garden highlighting native plantings and newly graded landforms, complemented by local fieldstone and pine duff paths that lead to the residence’s entry. The second garden features a waterside activity lawn and perennial garden an68

|

PHOTOGR A PHY BY MATTHEW CUN N I N G HA M

apld.org


choring one corner of the house with durable, salt-tolerant vegetation, while a planted threshold frames views of the water and mountains. Slabs of fieldstone surrounded by vibrant perennials invite visitors to the open lawn and a terrace at water’s edge. The granite seat wall permits overflow seating when the homeowners host clambakes and lobster dinners. The landscape comes alive in summer with ornamental grasses, salvia, nepeta, Russian sage, and purple coneflower that blissfully mingle with inkberry, lilacs, and hydrangeas. This garden thrives with minimal irrigation and attracts pollinators all summer.

â?§

apld.org

|

69


silveraward

S P E C I A LT Y P R O J E C T S The Restoration of a Historical Gem, Santa Barbara, CA

Margie Grace Grace Design Associates 70

|

apld.org

Santa Barbara, CA


U S D A Z O N E : 10A JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Good

restoration that hits just the right notes to make this historical garden work in the contemporary world. Excellent craftsmanship throughout. Entry garden particularly successful … Great details and detailing … an amazing transformation.”

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY H O LLY LEP E RE , LEP E RE STUDI O

apld.org

|

71


silveraward

S

aving the past can change our future. Now generations yet to come will be able to enjoy this significant property. This unique and historic shining jewel was once the studio of George Washington Smith (GWS), an American painter and architect who popularized the Spanish Colonial Revival style in the early 20th century. But age had taken its toll. The GWS tile and brickwork were falling apart, and some new elements were out of tune with the historic architecture. Margie Grace’s challenge was to preserve the surviving historic garden elements and to renovate existing plantings and add new ones as needed.

A new entry courtyard was carved out of the existing driveway and is now an inviting garden space with a “new” vintage fountain and a gravel “floor” with travertine pavers that tie into the existing stoop. A Moorish star motif, an original GWS detail, was designed into the fountain and repeated on a new gate. In the backyard, a replacement sunken tile fountain features reproduction period tiles and a Moorish star interior. A similar star tile medallion at the intersection of the primary and secondary axes pulls the entire garden together.

A historic Black Acacia allée dating to GWS’s era was carefully pruned; an existing Koi pond was refurbished; and new, salvaged brick walks retain the original feeling of the walkways while providing safe footing and eliminating the odd remnants of old paths. In addition, Grace added a new sunken fountain, runnels, walks, and a new tile wall fountain. All new plantings, approximately 50 percent of those on site, are low-water use and low maintenance.

72

|

apld.org

PHOTOGR A PHY BY HOLLY LEPER E, LEPER E STUDI O


apld.org

|

73


NON-RESIDENTIAL DESIGN Sawyer Free Library, Gloucester, MA

Hilarie Holdsworth Walker Creek Garden Design Gloucester, MA U S D A Z O N E : 6B

74

|

PHOTOGR A PHY BY MA R K TEI WES

apld.org


silveraward

JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “A

very handsome project that completely transformed this narrow, dark, public space, turning it into a gracious entry garden and gathering space for a whole community to enjoy … Durable materials and excellent craftsmanship … The steps are particularly graceful.“

T

his serene transformation delivered what the client requested—and more. The client’s goals were to provide an attractive, useable space for public use and for children’s reading programs; to bring the shared space into ADA compliance; and to establish coherent and easy access to ➸ apld.org

|

75


silveraward

all entryways into the library. Designer Hilarie Holdsworth decided that the project could meet those requirements as well as strengthen pedestrian and visual connections to the stunning historic architecture of the town’s City Hall and Post Office.

The previous dreary landscape surrounding the library included two large, diseased trees; a healthy beech tree; a steep slope; and a crumbling asphalt walkway that could not be used for ADA-approved access. In addition, the site was dark, and the granite retaining walls were collapsing. Now, curving amphitheater-style steps descend to a large, flat circular brick area with a gravel center, from which paths radiate to welcome visitors to other areas of the garden. At the edge of the circle, a semi-circular steel bench was designed to honor donors to the project. Along one side of the library, a generous pea stone inset—the site of a future sculpture garden/mosaic/children’s play area— has been sited between two 76

|

PHOTOGR A PHY BY MA R K TEI WES

apld.org


Hardscape materials mirror nearby buildings for a uniform site.

paths. Hardscape materials, including signature Cape Ann granite, brick, and steel fencing, were chosen to complement the city’s historic buildings. The large beech tree was preserved, and a great number of native plants were installed throughout the garden—yet another tie to the location’s environment. The steel fence surrounding the site includes three intriguing benches that were incorporated into it. Permeable brick paving was used to increase the absorption of rainwater.

apld.org

|

77


R E S I D E N T I A L D E S I G N OV E R $ 1 0 0,0 0 0 & P L A N T I N G D E S I G N Chatham Cottage, Chatham, MA

Kimberly Mercurio

Kimberly Mercurio Landscape Architecture Cambridge, MA U S D A Z O N E : 7A

78

|

PH OTO G R A P H BY T R ACEY ELLER

apld.org


silveraward

➸ apld.org

|

79


JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “A

handsome project that handles a variety of difficult situations with aplomb … abundance of plant material that is artfully crafted throughout in the vernacular Cape Cod style. Deft handling of all the details to create a clean, simple, formal yet summery garden for this lucky client … particularly love turning the extra lot into a daylily field.“

K

imberly Mercurio’s project for this client is a beautiful transformation of a one-and-one-half acre site, which was burdened by overgrown plantings, an empty lot, and invasive vines, into a classic Cape Cod cottage garden. These new plantings are so gorgeous they will stop visitors in their tracks.

80

|

Luckily for the client, the property was subdivided decades ago from a large estate that had an arboretum, so the designer was also able to preserve a number of mature specimen trees, including a Japanese Umbrella Pine, Stewartia, Cryptomeria, Chamaecyparis, Magnolia, and Carolina Silverbell.

apld.org


PHOTOGR A PHS BY KI MB ER LY MER CU RIO ( 2 )

silveraward

Perhaps most impressive of all, mature rhododendrons were relocated along the property line in 10-foot sections of massive, 30- by 30-foot plants. You couldn’t ask for a more spectacular show in late spring when the rhodies come into bloom.

PHOTOG R AP H BY T R ACY EL L ER

Hydrangeas and roses are typical Cape Cod summer garden plants. So the designer included rose trellises flanked by privet hedges at the southern property line for privacy, as well as incorporating luscious blue-flowering hydrangeas. The vacant lot was turned into a gorgeous, happy daylily field featuring varieties timed to bloom for several months. The lovely bluestone terrace featuring a rosedraped pergola and wisteria was sited so that family and friends could easily view the colorful daylily field. In addition, the perennial garden surrounded by a white picket fence provides an enclosed area for the client’s small dogs. The lawn area was reduced, and the relatively pest-free plantings are beneficial to pollinators.

apld.org

|

81


silveraward

82

|

apld.org


PHOTOGR A PH BY MI CHA EL CON WAY

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000 Coastal Landscape, Orleans, MA

Kimberly Mercurio

Kimberly Mercurio Landscape Architecture Cambridge, MA

PH OTO GRA PH BY KI MB ERLY ME RCU RIO

U S D A Z O N E : 7A JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Excellent

restrained modern design …. Beautiful materials and craftsmanship for the patio and retaining walls make a lovely, calm space … A handsome project that thoughtfully marries architecture and landscape with a deft hand on both professionals’ parts. The use of local natural stone combined with bluestone and ipe decking helps extend the architecture out into the land. “

apld.org

|

83


silveraward The idea of a "barrier free" design extends to the landscape, where expansive views are preserved.

84

|

apld.org


PHOTOGRA PH BY MICHA EL CON WAY

T P HOTOGRA P H BY K IM BE RLY M ERCU R IO

he theme for this top-to-bottom transformation was “barrier-free.” This 1940s Cape Cod home on a one-acre site definitely needed an overhaul due to drainage problems, invasive plants, impervious surfaces, and a residence in poor condition. The homeowners wanted to minimize any barriers between the interior and exterior by combining a landscape design with a modern feel, views to an estuary from outdoor living spaces, and traditional Cape Cod plants like hydrangeas and rhododendrons, while still preserving the gorgeous mature trees and shrubs. Though the house was left on its original foundation, it was completely remodeled otherwise. The intentionally understated landscape design by Kimberly Mercurio extends the interior of the house to the outdoors. Restoring a native plant palette was a primary goal, along with some non-native plant selections to benefit pollinators.

Twenty percent of the on-site plantings are now native, and the lawn was replaced with conservation-friendly creeping red fescue, which is low maintenance and drought tolerant. Sustainably harvested ipe forms the terraces and landings, while fieldstone paths and granite steps were made from repurposed materials. The lovely bluestone terrace off the home’s kitchen is surrounded with native ferns, birches, and junipers. Existing 15-foot rhododendrons, mature hydrangeas, and crape myrtles were relocated as a hedge at the property line. Outdoor materials were carried throughout the indoors to create a seamless transition between the interior and the exterior landscape.

apld.org

|

85


86

|

apld.org


silveraward

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000 Conner Residence, Orinda, CA

Colin Miller

Envision Landscape Studio Walnut Creek, CA U S D A Z O N E : 9B P HOTOGR A PH BY RYA N FETTER S

apld.org

|

87


silveraward JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Confident

handling of a constrained site. Simple and well-designed spare, modern elements … functional and solid design … Paving patterns admirably designed … Great tight space and hardscapes.”

L

et’s play! The clients of this Orinda, California, property had an amazing space to work with: a gently sloping front yard yielded to a flat backyard with 3,000 square feet of useable flat space—but that space dropped off sharply to the surrounding hills. How could their request for an “exciting” entrance and numerous outdoor spaces for entertaining and family activities, including a patio with a fire pit, an outdoor kitchen, a deck with a spa, and a dining room, be resolved? Colin Miller of Envision Landscape Studio, Walnut Creek, California, rose to the challenge.

Now, concrete pads with bluestone landings skip through planting beds filled with drought-tolerant ornamental grasses and perennials on a journey from the street and driveway to the front door of this residence located in Orinda’s oak-covered hills. The landings permit visitors to slow down so they can appreciate the plantings as they amble toward the entry.

88

|

PHOTOGR A PHY BY RYA N FETTER S

apld.org


The backyard design answered the clients by offering clean, organized spaces with specific activities in mind, such as dining, outdoor food preparation, lounging, and entertaining. Each area has a focal point such as a water feature, view, or fireplace to enhance interest and pull family members and guests outside.

Ipe thresholds link interior and exterior. The spa located at the edge of an ipe deck provides stunning long views out over the hills, and an infinity water feature with its magical vanishing edge is the main focal point of the backyard. As if that weren’t enough, there’s a separate dining patio, a lounge patio offering sofas and fire pit, and an outdoor kitchen with a steel and wood arbor overhead to provide shade, as well as a bar where guests can relax or watch a TV that’s often hidden behind a sliding barn door. So what do you say? Let’s play!

apld.org

|

89


silveraward RESIDENTIAL DESIGN $25,000-$100,000 St. Helena Residence, St. Helena, CA

Colin Miller

Envision Landscape Studio Walnut Creek, CA U S D A Z O N E : 9B JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Effective

use of low horizontal elements to reflect the larger landscape … Crisp and visually interesting … The designer deftly dealt with an old swimming pool that feels dated by updating with stone planks and corten fire pit and planters. “

T

he French wine term terroir loosely translates to “the specificity of place.” In California’s wine country, a massive property that backs up to a winery called for a landscape design that’s open and that easily flows from one space to the next, to suit its place. With 10,000 square feet of sprawling lawn in their St. Helena, California, backyard, designer Colin Miller’s clients wanted to convert a large portion of that blank canvas into useable outdoor rooms for entertaining, dining, and leisure activities centered around an existing swimming pool.

90

|

Because the landscape is flat, low walls of board form concrete were installed to visually and literally define several outdoor rooms and provide plenty of extra seating room for guests. The pool was updated by installing new tile and an integral color concrete pool deck that echoes materials used in the main outdoor living spaces. PHOTOGR A PH BY J OE DODD

apld.org


Pathways and patios of crushed rock and integral colored concrete pads extend from the house into the backyard, linking the client’s residence to the pool, the dining terrace, and a walkway that meanders through the top of the garden. Horizontal planters fashioned from corten steel were placed on the patio to help activate the space, and a nearby corten steel fire pit warms the area at night and during cooler months. The repetition of materials throughout this garden helps create its strong sense of place and knits the landscape together. ➸ apld.org

|

91


silveraward

Half of the existing back lawn was removed to fulfill the clients’ desire for outdoor living spaces. Of that, three-fourths of the main outdoor living areas is crushed rock, which allows water to permeate into the ground, and the balance is composed of concrete pads. Attractive drought-tolerant plantings were used throughout to limit the need for irrigation.

â?§

92

|

PHOTOGR A PHY BY J OE DOD D

apld.org


apld.org

|

93


silveraward RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000 Peirano Residence, Alamo, CA

Lush plantings soften the hardscape and create cozy, intimate spaces.

Colin Miller

Envision Landscape Studio Walnut Creek, CA U S D A Z O N E : 9B JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Nice

job of integrating the various outdoor elements everyone loves into a cohesive design. Lush, mature plantings make this project appealing. Good ground plane structure and forms … functional and straightforward spaces … modern elements developed well.”

T

he cool of concrete and the warmth of wood combine in this design to complement the home’s modern architecture while creating structure and elevation on a relatively flat backyard site. The Alamo, California, clients wanted outdoor spaces to enjoy their favorite family activities, including a swimming pool, lounge and dining areas, a fire pit, and a lawn for their children to play on.

94

|

The existing rectangular swimming pool is the centerpiece of the client’s backyard, and served as a design challenge. The five-foot-tall concrete board wall

PHOTOGR A PH BY J OE DODD

apld.org


forming the backdrop for a seating area and the outdoor kitchen unify the added garden areas surrounding the pool. A cozy steel-and-wood structure was designed to cover this area, providing shade on sunny days and protection on others.

Horizontal redwood facing defines the kitchen area and enhances its symbolic warmth, while concrete countertops echo the concrete wall to the ➸ apld.org

|

95


silveraward

96

|

apld.org


rear. Adjacent to the outdoor lounge is an integrated colored concrete fire pit and a seat wall on 2- by 2-foot concrete pavers, allowing additional seating around dancing flames for nighttime gatherings.

Board form concrete planters double as seating wall and help define the dining and kitchen areas. Designer Colin Miller installed a generous lawn as a children’s play area—with plenty of room for sunbathing. French drains at the back of the site permit storm water on the property to percolate slowly into the ground. Softtextured plantings spill over the planters and walkways, blurring the harder concrete edges and simultaneously adding more warmth to the site.

â?§

P H OTO GRAP H Y BY JO E DODD

apld.org

|

97


RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000 River Hills, Bedford, NY

Leslie Needham Leslie Needham Design, LLC 98

|

apld.org

Bedford, NY


silveraward

U S D A Z O N E : 6B JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Dream

project! The designer created the perfect setting for this handsome home, and found utility and beauty in every square inch … Just the right approach for the house and historic landscape … Great entry redesign and outdoor living spaces. Excellent rock wall and perennial borders. Great outward views. “ PH OTO G R A P H BY RO BERT LLEWELLYN

apld.org

|

99


100

|

apld.org


PHOTOGR APH BY J U L IE STAU F F ER

T

PH OTO G RA PH BY PHIL L IP EN NI S

his magnificent 16-acre property overlooking the Mianus River Gorge, a 755-acre National Natural Landmark owned by The Nature Conservancy, and the Mianus River Gorge Preserve is a treasure. The historic 1790s Dutch Colonial house is sited above centuries-old stonewalls, serene farmland, and spectacular granite outcroppings, but it had limited outdoor access and no outdoor entertaining areas. The homeowners wanted their landscape plan to include space to entertain, for dining, and for relaxation—all the while maintaining coherence with the distant vistas and the features of the historic home.

Terraces and flowing gardens meander downward through various levels of the site, all providing choice views of the vibrant landscape. Stonewalls and steps installed through the loose garden plantings, entertaining spaces, and fruit orchard create a synergy of style and substance. While the gardens are maintained close to the house, designer Leslie Needham used a sensitive hand for the outlying areas, creating meadows, woodland walks, and native wetlands. While these areas are not manicured, they are regularly mowed and invasive species are persistently removed. In 2012 Hurricane Sandy destroyed the front property, so the entire entrance was redesigned. More than 300 linear feet of new stonewalls were erected, all built from stone found onsite. The new tree and plant palette was carefully selected, with suggestions from the Mianus River Gorge Conservation Committee and The Nature Conservancy, with an eye to integrating the cultivated areas with the wilder areas beyond.

â?§

apld.org

|

101


S M A L L G A R D E N S Family Friendly Urban Garden, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Carrie Preston Studio TOOP

Amersfoort, The Netherlands

U S DA ZO N E : 7 JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Good

functional design. Designer’s attention to the needs of active children is commendable. Lush, well-chosen plantings add much to the warmth of this small space … A great family place to retreat and utilize. Good active and passive areas … Fun project for kids! Clearly, they love how simple and direct and active it is and how many things there are for them to do. Great work!”

102

|

PHOTOGR A PHY BY J OLA N THE LA L KEN S

apld.org


silveraward

T

he shortest distance between two points is—a diagonal? The owners of this small urban garden, dingy and gray with more algae than plants, asked the designer for a warm, family-friendly garden with space for their two young boys to play and for entertaining friends. And, why yes, it would also be nice if it were low-maintenance too. Designer Carrie Preston’s solution to this nearly total revamp came in the form of a diagonal line in the patio’s layout, which allows open play space and room for raised planting beds; the coping even doubles as extra seating. The diagonal is repeated on the pergola that spans the width of the garden; its overhead structure is also a place for climbers to grow and to hang lights and play equipment. An existing shed and fence made from cement slabs were updated with terracottacolored plaster and paint, and an extra door was added to shed, alley-side, so apld.org

|

103


that the boys could ride their bikes directly into a parking space. The really fun element is the playhouse built on top of the shed, accessible only by an ingenious climbing wall.

The garden’s sunny back corner with built-in seating is used for a barbeque and dining area and for growing seasonal vegetables, herbs, and flowers. Plantings throughout the garden were chosen with four seasons in mind: bulbs and irises in spring, oak leaf hydrangeas and clematis in summer, ‘Honorine Jobert’ anemones and ‘Rozanne’ geraniums in fall, and epimedium, ferns, and other evergreens for winter.

104

|

P H OTO GR A PHY BY J OLA N THE LA LKEN S

apld.org


thedesıgner wants you!

calling all writers

The only magazine written by designers for designers, The Designer is looking for talented members like you to share your stories, teach new techniques, and inspire with your designs.

All submissions from APLD members are considered, but The Designer is particularly interested in articles that fit the issue’s editorial theme or are appropriate for one of the magazine’s regular columns spotlighting technology or business strategies. Learn more about the submissions process and view the 2016 editorial calendar here.

Not sure if your story is a good fit? 2016 Editor in Chief Katie Elzer-Peters is happy to discuss your idea with you. Reach her at editor@apld.org.

r e thedesıgner n g ı s e d e th t hedes d r e ıgner Th kya c ASS

S p ri

ng

OC

201

IO IAT

F NO

F PRO

ESS

IO N

LAN AL

DSC

APE

DES

IG N

ERS

ASSOC IATION OF

PROFE SSION AL LANDS CAPE DESIG NERS

Summer 2015

Small Space Strategies

6

W

D AN

ER.

LUS

ASSO

T.

C IAT

IO N

OF

PRO

FESS

IO N A

Fa ll 20 16

L LA ND

SCAP

E DE S IG

Ba

NERS

A C KD T B OU H APL WIT

HE R T O V EE D G E H

KITC HEN GARD ENS TRAV EL INSP IRAT ION: BELG IUM CON TAIN ER DESI GNS

2 16 A INTE0 RNATPLD IO LAND SCAPNAL DESIG E N

Awa

rds

apld.org

|

105


RESIDENTIAL DESIGN $25,000-$100,000 White Twist, Tucson, AZ

Kathryn Prideaux Prideaux Design U S D A Z O N E : 9A

106

|

PH OTO G R A P H BY KATH RYN P RID EAUX

apld.org

Tucson, AZ

APLD


silveraward

apld.org

|

107


silveraward

JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “A

handsome design for such a small space …. The different levels work nicely with each other and the sculpture brings the verticality that makes the whole sing.”

108

|

apld.org


M

odern urban aesthetic plus Southwestern-style architecture divided by an exposed, small lot times functional design equal a spectacular space! The defining landscape feature of this client’s site in a gated community was empty space with very little privacy. The clients wished for a fun, family activity area to be centered around a pool. The main consideration in the design was the size and location of the pool, which needed to be large enough to accommodate multiple guests and long enough to swim laps, yet not overwhelm the limited space. The seating area created at one end of the pool holds a wood-burning fire pit custom-built from rusted steel plate, which makes the area useable in the evening and in cooler weather. An ipe top, which can serve as a table, was designed to sit atop the firepit when it is not in use. To fulfill the client’s wish to include sensory elements of moving water, Kathryn Prideaux designed a small water feature that cascades into the pool. It is both visible and audible from inside the residence’s main living areas. White Twist, three slender MCM sculptures installed at one end of the pool, is the focal point; viewed from the ledge loungers and nearby areas at the opposite end of the pool, you simply can’t miss them.

There’s also a covered patio in the backyard, with a dining area and two swings for children. Along a wall, a built-in sideboard is perfect for serving drinks and food, and baskets are placed strategically to accommodate pool items.

To the rear of ledge loungers, a custom seven-foot-tall steel trellis was designed for a green wall and much-needed privacy. Native plants that require little water are installed throughout the site, and a large area of artificial turf facilitates picnics and play.

PH OTO G R A P H Y BY KATH RYN P RID EAUX

apld.org

|

109


S M A L L G A R D E N S Spicy, Tucson, AZ

Kathryn Prideaux Prideaux Design

APLD

Tucson, AZ

U S D A Z O N E : 9A JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE:“Snappy

design … fun project … Creative thinking for desert tortoise and cat gardens—terrific use of spicy red pepper sculptures in the plantings.”

PH OTO G R A P H Y BY KATH RYN P RID E AUX

110

|

apld.org


I

t’s not often that a client asks for a design to accommodate pets, particularly a play yard for two cats and habitat for a desert tortoise, as well as a location to entertain and view nearby wildlife. But that’s exactly what the owner of this townhome in Tucson, Arizona, requested.

Designer Kathryn Prideaux conducted extensive research to narrow a list of plants that Bono, the desert tortoise, could eat. Bono also needed a natural habitat functional enough for his needs yet beautiful enough to become the primary landscape element in the small backyard. The cats, who previously utilized an enclosed screen porch for fun and games, had as the #1 priority a safe, enclosed area where the two could play. Their existing screened porch was torn down, and the cats now can romp around in their own safely enclosed garden area complete with cat hammocks, stairs, and railings for climbing.

With the pets' needs taken care of, Prideaux turned her attention to creating space for entertaining small groups of friends. The existing patio was enlarged and a retaining wall from sheet steel was installed along the side and back edges. The terrace now flows smoothly from the living room and is designed on an angle to allow clear views of the desert wash hillside and visiting wildlife just beyond the garden’s back wall. Prideaux honored the client’s love of travel and creative arts by featuring striking red accents, including chili pepper sculptures among the plantings and the use of rusted steel throughout the garden. Native plants were selected for low-maintenance qualities, and the sustainable materials are expected to last a lifetime. All products used in the garden were sourced from local vendors.

apld.org

|

111


RESIDENTIAL DESIGN UNDER $25,000 29th Street Garden, Oakland, CA

Patricia St. John APLD St. John Landscapes Berkeley, CA

U S D A Z O N E : 9B JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Careful

attention to clients’ needs and wishes. Expresses modern aesthetic consistently and cleanly … A very creative solution to a tiny space with multiple needs.

112

|

PHOTOGR A PHY BY J UDE PA R KI N SON -MOR GA N

apld.org


silveraward

I love the quality of fun juxtaposed with a contemporary cleanness that feels uncluttered yet full of plants. A deft hand at work here. Great that you had fun with the path angles, the fake grass squares, the beautiful patio and fire pit, the red slide. Impressive for such a small budget!”

T

he owners of this three-generation Victorian-style family home sited on a heavily trafficked corner didn’t want much—just a totally revamped landscape to accommodate adults, a two-year-old child, and two very large dogs! Oh! And their desires also included a vegetable garden, large-leafed plants, and clean, modern lines to contrast the lush, tropical shrubs and perennials—all within a very restricted budget. ➸ apld.org

|

113


Never fear—artful design with strong graphic lines came to the rescue to meet all the clients’ needs. In the sloping front garden, angled paths of decomposed granite and gabion cages filled with river rock retain the slope while simultaneously creating planting beds; concrete pavers and an artificial turf checkerboard form a prominent and striking design element; and a 12- by 12-foot artificial turf insert provides play space for the dogs and easy cleanup. Raised livestock feeding troughs were used as vegetable planters. 114

|

apld.org


silveraward

Above: You'd In the north side yard, never know this is two existing decks and an artificial turf! Top arbor were united by a left: An elevation concrete paver path, pachange is an easy tio, and plantings. Clumpway to divide space. ing bamboo screens the home from the busy traffic, while low-water-use plants that produce both nectar and pollen for beneficial insects replaced the dying lawns. Groundcovers that withstand foot traffic were used as borders in planting beds wherever possible.

â?§

P HOTOGR A PHY BY J UDE PA R KI N SON -MOR GA N

apld.org

|

115


silveraward RESIDENTIAL DESIGN UNDER $25,000 Red Renaissance, Boulder, CO

Cheri Stringer APLD TLC Gardens, LLC Longmont, CO U S DA ZO N E : 4

116

|

apld.org


PHOTOGR A PH BY DAVI D WI N GER A N D DAVE N A DEAU

apld.org

|

117


118

|

apld.org


silveraward JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Lively

entry garden transformation. Nicely thought-through, bird-friendly plantings and focal points. A handsome project with beautiful plantings and a very intriguing water feature for the birds … a deft hand behind the planting design and the driveway ideas.”

C

heri Stringer’s thoughtful and ingenious design for this low-budget project transformed a haphazard landscape with disjointed elements into an integrated whole guided by the theme of establishing a bird-friendly garden. The property, with its staggeringly beautiful views of distant mountains, is located at the edge of a dedicated open space that is home to many species of native and migrating birds. Ingenious design ideas incorporating a simple saw cut allowed the designer to convert the existing driveway, which ended at the front door, into a formal entry while limiting the effects to vehicular traffic and parking areas. A fence that bisected the front and back yards was removed, and the entrance landing was connected to an existing backyard deck with a boardwalk. Forty-five degree angles on the boardwalk now echo the architecture of the house. Family members were given easy access to the yard and grassy areas beyond by the addition of wraparound steps to the backyard deck. A new fence extends around the front of the site, with a gate for access; this feature also allows access to the property by the owners’ dogs while preserving the separate front entrance.

Planting beds in the front and back of the house overflow with low-maintenance shrubs, trees, and perennials specifically selected to provide food, shelter, and habitat for local and migrating birds. The intriguing water feature on the front entry deck was engineered from fabricated stone to provide constant access to water for the birds. The front fountain and a second one on the property include heaters so that birds have access to water year-round.

P H OTO GRAP H Y BY DAVI D WI N GER A N D DAVE N A DEAU

apld.org

|

119


120

|

apld.org


silveraward RESIDENTIAL DESIGN $25,000-$100,000 Rock Canyon, Longmont, CO

Cheri Stringer APLD TLC Gardens, LLC

Longmont, CO

U S DA ZO N E : 4

PHOTOGR A PH BY DAVID W IN G ER

apld.org

|

121


PHOTOGR A PHY BY DAV ID WIN G ER

122

|

apld.org


silveraward JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Good

resolution of water issues, with boulders and plantings making for a visually vigorous dry creek bed … Great waterway development and plantings and the addition of the entry terrace … The designer did an admirable job of creating a garden from a derelict drainage swale—beautifully set stones and interesting plantings all work beautifully along the street … The plantings along the new walkways are beautiful and fit the house perfectly.”

D

esigner Cheri Stringer transformed what was once a drab, ordinary front entrance into the heart of this family’s activity. The homeowners had just two major priorities: a landscape design to correct the eroding gravel ditch that ran along the entire front property line, thereby improving the home’s curb appeal, and a plan to allow them to spend more time with their children outdoors.

A large patio with seat walls was built into the front entry, with ample space for a table and chairs to entertain family and friends and provide a sight line to children riding bikes and playing games in the front yard. The front terrace was designed to echo some of the home’s architectural details, to foster a sense of arrival, and to serve as both a formal entry and a casual entertaining space. At the front property line next to the street, a dry creek bed replaced the eroding creek to maintain positive water flow. The surrounding plants were selected for their ability to withstand drought and high temperatures. Views from the front terrace now encompass four-season plants, vibrant color, and eye-catching textures. The integration of the front patio and outdoor living spaces has dramatically altered the home’s appearance. And if there were any question about the front drainage problem, the corrections afforded by the landscape redesign protected the home during historic floods in 2013.

apld.org

|

123


Nancy Drobnick's Meditation Garden in Bentleyville, Ohio

2016 APLD INTERNAT

Bronze Awa Colin Miller's Lee Residence in Palo Alto, California 124

|

apld.org


Tim Heelan's Shade to Sun Garden Transformation in Orono, Minnesota

TIONAL LANDSCAPE

ard Winners Debbie Gliksman's Tarzana Hilltop Residence in Tarzana, California apld.org

|

125


bronzeaward

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000 Meditation Building & Garden, Bentleyville, OH

Nancy Drobnick Miriam’s River House Designs, LLC Chagrin Falls, OH U S DA ZO N E : 5 JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE:

“Overall, a reflective and meditative place. Good craftsmanship throughout.”

126

|

PHOTOGR A PHY BY DA N DR OB N I CK

apld.org


PLANTING DESIGN California Native Garden, Los Angeles, CA

Debbie Gliksman

Urban Oasis Landscape Design Los Angeles, CA U S D A Z O N E : 10B JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE:

“A nice transformation using water-wise plants. An interesting blend of planting layers and colors make a successful scheme.”

PH OTO G R A P H Y BY DEBBIE GLIKS M AN

apld.org

|

127


bronzeaward

R E S I D E N T I A L D E S I G N OV E R $ 1 0 0,0 0 0 Tarzana Hilltop, Tarzana, CA

Debbie Gliksman Urban Oasis Landscape Design Los Angeles, CA U S D A Z O N E : 10B JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Creative

use of swaths of plants to support this Tarzana hilltop. Good transformation of the pool space, and highly textural plants give the design energy. The plan reveals the designer’s intentions and supports many of the detailed decisions.”

128

|

PHOTOGR A PHY BY DEB B I E GLI KSMA N

apld.org


RESIDENTIAL DESIGN $25,000 - $100,000 Shorefront Gardens, Norwalk, CT

Mark Greenwald APLD Maher &

Greenwald, Inc. Stamford, CT U S D A Z O N E : 6A

“A difficult site. The designer understands how to mix textures and colors to make the spaces appealing. Great seasonal effects in the horizontal and vertical design. Nice job.”

JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE:

PH OTO G R A P H Y BY M A RK GREENWALD

apld.org

|

129


RESIDENTIAL DESIGN $25,000 - $100,000 Copper & Stone, Orono, MN

Tim Heelan Stonepocket, Inc. Chanhassen, MN U S DA ZO N E : 4 JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Good

overall design, with very good craftsmanship and well-chosen materials. It’s difficult to discern the planting design since the plantings are young.”

130

|

apld.org


bronzeaward

PLANTING DESIGN Shade to Sun, A Garden Transformation, Minneapolis, MN

Tim Heelan Stonepocket, Inc. Chanhassen, MN U S DA ZO N E : 4 JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “A handsome planting

in this Minnesota front yard. The designer has a grasp on how to use perennials and grasses; overall, the concept is solid and it’s good to see seasonal changes.”

PHOTO G R A P H Y BY TIM H EELAN

apld.org

|

131


SMALL GARDENS San Francisco Residence, SF, CA

Colin Miller

Envision Landscape Studio Walnut Creek, CA U S D A Z O N E : 10B JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “A

handsome project, carefully crafted. A good water design feature, and the moveable planters are wonderful.”

PHOTOGR A PHY BY J OE DODD

132

|

apld.org


bronzeaward RESIDENTIAL DESIGN $25,000 - $100,000 Lee Residence, Palo Alto, CA

Colin Miller Envision Landscape Studio Walnut Creek, CA U S D A Z O N E : 9B JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “This

is a beautiful project with a mix of existing and new features. There is a good, clean, and clear entry, with interesting forms and structures with complementary plantings.”

apld.org

|

133


RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000 Southern Garden, Dallas, TX

Matthew Murrey Matthew Murrey Design Dallas, TX U S D A Z O N E : 8B 134

|

apld.org

JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE:

“Nicely executed formal design with a fine progression of spaces around the pool. The classic renewal respects the site and house for increased utility and beauty.”


bronzeaward

P H OTO GRAP H Y BY M ATTH E W M U RRE Y

apld.org

|

135


136

|

apld.org


bronzeaward

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000 Desert Spa, Tucson, AZ

Kathryn Prideaux APLD Prideaux Design Tucson, AZ U S D A Z O N E : 9A JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Remarkable

transformation, with good outdoor space and place. More and denser plantings would have helped make the space feel warmer.” PH OTOG R A P H Y BY KAT H RYN P RID EAUX

apld.org

|

137


bronzeaward RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000 Western Exposure, Boulder, CO

Cheri Stringer APLD TLC Gardens, LLC Longmont, CO U S DA ZO N E : 4 JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “A

wonderful project using concrete to mold the landscape in a highly effective way. Inviting entry design. Great control was used throughout.” PHOTOGR A PHY BY DAVI D WI N GER

138

|

apld.org


RESIDENTIAL DESIGN OVER $100,000 Woodland Retreat, Newton, MA

Tom Wilhelm

A Blade of Grass Boston, MA U S D A Z O N E : 6B JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE: “Overall

flow is good and visually engaging. It’s a lovely space for children to wander and explore, while adult spaces are well executed. There’s a good collection of flora and fauna.” PH OTO G R A P H Y BY A BLAD E O F GRASS

apld.org

|

139


studentaward A P L D I N T E R N AT I O N A L S T U D E N T AWA R D 2 0 1 6 The Restorative Garden

Jane Finlay

London, England

Lead judge Greg Pierceall Professor Emeritus, Purdue Landscape Architecture said of this complex site and residence: “Overall this is a stellar site design. At a macro scale looking at the total composition the project is great. The site spaces, plantings, and surfacing are well done as is the layout and construction details. The project presentation is very well defined, outlined, and presented. The plans, images, sections, and references work well to convey the weave of plantings and areas within the site design.”

JUDGES' PERSPECTIVE:

T

he existing 1960s house is to be demolished and replaced with a Huf Haus, the design of which has an effect similar to that created by Mies van der Rohe. The artist Mark Rothko is the designer's inspiration for this garden design, which will be a space that is both calm and yet re-energizing with vibrancy. The landscaping of a woodland edge and blending of heathland inspired plants in the outer perimeters of this garden will create a feeling of calm. Decked walkways of weathered grey will organically link the house and its habitat to invite exploration. Within the geometrically designed garden, plantings will smudge together and soften edges. Layered color and texture will have an uplifting effect, in the same way as Rothko’s art. The new Huf Haus will belong to its surroundings; views will be created outwards rather than inwards. From arrival in the car parking area, the journey to the house will give a sense of relief from the stresses of life outside.

140

|

apld.org


apld.org

|

141


Low maintenance AZEK. Looks like wood, lasts a lifetime.

Walpole is the largest and most experienced fabricator of AZEK, today’s most highly sought-after material for outdoor structures and architectural elements. Our work is finished, kitted, and shipped nationwide. Learn more. Visit walpolewoodworkers.com and fill out a design consultation form. Or call 800-343-6948.

TM

Serving professionals directly nationwide since 1933 • All projects shown crafted with AZEK® cellular PVC

142

|

apld.org

WW22189_APLD.Spring2016.indd 1

1/28/16 4:05 PM


2016 board of directors PRESIDENT Lisa Port, APLD Banyon Tree Design Studio 3630 Northeast 123rd Street Seattle, WA 98125 (206) 383-5572 PRESIDENT-ELECT Danilo Maffei, APLD Maffei Landscape Design LLC 202 N. Garfield Street Kennett Square, PA 19348 (610) 357-9700 SECRETARY/TREASURER Jock Lewendon, APLD Outdoor Living Spaces, LLC 766 Schoolhouse Lane Bound Brook, NJ 08805 (732) 302-9632 IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT Colleen Hamilton, APLD Bloomin' Landscape Designs 7122 Willey Way Carmichael, CA 95608 (916) 961-0191 ADVOCACY DIRECTOR Richard Rosiello Rosiello Designs & Meadowbrook Gardens 159 Grove Street New Milford, CT 06776 (860) 488-6507 CERTIFICATION DIRECTOR Maryanne Quincy, APLD Q Gardens PO Box 2746 Sunnyvale, CA 94087 (408) 739-5493

COMMUNICATIONS & OUTREACH DIRECTOR Nick McCullough, APLD McCullough’s Landscape & Nursery 14401 Jug Street New Albany, OH 43054 EDUCATION DIRECTOR Ellen Johnston, APLD ETJ Designs 5543 Wateka Drive Dallas, TX 75209 (469) 628-3321 GOVERNANCE DIRECTOR Eric Gilbey Vectorworks 7150 Riverwood Drive Columbia, MD 21046 (443) 542-0658

CONNECT WITH US!

MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR Paul Connolly, APLD Sundrea Design Studio 4999 North Sabino Canyon Road Tucson, AZ 85750 (520) 302-7441 RESOURCE DIRECTOR Joe Salemi DynaSCAPE Software 3426 Harvester Road Burlington, ON L7N3N1 (800) 710-1900

➸ Click name to email us!

➸ Click logo to go to webpage

The Designer is an official publication and member service of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD), 2207 Forest Hills Drive, Harrisburg, PA 17112. Ph: 717-238-9780 Fax: 717-238-9985. Disclaimer: Mention of commercial products in this publication is solely for information purposes; endorsement is not intended by APLD. Material does not reflect the opinions or beliefs of APLD. APLD is not responsible for unsolicited freelance manuscripts and photographs. All printed articles become the copyright of APLD.

apld.org

|

143


comingnextissue Subscribe Today! We're quarterly and FREE. CLICK HERE

DESIGNERS IN SITU WINTER IN THE LANDSCAPE PRO TIPS: PHOTOGRAPHY

144

|

apld.org

DESI GN A N D PHOTOGR A PH BY 2 016 A PLD GOLD AWA R D W I N N ER MATTHEW CU N N I N GHA M

The Designer – Fall 2016  
The Designer – Fall 2016  
Advertisement