Manhattan Resident Managers Club Newsletter-November 2017

from AMG NY

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Vol. 38 No. 176

Dedicated to the Performance & Advancement for the Real Estate Manager

OUR NEXT MONTHLY MEETING WILL BE HELD ON Thursday November 2, 2017 at 6:00pm at CONNOLLY’S PUB & RESTAURANT located at 14 East 47th Street, Ground floor

November 2017


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– MANHATTAN RESIDENT MANAGER’S CLUB, INC. –

D

A

I

S PRESIDENT:

ANTON MARKOLA 212-974-4650 Amarkola1@gmail.com

MANHATTAN RESIDENT MANAGER’S CLUB, INC. ORGANIZED 1980 P.O. Box 1144 New York, NY 10021

VICE-PRESIDENT: JOE CERVINI 917-588-4922 jcervini@mac.com TREASURER: PATRICK MCENANEY 917-699-5231

OUR NEXT CLUB MEETING

McEnaney.patrick@gmail.com

FIN.SECRETARY: STEVE MALA 212-861-2073 Steve.Mala@yahoo.com SECRETARY: BEN FLORES 917-860-5811 benjieflores3@gmail.com

will be held on Thursday November 2, 2017 at 6:00pm at Connolly’s Pub & Restaurant located at 14 East 47th Street, Ground floor. Please remember that business attire (JACKET & TIE) is required for this monthly meeting. If you are inviting a guest, inform them about dress code. Members: $40.00 Guests: $60.00 (in good standing)

TRUSTEES:

Laslo Karsai

John Szabo

Joe Vela

CLUB NEWSLETTER

Dean Berishaj

Steve Kukaj

Louis Parrilla Publisher 917-750-4117 resmgr524@gmail.com

Peter Guzman Business Manager 917-837-1390 pgu3911250@aol.com

Ben Flores Editor 917-860-5811 benjieflores3@gmail.com

Any Opinions expressed here are those of the writers and not necessarily those of the Manhattan Resident Managers Club,Inc., or its members. The Manhattan Resident Managers Club Inc. reserves the absolute right, at its sole discretion, to accept or decline requests or submissions for advertising or other copy in its Newsletter or in any Club publication.

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– MANHATTAN RESIDENT MANAGER’S CLUB, INC. –

Anton Markola President Manhattan Resident Managers Club, Inc.

Welcome to the November Newsletter!

On behalf of the Dais & Trustees of the Manhattan Resident Managers Club, I would like to thank all Regular Members, Guests as well as all Associate Members for attending our 7th Annual Twilight Dinner Cruise around Manhattan. What an amazing night out on the Harbor; with such beautiful weather and a great crowd of people. The CLUB and Foundation would like to congratulate Mr. John Szabo and Mr. Mike Kortoci on winning the final two John Person Memorial Scholarships in the amount of $2,000.00 each.

To all of our Veterans; living & deceased, “Happy Veterans Day’’! We sincerely thank you for all your sacrifices & your service. And to all the members of this great CLUB; whom I consider a part of my ex‐ tended family; have a Happy Thanksgiving Day!

The Manhattan Resident Managers Club is proud to have selected Mr. Ben Flores as our 2017 Res‐ ident Manager of the Year. We would also like to congratulate the winner and recipient of the William Key Vendor of the Year Award, Mr. Phil Levine of Major Air Service Corp.

REMINDER TO ALL MEMBERS! The 2017 Three Hands Grand Ball is set for Saturday, November 4th at Gotham Hall located at 1356 Broadway Between 36th and 37th Street. Cocktail hour starts at 7pm. This event is SOLD OUT! Our next meeting is scheduled for Thursday November 2, 2017 at 6:00pm at Connolly’s Pub & Restaurant located at 14 East 47th Street, Ground floor. Please remember that business attire (JACKET & TIE) is required for this monthly meeting. If you are inviting a guest, inform them about dress code.

Please remember to support our Associate Members as they are main source that keeps our club in existence. Most of our Associate Members take an ad in our monthly Newsletter, so when you’re in need of a contractor or vendor, please refer to the Newsletter for their services.

I’m looking forward to seeing everyone on November 2rd, for our next monthly meeting at Connolly’s. Remember this is a new location and not the previous Connolly’s we had the September meeting at. Spread the word! Fraternally yours,

Anton

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Top 10 Reasons to Join the MRM Club!

WWW.MRMCLUB.COM

10. Extra Curricular: Looks great on employment applications/resumes! 9. Networking: You will have the opportunity to meet and network with the BEST of the BEST in their field at our regular meetings on the 1st Thursday of each month. 8. Promote Awareness: The CLUB helps promote education and awareness about the NYC residential real estate market. 7. Life Insurance: Being a Regular Member of the CLUB affords you a personal life insurance policy in the amount of $125,000.00 6. Philanthropic: The CLUB participates and raises money for a number of local and national charities giving back to the community and those most in need. 5. Brotherhood: Being a member automatically gives you a feeling of closeness to other members. You share something that other people are not a part of and really can’t relate to. 4. Enrichment: Being part of a professionally ran Club or Organization is an en- riching experience. You owe it to yourself to at least try them out. 3. Exposure: The CLUB will expose you to real life every day experiences you and your peers regularly share and have in common 2. Growth: Members in Clubs/Organizations are encouraging and supportive of your personal growth. We all have a vested interest in each other. 1. Social: They are a BEST way to meet great people and have a lot of fun! With numerous events happening throughout the year; separate from our monthly meetings, it is impossible to not have some FUN!

NOVEMBER 1ST & 2ND ALL SAINTS / ALL SOULS

NOVEMBER 5TH DAYLIGHT SAVINGS

NOVEMBER 11TH VETS DAY

NOVEMBER 23RD THANKSGIVING

NOVEMBER 24TH BLACK FRIDAY

NOVEMBER 27TH CYBER MONDAY

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!ow "#n$ %ou&' (o )*o)+* #,-u#++$ wo&k. Since 1938, the official work week has been 40 hours. That was a triumph for workers laboring 12 to 16 hours a day. The labor motto was: 8 hours work; 8 hours rest; 8 hours for what we will. How that has worked in practice for both blue collar and white collar employees is different than the motto indicates. While, work week estimates vary widely depending on the source, most put average work times at greater than 40 hours. According to the Labor Department, average hours for full-time work broke down this way: - Management, professionals: 43.3. - Service: 41.3 - Sales and office: 41.9 Gallup surveys, in which people self-report working hours, show office workers logging an average of

49 hours. In production settings, according to labor statistics, work hours from 1940 to 2010 have been relatively stable at just over 40 hours, except for war years when hours topped 45 per week, and depression when hours dipped under 37. In 2015, Fortune, using numbers from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, calculated he average work week at just 34.4 hours. This put the United States at 16th for the highest number of hours worked. Canada at 32.77 hours ranked 22nd; the United Kingdom was 24th at 32.25; and Australia was 25th at 32 hours. In this analysis, the top six hardest working countries were Mexico at 42.85 hours; Costa Rica at 42.62; Korea, 40.85; Greece, 49.27; Chile, 38.27; and Russia, 38.17.

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– MANHATTAN RESIDENT MANAGER’S CLUB, INC. –

These seniors make major contributions after retirement

Y

ou probably know people who retired then spent their lives working on special projects. Some people take up art, some do free consulting, while others change their world. The Purpose Prize honors those in the latter category, people who at age 50 or older begin a progressive social project that makes a difference. More than 1,000 people are nominated annually for the prize, which offers cash awards. From this number, a few dozen become Purpose Prize fellows. The key is discovering an innovative approach to an important social problem, according to encore.org.

Among recent honorees: - Belle Michelson, a former science teacher who became an Episcopal priest and founded Dancing with the Spirit. The program connects children and elders through music. - Samuel Lupin, a doctor, started Housecalls for the Homebound. The organization has brought medical care to more than 4,000 patients in the New York City area. -Laurie Ahern, a former journalist, founded Disability Rights to fight the practice of putting children with disabilities in institutions.

SWITCH JOBS IN YOUR 50S FOR A LONGER CAREER, STUDY SAYS Switching jobs late in life might be the key to a longer career, according to Boston College's Center for Retirement Research. But the key is switching job voluntarily. Those who were laid off late in life had difficulty finding new jobs. Those who switched jobs voluntarily worked longer, increasingly the likelihood of still work-

job, all workers worked longer if they switched jobs in their 50s. About 41 percent of people who switched jobs did so most often to reduce stress. But stress didn't have a significant effect one when people retired, the study found. Other factors are at play, too. People who still had a mortgage at age 60 were 10 percent more likely to be working at age 65. In fact, more people now reach retirement with a mortgage than in previous decades, possibly because of differing attitudes toward debt.

NO COFFEE

ing at age 65 by 20 percent. About 44 percent of the population is still working at age 65, according to a University of Michigan study. No matter what level of education or type of —9—

Don't drink coffee before a fasting blood glucose test. Caffeine is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream and your glucose levels could change in response to even black coffee. The best, most accurate results come from complete fasting, according to Duke Medicine Health News.


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– MANHATTAN RESIDENT MANAGER’S CLUB, INC. –

PROS and CONS of SHORTER WORK WEEKS Companies have been experimenting with shorter work days for at least a decade and, despite announce‐ ments that the 40‐hour week is dead, there have been mixed results from the experiments. The idea has been to cut hours while keeping pay the same. On the plus side, employees love it. Quoted in the New York Times, Swedish employees at hospitals and Toyota factories say they do just as much work in six hours as they did in eight and they are happier. One audit of the experiment in a nursing home con‐ cluded that absenteeism was down while productivity and worker health improved. On the downside, Swedish the experiment in work hours has costs Swedish taxpayers for what one politi‐ cian called "paying people not to work." In France, the socialist government ordered a 35‐ hour work week in 2000. Companies bitterly com‐ plained that it reduced competitiveness and cost billions in additional hiring.

Younger workers think work flexibility is a right Millennials and college students don't expect to go to work at a desk and stay there. Surveys abound as to younger workers' beliefs in their workplace rights. According to Inc.: - 29 percent of college students think being able to work rDrinking water can save moneyemotely with a flexible schedule is a right, not a privilege. - 66 percent of Millennials say lack of flexible scheduling has caused them to leave a job. - 76 percent of Gen-Xers say they look for jobs with flexibility that will still let them get promoted. - But 72 percent of working parents think those who work flexible hours have fewer chances for promotion.

In Korea, a plan to reduce hours from 44 to 40 re‐ sulted in worker stress as employees struggled to get the same amount of work done in fewer hours, accord‐ ing to the Korean Journal of Happiness Studies. One American company in 2004 experimented with a six‐hour week and found employees worked harder but they didn't interact and worker camaraderie grounded to a halt as people struggled to get their work done in fewer hours, according to BBC Capital.

Drinking water

can save money

Sodas, teas and juices cost Americans a lot of money compared to getting by on plain old water. According to Statista, a full 28 percent of people in the United States consume soft drinks every single day. One blogger at 20 Something Finance crunched the numbers to di5scover that 4,787 bottles could be "illed with tap water for only $2.10. Compared to an average store price of $1 ‐ $2 for just one bottle, "illing up reusable bottles at home could lead to hundreds of dol‐ lars in savings each year.

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– MANHATTAN RESIDENT MANAGER’S CLUB, INC. –

Malls embrace pop-up stores, local flair

It is no secret that the American mall is facing a crisis. Rising competition from online retailers has put pressure on the stores that typically set up shop within the traditional closed mall, according to CNN Money. Once popular anchors like Sears, JC Penney, and Macy's have closed many of their locations with plans to close more in the coming years to stay profitable. Some analysts are even predicting that between 20 and 25 percent of malls will close within the next five years as online sales continue to grow. With the loss of foot traffic and vacancies in some of their biggest spaces, malls have begun looking in different directions to find ways to make ends meet. According to The Wall Street Journal, "pop-up stores" are one tool they are using to bring in new shoppers. These stores are short-term retailers or seasonal businesses that were once shunned in favor of permanent fixtures with stable rents. Filling mounting vacancies with these temporary solutions has helped to bring in cash flow and keep the scenery fresh for customers. Malls are also using this opportunity to use their empty spaces more creatively and they are supporting things that would have never been found in malls a decade ago. Those big online retailers, as mentioned above, are doing well but many are also seeking to have a physical presence in a building to help bring new customers in more cheaply and easily to their core business. Malls create "white box" stores that essentially act as a blank canvas for businesses that allow them to rotate in and out of the space more easily. Some malls have even offered to provide space to incubate startups or allow mom-and-pop stores access to a storefront without a lot of long-term strings attached. You could see malls become showcases for small retailers with local flavor.

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– MANHATTAN RESIDENT MANAGER’S CLUB, INC. –

EXPRESS HARDWARE & BUILDING MATERIAL Competitive pricing More than 30,000 items in stock Convenient New York City based location Same day / next day delivery JANITORIAL SUPPLIES GARBAGE LINERS HAND/POWER TOOLS LIGHTING/ELECTRICAL PLUMBING PAINT (BENJAMIN MOORE AND MORE) OFFICE STATIONARY SPECIAL ORDERS

Please call for more information or to open an account today 212-722-1553 917-528-0040 646-469-3123 929-444-1414 917-560-8899 Sales.expresshardware@gmail.com 235 East 123rd Street New York, NY 10035

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– MANHATTAN RESIDENT MANAGER’S CLUB, INC. –

FINDING AND USING A SMALL-BUSINESS MENTOR As a small-business owner, learning how to create and manage a successful business can be an overwhelming task. One way to help mitigate those challenges is to work with a mentor that has been out in the field already and has established the knowledge and experience necessary to succeed. Finding a mentor can be incredibly beneficial to a small business owner. Entrepreneur Magazine found that 80 percent of CEOs surveyed said they received mentorship in some form and that 93 percent of startups counted mentorship as instrumental to their own success. As with any endeavor, having a support system in place can help prevent failure and serve as motivation when the going gets tough.

Forbes Magazine points out several resources that a smallbusiness owner can use to more easily find someone to work with. In fact, there are entire networks of business mentors at places like the SCORE organization. These services help connect people via email and in-person counseling. Made up of retired or active business executives and leaders, mentor networks can provide high-quality candidates that are already interested in helping. Federally supported organizations like small business development centers (SBDCs), women's business centers (WBCs), and minority business development centers can provide access to businesses with more specific needs or backgrounds. Once a mentor is found, it is important to foster that relationship and build it over time. The mentor will likely be personally invested in helping, but that doesn't mean that the relationship can be ignored or treated as a one-way street. If email is the preferred contact method, for instance, be sure to send updates at agreed upon intervals and always ask new questions to ensure that the conversation keeps moving forward. If the mentor provides feedback, close the feedback loop by acting on that advice and showing results. A mentor could be spending a lot of time and effort in this role, and it's important that they are shown the respect and appreciation deserved.

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MANHATTAN RESIDENT MANAGERʼS CLUB, INC. IS PROUD TO HAVE SELECTED

BEN FLORES Resident Manager of the Year 2017 With gratitude & appreciation for the years of dedication and service to the CLUB — 20 —


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MANHATTAN RESIDENT MANAGERʼS CLUB, INC. IS PROUD TO HAVE SELECTED

PHIL LEVINE of Major Air Service Corp

Associate Member of the Year 2017 In recognition of many years of support & friendship you have show to the CLUB — 21 —


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JOKES FOR THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER Turkey jokes Q: Which side of the turkey has the most feathers? A: The outside! Q: Why did the turkey sit on the tomahawk? A: To hatchet. Q: How are a turkey, a donkey, and a monkey alike? A: They all have keys.

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Veterans Day vs

Memorial Day!

Veterans Day, celebrated on the 11th day of the 11th month, honors all military veterans. It's a day to thank the soldiers, sailors and Marines in your community and to honor their service by displaying the flag. Veterans Day is the anniversary of the signing of the armistice, which ended the World War I hostilities between the Allied nations and Germany in 1918. Memorial Day, celebrated on the last Monday in May, is often thought of as the first day of summer. Its’ meaning is deeper than that! Memorial Day, first celebrated in 1868, is an older holiday than Veterans Day. It is a day to remember all the men and women who gave their lives in the defense of the nation during all wars.

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– MANHATTAN RESIDENT MANAGER’S CLUB, INC. –

Horoscopes Aries 3/21 - 4/19: Stability is the keyword for November as projects reach completion and you wait for results. Taurus 4/20 - 5/20: Bulls find career at the forefront, with events building until the New Moon on the 18th. Gemini 5/21 - 6/20: Building and rebuilding in domestic and career areas confront Gemini this month. Family gives strength here. Cancer 6/21 - 7/22: Cancerians call on their ingenuity and patience as Jupiter moves to the 5th House this month. Leo 7/23 - 8/22: Personal goals take a back seat to the needs to others this month as cooperation becomes essential. Virgo 8/23 - 9/22: Virgos, never adverse to education, need to learn quickly this month. Key date is the Full Moon on the 4th.

Scorpio 10/22 - 11/21: Big changes are in the works; settle in for the ride. Likely changes will be personal, not career. Sagittarius 11/22 - 12/21: Your ruling planet, Jupiter, moves into the 9th House this month, bringing a spiritual focus. Capricorn 12/22 - 1/19: Look to completing a task you have started. You'll want your mind clear as changes arise in work life. Aquarius 1/20 - 2/18: Your life should be relatively calm this month, but there could still be a change in personal life. Pisces 2/19 - 3/20: Goodness is on your mind as you shed negative feelings and find your treasure in peace.

Libra 9/23 - 10/21: Some work is never done but the Waning Crescent on the 15th reveals a sliver of progress.

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– MANHATTAN RESIDENT MANAGER’S CLUB, INC. –

Exercising safely during pregnancy xpecting mothers shouldn't try to go for new exercise records, but maintaining fitness in pregnancy is important. According to the Mayo Clinic, exercise during pregnancy is often very beneficial for both the mother and child as long as there are no medical

calories to accommodate expected weight gain while maintaining muscle tone. Exercise can help get the body ready for labor. Increases in energy and mood help with the day-to-day ability to keep up regular routines and aid in reductions in back pain, constipation, swelling, and bloating.

issues such as preeclampsia, anemia, vaginal bleeding or problems with the cervix or placenta. The American Pregnancy Association says any exercise done routinely before pregnancy should be okay as long as it avoids rough physical contact or situations in which the mother is likely to fall. Active mothers should try to maintain their level of fitness, adding

Low-impact activities such as walking and swimming are best. Swimming is regarded as an extremely safe exercise that allows the body to produce excellent blood flow and muscle tone without adding stress to joints. Substitute a walk outside for a treadmill, since treadmill falls are common. Use a stationary bike instead of outdoor cycling. Light yoga is typically safe for pregnancy.

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Annoying chip readers Swiping a credit card just seems so much more efficient than sticking the card into a terminal and waiting. And waiting. But the chip cards are actually more secure, credit companies say. The chip cards attempt to prevent fraud by generating a unique code for every transaction that can only be used once. So the cards are supposed to slow down criminals who steal a bunch of card data and then manufacture physical cards. Chips make the data much less useful. The cards also reduce the value of card skimming, where a device is placed on the card reader to steal data. Chips do nothing for e-commerce fraud or a variety of other types of criminal activity. In addition, if you use a chip card, but sign for the transaction instead of using a pin number, the transaction is less secure.


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MRMC Building and Health Tips 10 Tips to Prepare For a Winter Storm 2017 was a mild winter but the forecast predictions for2018 are calling for heavy snow storms, so make sure your buildings are well stocked and prepared. 1.

Inspect your stock items and make sure you have enough and that all items are in good working conditions: (shovels, ice melt, snow blower, gloves, "lash lights, batteries, generators, etc.) 2. Bottled water: make sure you have a few cases on hand. 3. Keep non‐ perishable foods: stock up can foods: soups, vegetables, rice, pasta, also coffee, hot chocolate, milk, etc. Keep it handy for your staff in case the Deli’s and supermarkets in the area don’t open for business. 4. Keep blankets, pillows, sheets and blow up beds and prepare a room for the staff in case the buses or trains are not running. 5. Battery operated radio and extra batteries, keep yourself updated with the news. 6. Prescription medications: Always wise to inform your staff and residents to have enough medication on hand to last several days. 7. Keep "irst aid kit well stock in case of any injuries. 8. Cell phones: make sure it’s fully charge before the storm. 9. If weather calls for heavy winds, please remove all light items from balconies and secure large items. 10. Make sure your buildings are fully staff, it’s always a good idea to have extra men that live closer to building to be stand by in the building in case of transit shut down.

6 Food Choices to Help Ease Arthritis Pain

1.

2.

3. 4. 5.

6.

Broccoli, Brussels sprouts and cabbage: they are full of sulforaphane, which helps slow cartilage damages in joints. Fatty "ish: Salmon, Tuna, Trout and Mackerel are rich in omega‐3 acids which help "ight in"lammation. Garlic: Contains diallyl disul"ide which helps limiting cartilage damage. Turmeric: One of the best researched in"lammation "ighters. Tart cherries: study published in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage found that subjects that drank tart cherry juice had improvements in pain and stiffness. Vitamin C: Antioxidants in vitamin C, can slow the progress of OA. However, taking supplements with much higher does than 65 to 85 milligrams can increase the risk of kidney stones. — 29 —


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HOW TO FIND A WORTHY CHARITY When it comes to helping people in need across the world, everyone would agree that charities play a prominent role in ensuring that money makes it to the causes that need it the most. Unfortunately, not all of those charities are created equal and some time should be spent determining which ones will spend those dollars responsibly. According to Consumer Reports, for instance, most people assume that a charity's name tells the whole story about what they are doing for the community they represent. They use the example of the Disabled Veterans National Foundation. The name implies that they raise a lot of money to help veterans. In fact, less than one-third of the money brought into the organization goes into charitable programs while the rest is used for fundraising and overhead. This should alarm potential donors who think 100 percent of their donation will go towards helping the targeted group. One dollar turning into thirty cents is not an excellent deal in anybody's book. On the other side of the aisle, a charity called The Mission Continues spends nearly 90 percent of its money on charitable programs and only seven percent on fundraising. While most people tend to think of charities as all being the same, this kind of disparity sheds light on the fact that some are more efficient and ethical than others. Although it might be impossible to find a great charity by name alone, Kiplinger suggests following a few best practices

when it comes to giving. First, don't fall victim to the charity with the loudest voice. Often, charities that employ telemarketers to solicit donations are spending the least amount of money on their cause. It is important for a person to figure out which causes resonate with them the most and then seek out charities that benefit them. Secondly, research any charity thoroughly before giving to evaluate how it will handle the money. Charity watchdogs like Charity Navigator will have all of this information publicly displayed. A good rule of thumb is that the best charities spend at least 75 percent of their money on service and 25 percent or less on overhead. If a charity refuses to share this information, then they are probably not meeting these criteria.

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– MANHATTAN RESIDENT MANAGER’S CLUB, INC. –

Simple food safety tips for Thanksgiving

- The best way to thaw a turkey is in a refrigerator, according to USDA recommendations. Allow 24 hours for each four to five pounds,

tached bacteria can contaminate the kitchen when you wash meat or poultry. Studies have found bacteria cling to sinks, sponges and towels. Bacteria is effectively killed in the oven. The best idea is to take the turkey out of the package and put it straight into the pan.

in a refrigerator cooled to 40 degrees or below. Be sure to let the turkey thaw in a container so juices will not drip onto other foods. - If you must thaw a turkey in cold water, be sure it is in a leakproof bag. The turkey should be submerged in cold water. Allow 30 minutes per pound. Change the water frequently. USDA recommends every 30 minutes. Cook immediately when thawed. - Cook turkey to 165 degrees in thickest part of the breast, inner thigh, and inner wing. - Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds before touching any food. - Do not store stuffing inside a turkey. Refrigerate it separately. - Don't wash the turkey. According to the USDA, loosely at-

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Antiviral drugs still an option for flu

Thanksgiving BY THE NUMBERS - Total number of turkeys that are consumed on Thanksgiving Day, 51,650,000. - Total U.S. spending on Thanksgiving dinner food, $2,983,000,000. - Average household spending on Thanksgiving dinner, $59.18. - Average household spending on Thanksgiving weekend, $342. - Number of families that will travel for Thanksgiving, 39,000,000. - Number of places in the U.S. named Plymouth, 37. - Average cost per pound of turkey, $1.20 - Average number of turkeys raised in the U.S. each year, 254,000,000. - Annual consumption of turkey by the average American, 16 pounds. - Annual tons of green beans produced, 659,340 tons. - Pounds of sweet potatoes produced annually, 2.4 billion pounds. - Value of all pumpkins produced annually, $118,000,000. - Pounds of cherries produced annually, 266,000,000 pounds. - Barrels of cranberry produced annually, 7,600,000 barrels. - Total value of turkeys produced in the U.S. annually, $4,850,000,000. Source: USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, Statisticsbrain.com

Thanksgiving SLEEPY It's about the gobbler, but not the one you might think It has become a truism: You get sleepy at Thanksgiving because of all that tryptophan in turkey. But is it true? Yes and no, but mostly no. It is true that the amino acid tryptophan works as a precursor to other sleepinducing chemicals. Turkey has lots of it. But cheese and nuts have more. Even Tofu-turkey has more, according to Wired.com. In 1972 a psychiatrist named John Fernstrom looked into the tryptophan connection and found that tryptophan alone does not make you sleepy. Instead, he found that it's really a carb heavy meal of mashed potatoes, pie, dressing, and bread. Those carbs create loads of sugar and force amino acids to go to work breaking it all down. With amino acids busy fighting sugars, the brain starts converting tryptophan into serotonin and suddenly you feel you just can't watch another third and 10 on the game. Snores ensue. It's not just the chemistry of the meal, however. The parasympathetic nervous system also has a role to play. This little brain gadget does things in the background so you don't think about them; like breathing. When you eat too much, you have to digest a lot. The parasympathetic nervous system kicks in to give the body energy to digest and takes away energy elsewhere. You feel tired and it's because you ate a really big carb-loaded meal. Too late to do anything about it. Just kick off your shoes and don't blame the turkey.

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The best prevention during flu season is following the standard advice: Get a flu shot and wash your hands before eating or touching your face. But if you do get the flu, certain antiviral medications like Tamiflu (oseltamivir) and Relenza (zanamivir) are still available as a treatment, according to the Harvard Health Letter. These antivirals must be taken within two days of the onset of symptoms to be effective and might speed recovery by one or two days. In June, the World Health Organization removed oseltamivir from its list of essential medicines, citing low effectiveness in clinical trials. However, this drug and others in the antiviral category do help some people if taken early enough. Older people and those with chronic lung, heart or kidney disease or compromised immune systems would be a candidate for the flu drugs.

Good blood pressure equals good brain function Controlling blood pressure is one of the most straightforward ways of preventing one form of cognitive decline. According to Duke Medicine Health News, high blood pressure can lead to tiny strokes in the brain, a condition called vascular dementia. These little strokes take a toll on memory, reasoning, judgment and a general decline in thought processes. Controlling blood pressure also reduces the risk of major cardiovascular problems. So, it seems, what is good for the heart is good for the brain.

The return of the Polaroid Camera phones have incredible quality but you don't get the photos instantly on paper. To get that, you have to go retro. Polaroid and its 1977 OneStep, the best-selling camera of all time, fell out of favor with the mass adoption of digital photography. But the OneStep 2 is the updated reincarnation, sharing many characteristics of the original including the basic design and big red shutter button. The Impossible Company, new owners of Polaroid, has added a USB battery charger. You have to buy film, which at $2 a shot is expensive but turns out to be a big party treat, if not a master of beautiful photos. According to Wired, Fujifilm Instax Mini 9 Instant Camera has somewhat better photos but it doesn't have the retro reputation.


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“QUOTES 2 LIVE BY” The way to get started is to stop talking and start doing. ~ Walt Disney I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought, and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder. ~ Gilbert K. Chesterton Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all others. ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero Thank you is the best prayer that anyone could say. I say that one a lot. Thank you expresses extreme gratitude, humility, and understanding." ~ Alice Walker Gratitude is a quality similar to electricity: it must be produced and discharged and used up in order to exist at all. ~ William Faulkner

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CLUB SUDOKU

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“QUOTES 2 LIVE BY” If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader. ~ John Quincy Adams

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“QUOTES 2 LIVE BY” Confidence is not something that is defined by natural boundaries. Carol Hamilton, ~ President of L'Oréal Luxe USA


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Identifying Alzheimer's before symptoms New tests to diagnose Alzheimer's disease are emerging, offering hope for new treatments and therapies. According to the Alzheimer's Association, the memory disease is now the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, and more than 5 million people are currently living with the disease. In fact, for seniors, a third of all deaths stem from either Alzheimer's or another form of dementia. Although there is no cure in sight, for now, every effort is being made to find a way to diagnose and treat this growing threat.

According to The Wall Street Journal, there is support for a new approach to how Alzheimer's is identified in the population, and it could lead to dramatically earlier warnings of the disease and accelerate research. New approaches hope to discover the disease before symptoms ever present. Like finding malignant cells in the body to find cancer or plaque buildup in the arteries for heart disease, the presence of amyloid and tau proteins could be the key to early identification. Previously, doctors could only see these proteins during an autopsy, but improved

technology has allowed for these markers to be seen in living patients. These scans are sometimes used to rule out Alzheimer's in patients with various cognitive issues. Critics of the method agree that the process works to identify amyloid proteins but argue that there is no definitive way to predict whether or not the patient will actually develop symptoms. Another test involves recognition of smells. One of the first things to decline is the ability to smell, which is associated with the first cranial nerve, according to WebMD. Researchers have found the ability to smell differs between nostrils in Alzheimer's patients but it is still too early to say definitively if this will be a diagnostic tool for Alzheimer's.

Nothing wrong with most fat, experts say It is just possible that the fat-free movement made us fat. And unhealthy. Recent research shows that not all fat is bad and the movement to go fat-free threw out good fats along with bad ones. When all fat is removed from a product, something has to tNothing wrong with most fat, experts say ake its place and that is usually carbohydrates in the form of sugars. And, along the way, good fats are eliminated. In fact, not all nutritional fat, which has zero carbohydrates, is bad. According to the Harvard Medical School Health letter, healthy fats are an essential part of how the human body functions as they provide energy, build cell membranes, sheath nerves, and aid in blood clotting and muscle movement. The most harmful fats are trans-fats, which have been increasingly phased out of food products. These fats are created through a human-made process that keeps the fat solid at room temperature and allows it to be used in

food such as solid margarines and fast food French-fries. Trans-fat has been found to increase harmful LDL cholesterol while reducing beneficial HDL cholesterol. It has also been linked to inflammation, increasing the risk of heart disease and strokes as well as insulin resistance, increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Saturated fat, the type found in red meat and whole milk, is not necessarily bad for you but it can drive up total cholesterol and create more harmful LDL cholesterol. According to Harvard, a meta-analysis of 21 studies found there was not enough evidence to conclude that "saturated fat increases the risk of heart disease, but that replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat may indeed reduce risk of heart disease." In addition, two other major studies found that replacing saturated fat with highly processed carbohydrates actually increased the risk of heart disease, according to Harvard. The healthiest fats are monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. These fats are liquid at room temperature and can be found in such foods as olives, peanuts, avocados, nuts, and vegetable oils like corn and sunflower. Monounsaturated fats gained fame when it was discovered that the so-called "Mediterranean diet" in countries like Greece produced low levels of heart disease even when people were eating large quantities of fat. Polyunsaturated fats are called essential fats because the body needs them, but can't make them. These fats have to come from food.

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DRONES MIGHT BE THE NEXT MEDICAL TRANSPORTER

From breathtaking videos to Amazon deliveries, people have been finding more and more uses for drones. Because they are small, unmanned, and able to cover any terrain while flying, these aircraft are especially good at delivering small things from one place to another. According to The Verge, hospitals are currently testing them as a form of medical transport that could dramatically decrease the amount of time it takes to deliver medical supplies to the field or recover samples to take back to a laboratory. These hybrid drones combine the helicopter-like ability to vertically launch with an airplane's ability to fly longer distances to make them as flexible as possible in the field. Coupled with a special foam-cushioned cooling compartment, these drones are capable of keeping samples cool during a three-hour flight over the Arizona desert.


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