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Andrew Santa Lucia

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Architectural Designer / Critic

How to let Prentice Grow...

Growing

Up

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1

2740 W. Logan Blvd, #8 Chicago, IL 60647 I want to grow up!!

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C: 305-343-6285

E: andrew_santa_lucia@me.com

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I want to feel young again!

Prentice

(up, down, around, inside, Chicago Prize 2012 Competition outside, near, far and Entry, Chicago, IL - 2012 in-between) 1. OLD DOG (Old Prentice) Prentice Womens Hospital serves 1. OLD (Olda Prentice) as anDOG origin point, figural language for new city making in Chicago. Prentice Womens Hospital serves as an This type of urban narrative allows originforpoint for the development highly figural buildings - soft, of a iconic, fun easy - tomaking act as anin Chicago. language for and new city agent in terms fo speed This urbanizing type of urban narrative allows for and shapes.

highly figural buildings - soft, iconic, fun 2. INFLATE and easy - to act as an urbanizing agent in Allow Prentice’s iconic figural terms fo speed and shapes. column-less floor plan to reproduce itself across the street into a

30% larger floor plate. This acts 2. INFLATE as the maturing agent and is a Allowdirect Prentice’s figural columness responseiconic to Northwestern floor University’s plan to reproduce across the criticism itself of Old Prentice’s inability to sustain the street into a 30% larger floor plate. This 500,000 sq. ft. of new space they acts want. as the and is a direct By maturing inflating the agent current floor plan and of the building into response toshape Northwestern University’s a gigantic second mass across the criticism of Old Prentice’s inability to street, the first inklings of Prentice sustain 500,000 sq. cities ft. ofare new space as athe paradigm for figure they born. want. By inflating the current floor plan 3.and shape of the building into a INFANTALIZE gigantic second mass across From an inflated state, then Prenticethe street, can move into a smaller more the first inklings of Prenticeinfant as a paradigm version of the original Floor Plan, for figure cities are born. adjacent to the “Inflated” tower. “Infant” tower can be a completely different program for the hospital, INFANTALIZE such as administrative or hotel.

3. From an inflated state, then Prentice can move4. into a smaller more COPY-CAT (Prentice City) infant version of The “Prentice is to the the original FloorCity” Plan,complex adjacent completed by erecting an exact “Inflated” tower can be a copy oftower. the Old“Infant” Prentice Women’s Hospital different on Southwest corner of completely program for the the VA Lot. As a model for future hospital, such as administrative or hotel. figural city blocks, “Prentice City” is the first historic building to multiply

without kitsch reproduction 4. COPY-CAT (Prentice City)or abstract repetition. The “Prentice City” complex is completed by erecting an exact copy of the Old Prentic Women’s Hospital on Southwest corner of the VA Lot. As a model for future figural city blocks, “Prentice City” is the first historic building to multpiply without kitsch reproduction or abstract repetition.

4

I just want to be alive!!!

3

I want things to go back to the way they were!!


Andrew Santa Lucia

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Architectural Designer / Critic

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2740 W. Logan Blvd, #8 Chicago, IL 60647

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C: 305-343-6285

E: andrew_santa_lucia@me.com

room for Debate Permanent Installation at the Miami Science Museum, Miami, FL 2009-present

This project from PIE Studio was a collaborative effort to reuse trash and materials in non-typical ways. It actively challenged green design standards and championed effect versus building system. This is a space to explore basic energy principles, renewable energy sources, new and emerging energy efficiency technologies, and how these can be brought together to advance sustainable design, without mitigating or dumbing down architectural form. If anything, this interior shows the projective possibility of recycling without looking either worn or green. This room is equipped with different digital interfaces, embedded into the surfaces and furniture, including Snibbe Interactive, Carbon Footprint Interactive table & Storytelling Kiosk.

Entrance showing laser cut and CNC Milled Cork + Gypsum board

Backlit, Laser cut and folded recycled Strathmore Panels

Interlocking Celing Plane made from recycled Soft Foam, CNC Milled

My role in this project was in the schematic design phase and reclaiming materials, later digitally representing them to create a realistic model from recyclables. ***PIE Studio Project - Team: Director: Bannavis Andrew Sribyatta with Adrian Von der Osten, Alejandro Stein, Allen Plasencia, Allan Cabral, Alvaro Velosa, Analise Calleiro, Damian Caballero, Daniel Alonzo, Eric Peterson, Ernest Abuin, Henrik Schoop, Gabriella Sanchez, Juan Damas, George Valdes, Jorge San Martin, Shigehiro Otsuki, Yemail Sanchez.***

Exploded Projection of Room for Debate surfaces

Snibbe Interactive Room showing relaimed wood, rolled up magazine wall and printer paper tube wall.

Reclaimed Magazines wrapped with zip ties to create partition wall


Andrew Santa Lucia

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Architectural Designer / Critic

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2740 W. Logan Blvd, #8 Chicago, IL 60647

|

C: 305-343-6285

E: andrew_santa_lucia@me.com

Dam(n) Inevitable Nature Center, Hoover Dam, Arizona/nevada border, 2012 The Hoover Dam is located in a pivotal tug-of-war between nature and natural resource. Without it, Las Vegas and Los Angeles, or the lost-Las’s of post-modernity, would not exist. Water is the negotiated commodity and the Colorado River is the only loser. The reservoirs will inevitably silt up, if they don’t go dry earlier. Will the only thing for future alien archaeologists to examine be our silt-laden concrete arches? As a narrative, Damn Inevitable describes this future through a story about carving a hole through the Hoover Dam and allowing the Colorado River to flow freely once again. As architecture, this move is a détournement of the culturally accepted use of a dam, where its structure and iconicity is used against itself and inhabited. The nature center is the piece of active program embedded in this stultifying icon of the past.

Graph showing population rise in the Southwest United States versus available drinking water, projecting past our current history

Front Elevation of Nature Center

Cartoon Diagram of Major Changes to the Hoover Dam

Back Elevation of Nature Center

Autonomous Plan of main education and nature center floor

Maybe the reason there is a collective amnesia and our lack of history in this country is because of an inevitable restlessness to change, to amend. And then again maybe passive consumption is our form of entropy. Damn Inevitable is the architecture of active ownership and involvement of an I-have-noother-choice-but-to-be-informed future audience. Damn inevitable is an end to manifest destiny. ***INNATURE OpenGap Competition Entry for Nature Center in 2012. Work done with John Clark and Kevin Stewart***

Transverse Section through Nature Center and Underwater Silt Room

North Side/Back Side of New Hoover Dam with waterfall mouth

Axonometric of Nature Center (green), opening (yellow) and Silt Room (fuchsia)


Andrew Santa Lucia

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Architectural Designer / Critic

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2740 W. Logan Blvd, #8 Chicago, IL 60647

Aerial View Nature Center Floating in mouth of new waterfall

Compound View of Interior looking South out at the new waterfall (both Wet (wild) and Dry (tame) months)

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C: 305-343-6285

E: andrew_santa_lucia@me.com


Andrew Santa Lucia

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Architectural Designer / Critic

messy mies+ massive middle

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2740 W. Logan Blvd, #8 Chicago, IL 60647

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C: 305-343-6285

E: andrew_santa_lucia@me.com

View towards ‘Bark It’ Lounge and the Dinner Table

Audience looking at Barcelona Pavilion Model

Barcelona Pavilion without Flash Card

Barcelona Pavilion with Flash Card Frame

View outside the Cone of Silence (floating model inside, wrapped in mirrors)

View inside the Cone of Silence

Opening Night Seating at Dinner Table

Gallery Talk and Auditorium

Interactive Exhibition at Oakton Community Collge, Skokie, IL 2012 messy MIES + MASSIVE middle is an exhibition centering on Mies van der Rohe’s ambiguously built/ unbuilt architecture including a never-before-exhibited project. This exhibition presents three projects designed by Mies, starting with the Barcelona Pavilion (design/ built 1929, destroyed 1930, rebuilt 1986), Brussels Pavilion (designed/ unbuilt 1934, reappears publicly 1966) and the IIT Master Plan (partially built in the 1940s in its original design). Interestingly enough, all three projects do not exist in their original intention or even literal interpretation. The Barcelona Pavilion stood for a mere six months and was little noticed. Only later, decades after its demolition, did it emerge in the collective consciousness as a masterpiece of modern architecture, materializing in 1986 as a built copy by popular demand. The design for the Brussels Pavilion disappeared into the chaos of World War II only to make its way back into Mies’ hands in 1966. The IIT Campus Plan was only partially realized in its initial design, as it is missing several buildings in Mies’ master plan, and instead creates the pastiche urbanism we know today.

View from the Entrance of the exhibition

The exhibition provides two frames to engage with Mies’ models: the first is a series of designed enclosures/viewing platforms and the second is a series of interactive flash cards. The exhibition also intends to open up the conversation about the variant character versions of Mies that have evolved over time. ***Co-Curated with William Huchting, AIA***

View from the Rear of the exhibition

View


Andrew Santa Lucia

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Architectural Designer / Critic

|

2740 W. Logan Blvd, #8 Chicago, IL 60647

|

C: 305-343-6285

E: andrew_santa_lucia@me.com

Blanket Pyramid Loop, Chicago, IL - 2011

Linear Urban Plan of Tigerman’s 1966 Instant City across the Eisenhower Expressway

Stanley Tigerman’s initial focus on Instant City was on historical models of building cities along infrastructure and the introduction of road or highway system as being the first time where infrastructure caused schisms in community. He locates this project ambiguously along the “highways of the future” as a way to continue and recapture the infrastructural community. The program is distributed, much like the USDA food pyramid : the base is comprised of public services and amenities, as well as commercial; then having the semi-private/public offices and administrative level; finally housing the inhabitants on the upper levels, with mechanical being tucked into the highest areas of the pyramid. Alternative Projection of Instant City into a pyramid blanketing downtown Chicago and housing Soldier Field in its peak. This merges Tigerman’s intention of using the Instant City Pyramid typology in Football City (1967) over Soldier Field. This version is blown up and brought above the city.

Andrew Santa Lucia

Program Distribution into the Pyramid - 1966

Transverse Urban Section of Tigerman’s 1966 Instant City

***Completed for University of Illinois at Chicago - School of Architecture: Graduate Urban Seminar taught by Dr. Alexander Eisenschmidt in Spring 2011.

Afterglow

Blanket Pyramid

Exploded Axonometric of Tigerman’s 1966 Instant City Site

Authenticity is still possible in architecture. In this case, it’s possible to reoriginate an old Pyramid, model. You can teach anBlanket old dog newChicago, tricks.IL - 2011 Blanket Pyramid uses Stanley Tigerman’s 1966 project, Instant City, and creates a new


Andrew Santa Lucia

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Architectural Designer / Critic

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Liberty City After HOPE VI

2740 W. Logan Blvd, #8 Chicago, IL 60647

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C: 305-343-6285

E: andrew_santa_lucia@me.com

Cultural/Public Centers

Current Vehicular Flow

Figure Ground (transparency vs. opaquness

Existing Use/Program/Amenities

Liberty City, Miami, FL - 2008-2009 The original master plan of the Scott-Carver Homes, in Liberty City, Miami, had little to no relationship with the various urban situations occurring within the city. The identification of various systems focused on movement, urban activity, and potential for economic growth led to an orientation of microcommunities, all of which adapted to their immediate contexts.

Green Space

The housing blocks at Scott-Carver take cues from the climactically responsive buildings of old South Florida. Maximizing crossventilation, minimizing direct sun exposure, and re-emphasizing the front porch and its applicability to medium density structures. The blocks simultaneously engage issues of ecology and community. By increasing density within the housing sites, the residual open space takes on three distinct forms. By establishing a gradient between active and passive open space, the uniform housing structures become animated by the shifting ground conditions which surround them. The identity of each microcommunity can then become more apparent through different visual expressions, such as art or agriculture, in turn providing new images of a growing community, without jumping to conclusions as to how that would work.

View from the Platform Gardens into new Communities.

New Transportation Hub in Liberty City

The Competition Entry for USGBC Natural Talent Design Competition was one of four finalists, and was subsequently exhibited at the Miami Workers Center in Liberty City, Miami. ***This was a collaboration between myself and David de Cespedes, as a group called CASIS. It was a redevelopment of another work entitled, “Degentrification + Densification + Synthesis: �, a competition entry for the Future of Cities 2007.

Liberty City Urban Identity After Hope VI


Andrew Santa Lucia

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Architectural Designer / Critic

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2740 W. Logan Blvd, #8 Chicago, IL 60647

Patio Villa Redux

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C: 305-343-6285

E: andrew_santa_lucia@me.com South Elevation facing Street (renovation) Fig. 62 Elevation 1/16”=1’ (This elevation shows the materiality of the facade and the introduction of the glass loggia/widow’s walk element, superimposed on top  of the actual facade. The users would need to go outside of their  home to move through it, adding to the paradox of going on out and  in at the same time. 

Original Patio in the center of the house flanked by glass walls.(1988)

Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 2010

This thesis project explored the effects of gender and sexuality on the interior. Formally, the operations of this investigation occur on the interior and focus on the transgression of boundaries, both literally and phenomenally. The building being renovated is Rem Koolhaas/OMA’s early project titled ‘Patio Villa’ in 1988. It was designed for a prominent gay couple in the Netherlands. They continue to live here until today and were interviewed during this process. Throughout a year of research, writing and design, this final iteration is based upon a series of moments/operations working within the accepted cultural norms of surface, boundary and threshold, as well as instigates provocative reuse of spaces, based on sexuality, gender and history of both. Initially meant to be a triplex, then becoming a duplex, the villas were divided for 1. a gay couple and 2. a widow. Using this chance detail, I constructed narratives of interaction between the couple/ widow based on their adjacency and enabled through architectural manipulation. From conceptual understandings of reorganizing space and history/ theory of gender identity + sexuality, this thesis did not intend to answer any general questions, instead attempted to activate generalities of lifestyles and engender a new misreading/misshaping of the contemporary dutch house.

Patio Villa Duplex Site Photograph Satellite Photograph of Site in The Netherlands This thesis project examines boundaries in architecture, and how they are transgressed. This is done through closely analyzing an existing building, through a lens of gender and sexuality, and proposing a renovation. As post-modern gender theory transgresses the boundary and confine of structured opposition in sexuality, architecture also transgresses the boundaries created by walls and division, through opening, through permeation. This condition is a threshold. The threshold accepts the boundary, because without it there is nothing to transgress. Due to that acceptance, there is an architectural paradox in creating boundaries to transgress them. This thesis project embraces paradox and examines new ways to design and transgress boundaries that question normative notions of gender and sexuality. The site is the Patio Villa in Rotterdam, The Netherlands by Rem Koolhaas.

Ground and Second Floor Plans Plans Ground Floor + Second Floor (1988) Fig. 18 Satellite Image of Patio Villa Onderlangs 46, 3062 Rotterdam, The Netherlands OMA (1988)

Exploded Axonometric of Patio Villa (1988)

Study Model (Circuit)

Study Model (Circuit)

Plan (Circuit) TheDiagram villa has been the venue to test ideas regarding publicity and privacy, linguistic development of architectural form, politics, and much more. The compact and directed scope of the villa lends itself to commenting and questioning on much broader topics. Completed in 1988, the patio villa by Rem Koolhass/OMA, is one of the offices first major projects. This marks a turning point for Koolhaas in that it is is one of his first built works, marking his transition from a theorist to a practitioner.

Study Model (Intersection)

Study Model (Intersection)

Study Model (Division)

Study Model (Division)

Diagram Plan (Intersection)

***Thesis Project completed for Florida International University - School of Architecture: thesis critics: John A. Stuart, Fall 2009-Spring 2010. (Miami, FL)

Exploded Axonometric of both Widow’s villa and Dick/Joops Patio Villa (renovation) Diagram Plan (division wall)


Andrew Santa Lucia

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Architectural Designer / Critic

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2740 W. Logan Blvd, #8 Chicago, IL 60647

|

C: 305-343-6285

E: andrew_santa_lucia@me.com

View in interior garden adjacent to Sauna

View in Sauna adjacent to interior garden Steel Beam

Ground Floor Plan (renovation) Ground Floor Plan - Patio Villa Redux

Ground Floor Plan (renovation)

Steel C Channel Column

Wooden Weephole Wall - allows sauna steam to collect and roll off into cistern

Hydration System Connected to Greywater Colection from Sauna Steam Runoff

Logitudinal Section (renovation)

Logitudinal Section (renovation) Longitudinal Section - Patio Villa Redux

CMU - various sizes Poured in Place Concrete Flooring Poured in place Conrete Footing


Second Floor Plan (renovation)

Andrew Santa Lucia

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Architectural Designer / Critic

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2740 W. Logan Blvd, #8 Chicago, IL 60647

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C: 305-343-6285

E: andrew_santa_lucia@me.com

Cross Section o

Second Floor Plan (renovation) Couples VIlla Loggia (sectional Sequence 1)- Patio Villa Redux

Cross Section of Dick/Joop Patio Villa Exterior/interior wall shows three different sectional conditions within the same wall

View from Loggia walkway with alternating wall

Second Floor Plan (renovation) Second Floor Plan (renovation) Second Floor Plan - Patio Villa Redux

Couples VIlla Loggia (sectional Sequence 2)- Patio Villa Redux

Couples Loggia w/ Reading Bench + Refrigerator - Patio Villa Redux

View from Loggia walkway with a

Cross Section of Dick/Joop Patio Villa Exterior/interior wall shows three different sectional conditions within the same wall

Cross Section of Dick/Joop Patio Villa

Cross Section of Widow’s Villa

Cross Section of Dick/Joop Patio Villa Exterior/interior wall shows three different sectional conditions within the same wall

Couples VIlla Loggia (sectional Sequence 3)- Patio Villa Redux

Couples Breakfast Nook - Patio Villa Redux View from Living Room with Alternatig wall

Street Elevation (South) - Patio Villa Redux

Cross Section of Dick/Joop Patio Villa Exterior/interior wall shows three different sectional conditions within the same wall

View from Living Room with Widow’s VIlla Loggia (sectional Sequence 1)- Patio Villa Redux South Elevation facing Street (renovation) Fig. 62 Elevation 1/16”=1’ (This elevation shows the materiality of the facade and the introduc-

Widow’s Walk - Patio Villa Redux View from inside Widow’s Villa looking out


Andrew Santa Lucia

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Architectural Designer / Critic

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2740 W. Logan Blvd, #8 Chicago, IL 60647

|

C: 305-343-6285

E: andrew_santa_lucia@me.com

BOUNCE: Miami Womens Center Formal Analysis on Arthropod: Used as Generator

Miami, FL - 2009 Using a digitally driven design method to create a soft-physical type, this bounce house looks to erode a glass-ceiling imposed on women in contemporary society, by establishing a malleable systems of shapes that flow in and out of each other for leisure activities to take place right on Biscayne Bay. Through careful formal analysis and generative processes, a proposal for a structural member that could perform and change under three different scalar moves, a model was created and edited to create a fully self-sustaining and referential shape for the bounce house. This allowed for the softness of the pneumatic sections to function seamlessly with the more rigid mechanical ones, in turn creating sculptural structure and functional shapes.

Structural Combnations Generated from Analysis Renderings of Pool + Bounce House in action

original celloriginal cell developingdeveloping cell cell

evolved cell evolved cell

Model of Structural Memebers

Section through Bounce House v.2.0

Section

Model - v.1.0


Andrew Santa Lucia

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Architectural Designer / Critic

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2740 W. Logan Blvd, #8 Chicago, IL 60647

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C: 305-343-6285

E: andrew_santa_lucia@me.com

S.O.F.I. Kiosk South Beach, Miami,Miami, FL USA -FL, 20062006 South Beach,

South Beach’s S.O.F.I. (South of Fifth Street) district is a collection of historic exchanges between art, culture, architecture and technology that calls for a urban public gathering space that questions the boundaries between inside and outside; digital and analog; as well as real and virtual, through fragmented kiosks that push the enigmatic imagery associated with its character. The S.O.F.I. Kiosk perpetuates the visual character of Art Deco without kitch reproduction, instead focusing on breaks in the urban fabric, as well as fragmented urban views afforded through the facade narrative. Employing simple shapes as fenesrtation and coupling them with more complex volumetric arrangements, yields a new typology for urban collective form.

S.O.F.I. Kiosk South Beach, Miami, FL Urban Plan 1”= 80’

S.O.F.I. Kiosk Plan

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1’

3’

6’

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S.O.F.I. Kiosk

Construction Section 1

1’

3’

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Andrew Santa Lucia (Work Samples, 2013)