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Summer 2011 www.annecenter.org

For supporters of the mission and vision of the Anne Carlsen Center

Anne Carlsen Center uses combination of compassion and expertise in providing services for individuals with autism. Pages 6–17

Community Services Help Create Social Life for Grand Forks Man. Page 15

ACC Expands with EarlyIntervention Services. Page 4


Summer is a special time at the Anne Carlsen Center ... especially this year.

Taylor and Ally distribute newspapers to residents at a nursing home.

Matt makes sure all the oors are kept clean with an adapted broom that hooks onto his power chair.

Max builds a tower of blocks during one of his sessions with the KIDS program.

Ally and her mom Becky have a blast, learning with Jenny Costello during all the aspects of her KIDS Program visits.


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he lives the Center touches continues to grow … not only through our Campus in Jamestown, but

also in communities across the state. Since 2008, ACC has been providing community-based services that allow a number of families to remain together. Beginning in January, the Anne Carlsen Center assumed operations of four offices of the KIDS Program. Today, over 550 children (from birth to age 3) are receiving early-evaluation services from the KIDS Program through offices in Fargo, Grand Forks, Devils Lake and Jamestown. Levi crawls through a colorful nylon cylinder as part of his KIDS Program session.

As the Center continues to expand its scope of service to individuals of all abilities throughout North Dakota, we remain committed to our mission of creating opportunities for independence and making the world a more inclusive place.

Desi and Danie help shoppers at a mall in Fargo by distributing baskets.

Ben and ACC Teacher Tom Kenna share a laugh during the graduation ceremony in May.

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M E S S A G E

F R O M

Using technology to unlock doors, potentiall for individuals with disabilities This year marks the 70th Anniversary of the Anne Carlsen n Center’s Jamestown Campus. With ith great pleasure, we reflect on our heritage of excellence and the promise of the future. In the fall of 1941, the Center dedicated i t d a new school on six acres just west of Jamestown. Eighteen students began classes that September. Over the decades, the buildings have grown, along with the number of individuals served. While continuing to serve individuals with disabilities on its Jamestown Campus, the Center expanded to provide community-based support and earlyevaluation services throughout North Dakota. The Center has been blessed through the years with dedicated and talented staff members who proudly follow the example of our namesake, Dr. Anne Carlsen. These individuals infuse energy and love into every day … and every interaction. They are at the top of their fields, contributing a wealth of expertise and insight to our programming. One of these vital areas of knowledge is technology. ACC professionals incorporate technology into each individual’s school day, home living environment, vocational setting and places of recreation. In the last ten years, we have seen rapid acceleration in the development of a broad range of high-tech tools benefitting children and adults with disabilities. Computers are now a critical learning tool in a variety of settings. Students of all abilities at the Center benefit from this technology by using hardware and software adaptations. Individuals with limited mobility often use a single switch instead of a keyboard or mouse to operate the computer. Eye-scanning technology enables students to use eye movements to interact with the computer. Basic learning activities like reading and spelling, or more advanced applications like blogging and podcasts, are all made possible by these assistive technologies and our specially-trained staff. 2 THE AMBASSADOR

T H E

C E O

Techno Technology is becoming increasingly mobile mobile, and a variety of mainstream devices are having a big impact on children and adults with disabilities. childre such tool is the iPad™, a wireless One su tablet computer with a touchscreen display. For individuals with autism, display portable device offers an effective this po mix of visual and audio cues, proving to be a powerful aid in communicating needs, enhancing vocabulary and social skills. improving socia The Anne Carlsen Center is in the midst of seeking recognition as an Apple Distinguished School, a designation reserved for schools with a 21st century vision of technology in education. While the recognition is highly desirable, our main goal is to continue providing the best learning environment possible for the children and adults we serve. The Center has a history of working closely with companies developing computer-based technology for individuals with disabilities, and we are often among the first consulted and asked to test cutting-edge products and processes. As a faithful supporter of the Center’s programs and mission, you help us apply technology in unique, innovative and meaningful ways. Thank you for empowering students and clients to experience greater hope and independence as they learn, explore and dream about tomorrow.

With gratitude,

Eric Monson Chief Executive Officer Anne Carlsen Center


ACC Awarded DMF Seal of Distinction

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he High Impact Seal of Distinction recognizes nonprofit organizations whose executive and board leadership has demonstrated a sincere commitment to producing superior results for the people of our region by improving their performance in five key areas of nonprofit management: Purpose, Platform, People, Resources and Results. To attain the High Impact Seal of Distinction, nonprofit executives and board members devoted hundreds of hours to completing a series of rigorous trainings, conducted an in-depth organizational assessment, developed measurable plans to improve their organizational effectiveness, and implemented key practices to dramatically improve results for the people they serve. “This was an amazing experience,” said Tom Rohleder, ACC Board Chair and one of the participants in the sessions. “It was very informative and I really enjoyed the various sessions.”

Nonprofit executive directors participated in an advanced seven-month leadership program focused on strategic thinking, board engagement, collaboration, managing change and leading people. A significant number of board members attended five intense training sessions on highly effective governance, strategy development, performance measurement, fundraising, and sharing resources. The nonprofit executives and board members who participated in the program are better equipped leaders, highly capable of engaging their organizations and their communities to more effectively address important societal problems.

Dakota nonprofit organizations. Impact will continue to convene this group of nonprofits to build a network of nonprofit leaders to share best practices, develop meaningful partnerships, devise innovative answers to mutual challenges, promote the sharing of infrastructure and experience, and continually work with each other to produce superior results for the people of our region. Eric Monson, Chief Executive Officer, and Anne Carlsen Center board members Rohleder, Dr. Robert Montgomery, Bruce Iserman, Patrick Traynor and Joel Fremstad participated in the Seal of Distinction Program. “Opportunities such as this are so rare,” said Monson. “There were so many useful approaches and applications to what we do at the Anne Carlsen Center … and how we can continue to be a leader in empowering the remarkable individuals we serve.” The High Impact Seal of Distinction awarded to organizations in May 2011 will be valid through 2012. To renew their organization’s Seal of Distinction in 2013, board members and executives will be required to complete an organizational assessment, update their organizational development plans, and receive additional training designed to improve their effectiveness. The High Impact Seal of Distinction is an initiative of the Impact Foundation’s Institute. Impact Foundation’s mission is to build the capacity of nonprofits, businesses and individuals to maximize their societal impact. Learn more at www.impactgiveback.org.

In May, the Impact Foundation awarded the High Impact Seal of Distinction to 14 North THE AMBASSADOR 3


Excellence in

Early Intervention

KIDS Infant Development Program Supports Children, Families in Their Homes

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hey say there’s no instruction manual for raising children. But Toby and Philip Cherney of Jamestown have the next best thing.

To learn more about the North Dakota KIDS Infant Development Program, contact the Anne Carlsen Center at 1-800-568-5175 or visit ACC online at www.annecenter.org.

Thanks to Early Interventionist Mindy Blackmore, they have a binder five inches tall filled with advice to guide them in their interactions with their 2-yearold son Alexander, who was diagnosed with autism in August 2010. Blackmore provides services—home-based support, instruction, information and resources —as part of the North Dakota KIDS Infant Development Program. With each weekly visit she provides a home activity report filled with observations, suggestions and activities. It’s a familyfocused approach in which professionals and parents/caregivers work together as partners to help children learn and develop their full potential. “Children learn so much within the first few years of life,” says Blackmore. “Parents play a major role in their child’s growth and development. We include families in our sessions because they can stretch the interventions throughout the entire day. By training the parents, we are empowering families.” Blackmore helps the Cherneys maximize learning for Alexander through typical activities to enhance his development in the areas individuals with autism often struggle with—communication, cognitive development and social/emotional development. “I don’t know where we would be without Mindy and the KIDS Infant Development Program,” says Alexander’s mom, Toby. “I work full time, and my husband and I have two other

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children. The autism diagnosis was overwhelming for us … in fact, we’re still processing it. We have a long road ahead, but the KIDS Infant Development Program has provided us with a lot of answers. They have our son’s best interests in mind.” Long-term stability Eligibility for the North Dakota KIDS Infant Development Program is based on an evaluation completed by a speech/ language pathologist, occupational therapist, physical therapist, social worker, and special education professional. Infants or toddlers under the age of 3 with developmental delays, or with a medical diagnosis associated with delays, are eligible. There is no cost to families for the program, which is supported by the North Dakota Department of Human Services and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Northern Plains Special Education, a co-op of several Special Education programs in North Dakota, administered the KIDS Infant Development Program. Managing the growing program, however, in addition to meeting its other varied responsibilities, has been a challenge. The co-op spread the word that it was looking for an organization to run the program efficiently and effectively, and started a thorough interview process. Northern Plains KIDS selected the Anne Carlsen Center from amongst a group of providers to assume operation of the KIDS Infant Development Program effective January 1, 2011. “We knew the Anne Carlsen Center could provide longterm commitment and stability,” says Keith Gustafson, executive director of Northern Plains


Special Education. “One of our goals as a service provider is to provide the least restrictive and most natural environment for children … to help prevent a child from having to leave his or her home for services. That’s exactly what the Anne and the Center has demonstrated success.” There are more than 900 children enrolled in the Infant Development Program throughout nine regions in the state. Northern Plains Special Education administers services to 550 children and their families in four of those regions: Lake Region-Devils Lake, Southeast-Fargo, Northeast-Grand Forks and South Central-Jamestown. The Anne Carlsen Center has been providing human resource, financial and billing services for the KIDS Infant Development Program since July 2010.

The KIDS Infant Development Program has been working with Evan since August—just a few weeks after he was born—to help him reach milestones in his physical and cognitive development. He’s achieving motor skills such as sitting, rolling and head control. Most recently during “Tummy Time,” he is propping himself up with his arms. “The KIDS Infant Development Program has really made a difference in terms of his growth and development,” says Ashley. “I don’t know where we would be without the program. They really go the extra mile for and with you.” Blackmore makes weekly visits to the Frenzels’ home, and has made arrangements for occupational and speech therapists to work with Evan. She also facilitated a visit to their house by North Dakota Vision Services, when the family expressed an interest in having his vision checked.

“At the Anne Carlsen Center, we have a passion for providing care as close to home as possible, and the KIDS Infant Development Program fits in “We provide our services in perfectly with that goal,” the environment in which says CEO Eric Monson. children and their families “The Center also recogare most comfortable—their nizes the importance of homes,” says Blackmore. “It early intervention and is so rewarding to see their identification for individgrowth and process. We can uals on the autism spend months preparing for a spectrum in terms of The KIDS Infant Development Program serves over 550 unique and loveable children just like Alexander throughout milestone to be reached and developing independence four regions in the eastern half of North Dakota. when it happens—it is very and integration. By As of January 1, 2011, about 50 KIDS Program staff exciting!” integrating the wonderin these regions became ACC employees. ful skills and hard work The Cherney family busily of the people who make prepared for a major milestone when Alexander up the KIDS Infant Development Program and the entered preschool at the end of January. The Anne Carlsen Center, this new partnership allows KIDS Infant Development Program, along with the Center to apply its experience and knowledge its other services, offers transition planning and in these areas.” coordination, and has assisted the family in Not just a number making important arrangements and decisions. Ashley Frenzel of Jamestown says the KIDS Infant Development Program staff has treated her “Alexander has really developed in his cognitive family with compassion during some challenging learning, his speech and his social skills,” says times. “You’re not just another case … another Toby. “We still have issues from time to time, and number,” she says. “They really seem to care.” there are days when I want to cry. But there are the good days, too. The KIDS Infant Development Ashley and her husband, Jason, have a 5-month-old Program has been with us every step of the way, son with Down syndrome. “At first, it was a real offering valuable information and support.” blow to find out the diagnosis,” says Ashley. “But Evan has brought so much joy into our lives.”

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Autism spectrum disorders are a group of developmental disabilities that cause major social, communication and behavioral impairments. The prevalence of these disorders, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has risen to 1 in every 110 births in the United States and nearly 1 in 70 boys. While autism affects far m more boys than girls (4:1), both sexes are affected.

Tieranny often has a smile for staff and fellow students. Through nurturing and insightful care, the Anne Carlsen Center has helped this social butterfly come out of her cocoon.

Eight-year-old girl with wi autism makes rapid progress in overcoming social and academic hurdles

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ieranny Eagle has a spring to her step as she walks to class in the morning. A student at the Anne Carlsen Center from the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, this 8-year-old girl with long shiny hair and sparkling eyes has made a remarkable transformation since her first day on campus. “Tieranny now comes to school eager to learn,” says special education teacher Sharon Olson. “She’s curious and motivated. She is very endearing to those who know her.” Those early days at the Center, though, were frustrating and fearful for Tieranny. “That whole first summer was overwhelming for her,” recalls Olson. “For the first couple of weeks, she would kick at the door of the classroom and scream. She wanted out.” Through nurturing and insightful care, the Center has helped this social butterfly come out of her cocoon. It’s a metamorphosis that has been years in the making, beginning with a mother’s determination to get answers and help. A Mother’s Instinct At 6 months old, Tieranny was diagnosed with chronic asthma, and was hospitalized when her breathing problems became severe. It soon became apparent that the little girl had other difficulties as well. “Tieranny couldn’t

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hold her head up, sit up or hold her own bottle at age 1,” says her mom, Jessica Hinsley-Saven. “She didn’t roll over until she was a little over 1 year old.” Doctors, though, told Jessica not to worry … that she was just a young, inexperienced mother. “They told me not to compare Tieranny to her older brother, who had reached all of his milestones on time,” she recalls. “They said all children develop at a different rate.” But Jessica was becoming increasingly aware of her daughter’s difficulties. Tieranny did not want to be cuddled or wrapped up, and she would eat only two kinds of jarred baby food—sweet potatoes and peach cobbler. “If I tried to feed her anything else, she would spit it out,” remembers Jessica. “Doctors told me she needed to eat more solid foods, but it was a real struggle.” As Tieranny grew, there continued to be issues with food. At breakfast, she would take her breakfast cereal contents and line them up on the table—not uncommon behavior for individuals on the autism


spectrum. “If you moved just one of those pieces of cereal, she would have an outburst … there’d be a total meltdown,” says Jessica. Tieranny did not develop basic language skills— another characteristic of autism—and there were also restricted interests and repetitive behaviors. “She loved to touch the blinds in the house,” remembers Jessica. “She would constantly run her fingers over them, to the point that they started to crack and break. She broke them all.” Jessica began doing a lot of research on autism and read dozens of books. “I took Tieranny to my sister’s pediatrician,” she says, “and he wondered why someone hadn’t caught the signs of autism sooner.” Tieranny was diagnosed with autism at age 3. When Tieranny was 4 years old, two Anne Carlsen Center trained professionals worked with Tieranny on her behaviors and communication. During one of the sessions, Tieranny wanted more fruit loops. She couldn’t have any more, they explained, until she used sign language to indicate she wanted some more. “After about half an hour, she was signing ‘more’ and ‘all done.’ I realized I couldn’t do what they can do,” says Jessica. “I knew the Anne Carlsen Center would be able to help my daughter.” Making a Difference Tieranny became a student at the Anne Carlsen Center in June 2008. The first couple of weeks in the Center’s Early Childhood Classroom were a struggle for Tieranny. She’d scream and then kick the classroom door, wanting to get away from her teachers and fellow students. Eventually, though, she became more comfortable with her surroundings. To help her function better in the school setting, staff began teaching her methods of communication. “When Tieranny first came to the Center,” explains Olson, “she knew only a few signs. Her other ways of communicating were to point or push things

away. When it came to language skills, she wasn’t saying words that were understandable.” The staff worked with Tieranny on developing more sign language, and they equipped her with a binder called a Communication Book, containing colorful symbols that Tieranny used to communicate with staff about transitions and choices. “The visual supports have resulted in a significant reduction in behaviors,” says Olson. “It gives her control over her life. She knows what is expected of her.” Playtime during those first days at the Center revealed Tieranny’s restricted interests, a trait often seen in children with autism. “There were only three things she would play with, and in a very rigid way,” remembers Olson. “She’d play with a specific set of blocks and phone books. With each, she’d stack them or line them up. She also loved playing with her Elmo plush toy. We have gradually expanded what she enjoys playing with. We started with introducing a different set of blocks from what she was accustomed to.” The differences were immediately apparent to Tieranny’s family on the first visit home. “After just a month as a student at the Center, I saw a huge difference,” says Jessica. “I brought her home for a visit the 4th of July weekend of 2008. Her behavior, in general, had really improved. She was able to sit better and for longer periods of time. She was able to sit and eat, which before, had been a struggle. She was using sign language and even vocalizing more. Her temperament seemed calmer … more easy-going.”

When Tieranny became an ACC student in 2008, she would kick at the door of the classroom and scream. Now, teachers describe her as “curious,” “motivated,” and “eager to learn.”

Jessica also came to appreciate the Center’s team approach in providing services and support to her daughter. “When I went in for that first meeting, they were so effective in their communication. I also appreciate how consistent they are in their care.” Tieranny needs that. I could never provide that to her, especially while also caring for her four siblings.” THE AMBASSADOR 7


Individuals on the autism spectrum need routine and structure, and Tieranny thrives on it. And, like many others on the spectrum, Tieranny needs sensory input throughout her day to help her be her best. She loves the Center’s therapy pool, ball bin, indoor tree house and fiber optic curtain. She enjoys walking the halls of the Center and participating in the Center’s “Lap Club” in the gymnasium. Tieranny is very aware of her daily schedule of activities, and in recent months, has been vocalizing more when referring to it. She’ll say, for example, “OT” (occupational therapy) and “brush teeth.” It’s major progress for a girl who, early on, would scream, point or push in attempts to communicate. “When I call her on the phone now, Tieranny says ‘hi,’” says Jessica. “When I ask her about her daily activities, I’ll get oneword response like ‘reading’ or ‘swimming.’ It’s so wonderful to hear her use words now.” Cottage Life Tieranny spends her days at the Center receiving educational and therapy services, and when the school day is over, she goes to her cottage— just yards away from her classroom, where she lives with seven other students. Tieranny has a roommate she enjoys playing with. In the cottage, she likes to work on big floor puzzles, look through books, watch movies, and—most of all—work on the computer. She does her own laundry and takes her dishes to the sink after dinner. “Everyone does a house chore that benefits the cottage as a whole,” says Scott Hobert, an ACC Home Life Services Coordinator. “Tieranny, with staff support, sets the table for dinner. She knows where everybody sits.” Although Tieranny sometimes still struggles with behaviors—at times being aggressive or crying loudly—staff is able to re-direct her using her visual schedule and other visual supports. “She is successful if she knows what to expect … if she has routine, structure and visual aids,” says Hobert. One of the major goals for Tieranny currently as part of her residential services is learning proper social boundaries and interactions. “There are fellow students she’s very fond of, and her way 8 THE AMBASSADOR

of expressing friendliness is to stand face to face with them. That can be intimidating for some.” A Bright Future They are also working on social interaction in the classroom. “We are teaching her how to initiate social contact,” says Olson. “She now taps on someone’s shoulder to get his or her attention, and then she says ‘hi.’ She’ll ask for a hug using sign language.” Tieranny’s speech therapist at the Center recently trained her on the use of an ALT-Chat Communication device. “This device has opened up a whole new world for her,” says Olson. “She uses this device to let us know her wants and needs. With it, she is able to participate more in class.” “She’s a smart little girl,” says Tom Gaffaney, ACC Behavior Support Coordinator. “At this point, her future is unlimited, especially when you consider how quickly she’s picked up on her communication device. We’re still working on the behaviors and getting her to respond differently when she gets frustrated. Further improvement of her communication skills, I believe, is the key to her success.” The Center is working with public schools in Jamestown to find appropriate opportunities for Tieranny to get experience attending public school part-time, a development that Jessica has been longing for. “This will be so good for her,” says Olson. “Some day, when she’s ready, she will be able to move closer to home and attend a public school.” Jessica says she’s thankful for the way in which the Center keeps encouraging and empowering her daughter. “Watching her in the way she is growing … she’s a little woman now. She is much more self-sufficient. I have so much hope for the future. Early on, my biggest fear was that my child would never be able to tell me she loved me. Tieranny said it for the first time a few months ago. It’s the best thing I’ve ever heard.”


Shining Through Wahpeton teenager overcomes changes, challenges on path to greater quality of life

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ohn Withuski, 14, had a rough start to his teen years. The Wahpeton, N.D., teen was, all at once, faced with major changes and challenges. But John and his family were willing to reach out for help, and now, he is overcoming obstacles to happiness and learning how to navigate the complex world around him. As is the case with many others on the autism spectrum, John’s childhood was filled with peaks and valleys. That journey has shaped him and his family in powerful and inspiring ways. Early Questions Shortly before John turned 3 years old, his parents became concerned about delays in a number of areas of his development.

PDD-NOS may have impaired social interaction and heightened sensitivities to certain stimuli. Overall, they tend to have better language skills than children with autism and fewer repetitive behaviors. PDD-NOS is a spectrum disorder with symptoms ranging from mild to severe. “At that time, finding out information about autism was hard … very hard,” says Paula. “It’s so much easier now. There are so many more resources.”

“He wasn’t verbalizing,” remembers John’s mom, Paula. “He was a cranky kid. We began to wonder … is this just the Terrible Twos?” There were other signs, Paula says, that something was wrong. “There were the repetitive behaviors,” she recalls, “such as spending hours playing with the garden hose. John would water the whole driveway, and if any portion of it would dry out, it would greatly bother him. He’d cover it with water again.”

John and his family had sessions with speech therapists and a psychiatrist, but one of their biggest allies came into their lives shortly before John turned 4 years old. They saw a Fargo pediatrician with a special focus in autism. He helped the Withuskis learn effective behavioral interventions and identify helpful medications.

John was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder known as pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). Those with

It was in the summer before 6th grade when the subject of the Anne Carlsen Center came up again. This time, there were more options available for John at the Center. This time, it was the right thing to do.

But there were still struggles over the years. When John was in the 4th grade in Wahpeton, staff at the school urged the family to consider Anne Carlsen Center in Jamestown as an option. “He was only 9 years old then, and he would have had to leave home to become a student at the Center,” says John’s dad, Jeffrey. “We didn’t feel like it was the right thing to do.”

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Reaching Out The Withuskis learned placement as a student on the Jamestown campus was not appropriate for their son. However, the Center had recently expanded its Community Services into southeastern North Dakota, and its In-Home Supports, could provide John and his family with multi-disciplinary care from their home. “It was exactly what we needed at a very critical time,” says Paula. “We had reached a scary point in which John was becoming intolerant to his medications, was going through puberty, and had been growing quite a bit. There were a lot of changes he was trying to cope with. Since he had a difficult time communicating, his way to communicate was to have an outburst.” First, the Anne Carlsen Center’s highly-trained professionals performed assessments in John’s school and home. One of those professionals was Mark Coppin, the Center’s Assistive Technology Director. “When we went to perform the evaluation, it was obvious that John really liked technology,” says Coppin. “I let him use an iPod touch, and when he mentioned he liked math, I installed a math app. He caught on right away. It was a natural fit for him.”

At school, there’s a group of four boys with similar communication needs that he spends a lot of time with. They each use an iPod touch for speech and communication.” Equipping Teachers John attends public school in Wahpeton. While he spends much time in a special education classroom, he is integrated with the rest of his classmates for some of his classes. In 2009, John’s communication impairments were resulting in major behavioral episodes in the classroom. Physically aggressive at times, he was often frustrated and angry. Anne Carlsen Center specialists spent some time at John’s school. They shared knowledge on ways to teach individuals with communication impairments, and showed John’s teachers effective approaches to the behavioral issues. The Center also helped the school develop a curriculum for John, along with key adaptations to make it successful. “They helped his teachers learn more about autism, so that they can tap into more of John’s potential as a student,” says Paula. “Before, things would really agitate him. He’s doing well now, and he understands more. He’s become a better student. His teachers are now better equipped to work with him.”

ACC Behavior Support Coordinator Kim Strandberg was one Coppin met with the WithusThis photo snapped in 2008 shows John ski tubof the ACC professionals who kis to talk about how the iPod ing. The following summer, he would begin trained the teachers at John’s touch, and other technology to struggle with a variety of changes and school. “With John, you need challenges, which prompted John’s family to tools, could help John in his ask the Anne Carlsen Center for help. to understand his cues,” says communication needs. He Strandberg. “He gives verbal recommended Proloquo2Go, and visual cues if he starts to get anxious about an assistive technology app designed for the iPod things. It’s important to know and understand his touch. Taking the place of bulky and expensive cues. John’s teachers now know ways to manage devices, the app can be used for communication, and decrease his behaviors, so that it doesn’t get curriculum support and entertainment. “John was to the point where he is lashing out.” having a difficult time expressing how he was feeling, especially if he was frustrated or upset,” exAt Home with ACC plains Coppin. “This device helps him do that now. Strandberg also made several trips to the It vocalizes his feelings. There is vocabulary for Withuskis’ home, providing the same insight different settings: community, home and school.” and training. “The idea was to show effective behavior intervention techniques and help the “This technology has been wonderful for John,” family function better,” she says. says Paula. “It helps him put sentences together. 10 THE AMBASSADOR


While wanting to reduce the number of behavioral interruptions and outbursts, the family also wanted to increase the number of opportunities John had to engage in fulfilling and enriching activities. The Anne Carlsen Center began providing In-Home Supports on a regular basis. The Center helps John participate in meaningful activities, communicate more effectively, learn safety skills, understand how to make choices, develop social skills, and advocate for himself. During the summer months, an ACC Life Skills Assistant (LSA) provides nearly 40 hours of support each week to John and his family. During the school months, the LSA works with John for about 2-3 days a month. According to Danielle Remmick, an ACC Family Resource Coordinator. “His experiences, overall, on how to spend free time were pretty limited. Our staff has helped broaden his choices for activities.” John and his LSA shoot baskets, jump on the trampoline, go to the park and playground, go shopping, and—for a special treat—go to the Dairy Queen. The LSA works with John to enhance his understanding of safety—crossing the street properly, being careful around strangers, and staying close to family and/or staff in busy areas. The LSA also helps reinforce the learning he is doing in school with activities like math worksheets and puzzles. “We appreciate how there are many different options within the Center’s Community Services program,” says Paula. “They are extremely accommodating.” The Withuskis, both dentists, own a dental practice, and—in addition to John—have three other sons: Michael (16), Thomas (8) and Andrew (5). For this busy family, the Center’s individualized and flexible services have been critical. Personality Revealed “With John, there isn’t a lot of verbal activity because the feelings of the moment overtake his ability to formulate speech,” says Remmick. “We are working on helping him understand and communicate his feelings and emotions.” John now has an emotion cue card with pictorial representations of emotions, helping him communicate to others how he is feeling. He also has these cue cards on his iPod touch. Staff and his family have noticed a reduction in his frustrations and aggressive behaviors, as he uses these tools to communicate his needs and have more control over his daily life.

John’s family is thrilled to see their son’s true personality shine through. “John is a fun kid,” says Paula. “He jokes around in his own way.” And while he doesn’t like singing, humming or crowds, there are plenty of things John does enjoy. “He loves animated films, skiing, ice skating, snowmobiling, Roller Coasters and water parks,” says Jeffrey. Anne Carlsen Center staff members have also been touched by John’s abilities and personality. “He is smart and fun to be around. Years ahead, I don’t see many limits for him,” says Remmick. “With the right training and support, he has a bright future. He could live on his own someday, perhaps in an apartment with limited residential support. Paid employment opportunities are likely, too. Each day, John makes improvements with his social connectivity, communication and eye contact. “It’s been pretty smooth sailing for the last 1½ years, since the Anne Carlsen Center got involved with our family,” says Jeffrey. “When it comes to expertise in working with individuals with autism, ACC has a tremendous amount of knowledge.” Like other parents of individuals on the autism spectrum, Paula and Jeffrey have faced their share of challenges, including the incomprehension and insensitivity of people unfamiliar with their situation. “We have gotten dirty looks at restaurants,” says Paula. “We wish people would just realize that there may be more to it than a kid being naughty.” While they recognize that there is growing awareness about autism spectrum disorders, the Withuskis hope people will take the time to gain a thorough understanding of these developmental disabilities. “We want people to become more educated about what it is about, and how to interact with those living with it,” says Jeffrey. And they want John to continue to learn and grow, reaching his full potential. “We want to see him become self-sufficient, with guidance,” says Jeffrey. “We can see him performing a job of some kind. And, someday, I’d like him to be able to go fishing with me. Most of all, we want our son to be happy.”

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Casey’s Community Connection ACC stu student, family savor success of great greater inclusion and independence

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or those who know 16-year-old Casey Savelkoul, the adage “A picture is worth a thousand words” could be modified somewhat to say, “A smile is worth a thousand words.” Indeed, his smile communicates volumes to everyone with whom he comes in contact. The he Anne Carlsen Car Center student, also known nown for his hugs, is one of the most gregarious students on the Jamestown regarious st “Casey is fun-loving,” says Campus. “Ca education teacher Jackie Loeppspecial educ Trautman. “He is full of energy. He is excited tto come to school each morning greet everyone.” and g For Casey’s parents, the knowledge that their son, who is on the autism spectrum, is happy at the Center brings them a tremendous sense of peace. But the Savelkouls, who live near the Canadian border in Mohall, N.D., have had their share of challenges over the years. Their search for answers about autism spectrum disorders has run the gamut from exhausting to empowering. Early Obstacles Casey was 15 months old when doctors first noticed the signs of delayed development. The Savelkouls had taken Casey in for an ear infection. They were told their son was so far behind in his developmental milestones that he would likely have to be institutionalized someday. “That was scary for us to hear,” says Casey’s mom, Laura. “But we had sensed that something 12 THE AMBASSADOR

was wrong. We could see that Casey’s peers could do a lot more. At 15 months, he still had a hard time standing, and would fall down if we didn’t help support him.” The Savelkouls were determined to find answers, and began doing a lot of research on their own. “That was quite a few years ago, so there wasn’t a lot of information out there, but repeatedly we were drawn to the diagnosis of autism,” says Laura. Casey was exhibiting characteristics of autism such as lack


of eye contact, hand flapping and repetitive behaviors. “We told our pediatrician about what we believed, and he didn’t agree. He completely dismissed our concerns.” Shortly before Casey’s 3rd birthday, physical and occupational therapists began traveling from Minot to Mohall to work in the home with him. There was also a family friend with experience working with children with disabilities who provided many valuable ideas. But visits to doctors never yielded a conclusive diagnosis. “At that time, doctors seemed reluctant to diagnose children with autism,” remembers Laura. “Casey didn’t have all of the signs. While some children on the autism spectrum are indifferent to other people and prefer being alone, Casey has always been highly social. He loves people, loves hugs and loves giggling.” Casey began attending a special education preschool in Mohall at age 3. Attending public school through grade 3, Casey wasn’t making the kind of progress his parents hoped to see, and was exhibiting behaviors such as pulling hair, kicking and throwing objects handed to him. And although Casey had some access to therapists, the Savelkouls wanted their son to have more opportunities for speech, occupational and physical therapies. “The school did the best they could,” says Casey’s dad, Terry. “But we knew Casey needed more.” A New Start In August 2004, at the start of 4th grade, Casey began receiving residential, education and therapy services at the Anne Carlsen Center in Jamestown. It was 214 miles from home, but the Savelkouls had researched their options and knew this was the place where their son “could be the best Casey he could be.” “It was extremely difficult to see our son leave home at such a young age,” recalls Laura. The Savelkouls spent 10 days in Jamestown to ensure the transition was as smooth as possible. When Casey finished his school day, his family was in the home-life area to help with snack preparation, and later, dinner. Casey had a difficult time sleeping for the first few nights, but gradually became more accustomed to his new surroundings. His family visited often in those early weeks. They continue to make

frequent visits to Jamestown, and although it’s difficult for the family to not have everyone under one roof, Casey is still close with his three younger siblings: Trevor (11), Janie (9) and Braden (5). “They all adore each other,” says Laura. “Even Braden, who was born after Casey left home, has a good relationship with his big brother.” Casey’s teachers, equipped and trained to work with individuals with autism, have provided him with individualized instruction. “When it comes to teaching individuals on the autism spectrum, you never have the same approach, from one student to the other,” says Loepp-Trautman, who along with teacher Patrick Kellam, currently teaches four students on the autism spectrum—including Casey—out of a class of seven. “Six of our students have visual schedules, but there are five different types of visual schedules. Some utilize photographs, others use symbols. We also use different methods to gauge comprehension, depending on the abilities of the student. Some might be asked to respond with a ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ and others might be given four choices to choose correctly from.” The Center helped provide more answers for the family, too, by arranging for a professional assessment of Casey’s disability. The diagnosis: pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), one of the three main types of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). No two children with PDD-NOS are exactly alike in their symptoms, but key features include severe and pervasive impairment in the development of reciprocal social interaction; impairments in verbal and nonverbal communication skills; and restricted, repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior. “The Anne Carlsen Center has been a lifesaver for us,” says Terry. “They have a plan for Casey and help us map out the next steps. It’s been like a second home for us. We are so appreciative to them for what they are doing.” Increasing Independence “When Casey came to the Center in 2004, he was having issues with eating and drinking,” says ACC speech/language pathologist Rachel Coppin. “He would do a reverse swallow, holding his tongue so that whatever he was drinking would jet out of his mouth and go everywhere. We worked on some exercises until he was able to THE AMBASSADOR 13


swallow normally. Now, he is able to go to restaurants with his family.” Children with ASD can be disruptive and physically aggressive at times. “When Casey came to the Center, his way of communicating was with behaviors. He would hit people,” says Coppin. “We taught him ways to communicate that were socially acceptable. We developed a total communication approach for him.” While Casey has been unable to vocalize when communicating, he does know basic sign language: “more,” “all done,” “please” and “help.” He uses laminated photographs to make requests and share his feelings. Sometimes, the photos are displayed on a board, other times he hands a picture card to a staff member. There are also color-coded “yes” and “no” symbols he uses in response to simple questions.

vocational skills at the Center, such as folding and shredding paper, sorting items for recycling, stocking the supply room, gathering classroom supplies, and delivering supplies throughout the Center. Step by Step

One of the biggest accomplishments Casey has made is his integration into the community. “Early on, when we would go places, he would be destructive,” says Kellam. “We would need two to three people to accompany him in the check-out line at Walmart, for example. He would throw things and push items off shelves. But we kept going there, practicing appropriate ways to act. We used social scripts to make clear what the expectations were. Now he is able to participate, without those behaviors, in a variety of ways in the community.” “Casey is in a town that knows him,” says Terry. “Jamestown is his home. When we eat at restaurants in town or go to the mall, there’s a good chance we’ll run into someone who knows him. I really like that.”

“Unlike a lot of individuals on the autism spectrum, Casey really enjoys being in a group setting and What gives the Savelkouls the interacting with his peers,” most satisfaction, though, is says Kellam. Now the ACC the knowledge that their child staff is working to help What gives the Savelkouls the most is enjoying life. “When we pick satisfaction is knowing their child is fine-tune these positive enjoying life. “It means so much to know Casey up for a weekend visit, qualities. “His hugs are so he is happy,” says his mom, Laura. he’s happy,” says Laura. “When strong,” says Loepp-Trautwe bring him back to the Center, man. “He’ll run behind a he’s happy to be back. As a parent, that means person, and then hug them from behind. We’re so much. I couldn’t handle it if he started to cry. working with him so that he can express his It means so much to know he’s happy.” affection in more socially appropriate ways.” Among the skills Casey has developed in his six years at ACC are vital computer skills. “We try to give him exposure to computers as often as we can,” says Kellam. “We worked with him using mouse training software. Now, he can independently access files on the computer and work unassisted, for the most part.” Casey also meets regularly with an ACC job trainer and enjoys gathering grocery carts from the parking lot of a Jamestown grocery store. Staff provides Casey with opportunities to build 14 THE AMBASSADOR

“At times, we wish there was a magic pill or therapy,” adds Terry. “But, really, it’s the little things that have come to mean so much. It takes time, and we will always remember every accomplishment along the way.”


From

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Gra and Forks orks man m overc overcomes barr rriers to o leading a sociallysatisfying y g life

B

ryan Stoltman of Grand Forks is the perfect host. His smiling face greets his friends at bowling tournaments, smili grill-outs, holiday parties and game days. The 32-year-old grillAnne Carlsen Center (ACC) client—in addition to organizing the ne Carlse nts—che events—checks on each guest periodically, makes sure everyone’s needs are met,, provides p provide the music, and cleans up afterwards. If contests are involved, he provides the prizes—artwork he paints d frames. frames To make sure the atmosphere is just right, he rallies and ow client fellow clients to help him put up decorations. But what he enjoys the most ab about his role as host is providing the refreshments Bryan specialty, much to the delight of his friends, is … and Bryan’s baking. “Sugar cook cookies. Family recipe. Very secret,” he says with a twinkle in his eyes eyes. “Bryan loves people and has such a gift of hospitality,” says ACC Family Resource Director Rhonda Eppelsheimer. “When I first met him, though, he seemed unsure of himself and very guarded about trying new things.” That was in March 2009. Since then, guided by the highly-trained staff of the Anne Carlsen Center, Bryan has undergone a dramatic transformation. Today, he shows the world—with his gregarious personality and generous ways—that his disability does not define him. Heartbreak and Healing The youngest of three sons, Bryan was born into a family that farmed in the Grand Forks area. Although he had reached many developmental milestones—such as walking and potty training—at roughly the same time his two older brothers had, Bryan still wasn’t talking at 2½ years old. And there were other signs that Bryan was different from his peers.

“I could see he wasn’t making eye contact,” says Bryan’s mom, Winnie. “I knew there was something wrong. I couldn’t get his attention. There was a veil between him and the world.” Winnie, an in-home mental health therapist and counselor, was accustomed to helping families deal with a wide assortment of challenges. That vast experience, however, hadn’t prepared her for the news she received about her own toddler. “After Bryan was examined, the doctor asked Greg and I to come in, and he told us we had a handicapped child,” remembers Winnie. “That was heartbreaking.” The family was referred to a psychiatrist who provided a specific diagnosis for Bryan of autism. Autism, a complex neurodevelopment disorder, is characterized by deficits in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, and repetitive behaviors or interests. Children with THE AMBASSADOR 15


autism also have a higher than normal risk for co-occurring conditions. In Bryan’s case, it was Tourette syndrome, a neurological condition characterized by motor and/or vocal tics. Brian had only motor tics, such as tugging repetitively on his shirt. Bryan began speaking single words at age 5, but he had a difficult time grouping them into phrases— a common trait of autism. He started receiving speech therapy services, to which he responded well. His family also found ways to help him work on his language development throughout each day. “He would say one or two words, and then I would make a sentence out of that,” says Winnie. “The idea was to get him accustomed to hearing complete sentences using the words he knew. He would say, ‘Car?’ and I would say, ‘Yes, we’re going to the car.’” Baby Steps As a young adult, Bryan left home and began living semiindependently. He received residential services, vocational experiences and life-skills training from a service provider in Grand Forks. He became active in social clubs and earned several citizenship awards for his volunteerism in the community.

Bryan’s parents asked the Anne Carlsen Center to intervene and help their son return to his happy, productive self. “It took four visits to his apartment, before he was willing to come out of his room to meet me,” says ACC Family Resource Coordinator Dawn Scott-Larson. “We took baby steps. We joked with him, and approached situations from his point of view. He felt comfortable with us.” Bryan’s family was delighted. “He responds positively to the Anne Carlsen Center staff,” says Winnie. “The staff realized, early on, that Bryan has a desire to be social. They have found creative ways to get him involved in the community, and to keep him interested in what they have to offer.” ACC’s highly-trained Community Services staff works with Bryan 40 hours a week, providing individualized skill training, leisure training and support, and communitybased programming. They also offer guidance with daily living activities and self-care skills.

The Perfect Host One of Bryan’s favorite activities is bowling, and he eagerly joined fellow Anne Carlsen Center clients for bowling every Friday. “He While Bryan was becoming Bryan, pictured here at age 1, would later be diagnosed with autism. “I could see he wasn’t loves bowling,” says Winnie. increasingly social and making eye contact,” says Bryan’s mom, Winnie. “He encourages others, shakes interactive, behavioral issues “I knew there was something wrong.” their hands and cheers them would sometimes interfere with on.” It didn’t take long before his progress. He was diagnosed Bryan was planning an additional bowling outing with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), for his new friends: Bryan’s 1st Annual Bowling an anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, Tournament. unwanted thoughts and/or repetitive behaviors. For individuals with autism, the communication and sensory obstacles can sometimes lead to anxiety and depression. A severe bout of depression several years ago concerned Bryan’s parents so much they brought him to their home to live for a while. He recovered and returned to his activities and to his apartment, but in March 2009, the depression returned in full force. “He was reluctant to come out of his apartment,” says Eppelsheimer. “He would cocoon in his bed and stay there all day refusing to do basic hygiene.” 16 THE AMBASSADOR

“Bryan loves being the host,” says Scott-Larson. “And he’s so good at it. There are quite a few special events around here: birthdays, holidays, picnics and potlucks. Because of Bryan, these gatherings keep getting better and better.” This past Fourth of July, he organized a picnic for ACC staff and clients, and their families. With support from his staff, he made and delivered invitations, purchased decorations, made a potluck sign-up sheet, put pop in coolers, and selected the music and activities. “When I got


there, Bryan and an Anne Carlsen Center staff member were manning the grill,” says Winnie. “Bryan served the hot dogs until everyone had their fill.” Bryan’s smile widens when asked why hosting is so much fun. “(It) puts a smile on people’s faces,” he says with satisfaction. Because autism symptoms vary greatly, two individuals with the same diagnosis may act quite differently and have strikingly different skills. While impaired social interaction is one of the most common signs of autism, Bryan—although periodically withdrawn—most often loves being around and interacting with people. “Individuals with autism are not, for the most part, highly social,” says Scott-Larson. “Sometimes you are fortunate to get one-on-one interaction. Not with Bryan! He thrives in situations where he can be social.” Finding Success ACC staff calls it a “real breakthrough” when Bryan started swimming. “The first time staff tried to take him swimming, he got very frustrated. He looked angry, and he started pacing and yelling,” remembers Scott-Larson. Today, she says, his response is much different: “We assigned him a buddy—a fellow ACC client—who could swim at the same time he did. He knew his buddy was waiting for him, and didn’t want to let him down. They swim together two mornings a week now.” The Anne Carlsen Center also assisted Bryan in finding a part-time job to gain work place experience. He folds towels once a week at a local hair salon. “He likes to fold towels and has the experience of being in a work setting where he is required to show up, interact appropriately and complete tasks,” says Eppelsheimer.

“He was so proud when he received his first pay check.” When Bryan arrives to work at the salon, he announces the “color of the day,” which is— always—the color he is wearing that particular day. He enjoys teasing those who aren’t wearing the designated hue. One day, the salon employees surprised him by calling the Anne Carlsen Center early in the morning, before his shift, to find out what the day’s color was and make the necessary changes to their attire. “He was blown away!” says Eppelsheimer. “They care about him and value him as a person.” Bryan’s vocabulary has grown substantially over the years, but—at times—he speaks too rapidly for his staff and family members to understand him. Bryan’s team made arrangements for him to receive speech therapy services as part of his regular day support program. The Stoltmans hope that, as Bryan gains more skills and experiences, he can continue to become more independent of his family. “We want him to have a sense that he is coming to visit his parents, not returning home every weekend,” says Winnie. With each day, Bryan reaches another milestone and grows as an individual. The skills he is learning, and the connections he is making, help ensure a productive, purpose-filled future. “He is on that path,” says Winnie. “He is on his way there. You don’t overcome autism, but you can certainly make gains. Today, Bryan is happy. He is very satisfied, and that is wonderful to see.” This past fall, Bryan and other ACC clients went to the local pumpkin patch and selected pumpkins to take home. At the Halloween party that followed, Bryan was all smiles as he decorated one of the pumpkins.

THE AMBASSADOR 17


G I V E N

I N

M E M O R Y

O F

For the months of January, February, March, and April 2011

Each time someone donates to the Anne Carlsen Center, in memory after that person’s passing, a special bond is created. These gifts honor your friends and family, and help shape a brighter future for individuals with disabilities. Together, we are providing opportunities and experiences that are changing lives. Given By

In Memory Of

Given By

In Memory Of

Given By

In Memory Of

Given By

In Memory Of

Mrs. Frances Aasness

Kenneth Aasness

Mrs. Helen Kosinski

Dr. Anne H. Carlsen

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Anna C. Friesz

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Fern Liechty

Mrs. Phyllis R. Lura

Marlys M. Burdett

Cleo and Claire Berdahl

Helga A. Franz

Donald and Inez Olson

Marjorie M. Iverson

Todd and Jolene Sjostrom

Fern Liechty

Ben and Claudette Harring

Mary B. Burnside

Marvin and Laverne Schulz

Hubert Freise

Mr. Dennis L. Anderson

Gary Jacobson

Lyle and Evelyn Sjostrom

Fern Liechty

Mrs. Norrine Zwicker

Mary B. Burnside

Hon. Lyle A. Podoll

LaVon S. Frerichs

Mrs. Hazel Ramberg

Lindsay E. Jensen

Mrs. Juanita J. Dura

Margaret E. Lindberg

Mrs. Judy Hunter

Malcolm Carlisle

Gordon and Ida Mae Smith

Ernest H. Frey

Mrs. Muriel B. Smith

Lindsay E. Jensen

Mrs. Edna L. Anderson

Sandrea Lindsay

O. Gene Brooks

18 THE AMBASSADOR

and Billy Bradley Fraass


Given By

In Memory Of

Given By

In Memory Of

Given By

In Memory Of

Rebecca and Robert Holst

Esther B. Linin

James and Deon Gebhard

Col. Wesley W. Pennington

Ms. Caroleen Williams

Marie Skarphol

Romeo and Mary Boucher

Clara G. Linson

Mr. Bruce G. Pentland

Ellen Pentland

Mr. Mark A. Erickstad

Dr. Harm P. Smeenk

Mrs. Darlis Short

Donald Lipetzky

Mr. Bruce G. Pentland

Virginia Pentland

Richard and Dorothy Homstad

Gaye Smith

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Jerry Longmuir

Gerald and Donna Collins

Adeline Perry

Lynn and Jeanette Kieper

Bernard Solberg

Mrs. Marilyn F. Nissen

Jackie Luehring

Mrs. Mary Ann Engebretson

Ira Peterson

Mrs. Ruth J. Johnson

Inez Solseng

Mrs. Mary Ann Engebretson

Kenneth V. Lund Sr.

Gerald and Elenore Borstad

Carol Peterson

Marvin and Helen Johnson

Rudy Speten

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Victor Mahlum

Willmar and Janette Peterson

Lisa D. Peterson

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Mae Springan

Marvin and Laverne Schulz

Chuck Maier

Mrs. Mary Ann Engebretson

David Pittsley

Mrs. Mary Lou Stavros

Athena Stavros

Mr. Dennis L. Anderson

Matthew W. Malm

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

David Pittsley

Mrs. Mary Lou Stavros

James Stavros

Milton and Danene McLaen

Marivn Malpert

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Mercedes Plante

Orville and Alice Suhumskie

Matthew Steenhout

Marlin and Lois Ness

LaVonne Maring

Hon. Lyle A. Podoll

Vernon Podoll

Ms. Sheryl Landis

William Steinbar

Mrs. Clarice C. Weigel

Genevieve M. Markwardt

Gerald and Elenore Borstad

Nina Pomeroy

Ms. Helen E. Baker

Trent Stellrecht

Patrick and JoDee Davenport

John Marquardt

Mrs. DiAnn Loll

Paul Popp

Mrs. Glenna Mae E. Larson

Patricia Stokka

Orville and Sharon Helgeson

Joey Maryott

Clarice Andrus

Jerome Praus

Dale and Bev Brunsch

Lawrence Stolz

Mrs. Helen Mastroianna

Jerry Mastroianna

Gary and Peggy Fenster

Jerome Praus

Mrs. Katherine Paschke

Gerda Stordahl

Romeo and Mary Boucher

Wanda Mattern

Donna L. Gilbertson

Jerome Praus

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Myrtle I. Strand

Sharon Munyer

Wanda Mattern

Clayton and Lynnea Koehler

Jerome Praus

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Garry L. Strandemo

Thomas and Roxanne

Jerome Praus

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Theron Strinden

Bert and Helen Egstad

Erma D. M. G. Such

C. William and Patricia Dennert Patricia J. Maunu Tom and Beth Mc Cauley

Michael T. Mc Cauley

Metelmann

Bosard, McCutcheon & Rau, Ltd. E. Hugh Mc Cutcheon

Henry and Mabel Reichert

Jerome Praus

Raydon and Betty Workin

Erma D. M. G. Such

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Ann McCabe

Marian E Sateren

Jerome Praus

Dale and Bev Brunsch

Delwen D. Sukut

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Mary McCallum

Marla Beth Schmidt and

Jerome Praus

Mrs. Mabel Dahl

Robyn K. Surface

Knox Presbyterian Church

Ida McCann

Anthony and Jean Peszko

Robyn K. Surface

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Leona B. McCarty

Dr. Robert R. Tangsrud Jr.

Eula Tangsrud

Larry and Edith Raatz

Wyman McCarty

Mrs. LaVerne M. Bengtson

Pamela Taylor

David and Evelyn Trangsrud

Jerome B. Meide

David and Julie Arneson

Mary and John Quanrud

Mr. Dennis L. Anderson

Michael Ann Teranes

Mrs. Juanita J. Dura

Ben Meier

Mrs. Lucille A. Rotz

Severt and Lulu Rask

Eugene and Ruth Opperman

Gertrude L. Thom

Gordon and Ida Mae Smith

Audrey Meier

American Legion Post #116

Gordon Rasmussen

Vernon and Charlotte Baenen

Richard H. Thom

Mrs. Blossom G. Schnabel

Waldemar Meitz

Orville and Sheryl Kjelland

Dennis D. Rau

Mrs. Swanhild M. Morrison

Howard Thon

C. William and Patricia Dennert Floyd Mertz

Hon. Lyle A. Podoll

Renee I. Reede

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Sharon A. Thorne

Michael and Paula Miller

Katherine L. Miller

C. William and Patricia Dennert Frank Reniker

Stefanie Throlson

Sara J. Throlson

Mrs. Sherry Mischke

Michael Miller

Robert and Norma Richardson

Aaron K. Richardson

Mrs. Barbara L. Tietz

Duane Tietz

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Jack Mills

Daris and Mabel Bittner

Patrick Riedesel

Orville and Sharon Helgeson

Martha Tirrel

Valerie and Dustin Bakken

Taylor G. Mini

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Maxine V. Riedman

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie P. Sorenson Ellen Tracy

C. William and Patricia Dennert Eugene Mitchell

Vernon and Charlotte Baenen

Leonard Roe

C. William and Patricia Dennert Marcella Twite

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Eldon and Clara Jo Conant

Kaare Romsaas

Mrs. Shirley Ledahl

Joe Ulledal

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie P. Sorenson Helen Moe

Mrs. DeLores Ust

Kaare Romsaas

Marvin and Laverne Schulz

George P. Vellios

Donald and Inez Olson

Frances A. Monge

Harold and Vivian Joos

Ida C. Romsos

Dale and Arnola Savelkoul

Ronald K. Vesey

Sidney and Ruby Peterson

Noelyn Monson

Ms. Dorothy A. Briss

David W. Ronholm

Douglas and Shirley Vesey

Ronald K. Vesey

Mrs. Darlis Short

Noelyn Monson

Mrs. Rosanne M. Farrell

David W. Ronholm

Eddie Moch

Samuel Quainoo Norman and Gwynneth

Jerome Praus

Schwanbeck

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Agnes Vigesaa

Larry and Carmen Svenningsen Noelyn Monson

C. William and Patricia Dennert Mark A. Ronning

Mr. Charles D. Stromsodt

Agnes Vigesaa

Jim and Joyce King

John Moore

Mrs. Lillian G. Rost

Art Rost

Gordon and Loretta Domier

Daniel Viken

Raydon and Betty Workin

Dennis Myers

Mrs. B. Sophie Loftsgard

Thelma A. Rosvold

Vernon and Charlotte Baenen

Frances Vining

James and Virginia LaBarre

Judy Naglestad

Mrs. Lucille A. Rotz

George

Mrs. Betty A. Whitmore

Frances Vining

Mrs. B. Sophie Loftsgard

Barbara J. Nelson

C. William and Patricia Dennert Gertrude Ruden

G. G. and Millie Henne

Mrs. Donna E. Gaffaney

David A. Nelson

Martell and Luella Stenberg

Carol F. Salberg

James and Linda Kimball

Arthur and Grace Dietze

David M. Nelson

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Barbara Salwei

Mrs. Muriel Hoplin

Delores Nelson

Mr. G. Thomas Bogan

Gerald and Marian Rasmussen Hans R. Nelson Orville and Sheryl Kjelland

H O N O R

O F

These living tributes have been given in honor of meaningful friends and family … people who have helped shape the lives of our donors. Through this faithful support, individuals served by the Anne Carlsen Center are living life to the fullest and receiving a wide variety cares … and making a difference each day. Given By

In Honor Of

June Votava

Ms. Wendy K. Johnson

Kaitlin Anderson

Dorothy Watterud

Kent and Margo Bergene

Marlys A. Bergene

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Ann Wefald

Lyle and Jean Sevre

Muriel Christopherson

Bernie Sateren

Mrs. Lois Lundgren

Bonnie Weigel

Tom and Margie Holmes

Kurby D. Frey

Mrs. Evon J. Praus

Bernie Sateren

Mrs. Mabel F. Tunby

Mary L. Weismantel

Ms. Cynthia M. Stecher

Benjamin P. Kilzer

Ernie Nelson

Monte and Julie Schlecht

Bernie Sateren

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Earl J. Weiss

Loretta and Noel Moe

Sander Kjelland

Alice E. Thompson

Signa C. Nelson

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie P. Sorenson Bernie Sateren

Donald and Inez Olson

Lorentina W. Weisz

Marcia and James Gums

Judy L. Kulla

Lois Weeks

John Nickelson

Judy Steinhouse

Bernie Sateren

Donald and Inez Olson

Janet Welken

Gary and Shirley Skarphol

Christopher LaCroix

Hon. Lyle A. Podoll

Judy L. Nicolaisen

Curt and Rose Vanek

Bernie Sateren

Larry and Edith Raatz

Ken Weltz

Jerry and Kay Gnoinsky

RomaKay Landis

Grace Mork

Evelyn J. Nielsen

Ms. Bernice A. Haakenson

Helen and Donald Sathe

Randy and Karen Striefel

Ken Weltz

Mrs. Doris Graf

Emanuel Oberlander

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Raymond Scharnowske

Mrs. Mary L. Johnson

Bernard Wemmer

Monty and Jackie Larson

Marshall and Josh Larson

Mrs. Katherine Paschke

Dorothy E. Ochs

Donald and Carol Odenbach

Betty M. Scheen

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Gene Werre

William and Margaret Leech

Sarah M. Leech

Mrs. Evelyn Zick

Dianne M. Odden

Beverly and Glenn Frericks

Marion M. Scheff

Mrs. Betty D. Johnson

Darla Westphal

Leif and Cynthia Peterson

Keaton Lewis

Marlo and Rebecca Jungemann Gerald O’Donnell

Mrs. Dolores E. Williams

Evan Schmidt

Carolgene and Edward

Irma Whitney

Mrs. Judy Borlaug

Helen McCormack

Curtis and Betty Mc Cabe

Eleanor Oeder

Mrs. Jacquelyn R. Schulte

Rose L. Schmidt

Ms. Alice M. Alexander

Saige B. Meyer

Mrs. Gladys Jondahl-Morton

LaVonne Olsgaard

Darwin and Mary Ann Bitz

Verna Mae Schrader

Haakon and Myrtle Thunshelle Angelus Widdel

Renae and Robert Mehlhoff

Saige B. Meyer

Mrs. Marcella Haakenson

Ellwood Olson

Lawrence and Diane Peterson

Verna Mae Schrader

Mark and Susan Widdel

Angelus Widdel

Bradley and Cynthia Gray

Jeffrey and Pamela Morrau

Byron and Ardyce Ellingson

Cora Olson

Mrs. Marian B. Bergan

Mary L. Schuelke

Herbert and Isabel Groninger

Doris M. Williams

David and Karla Hillerud

Jeffrey and Pamela Morrau

Ms. Helen E. Baker

Virgil Olson

Wenzel and Florence Soland

Edna Schultz

Mr. Sam A. Kleinsasser

Bernice Wilson

North Dakota Senate

David Nething

Larry and Edith Raatz

Marie Olson

Bette and Robert Johnson

Clara Schweitzer

Hon. Lyle A. Podoll

Grace Wilson

Mrs. Dorothy Cook

Loved ones

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Clara Schweitzer

Mr. Meryl T. Hansey

Earl Wold

Stewart Ekstrom

Carl and Mary Ekstrom

Randy and Karen Striefel

Clara Schweitzer

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Freda A. Wolfer

Orville and Sharon Helgeson

Sherry Jones’ Mother

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

George H. Seaworth

Ms. Viola Tangsrud

Darlene Wolla

Curtis and Lynne Kennedy

Chammy

Clifford and Velma Martin

Nellie M. Sexton

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Gayle Wrangham

Mrs. Kay D. Leisz

Friends and relatives

Clifford and Velma Martin

Richard Shipton

Donald and Inez Olson

Henry Glenn Wright

Ms. Betty L. Nelson

Richard Shipton

James and Linda Kimball

Margaret Young

Mrs. Swanhild M. Morrison

Juanita Newman’s sister

Arlin and Karen Oas

Helen Silseth

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Jack F. Zentner

Mrs. Swanhild M. Morrison

June, Mary Ugelstad sister

Orville and Sheryl Kjelland

Larry Simmons

Robert and Ruby Proctor

Vesper I. Zimmer

North Dakota Well Drillers

George Opp

Mr. Robert W. Martinson

Lillian Simons

Mrs. Dorothy L. Zimmerman

Randal J. Zimmerman

Ray and Mildred Dewall

Hannah M. Panbecker

Mrs. L. Elvira Lokken

Marie Skarphol

Curtis and Betty Hahn

Vera L. Zimmerman-White

Jon and Kathleen Schultz

Girdell W. Patterson

Randy and Linda Myhra

Marie Skarphol

Robert and Ruby Proctor

Darrell Zinter

Mrs. Charlotte Payette

Milo Payette

Mrs. Beatrice Overlee

Marie Skarphol

Ms. Shirley Jensvold

Lloyd Pearson

Jim and Ellen Redding

Marie Skarphol

Mr. Harvey H. Pedersen

Shirley Pedersen

Robert and Eunice Tangsrud

Marie Skarphol

Mrs. Dorothy L. Pederson

Lloyd Pederson

Dr. Robert R. Tangsrud Jr.

Marie Skarphol

from the Hanson family

Wolf-Matthiesen

Judiciary Committee Randy and Penny Gengler

JHS Football, Basketball

Mrs. Carol L. Kahn

George A. Porter Jr.

Glenn and Marlene Rolstad

Jaxon A. Rolstad

Mrs. Dolores E. Williams

Austin D. Schmidt

& Baseball coaches

THE AMBASSADOR 19


C O M M U N I T Y Partners Each year the Anne Carlsen Center partners with area businesses who—like the Center—want to empower individuals to reach greater heights of independence. This year, 11 businesses are helping to further the tradition the Center began 70 years ago. Through cooperation, awareness and compassion, we are all improving the lives of individuals of all abilities. “The dedication our Community Partners show is tremendous,” said ACC Chief Executive Officer Eric Monson. “The relationships we have made over the years … there is no way to attribute a value to them except to say it is truly humbling and amazing.”

20 THE AMBASSADOR


BOARD OF TRUSTEES

G O L F

Thomas Rohleder Chairperson Fargo, N.D.

The Anne Carlsen Center will celebrate the 29th annual installment of the state’s longest-running benefit golf tournament in August.

Tim Flakoll Fargo, N.D. Joel Fremstad Moorhead, Minn.

Robert Montgomery, M.D. Fargo, N.D. Sue Offutt, Ph.D. Arlington Heights, Ill. Janet Seaworth Bismarck, N.D.

Harvey Huber Jamestown, N.D.

Pat Traynor Vice Chairperson Fargo, N.D.

Bruce Iserman Fargo, N.D.

Reesa Webb Denver, Colo.

Pat McCullough Edina, Minn.

Myra Quanrud, M.D. Ex Officio Jamestown, N.D.

T O U R N E Y

P R E V I E W

The 34-team scramble is scheduled to begin August 6 at Jamestown Country Club. The four-person teams will compete in scratch and handicap divisions, while helping to support individuals with disabilities. This annual event is a fun way to connect with the Anne Carlsen Center and the variety of individuals we serve. By sponsoring a team, playing in the tournament, or volunteering your time to help with the tournament, you are connecting with a piece of North Dakota history—and helping shape tomorrow for individuals with disabilities

SENIOR MANAGEMENT Eric Monson Chief Executive Officer

Judy Kulla Chief Financial Officer

Marcia Gums Chief Operating Officer

Margie Johnson Human Resource Director

THE AMBASSADOR Published by: Anne Carlsen Center 701 3rd St. N.W., P.O. Box 8000 Jamestown, ND 58402 1-800-568-5175 www.annecenter.org Lori Gress, Editor lori.gress@annecenter.org Kalen Ost, Assistant Editor kalen.ost@annecenter.org Brenda Tappert, Writer brenda.tappert@annecenter.org Paul Johnson, Designer paul@pauljohnsondesign.com The Ambassador is mailed, free of charge, for supporters of the mission and vision of the Anne Carlsen Center. Notice of Non-Discrimination Policy: Anne Carlsen Center does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age or disability in employment or services. If you would like to be removed from our mailing list, please call 1-800-568-5175, ext. 167. Eco-friendly Ambassador At the Anne Carlsen Center, we are taking steps every day to be kind to the environment. The Forest Stewardship Council logo you see here means we are printing The Ambassador on an environmentally-certified paper. Each page has a 10% post-consumer waste content, and the inks utilized are Soy Inks.

S C H O O L

E Q U IP ME N T

N E ED ED

When students attend classes at the Anne Carlsen Center, they also have access to many cuttingedge approaches to learning. These approaches include learning through the use of equipment that can provide a ‘voice’ for someone who is non-verbal, teach new skills and techniques for learning, and empower an individual to connect with his or her environment. We live in an exciting time when changes occur almost daily. But, each day the Anne Carlsen Center remains dedicated to providing the individuals we serve with unique experiences and opportunities to succeed.

Make a Lasting Impact With Educational Equipment I would like to visit with an Anne Carlsen Center representative about: __ Making a retirement plan gift. __ Establishing a Charitable Gift Annuity. Name _______________________________________________________________________ Address _____________________________________________________________________ City, State, Zip _______________________________________________ _________________ Phone _______________________________________________________________________ E-mail _______________________________________________________________________


Non-ProďŹ t Org. U.S. Postage PAID FARGO, ND Permit #684

701 3rd St. N.W. P.O. Box 8000 Jamestown, ND 58402

Connect with the Anne Carlsen Center on Facebook Become a fan, learn about upcoming events, and share your memories with fellow friends of the Center.

Cade (middle) pets a horse with his teacher Karmel Wanzek (left) and Grandma Chicken (right).

The Ambassador: Summer 2011  

The Gentle Touch

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