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American PlanIling Association Illinois Chapter

Phil Peters Reviews Past Year for Illinois Chapter by Phil Peters,

Illinois Chapter APA President Your Chapter Executive Board has been in office for about a year. It's time for an accounting! Let me try to provide a quick listing of Chapter services and accomplishments during the past year. Some you have all seen, such as this fine Newsletter, edited by ~ Forrest, assisted by Jill Doak. Other Chapter activities may not have come to your attention. One of our measures of success is the number of members actively participating in one or another of these activities. We estimate that we have enlisted more than 100 people, including about 50 volunteers working on the Upper Midwest Conference. Conferences may be our most visible activity. The Annual Chapter Meeting, held in conjunction with the Institute on Planning and Zoning at the Pheasant Run Resort in St. Charles, attracted about 150 people. The Chapter took its turn at hosting the Upper Midwest four-state conference this fall. Jacques Gourguechon assumed the herculean task of conference chairman, assisted by Janet McBride. This conference is, by far, the largest single undertaking of the Chapter this year. As this newsletter was going to press the registration appeared to be over 350 persons. A major element of the Chapter's education program is provided by the sections, with a portion of your dues going to the Metropolitan Chicago and the Greater Illinois sections for that purpose. Ten meetings were held in the Metro section and four in the Greater Illinois area. One unusual part of our

education program this year was Chapter sponsorship of a grant request to the national Chapter Presidents Council for funds to support the development of workshop training program on Hypermedia, and interactive computer and video planning tool. Mike Shiffer, a Ph.D. planning student at U of I Champaign-Urban is currently preparing that training package. Which provides a segue to the subject of students: we have made special efforts to make student planners a part of the chapter activities. A quarter-time assistantship is provided for the assistant newsletter editor for a student at UIVC. Student membership dues are rebated to the student organizations to help them organize on-campus activities. Financial support was provided to assist students from both VIUC and VIC to attend the national conference in Atlanta. Thirty-five students were able to attend. Two Wetmore Fellowships of $1,000 - one for each of the AP A-recognized schools - were awarded to outstanding students nominated by their faculty. Arrangements have just been completed to launch a Mentor program, linking planning students at VIC with practicing planners. If you are interested in being involved contact John LaMotte or Charles Hoch. Another educational effort has been carried out by the Chapter's Professional Development Committee. Chaired by the Chapter's Professional Development Officer, Clyde Forrest, the committee organized a preparation program for planners taking the AICP exam. Twenty-two Chapter members

passed the last exam in May. A Legislative Committee, chaired by Chuck Kirchner, helped the Executive Board to identify a half dozen General Assembly bills deserving an APA position and to communicate our views. On the national front, four Executive Board members, joined by Wes Wheeler, represented the Chapter at a delegate assembly in Atlanta, to debate and adopt APA positions on billboards, groundwater, and the federal role in planning. The national AP A office, on short notice, asked the Chapter to encourageAPA members to participate in USDOT policy hearings held in Chicago in August. Sarah LaBelle and Jim Foerster, both members of the APA Transportation Division, prepared statements at the request of the Chapter. A Chapter Awards jury, organContinued on Page 2

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Planning News

Make the Census Count in Your Community by Max Dieber, Director of Research Services, Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission Short of litigation for some sort of favorable official post-census adjustment, municipalities have three remaining important opportunities to promote an accurate 1990 decennial census enumeration within their jurisdiction. The first is the Census Bureau's Local Review Program; the second is the Boundary and Annexation Survey; the third is the range of local promotional activities to encourage residents to participate.

While it would be possible to create an extensive list of uses and purposes for the results tabulated from each decennial census, all could be grouped into, perhaps, three broad categories: political representation; distribution of funds; and basic information about who and where we are and where we've been. For those of you who think the census is boring and without sex appeal, note that it means power, money, and knowledge!! What more can you ask for? The consitutional reason for the census is reapportionment, i.e., to determine the number of seats in the U.S. House of Representatives that will be allocated to each state. On December 31,1990, the Bureau will report to the President and Congress the state by state totals - this time with the cautionary suggestion that these may be subject to adjustment (see last section of this article for further discussion). Several researchers have estimated that with this census, and without a relatively extraordinary effort to count each resident, Illinois will lose two more seats, bringing our Congressional Representative count to 20! By April 1, 1991, small area results for total population, population by selected ages, by race and Spanish origin will be provided to the

states to be used for redistricting, i.e., the process of redrawing the boundaries for congressional representatives. These totals, which also may be subject to later revision, will also be used to redraw state legislative districts and political boundaries within many counties and municipalities. The federal government distributes billions of dollars to state and local governments - an estimated $107 billion in federal fiscal year 1987. That figure equates to approximately $428 for every man, woman and child. Of course, not all this money was allocated on the basis of population data, but to the approximate 30% that was, the decennial census results are critical (a useful presentation of the relationship between census data and federal funding is found in the April 1989 issue of the Indiana Business Review). The State of Illinois also transfers money to local governments based on population data. In FY88, Illinois municipalities received a combined approximate total of $47.50 per person in motor fuel and state income tax funds. It is easy to understand how expensive it could be for communities where several hundred residents are either missed in the enumeration or choose not to be counted. The results of the census also provide us every ten years with a snapshot for our national family album. Decisions made in federal, state, and local government; market determinations and location decisions in the business community; research in the academic community; and needs assessments for not-for-profit and civic organization are dependent upon an accurate count. In addition, many of the estimating and sampling methods devel oped to generate information in intercensal years are based on the decennial enumeration.

Briefly stated, the Local Review Program provides block level counts of housing units to municipal, township

and county officials for comparison with their own estimates. Beginning this last July 20 in Woodstock and concluding on Oct. 5 in Springfield, the Illinois State Data Center cooperative sponsored 24 workshops for local governments on how to participate in this program. What follows is a summary of what was presented. For greater detail, refer to The 1990 Decennial Census Local Review Program Technical ~. Copies of this document are rare but any extra copies that we have here at the Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission are yours for a phone call (Max Dieber or Mary Cele Smith at 312-454-0400) . In Illinois, the census will be conducted by one of two methods. Most of the State will be counted by the Continued on Page 3 Continued From Page 1

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ized by Bob Mosteller, screened nine nominations and selected three for awards: Lachlan Blair for DistinguishedProfessionalPlanner, "Taylorville: The Elements of Success" for Best Specific Planning Project and the Lake County Zoning Revision for Best Planning Process. A Public Relations Committee was organized to give greater visibility to good planning in Illinois. The committee, chaired by Joe McElroy, has focused principally on the Upper Midwest Conference as its first opportunity for media attention. Finally, the Executive Board has responded to a petition for by-law changes, mainly in the area of election procedures. As you can see elsewhere in this newletter, the process is not yet completed, but is getting close. This year's experience has identified a number of ways to improve current services, as well as potential new initiatives. The Chapter Board is planning a retreat in mid-November to plot its next advances. Your suggestions, and your help, are seriously invited.


Page 3

"mail-out/mail-back" method. As the name implies, with this approach the census questionnaires (both long and short form versions) are delivered by the Post Office on March 23, 1990 to a pre-developed list of addresses. Respondents are then asked to mail the filled out questionnaires back to the Census Bureau after April 1, 1990, Census Day. Counties, townships, and municipalities in this portion of the State have a chance to review census housing counts both before and after the census (but before publication). In twelve counties at the southern end of the State (as well as in selected Chicago Housing Authority developments), the census will be conducted by the "update/leave" method. These counties include Alexander, Gallatin, Hamilton, Hardin, Johnson, Massac, Monroe, Perry, Pope, Pulaski, Union, Washington, and White. With this method, the Bureau first generates an address listing through field canvassing. Enumerators then drop off the questionnaires, updating the address listing as they go. Respondents are asked to mail the filled out forms back through postal service. In this portion of the State, with the exception of reviewing census maps, places can only participate in the postcensus portion of the Local Review Program. By now, all eligible local governments, whether in the mail-out/mailback area or not, should have received the pre-census local review maps. There will probably be significant boundary problems on these maps; they should not be expected to show municipal borders any more current than 1988. Participants are asked not to tell the Census Bureau about such problems at this time. If you must, the geography staff at the Regional Census Center in Westchester, Illinois (the center responsible for taking the enumeration in Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin) can be reached at 312 (708 after November 11) 409-4632. The December 1989/February 1990 Boundary and Annexation

Survey provides the appropriate opportunity for such corrections. These precensus review maps are provided as a geographic reference tool to assist participants in developing their own estimates of housing units. A few special notes here: First, for the 1990 census each piece of land has been assigned a block number. The concept of enumeration district as used in the 1980 count is dead! Second, participants should not expect that the 1990 block numbering (even the shape and size of some blocks) is the same as it was in 1980. . Counties, townships and municipalities eligible to participate in the full pre-census review program should receive from the Census Bureau on or about November 1, block by block estimates of the number of special places and housing units based upon address list information that has been purchased from commercial sources, checked by the Post Office, and, in some instances, verified through field canvassing. Special places represent locations where residential arrangements other than housing units might be found. These include colleges, military installations, hotels, hospitals, nursing homes, prisons, and so forth. Checking these estimates against their own sources, participating local governments are then asked to note the major discrepancies and return such information with proper documentation so that it is received by the Bureau no later than Januarv 5. 1990. The Bureau will review up to 3% of all housing units within each District Office area (which contains approximately 250,000 units) and at least one block within each governmental unit requesting such reconsideration. All reported special place discrepancies will be reviewed.

The post -census local review maps should be delivered to participating governments by the end of June 1990. These maps will contain block and tract (or block-numbering areas in non-metropolitan Illinois) codes identical to those shown in the pre-review maps but now will show what the Bureau believes to be each community's January 1, 1990 boundaries. Another special note here: the April 1 census will represent the April 1 population but within January 1 boundaries (get your annexations accomplished by then to get c~edit for such populations). Corrections to these maps are critical and will be due by August 1, 1990. During August, but perhaps as late as September, participating local governments will receive block by block counts of housing units and population living in group quarters (with some exception, group quarters are the residential facilities found within special places). The counts will now be based on the almost-completed enumeration. As with the pre-census review, participants will be asked to note the major discrepancies and provide this information with appropriate documentation to the Bureau. Communities will have only 15 working days - including Saturdays - to review this information. The Bureau will review up to 2% of the housing units and at least one block within each requesting governmental unit. Participation in the Local Review Program is entirely voluntary, and although the Bureau will ultimately spend an estimated $2.6 billion on the process from the development of the questionnaire through delivery of data products, local participation must be paid for locally.

Advertise in Planning News All advertisements are at a convenient yearly rate. For more information contact Jill Doak

at (217)244-0815.

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Full Page Half Page 1/4 Page Business Card

$500 $300 $200 $100


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Planning News

Fall 1989

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1

Section of By-Laws to Be Voted on Again In the last issue of Planning News, Chapter members were provided an opportunity to vote on a series of by-law amendments. Unfortunately, the language proposed by the Chapter Executive Board last month for Section 6.2 Elections: Nominations differed from the language submitted last year by valid petition - a petition which initiated the by-law revision process. That petition contained more signatures than the required 5% of membership (over 50 signatures). We have been advised that we should present the petition language verbatim, along with the Board recommendation, and give members an opportunity to vote. You can vote "yes" on Option 1 or Option 2, or can vote "no" on both. A "yes" vote on both would invalidate the ballot, and if nei ther option recieves a majority of votes cast, the existing language remains. The two options follow. While the differences appear small, we believe there could be real implications to those differences. We apologize for the inconvenience, and ask that you give the two options your consideration, and return the attached ballot by November 30, 1989. We will report on both referenda in the next issue of Planning News. The By-Laws of the Illinois Chapter of AP A would be amended by adding the following language in boldface and deleting the language that is slnteka't'ef.

6.2

Elections: Nominations Announcement of the appointment of the Nominating Committee and a solicitation of nominations shall be made through a publication sent to all members of the Illinois Chapter at least one hundred and twenty (120) days prior to the-date of the Annual Meeting at which these officers will be installed in office. The Nominating Committee may require the submission of draft position statements at this time. The Nominating Committee shall file with the Executive Committee its report of nominations to fill the offices of President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer at least ninety (90) days prior to the Annual Meeting. Each officer shall be a member of the Chapter for at least six (6) months prior to the date of the Annual Meeting at which the officer will be installed in office. The Nominating Committee shall nominate at least two (2) candidates for each office. The names and position statements of nominated candidates shall be published in a publication mailed to all members of the Illinois chapter at least ninety (90) days

prior to the date of the Annual Meeting. This publication shall include a petition form that can be used to nominate members for the offices up for election. A petition of nomination for one or more offices signed by fi ,e (5 %) f'ereet'lt af mafe af tfie membershif' at least twenty (20) members of the Illinois chapter may be submitted to the Teller Committee no later than si.:H:ly(60) thirty-five (35) days prior to the Annual Meeting. The names submitted on a petition of nomination shall be included on the offical ballot. OPTION 2: EXECUTIVE BOARD PROPOSAL, PRESENTED IN LAST NEWSLETIER 6.2

AS

Elections: Nominations Announcement of the appointment of the Nominating Committee and a solicitation of nominations shall be made through a publication sent to all members of the Illinois Chapter at least one hundred and fifty (150) days prior to the date of the Annual Meeting at which these officers will be installed in office. The Nominating Committee may require the submission of preliminary position statements at this time. The Nominating Committee shall file with the Executive Committee its report of nominations to fill the offices of President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer at least ninety (90) days prior to the Annual Meeting. Each officer shall be a member of the Chapter for at least six (6) months prior to the date of the Annual Meeting at which the officer will be installed in office. The Nominating Committee shall nominate at least two (2) candidates for each office. The names and preliminary positions statements of nominated candidates shall be published in a publication mailed to all members of the Illinois Chapter at least sixty (60) days prior to the date of the Annual Meeting. This publication shall include a petition form that can be used to nominate members for the offices up for election. A petition of nomination for one or more offices signed by-fi:짜e (5%) f'ereet'lt three (3%) percent or more of the membership of the Illinois Chapter and with at least five (5) signatures from each section may be submitted to the Teller Committee no later than si:H:l} (60) forty (40) days prior to the Annual Meeting. The names submitted on a petition of nomination shall be included on the official ballot.


Planning News

apers Goes Out for 1990Annual Meeting _ "ews readers are ~~~~~G;re.~;epapers for pres=3JO:;:ia;. t::~- ;5-0 interest to Illinois ~:I:e::::i officials at the comg of the Illinois d the University of Planning and Zono

Next year's program will beat the Pheasant Run Resort located in St. Charles, Illinois. The program runs from March 28 through March 31, 1990. Efforts are underway to use the

eeting Organizers Needed ~~G~.:e:rlllinois Section of the . g Association is ~ ~s who are interested local area planning meetuld enable planners in the together to discuss local uld also provide an oppor_ eral networking. ~- Greater Illinois Section is ist these persons in provides to reduce the cost of these :::e=~and also assist in contacting bers in the area to initiate this _

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of area, and therefore it is difficult for section members to meet on a regular basis. It is the hope of the board of the Greater Illinois Section that this process will enable the section to interact more effectively. . Additional information can be obtained by contacting John F. Boyle, President of the AP A Greater Illinois Section, or Pat Landes, Training Coordinator of the Greater Illinois Section. Both can be reached at the City of Peoria Planning and Zoning Department, 419 Fulton, Room 404, Peoria, Illinois, 61602 or call (309)672-8556.

program as a means to reach more local officials and enhance the effectiveness of planning. The topic outline should not be more the 150 words. Please indicate who the speaker will be, name, address and phone number along with a biographical sketch of the speaker. The deadline for submission is Wednesday, November 15, 1989. Please be aware that speakers who are willing to participate do so on a volunteer basis. Publication of selected papers will follow in the Annual Institute Proceedings. Please submit your proposals to the address below: Professor Clyde W. Forrest University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign Department of Urban and Regional Planning 907 1(2 West Nevada Street Urbana, IL 61801 (217)333-3890


Page 6

Planning News

Fall 1989

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1

1989 Chapter Awards Program Winners Announced by Joe McElroy, Chair, Public Relations Commitee An innovative zoning ordinance for a rapidly urbanizing county and a plan for a small city in ois have been honored 'y the Illinois Chapter of llanning Association. mization also honored an lJrbana-based cong-time planning profesmany achievements in .ce and education. e e County Department of Planning, Zoning and Environmental Quality was honored for "Achieving Consensus," a program to revise the county's zoning code using performance standards instead of traditional zoning districts.

lJnder most zoning ordinances, certain land uses are permitted in certain areas. But performance zoning is more flexible, allowing new construction if the developer can prove it will not cause problems such as traffic congestion, noise or pollution. The county's program included special efforts towards citizen participation, such as a "building block" approach, under which various sections of the proposed ordinance were discussed at different public hearings. This format enabled interested parties to comment on specific aspects without being overwhelmed by the complexity of the entire ordinance. A comprehensive plan for Taylorville, written by graduate students in the Department of lJrban and Regional Planning at the lJniversity of Illinois at

lJrbana-Champaign, won the award for best planning project or ordinance. Lewis Hopkins served as faculty advisor to the student team. Downtown Taylorville is faced with competition from a large national retailer near the central business district. Also, a railroad that runs through town has been abandoned. The plan proposes that the railroad be converted into a walking and riding path that will help connect the traditional downtown with the new retail center. The 1987 plan also calls for economic development incentives such as the establishment of an "incubator" facility to promote small business development. Also, a low-interest loan fund is proposed to encourage renovation of older homes and construction of new housing for moderate-income residents. Lachlan Blair received the


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Planning News

Fall 1989

1

1

1989 Chapter Awards Program Winners Announced by Joe McElroy, Chair, Public Relations Commitee An innovative zoning ordinance for a rapidly urbanizing county and a . . plan for a small city in ois have been honored 'y the Illinois Chapter of )lanning Association. mization also honored an Urbana-based cong-time planning profesmany achievements in .ce and education. e e County Department of Planning, Zoning and Environmental Quality was honored for "Achieving Consensus," a program to revise the county's zoning code using performance standards instead of traditional zoning districts.

Under most zoning ordinances, certain land uses are permitted in certain areas. But performance zoning is more flexible, allowing new construction if the developer can prove it will not cause problems such as traffic congestion, noise or pollution. The county's program included special efforts towards citizen participation, such as a "building block" approach, under which various sections of the proposed ordinance were discussed at different public hearings. This format enabled interested parties to comment on specific aspects without being overwhelmed by the complexity of the entire ordinance. A comprehensive plan for Taylorville, written by graduate students in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Illinois at

Urbana-Champaign, won the award for best planning project or ordinance. Lewis Hopkins served as faculty advisor to the student team. Downtown Taylorville is faced with competition from a large national retailer near the central business district. Also, a railroad that runs through town has been abandoned. The plan proposes that the railroad be converted into a walking and riding path that will help connect the traditional downtown with the new retail center. The 1987 plan also calls for economic development incentives such as the establishment of an "incubator" facility to promote small business development. Also, a low-interest loan fund is proposed to encourage renovation of older homes and construction of new housing for moderate-income residents. Lachlan Blair received the


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VIe Initiates Mentor Program to Link Planning Students With Practicing Professionals by Anthony Jones AP A Student Representative

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The University of Illinois at Chicago (VIC) School of Urban Planning and Policy wants to create a mentor program This program will link the planning students at VIC with practicing planning professionals. The goals ofthe mentor program are: to give students a realistic view ofwhat goes on in planning; to show students the vast diversity of the planning profession; and to help students develop a network with professionals in the planning profession. This program will integrate planning students at VIC with planning professionals of the AP A. We are asking APA members in the Chicago metro area to assist us in implementing the mentor program. The program will function as follows. Attached to this newsletter is a form which we would like planning professionals to fill out. These forms will be sent to the VIC faculty coordinator Charles Hoch. A list of planners who filled out the form will be presented to students for them to pick a "mentor." The student will call the planner, and between the two of them, they will make arrangements to meet and discuss various topics of interest to the student. We want to start the program by November 1, 1989. We are asking APA members to assist us in our goal. We need professionals to volunteer to talk to students about what they do in the planning profession, answer student questions about planning issues, discuss how these issues are dealt with in the "real" world, and develop a positive relationship between planning students and professionals. Developing this positive relationship is important, for a few years down the road these students are the people who will work with you. Helping students gain a greater understanding of what planning is, and what

it takes to be a planner is helpful. They can make informed career and on-thejob decisions. If you are interested in giving some time to future planners please fill out the attached form, and send it to: Charles Hoch University of Illinois at Chicago

College of Architecture, Art and Urban Planning School of Urban Planning Box 4348 . Chicago, Illinois 60680 If you have any further questions call Charles Hoch at 996-2156. You can make the difference!

~----------------------I Mentor Application Date _ Name:

_

Agency or Company:

_

Address:

_

Home Phone Number:

_

Work Phone Number:

_

Job Title:

_

Job Description:

_

1-

---------------1 ---------------1 Are You Interested In Assisting More Than One Student If Necessary? __

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Yes

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Only One

Thank You For Participating!

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Planning News

AICP Exam Information Available The 1990 AICP examination will be held May 14-19. All applications for 1990 must be received in the Washington, D.C. office by January 5, 1990. The address is: 1776 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington, D.C. 20036. Call (202)872-0611 for further information. Illinois members may also contact the Chapter Professional Development Committee for more information. The Professional Development Committee members are: Clyde W. Forrest, AICP, Chairman Dept. of Urban and Regional Planning 907 1(2 W. Nevada Urbana, Illinois 61801

Richard M. Marlatt, AICP 502 S. Cottage Grove Urbana, Illinois 61801 Paul M. McNamara, AICP Economic Development Commission 103 Main Street Cahokia, Illinois 62206 Robert J. Piper, AICP 972 Elm Street Winnetka, Illinois 60093 Tom Redmond, AICP Planner 609 East College Carbondale, Illinois 62902-2047

Illinois Chapter Membership Compared to Other States From March to August 1989,67 Illinoisans joined the ranks of the American Planning Association during the 1989 member recruitment campaign. Only California and Florida had more members join during the same period of time. The breakdown of new membership is as follows: AP A and AICP - 30; Student - 23; and Planning Board Members - 14. Only California had more student members join, while California, Florida, Kentucky, the New York Metropolitan Chapter and Tennessee had more planning board members join. The percentage growth during this six month period was 4.5 for the Illinois Chapter. Most chapters saw increases in their membership prior to last spring's national AP A meeting in Atlanta, Goorgia. Total Illinois Chapter membership in AP A is 920. This breaks down to 671 in APA and AICP; 94 as Students; and 155 Planning Board Members.

Nationally, members. APA number 18,082. student members board members. ship growth over

APA has 23,951 and AICP members Also, there are 1,735 and 4,134 planning Total APA memberthese six months was

3.8%.

ARCHITECTS

Job Available: Community Planner Entry level position. Community Planner needed for a four-county planning agency. Responsibilities include preparation of comprehensive plans, solid waste plans, zoning ordinances, and regional studies. Duties also include preparation of loan-grant applications, administration of Community Development Assistance Programs, and general technical assistance to rural units of local government. Must be willing to attend various village and city night meetings. Experience in fields of community lenvironmental/regional planning and grant administration a plus. Graphics skills also desirable. Minimum qualifications are BA or BS in Urban Planning or related field. Salary will be commensurate with education background and work experience. Represents exciting career opportunity for persons interested in working with local governments. Applications may be sent to the North Central Illinois Council of Governments, P.O. Box 206, Princeton, IL 61356. Application deadline is November 15, 1989.

ENGINEERS

LAND SURVEYORS

AsBESTOS CONSULTANrS

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Chapters to Debate Controversial Issues in Denver by Nancy S. Willis, Alep Director, GovernmentAffairs Controversial issues of significance to planners, nationally as well as at the state and local levels are on the agenda for the Chapter Delegate Assembly which will be held in Denver, Colorado during APA's annual meeting, April 21-25, 1990. Among the issues that the chapter delegates will debate are: Should APA chapters oppose or seek the repeal of state statutes and local ordinances which grant to extend the use of ballot box initiatives or referenda to land use decisions of any kincl? Should APA support the goal of no overall net loss of the nation's wetlands? Should APA support the reuse of waste over depositing it in environmentally safe landfills? Should APA support private sector and public/private joint ventures in financing, constructing and operating solid waste facilities? These questions and others are contained in the Policy Implementation Principles (pIPs) which will be debated and adopted by chapter delegates. PIPs are short statements on a specific, narrow subject that supplement one of APA's more general ratified policies. The Chapter Delegate Assembly will define: What should APA's position be on wetlands? This statement was written by David G. Burke, AICP, who is with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, and Cyrilla P. Cook, Henigar & Ray Engineering Associates, Inc., Crystal River, Florida. What should APA's position be on solid waste management? This statement was written by APA Board member Sumner M. Sharpe, AICP and Arnold M. Cogan, AICP, Cogan Sharpe Cogan, Portland, Oregon. What should APA's position be on the making of land use decisions through citizen initiative and referendum? This was prepared by David L. Callies, AICP, Professor of Law, William S. Richardson School of Law, Honolulu, Hawaii, and Daniel J. Curtin, Jr., McCutchen, Doyle, Brown & Enerson, Walnut Creek, California.

An updated version of APA's transportation planning policy, originally ratified in 1981, will also be before the Assembly. It was updated by the Transportation Planning Divsion, chaired by Lawrence Dallam. Among the issues it addresses is: Should APA support full cost pricing for transportation services and facilities? Should transportation facilities be financed from direct user charges? The PIPs adopted by the Chapter Delegate Assembly, when ratified by the APA Board of Directors, will be added to APA's official policies which are used as the basis for the Association's lobbying at the national and state levels.

Drafts of the PIPs and the transportation policy have been distributed to all chapter presidents for review. If you are interested in participating in this review, or if you wish to be considered as a delegate from your chapter to the 1990 Chapter Delegate Assembly, contact your chapter president as soon as possible. Motions to amend to PIPs and the transportation policy are due to APA on December 4, 1989. This is every APA member's opportunity to influence APA's policy base. Members of APA's Environmental Planning, Transportation Planning, and Planning and Law Divisions should take the initiative to participate in your chapter's review. This review period is very important for two reasons. First The authors will review suggestions submitted by the deadline and consider including them. Second: At the meeting of the National/State Policy Coordinating Committee in Boise, it was decided to encourage people to participate in the review by NOT allowing new motions from the floor at the Assembly, This decision was also made so that the delegates may finish all four statements during the Assembly. The Chapter Delegate Assembly will be convened in Denver by the National/State Policy Coordinating Committee. It is chaired by APA Board member Carole Bloom; Carol D. Barrett, AICP, is the Vice Chair. For questions on APA's policy process, or for a copy of the policy and PIP drafts, contact George T. Marcou, AICP, or Nancy S. Willis, AICP, at (202)872-0611. Staff prepared a pamphlet, "Everything You Wanted to Know about PIPs ....(Including Some Stuff You Didn't Want to Know)", at the suggestion of the Chapter Presidents Council Legislative Committee. It is also available from George Marcou or Nancy Willis in Washington.


Planning News

Planning Calendar

I

November 2-3 Guiding Design on Main Street. Milwaukee, WI. National Trust for Historic Preservation, National Main Street Center. For information call (202)673-4219. November 3-4 Second International Conference on Industrial and Organizational Crisis Management. New York, NY. Call Paul Shrivastava at (718)859-3435 for more information. November 7 Introduction to the TIGER System and Applications. Columbia, MO. Bureau of the Census. Call (301)763-1510 for more information. November 9-10 Urban Design Review. AICP Planners Training Service Workshop. Philadelphia, PA. November 12-17 USGS National Symposium on Water Quality. Orlando, FL. Contact the United States Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, Reston, VA 22092, Attn: WGS-Mail Stop 412. November 13-17 New Strategies for Urban Management: The IFHP International Congress. Chiba, Japan. Sponsored by the International Federation for Housing and Planning. For more information write: IFHP, 43 Wassenaarseweg, 2596 CG The Hague, The Netherlands or call 31-70-24 4557/28 1504. November 15 Due date for topical outlines for proposal papers for the Illinois

Chapter Annual Institute on Planning and Zoning. See article this issue for more details. November 16 Chicago Metro Section Meeting. "Hospitals and Neighborhoods: The Disease or the Cure." Lunch meeting in Chicago. Information on the 1990 Metro Section meetings will be forthcoming soon. November 17-21 42nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America. Minneapolis, MN. Contact Elizabeth Borgen at (202)842-1275 for more information. November 27-29 Superfund '89 - Hazardous Materials Control Research Institute's 10th Annual Conference. Washington, D.C. Call (301 )587-9390 for more information. December 4-6 Inter-Noise '89: The 1989/nternational Conference on Noise Control Engineering. Newport Beach, CA. Call Joyce Raymond at (914)4626719 for more information. December 7-8 Land Use Law for Planners and Lawyers. Tentative date and location: Sarasota, FL. AICP Planners Training Service Workshop. January 5 Application Deadline for 1990 AICP Examination. Applications must be received in the Washington office for the May 14-19 AICP examination. See

URBAN

899

Page 8 this issue for more information. January 11-12 Urban Design Review. New Orleans, LA. AICP Planners Training Service Workshop. February 1-2 Land Use Law for Planners and Lawyers. Tentative date and location: Salt Lake City, UT. AICP Planners Training Service Workshop. March 8-9 Urban Design Review. San Diego, CA. AICP Planners Training Service Workshop. March 28-31 1990 Annual/nstitute on Planning and Zoning. Sponsored by the Illinois Chapter of APA and the University of Illinois. To be held in St. Charles, Illinois at the Pheasant Run Resort. Mark your calendars now! April 9-11 America the Beautiful? - A Conference on Aesthetic Values in the American Landscape. Washington, D.C. American Society of Landscape Architects. Call Mariana Nork at (202)466-7730 for more information. April 21-25 APA National Conference. "Planning in the 1990s." Denver, CO. May 14-19 1990 AICP Examination. Applications must be recieved by January 5,1990. See Page 8 in this newsletter for more details.

PLANNERS SKOKIE

AND

LANDSCAPE

BOULEVARD.

ARCHITECTS

NORTHBROOK.

ILLINOIS


Page 10

I

Fall 1989

Legislative Watch

I

Chapter Takes Positions, Lobbies General Assembly by Chuck Kirchner, Legislative Committe Chair, Illinois Chapter APA Most of the legislation that the Illinois Chapter supported this past session of the General Assembly was approved, and those biBs that the Chapter opposed did not make it into law. The Chapter Legislative Committee was busy this year tracking legislation of interest to the Chapter, as well as doing a bit of lobbying. In keeping with the Chapter's legislative program strategy, the Committee analyzed the following bills: HB788 and 8BI463 - Affordable Housing Act HB501- Amendment to Housing Development Act (Tabled) HB361 - Amendment to TIP Act concerning projects which have not commenced construction before 1-19. Required qualifying conditions to e;tist throughout the area and on at least of whole area, etc. (Tabled) Proposed Amendment to HBl 9 - Proposal that would have 'led the use of TIP for industrial HB2780 - Created the Interetland Policy Act HB 'i7 - The lllinois Landscape _-=f.l~trrre Act of 1989 Chapter board meeting in Run (St. Charles), the official position in supordable Housing Act. ling of the State Real Tax, the Act creates a vide for loans and the construction or using for low and :.::lJ13:"::~LX:O=~ households. This ._ ed into law by the ber15th, marks the o general revenues in the solution of illinois.

The Legislative Committee and Chapter president also sent letters and! or made phone calls relative to the Landscape Architecture Act, Amendment #1 to HB1897, HB2286 (Residence Right to Locate Act), and the Affordable Housing Act. In the case of the Landscape Architecture Act of 1989, contacts were made with the bill's sponsor and others in an attempt to have language inserted in the bill that would make it clear that planners could practice general comprehensive planning or land use planning without being a registered landscape architect. While the Act passed both houses, it was vetoed by the Governor on September 17th. The Chapter sent letters in support of Amendment #1 to HB1879, which would have helped communties more effectively use tax increment financing for industrial development purposes. HB 1879 proposed to expand the definition of industrial development purposes. HB 1879 was tabled on May 30th. Calls were made to Rep. Satterthwaite with respect to the Chapter's concern about the Residence Right to Locate Act, which proposed to prohibit the use of zoning laws to exclude community residences for the disabled from residential zoned areas. This is a measure that the Chapter attempted to get amended last year. Since the provisions of HB2286 would have been superceded by the Federal Fair Housing Act Amendments of 1988, the Chapter did not pursue its concerns too vigorously this year. The Federal Act is very far reaching and goes even further than HB 2286 in prohibiting communities from using zoning to exclude resjde:Da~ for the disabled, etc. At any 6 was amended to de 'dence Rights to Locate, replaced

with the Community Residence Location Planning Act. This Act requires that Home Rule municipalities submit plans and assurances in compliance with provisions of the Federal Fair Housing Act Amendment Act of 1988 for the adequate availability of sites for community residences. It also requires the Illinois Council on Developmental Disabilities to hold public hearings on the plans by January 31, 1991. This Act was passed by both houses on June 22nd, and signed into law by the Governor on September 1. (P.A. 86-0638). The Chapter Board also supported the Wetlands Policy Act of 1989 which, in a manner similar to the Farmland Preservation Act, is aimed at the prevention of the continuing loss of wetlands in Illinois and minimization of adverse impacts through State interagency cooperation and action plans. The Wetlands Policy Act (HB2780) was signed into law by the Governor on June 27th (p.A. 86-0157).

In addition to the tax increment financing related measure that the Chapter supported, two other bills amending the TIP Act were enacted. HB40 (FA 86-0928), which' was drafted by the Illinois Department of Revenue, attempts to permit sales tax TIFs to receive the same amount of local and state sales tax increment after the 1988 Sales Tax Reform becomes effective on January 1, 1990 as they would have received in the absence of that reform. The schedule and procedures for payment of the State increment and transfer of the local increment at the municpallevel are unaffected by these changes . SB494, as amended, provides for the creation of aJointReview Board for any TIF project created after e effective dateofthe Act(p.A. 1..• ). The


Planning News Board would focus its review on a proposed TIP area's ability to satisfy statutory blight or conservation eligibility criteria. Its recommendations are strictly advisory and the final decision on establishment of a TIF project would still be up to the local governing body of a municipality. Membership on the Joint Review Board includes representatives of each community college district, each elementary, secondary or unit school district, park district, library district and county with authority to directly levy taxes on property in the TIF area. The Board would also have a municipal representative and a public member. The public member and chairman of the board are selected by the Board. Municipalities may also create a Joint Review Board for existing TIF projects. If an AP A member has any questions concerning legislation with which the Chapter dealt this past session, he or she may call the chairman of the Chapter's legislative committee, Chuck Kirchner, (217)785-6132.

Ignorance No Defense Under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act by Joseph Hooker, Student, Master of Urban Planning, University of Illinois at U-C and Member, Illinois State Bar Association In the case of United States v, Douglas Hoflin!, decided by the U. S, Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in July of 1989, the court has given new meaning to the old legal maxim that "ignorance of the law is no defense," Douglas Hoflin, the Director of Public Works for Ocean Shores, Washington, was convicted of a felony for disposing of waste paint at the city's sewage treatment plant without the required permit under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Hoflin appealed his conviction, arguing that the trial had been acquired before they could convict him. In a decision that could have a farreaching effect on the future success and frequency of criminal prosecutions under RCRA, the court held that it was irrelevant whether or not Hoflin knew that no permit had been obtained. It was sufficient that he realized that the material he was disposing of was chemical waste having "the potential to be harmful to others or to the environment."2 The pertinent section of the statute reads as follows: "Any person who- ..... (2) knowingly treats, stores, or disposes of any hazardous waste identified or listed under the subchapter either (A) without having obtained a permit under section 6925 of this title .... ; or (B) in knowing violation of any material condition or requirement of such permit; ..,. shall, upon conviction, be subject to ,..,(fines, imprisonment, or both) emphasis added,3

The court declined Hoflin's invitation to adopt the view of the 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals, articulated in the 1984 case of United States v, Johnson and Towers. Inc,4 The Towers opinion held that employees could be subjected to criminal sanctions under this section of RCRA only if they knew, or should have known, that their employer had failed to obtain the required permit. Relying on traditional rules for statutory interpretation, the Hoftin opinion focused first on the express language of 6928(d), and then on Congress' purpose in passing RCRA, to support its findings. Regarding the express language of 6928( d), the Hoft in opinion reasoned that Congress would have referred to a knowledge requirement in subparagraph (A) if it intended to avail defendants of a defense of ignorance about the existence of a permit. The court also rejected the suggestion that the word "knowingly" in paragraph (2) modified subparagraphs (A) and (B), given the fact that Congress apparently deemed it necessary to insert the word "knowingly" in subparagraph (B), The opinion held that its interpretation of 6928(d) was consistent with Congress' purpose in enacting RCRA, as is reflected in the language of the statute as a whole, and the history of its enactment. The court was impressed by the scope of the problem that RCRA attempts to address, stating that "Millions of tons of hazardous substances' are literally dumped on the ground each year; a good deal of these can blind, cripple, or kill ..... Many of such substances are generated and buried without notice until the damage becomes evident."5 The opinion also cited language from 6901(b) of the RCRA, that "hazardous waste presents, in addition Continued on Page 14


APA Reviews PC Software and Technology Personal computers (PCs) are rapidly transforming planning practice. No longer an esoteric curiosity, PCs are found in nearly every planning office and have become an accepted part of planning practice and education. The PC revolution has created a need for reliable and current information on software and technology relevant to planning. To fill this gap, the American Planning Association has published A Planners Review of PC Software and Technology. The 102-page document contains nine reviews of microcomputer software and technology, addressing the products' relevance for planning. The reviews, all of which have appeared previously, have been thoroughly revised and updated. The first review examines 22 books and reports dealing with microcomputer applications in planning. Chapter two looks at six books with electronic spreadsheets, while the third chapter evaluates a range of demographic data for microcomputers. Lowcost, commercial thematic mapping packages are reviewed next. Chapter five analyzes computer-aided design and drafting packages suitable for planning. Geographic information systems (GISs) are reviewed in part six, while chapter seven examines 17 statistical analysis, forecasting, causal modeling, and data transformation packages. The final two chapters analyze more sophisticated packages and systems. In part eight, three regional economic analysis packages are summarized. The review in chapter nine intro-

Planning Engineering Landscape

Architecture

Chicago Jacksonville Memphis Richmond SI.Louis Tampa

duces expert systems and discusses their potential application to planning practice. Expert systems are computer programs that apply artificial intelligence to narrow and clearly define problems. Although few expert systems to aid planners are now operational, research is under way into applications such as site analysis and zoning ordinance implementation. A Planners Review of PC Software and Technology, Planning Advi-

sory Service Report number 414/415, was edited by Richard E. Klosterman. Klosterman is an associate professor in the Department of Urban Studies at the University of Akron. He also is editor of InfoTEXT, the newsletter of APA's Information Technology Division. Copies of the report may be obtained from Planners Press, 1313 E. 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, at a cost of $39.50. The price includes shipping and handling. For additional information on A Planners Review of PC Software and Technology, contact Jim Hecimovich at (312)955-9100. APA's Planning Advisory Service provides subscribers with eight research reports a year, monthly newsletters containing information on hot topics, and the answer service, which offers ordinance searches, advice, and research publications for review. For subscription information, contact Barbara Baldwin at (312)955-9100. To find out more about AP A services, contact Karen Finucan or Cynthia Clark at (202)872-0611.

Former Illinoisian Heads Baltimore Planning Department Partially reprinted from The Sun, Aug. 31,1989Brian Sullam Ernest Freeman, a former Illinoisian, has been named as BalLimore' s new planning director. "Mr. Freeman has been described by his colleagues in the planning profession as a rising star. We look forward to his being with us for many years and continuing the great tradition that has been developed in our planning department," said Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke. More than 100 people applied for the job, which was advertised nationwide. Freeman began his job in October.

"We sought the best qualified person to lead us into the future of planning and we are very enthusiastic and happy to report that we have the best candidate who applied," said Kenneth J. Strong, chairman of the Planning Commission. Mr. Freeman worked most recently as the director of planning for the city of Cincinnati. Prior to that, Freeman worked as the planning director of Portsmouth, VA, for three years. He also served as senior planner in Norfolk, VA, and as a community planner in Columbus, OH. He is a 1971 graduate of the University of Southern Illinois and has a master's degree in city and regional planning from the University of Illinois.


Planning News

The Boundary vey

and Annexation

Sur-

In the period from December 1989 through February 1990, municipalities will be asked to update the Census Bureau maps so that January 1, 1990 boundaries will be used for the 1990 Decennial Census. Input is due no later than March 1. Many communities may choose not to participate in the Local Review Program due to the significant commitment of time and resources that might be required. Participation in the Boundary and Annexation Survey (BAS) should be reasonably easy and is important. Each community has a BAS official, usually the highest elected official. Be sure to encourage this person to participate. Boundary revisions provided by the Bureau only will be recognized if appropriately certified by the BAS official.

The technical programs discussed above are important, but ultimately, a full count will be dependent upon getting to those individuals in the community who either do not want to be counted or do not know how to participate. Three messages need to be delivered: First, the Census is important. Enough has already been said above about that. Second, participation in the Census is easy. Questionnaires will be printed in English and Spanish and directions will be available in 30 languages. Toll-free phone numbers for assistance will be available, and, in many communities, walk-in or call-in assistance centers will be open from late March through mid-April. It has been estimated that even for the sample of households that will receive the longform of the questionnaire, the average response time should be about 40 minutes.

Third, participation is safe. The law guarantees that individual responses are con fiden tial. There rea IIy is no way that an individual response can be seen by the Internal Revenue Service, the tax assessor, the immigration service, local government officials, or any government agency other than the Bureau of the Census. Because local residents are more likely to heed these messages if delivered by local opinion leaders rather than state or federal officials, local communities are encouraged to develop promotional programs. A Census booklet, entitled The Government Promotions Handbook, provides ideas and sample news releases and mayoral proclamations useful to these purposes. Central to these ideas is the establishment in each community of a "complete count committee." Of course, all promotions do not require a committee. It does, however, offer an opportunity to gain the participation of local education, religious, governmental, and business leaders. It is not too late to start. For assistance (not dollars) from the Census Bureau, call 312 (or 708 after November 11) 409-4619.

An earlier mention of potential adjustments for an undercount(orover-

count) was made. On July 17, the Department of Commerce and the City of New York (joined by Chicago) reached a settlement in a case brought to force the Census Bureau to adjust the census results for possible miscounts. According to the agreement, the Bureau will conduct the usual census but will label the results intended for reapportionment/redistricting as subject to potential revision. If adjustments are to be made these will be announced by July 15,1991. The process toward a potential adjustment will begin with a March 10, 1990 announcement of the criteria to be used to determine adjustment feasibility. An independent eight-person panel will advise the Department of Commerce (parent agency for the Census Bureau) on this matter. In July 1990, a post-enumeration survey of 150,000 households will be conducted. If an adjustment is to be made, it will be based on the results of the survey. In deciding whether it is appropriate for a community to participate in the local review program, in the BAS, and in the promotional programs, communities should not assume that any adjustment, much less a favorable one, will be made. It is better to get the count right in the first place, rather than rely on some statistical procedure to "correct" it.

Job Available:

Community Development Director Roselle, Illinois, population 20,000 is seeking qualified applicants for the position ofDirectorofCommunity Development. Salary range is $38,371 - $49,064. Work includes responsibility for planning, organizing and directing a multi-function department engaged in planning, zoning, economic development, building inspection and code enforcement. Also responsible for providing technical advice and guidance to the Village Board and its committees and relevant commissions. Qualifications are Bachelor's Degree in Urban Regional Planning or related

field, preferably supplemented with graduate work and considerable progressively responsible experinence in urban/regional planning including supervisory experience. Roselle, incorporated in 1922, is_ a largely residential community with convenience retail and some industrial parks. There is a Towncenter Plan and the Village is pursuing a TIF District. Please apply to Glenn F. Spachman, Village Administrator, 31 S. Prospect Street, Roselle, Illinois 60172, by November 15, 1989. Roselle is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


Planning News

Aging Society Resource Materials Available Portland State University's Institute on Aging has just completed a training grant funded by the Administration on Aging. The grant developed and tested training materials and approaches for educating urban and land use planners about the implications of an aging society for planning. Products from the grant are now available, and include a Trainer's Guide, a set of Resource Papers, and a Videotape. The Trainer's Guide includes scripts for nine topic areas, handout and transparency masters, two sets of slides and an audio tape, as well as a set of the Resource Papers. The Resource Papers are a series of ten monographs on topics related to planning and its implications for an

aging society. Topics include demographic changes, physical and sensory changes with age, housing alternatives (including adapting the single family home, planning and zoning issues, and siting specialized housing) mobility and access, citizen participation, economic and political impacts of retire-

...---•...

.

',

, , ,

ment populations, and incorporating age as a focus in the community planning process. The 18 minute videotape provides an overview of the role that communties can plan in responding to the needs of an aging society. For purchase and rental information, please contact the Institute on Aging, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, Oregon 97207, or telephone (503)464-3952.

Continued From Page 11

Resource and Conservation Recovery Act to the problems associated with nonhazardous waste, special dangers to health and requires a greater degree of regulation than does non-hazardous waste."6 In addition, the court was impressed with RCRA's emphasis on the tracking of the location of hazardous waste "from its generation to its disposal."7 Specifically, paragraph 6925(b) requires that permit applicants provide detailed information about the composition, concentrations, quantities, frequencies of handling, and locations of hazardous waste, whether the applicant is involved in the disposal, treatment or transportation of said wastes.9 Noting that anyone who handles hazardous waste could thwart entirely the regulatory goal ofRCRA at the threshold of the regulatory process by failing to apply for a permit, the opinion reasoned that it was logical for Congress to apply a stricter standard for criminal liability for such an omission than for a violation of a material condition or requirement of the permit as is proscribed by subparagraph (B) of 6928(d).

Whether the 9th Circuit's or the 3rd Circuit's interpretation of the standard of criminal liability imposed by 6928(d)(2)(A) ultimately prevails by some future decision of the U.S. Supreme Court remains to be seen. Given the persuasive logic of the Hoflin opinion and its sound reliance on traditional rules of statutory interpretation, it is this writer's view that the Hollin view will win out. In any event, Hollin is a sobering "wake-up call" for anyone in the private or public sector who comes into contact with hazardous waste and who has assumed that jail is reserved for those who are familiar with RCRA and consciously defy it 1 U.S. v. Hollin, No. 86-3071, U.S. Court of Appeals, 9th Circuit 2 U.S. v. Hollin, ibid. 342 U.S.c. @ 6928(d) 4U.S. v. Johnson and Towers, Inc., 741 F.2d 662, 3rd Cir. 1984 5 U.S. v. Hollin, ibid. 6 U.S. v. Hollin, ibid. 7 U.S. v. Hollin, ibid. 842 U.S.c.@ 6925(b)

Continued From Page 6

Chapter Awards Donald L. Hey Donald L. Hey and Associates 53 West Jackson Blvd. Chicago, IL 60604 Curtis M. Allison, AICP Village of Winnetka 510 Greenbay Road Winnetka, IL 60093 Bruce Knight Director of Planning City of Champaign l02 North Neil Champaign, IL 61820 Brian F. O'Connell, AICP Dept. of City Development 809 North Broadway P.O. Box 324 Milwaukee, WI 53201


Fall 1989

Page 15

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Planning News

Fall 1989

Current Illinois Chapter Officers

I

illinois Chapter

IIlifll)is Professional Developmelll Officer Oyde W. Forrest Professor, University of lllinois Department of Urban and Regional Planning 1003 W. Nevada Urbana, IL 61801 (217)333-3890

Executive Committee Presidelll PIrillip D. Peters Deputy Director Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission 400 W. Madison Oricago, IL 60606 (312)454-0400

Stutklll Representative Jay GelZ University of Dlinois at UrbanaChampaign Department of Urban and Regional Planning 1003 W. Nevada Urbana, IL 61801 (217)333-3890

Vice路Presithlll Wayne Anthony Director, Planning & Zoning Department City of Peoria 419 Fulton Street Peoria, IL 61602 (309)672-8556

Stutklll Representative Anthony Jones University of Dlinois at Chicago Center for Urban Economic Development Suite 500 Rice Building 815 Van Buren St. Chicago, IL 60607 (312)996-6671

Secretary Robert W. Chave Director, Planning Zoning and Environmental Quality County of Lake 18 N. County Street RoomA-803 Waukegan, IL 60085 (312)360-6376

Past Presithnt Jacques Gourguechon Camiros, Ltd. 411 S. Wells Suite 400 Chicago, IL 60607 (312)922-9211

Treasurer Joseph Abel Executive Director Economic Development Commission of Chicago 1503 Merchandise Mart Chicago, IL 60654 (312)744-9550

Chicago Metro Section Executive Committee Chairman John V. laMotte, Jr. Vice-President, Lohan Associates 225 N. Michigan Avenue Chicago, IL 60601 (312)938-4455 Vice-Chairman Laura Talkington Senior Planner Village of Wilmette Wilmette Village Hall 1200 Wilmette Road Wilmette, IL 60091 (312)251- 2700 Secretary Barbara Berlin Senior Associate Trkla, Pettigrew, Allen and Payne 123 W. Madison Chicago, IL 60602 (312)782-8893 Treasurer Richard Dunn Director, Economic and Community Development Village of Arlington Heights 33. S. Arlington Heights Rd. Arlington Heights, IL 60005 (312)253-2340

-

PLANNING NEWS Clyde

W. Forrest,

Jill Doak,

AICP,

Assistant

Department

Presithnt John F. Boyle 1308 W. Parkside Drive Peoria, IL 61606 (309)672-8556 Vice-Presith1lJ Ronald L. Dickerson 132 Court Street Pekin, IL 61554 (309)477-2319 Secretary April D. Getehius 115 West Main St. Urbana, IL 61801 (217)384- 2440 Treasurer Bill Fruhling 613 W. Wilcox Peoria, IL 61604 (309)672-8556 Training Coordinator Patricia S. Landes 419 Fulton SL City Hall Rm. 404 Peoria, IL 61602 (309)672-8556

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Illinois Planning News, Fall 1989  

Clyde W. Forrest, FAICP, Editor

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