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thedes覺gner ASSOCIATION OF

PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGNERS

Fall 2015

2015 INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE DESIGN AWARD

Winners


editor’sletter Design Awards

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few months ago I received an email that made my day, if not my week. The Garden Writers Association wrote to inform me that The Designer was a recipient of their prestigious Silver Achievement medal in the category of online media. What a pleasure letting the many writers, photographers, and editors who help make the magazine a success know we had been honored for our work! It was particularly rewarding sharing the news with Art Director Marti Golon, the person responsible for the innovative layout and stunning visuals you’ve come to enjoy.

My delight in the magazine’s achievement makes me all the more excited that our fall issue is devoted exclusively to the winners of the APLD International Landscape Design Awards. Winning landscapes were judged on a variety of criteria, including plant choice and composition, creativity, and technical merit. In addition to gold, merit, and a special student category of awards, the issue kicks off with an extended piece on the APLD Landscape Designer of the Year. This issue, I decided to read contributing editor Genevieve Schmidt’s evocative write-up on each winner’s design before reviewing the accompanying photos. We designers tend to be visual creatures, but even without pictures to accompany her text, I found myself easily visualizing the beautiful spaces and innovative design solutions she describes. I hope you find this special issue as inspiring as I do! SUSAN MORRISON

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EDITOR@APLD.ORG


Plays well with others Clipped into a classic orb or left loose and casual, Golf Ball

cottage. Use it as an unexpected alternative to boxwood

Kohuhu is an all-star ace in the landscape.Tidy and dense, the

when edging a walkway, fronting a border, or filling pots. Once

naturally mounded shape, gorgeous rich-green glossy leaves

established, this versatile shrub is virtually maintenance-free

and dramatic dark stems add structure and architectural

and provides abundant beauty year-round.

interest to almost any style garden from contemporary to

Monrovia‌High-bred. Well-fed. Loving care.

monrovia.com

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contents

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FALL 2015 6 PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 9 JUDGES 12 2015 APLD INTERNATIONAL DESIGNER OF THE YEAR Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens and Jose Alminana Andropogon Associates, Ltd

18 22 26 30 34 40 46 50 53 56 60 64 68 72 76

GOLD AWARDS Susan Cohan, APLD Matthew Cunningham Matthew Cunningham Aaron Andrew McIntire Patricia St. John, APLD David Thorne MERIT AWARDS Shelly Ann Abbott, MLA, APLD Pete Cadieux Pete Cadieux Vickie Cardaro Margie Grace, APLD Jennifer Hoxsie, APLD Reuben Huffman Joly John, Shibanee & Kamal Architects Nick McCullough, APLD

STUDENT AWARD 80 Tanya Wilson

ON THE COVER : 2015 A PLD GOLD W I N N ER SU SA N COHA N GA R DEN S; PHOTOGR A PH BY R I CH POMER A N TZ ON THI S PAGE: 2015 A PLD MER I T W I N N ER SHELLY A N N A B B OTT, MLA , A P L D; PHOTOGR A PH BY SHELLY A N N A B B OTT

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president’smessage A Way of Life

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andscape design is a way of life for me. It is an exciting career that allows me to help others have a more functional, beautiful and sustainable landscape and environment. I feel confident that I am providing a service to homeowners that gives them special and unique outdoor spaces where they can relax, entertain, and enjoy nature.

How have I become so confident? Partly as a direct result of my membership in APLD. Being involved in APLD has given me the opportunity to further my design and horticulture education, meet and build relationships with amazingly talented peers, develop and use my leadership skills and become an APLDcertified landscape designer. Some might say that being APLD-certified does not really mean anything. Well, I don’t believe that, because being confident enough to submit my work to my peers and have them evaluate and qualify it means a lot! I love having the APLD credential after my name.

The profession of landscape design is facing more and more challenges in a changing world. APLD is growing and changing too. It is empowering to be part of an organization that promotes and offers a variety of opportunities for business and personal growth, yet is committed to a future of higher standards for our landscape design profession. I challenge you to make APLD a bigger part of your career. Start building your CEU’s (new continuing education requirements for all levels of design membership); become certified; and volunteer at the local, state, or national level. Don’t just work as a landscape designer, be a landscape designer. Make APLD and your career a way of life. COLLEEN HAMILTON APLD

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thedesıgner EDITOR IN CHIEF Susan Morrison ART DIRECTOR

Marti Golon CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Genevieve Schmidt EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Denise Calabrese ASSOCIATE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Lisa Ruggiers MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR

Angela Burkett COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR

Michelle Keyser CERTIFICATION COORDINATOR

Kelly Clark COMMUNICATIONS ASSOCIATE

Courtney Kuntz BOOKKEEPER

Jennifer Swartz DIRECTOR OF CONFERENCES AND EVENTS

Lori Zelesko MEMBERSHIP, FINANCE & EVENTS COORDINATOR

Leona Wagner NEWSLETTER EDITOR

Amy Bobb COPY EDITOR

Claire Splan

➸ Click name to email us! For information on advertising in The Designer, contact communications@apld.org For submission guidelines click here

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D E TAIL OF A PLD INTER N ATI ON A L LANDSCA PE DESI GN ER O F THE YEA R WINNER PHI PPS CO NSERVATORY A N D BOTAN I CA L GA R DEN S AND JOSE A LMI N A N A O F ANDR OPOGON ASS O CI ATES, LTD; I MAGE CO UR TESY OF PHI PPS CO NSERVATORY A N D BOTAN I CA L GA R DEN S


thejudges

John Greenlee

Julie Moir Messervy

John Greenlee is the founder of Greenlee Nursery, the oldest specialty grass nursery on the west coast and the author of The Encyclopedia of Ornamental Grasses and The American Meadow Garden. He currently creates meadow gardens with his own landscape design firm, Greenlee & Associates. John has been creating grass ecologies in public and private gardens for 30 years, such as the Norton Simon Museum and the Getty Museum in Los Angeles, Disney’s Animal Kingdom in Florida, and the San Diego Zoo. He has worked as an advisor to landscape architects including Pamela Burton, Andrea Cochran, HM White Site Architects, Peter Walker and Partners, and James Corner Field Operations. He has designed private gardens for Diane Keaton, Katherine Bigelow, Ellen DeGeneres and Portia DeRossi, Ed Harris, Tea Leoni, and Steven Spielberg. His movement to reinvent America’s turf-lawn culture has grabbed headlines in major media sources such as the New York Times, Martha Stewart Living, Architectural Digest, Garden Design, the Los Angeles Times, and Sunset. An indemand speaker, John’s lectures, like his gardens, rally for the transformation of lawns from staid, wasteful monocultures to sustainable, lively meadow gardens.

Author and landscape designer Julie Moir Messervy’s vision for composing landscapes of beauty and meaning is furthering the evolution of landscape design and changing the way people create and enjoy their outdoor surroundings. Julie is the principal designer of JMMDS, a landscape architecture and design firm in Saxtons River, Vermont, creators of parks and residential gardens around the country. Her best- known work, the three-acre Toronto Music Garden, was designed in collaboration with noted cellist Yo-Yo Ma and received the Leonardo da Vinci Award for innovation and creativity. She is a distinguished lecturer and the author of eight books on landscape design, including Landscaping Ideas That Work; Home Outside: Creating the Landscape You Love; and Outside the Not So Big House with Sarah Susanka. She has written numerous articles, including the popular long-running “Inspired Design” column for Fine Gardening magazine, and gives lectures and workshops around North America. Julie has a mission to use digital technologies to bring great design to anyone, anywhere. She created the Home Outside® online design service and Home Outside® Palette landscape design app to do just that. For more information, please visit www. jmmds.com.

Gregory M. Pierceall

ASLA

Greg Pierceall is a Professor Emeritus of Purdue Landscape Architecture, where he taught for 29 years. He has been involved with APLD for 20-plus years and is the recipient of the International Award of Excellence from APLD in 2003. As a site and landscape designer, Greg’s philosophy is that landscape design should reflect the space, place, case, taste, and time, as well as the individual, personal aspects associated with the design context and program. As an educator, Greg works to take landscape design issues and simplify them to their elemental parts and components. Greg has authored numerous books on landscape design and interiorscapes, including Residential Landscapes, one of the first landscape texts written for the industry. He has been extensively involved with the Illinois Landscape Contractors Association, and was the recipient of their Service Award in 2004 and the Man of the Year Award in 2008. He currently is a consulting educator and lectures nationally and internationally on landscape design.

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thank you to our

sponsors Platinum

Gold

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Visit us at APLD’s annual conference in October

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Project: Kat’s Garden

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Designer: MCLD


2015 APLD INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE

Designer of the Year CENT ER FOR SUSTAI N A BL E L A N DSC A P ES AT T H E P H I P P S CO NS ERVATORY A N D BOTA N I C A L G A R D EN S, PI TTS B U R G H

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P H OTO GRAP H : RENE E ROS E NSTEEL

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designeroftheyear NON-RESIDENTIAL PROJECTS OVER $500,000 Center for Sustainable Landscapes, Pittsburgh, PA

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Garden, &

Jose Alminana

of Andropogon Associates, Ltd. Philadelphia, PA U S D A Z O N E : 5A

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iven the majestic view of the Monongahela River in Pittsburgh, this landscape started with an immediate connection to the region. Yet the project, part of the Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, was built on a site that literally did not exist previously.

PHOTOGR A PH: PAU L G . WIEG M

A 27-foot cliff going down to a lower terrace had suffered decades of environmental devastation during its use as a city fueling depot. There was no existing usable soil, no vegetation, and certainly none of the walkable pathways filled with wildlife that are now such a highlight of this educational center. Now the experience of the newly designed landscape changes greatly as you walk through it.

“At the top, you get an overview of the region with a beautiful view of the native topography and waterways of Pittsburgh,” says Jose Alminana of Andropogon Associates, Ltd. “As you walk through the site, you notice the details of the plants, native insects, and birds around you. The journey through the landscape takes on a personal and human scale and makes it possible for individuals to feel embedded in this regional experience.” 14

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Although the scope of the project was large, the design team's goal was to introduce elements that worked at a human scale.

PH OTOGR A P H : H AW K EYE AE RIAL P H OTO GRAP H Y

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designeroftheyear In order to create this groundbreaking center for education and research, the design team had to craft a completely new landscape comprised of indigenous plants. All the materials were imported, down to the variety of soils engineered for different parts of the site. Each area mimics a different part of the regional landscape, from the vegetation in the Allegheny Plateau, to the oak woodland, to the constructed wetlands and rain garden.

“We were greatly inspired by PHOTOGR A PH: CORY DOMA N Doug Tallamy’s book, Bringing Nature Home, and we used his teachings to guide us as we created each section of the garden,” says Alminana. The results, even in a short time, were stunning. “When we planted milkweed in the roof garden, we had monarchs visiting the very first season—they found it so quickly. We have a resident hawk who dive-bombs the pond and fishes, and picks up field mice in the meadow. When researching the types of caterpillar that each native plant here could host or attract, we realized that we have the potential for over 2400 different species of butterfly on this site.” Given the barren and possibly polluted space they started with, it’s an achievement of the highest order. The project is net zero water, managing all storm and sanitary water on site through the use of green roofs, rain gardens, and bioswales, and no potable water has been used for irrigation since the landscape’s establishment period. Sanitary water is treated using constructed wetlands and sand filters and is reused as flush water, while any excess water is directed to a unit that uses solar energy to distill the water for use in watering orchids. A 4000-square foot lagoon, fed by roof runoff, contains native fish and turtles and is bordered by an FSC-certified oak boardwalk where the Conservatory’s 33,000+ annual visitors can witness up close the beauty of the native wildlife and plan plants that this regenerative landscape is designed to preserve and protect.

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The project is net zero water, managing all storm and sanitary water on site. PH OTO G R A P H : PAU L G. WIE GM AN

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P L A N T I N G D E S I G N : Lee Hill Farm, New Vernon, NJ

Susan Cohan APLD F I R M : Susan Cohan Gardens, LLC, Chatham, NJ U S DA ZO N E : 6

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sense of history permeates the grounds of this property, which served as Gen. Lafayette’s winter headquarters during the revolution. The 7800-square foot garden was built in the 1920s, when the property had a working greenhouse and two full-time gardeners. By 2007, only the bones of that garden remained: stonework in disrepair, heaved brick walkways, and a leaky concrete pond. Landscape designer Susan Cohan, APLD, worked with the homeowners to reimagine it in the spirit of the original, but with lower maintenance and an eye towards family use and deer resistance.

PHOTOGR A PHY: R ICH POMER A N TZ

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Landscape designer Susan Cohan, APLD, worked to maintain the historical spirit of the original landscape.

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goldaward “Most of the properties I work on have some kind of context, whether it’s the neighborhood or actual history,” says Cohan. “I’m a huge fan of 18th-century French gardens, as their structural formality speaks volumes to me as a designer, and the hedges and repeating pyramids in this garden are a nod to that style.” However, she says, there are very few people willing or able to maintain a formal garden, so she will often choose to interpret that structure with naturally rounded varieties of boxwood such as ‘Green Velvet’, or naturally pyramidal forms such as ‘Green Mountain’. “Most people don’t realize how many natural forms boxwood varieties have without pruning,” she says. “It’s a matter of using the right one; not all boxwood are equal!” The garden reflects the formal nature of the property, but with lower maintenance plant choices.

For this property, planting plans from the 1940s were available, and indicated a color palette of deep blues and pinks punctuated with seasonal accents in yellow and white. Instead of using the primarily annual flowers as was indicated in those earlier plans, Cohan selected a variety of easy care perennials.

“I love the combination of bearded iris and Amsonia in spring,” she says. “Later in the summer, Agastache ‘Black Adder’ and the Knock Out roses are the stars.”

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The planting design is a mirrored scheme bisected by the black Agriframe arches and the peony walk. In the east and west, the planting beds are predominantly spring-blooming, with north and south providing summer and fall interest. Strong bloomers include bearded iris (both the deep purple of ‘Blenheim Royal’ as well as the pale lavender color of existing apld.org


I’m a huge fan of 18th-century French gardens … and the hedges and repeating pyramids in this garden are a nod to that style.

bearded iris transplanted from elsewhere on site), ‘Firewitch’ cheddar pink (Dianthus gratianopolitanus ‘Firewitch’), ‘May Night’ sage (Salvia nemerosa ‘Mainacht’), and lady’s mantle (Alchemilla mollis). In partially shaded areas, ‘Sprite’ astilbe (Astilbe ‘Sprite’) and ‘Richard Ahrens’ windflower (Anemone x hybrida ‘Richard Ahrens’) steal the show with their pale pink blooms in spring and fall, respectively. Lawn allows play space for the family as well as visual respite from the exuberantly planted beds.

“I was able to achieve something with this garden that is most important to me as a designer,” says Cohan. “When I finish with a design, my hope is that it is so right for its site and how the homeowner will use it, that my hand is somewhat invisible. Stylistically, this garden also speaks to my interest in having an underlying hard, geometric structure that is planted with abandon.”

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goldaward RESIDENTIAL DESIGN: Longwood Garden, Brookline, MA

Matthew Cunningham F I R M : Matthew Cunningham Design, LLC, Winchester, MA U S D A Z O N E : 6B

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s California-style indoor-outdoor living possible in New England? Designer Matthew Cunningham’s clients, an active professional couple with two kids, hoped so. They wanted Cunningham to transform their neglected front and back yard, and reimagine it as a welcoming place that would encourage them in their beachy, active lifestyle, with areas for the family to enjoy together in differing seasons, moods, and at different times of day. The front yard had numerous issues at the start. Eroding embankments, nondescript front pathways, and year-round pooling in the narrow, cracked driveway made it an eyesore in this prominent Boston neighborhood. A new approach was clearly needed, and Cunningham specified a beautifully textured board-formed concrete wall to retain and elevate the front yard to address the issue of soil crumbling down the slope. A crisp concrete staircase clearly defines the entry to the home, and a new parking court made of porous pavers allows storm water to percolate into the watershed. Native plants with contrasting foliage add color and texture, and drape softly over the wall to break up hard edges. Permeable stone paths connect the front and back yards, and the previously broken and unusable flagstone patio in back was replaced by two separate sitting and dining terraces. Having the dining and lounge areas in different places keeps the view from indoors uncluttered, and allows the family to choose whether to enjoy a sunny or a shady garden retreat. 22

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Eroding embankments and a cracked driveway were only a few of the issues that needed resolution.

P H OTO G R A P H Y: M ATTH EW CUNNI NGH AM

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The sitting terrace, cooled and shaded by a mature burr oak (Quercus macrocarpa) that was preserved from the original landscape, is perfect for relaxing during the hottest times of the day. It’s surrounded by a beachy meadow planting of Russian sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia), fountain grass (Pennisetum spp.), and other plants that provide color and gentle movement in the breeze. Comfortable chairs and an ottoman with sky-blue cushions invite the family to put their feet up and settle in for conversation or a cool drink. Reclaimed granite slabs

The sunny dining terrace is made comfortable by a wooden pergola that provides dappled shade, and a small kitchen garden provides fresh herbs for outdoor grilling. The entire backyard has been regraded and a flat lawn was cut into the slope to provide a green carpet, perfect for an impromptu game of frisbee or catch. Around the periphery, reclaimed granite slabs from a local decommissioned seawall hold the slope and become benches and stair risers for the perimeter garden, which is densely planted with coastal woodland species and provides a fresh green buffer between a shared fence line along the rear of the property.

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The sitting terrace, cooled and shaded by a mature burr oak … is perfect for relaxing during the hottest times of the day.

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S M A L L G A R D E N D E S I G N : Kat’s Garden, Cambridge, MA

Matthew Cunningham F I R M : Matthew Cunningham Design, LLC, Winchester, MA U S D A Z O N E : 6B

PH OTO G R A P H Y: M ATTH EW CUNNI NGH AM

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A sliding, sculptural gate marks the entrance to this elegant, urban courtyard.

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t the entry to this elegant urban courtyard stands a sculptural sliding gate crafted from raw aluminum, the design of which was inspired by a sentimental family drawing from the client’s collection. It acts as an inspired focal point and sets the tone in this artistic garden that uses a variety of reclaimed materials, each of which brings its own story or sense of history.

The landscape is bordered by horizontal wooden fencing built from western red cedar, which radiates out from the gate and encloses the courtyard. Air conditioner screens mirroring the same detailing provide continuity. Upon entry to the garden, the flooring is made up of linear slabs of reclaimed granite, upon which a striking recycled plastic dining set sits. The dining set has

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goldaward strong contemporary lines, and the brilliant white color reflects light and brightens the courtyard. An outdoor grill sends delicious fragrances wafting over the gathering area.

The courtyard holds three blocks of antique granite that were salvaged from an early 19th century decommissioned On lazy afternoons, the building in Boston. Two courtyard can be taken in from are nestled into the two modern black Adirondack planting beds and act chairs, nestled into an elevated yet as overflow seating for protected corner of the garden. larger gatherings, while the third was carefully outfitted with a stainless steel rill and became a soothing contemporary water feature, with the water spilling into a basin of river stones. Underground drywell pockets are dotted throughout the landscape, so storm water can easily percolate into the surrounding planter beds.

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Playing off the metal gate, a dramatic stainless steel trellis has been set against the building and spans two stories, with a clematis vine (Clematis montana var. rubens) twining up to diminish the previously overwhelming scale of the house. On lazy afternoons, the courtyard can be taken in from two modern black Adirondack chairs, nestled into an elevated yet protected corner of the garden.

A simple planting palette composed of sculptural trees, evergreen and deciduous shrubs, and multi-season perennials forms the foundation of this garden and provides interest year-round. The look in fall, with a scattering of leaves dusting the granite slab flooring, is particularly compelling due to the fall color of Stewartia, paperbark maple (Acer griseum), and shad (Amelanchier) trees, along with the purple tone of oakleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia). Cunningham left numerous planting pockets improved with exceptional soil so the homeowner, who sees gardens as an artistic form of expression, could dabble in gardening and enjoy contributing her own creative touch.

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goldaward S P E C I A LT Y P R O J E C T S : Tribeca Roof Garden, New York, NY

Aaron Andrew McIntire

F I R M : Gunn Landscape Architecture, PLLC, New York, NY U S D A Z O N E : 6B

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raw rooftop space in Tribeca needed a functional and friendly outdoor living environment for family gatherings and entertaining friends. With floor-to-ceiling windows, the client wanted a contemporary design that would play off the layout of the interior and include a number of earth tones, while introducing a few elements with bright color to act as an inviting lure into the outdoors.

Because this is a rooftop garden, white paving was used in the most exposed areas to reflect sunlight and keep the building underneath from heating up to an uncomfortable degree. On the main patio area, a selection of furnishings from Italian furniture manufacturer Paola Lenti were selected, all using high-tech outdoor fabrics that are waterproof and resist fading. The clean lines of the furnishings reiterate the modern styling of both the landscape and the interior. A circle of decking in tropical hardwood defines the main seating and lounging area and breaks up the pale paving with its organic shape. 30

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A more private outdoor deck off the master bedroom houses a diamond jet spa with a sheet of cascading water. Raised bamboo planters create a gentle

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Raised bamboo planters create a gentle rustling sound that masks the noise of the city.

PHOTOGR A PHY: GU N N LA N DSC A PE A R CHITECTU R E, PLLC

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Natural materials like moss and stone are a nod to the client's love of nature.

rustling sound that masks the noise of the city, and screens the spa from neighboring windows. A horizontally slatted fence provides a sense of enclosure and privacy, while retaining a feeling of openness. The horizontal lines of the fence are reinforced by the lines of lighting used underneath the lip of each stair.

The client wanted to incorporate nature while keeping the look relaxing, clean, and spa-like. Landscape architect Aaron Andrew McIntire accommodated the client’s love of natural materials including moss, seaweed, and stone by using these materials within the design, or by reflecting the color or texture of each in the plantings, furnishings, and materials. In the green roof area, lime green scotch moss grows in between pale path stones, while the texture and color of potted junipers have a similar texture to a mossy forest floor. The pale concrete paving has the appearance of stone and is made from light-colored crushed stone aggregate. The bold marine blue and chartreuse colors of some of the outdoor furnishings, along with the weeping foliage found in many of the planters, interpret the idea of seaweed in a way that is appropriate to the contemporary urban setting.

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Garden, Landscape Design

Woody Plant Material

Herbaceous Plant Material

Woody Plant Material

Herbaceous Plant Material

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goldaward Simple, clean lines create the structure for this family-friendly urban garden.

It’s easy for the family’s two young daughters to harvest greens ... the twoyear-old’s technique for kale is ‘ripping off the leaf and eating it on the spot.’

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SMALL GARDEN DESIGN & COST EFFICIENT DESIGN: City Gem, San Francisco, CA

Patricia St. John APLD F I R M : St. John Landscapes, Berkeley, CA U S D A Z O N E : 10A

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he simple, clean lines of this small urban landscape reinforce the modern aesthetic of the client’s newly renovated home. Because the land drops down seven feet from the house to the back fence, landscape designer Patricia St. John, APLD, built in three level, useful areas: a deck for entertaining right off the back door of the house, a second level with a children’s sandbox and a bench, and a decomposed granite patio with a table and chairs on the lowest level. Since the garden would primarily be viewed from two and three stories up, designing it in three levels also worked to keep the aerial view visually uncluttered.

P H OTO G R A P HY: K RITSADA. USED WITH PERMISSION FROM BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS MAGAZINE. 2014 MEREDITH CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. WWW.BHG.COM

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The new design creates enticing views of the garden from the home's interior.

The owners, a professional couple with two young daughters, enjoy having a series of entertaining spaces that can not only be used by the adults of the family to relax with friends, but can be enjoyed equally by the little ones, who have fun making the circuit from the deck to the sandbox and back. St. John selected a variety of child-friendly plants which are not poisonous, have no sharp features, and have the ability to bounce back from the children’s active play.

The client says, “Our daughter LOVES picking all the little white flowers off the Erigeron daisies, and I love knowing she won’t harm those plants one bit with all of her not-so-delicate tugging to get them off.” A vegetable and herb garden filled with lush edible specimens is located off the back door on the entertaining deck. It’s easy for the family’s two young daughters to harvest greens; the mother describes the two-year-old’s harvesting technique for kale as “ripping off the leaf and eating it on the spot.” “It gives me so much joy to hear that the daughters, in the middle of the city, are able to enjoy fresh, nutritious greens in their garden,” says St. John.

On the other end of the deck, a redwood eyebrow arbor adds dimension against the walls of the neighboring home, and gives a feeling of privacy and enclosure to the family when they dine or relax outdoors. “I designed broad steps on the deck to give easy access and a welcoming invitation to the rest of the garden,” she says. The steps can be used as extra seating when several families are visiting, and the raised bed in the middle of the steps was built with a broad ledge that can also be used for casual overflow seating.

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Running through the center of the landscape, a decomposed granite pathway is lined by dwarf mat rush (Lomandra longifolia ‘Breeze’) and burgundy cordyline (Cordyline ‘Design-a-Line Burgundy’), the placement of which emphasize the curved shape of the path. A specimen fernleaf full moon

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maple (Acer japonicum ‘Aconitifolium’) adds a pop of color in a key focal area of the garden.

Low-water plants, and local materials such as redwood and stone keep the garden environmentally friendly.

Square limestone pavers set on sand have an attractive pale color that contrasts with the decomposed granite, and create a stable path to both the bench and the children’s sandbox. The built-in sandbox has been cleverly fitted with a screen lid and latch to keep neighborhood cats out. “When their daughters outgrow the sandbox, because it is located in the sunniest part of a foggy San Francisco garden, it can easily become a raised bed for growing vegetables year-round, by replacing the sand with good soil and compost,” says St. John.

Not only is this garden an effective example of cost-effective small-space design, but it is also environmentally friendly. St. John selected sustainable and low-cost redwood for the arbor, raised planters, and deck; local stone for use in the dry stack walls at the back of the garden; local decomposed granite for the lower patio and pads; and water-wise plants that require little supplemental care. The opportunity to grow one’s own fresh herbs and vegetables is another eco-friendly choice that is not only healthful, but also saves the family money over purchasing organic produce at the store.

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RESIDENTIAL DESIGN: The Reclamation of Native Oak Ridge, Lafayette, CA

David Thorne F I R M : David Thorne Landscape Architect, Inc, Oakland, CA U S D A Z O N E : 9B PH OTO G R A P H : S H A RO N D E BE LL

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Every bit of rainfall that hits this property is caught and directed to where it can be of most benefit.

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A native plant palette blends seamlessly with the surrounding landscape.

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ith stunning views of Mount Diablo, this 10-acre property is on a ridgetop setting that had been badly damaged during the process of clearing the site. Left behind was a scarred and barren pad of soil and several prominent oaks aging prematurely due to soil compaction and stress. Together with landscape architect David Thorne, the clients hoped to restore and repopulate the barren ridge-top with oaks and native grasses to create a transition from hillside to home that blurred the boundaries between the natural and built environment.

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The live oaks dictated a planting palette that could withstand the hot summers with little supplemental water. Given that, Thorne chose a palette of native plants and brought them right up to the edge of the house, using large drifts to provide wildlife habitat and attract pollinating insects and birds. Native strawberry (Fragaria spp.), manzanita (Arctostaphylos spp.), and flowering currant (Ribes spp.) provide berries and seeds to feed the local birds. A blend of native grasses, California poppy (Eschscholzia californica), sticky PHOTOGR A PHS: TR EVE JOHN SON PHOTOGR A PHY

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goldaward monkey flower (Mimulus aurantiacus), and blue-flowered silver bush lupine (Lupinus albifrons) provide seeds and nectar. Watching and hearing the birds and buzzing pollinators attracted by this diverse blend of regionally appropriate plants allows the homeowners to feel in tune with their mesmerizing surroundings.

Arizona flagstone pathways reflect the warmth of the surrounding hills.

In addition to using water-wise native plants, every bit of rainfall that hits this property is caught and directed to where it can be of most benefit. Thorne designed most areas of the landscape to be permeable, and water is routed throughout the landscape to percolate back into the soil. The few impervious areas are graded towards convenient swales, which direct water to the planting beds. Roof runoff is collected in a series of rockeries and bioswales planted with seasonal grasses that filter rain before replenishing the groundwater supply.

Generous pathways and patios of Arizona flagstone have a similar warm tone to the native California grassland in the natural landscape, and these comfortable areas create a landscape that unfolds with small surprises as you make your way through it. Along one pathway, a single stone bowl fountain that Thorne found at a local stone yard has a small piece of copper tubing feeding the fountain with a periodic slow drip, to keep the fountain full and the water fresh.

“People love this little fountain,” says Thorne. “Birds and animals come and drink here, and the little circular ripples created as each drip falls to the water has a magical effect.”

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As the afternoon goes on, the sculptural branching of the native oaks casts dramatic shadows throughout the landscape. California live oak (Quercus apld.org


agrifolia), California valley oak (Quercus lobata), and a scattering of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) have a majestic appearance due to their age and regal form. To create a natural succession that would have occurred had the site not been cleared, Thorne specified that 40 new oaks be planted around the hillside to take the place of the mature oaks as they inevitably decline over time. Minimal use of low-wattage lighting allows the homeowners to enjoy the garden in the evening, while minimizing the negative effects of light pollution on wildlife.

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meritaward RESIDENTIAL DESIGN: Colorful Desert Hummingbird and Butterfly Garden, Vail, AZ

Shelly Ann Abbott MLA, APLD F I R M : Landscape Design West, LLC, Tucson, AZ U S D A Z O N E : 10A

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Abbott used a variety of native plants to encourage food and habitat usage by local wildlife, and planted a number of these wildlifeattracting plants close to seating areas so the owners could feel a connection to the land.

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he breathtaking view of the rugged mountains and pristine open desert just outside the garden wall set the scene in this Southwest landscape. In her desire to create harmony between the built landscape and the adjacent desert, landscape designer Shelly Ann Abbott used a variety of native plants to encourage food and habitat usage by local wildlife, and planted a number of these wildlife-attracting plants close to seating areas so the owners could feel a connection to the land through the activity of hummingbirds, butterflies, and more.

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To use water responsibly in this dry climate, she utilized passive solar principles and placed perennials where the full afternoon shade from the home would reduce their need for supplemental water. In the areas that are sunny and dry, she chose tough succulents and cacti that thrive with almost no water aside from the natural rainfall. Stormwater runoff from the roof of the home is preserved for use in the backyard, and passive water harvesting and soil contouring is used to capture the rainwater that falls in the landscape, and direct it where it can be most beneficial.

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The free-form pool and round circular spa were designed for a naturalistic appearance that would go well with the shape of the curved perimeter wall and the mountains defining the skyline. Boulders set around the periphery of the pool and spa soften the man-made edges and are yet another touchpoint with the distant scenery. Given that the pool was designed to be as aesthetically pleasing as it is functional, the landscape was designed so that the pool is visible from all backyardfacing windows and major areas of the landscape. The dramatic forms of desert spoon (Dasylirion wheeleri), ocotillo (Fouquieria splendens), and a variety of agaves cast sculptural shadows on the paving and stucco wall during both day and night, making the walk to the outdoor fireplace appealing even as daylight dims. Colorful plantings, comfortable seating and entertaining areas, the sound of water, and the crackle of fire combine to make this an appealing outdoor living space at any time of day.

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When the fire is on, the Plexiglas seems to glow from within and reflects the light back into the seating area. P H OTO G R A P H Y: A BLAD E O F GRASS

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meritaward SMALL GARDEN DESIGN: Contemporary Courtyard, Boston, MA

Pete Cadieux F I R M : A Blade of Grass, Wayland, MA U S D A Z O N E : 6A

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he courtyard to this modern townhouse had been neglected for years and was a barren plot of weeds when designer Pete Cadieux was called in. The clients wanted a clean, contemporary outdoor living area to serve as an extension of their home. To that end, there were a number of elements they desired, including a fire feature to warm the courtyard by night and during the cooler months, a water feature to help soften the sounds of the city, an outdoor grill, landscape lighting so the space can be enjoyed at night when the clients are home, as well as a flexible seating area that could be used for relaxing, casual dining, and entertaining.

Given the 2-foot change in elevation from the home to the back fence, the first challenge was maximizing the amount of flat, usable space in this petite backyard. Because of the elevation in grade, the outdoor area feels as though it is on display from the inside of the home, so the overall design needed to be carefully handled to avoid the look of a platform or stage. Cadieux used extra-wide treads on the stairs for a gradual grade change that reads as terraced levels. The water feature, which has an elegant sheet of water cascading into a pebbled pool, was incorporated into the terracing so it didn’t take up any room that could otherwise have been used for seating. To give the warming fire feature a minimal footprint, it was built into the sitting wall as a linear, natural gas fire trough. Backlit Plexiglas panels behind both the water and the fire features make each of these spots an eye-catching focal point, even when the fire is not lit. When the fire is on, the Plexiglas seems to glow from within and reflects the light back into the seating area, providing comfortable ambient apld.org

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Contemporary, light-weight furniture complements the strong lines of the design.

lighting by which to enjoy a glass of wine with friends in the evening.

Planting was kept minimal and used for its deep green color, texture, and distinctive form. ‘Green Mountain’ boxwood (Buxus ‘Green Mountain’), known for its naturally conical form, is used in a cluster of three against the backdrop of horizontal wooden fencing, and contrasts with the wide leaves and golden striping on the ‘Center of Attention’ hostas (Hosta ‘Center of Attention’), which are used along the back of the water feature.

Because the space needed to be as flexible as possible to accommodate differently sized gatherings, the contemporary furniture was chosen to be lightweight and easy to move. Enameled ceramic stools are a vibrant shade of red for a modern take on a Moroccan-style stool, and can be used either as seating or as side tables. The glass table has wheels, and can be moved by one person to easily change the layout. The comfortable gray seats have a metal frame with mesh coverings, and while they look stationary and permanent, they are lightweight and highly portable. Given the ease of repositioning the modern furnishings, the courtyard transitions easily from an intimate seating area to a larger gathering space for parties.

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RESIDENTIAL DESIGN: Dedham Residence, Dedham, MA

Pete Cadieux F I R M : A Blade of Grass, Wayland, MA U S D A Z O N E : 6A

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hough this Greek Revival home has a generous lot, prior to landscaping it was open on all four sides to both neighbors and a main road. Worse, the existing backyard was dominated by a cracked and unsightly circular driveway, giving the family little reason to look out the windows or go outside. By reducing the footprint of the driveway, they made room to add a welcoming brick pathway with bluestone edging from the back garage to the home, softened by exuberant perennials that spill over the sides to welcome the owners home from a long workday.

The more formal front entry was given a straight bluestone path to the door, which is flanked by broadly curving planting beds wrapping around the edges of a spacious lawn area. In the beds, purple-leaved smoke tree (Cotinus obovatus), ‘Little Princess’ spirea (Spiraea japonica ‘Little Princess’), and a mix of hydrangeas provide seasonal color to draw the family outside to play and relax. In winter, an architectural framework of boxwood, dense spreading yew (Taxus x media ‘Densiformis’), and ‘Ivory Halo’ red-twig dogwood (Cornus alba ‘Ivory Halo’) have a sculptural quality when covered in snow.

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Given the extreme lack of privacy in the initial site, the new landscape was designed from the outside in, starting with a staggered planting along the perimeter of large evergreen shrubs and trees, with a few deciduous specimens mixed in for a textural contrast and seasonal color. A mix of Norway spruce (Picea abies), white fir (Abies concolor), Douglas fir P H OTOGR A PHY: A B LA DE OF GR ASS

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Comfortable seating is visible from the informal owner’s entry, and acts as a visual cue to prompt the family to consider spending some time outside.

(Pseudotsuga menziesii) ‘Heritage’ multi-stemmed birch (Betula nigra ‘Heritage’), and ‘Thundercloud’ purple leaf plum (Prunus cerasifera ‘Thundercloud’) was used.

In the backyard, a spacious outdoor dining table with a shade umbrella and comfortable seating is visible from the informal owner’s entry, and acts as a visual cue to prompt the family to consider spending some time outside when they arrive home. The wraparound stone seat wall with a smooth cap provides casual overflow seating for larger gatherings. Lounge chairs in a subtle olive color match the seating in the dining area, and invite the family to relax with a book and a cool drink on hot summer days.

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RESIDENTIAL DESIGN: House in the Dunes , Shelter Island, NY

Vickie Cardaro

F I R M : Buttercup Design Group, Shelter Island, NY U S DA ZO N E : 7

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This landscape fuses a modern zen sensibility inspired by the architecture, with a naturalistic dune environment of swishing grasses.

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verlooking a wide open view of New York’s Gardiners Bay, this landscape fuses a modern zen sensibility inspired by the architecture, with a naturalistic dune environment of swishing grasses and other plants that stand up to the saltladen coastal winds. The contemporary rectilinear design of the home, along with the painted black deck, pergola, and cabana led Cardaro to use a palette of Asian-style plantings including ‘Bloodgood’ Japanese maple (Acer palmatum ‘Bloodgood’), ‘Mt Fuji’ flowering cherry (Prunus serrulata ‘Mt Fuji’), and a variety of bamboos such as darkstemmed black bamboo (Phyllostachys nigra), low-growing Veitch’s bamboo (Sasa veitchii), and hardy bisset bamboo (Phyllostachys bissettii). Further away from the home, these architecturally inspired areas of the landscape give way to a more naturalistic and windswept look.

“My intention was to return the property to what it might have looked like 100 years ago before it was bulkheaded,” says designer Vickie Cardaro. “To create a rugged, wild, drought-tolerant landscape that would stand up to the sometimes harsh coastal environment.” The most prominent feature is the constructed sand dunes, built with soft 58

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Architecturally inspired areas of the landscape give way to a more windswept look.

sand brought in from East Hampton and retained by mass plantings of ‘Blue Dune’ lyme grass (Elymus arenarius ‘Blue Dune’) and American beach grass (Ammophila breviligulata). The character of these constructed dunes provides a dynamic connection to the seaside locale.

Crushed Quahog clamshells were used for the driveway and areas around the sea-facing side of the house, another way Cardaro reinforced the modern yet beachy aesthetic. The pale color stands out against the dark colors and clean lines of the building, while the gentle crunch underfoot adds a rustic coastal touch. Simple crushed gravel was used in the interior courtyard, poolside, and in the secret garden off the guest rooms, and large native boulders have been strategically placed as accents.

PHOTOGR A PHY: VICKIE CA R DA R O

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R E S I D E N T I A L D E S I G N : Monarch Sanctuary, Goleta, CA

Margie Grace APLD

F I R M : Grace Design Associates, Santa Barbara, CA U S D A Z O N E : 10A

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laying off of the stunning views of the adjacent nature preserve, designer Margie Grace, APLD, used naturalistic plantings and materials to blur the boundary between built landscape and the panoramic view outside the garden fence. The thoughtful transition from home to the California grassland beyond begins with the interior stone flooring, which is repeated in the back patio and transitions from mortared and grouted, to dry set with gravel joints, eventually fading into the gravel beyond. Further reinforcing that local connection, all stone, soil, and plants were sourced within 15 miles.

A naturalistic gas fire pit and trickling fountain carved from local sandstone have a similar color to the waving beige grasses in the nature preserve, reinforcing the connection with the scenery in the backdrop. Circulating water not only attracts wildlife such as bees, hummingbirds, and other birds but provides a musical note in the landscape that enhances the sound of the

P H OTO G R A P H Y: LE P E RE P H OTO GRAP H Y

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Circulating water not only attracts wildlife… but provides a musical note in the landscape.

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meritaward Seating scattered throughout the site provides numerous opportunities to enjoy the garden.

waving grasses, buzzing pollinators, and birds tweeting in the garden. LED lighting was designed to be night sky–friendly and doesn’t disrupt the natural cycles of nesting birds.

With heavy clay soil, the planting selections posed a mild challenge, but a variety of clay-tolerant and water-wise ornamental grasses such as slender veldt grass (Pennisetum spathiolatum), autumn moor grass (Sesleria autumnalis), dwarf red fountain grass (Pennisetum ‘Eaton Canyon’), and ‘Karl Foerster’ feather reed grass (Calamagrostis x acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’) were chosen to blend with the extended view. Other plants were included for their ability to attract and support wildlife, such as native California lilac (Ceanothus ‘Skylark’), tropical milkweed (Asclepias curassavica), and nectarproducing plants such as culinary herbs, lavender, and catmint. Closer towards the house, an interior courtyard provides shelter from the wind and heat. A central fountain in a Moorish star pattern, tiled in a cooling shade of green, bubbles as a cheerful focal point. A pebble surround catches any runoff. A variety of flowering orchids and lush greenery thrive in the enclosed space.

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RESIDENTIAL DESIGN: A Home to Showcase, Glencoe, IL

Jennifer Hoxsie APLD F I R M : Greenhaven Landscapes, Inc., Lake Bluff, IL U S D A Z O N E : 5B

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hen this architecturally significant 1923 Seyfarth Tudor home was purchased in 2010, the owner had a long wish list of improvements, but the most important underlying thread was to enhance and visually support the historic architecture without overwhelming it. They hoped to add clean, structured plantings with touches of color, as well as create a variety of inviting outdoor areas for the family to enjoy.

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The circular drive along the front entry was neither attractive nor effective, given the lack of useful parking space, so landscape designer Jennifer Hoxsie relocated a utility pole in the center parkway and opened up the front wall to create a generous motor court with parking for three to five cars. To keep the space feeling proportional to the architecture, she used reclaimed street pavers to create an elegant

PHOTOGR A PHY: HA N N A H GOER IN G PHOTOGR A PHY

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The most important underlying thread was to enhance and visually support the historic architecture without overwhelming it.

quatrefoil design in the center, with a matched banding of pavers around the periphery. A structured hedge of naturally trimmed boxwood acts as a formal backdrop against which a selection of softly-textured flowering plants are grown.

From the motor court all the way to the backyard, screening from the neighbors was a must. A staggered privacy planting of evergreen spruce quickly filled in, and Hoxsie used small clusters of compact burning bush (Euonymus alatus ‘Compactus’), ‘Pink Diamond’ hydrangea (Hydrangea paniculata ‘Interhydia’), and ‘Snowapld.org

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meritaward A new pool and pool house became the focal point of the backyard

mound’ spirea (Spirea nipponica ‘Snowmound’) to provide a seasonal display of flowers and foliage color that changes throughout the year. A new pool and pool house became the focal point of the backyard, and was built with a surrounding pool deck of Jerusalem limestone, chosen for its light color and tendency to stay cool even under the hot summer sun. In the classically beautiful cut flower garden nearby, a garden ornament original to the property stands on a column around which lilies, yarrow (Achillea), peonies (Paeonia) and ‘May Night’ sage (Salvia nemorosa ‘Mainacht’) tumble and bloom.

Layered plantings of perennials and shrubs soften and enhance the experience of the different entertaining areas, including the built-in grill and brick fire pit off the family room. Mature tree plantings of linden (Tilia), sweetbay magnolia (Magnolia virginiana), ‘Accolade’ elm (Ulmus ‘Morton’), and ‘Winter King’ hawthorn (Crataegus viridis ‘Winter King’) balance the architecture with their stately size.

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3425 HARVESTER RD MAPLE LANE, ON

HAYDEN RESIDENCE

Drawing courtesy of Cedar Springs Landscape Group

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NON-RESIDENTIAL PROJECT OVER $500,000: Garden of Hope, Centerville, OH

Reuben Huffman

F I R M : Fullmer’s Landscaping, Inc., Dayton, OH U S D A Z O N E : 6A

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his healing garden space was installed between two wings of a hospital campus, and needed to be beautiful from every angle as it is visible not only from the pathways and seating areas, but also from numerous windows within the adjacent, towering hospital buildings. Viewed from above, broadly curved pathways sweep through winding swaths of flowering or foliage plants, and are punctuated with a recirculated stream that cuts through the layout, rippling and glistening between large limestone outcroppings.

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Three living arc walls, planted with bold bands of seasonal color, soar in sweeping crescents above the pathways and act as a vibrantly colored living art piece, with lettering sharing the name of the garden, The Garden of Hope, and thanking the volunteers who help the hospital run successfully. Beneath the living arc walls, PHOTOGR A PHY: R EU B EN HU FF MA N

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Three living arc walls, planted with bold bands of seasonal color, soar in sweeping crescents above the pathways and act as a vibrantly colored living art piece.

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meritaward Huffman selected local stone for the stream creation to provide a touchstone to the natural land

jewel-toned translucent panels made of 38 percent recycled materials hang down from the walls and define each section of the garden, framing a carefully constructed view under and through each arc.

In what is called the Ripple Terrace, water bubbles out of a cluster of three faux stone globes, serving as a focal point for the surrounding pavement. The water ripples out in concentric rings, and this part of the garden is framed by broad, curving seat walls that make a great place to chat with a friend or have lunch on a warm summer day. Landscape designer Reuben Huffman selected local stone for retaining, seat wall caps, stream creation, and some of the architecture, as local stone is both more environmentally friendly and provides a touchpoint with the natural land.

Swaths of perennials including ‘Dazzleberry’ stonecrop (Sedum x ‘Dazzleberry’), ‘May Night’ sage (Salvia nemorosa ‘Mainacht’), prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis), and ‘Firewitch’ cheddar pink (Dianthus gratianopolitanus ‘Firewitch’) weave throughout the garden in organized arcs and spirals, emphasizing the curves of the hospital architecture and adding seasonal cheer and motion against a strong backdrop of small trees, elegant shrubs, and evergreen groundcovers.

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S P E C I A LT Y P R O J E C T S : Windmills of Your Mind, Bangalore, India

Joly John Shibanee & Kamal Architects Bengaluru, Karnataka, India U S D A Z O N E : 12

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he iconic round clubhouse, which serves all of the people staying in the seven adjacent high-rise apartment complexes, needed a landscape that would enhance the experience from the inside, as well as provide a spectacular view from all the windows above. Given these dual challenges, designer Joly John created a rooftop garden with a repeated pattern of foliage inspired by the circular nature of the architecture and the idea of windmills.

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The clubhouse is not only the focal point of the architecture for this development, but it is also the main gathering space for this wide variety of people. It hosts meditation sessions, a gym, indoor sports, areas for parties, and a showPHOTOGR A PHY: SMITHA

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The roof garden is irrigated with treated water, and serves double duty as both a living art piece and an environmentally friendly method for reducing the indoor temperatures.

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er and changing area for the extensive outdoor pools. To provide a lush, cascading look over the windows of this circular building, John used two genera of weeping plants with hanging tendrils, clock vine (Thunbergia spp.) and curtain creeper (Vernonia elaeagnifolia). This rich curtain of cooling foliage covers the windows for a fresh green look, provides privacy to those using the gym areas, and helps to reduce the interior temperature by providing protection from the beating sun.

The green roof posed a number of challenges. Given the restrictions on weight, the roof garden used a lightweight mix of materials. A honeycomb of geotextile fabric pockets was filled with a lightweight soil media, and the depth of the fill was restricted to a mere five inches. Even with that restriction, the expectation was that this planting would result in relatively tall plants. John selected only the hardiest species for this tough zone, including fountain grass (Pennisetum setaceum), golden trumpet (Allamanda cathartica), Mexican heather (Cuphea hyssopifolia), and moss rose (Portulaca grandiflora), all bordered by no-mow Korean grass (Zoysia tenuifolia). The roof garden is irrigated with treated water, and serves double duty as both a living art piece and an environmentally friendly method for reducing the indoor temperatures.

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RESIDENTIAL DESIGN: Barn House, New Albany, OH

Nick McCullough APLD F I R M : McCullough’s Landscape and Nursery, Johnstown, OH U S D A Z O N E : 5A

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n existing landscape with high-maintenance plants ravaged by the local deer wasn’t doing anything to enhance the architecture of this recently built Georgian home or to support the local ecosystem. Designer Nick McCullough, APLD, was called in to create a master plan to help blend the existing architecture with the owner’s love for modern design. Another important goal was to restore managed native meadows and to build upon the surrounding hardwood forest to create a rich tapestry of native species and habitat for the indigenous fauna.

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In order to create harmony between the brick of the Georgian home and the dark contemporary color of the pool house, he used a series of outdoor pergolas painted in the same shade as the exterior of the pool house to frame the view back to the house and act as a transition point between the two buildings. Plants with dramatic dark foliage such as ‘Black Magic’ elephant ears (Colocasia

PHOTOGR A PHY: N ICK MCCU LLOU G H

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Plants with dramatic, dark foliage … add to the bold, modern look.

esculenta ‘Black Magic’) and ‘Black Negligee’ snakeroot (Cimicifuga simplex ‘Black Negligee’) add to the bold, modern look.

Broad, curved drifts of perennials with contrasting foliage color and flowers at different times of the year provide low-maintenance swaths of color. The silvery color and purple accents of Japanese painted fern (Athyrium niponicum var. ‘Pictum’) are combined with vivid chartreuse Japanese forest grass (Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’), ghost fern (Athyrium ‘Ghost’), winterblooming Lenten rose (Helleborus orientalis), and purple-flowering lilyturf (Liriope spicata) for a look that blends contemporary color contrasts with the freshness of an old-fashioned woodland garden. A bluestone pathway in a zipper pattern runs in a straight line through these loose perennial drifts to bring order to the composition.

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The silvery color and purple accents of Japanese painted fern are blended with vivid chartreuse Japanese forest grass.

Areas of meticulously maintained lawn are neatly bordered by natural Midwest meadowlands, which have been cleared of invasive species and reseeded as needed with local strains of grass. This provides habitat to numerous types of local wildlife. These natural grassy borders are framed by the surrounding hardwood forest, which has since been designated by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources as a native forest that is never to be developed, cementing the legacy of this property as a haven for local species.

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Emerald lawns are enclosed in grassy borders and framed by the surrounding hardwood forest.


studentaward The student award category was judged by Bob Perry and Karen Sumek.

Modern Country Garden

Tanya Wilson

Dallas, TX

U S D A Z O N E : 5A

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n this award-winning student design, a small country home is given a tasteful contemporary update that respects the serenity of the surroundings while providing numerous amenities for the homeowners to enjoy. Off the back door, a bluestone terrace set on cardinal points leads to an ipe dining deck with raised concrete tree planters, a builtin bench, and a square concrete planter with seasonal combinations of color. Square pavers wrap around the curved edge of the lawn to define a planting bed and lead to a small greenhouse, three raised vegetable beds, and a wellthought-out utility area. In the morning, the homeowners can enjoy the sunshine on their ipe pool deck and perhaps even enjoy an early dip in the plunge pool, which has a bathing shelf and bluestone coping, and is enhanced by a concrete sculpture window with a stacked bluestone water feature. The concealed pool equipment is inside a compartment of the deck so as not to detract from the atmosphere. In the 80

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studentaward afternoon, a short walk across rectangular concrete pavers leads to a gravel evening terrace, where a four-foot-tall hedge and live oak trees provide privacy from neighbors. A gas fireplace and lounge seating extends afternoon gatherings into the evening, and an elevated birdbath placed among the waving ornamental grasses adds life and activity when the local birds visit.

A palette of burgundy, lilac, pale mauve, and white mixed with shades of green, bluish gray, and silver foliage contrast with the white house and complement the hardscape choices. Student designer Tanya Wilson selected ornamental grasses for their movement and ability to catch the light of the sun, along with structured evergreens and shrubs, a variety of fragrant herbs, and exuberantly colored perennials. Though most of the plants used are known for their water-wise qualities, Wilson takes environmental responsibility one step further with a water-harvesting cistern, which collects rainfall to water the landscape.

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2015 board of directors PRESIDENT Colleen Hamilton, APLD Bloomin' Landscape Designs 7122 Willey Way Carmichael, CA 95608 (916) 961-0191 PRESIDENT-ELECT Lisa Port, APLD Banyon Tree Design Studio 3630 Northeast 123rd Street Seattle, WA 98125 (206) 383-5572 SECRETARY/TREASURER Jock Lewendon, APLD Outdoor Living Spaces, LLC 766 Schoolhouse Lane Bound Brook, NJ 08805 (732) 302-9632 IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT Susan Cohan,, APLD Susan Cohan Gardens, LLC 69 Hedges Avenue Chatham, NJ 07928 (973) 665-9260 ADVOCACY DIRECTOR Richard Rosiello Rosiello Designs & Meadowbrook Gardens 159 Grove Street New Milford, CT 06776 (860) 488-6507 CERTIFICATION CHAIR Maryanne Quincy, APLD Q Gardens PO Box 2746 Sunnyvale, CA 94087 (408) 739-5493

COMMUNICATIONS & OUTREACH CHAIR Vanessa Gardner Nagel, APLD, NCIDQ Seasons Garden Design LLC 12517 Northeast 20th Avenue Vancouver, WA 98686 (360) 546-2746 EDUCATION CHAIR Ellen Johnston, APLD ETJ Designs 5543 Wateka Drive Dallas, TX 75209 (469) 628-3321 GOVERNANCE CHAIR Eric Gilbey 7150 Riverwood Drive Columbia, MD 21046 (443) 542-0658

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MEMBERSHIP CHAIR Tina Nyce, FAPLD Nyce Gardens 20521 NE 34th Place Sammamish, WA 98074 (425) 533-4292 RESOURCE DIRECTOR Joe Salemi DynaSCAPE Software 3426 Harvester Road Burlington, ON L7N3N1 (800) 710-1900

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The Designer is an official publication and member service of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD), 2207 Forest Hills Drive, Harrisburg, PA 17112. Ph: 717-238-9780 Fax: 717-238-9985. Disclaimer: Mention of commercial products in this publication is solely for information purposes; endorsement is not intended by APLD. Material does not reflect the opinions or beliefs of APLD. APLD is not responsible for unsolicited freelance manuscripts and photographs. All printed articles become the copyright of APLD.

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thedesıgner wants you!

The only magazine written by designers for designers, The Designer is looking for talented members like you to share your stories, teach new techniques, and inspire with your designs.

calling all writers

All submissions from APLD members are considered, but The Designer is particularly interested in articles that fit the issue’s editorial theme or are appropriate for one of the magazine’s recurring features, such as “Pro Plant Picks,” or regular columns spotlighting technology or business strategies. Learn more about the submissions process and view the 2015 editorial calendar here.

Not sure if your story is a good fit? Editor in Chief Susan Morrison is happy to discuss your idea with you. Reach her at editor@apld.org.

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comingnextissue ORNAMENTAL GRASSES A GARDEN LABORATORY JAPANESE GARDENS

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2015 A PLD MER IT AWA R D WIN N IN G DESIGN A N D PHOTOG RA PH BY VICKIE CA R DA RO

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The Designer – Fall 2015  
The Designer – Fall 2015  
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