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U.S. Navy’s Rhino The McDonnell Douglas F-4B Phantom II

-Modelling in time of crisis. -Caudron G.III. -Special article from www.Solomaquetas.com -Interview with Evert Guadarrama.

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RPM Polish TKS 20mm Tankette

Galery: Ernesto Reyes.

Review F-4B Phantom II Academy 1/48.


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McDonnell Douglas F-4B Phantom II

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Modelling in times of crisis

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IPMS Venezuela Board of Directors Javier Aguilar - President Nestor Yanez - Secretary José Luis Reinoso - Treasure

Editors

F-4B Phantom II Kit Review

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Javier Aguilar Delgado Antonio Ces José Luis Reinoso

Modeler’s Gallery Ernesto Reyes

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Modeller´s Biography

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Solomaquetas.com´s article

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Angelo Palladino

Colaborators Juan José Moreno Antonio Ces Willy Puchades Ernesto Reyes Evert Guadarrama Jose Luis Reinoso

Caudron G.III

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Polish TKS 20mm tanketta

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Sponsored by


EDITORIAL

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irst of all a cordial greeting, we want to present our sixth edition, a magazine made with great love and effort, for you our fellow modelers, this time both in Spannish and English.

In this year that begins and with the support of a new IPMS Venezuela directive, we want to give continuity to this wonderful project, emerged from the dream of four “crazy guys ” (sort of speaking). With the effort and collaboration of a few friends, we made possible the materialization of this project which today, after a year and a half later, reaches its sixth magazine. Our vision continues to grow and we invite all fellow modelers from arround the world to participate in our dream. We invite all the established model makers, with great experience, as well as the novice modelers who are taking their first steps. We invite everyone to share their projects and their knowledge with others through our magazine. In IPMS Venezuela, we think that we have to continue stimulating plastic modeling in Venezuela, which is quite battered by the economic crisis and the departure of large number of fellow modelers to other countries. In this sixth edition we have the collaboration of both modellers from the yard and abroad, who have gladly given us their articles so that we can share them with you. Starting with the excellent work, done by the Spanish modeller Juan José Moreno, who buildt 1/48 Academy´s F-4 B Phantom II, with which he represented a copy of the VF-111 Sundowners. Simply a delight for your eyes. Also our colleage José Luis Reinoso, shares an article entitled Modelism in Time of Crisis, where he tells us about his experiences and those of other colleagues in the use of some substitutes for consumables, and thus be able to continue enjoying this wonderful hobby without compromising even more the battered economy of our pockets. Our coleague Antonio Ces, model of the courtyard, in exile, first presents a Review of the model of Academy of the Phantom II in 1/48, and later presents an excellent work, worthy of showing, his hardly seen Polish Pancerny Tks 20 mm. in 1/35 scale in a two part article. In our section, the Modeler’s Gallery, this edition is proud to have a small sample of the work of artist, painter and modeler Ernesto Reyes. Simply a luxury !!!! Comrade Evert Guadarrama brings us an article entitled “The life of a modeler” where he talks about his approach to this beautiful Hobby. We also have the collaboration of the portal Solomaquetas.com, who bring us an excellent work of the modeller Klaus Ebert who makes an excellent transformation of an LAV-25 from Italeri to turn it into a 6x6 Mowag of the Chilean army. Later we have another excellent creole modeller, also in exile, Willy Puchades, who shows us his Caudron G III in 1/72, resin model of the French house Omega Models. We hope you like this edition and enjoy it as much as we did, and we remind you that participating is very easy, you just have to write us at ipmsvzlamagazine@gmail.com, and we will give you all the guidance you need. No more to say, just thanks for taking your time to read us. 4


McDonnell Douglas F-4B Phantom II Juan JosĂŠ Moreno

Model: McDonnell Douglas F-4B Phantom II Brand: Academy/MRC Scale: 1/48

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1/48


The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II, what about the Phantom (the flying closet) has not been said? The Rhino. Who does not know it? What aviation modeler has not done it? With this model I want to represent an F-4 of the VF-111 Sundowners, the famous NAVY squadron with it’s spectacular livery. This squadron was assigned to the attack wing embarked 15 (CVW-15) embarqued on the USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) during its passage through Vietnam War from November 1971 to July 1972; I decided to make the F-4B “Old Nick” 204 (Old Nick was the radio code of the squadron) for a couple of reasons, first, most modellers represent number 200, belonging to the squadron leader, or number 201 that was a Mig Killer. I did not want to do either, instead I want to put the unknown numeral 204, just for the fun of it. The second reason is that there are a couple of good pictures (by the way one in color and one in black and white) throwing their entire load on the target and I just love d them. I must say that I hadn’t place the pilots names in the frame of the cabin because I wasn’t sure of them (I could have put the ones that come in the decals but I decided to leave them unset). This airplane, serial number is 150466, belonged before to VMFA 115 Silver Eagles of the USMC, and apparently meanwhile , it served in this squadron, it was involved in an accident where some ground personnel perished in September 1970. After its time in the Sundowners run out it returned to the marines at VMFA112 Cowboys and VMFA314 Black Knights to continue serving for a few more years.

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The Cockpit

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Academy has done a small wonder, although of course it is not perfect as usual. The engraving and riveting is very fine (also in the tail rudder but I think it should not be riveted). Overall it has very good detail in general. It brings complete air intakes all the way to the blades of the engine, although it is somewhat complicated to assemble and adjust. What I like the least is the color of the sprues, they come in three colors. In the white parts the details are difficult to observe while we work . Also the black sprues have a very soft plastic, difficult to sand and very sensitive to glue.

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You can see a complete review in the following article in this very same magazine. The Academy Mk-4 seats do not convince me so I use a Hasegawa’s from the drawer of leftovers properly modified (1). With two-component filler make the seat cushions as well as modifications to the parachutes. With stretched plastic and various pieces of Evergreen I made actuators, and with metal sheet and copper wire the belts and buckles (2).

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Top view of the seats, you can see the detailed finish and the diverse materials used (3). Then I paint the part of the chassis of the seats, with black color applied with airbrush and some acrylics using a brush form fine details. I make the rest of the details finishing doing some washing with oils in some areas of the black chassis (4). I wanted to give a stroke of color to the seat belts to break a little the chromatic range and I leave them so grayish. I give another tone to the main ones. The seams are highlighted with black pencil (5)

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With stretched plastic and sheets of Evergreen, I add the details to the bathtub as well as the rails of the seats with u-profiles (6-7).

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To give more depth to the panel clocks, I perforate them and add small plastic slices made with the Punch and Die tool for that purpose (8).

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Detail of the rear part of the RIO’s instrument panel is made adding bits of Evergreen rod but the wiring is still missing (9).

9 We paint the bathtub and front panels with a light gray then shadowing and litening the instrument panels over the black base. We paint the clocks and buttons with light gray except for the ones that we will give color s according to photographs (10). 10

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To integrate and give a sense of used, we do some overall oil-washing using brown tones (11). The construction of the classic wiring of the rear front panel with stretched plastic is easy but cumbersome, some wiring is also added to the rear of the radio operator’s cabin (12). 12

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View of the rear front panel (13). In this image you can see that, in addition to the painted wiring, I detailed the area where the domes are supported by thin plastic strips (14).

View of the cabin with the seats on.

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Starting from drills and a punch in a piece of plastic I begin to outline the pieces with a knife and sandpaper tin order o replicate the hooks that close the domes (15). Detailed domes with plastic sheets and acetate (16).

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The exhausts 17

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Detail of the air purge of the upper part of the intake’s fins, they are hollowed with a blade and files and then the details are added with thin sheets of plastic (17). The air purge of the lower part is different, it has one more division but practically has the same work (18).

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As I’m going to put a resin exhausts that are designed for the Hasegawa F-4, so you have to supplement the space where they settle with a 0.4 mm plastic strip since they are a little narrower (19). 21

The two areas of the supplemented exhausts, filled with cyano and sanded although then they practically will remain unseen (20). A thin strip of plastic is also added to the nozzles to fit them perfectly(21). Checking the adjustment of the exhaust (22-23). 23

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Another view of the adjustment of the exhaust (24).

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I had to add a plastic sheet for better fit of the nose cone (25).

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Airbreaks and Landing Gear The airbrakes are well detailed but with little depth and also lacked the tab around so I empty following the inside drawing and I glue a plastic sheet on the outside with the shape but a little larger to make the tab (26). The airbrakes painted with dark red to create shadows and adding some yellow to make areas of lights (27).

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Fully finished airbrakes with the effects of dirt achieved by washing oils of various shades of brown and sienna (28). With stretched plastic, copper wire of different diameters, and plastic we build the details that are missing from the landing gear wells (closing mechanisms, actuators, hidraulic’s tubing, wiring, electrical boxes, etc.). We also do the riveting at the bottom of the main wells (29-30-31).

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The parts of the main well completely painted and ready for assembly. Main wells completely painted (32-33-34). Detailing of the landing gear with the usual copper wire, stretched plastic and metal sheet for the clamps (35).

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Landing gear completely painted (36-37). 36

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Detail picture where you can see the inside of one of the wells as well as various details.

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View of the wheels completely installed with the final painting of some warning signs on the leg and gates. Here you can also see the aspect of the tires (38).

Armament Inner pylon, which I have detailed and added the weapons supports (39).

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Checking the union between the pylon and the TER, this I think is the best I’ve seen 1/48, both in size and shape but needs a good detailing (40). Another view of the pylon next to the fully completed TER (41-42). First I decide that I’m going to put the Hasegawa‘s Sidewinders but two instead of four. I also changed the fins and added some detail (42).

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Finally, I decided on the Academy’s Sidewinders, changing the front fins, they were too thick. Here is one completely finished (44).

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Sparrow missile finished, I also only set a pair on the back launchers (45). I decide to put two Mk-82 bombs in each TER as they are usually seen in many pictures of these planes in Vietnam, these are from the Hasegawa weapon kit to which I have changed the fuses for ones built scratch (46).

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Finished ventral fuel tank (47) View of completed complete external load (48). 46

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Painting

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White color with shading and some patching effects (48-49). 49

Shaded gray as well as to the white color. Here I add a series of effects in the form of shades, patches and lines applied according to our criterion (50).

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The drawing was made with a design program to make the different templates that I will need for the numeral, tail decoration and walk way. The emblem of the tail painted (51). Taking advantage of the red in the airbrusher, I painted other details of the same color. General view of the model prepared to remove the masks and see the result. (52). 51

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Final result on the tail’s fin (53).

The numeral was made with a mask for the color white and freehand work with a black marker of the o,5mm point, then I touched up details (54).

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Top view of the model with glossy varnish (55).

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Lower view of the fuselage prepaneled with a pencil lead(56).

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Decals on and pannelling done (57-58-59). 16


Exhaust painting proccess I

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Paint of the metallic zone of the tail (gas exhaust of the engines) still without effects of fumes and burn (I). Same area with light touches of transparent Tamiya blue (II). With brown oils and siennas we draw strokes trying to imitate the burns that are seen in the pictures (III). Also with oil but black we draw lines in the areas where smoke accumulates (IV). Appearance of the finished area; the nozzles are provisionally for the photo (V). Tail zone with depth rudders placed and finished. (VI). 17


Decals placed and panelling made (60).

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First with oil and then with watercolor pencils we give the effects we think appropriate (61-62). Both with the oils and the watercolor pencils give us time to work on them and give them the intensity or subtlety we need (63). In the most damaged panels and areas they are given a primer against rust (64). The belly of the plane with the effects of dirt finished (65). 62

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The walkways areas with their finished worn effects (66-67).

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Modelismo en tiempos de crisis.

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any times I have heard that every hobby is expensive and ours is. It is true, why deny it, nowadays in Venezuela everything is expensive, and modelling does not escape to this reality. Many of the venezuelan modelers are assembling what they have left in their reserves and these aren’t unlimited, specially our paints and consumables. But it is this last item, the consumables, that inspire me to write these lines. Although I’ve been making models for more than 30 years (at the age of 7th) I don’t consider myself an expert modeler but one of the bunch. With the help of many fellow modelers I’ve been improving my level a little in the last 4 years, up to the point that when comparing my recent models with old ones they show a big difference. I’ve experimenting to recover, or to clean up my old models, disassembling and discarding them, and of course, re-making them with latest techniques I’ve learned over these years On the other hand it gives me a benefit, my kit reserve or “reservoir” of models is extended in terms of its duration. But it also gave me new challenges, with the new Venezuelan economics, costs of modelling materials get higher and higher. For example, the consumables. The solutions came following advices of some friends and colleagues. Like many of you, some modelers have been trying the use of new products (mostly unrelated to model making) allow us to weather the storm, without annihilating our battered pockets. I now that it is true that we all love to use specialized products to build and paint models, to dennying it is pointless but the sad reality is that today (at the time of writing this “article”) the most simple modelling glue costs a good quantity of money (around one million bolivars or even more) which, adding other materials results hard to afford for many of us. Well the good news are that many of this specialized materials are easy to replace with cheaper and more common materials. Products you may find in supermarkets, drugstores or fine arts suppliers. For example, the liquid Tamiya glue can be replaced with nail paint thinner, in fact you can reuse its empty bottle and brush applier without problem. Just remenber is diluyent not remover, preferably containing in its chemical composition toluene compound. Its use is exactly the same as the tamiya green type glue. Many of you already sustitute acrylic gloss varnish with future floor polishing wax. I know that many purist will say that it’s not the same as acrylic varnish but it sure gives us a cheap solution to varnish a model. Most of you uses it and know that for the price of one large bottle of gloss varnish (from the most renoum brands) you can buy more than 3 bottles of future floor wax. Now if you consider the amount of glossy varnish that is spent per model the count is becoming relevant. The acrylic thinner is also expensive, is you take on consideration the ammount used on painting and cleaning our aerographs. For some acrylic paint brands ( most of 24


them) you may use window transparent cleaning fluids commonlly sold on any supermarket, any brand may be use, instead of specifics thinners. Also some modellers have being using burning alcohol as a substitute especially with paints such as gunze. Finally, for oil colors and emanel paint, many modelers are painting with odorless white spirits from the most various brands. From white brands (the ones hipermarkets launch such Mercadona, Carrefour or Walmart) to more traditionally brands such as Jhonson and Jhonson. In conclution, of course that most of us would like to use top quality modelling products but, in most of our cases, we have to fit into a tight budget and in many occasions our inventive must be use to keep our hobby active in our lives. Of course that many of the modelling products we see in magazines articles and modelling blogs are terrific solutions to our modelling challenges but it’s a matter of economic reality vs ideal situations. Most important matter is to continue modelling, assembling and bringing our projects to reality and enjoying our beloved hobby with friends and family. Un Saludo ‌. Y Keep Modelling!!!!!!!

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Kit Review Time Academy 1/48 - McDonnell Douglas Antonio Ces

F-4B Phantom II HISTORY The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II B/N is a supersonic, two-seater, twin-engine, long-range interceptor and fighter bomber originally developed for the United States Navy by McDonnell Aircraft. It entered service in 1960 with the US Navy and demonstrated great adaptability. It was also adopted by the Marine Corps, and in 1963, by the United States Air Force, so that in the mid-1960’s, it was already an important asset of their respective aircraft fleets. Although the Phantom is a large fighter jet with a maximum takeoff weight of over 27,000 kg, it is capable of reaching a maximum speed close to Mach 2.23 and an initial ascent speed of 210 meters per second. As of 1959, this airplane model established fifteen world records, including a record of absolute speed (2585,086 km/h) and another of absolute altitude (30,040 m). Five of the speed markers were not surpassed until 1975. It can load more than 8,400 kg of weaponry into nine external anchors, including air-to-air missiles, air-to-surface missiles and various types of bombs. The F-4, like other interceptors of its time, was designed without internal cannon because the use of missiles was expected to eliminate the need for direct combat, but in later versions it incorporated a M61 Vulcan rotary cannon. Due to its wide use by the United States and its allies and its characteristic shape, the F-4 is one of the best known icons of the Cold War. It was widely used during the Vietnam War, serving as the main air superiority fighter both in the Navy and Marines and in the Air Force. He also played an important role in the tasks of grounding and reconnaissance during the United States’ participation in the war. The Phantom has the distinction of being the last American fighter with which a pilot achieved the prestige of “as” in the twentieth century. During the Vietnam War, the Air Force had a pilot and two weapons systems officers, and the Navy a pilot and a radar officer, who got five victories against other enemy fighters becoming air combat aces.

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The F-4B was the first variant of the venerable Phantom II to enter operational service with the U.S Navy in 1960, with a total of 469 units built. Later, 228 were reconstructed with the configuration of the N variant, after receiving new electronics, the Phantom of the USAF were re-designated as F-4C.

THE MODEL When you open the box you find yourself with no less than 14 multicolored sprues; 8 white, 3 black, 2 medium gray, 1 light, and a fuselage of a single top piece. Additionally it comes with complete instructions of 8 pages, with a folio in color with the layout of the armament, another folio with a beautiful representation of the placement of the decals and, finally a spectacular sheet of decals with a single decoration corresponding to the F-4B # 15100, VF-111 Sundowners, NL / 200, USS Coral Sea, 1975, CAG aircraft. With this spectacular model the modeler will have: -Excellent detail in the cockpit (pilot and RIO). -Super detailed Martin Baker ejector seats. -Highly detailed figures. -Includes the access ladder. -Canopies can be positioned closed or open. -Detailed landing gear. -Separate steering throttle. -Airbrakes can be made open or closed. -Intake’s ducts complete with blades in the bottom. -Excellent detail of the nozzle and the post-burner. -Open/closed position of the fuel intake. Although additional USAF weaponry comes for the navy version only the following will be used: 4 x AIM-9B Sidewinder 4 x AIM-7D/E Sparrow 12 x Mk.82 Slicks 2 x 370 gallon wing tanks 1 x 600 gallon centerline tank 2 x triple ejector racks (TER) 2 x multiple ejector rack (MER)

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CONCLUSIONS A nice detail of this kit is the amount of additional pieces with which you can detail up some old Phantom II kits in your stash. For example: there are two types of depth rudders used in the Vietnam War, with and without slots in the leading edge of the F-4J and the models of the USAF. It brings several infra-red sensors and wing tips. Also in the sprues come USAF’s weapons pilons and many options in missiles, bombs and fuel tanks, as well as several MERs and TERs with a good level of detail. The assembly instructions of Academy are sufficiently clear, with the steps of construction well drawn and detailed to demonstrate the exact placement of the pieces. The painting map is very detailed and well specified the paintings and their references according to the different houses. One point that I do not like very much is the tradition of Academy to always include a single option of decoration, in this case it is the attractive appearance of the Sundowners of Vietnam, so if you want another you have to go to the aftermarkets or acquire a lot more expensive Eduard kit (which also brings all the resins in the house) at a higher price. Recently they reedited this same model that using the colors of the JollyRogers. In conclusion, overall the model is spectacular, exceeds in my humble opinion, the already excellent Hasegawa Phantom models. Although it must be clarified that the Japanese brand has much more variant offered than Academy, including the RF-4 recognition models, the f-4E/J/G/K and the wild weasel of the USAF. A very good point is the fact that, with this kit, you got a source of improvements for less detailed models, conversions of models that are kept in storage, and not to mention the possibilities to build Hasegawa‘s Phantom with leftover weapons from this kit. In short, the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II Academy in 1/48 is a highly recommended kit, in terms of detail, ease of assembly and the possibility of improving other kits in our model reserves.

Autor: Juan José Moreno

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Modeller’s gallery Ernesto Reyes

Ernesto Reyes SS Sturmbanfhurer of Artillery, 2º SS Panzer Division ‘’Das Reich’’, France 1944

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ery special figure since it was the first figure that I painted officially for Pegaso Models, sculpted by the genius Andrea Jula and for me one of the best 90mm scale figures of this brand. It presents various challenges such as leather’s aspect, in addition, the painting job on the dog ‘s fur was a not a simple task. The figure was the cover of the Euromodelismo figures magazine.

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Roaming Knight, XV century

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or me it was my first mounted figure. The weight of the horse and the figure, all in white metal, the 75mm scale, and the first time I use oil paints transformed this wrok into a challenge. Remarcable anatomy and perfection of facial expressions mastered by the teacher Andrea Jula.

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Foreing Legion Skier WWII

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ust painted for the brand W.O.S figures, sculpted by French friend Greg Girault, application of new lighting trends generating a dark and cold atmosphere with predominance of violets and purples on the skin causing a winter environment effect.

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RAF Pilot WWII Excellent figure of the Young Miniatures brand. I simply have to say that this brand is the best in World War II busts. A great sculpture that gives pleasure to paint it. A mixture of all kinds of materials such as leather, rubber, fabrics...... and in this case I use the non-metal metal technique , something new for me but very effective and that gives good results.

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ZHORK-SETH Special figure for me since it is one of the first fantasy figures that I ever painted for a collector. For being a 75mm figure it has an excelent anatomy and a luxury of fine details, as well it has a great variety of materials and textures to play with.

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A modeller’s life. Evert Guadarrama A long time ago in a very distant Caracas ... I went to a store with my younger brother with the idea of ​​giving him a birthday present, something from Star Wars; It turns out that in this store all the modelers of the city meet, besides, it is the center of good conversations, in short (as we call it) the Trenelandia temple. Upon entering we asked if they had Star Wars stuff and they told us: “up in the in the mezzanine”. Once we got upstairs it was like a shock. We saw tanks, planes, ships, magazines, paintings, among other things. Rightaway we started to ask what it was all about and a man looking like a tiny Freddie Mercury, like in 1/72 scale, told us: “this it’s Static Modeling. “ We came home looking for information about all that in the websites, it was the year 1999 and I was 25 years old. By that time, one day, we attend to an event where I bought some figures for my brother, I wanted starting encoraging my brother but I did not see myself doing any modelling. I just liked civilian vehicles and my brother the warhammer figures. Over the months I bought everything I could for my brother, but like many Venezuelan, my brother went to study to another country and I remained with a civilian vehicle, an airbrush and a compressor. When I tried to assemble the vehicle I did not like it but later, looking among the things that I had from the hobby, I found a Warhammer metal figure that my brother left at home and I started to paint it. When I finished I went out and bought another one. I bought three more figures of the same brand and started asking friends how to do each thing. At that time many people informed and helped me. Someothers just saw me as an annoying novice who asked. I remember a man who told me: “You have to paint many plastic dolls to have a level hahaha” but I keep trying and learning. Two fellow modellers, Blas P. and Sergio S., shared their experience and knoledge and I enjoyed our modelling sessions. It was the time of Wheels and Chains website. Of course that my first figures on the table did not win any medal. Then there appeared published texts of zenithal light painting, and black and white, I devoured those books, but I did not understand anything, overhead light, mixtures, rises of light, shadows ... 39


Continue compiting from event to event, asking and asking, and I found my friend Ernesto Reyes. When he saw one of my figures he told me: “I can criticize if you wish but don’t get upset” And I said: “Yes of course, not at all”. That day I understood everything I had read in books and on the internet. That day something happened that gave me much encouragement, Ernesto asked me how I got to paint the helmet of the figure that criticized. That day I did something he did not know well, so I started to ask him more about how to make the mixtures of the paintings, how to eliminate the satin from the Vallejo paint, and millions of other things. That’s how I started with this crazy hobby, between college classes, work and trips, a wedding, a daughter, it’s been 18 years now and I keep painting figures. Several figures, not as many as I would like, won medals most of them ended in a shoe box. My modelling brought me, above all, good friends with whom you can talk for hours without noticing. Now a days I paint slower, I spend time studying the pieces, seeing mixtures of colors, ambientations. As I always say, I paint to make the judges have a hard time evaluating hahaha. I hope things improve in Venezuela to be able to buy more figures, to have a showcase like many maestros like Pepe G. or J.J. Barrena. Nice colleagues who have time to share knoledge by Facebook, or being like my friend Ernesto R. I would like to go to an event in Europe where the hobby has a higher level and make it difficult for a judge to evaluate one of my pieces. It would be a luxury that would pay that trip. Remember every day how it all began, see how my club brothers started Ruedas y Cadenas.com, and how it evolved into Club Phantom. It is to see how they go and return, to see friends leaving for other countries and the hardest when those friends go to heaven; all this has been the best school that this hobby is giving me. For me my hobby fills me as a person. It proud me seeing your friends admiring your work at the table. I don’t care if they don’t win a medal but you know it’s there. And everybody is looking at it, loving or hating it. The best day is the day to get home after an event on the weekend and leave the pieces in the showcase, pick a new one and start all over again!

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ARTICULO SOLOMAQUETAS.COM

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The Mowag 6x6 is the Chilean vehicle that I always wanted to do. Since it´s one of the most known vehicles of the Army of Chile, I could not miss it in my collection. Now, the 6x6 version does not exist as such in injected plastic, although there are some conversions and models in resin I challenge me to do it from an Italeri Lav-25 and some scratch. I started with the hard work of building our own version VTP (Personal Transport Vehicle)...

The Work Without any references than the photos that some members of Solomaquetas.com share kindly, I proceeded to cut the hull in approximately 0.5 cm at the height of the second axis of traction, which it wasn’t assembled, and rebuild the structure with plasticard. Then, I cut the back part in approximately 1cm, until leaving it leveled. At this point I recommend not to do it as I did, first remake the lower hull piece and then cut the upper part and rebuild the rear doors. For the roof of the hull, I rebuild it with plasticard and reconstructed it adding some hatches (one from the kit and the other built by me). At this point you start applying putty and sanding to leave the surfaces leveled. Once this was done, I made the following modifications and additions: * Clamps and handles are from kitbash pieces of built models. The hinges and support systems were added to the roof hatches. * the curved part was added in the left center area of ​​the upper hull. * peak and shovel to starboard. * antenna * U-turn of the small hatch supports at the front. * The breakwater was completed according to the 6x6 version. * the weapons station was manufactured with plastic and spare pieces. * photoetches from other models. * MG tank and machine gun was added. * new rear stop lights. * Additional ventilation grille to the right was trimmed according to the references.

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Following with sandpaper, putty and more putty (I spent almost a tube full of Tamiya Putty just for this model), I made the corrections to the .50 station, which was not as traumatic as I thought at first, I just added one more armor in front of this and the back is hidden, so I did not worry anymore. The embrasures were also added (a little big, I know) and the periscopes, plus a bunch of clamps, again leftovers from other kits. Finally the exhaust protection (plastic and aluminum foil from a drink can) and I put one of the wheels as a spare. Although the photos do not show it that way, I took the liberty since later I will add load bags and supplies on the vehicle. The periscopes of the tower are photoetches from Eduard unuse pieces from a previous project. At this point, I am thinking that no more modifications were needed, I had to fix the cylindrical structure on the right side of the vehicle and changed the base and rail of the machine gun mount.

Painting At that moment I decided to paint it according to the scheme used at the present in Haiti by the Chile Battalion. The process described below was followed. As it’s my habit, I took the freedom of making more weathering effects leaving it with a more operative and used look. As base, it was painted with a Humbrol matt black primer. Then white Model Master glaze was used and weathering effects were made with Vallejo and Citadel acrylics, using black, desert yellow, buff, gray-green, black gray Iraqi sand and US tan. I applied them both directly and mixed. Chipping was made with a fine brush. Decals applied came from leftovers and hand made Chilean flags. And the load that was missing from the vehicle was added

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also of several kits and scratched with masking tape. Later they were painted with acrylics on enamel primer using the colors described above. I want to pause a bit to explain how to make weathering to simulate dust and dry mud. First I airbrushed humbrol enamels of different earth tones in several passes without mixing them, only attenuating the effects. Then I applyed dry brush with matte black to the wheels, and then sprayed a layer of Humbrol enamel Buff color very diluted in thinner. Once dry, I used chalk colors and MIG pigments to retouch what was done. Later I fixed all this with Humbrol thinner and water, as needed it. Another point I want to mention are the wheels, which are extremely simple. I recommend buying, in case you want to build your own Chilean 6x6 Piranha Mowag, a set of Hobbyfan resin wheels or Maple Leaf Models. The look of the undercarriage will be greatly improved with respect to those originals of the kit.

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Conclusion As you can see, it’s one of the hardest and complex conversions I’ve made, but so far, the one that have left me most satisfaction. Although it was complicated and tedious at first, given the large number of modifications, the final result makes me happy and proud. And finally I can have this model in my collection. There´s no need to say that it has given me a very important experience that will allow me, god willing, undertaking future transformations with more confidence and better terminations. I hope that this small article will become handy to the modelers who wanted to make on of this exotic Chilean armed car.

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SOCIETÉ DES AVIONS CAUDRON G.III 1/72

Willy Puchades

History

The Caudron G.III is a biplane, single-engine aircraft manufactured by the French firm Societé des Avions Caudron. It was widely used during the First World War in reconnaissance missions, as well as training of new pilots due to its maneuverability and flight attitude, in addition to being two-seater. The Caudron G.III has the “honor” of being the first official airplane of the newly formed Venezuelan Air Force (FAV), both in the role of military aircraft as a training aircraft, in June 1920. The french manufacturer delivered the first units in France of the G .III. After the respective flight tests and acceptance by the government of Venezuela they were embarked and they arrived in September 1920, at the port of La Guaira. After disembarqued they were sent by rail to Maracay, where the French delegation (composed by the pilot Robert Petit and the mechanics Lodovic Rouguet and Louis Roullin) began their assembly and proper testing. On December 11, Under-lieutenant Francisco Leonardi made the inaugural flight. Its general characteristics were: Length: 6.8 m Width: 13.40m Height: 2.5m Empty weight: 445kgCaudron Maximum take-off weight: 734kg Power plant: 1 Le Rhone 9c engine (rotary) Power: 80 hp Average speed: 160 Km / h Ceiling: 3000m Scope: 4 hours Then, on December 19th, the official opening ceremony of the Maracay Airfield (now the facilities of the Aeronautical Museum) was held, as well as the official creation of the Venezuelan military aviation. In the year of 1923, 3 new G.IIIs were acquired to renew the inventory of the young FAV. Due to multiple accidents occurred with the first aircraft, these new units would be provided with machine guns and new engines. Now a days the only operating G.III in the world is in Venezuela. This aircraft flew again once restaured in the events of the Anniversary Celebrations of the FAV in the decade of the 80’s. 47


This aircraft rests today in the hangar of the FAV’s Aeronautical Museum of Maracay Luis Hernán Paredes.

Aircraft Caudron G.III in the hangars of the old aviation school in Maracay.

THE MODEL As a Venezuelan model maker I am very fan of FAV aircraft and whenever I can I add new models to my FAV airplane collection. The first model of the G.III that fell into my hands was one of the Roseplane brand, thanks to my friend Armando Gil. This is a vacunformed model which discouraged me from even thinking ofstrating it. I have being searching for a Caudron G.III in 1/72, since then. Fortunately I finally got it from the French brand Omega Models (kit No. 72-209). It is made of resin and comes quite well molded, with a medium degree of difficulty. But as always I also made some improvements so let’s see them. As you can see the interior of the kit leaves much to be desired, it comes visturlly detailess. So I proceeded to add the structures and bracing that make up the nacelle, as well as the base of the control pedals and the control sticks.

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Once assembled the nacelle, I proceeded to clean flushes, sanding and straighten the rest of the pieces. I also present the other pieces that make up the aircraft, such as upper and lower planes, lateral ribs and tail rudder, to see fittings and adjustment work . I noted that the upper plane was bent so I had to straight it by submerging it in hot water, softening it and then depositing in a flat place with some weight. Assembling the area of ​​the main body, together with the ribs of the fuselage, tail planes and the support beams of the upper plane. It is very important verifying in all the steps of assembly the fitness of the pieces because you can find deformed pieces which have to be corrected or be remaked (scracht). THE FINAL RESULT My aircraft was inspired by the one that was hanging in the dining room of the Aviation Academy, with its typical light cream color and the black cowling. After being damage during the coup attempt in 1992, it was later repaired and restored but with other paint scheme.

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The kit was painted with Humbrol enamel colors, using as base color N° 7 (light buff), using N°24 (trainer yellow) and N°149 (radome tan) to try to achieve the yellowish cream color seen in the original aircraft, (it should be noted that the museum is painted blue as seen at the beginning of the article). The flag on the tail rudder was painted with Vallejo paints applyed with a brush and the rosettes of the upper plane are decals from Aztec Decals. The riostas were made with the method of heating a sprue and stretch it to get a fine plastic thread, which was glued with cyanoacrylate to achieve the desired effect. It should be noted that at that scale it is almost impossible to present all the riostas carried by the original aircraft. The interior of the nacelle was also painted in different shades of Vallejo brown trying to give a woody look. It was varnished brilliant using Microgloss varnish and the matt tone was achieved with Modelmaster dull cote. I hope you liked the article and getting into a part of the FAV’ history through this kit which is now part of my beloved FAV aircraft collection.

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First Part

Antonio Ces

TK-S z dziatkiem 20mm FK wz.38

The TKS was, together with the TK3, the most important armored vehicle from the numerical point of view in service in the Polish Army in September 1939. Like all the tanks of the 30s, they were a good alternative to traditional tanks, being cheaper and a good solution for the light mechanization needs of infantry battalions.

Modelo: CIAGNIK PANCERNY CP Marco: RPM Escala: 1/35

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1/35


575 TK / TKS formed the bulk of Polish armored forces before the start of the war. They suffered heavy casualties during the invasion of Poland, often being the only armored fighting vehicle available. Due to their light armament of a single machine gun, they did not succeed in combat against the German tanks, with the exception of the Panzer I, although their small size made them appropriate for recognition and support to infantry. Only a handful of tanks armed with a 20mm cannon (TKS) had some success against enemy tanks. Standing out in the battles of the Bzura counter-attack, in which a TKS tank with a 20mm automatic cannon commanded by Sergeant Roman Orlik, destroyed three German light tanks Panzer 35 (t). One of them was commanded by Lieutenant Victor de Hohenlohe, Prince of Ratibor, who died in that attack. After the Polish capitulation, the surviving units became part of the reconnaissance, training, police and surveillance units of the Wehrmacht and the armed forces of the Axis satellite countries.

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There is not much to ask from these models in terms of details. They are models of medium quality and low price but they bring original subjects to the market. Hard vehicicles to see in contests, which help to complete the most elaborate collections of true model makers.

THE MODEL

With a gray plastic, the external parts come with a lot of detail. The thickness of the shield is a little exagerated for the scale but well molded without ejection marks. I started having a Panzerny CP model and later I transform it into a TKS tankette. CP was a multiple use tractor without roof, much like the brittish Universal Carrier, so the model came with pieces for the interior but without great details. This model was given to me as a gift from my good friend and modeler, Nestor Yanez, eternal lover of Polish historical models. Once I opened the kit I noticed a curious fact. As it happens with other scale models brands, the sprues came with many additional pieces for other versions. Investigating the Polish armor I found the TKS tanks with their 20mm cannon and I decided to take advantage of the aditional pieces to make my own TKS. Looking for references, I found the diagrams of the TKS 20mm Tankette and put my brains to work. THE PROJECT As I said, I was captivated by the image of the small tank shooting against many larger tanks and coming out victorious, quite a fact seeing the difference in size between the TKS and the panzar II or the 38 (t). In addition, there was the advantage that already had the internal parts, that although simple, they formed a good base for a scratch interior, with which the project could be made even more attractive. The first and main obstacle was the upper armor. Then the cannon and the other internal parts. Looking for planes you can get a good idea of ​​the angles and dimensions required. Surfing on the internet finally, after searching a lot, I found a blog in Polish where I got these schematics.

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The second obstacle is the Nkm wz.38 FK 20 mm cannon. Some 20 TKS tanks were equipped in 1939 with this autocannon. The model does not have but one component of this cannon so it will be made almost from 0. Finally, I intend to do all the interior so many of the pieces are going to be improved and others made also from 0 using the references that are obtained on the internet. Luckily, the brief but interesting history of these tanks in the Polish army has promoted many groups of interest (mainly in Poland) that maintain illustrations and visual records useful for my purpose. As you can see in the photo, these are the original parts of the kit, they do not have much detail, however they can serve as a basis for future modifications (1).

20 mm Nkm wz.38 FK Cannon

1

UPPER ARMOR As I said before, the main obstacle is the top armor. You have to do it practically from 0. The only thing I have, and that comes with the kit, is a front part of it, which will be the starting point and reference for all the pieces to be made. With the front part we begin to chop and adapt plastic sheets matching the shapes of the front armor plate(2).

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As we build the armor we keep verifying its fittings and the proportions with the chassis of the TKS (3-4).

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4

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5

Once the upper armor has been checked, we seal everything with cyanoacrylate glue and begin sanding to smooth the surfaces. Originally the armor was joined with hot rivets, it was not welded. The most difficult and tedious to do was the rivets with round head visible from the outside. The manufacture of the rivets was endless, believe me (5).

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Subsequently, a hole had to be drilled through and one by one each rivets is glued in position. It is important to keep an even separation and constantly reviewing the work done so that it results as real as possible (6-7). The materials and tools used can be seen in the following image (8).

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9 View of the armor with all the rivets. You can also see the gunner’s viewer that we made later (9).

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INTERIOR

10

Using internet referential material we see the internal distribution of the tank. Internal space is scarce so all internal components have to fit perfectly (10). The kit has 60% of the interior but most of the pieces come without more detail. The most voluminous element is the engine, occupying almost a third of the internal space. Also this can be seen through the two hatches that we will leave open on the roof of the shell. So we will re-build the engine from 0 (11). 11 First we go with the transmission. The system is rebuilt because I cutted the original part and replace it with the one I made. Then I make the pedals system: clutch, brake and accelerator (12-13). Before assembling them, we must make the linkage system for the steering wheel since once we place the parts of the transmission it will be more difficult (14). The final result already looks better than the original (15). 12

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8

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ENGINE

1

2

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In this sequence we can see how the engine and its elements are being built. First the block (1). Then the air filter system (2). Valves, exhaust tubes, dynamo, coils, injectors, etc (3) We are always checking that the pieces fit in the chassis (4). We assemble the rest of the internal elements such as the fuel tank and the radiator (5). View of the motor including the shaft to move the blade of the radiator through belts (6). View of the set presented to verify the fit (7). Zoom into the blade and shaft later I will add the transmission belt (8). 7

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Once all the pieces are positioned together you can see how the interior is going to be. We can also begin to see the little internal space that existed inside these tiny tanks (16).

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Once made and placed other elements of the interior of the tank, including seats, racks of ammo, etc ... we can see the internal is overcrowded (17-18). The set of the tank can be seen here. I have opened some hatches to see the interior once everything has been assembled (19). 18

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Profile for antonio ces

Sixth World Modelling Magazine  

World Modelling Magazine is a free digital magazine made by modelers for modelers. In our pages, you can find plastic modeling from aircraft...

Sixth World Modelling Magazine  

World Modelling Magazine is a free digital magazine made by modelers for modelers. In our pages, you can find plastic modeling from aircraft...

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