Page 1

MAGAZINE FROM THE AMSTERDAM FASHION INSTITUTE fifth edition - summer 2008

FASHION MUSIC ART DESIGN

THE ART OF UPCYCLING


Naar een eerlijke strie kledingindu


Naar een eerlijke strie kledingindu


THE EVOLUTION

of Your Biggest BANG It all started in late January 2008. Thirty seven students, divided into seven groups, were given the task of developing a new magazine. After years of reading hundreds of magazines making our own was a dream come true. We could fill it with everything that we wanted to show the world, let our fears and inhibitions go and use our creative ideas. After two months a team of judges had to choose one of the seven sparkling, new fashion magazines to go into production. After much deliberation, it was this- Your Biggest BANG. The concept of Your Biggest BANG was really simple. It all began with an apple headed for the trash can. To us this was a new beginning. We wanted to stop the process of always throwing things away. If something becomes old it does not necessarily mean an ending. We want to give those things a new life and an opportunity to do more. Thus Your Biggest BANG was born. Its core value: Every ending is a new beginning. We take recycling to a higher level and call it ‘The art of upcycling’. We not only upcycle in an ecological sense, but also through fashion, art, design, ideas and music. Naturally, we re-used all seven magazines that were initially created. Thus, Your Biggest BANG is the result of upcyling the work, creativity and ideas of 34 students at AMFI – Amsterdam Fashion Institute. The outcome is a magazine that is made by young creatives with the idea that it be used as a platform to inspire and motivate others. There is more to the story. Our former competitors turned into colleagues. As well as the magazine a product line has been designed and our website is up and running. Yes, we are proud to present Your Biggest BANG: a guerilla brand that was built in five months by young creatives. Even though we may decide to close it down again just as quickly, we hope the ideas in Your Biggest BANG will inspire you to maybe a new beginning…

The editors, Saba Babas-Zadeh Cherryl Karijodirono Billy Pavlovic Reed Sacharoff


THE EVOLUTION

of Your Biggest BANG It all started in late January 2008. Thirty seven students, divided into seven groups, were given the task of developing a new magazine. After years of reading hundreds of magazines making our own was a dream come true. We could fill it with everything that we wanted to show the world, let our fears and inhibitions go and use our creative ideas. After two months a team of judges had to choose one of the seven sparkling, new fashion magazines to go into production. After much deliberation, it was this- Your Biggest BANG. The concept of Your Biggest BANG was really simple. It all began with an apple headed for the trash can. To us this was a new beginning. We wanted to stop the process of always throwing things away. If something becomes old it does not necessarily mean an ending. We want to give those things a new life and an opportunity to do more. Thus Your Biggest BANG was born. Its core value: Every ending is a new beginning. We take recycling to a higher level and call it ‘The art of upcycling’. We not only upcycle in an ecological sense, but also through fashion, art, design, ideas and music. Naturally, we re-used all seven magazines that were initially created. Thus, Your Biggest BANG is the result of upcyling the work, creativity and ideas of 34 students at AMFI – Amsterdam Fashion Institute. The outcome is a magazine that is made by young creatives with the idea that it be used as a platform to inspire and motivate others. There is more to the story. Our former competitors turned into colleagues. As well as the magazine a product line has been designed and our website is up and running. Yes, we are proud to present Your Biggest BANG: a guerilla brand that was built in five months by young creatives. Even though we may decide to close it down again just as quickly, we hope the ideas in Your Biggest BANG will inspire you to maybe a new beginning…

The editors, Saba Babas-Zadeh Cherryl Karijodirono Billy Pavlovic Reed Sacharoff


CONTENTS

THE STORY SO FAR.............................................9 MY T-SHIRT UPCYCLED...................................11 CONTRIBUTORS.................................................12 INDIVIDUALS......................................................13 THE SECRETIVE XOOOOX.................................14 GREG IPP..............................................................15 MUSICAL NARRATIVES....................................16 BEST DRESSED BAND.........................................18 PARRA....................................................................19 IMAGE UPCYCLING............................................20 60 MINUTE FASHION.........................................21 COLUMN BY NENZ.............................................27 3 OF A KIND..........................................................28 KARAOKE VS THE ORIGINAL.........................32 THE WALL FLOWER...........................................34 BIO COUTURE......................................................40 PASS IT ON...........................................................42 CLOAKROOM MADNESS...................................49 SHAPE SHIFTERS...............................................52

SUSANNE PIET ON GREED...............................60 MY LIFE AS COUTURE DRESSER...................64 SEE THE MELODY..............................................67 ALL THAT JEANS................................................70 JUNK ADDICT......................................................78 VINTAGE AMSTERDAM.....................................81 MY GRANDMA’S DRESSES ..............................86 GET INSPIRED.....................................................91 MELTING POT......................................................95 COLOURS FOR TOMORROW..........................101 BAS KOSTERS....................................................102 ETHICAL FASHION..........................................104 MUSICAL REVOLUTION.................................106 DEVIL & JOHNSTON.......................................114 YBB PRODUCTS................................................116 MAGICAL SYMBIOSIS.....................................118 BORN THAT WAY..............................................120 SERVICE............................................................126

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

7


CONTENTS

THE STORY SO FAR.............................................9 MY T-SHIRT UPCYCLED...................................11 CONTRIBUTORS.................................................12 INDIVIDUALS......................................................13 THE SECRETIVE XOOOOX.................................14 GREG IPP..............................................................15 MUSICAL NARRATIVES....................................16 BEST DRESSED BAND.........................................18 PARRA....................................................................19 IMAGE UPCYCLING............................................20 60 MINUTE FASHION.........................................21 COLUMN BY NENZ.............................................27 3 OF A KIND..........................................................28 KARAOKE VS THE ORIGINAL.........................32 THE WALL FLOWER...........................................34 BIO COUTURE......................................................40 PASS IT ON...........................................................42 CLOAKROOM MADNESS...................................49 SHAPE SHIFTERS...............................................52

SUSANNE PIET ON GREED...............................60 MY LIFE AS COUTURE DRESSER...................64 SEE THE MELODY..............................................67 ALL THAT JEANS................................................70 JUNK ADDICT......................................................78 VINTAGE AMSTERDAM.....................................81 MY GRANDMA’S DRESSES ..............................86 GET INSPIRED.....................................................91 MELTING POT......................................................95 COLOURS FOR TOMORROW..........................101 BAS KOSTERS....................................................102 ETHICAL FASHION..........................................104 MUSICAL REVOLUTION.................................106 DEVIL & JOHNSTON.......................................114 YBB PRODUCTS................................................116 MAGICAL SYMBIOSIS.....................................118 BORN THAT WAY..............................................120 SERVICE............................................................126

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

7


THE STORY SO FAR Issue #1 Fall 2008

Fashion Music Visual Art Detailed You Must Create

Edition # 1 Spring 2008



ISSUE 1

YOUR BIGGEST

A DIFFERENT VIEW ON FASHION & SOCIETY Rolf&Viktor - Off Runway - Marc VS. Louis - View on Growth of Fashion - Earth Intruders YOUR BIGGEST BANG

magazine

prime

magazine

NL €9 FR €10 GR €8 UK £5

EVERY ENDING IS A NEW BEGINNING

# 01

prime.indd 1

27-3-2008 14:09:42

GULZIG

Blanc: Looks beyond the top layer of the arts, delving into the philosophy behind the designs and the designers.

Verslik je niet!

Verslik je niet! #01 - APRIL 2008- € 10,-

Back & Front: Sees everything from a different perspective.

Nooit een tweede kans voor een eerste keer. 124 pagina’s, 1000 doelen, een taak... ...fashionable creatief

WWW.GULZIGMAGAZINE.COM 0276 94 0000 7835

Prime: A picturesque magazine about time management. Gulzig: Young creatives who are greedy for inspiration, knowledge and skills.

Blur: Is all about melting different creative subjects into one and enhancing one another. Next: Inspiration and platform about upcoming talents in the field of fashion and lifestyle.

üÇċ¹ņÍãţñċÇņ ĽìñđċņŅņ$ǹñņŅņĹʼnņŅņ$ŕĽñ­ņŅņ ŕüʼnŕĹÇ % $ņ%€ņ %ņĘŅœņ4 '%% $ %|ņ…''4ņ$4ņĘń¶ÜťņŅņ­ìÇ­úņŝŝŝħ£üÇċ¹ħċü


THE STORY SO FAR Issue #1 Fall 2008

Fashion Music Visual Art Detailed You Must Create

Edition # 1 Spring 2008



ISSUE 1

YOUR BIGGEST

A DIFFERENT VIEW ON FASHION & SOCIETY Rolf&Viktor - Off Runway - Marc VS. Louis - View on Growth of Fashion - Earth Intruders YOUR BIGGEST BANG

magazine

prime

magazine

NL €9 FR €10 GR €8 UK £5

EVERY ENDING IS A NEW BEGINNING

# 01

prime.indd 1

27-3-2008 14:09:42

GULZIG

Blanc: Looks beyond the top layer of the arts, delving into the philosophy behind the designs and the designers.

Verslik je niet!

Verslik je niet! #01 - APRIL 2008- € 10,-

Back & Front: Sees everything from a different perspective.

Nooit een tweede kans voor een eerste keer. 124 pagina’s, 1000 doelen, een taak... ...fashionable creatief

WWW.GULZIGMAGAZINE.COM 0276 94 0000 7835

Prime: A picturesque magazine about time management. Gulzig: Young creatives who are greedy for inspiration, knowledge and skills.

Blur: Is all about melting different creative subjects into one and enhancing one another. Next: Inspiration and platform about upcoming talents in the field of fashion and lifestyle.

üÇċ¹ņÍãţñċÇņ ĽìñđċņŅņ$ǹñņŅņĹʼnņŅņ$ŕĽñ­ņŅņ ŕüʼnŕĹÇ % $ņ%€ņ %ņĘŅœņ4 '%% $ %|ņ…''4ņ$4ņĘń¶ÜťņŅņ­ìÇ­úņŝŝŝħ£üÇċ¹ħċü


My T-shirt UPCYCLED

SEARCH FOR TALENT

Keeping with the concept that every ending is a new beginning, the Your Biggest BANG team gave their old T-shirt a new life. By printing the logo on an old white shirt, they upcycled it, making it new again. Here is a short explanation of the lifecycle of their T-shirts.

Who: Zyrah Montebon Lifecycle: “This white T-shirt came a long way. It has seen Asia and now it is still rockin’ here in the EU. Who knows, it might just see the seven wonders as well.”

Who: Rebecca Starkey Lifecycle: “Miss T-shirt, bought for 5 pounds, in England. She travelled to America where she lived for 3 months. She jumped 15,000 feet out of a plane over the Kennedy space centre and is now enjoying life in Amsterdam.”

Who: Roos Smits Lifecycle: “It was my boyfriend’s, he got it when he was eight. Back then it was too big, it fit him for a while, but now it is so old that it became too big again. For him it still has sentimental value though I’m the one wearing it now.”

Who: Suzanne van Rooij Lifecycle: “This T-shirt was originally a give-away from Hey Travel. When I got home, I threw it in a corner and forgot about it. I used to sleep in it, but now I have an up-cycled T-shirt that is ready to wear!”

Who: Maartje Gruyters Lifecycle: “I got this T-shirt from my sister. She wore it during her belly dancing classes. She gave it to me because it was not suitable for belly dancing.”

Who: Linda van de Wiel Lifecycle: “This was my favourite chill T-shirt. I wore it, because it made me feel good.”

Mexx is a European multi-channel apparel and accessories business, with over 10,000 points of sale across more than 50 countries. We are part of Liz Claiborne Inc, one of the world’s leading multi-brand apparel and accessories companies. Are you talented, passionate and creative? As we take our brand to the next level, we have a range of exciting new career opportunities at our stunning Head Office in Amsterdam. We are always keen to hear from talented professionals with backgrounds in the following areas:

Buyers Designers Concept Designers Merchandise Planners & Allocators Product Line Merchandisers Product Developers Interested? Submit your details and CV (in English) by following this link:www.mexx.com/applicationform

MEXX.COM

Photographer: Michel Wongsomenawi Text: Cherryl Karijodirono & Saba Babas-Zadeh

MY T-SHIRT UPCYCLED - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

11


My T-shirt UPCYCLED

SEARCH FOR TALENT

Keeping with the concept that every ending is a new beginning, the Your Biggest BANG team gave their old T-shirt a new life. By printing the logo on an old white shirt, they upcycled it, making it new again. Here is a short explanation of the lifecycle of their T-shirts.

Who: Zyrah Montebon Lifecycle: “This white T-shirt came a long way. It has seen Asia and now it is still rockin’ here in the EU. Who knows, it might just see the seven wonders as well.”

Who: Rebecca Starkey Lifecycle: “Miss T-shirt, bought for 5 pounds, in England. She travelled to America where she lived for 3 months. She jumped 15,000 feet out of a plane over the Kennedy space centre and is now enjoying life in Amsterdam.”

Who: Roos Smits Lifecycle: “It was my boyfriend’s, he got it when he was eight. Back then it was too big, it fit him for a while, but now it is so old that it became too big again. For him it still has sentimental value though I’m the one wearing it now.”

Who: Suzanne van Rooij Lifecycle: “This T-shirt was originally a give-away from Hey Travel. When I got home, I threw it in a corner and forgot about it. I used to sleep in it, but now I have an up-cycled T-shirt that is ready to wear!”

Who: Maartje Gruyters Lifecycle: “I got this T-shirt from my sister. She wore it during her belly dancing classes. She gave it to me because it was not suitable for belly dancing.”

Who: Linda van de Wiel Lifecycle: “This was my favourite chill T-shirt. I wore it, because it made me feel good.”

Mexx is a European multi-channel apparel and accessories business, with over 10,000 points of sale across more than 50 countries. We are part of Liz Claiborne Inc, one of the world’s leading multi-brand apparel and accessories companies. Are you talented, passionate and creative? As we take our brand to the next level, we have a range of exciting new career opportunities at our stunning Head Office in Amsterdam. We are always keen to hear from talented professionals with backgrounds in the following areas:

Buyers Designers Concept Designers Merchandise Planners & Allocators Product Line Merchandisers Product Developers Interested? Submit your details and CV (in English) by following this link:www.mexx.com/applicationform

MEXX.COM

Photographer: Michel Wongsomenawi Text: Cherryl Karijodirono & Saba Babas-Zadeh

MY T-SHIRT UPCYCLED - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

11


CONTRIBUTORS Publisher Amsterdam Fashion Institute Editors-in-chief Charlotte Lokin Frank Jurgen Wijlens Editors & Graphic Design Saba Babas-Zadeh Cherryl Karijodirono Billy Pavlovic Reed Sacharoff Yearbook Martine Bakker Lauri Berkhoudt Josselin Bijl Neslihan Kiyak Roos Smits Copy editors Rebecca Breuer Patricia Brien Andrew Kerven Reed Sacharoff Stephen Fetherston Concept Saba Babas-Zadeh Emily Jane Cusack Cherryl Karijodirono Billy Pavlovic Roos Smits Advertising Manager Yma van den Born

Marketing, Sales & PR Janne Coolen Kim Evertse Gerdien Koster (supervising teacher) Stephanie van Hoof Jacqueline Schrama Linda van de Wiel Events Rosanne van den Bosch Emily Cusack Herman Jager (supervising teacher) Debora Leeser Sophie Röder Mirjam de Ruiter Rebecca Starkey www.yourbiggestbang.com Rianne Duursma Marlou van Eeten Lieke Faber Gemma French Maartje Gruyters Tara Koppenol Zyrah Montebon Jean-Casimir Morreau (supervising teacher) Katinka Schmitz Products Janize Guleria Charon Kooijmans Kim Meertins Linnemore Nefdt (supervising teacher) Jessica Put Susanne van Rooij Femke Verheuvel

Special thanks Xaviera Aubri, Beauty V.o.F., Merel van de Beek, Joep Becx, Koos de Boer, Piet Dekker, Evelyn Fox, Janneke Gaanderse, Helmke van Geel, Celia Geraerdts, Liesbeth in ’t Hout, Gonneke van den Kieboom, Nannet van der Kleijn, Valentijn Langendorff, Ilonka Leenheer, Adriana M Martien Mellema, Eva Mooiman, Jan Piscaer, Else Pool, Esther Ram, Jay Ramautarsing, Peter van Rhoon, Willem Schouten, Sjef Smit, Vivian Sneep, Thierry Sommers, De Streng B.V., Loes Termeer, Narda van ’t Veer, René van de Velde, Marja Vreeswijk, Anneke Wijnhoff, Zuntrade, Studio Witman&Kleipool. All photographers, journalists, copywriters, make-up artists, models, model agencies, brands, designers and everyone who share their creative talent with Your Biggest Bang. Everybody @ robstolk®: thanks for all the help and patience! Printer by Robstolk® Amsterdam (www.robstolk.nl) Paper: Reviva offset 250g (sleeve), Reviva offset 115g (interior) Your Biggest BANG and AMFI yearbook 2008 are published by: Amsterdam Fashion Institute Hogeschool van Amsterdam Mauritskade 11, 1091 GC Amsterdam T: +31 20 595 4555 www.amfi.hva.nl

Cover magazine & sleeve: Photographer: Duy Quoc Vo Styling: Saba Babas-Zadeh and Cherryl Karijodirono Model: Swanny @ Anka Models Makeup/hair: Ed Thijsen for AVEDA @ Angelique Hoorn Sleeve: Bodysuit: Elsewerk Magazine: Jacket: Edwin Oudshoorn Trousers: Django Steenbakker Shoes: Balenciaga All rights reserved © 2008 Amsterdam Fashion Institute On all offers, tenders and agreements made by Amsterdam Fashion Institute the conditions of the Dutch law apply. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Although the highest care is taken to make the information contained in Your Biggest BANG as accurate as possible, neither the publisher nor the authors accept any responsibility for damages, of any nature, resulting from the use of this information. The editors of Your Biggest BANG and AMFI Yearbook-2008 have attempted to abide by all copyrights. If someone believes they have copyright to any part of this publication, contact AMFI – Amsterdam Fashion Institute.

This publication is possible thanks to our sponsors and advertisers!

- www.yourbiggestbang.com -

Sustainability has a high priority at AMFI Amsterdam Fashion Institute. Therefore in the future INDIVIDUALS will be focussing more on sustainability. The brand gives something old a new life and upcycles the strangest items into fashion must haves. The outcome of these upcycling experiments are added to the collections or used in the INDIVIDUALS store.

This rose has had candle wax applied to it and will be used as a necklace.

INDIVIDUALS is the AMFI - Amsterdam Fashion Institute owned fashion brand that is designed, produced and marketed by young creatives from this integrated fashion college. They translate their diverse academic view of fashion into inspirational designs in their own style.

These coat hangers were given a new look by spotting them with leftover paint. In that way the old hangers got a new life and make them a perfect fit for the INDIVIDUALS store.

Address: Spui 23 1012 WX Amsterdam T: +31(0)20 525 81 33 E: shop@individualsamfi.nl www.individualsamfi.nl

Save the dates. In these boxes you can save the important dates on the Individuals calendar. Used fabrics, rose leaves, old paper and stickers are used to define the brand. All wrapped up in a little box…

INDIVIDUALS A collective of variety Written by Saba Babas-Zadeh Image: Billy Pavlovic


CONTRIBUTORS Publisher Amsterdam Fashion Institute Editors-in-chief Charlotte Lokin Frank Jurgen Wijlens Editors & Graphic Design Saba Babas-Zadeh Cherryl Karijodirono Billy Pavlovic Reed Sacharoff Yearbook Martine Bakker Lauri Berkhoudt Josselin Bijl Neslihan Kiyak Roos Smits Copy editors Rebecca Breuer Patricia Brien Andrew Kerven Reed Sacharoff Stephen Fetherston Concept Saba Babas-Zadeh Emily Jane Cusack Cherryl Karijodirono Billy Pavlovic Roos Smits Advertising Manager Yma van den Born

Marketing, Sales & PR Janne Coolen Kim Evertse Gerdien Koster (supervising teacher) Stephanie van Hoof Jacqueline Schrama Linda van de Wiel Events Rosanne van den Bosch Emily Cusack Herman Jager (supervising teacher) Debora Leeser Sophie Röder Mirjam de Ruiter Rebecca Starkey www.yourbiggestbang.com Rianne Duursma Marlou van Eeten Lieke Faber Gemma French Maartje Gruyters Tara Koppenol Zyrah Montebon Jean-Casimir Morreau (supervising teacher) Katinka Schmitz Products Janize Guleria Charon Kooijmans Kim Meertins Linnemore Nefdt (supervising teacher) Jessica Put Susanne van Rooij Femke Verheuvel

Special thanks Xaviera Aubri, Beauty V.o.F., Merel van de Beek, Joep Becx, Koos de Boer, Piet Dekker, Evelyn Fox, Janneke Gaanderse, Helmke van Geel, Celia Geraerdts, Liesbeth in ’t Hout, Gonneke van den Kieboom, Nannet van der Kleijn, Valentijn Langendorff, Ilonka Leenheer, Adriana M Martien Mellema, Eva Mooiman, Jan Piscaer, Else Pool, Esther Ram, Jay Ramautarsing, Peter van Rhoon, Willem Schouten, Sjef Smit, Vivian Sneep, Thierry Sommers, De Streng B.V., Loes Termeer, Narda van ’t Veer, René van de Velde, Marja Vreeswijk, Anneke Wijnhoff, Zuntrade, Studio Witman&Kleipool. All photographers, journalists, copywriters, make-up artists, models, model agencies, brands, designers and everyone who share their creative talent with Your Biggest Bang. Everybody @ robstolk®: thanks for all the help and patience! Printer by Robstolk® Amsterdam (www.robstolk.nl) Paper: Reviva offset 250g (sleeve), Reviva offset 115g (interior) Your Biggest BANG and AMFI yearbook 2008 are published by: Amsterdam Fashion Institute Hogeschool van Amsterdam Mauritskade 11, 1091 GC Amsterdam T: +31 20 595 4555 www.amfi.hva.nl

Cover magazine & sleeve: Photographer: Duy Quoc Vo Styling: Saba Babas-Zadeh and Cherryl Karijodirono Model: Swanny @ Anka Models Makeup/hair: Ed Thijsen for AVEDA @ Angelique Hoorn Sleeve: Bodysuit: Elsewerk Magazine: Jacket: Edwin Oudshoorn Trousers: Django Steenbakker Shoes: Balenciaga All rights reserved © 2008 Amsterdam Fashion Institute On all offers, tenders and agreements made by Amsterdam Fashion Institute the conditions of the Dutch law apply. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Although the highest care is taken to make the information contained in Your Biggest BANG as accurate as possible, neither the publisher nor the authors accept any responsibility for damages, of any nature, resulting from the use of this information. The editors of Your Biggest BANG and AMFI Yearbook-2008 have attempted to abide by all copyrights. If someone believes they have copyright to any part of this publication, contact AMFI – Amsterdam Fashion Institute.

This publication is possible thanks to our sponsors and advertisers!

- www.yourbiggestbang.com -

Sustainability has a high priority at AMFI Amsterdam Fashion Institute. Therefore in the future INDIVIDUALS will be focussing more on sustainability. The brand gives something old a new life and upcycles the strangest items into fashion must haves. The outcome of these upcycling experiments are added to the collections or used in the INDIVIDUALS store.

This rose has had candle wax applied to it and will be used as a necklace.

INDIVIDUALS is the AMFI - Amsterdam Fashion Institute owned fashion brand that is designed, produced and marketed by young creatives from this integrated fashion college. They translate their diverse academic view of fashion into inspirational designs in their own style.

These coat hangers were given a new look by spotting them with leftover paint. In that way the old hangers got a new life and make them a perfect fit for the INDIVIDUALS store.

Address: Spui 23 1012 WX Amsterdam T: +31(0)20 525 81 33 E: shop@individualsamfi.nl www.individualsamfi.nl

Save the dates. In these boxes you can save the important dates on the Individuals calendar. Used fabrics, rose leaves, old paper and stickers are used to define the brand. All wrapped up in a little box…

INDIVIDUALS A collective of variety Written by Saba Babas-Zadeh Image: Billy Pavlovic


GREG IPP

THE SECRETIVE

XOOOOX

Written by Marlou van Eeten Image: XOOOOX

Mysterious Berlin based street artist xoooox has been leaving his mark on public buildings for the past 15 years. With his identity still unknown to the public, his relatively simple illustrations tug at your heartstrings, bringing up feelings of daydreaming, loss, and keeping some secrets hidden. During a trip to Berlin, I felt a little underwhelmed by the icy feeling of the city, however, my heart was warmed a little by the amount of street art I found. When I returned home, there was one image that stuck in my mind. A pensive girl in the corner, thinking of the events happening in the world around her. I felt a connection with her. I had to find out who created her, and if there were similar images out there. It was tagged with xoooox, so my search began. The internet provided a lot of images, but finding information about the man himself was much more difficult. I decided to send him an email, crossing my fingers I would get a response. To my surprise, a few days later I did. A personal email written by xoooox, the man who has been inspiring me for many years. I was thrilled. He told me that his work had started back in 1991, when he was working in an office. One afternoon out of pure boredom and curiosity, he emptied his pockets onto his personal photocopier. The resulting images soon became inspiration for his later work. In his email he writes that he likes to remain anonymous, because it is his work that is important and not himself. It is his personal mission to make people think and wonder about life’s questions.

14

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

Initially he chose very carefully where he wanted to show his work, mostly inside porches, on corners or doors. Sometimes the locations were on very busy streets, and others where only one or two people would come across it per day. After a few years he started showing his work in other cities, including Frankfurt, Milan, New York, Prague, Cannes, Paris and Barcelona. His biggest inspiration still remains fashion, which is evident when seeing his translation of garments in the illustrations. The interesting thing about fashion, he thinks, is that it can change very quickly. Everybody is going along with certain trends while still wanting to remain individual; soon it seems that this is close to being impossible. Xoooox is adding to the fashion melting pot through his collaboration with a small clothing label based in Berlin. His need for perfection isn’t completely satisfied by it. It turned out that the fashion label wanted to determine which clothing pieces they wanted to use, while they had initially agreed that he would be the one to make the final decision. In his opinion the garment needs to be every bit as original as the work of art he created.

Greg is a graphic designer from New York City. This image was a mixture of a few different sources. The floor is from an old factory, that was converted into new apartments. I found the shoes in a second hand shop for $5.00. The fractal was made using an online generator. Initially I had created it for another image but found the shapes fit this one better, echoing those found naturally in the wood. Combined, they created a brand new composition. www.areyoufamiliar.com/unfamiliar/

www.xoooox.com/

ART & DESIGN - XOOOOX

Production: Reed Sacharoff

GREG IPP - ART & DESIGN

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

15


GREG IPP

THE SECRETIVE

XOOOOX

Written by Marlou van Eeten Image: XOOOOX

Mysterious Berlin based street artist xoooox has been leaving his mark on public buildings for the past 15 years. With his identity still unknown to the public, his relatively simple illustrations tug at your heartstrings, bringing up feelings of daydreaming, loss, and keeping some secrets hidden. During a trip to Berlin, I felt a little underwhelmed by the icy feeling of the city, however, my heart was warmed a little by the amount of street art I found. When I returned home, there was one image that stuck in my mind. A pensive girl in the corner, thinking of the events happening in the world around her. I felt a connection with her. I had to find out who created her, and if there were similar images out there. It was tagged with xoooox, so my search began. The internet provided a lot of images, but finding information about the man himself was much more difficult. I decided to send him an email, crossing my fingers I would get a response. To my surprise, a few days later I did. A personal email written by xoooox, the man who has been inspiring me for many years. I was thrilled. He told me that his work had started back in 1991, when he was working in an office. One afternoon out of pure boredom and curiosity, he emptied his pockets onto his personal photocopier. The resulting images soon became inspiration for his later work. In his email he writes that he likes to remain anonymous, because it is his work that is important and not himself. It is his personal mission to make people think and wonder about life’s questions.

14

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

Initially he chose very carefully where he wanted to show his work, mostly inside porches, on corners or doors. Sometimes the locations were on very busy streets, and others where only one or two people would come across it per day. After a few years he started showing his work in other cities, including Frankfurt, Milan, New York, Prague, Cannes, Paris and Barcelona. His biggest inspiration still remains fashion, which is evident when seeing his translation of garments in the illustrations. The interesting thing about fashion, he thinks, is that it can change very quickly. Everybody is going along with certain trends while still wanting to remain individual; soon it seems that this is close to being impossible. Xoooox is adding to the fashion melting pot through his collaboration with a small clothing label based in Berlin. His need for perfection isn’t completely satisfied by it. It turned out that the fashion label wanted to determine which clothing pieces they wanted to use, while they had initially agreed that he would be the one to make the final decision. In his opinion the garment needs to be every bit as original as the work of art he created.

Greg is a graphic designer from New York City. This image was a mixture of a few different sources. The floor is from an old factory, that was converted into new apartments. I found the shoes in a second hand shop for $5.00. The fractal was made using an online generator. Initially I had created it for another image but found the shapes fit this one better, echoing those found naturally in the wood. Combined, they created a brand new composition. www.areyoufamiliar.com/unfamiliar/

www.xoooox.com/

ART & DESIGN - XOOOOX

Production: Reed Sacharoff

GREG IPP - ART & DESIGN

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

15


MUSICAL NARRATIVES Written by Mirjam de Ruiter Photography: Petrovsky & Ramone

Djosa & Nelson Full of ambitions and dreams, drifting somewhere between the here and now and the up and above, Nelson & Djosa bring a different message across with their album Don’t Kill Your Feelings. They re-use all the songs and little things they love to create their own sound: space funk. “Upcycling is a basic element of our music. Our sound is created out of music that we like, anything from the seventies until now. From funk to disco or electro, from Brazilian rhythm to African music.” Nelson & Djosa walk around the world, drawing inspiration from all the elements the horizon offers. They label their music ‘space funk’, a term derived from their lyrics ‘made in outerspace’, as Djosa says. “We don’t just do funk based on the oldskool stuff, but we take it into a broader perspective. Into space.” Don’t Kill Your Feelings, Nelson & Djosa’s first album will be in stores soon. www.appletreerecords.net

Ntjamrosie

Ntjamrosie African born singer Ntjamrosie is a woman of the world, who walks, talks and tells her stories through the music she makes. Inspired by the traditional way of storytelling in Cameroon, she re-uses themes and brings them to life in her songs. “My album is a tribute to my deceased grandmother, Atouba Bernadette. She was a strong beautiful woman who always said: when you fall, you get up and continue!” Ntjamrosie produced her first album together with Nelson & Djosa, which is a journey of their combined stories, musical influences and inspirations. “Now Atouba is out there, it feels like my stories are captured in the universe forever. Finishing the album feels like a closure, the end of a period. For us every day was a new beginning. Back in the days when I wrote the song Patience at the age of fifteen, I could never have imagined that it would end up on a cd.” Djosa

Ntjamrosie’s first album Atouba is out now.

Neslon

See the full interviews on www.yourbiggestbang.com 16

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

MUSIC - MUSICAL NARRATIVES

MUSICAL NARRATIVES - MUSIC

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

17


MUSICAL NARRATIVES Written by Mirjam de Ruiter Photography: Petrovsky & Ramone

Djosa & Nelson Full of ambitions and dreams, drifting somewhere between the here and now and the up and above, Nelson & Djosa bring a different message across with their album Don’t Kill Your Feelings. They re-use all the songs and little things they love to create their own sound: space funk. “Upcycling is a basic element of our music. Our sound is created out of music that we like, anything from the seventies until now. From funk to disco or electro, from Brazilian rhythm to African music.” Nelson & Djosa walk around the world, drawing inspiration from all the elements the horizon offers. They label their music ‘space funk’, a term derived from their lyrics ‘made in outerspace’, as Djosa says. “We don’t just do funk based on the oldskool stuff, but we take it into a broader perspective. Into space.” Don’t Kill Your Feelings, Nelson & Djosa’s first album will be in stores soon. www.appletreerecords.net

Ntjamrosie

Ntjamrosie African born singer Ntjamrosie is a woman of the world, who walks, talks and tells her stories through the music she makes. Inspired by the traditional way of storytelling in Cameroon, she re-uses themes and brings them to life in her songs. “My album is a tribute to my deceased grandmother, Atouba Bernadette. She was a strong beautiful woman who always said: when you fall, you get up and continue!” Ntjamrosie produced her first album together with Nelson & Djosa, which is a journey of their combined stories, musical influences and inspirations. “Now Atouba is out there, it feels like my stories are captured in the universe forever. Finishing the album feels like a closure, the end of a period. For us every day was a new beginning. Back in the days when I wrote the song Patience at the age of fifteen, I could never have imagined that it would end up on a cd.” Djosa

Ntjamrosie’s first album Atouba is out now.

Neslon

See the full interviews on www.yourbiggestbang.com 16

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

MUSIC - MUSICAL NARRATIVES

MUSICAL NARRATIVES - MUSIC

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

17


MOKE

PIETER “PARRA” JANSSEN

Written by Kim Meertins Image: Govert de Roos

I was talking to Eddy Steeneken(pictured far left). He plays the piano in “Best Dressed Band” Moke. I really wanted to know how they earned that title “Best Dressed Band”. We were named the “Best Dressed Band” by Esquire magazine. Back then we played in our so to say H&M look. Esquire had

created a new category, that for ‘Best Dressed Band’ which we won. We thought that was kind of funny. Afterwards someone from the management of Karl Lagerfeld contacted us. Karl loves music. His latest collection from the K by Karl Lagerfeld line is inspired by Amy Winehouse. With this new line, he was looking for a band in each country that represented his im-

age. He is always looking for naturally cool people, and he chose us for Holland! The head office for the K line is situated here in Amsterdam, so we just went and picked out a new wardrobe from the spring collection. Our image hasn’t really changed since we got sponsored. Before, We were always dressed in black, but now it is much more beautiful, and more expensive!

Piet ‘Parra’ Janssen is a multi-talented Dutch illustrator and owner of the brand ROCKWELL. His work is instantly recognizable through the use of bright colours, fat women with bird heads, all topped with striking quotes. For Your Biggest BANG Parra designed an illustration based on the theme; ‘Every ending is a new beginning’. Production: Saba Babas-Zadeh

18

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - MOKE

- STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

19


MOKE

PIETER “PARRA” JANSSEN

Written by Kim Meertins Image: Govert de Roos

I was talking to Eddy Steeneken(pictured far left). He plays the piano in “Best Dressed Band” Moke. I really wanted to know how they earned that title “Best Dressed Band”. We were named the “Best Dressed Band” by Esquire magazine. Back then we played in our so to say H&M look. Esquire had

created a new category, that for ‘Best Dressed Band’ which we won. We thought that was kind of funny. Afterwards someone from the management of Karl Lagerfeld contacted us. Karl loves music. His latest collection from the K by Karl Lagerfeld line is inspired by Amy Winehouse. With this new line, he was looking for a band in each country that represented his im-

age. He is always looking for naturally cool people, and he chose us for Holland! The head office for the K line is situated here in Amsterdam, so we just went and picked out a new wardrobe from the spring collection. Our image hasn’t really changed since we got sponsored. Before, We were always dressed in black, but now it is much more beautiful, and more expensive!

Piet ‘Parra’ Janssen is a multi-talented Dutch illustrator and owner of the brand ROCKWELL. His work is instantly recognizable through the use of bright colours, fat women with bird heads, all topped with striking quotes. For Your Biggest BANG Parra designed an illustration based on the theme; ‘Every ending is a new beginning’. Production: Saba Babas-Zadeh

18

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - MOKE

- STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

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IMAGE UPCYCLING Written by Billy Pavlovic

                60 MINUTE FASHION get creative

Tessa M. de Graaf is a graduate of the Amsterdam Fashion Institute and now works as an illustrator. When it comes to ecological fashion she has strong beliefs. This is why she was asked to make an illustration with “Every ending is a new beginning” as the central theme. TESSA: “Illustrations that I don’t think worked out, are being reworked and used again. Parts of it I will scan and process onto my computer, so it becomes a whole new illustration. Old sketches can lead to inspiration for a new piece. That is the reason why I hardly ever throw things away.”

60 MINUTE FASHION. A new concept in quick design where students from different faculties are given new and scrap fabrics and one hour to create a garment of their choice to be used the next day in a photo shoot. An experiment in first impressions. The room, the atmosphere, the music, the fabrics, and whatever else each student brought to the table.

www.ownme.nl Photography: Bob van Rooijen Stylists: Maartje Gruyters & Rebecca Starkey Hair & Makeup: Maartje Willems Models: Lotte & Linda @ Modelution

60 MINUTE FASHION - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

21


IMAGE UPCYCLING Written by Billy Pavlovic

                60 MINUTE FASHION get creative

Tessa M. de Graaf is a graduate of the Amsterdam Fashion Institute and now works as an illustrator. When it comes to ecological fashion she has strong beliefs. This is why she was asked to make an illustration with “Every ending is a new beginning” as the central theme. TESSA: “Illustrations that I don’t think worked out, are being reworked and used again. Parts of it I will scan and process onto my computer, so it becomes a whole new illustration. Old sketches can lead to inspiration for a new piece. That is the reason why I hardly ever throw things away.”

60 MINUTE FASHION. A new concept in quick design where students from different faculties are given new and scrap fabrics and one hour to create a garment of their choice to be used the next day in a photo shoot. An experiment in first impressions. The room, the atmosphere, the music, the fabrics, and whatever else each student brought to the table.

www.ownme.nl Photography: Bob van Rooijen Stylists: Maartje Gruyters & Rebecca Starkey Hair & Makeup: Maartje Willems Models: Lotte & Linda @ Modelution

60 MINUTE FASHION - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

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22

Cecilia Thomas-

Jeffrey Kroon and Daud Lekranty-

Cecilia is an architecture exchange student from Denmark.

Jeffrey and Daud are both studying Fashion & Design and are from The Netherlands

My first impression on initially entering the room was that it was so messy, I didn’t know where to begin. I grabbed some fabrics that reminded me of my home country a sand coloured old curtain, some blue jersey, and some lacy ribbon. Initially I was inspired by the Eiffel tower, but after adding form to the bottom of the dress with cardboard, it reminded me more of the Statue of Liberty in New York, which is another of my favorite monuments.

When we first teamed up we started brainstorming about what we could do with this piece of embroidered white fabric. The romantic feeling we got from it led to the design. Daud created a hoodie for the top and Jeffrey started spray painting the skirt and bodice. The main inspiration for the dress was an urban feel mixed with designers like Heatherette and Darryl van Wouw.

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - 60 MINUTE FASHION

60 MINUTE FASHION - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

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22

Cecilia Thomas-

Jeffrey Kroon and Daud Lekranty-

Cecilia is an architecture exchange student from Denmark.

Jeffrey and Daud are both studying Fashion & Design and are from The Netherlands

My first impression on initially entering the room was that it was so messy, I didn’t know where to begin. I grabbed some fabrics that reminded me of my home country a sand coloured old curtain, some blue jersey, and some lacy ribbon. Initially I was inspired by the Eiffel tower, but after adding form to the bottom of the dress with cardboard, it reminded me more of the Statue of Liberty in New York, which is another of my favorite monuments.

When we first teamed up we started brainstorming about what we could do with this piece of embroidered white fabric. The romantic feeling we got from it led to the design. Daud created a hoodie for the top and Jeffrey started spray painting the skirt and bodice. The main inspiration for the dress was an urban feel mixed with designers like Heatherette and Darryl van Wouw.

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - 60 MINUTE FASHION

60 MINUTE FASHION - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

23


24

Mirjam de Ruiter-

Rebecca Starkey-

Mirjam studies International Fashion & Branding in The Netherlands.

Rebecca is a Fashion Design student on exchange from the U.K.

I started this outfit towards the end of the day and there wasn’t much fabric left. I wanted to create a top and skirt with a light and summery feel. I braided together fabrics to create the neckline for the top. For the skirt I found some fabric that Jeffrey had tagged earlier in the day. I thought the light fabrics and colours created a nice contrast with the spray painting.

I also started late in the day. I found the trash bag that Jeffrey and Daud had used for their spray painting and thought I could upcycle it to make an incredible skirt. At the same time I was very inspired by the creative vibe in the room and the music by Daft Punk playing. The end result was a mixture of many different influences, leading to the creation of this one of a kind garment.

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - 60 MINUTE FASHION

60 MINUTE FASHION - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

25


24

Mirjam de Ruiter-

Rebecca Starkey-

Mirjam studies International Fashion & Branding in The Netherlands.

Rebecca is a Fashion Design student on exchange from the U.K.

I started this outfit towards the end of the day and there wasn’t much fabric left. I wanted to create a top and skirt with a light and summery feel. I braided together fabrics to create the neckline for the top. For the skirt I found some fabric that Jeffrey had tagged earlier in the day. I thought the light fabrics and colours created a nice contrast with the spray painting.

I also started late in the day. I found the trash bag that Jeffrey and Daud had used for their spray painting and thought I could upcycle it to make an incredible skirt. At the same time I was very inspired by the creative vibe in the room and the music by Daft Punk playing. The end result was a mixture of many different influences, leading to the creation of this one of a kind garment.

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - 60 MINUTE FASHION

60 MINUTE FASHION - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

25


INNER VISION NEnz, a freelance fashion journalist, shares her view of the world of fashion.

Roosmarie RaasRoosmarie studies International Fashion & Design in The Netherlands I started with a plain white T-shirt and added some dark grey jersey. I wanted to add some more volume, adding some playfulness to the body shape. For colour I grabbed some purple ribbon and pinned it around the mannequin. At the last minute I decided to shorten the dress. The longer silhouette was just not working for me.

26

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - 60 MINUTE FASHION

A couple of weeks ago, I was asked if I would be interested in joining a fashion jury for a famous Dutch glossy magazine. Hysterical fashion freak that I am, I saw myself being called the next Fiona Hering; the little fashion kids desperately trying to kiss my Louboutain heels. But then something happened, something that I had not foreseen: I found it really hard to criticize other people’s outfits. Who am I to reject their look, on which they had spent so much time, effort, and creative power on? Does Anna Wintour, chief of all fashion editors, even have the right to do this? Is her vision really that crucial? Creativity is somewhat dying out in the fashion world. Or better said: many fashion editors are trying to eliminate creativity – consciously or not. Every season, the fashion magazines draw up lists with things that need to be immediately added to your wardrobe, and garments that the most idiotic tramp doesn’t want to be caught dead in. And we, fashion victims as we are, are obliged to follow. On the other hand those fashion magazines also worship the hipsters, it-girls, models and other celebrities who are as innovative as possible in the way they dress. Just take the icons of the last couple of months: model Agyness Deyn, Amy Winehouse, or Chloë Sevigny… not really the

kind of wallflowers that fly with every trend. They are all people that don’t seem to care about the dictated rules in the fashion world and who walk their own fashionable path in every possible way. What a mixed message to their audience; on the one side we need to all dress the same according to the universal trend code, on the other hand they love to see us being original, inventive and creative. The weirdest thing is that designers, who give the outlines for fashion every season, do not seem to follow this whole trend story.

Designer Marc Jacobs found a not too friendly review about his last show, written by New York Times editor Cathy Horn. He immediately responded on her blog: “My last few collections have been nothing but an expression of where I am at and what interests me and my team in terms of cut, shape, colour and our individual interests in fashionable clothes. I find so many aspects of life today fascinating... I don’t work in a bubble. I am influenced by the world, and what of the world I know, remember, and hope for.” Very brave of Marc, to declare his vision like that. But as a creative nowadays, you need to be brave to a certain extent. Because many times my creative thoughts are knocked down by people in my surroundings who don’t understand my style! Nevertheless, however hard your critics shout they don’t like it or shake their uncomprehending heads; it will eventually always make you happier to express your creativity and follow your own fashionable path. In short: to be who you are. And by god do it fast; before it’s called a trend…

So thank god for designers like Jeremy Scott, Gareth Pugh, Christopher Kane, Viktor & Rolf and John Galliano, who still do what they want and follow their own creative path every season! This can clearly be seen in their diverse collections, but also in their choice of their muse. Take for instance Viktor & Rolf who chose the alien looking Tilda Swinton, Karl Lagerfeld who drily showed his whole collection on Amy Winehouse look-a-likes (who had been chosen as “worst dressed” by Mr. Blackwell a couple of weeks before). But then why do fashion editors so necessarily have to look for similarities and certify them as a new trend? nenz.web-log.nl/ Why can’t it be as it is; an expression of creativity?

NEnz

INNER VISION - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

27


INNER VISION NEnz, a freelance fashion journalist, shares her view of the world of fashion.

Roosmarie RaasRoosmarie studies International Fashion & Design in The Netherlands I started with a plain white T-shirt and added some dark grey jersey. I wanted to add some more volume, adding some playfulness to the body shape. For colour I grabbed some purple ribbon and pinned it around the mannequin. At the last minute I decided to shorten the dress. The longer silhouette was just not working for me.

26

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - 60 MINUTE FASHION

A couple of weeks ago, I was asked if I would be interested in joining a fashion jury for a famous Dutch glossy magazine. Hysterical fashion freak that I am, I saw myself being called the next Fiona Hering; the little fashion kids desperately trying to kiss my Louboutain heels. But then something happened, something that I had not foreseen: I found it really hard to criticize other people’s outfits. Who am I to reject their look, on which they had spent so much time, effort, and creative power on? Does Anna Wintour, chief of all fashion editors, even have the right to do this? Is her vision really that crucial? Creativity is somewhat dying out in the fashion world. Or better said: many fashion editors are trying to eliminate creativity – consciously or not. Every season, the fashion magazines draw up lists with things that need to be immediately added to your wardrobe, and garments that the most idiotic tramp doesn’t want to be caught dead in. And we, fashion victims as we are, are obliged to follow. On the other hand those fashion magazines also worship the hipsters, it-girls, models and other celebrities who are as innovative as possible in the way they dress. Just take the icons of the last couple of months: model Agyness Deyn, Amy Winehouse, or Chloë Sevigny… not really the

kind of wallflowers that fly with every trend. They are all people that don’t seem to care about the dictated rules in the fashion world and who walk their own fashionable path in every possible way. What a mixed message to their audience; on the one side we need to all dress the same according to the universal trend code, on the other hand they love to see us being original, inventive and creative. The weirdest thing is that designers, who give the outlines for fashion every season, do not seem to follow this whole trend story.

Designer Marc Jacobs found a not too friendly review about his last show, written by New York Times editor Cathy Horn. He immediately responded on her blog: “My last few collections have been nothing but an expression of where I am at and what interests me and my team in terms of cut, shape, colour and our individual interests in fashionable clothes. I find so many aspects of life today fascinating... I don’t work in a bubble. I am influenced by the world, and what of the world I know, remember, and hope for.” Very brave of Marc, to declare his vision like that. But as a creative nowadays, you need to be brave to a certain extent. Because many times my creative thoughts are knocked down by people in my surroundings who don’t understand my style! Nevertheless, however hard your critics shout they don’t like it or shake their uncomprehending heads; it will eventually always make you happier to express your creativity and follow your own fashionable path. In short: to be who you are. And by god do it fast; before it’s called a trend…

So thank god for designers like Jeremy Scott, Gareth Pugh, Christopher Kane, Viktor & Rolf and John Galliano, who still do what they want and follow their own creative path every season! This can clearly be seen in their diverse collections, but also in their choice of their muse. Take for instance Viktor & Rolf who chose the alien looking Tilda Swinton, Karl Lagerfeld who drily showed his whole collection on Amy Winehouse look-a-likes (who had been chosen as “worst dressed” by Mr. Blackwell a couple of weeks before). But then why do fashion editors so necessarily have to look for similarities and certify them as a new trend? nenz.web-log.nl/ Why can’t it be as it is; an expression of creativity?

NEnz

INNER VISION - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

27


3 OF A KIND

1

Three designers, hailing from the UK, The Netherlands, and France, with one thing in common: using old, unwanted garments and transforming them into new ones. From couture to streetwear, these designers are inspiring individuals that love to tear, rip, and experiment with old clothing. Find out how Gary Harvey, Michael Barnaart van Bergen and Andrea Crews interpret the art of upcycling.

GARY HARVEY:

Written by Billy Pavlovic Images: Robert Decelis Model: Tabitha @ MODELS1

Most women simply love the art of creating new things from fabrics or clothing that they no longer use. We are now seeing that some men love to do the same. The super talented former creative director of Levi’s, Gary Harvey, is starting his own collection.

GREENER FASHION

had gathered from the places he has visited, and was shown during the Estethica exhibition at London Fashion Week in 2007. This exhibition was the kick-off for a greener Fashion Week. Thirteen designers who uphold the principles of fair trade, organic fabrics and recycling were invited to show

change people’s perception of secondhand clothing and create fashion with a conscience. People are becoming increasingly aware of what being environmentally friendly means. They are moving beyond the hype and seeing it as natural way to live. The responsibility of being aware of what you are using and at

Clothing pieces don’t have life cycles one season anymore of

.

their stunning work. Some of the more famous ones included Enamored, Ciel and Terra Plana. His stunning collection gave the audience a feeling of real femininity with some stunning ‘arty farty’ piecework like the Baseball Puffball Dress, made from 26 nylon baseball jackets. To please his former employer he made a dress out 41 pairs of Levi 501’s. His collection created a dramatic display designed to

the same time trying to help the environment begins with the individual. Some believe that clothing can only be worn for one season, with it then being dumped in the back of the wardrobe with the rest of their unworn clothes. Harvey decided to put an end to this way of thinking. He uses material he has found in places like secondhand clothing stores to avoid waste: “people wear it

once or twice, then discard it because it is suddenly deemed aesthetically unimportant and out of date when there are actually years of life left in the garment.” His collection “was a comment on the real cost of the garment that you buy; about the cost in natural resources, exploitation of labour, the biodegradable nature of garments”. His primary collection reflected all these aspects and we will definitely see more of him in the future. He opened the eyes of many people to the fact that clothing pieces no longer have a life cycle of a single season. On the contrary, with some small or drastic adjustments everybody could turn their used garments into something stunning, possibly even a couture piece. Thus a whole new item is created and, hopefully with recycling foremost in mind, it will not just have a lifetime of one year... Perhaps it may be ‘till death do us part’...?

First things first. A decade ago environmentally friendly clothing brought to mind hemp socks and Birkenstocks. Today eco fashion is shedding the hippie image. Think innovation; think one of a kind; think couture; think Gary Harvey. He began his career at Levi’s, where he made his mark by changing the way the campaigns were shot, starting a line of 100% organic cotton jeans, and introducing packaging made from recycled materials and dyed with soybased ink. Harvey takes his inspiration from ‘people on the streets who have the potential to change’. His first collection of nine stunning dresses was made from all types of second hand fabrics and garments that he

28

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

3 OF A KIND - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

29


3 OF A KIND

1

Three designers, hailing from the UK, The Netherlands, and France, with one thing in common: using old, unwanted garments and transforming them into new ones. From couture to streetwear, these designers are inspiring individuals that love to tear, rip, and experiment with old clothing. Find out how Gary Harvey, Michael Barnaart van Bergen and Andrea Crews interpret the art of upcycling.

GARY HARVEY:

Written by Billy Pavlovic Images: Robert Decelis Model: Tabitha @ MODELS1

Most women simply love the art of creating new things from fabrics or clothing that they no longer use. We are now seeing that some men love to do the same. The super talented former creative director of Levi’s, Gary Harvey, is starting his own collection.

GREENER FASHION

had gathered from the places he has visited, and was shown during the Estethica exhibition at London Fashion Week in 2007. This exhibition was the kick-off for a greener Fashion Week. Thirteen designers who uphold the principles of fair trade, organic fabrics and recycling were invited to show

change people’s perception of secondhand clothing and create fashion with a conscience. People are becoming increasingly aware of what being environmentally friendly means. They are moving beyond the hype and seeing it as natural way to live. The responsibility of being aware of what you are using and at

Clothing pieces don’t have life cycles one season anymore of

.

their stunning work. Some of the more famous ones included Enamored, Ciel and Terra Plana. His stunning collection gave the audience a feeling of real femininity with some stunning ‘arty farty’ piecework like the Baseball Puffball Dress, made from 26 nylon baseball jackets. To please his former employer he made a dress out 41 pairs of Levi 501’s. His collection created a dramatic display designed to

the same time trying to help the environment begins with the individual. Some believe that clothing can only be worn for one season, with it then being dumped in the back of the wardrobe with the rest of their unworn clothes. Harvey decided to put an end to this way of thinking. He uses material he has found in places like secondhand clothing stores to avoid waste: “people wear it

once or twice, then discard it because it is suddenly deemed aesthetically unimportant and out of date when there are actually years of life left in the garment.” His collection “was a comment on the real cost of the garment that you buy; about the cost in natural resources, exploitation of labour, the biodegradable nature of garments”. His primary collection reflected all these aspects and we will definitely see more of him in the future. He opened the eyes of many people to the fact that clothing pieces no longer have a life cycle of a single season. On the contrary, with some small or drastic adjustments everybody could turn their used garments into something stunning, possibly even a couture piece. Thus a whole new item is created and, hopefully with recycling foremost in mind, it will not just have a lifetime of one year... Perhaps it may be ‘till death do us part’...?

First things first. A decade ago environmentally friendly clothing brought to mind hemp socks and Birkenstocks. Today eco fashion is shedding the hippie image. Think innovation; think one of a kind; think couture; think Gary Harvey. He began his career at Levi’s, where he made his mark by changing the way the campaigns were shot, starting a line of 100% organic cotton jeans, and introducing packaging made from recycled materials and dyed with soybased ink. Harvey takes his inspiration from ‘people on the streets who have the potential to change’. His first collection of nine stunning dresses was made from all types of second hand fabrics and garments that he

28

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

3 OF A KIND - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

29


2

3

MICHAEL BARNAART VAN BERGEN: PAPER TIGER

ANDREA CREWS:

Written by Saba Babas-Zadeh Images: Andrea Crews Winter 2008/09

POPPING SECOND HAND CLOTHING

Written by Billy Pavlovic and Saba Babas-Zadeh Images Billy Pavlovic

Michael Barnaart van Bergen is in his graduation year at AMFI - Amsterdam Fashion Institute and already had a fashion show at the Amsterdam International Fashion Week. His first collection was made entirely out paper and surprised many. Michael is a passionate fashion designer who has just started his career. The collection that he showed at the Fall/Winter 2009 Amsterdam International Fashion Week consisted of eight couture sets. He collaborated with fashion house Marni, who took care of the sunglasses to complete the look. “The collection, which is made out of paper, reflects my view on the current interdependency between fashion and textiles. Paper has its own life cycle and sensitivity. With the paper I did a lot of folding and stitching. The stitching part was difficult due to the fragile nature of the medium.

that it was nearly impossible to design a collection out of paper, he still wanted to experiment and see what he could do. In the beginning it felt like torture and was one of the hardest things he had ever done. It was very important to make clothing which looks good, but did not

The collection reflects

on the interdependency between

fashion and textiles My designs are conceptual but still fashionable, however you can only wear them once. That makes the wearer feel extra special, because the day after wearing it, the dress is gone. It is a unique piece that you own’, says Michael. Despite the fact

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YOUR BIGGEST BANG

have to be wearable. According to Michael being creative does not mean you want to brag about your work, but to reflect on what you have seen and done in your life. He uses inspiring images which when added together make something

STYLE - 3 OF A KIND

They call themselves Andrew Crews and are a group of creative minded people – stylists, artists, disc and video jockeys, models and photographers – who are interested in everything from fashion and art to activism. Despite their different backgrounds they all share a common interest in recycling fashion.

totally new. He calls this upcycling of your creative mind and ideas. The future is full of plans, the main theme of which is to continue to refine and expand his use of upcycling as this is where Michael draws most inspiration from. He intends to continue to show at Amsterdam Fashion Week and there is increasing international interest in his work. “I want to let people in so they can become a part of my career and visit my fashion shows. I do not want to be put on a pedestal or lose contact with those who have stood by me.” http://www.michaelbarnaartvanbergen.com/

Their projects are based on the reinterpretation of second hand clothing, which for them is a social, economic and ethical choice with a focus on personal

Underground

and

counter culture:

art in the rough

creativity, experimentation and independence. Andrew Crews transforms tons of second hand clothing into unique and desirable fashion pieces and conduct workshops in many cities, providing people with the opportunity to assist them in creating their experimental collections. Maroussia Rebecq, a designer and founder of Andrea Crews, progressively transforms each garment after getting an initial sense of it; every piece is treated individually with love and care.

3 OF A KIND - STYLE

Everything is made by the individual stylist with the desire to have as the end product an item that is daring, tempting and different. Grandpa pants are turned into overalls; a clapped out T-shirt into a sexy dress; a baggy sweater into a nightdress... The possibilities are never-ending. Creative energy is developed through inviting other likeminded people to participate. This in turn has resulted in the creation of a network throughout Europe centred on art and fashion. Everyone who works with them is given the chance to let their imaginations run riot. It is underground and counter culture – art in the rough. The main idea is to show the world the art of recycling clothing. To them fashion is an art form. Concerned about the environment they work with humanitarian groups and collaborate with schools. More than a label, Andrea Crews is a new concept that proposes an equitable model of production, an alternative to the current consumer system. Andrea Crews’ dynamic vision brings about cultural, technical and human exchanges. They create timeless garments with passion and inspire the wearer to transform these themselves. http://www.andreacrews.com/SPIP/index2.php

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

31


2

3

MICHAEL BARNAART VAN BERGEN: PAPER TIGER

ANDREA CREWS:

Written by Saba Babas-Zadeh Images: Andrea Crews Winter 2008/09

POPPING SECOND HAND CLOTHING

Written by Billy Pavlovic and Saba Babas-Zadeh Images Billy Pavlovic

Michael Barnaart van Bergen is in his graduation year at AMFI - Amsterdam Fashion Institute and already had a fashion show at the Amsterdam International Fashion Week. His first collection was made entirely out paper and surprised many. Michael is a passionate fashion designer who has just started his career. The collection that he showed at the Fall/Winter 2009 Amsterdam International Fashion Week consisted of eight couture sets. He collaborated with fashion house Marni, who took care of the sunglasses to complete the look. “The collection, which is made out of paper, reflects my view on the current interdependency between fashion and textiles. Paper has its own life cycle and sensitivity. With the paper I did a lot of folding and stitching. The stitching part was difficult due to the fragile nature of the medium.

that it was nearly impossible to design a collection out of paper, he still wanted to experiment and see what he could do. In the beginning it felt like torture and was one of the hardest things he had ever done. It was very important to make clothing which looks good, but did not

The collection reflects

on the interdependency between

fashion and textiles My designs are conceptual but still fashionable, however you can only wear them once. That makes the wearer feel extra special, because the day after wearing it, the dress is gone. It is a unique piece that you own’, says Michael. Despite the fact

30

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

have to be wearable. According to Michael being creative does not mean you want to brag about your work, but to reflect on what you have seen and done in your life. He uses inspiring images which when added together make something

STYLE - 3 OF A KIND

They call themselves Andrew Crews and are a group of creative minded people – stylists, artists, disc and video jockeys, models and photographers – who are interested in everything from fashion and art to activism. Despite their different backgrounds they all share a common interest in recycling fashion.

totally new. He calls this upcycling of your creative mind and ideas. The future is full of plans, the main theme of which is to continue to refine and expand his use of upcycling as this is where Michael draws most inspiration from. He intends to continue to show at Amsterdam Fashion Week and there is increasing international interest in his work. “I want to let people in so they can become a part of my career and visit my fashion shows. I do not want to be put on a pedestal or lose contact with those who have stood by me.” http://www.michaelbarnaartvanbergen.com/

Their projects are based on the reinterpretation of second hand clothing, which for them is a social, economic and ethical choice with a focus on personal

Underground

and

counter culture:

art in the rough

creativity, experimentation and independence. Andrew Crews transforms tons of second hand clothing into unique and desirable fashion pieces and conduct workshops in many cities, providing people with the opportunity to assist them in creating their experimental collections. Maroussia Rebecq, a designer and founder of Andrea Crews, progressively transforms each garment after getting an initial sense of it; every piece is treated individually with love and care.

3 OF A KIND - STYLE

Everything is made by the individual stylist with the desire to have as the end product an item that is daring, tempting and different. Grandpa pants are turned into overalls; a clapped out T-shirt into a sexy dress; a baggy sweater into a nightdress... The possibilities are never-ending. Creative energy is developed through inviting other likeminded people to participate. This in turn has resulted in the creation of a network throughout Europe centred on art and fashion. Everyone who works with them is given the chance to let their imaginations run riot. It is underground and counter culture – art in the rough. The main idea is to show the world the art of recycling clothing. To them fashion is an art form. Concerned about the environment they work with humanitarian groups and collaborate with schools. More than a label, Andrea Crews is a new concept that proposes an equitable model of production, an alternative to the current consumer system. Andrea Crews’ dynamic vision brings about cultural, technical and human exchanges. They create timeless garments with passion and inspire the wearer to transform these themselves. http://www.andreacrews.com/SPIP/index2.php

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

31


KARAOKE vs the ORIGINAL Written by Roos Smits Image: Billy Pavlovic

de Castelbajac is definitely a master of recycling his

own ideas

He is a middle aged French designer named JeanCharles de Castelbajac, who has started a fashion revolution in the heart of London’s youth culture. His personal motto: ‘I am and I don’t follow’. What is it that makes this guy so popular right now? Roos Smits, a third year Fashion and Branding student at AMFI found the answer.

1983 collection. His inspiration back in the eighties began with the medieval era, because for him that period in history was similar to ours, almost everyone was illiterate. Referring that back to the present, we are part of a visual society, where we focus predominantly on image rather than text. At the time, this collection was not popular at all. The loud designs seemed to scare people away. It wasn’t until recently that London’s youth culture picked up on the trend, and now As he would say himself: “This period is interesting, because like everybody is wanting a JC/DC dress or sweater. “Maybe I was with music there’s this huge proahead of my time.” Actually he did cess of recycling. Sometimes the not find out how huge his cartoon karaoke is better than the origidesigns were until a friend of his nal.” It all started when he was 17 years old, when he rejected his son mentioned it. The friend, who family’s wealth and heritage, and is a well known DJ in UK, told him that all the youngsters were began to design. For him it was a means of survival during boarding calling him JC/DC and that the London club kids were all wearing school, a way of creating his own his clothes from back in the eightuniverse. He’s been quoted that ies. After hearing this news, De clothes originally were his way Castelbajac realized that his heart to meet girls, “I was no good at belonged to London. Rock‘n’ Roll, and in fashion most men don’t like girls anyway!” And Looking at the collections of JC/ being brought up in the age of DC today, we see that he is recytelevision, that’s where many of cling ideas from his earlier colhis influences came from. lections back in the eighties. His Celebrating his 45-year career, clothes are hysterical, covered in the man has certainly seen it all. What he is now mainly known for prints and colours. Taking inspiare his garments with big cartoon ration from the New Rave scene, he knocks out the use of neon prints, originally shown in his

His clothes, are hysterical,

32

covered in prints

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - JC/DC

colours and limits himself to using simply black, blue, red, yellow and green. He even reintroduced some of his old designs, dressing some of the young and upcoming artists including, M.I.A, and Cassette Playa. He has also been busy collaborating with other young people from the fashion, art and music world. Looking at his newest collection Sportacus, a lot of the designs were inspired by figures from another historical epoch: Caesar and Cleopatra. He still maintains the New Rave feelings with the playful touches. For example the necklaces made of Lego or the oversized shirts and dresses covered in bold graphic prints. In addition he is paying a tribute to his work with a big exhibition called “Explosion Hysterique” held in Paris. Here, De Castelbajac is combining pieces of his own work with clothes from the past. A big melting pot of different outfits, with dresses from the era of Marie Antoinette, and clothing from Napoleon, being placed next to the gowns he once designed for the Pope, and 5000 Bishops during their visit to Paris in 1997. De Castelbajac wanted to show that fashion is something sacred, and that it should not be put aside from historical contexts. In the current world climate, recycling has become part of our daily lives. In fashion this had been going on for years, however, recycling your own collection is something else, and therefore something to look out for. Now is the right time for JC/DC to make his comeback, so keep an eye out for the next JC/DC collection, and see what his next move will be! www.jc-de-castelbajac.com

- STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

33


KARAOKE vs the ORIGINAL Written by Roos Smits Image: Billy Pavlovic

de Castelbajac is definitely a master of recycling his

own ideas

He is a middle aged French designer named JeanCharles de Castelbajac, who has started a fashion revolution in the heart of London’s youth culture. His personal motto: ‘I am and I don’t follow’. What is it that makes this guy so popular right now? Roos Smits, a third year Fashion and Branding student at AMFI found the answer.

1983 collection. His inspiration back in the eighties began with the medieval era, because for him that period in history was similar to ours, almost everyone was illiterate. Referring that back to the present, we are part of a visual society, where we focus predominantly on image rather than text. At the time, this collection was not popular at all. The loud designs seemed to scare people away. It wasn’t until recently that London’s youth culture picked up on the trend, and now As he would say himself: “This period is interesting, because like everybody is wanting a JC/DC dress or sweater. “Maybe I was with music there’s this huge proahead of my time.” Actually he did cess of recycling. Sometimes the not find out how huge his cartoon karaoke is better than the origidesigns were until a friend of his nal.” It all started when he was 17 years old, when he rejected his son mentioned it. The friend, who family’s wealth and heritage, and is a well known DJ in UK, told him that all the youngsters were began to design. For him it was a means of survival during boarding calling him JC/DC and that the London club kids were all wearing school, a way of creating his own his clothes from back in the eightuniverse. He’s been quoted that ies. After hearing this news, De clothes originally were his way Castelbajac realized that his heart to meet girls, “I was no good at belonged to London. Rock‘n’ Roll, and in fashion most men don’t like girls anyway!” And Looking at the collections of JC/ being brought up in the age of DC today, we see that he is recytelevision, that’s where many of cling ideas from his earlier colhis influences came from. lections back in the eighties. His Celebrating his 45-year career, clothes are hysterical, covered in the man has certainly seen it all. What he is now mainly known for prints and colours. Taking inspiare his garments with big cartoon ration from the New Rave scene, he knocks out the use of neon prints, originally shown in his

His clothes, are hysterical,

32

covered in prints

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - JC/DC

colours and limits himself to using simply black, blue, red, yellow and green. He even reintroduced some of his old designs, dressing some of the young and upcoming artists including, M.I.A, and Cassette Playa. He has also been busy collaborating with other young people from the fashion, art and music world. Looking at his newest collection Sportacus, a lot of the designs were inspired by figures from another historical epoch: Caesar and Cleopatra. He still maintains the New Rave feelings with the playful touches. For example the necklaces made of Lego or the oversized shirts and dresses covered in bold graphic prints. In addition he is paying a tribute to his work with a big exhibition called “Explosion Hysterique” held in Paris. Here, De Castelbajac is combining pieces of his own work with clothes from the past. A big melting pot of different outfits, with dresses from the era of Marie Antoinette, and clothing from Napoleon, being placed next to the gowns he once designed for the Pope, and 5000 Bishops during their visit to Paris in 1997. De Castelbajac wanted to show that fashion is something sacred, and that it should not be put aside from historical contexts. In the current world climate, recycling has become part of our daily lives. In fashion this had been going on for years, however, recycling your own collection is something else, and therefore something to look out for. Now is the right time for JC/DC to make his comeback, so keep an eye out for the next JC/DC collection, and see what his next move will be! www.jc-de-castelbajac.com

- STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

33


THE

WALL

FLOWER SHORT ON MONEY? BEHIND ON THE RENT? TAKE A LOOK AROUND YOUR NEXT OUTFIT COULD BE OFF THE WALL.

Photographer: Bob van Rooijen Styling: Suzanne van Rooij & Mirjam de Ruiter Hair & Makeup: Maartje Willems Model: Hennie @ Anti-Models

Dress: Suzanne van Rooij Top: H&M Dress: Suzanne van Rooij Top: H&M


THE

WALL

FLOWER SHORT ON MONEY? BEHIND ON THE RENT? TAKE A LOOK AROUND YOUR NEXT OUTFIT COULD BE OFF THE WALL.

Photographer: Bob van Rooijen Styling: Suzanne van Rooij & Mirjam de Ruiter Hair & Makeup: Maartje Willems Model: Hennie @ Anti-Models

Dress: Suzanne van Rooij Top: H&M Dress: Suzanne van Rooij Top: H&M


Trousers: Suzanne van Rooij Plaid and White Shirt: Episode


Trousers: Suzanne van Rooij Plaid and White Shirt: Episode


Left, Dress, Jacket & Neclace: Suzanne van Rooij Right, Dress & Tights: Suzanne van Rooij Top: H&M

- STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

39


Left, Dress, Jacket & Neclace: Suzanne van Rooij Right, Dress & Tights: Suzanne van Rooij Top: H&M

- STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

39


COUTURE Written By Dara Lang

Dresses made of bacteria, vegetables and fruit that produce patterns on fabrics; the current environmental issues push the fashion industry to develop new techniques in sustainable manufacturing. Dara Lang, a graduate with a BA in Fashion Promotion, met with Suzanne Lee to discuss her recent experiments in this field. Living in a highly technological world that continues to inspire designers, the shift from wearable technology is moving towards more natural, sustainable methods that bring together fashion and science. Through the collaboration of scientists, artists and fashion designers, the industry is responding to fashion’s ongoing demand for cheap clothing by proposing alternative methods of producing natural, environmentally friendly clothes. I had the opportunity to meet with Suzanne Lee, a Senior Researcher at the prestigious school of arts, Central Saint Martins in London. She has been experimenting with the concept of growing garments from bacterial cellulose. With a background in both fashion design and digital arts, her research focuses on the potential offered by technology, and working with young people to think about the future and today’s environmental issues. Suzanne Lee is best known for

40

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - BIO COUTURE

having merged textiles and technology to create wearable electronic devices in garments through her book, “Fashioning the Future” which explores a future wardrobe based on contemporary technology. However, more recently she has been experimenting with cellulose bacteria to create garments. Her new project aims to bring forward sustainable and green methods of manufacturing clothes. Lee suggests an alternative method to produce clothes whilst not harming the environment and using minimal resources. Through bio-couture, Lee aims to address ecological and sustainable issues around the fashion industry. By using natural resources such as vegetable composites and fruit to produce patterns, with the help of material scientist Dr. David Hepworth (who is renowned to have found Bio-mimetic solutions to engineering problems) are together experimenting with clothes and looking at how the

organisms grow, thus allowing nature to design it for us. So how is it made? The method is simple. By mixing bacteria with yeast and sweetened tea, fibres are produced. The fibres are then left to dry, resulting in sticky clumps that form a compact, leathery, papyrus-like substance. The last step in the process then involves printing, in which Lee uses fruits and vegetables such as blueberries and beetroot to make stains on the fabrics. Tumeric, port, curry powder, cherries and blueberries are the best and the most effective dyes. The project began in 2006 and is

the idea sounds very bizarre to those who have not heard of this process before, the project aims to look at how we can use our own bone cells as a source to produce jewellery. This is a collaborative design and bioengineering research project, which received a lot of media attention. It has become popular with couples who have donated their own bone cells (ideally by removing a wisdom tooth). In return they receive rings made with the tissue of their partner. On the same note, another discovery which is still under construction is Helen Storey’s

scientist have created. The project, which is similar to Lee’s bio-couture, illustrates the new upcoming gengeration of designers and scientists. Through this, we can combine scientific research and compliment it with the creative and artistic mind of a designer. Eventually this development, as explained by Suzanne Lee, could lead to the end of crafts such as weaving and tailoring, and ultimately such development could put an end to crafts altogether.

What does the future hold for bio-couture? Although Lee is still at an early stage of her experimentation with growing bacteria, she trusts that this development will attract designers and most this development could lead importantly young inspiring designers to feed off these ideas and to the think about the future of fashion. The environment is one of the such as most challenging crises today, with global warming and oil shortages. Suzanne Lee, along with Helen Storey, and other scientists and engineers are coming up with new ways of developing eco-friendly clothing. By introducing and developing alternative methods such as the use of Foundation which was created in vegetables, human bone tissue or still in experimental mode. Lee response to the current crisis in is unable to predict the end of disposable garments, it creates “fast” disposable fashion. Inthe the experiment as it relies a different outlook on possible primarily on funds to cover costs futures in fashion. It could even spired by “disappearing bottles”, of research and development. “We the project illustrates the prohelp establish sustainable, green are expecting more of clothing and natural resources as opposed found impact that the fashion for the future in addition to its to bringing more harm to the industry can have through the basic function” explains Lee. She aid of science. As a result, Storey fragile state, in which the world describes the project as “a logical explores the concept of biodegrad- is in today. conclusion to fashion’s pace”. Lee able materials alongside Profesis not the only one with the idea sor Tony Ryan from Sheffield of using natural products, from University. Together they have bio-couture; we also notice the de- created six dresses chemically velopment of bio-jewellery. Howfabricated specifically to disolve http://www.biocouture.co.uk/index.html ever, unlike Lee’s use of vegetable over time in water. Entitled composites as a source of clothing, Wonderland, the project, which bio-jewellery aims to create rings was previewed in February 2008, made of biologically engineered demonstrates the miraculous human bone tissue. Although plastics that both designer and

Eventually end of crafts weaving and tailoring

BIO COUTURE - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

41


COUTURE Written By Dara Lang

Dresses made of bacteria, vegetables and fruit that produce patterns on fabrics; the current environmental issues push the fashion industry to develop new techniques in sustainable manufacturing. Dara Lang, a graduate with a BA in Fashion Promotion, met with Suzanne Lee to discuss her recent experiments in this field. Living in a highly technological world that continues to inspire designers, the shift from wearable technology is moving towards more natural, sustainable methods that bring together fashion and science. Through the collaboration of scientists, artists and fashion designers, the industry is responding to fashion’s ongoing demand for cheap clothing by proposing alternative methods of producing natural, environmentally friendly clothes. I had the opportunity to meet with Suzanne Lee, a Senior Researcher at the prestigious school of arts, Central Saint Martins in London. She has been experimenting with the concept of growing garments from bacterial cellulose. With a background in both fashion design and digital arts, her research focuses on the potential offered by technology, and working with young people to think about the future and today’s environmental issues. Suzanne Lee is best known for

40

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - BIO COUTURE

having merged textiles and technology to create wearable electronic devices in garments through her book, “Fashioning the Future” which explores a future wardrobe based on contemporary technology. However, more recently she has been experimenting with cellulose bacteria to create garments. Her new project aims to bring forward sustainable and green methods of manufacturing clothes. Lee suggests an alternative method to produce clothes whilst not harming the environment and using minimal resources. Through bio-couture, Lee aims to address ecological and sustainable issues around the fashion industry. By using natural resources such as vegetable composites and fruit to produce patterns, with the help of material scientist Dr. David Hepworth (who is renowned to have found Bio-mimetic solutions to engineering problems) are together experimenting with clothes and looking at how the

organisms grow, thus allowing nature to design it for us. So how is it made? The method is simple. By mixing bacteria with yeast and sweetened tea, fibres are produced. The fibres are then left to dry, resulting in sticky clumps that form a compact, leathery, papyrus-like substance. The last step in the process then involves printing, in which Lee uses fruits and vegetables such as blueberries and beetroot to make stains on the fabrics. Tumeric, port, curry powder, cherries and blueberries are the best and the most effective dyes. The project began in 2006 and is

the idea sounds very bizarre to those who have not heard of this process before, the project aims to look at how we can use our own bone cells as a source to produce jewellery. This is a collaborative design and bioengineering research project, which received a lot of media attention. It has become popular with couples who have donated their own bone cells (ideally by removing a wisdom tooth). In return they receive rings made with the tissue of their partner. On the same note, another discovery which is still under construction is Helen Storey’s

scientist have created. The project, which is similar to Lee’s bio-couture, illustrates the new upcoming gengeration of designers and scientists. Through this, we can combine scientific research and compliment it with the creative and artistic mind of a designer. Eventually this development, as explained by Suzanne Lee, could lead to the end of crafts such as weaving and tailoring, and ultimately such development could put an end to crafts altogether.

What does the future hold for bio-couture? Although Lee is still at an early stage of her experimentation with growing bacteria, she trusts that this development will attract designers and most this development could lead importantly young inspiring designers to feed off these ideas and to the think about the future of fashion. The environment is one of the such as most challenging crises today, with global warming and oil shortages. Suzanne Lee, along with Helen Storey, and other scientists and engineers are coming up with new ways of developing eco-friendly clothing. By introducing and developing alternative methods such as the use of Foundation which was created in vegetables, human bone tissue or still in experimental mode. Lee response to the current crisis in is unable to predict the end of disposable garments, it creates “fast” disposable fashion. Inthe the experiment as it relies a different outlook on possible primarily on funds to cover costs futures in fashion. It could even spired by “disappearing bottles”, of research and development. “We the project illustrates the prohelp establish sustainable, green are expecting more of clothing and natural resources as opposed found impact that the fashion for the future in addition to its to bringing more harm to the industry can have through the basic function” explains Lee. She aid of science. As a result, Storey fragile state, in which the world describes the project as “a logical explores the concept of biodegrad- is in today. conclusion to fashion’s pace”. Lee able materials alongside Profesis not the only one with the idea sor Tony Ryan from Sheffield of using natural products, from University. Together they have bio-couture; we also notice the de- created six dresses chemically velopment of bio-jewellery. Howfabricated specifically to disolve http://www.biocouture.co.uk/index.html ever, unlike Lee’s use of vegetable over time in water. Entitled composites as a source of clothing, Wonderland, the project, which bio-jewellery aims to create rings was previewed in February 2008, made of biologically engineered demonstrates the miraculous human bone tissue. Although plastics that both designer and

Eventually end of crafts weaving and tailoring

BIO COUTURE - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

41


psssst....

PASS IT ON Production: Lieke Faber, Tara Koppenol, Jessica Put & Femke Verheuvel

_56 When you hear the words ‘Broken Telephone’ you all know what I mean by it. You whisper a word or sentence in the ear of the person sitting next to you, this person needs to repeat the word or text to the next person and so on. The last person in the circle has to say out loud the word or text. Specially for Your Biggest BANG five creatives played this game, passing on their creative work to be expanded upon. Our start was a text from a movie which made us wonder what kind of exciting inspirations would come out of it.

42

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

ART & DESIGN - PASS IT ON

I am sorry for who I am


psssst....

PASS IT ON Production: Lieke Faber, Tara Koppenol, Jessica Put & Femke Verheuvel

_56 When you hear the words ‘Broken Telephone’ you all know what I mean by it. You whisper a word or sentence in the ear of the person sitting next to you, this person needs to repeat the word or text to the next person and so on. The last person in the circle has to say out loud the word or text. Specially for Your Biggest BANG five creatives played this game, passing on their creative work to be expanded upon. Our start was a text from a movie which made us wonder what kind of exciting inspirations would come out of it.

42

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

ART & DESIGN - PASS IT ON

I am sorry for who I am


Marieke van Enk - Visual artist:

“Everything is connected even the parts we don’t like... Especially the parts we don’t like.” – A history of the world in 10½ chapters, Julian Barnes

Yona van Mansfield - Fashion & Design student at AMFI - Amsterdam Fashion Institute: “Individual people are not allowed to say what they want, they are being pulled back by their skin and clothes. Still there are some who show what is behind that skin, the pure core parts of their fragile innocence”


Marieke van Enk - Visual artist:

“Everything is connected even the parts we don’t like... Especially the parts we don’t like.” – A history of the world in 10½ chapters, Julian Barnes

Yona van Mansfield - Fashion & Design student at AMFI - Amsterdam Fashion Institute: “Individual people are not allowed to say what they want, they are being pulled back by their skin and clothes. Still there are some who show what is behind that skin, the pure core parts of their fragile innocence”


ble m: ossi poe ns p n o i o t i t a zon. vari nsla s nterhe hori u o Tra hought endless ruth c s enadens t In t venly amed t sire f de nd bro o Hea he dre d a n on t sing y, the e tricted mu realit unres The iration insp

Benny Kleine - Graphic Designer: “Everyone is unique, always remember that”

Julie Schulting - Journalism student:

“Nothing is a waste of time if you use the experience wisely.” - Auguste Rodin


ble m: ossi poe ns p n o i o t i t a zon. vari nsla s nterhe hori u o Tra hought endless ruth c s enadens t In t venly amed t sire f de nd bro o Hea he dre d a n on t sing y, the e tricted mu realit unres The iration insp

Benny Kleine - Graphic Designer: “Everyone is unique, always remember that”

Julie Schulting - Journalism student:

“Nothing is a waste of time if you use the experience wisely.” - Auguste Rodin


CLOAKROOM

MADNESS

Cloakroom Madness. Have you always wondered where someone’s coat has come from? What is the history of the coat? Where is it headed in the future? We visited the Stedelijk Museum to find out. Armed with a photographer and model we ventured into the cloakroom. The best solution was to ask the coats themselves…

Katinka Schmitz - Int. Fashion & Design student at AMFI - Amsterdam Fashion Institute:

Photography: Taufiq Hosen Styling: Saba Babas-Zadeh & Emily Cusack Model: Joep Pingen

“My inspiration were the words: in gedachten and het slot op verlangens.”

CLOAKROOM MADNESS - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

49


CLOAKROOM

MADNESS

Cloakroom Madness. Have you always wondered where someone’s coat has come from? What is the history of the coat? Where is it headed in the future? We visited the Stedelijk Museum to find out. Armed with a photographer and model we ventured into the cloakroom. The best solution was to ask the coats themselves…

Katinka Schmitz - Int. Fashion & Design student at AMFI - Amsterdam Fashion Institute:

Photography: Taufiq Hosen Styling: Saba Babas-Zadeh & Emily Cusack Model: Joep Pingen

“My inspiration were the words: in gedachten and het slot op verlangens.”

CLOAKROOM MADNESS - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

49


WEEKDAY RAINCOAT

YVES SAINT LAURENT

Age: 1

Age: 4

Life cycle: Gødmorgen! I am from Denmark. My life started when a bunch of Dutch guys bought me in Copenhagen. I could see they were the real fashionable types, searching for that one special thing that would separate them from the crowd. Which turned out to be me! I guess that is pretty flattering come to think of it. I think they will definitely take good care of me.

50

Life cycle: It all started when a gentleman from the United States purchased me. However, after trying me on a couple of times he finally realized he looked better without me. I knew that right at the start. After being on eBay for more than one month someone finally bought me. I traveled all the way to The Netherlands in a very small box and here I am, living it large!

RABBIT FUR COAT, VINTAGE

H&M RAINCOAT

Age: +/- 30

Age: 1,5

Life cycle: My previous owner was a very beautiful and classy lady from Iran. She wore me with a lot of pride. Those were the days. Now I have been handed down to her stunning daughter. I am happy to be staying in the family, it is a lot better than being sold for â‚Ź20 on Waterloo square. I must say I am a very lucky coat.

Life cycle: To be exact my life started at a PR company. I was sent to the editorial team of a very famous magazine. Being used in a photo shoot was exciting, however, nobody really appreciated me over there.. Thank God they hired this young and crazy intern! She finally accepted me for who I am and the staff were wise to give me to her. Every day is a blast now, we look fabulous together! I still have a long life to live.

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - CLOAKROOM MADNESS

CLOAKROOM MADNESS - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

51


WEEKDAY RAINCOAT

YVES SAINT LAURENT

Age: 1

Age: 4

Life cycle: Gødmorgen! I am from Denmark. My life started when a bunch of Dutch guys bought me in Copenhagen. I could see they were the real fashionable types, searching for that one special thing that would separate them from the crowd. Which turned out to be me! I guess that is pretty flattering come to think of it. I think they will definitely take good care of me.

50

Life cycle: It all started when a gentleman from the United States purchased me. However, after trying me on a couple of times he finally realized he looked better without me. I knew that right at the start. After being on eBay for more than one month someone finally bought me. I traveled all the way to The Netherlands in a very small box and here I am, living it large!

RABBIT FUR COAT, VINTAGE

H&M RAINCOAT

Age: +/- 30

Age: 1,5

Life cycle: My previous owner was a very beautiful and classy lady from Iran. She wore me with a lot of pride. Those were the days. Now I have been handed down to her stunning daughter. I am happy to be staying in the family, it is a lot better than being sold for â‚Ź20 on Waterloo square. I must say I am a very lucky coat.

Life cycle: To be exact my life started at a PR company. I was sent to the editorial team of a very famous magazine. Being used in a photo shoot was exciting, however, nobody really appreciated me over there.. Thank God they hired this young and crazy intern! She finally accepted me for who I am and the staff were wise to give me to her. Every day is a blast now, we look fabulous together! I still have a long life to live.

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - CLOAKROOM MADNESS

CLOAKROOM MADNESS - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

51


Top: Huebsch at YDU Trousers: Maaike at Individuals

SHAPE SHIFTERS

Photographer: Duy Quoc Vo Styling & Production: Cherryl Karijodirono & Saba Babas-Zadeh Hair & Makeup: Ed Thijsen for AVEDA @ Angeligue Hoorn Model: Swanny @ ANKA Model Management

52

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE -


Top: Huebsch at YDU Trousers: Maaike at Individuals

SHAPE SHIFTERS

Photographer: Duy Quoc Vo Styling & Production: Cherryl Karijodirono & Saba Babas-Zadeh Hair & Makeup: Ed Thijsen for AVEDA @ Angeligue Hoorn Model: Swanny @ ANKA Model Management

52

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE -


Jacket: Huebsch at YDU Trousers: H&M Shoes: Invito

Jacket: Edwin Oudshoorn Trousers: Django Steenbakker


Jacket: Huebsch at YDU Trousers: H&M Shoes: Invito

Jacket: Edwin Oudshoorn Trousers: Django Steenbakker


Bodysuit: Elsewerk atYdu

Jacket: Django Steenbakker Trousers: Balenciaga


Bodysuit: Elsewerk atYdu

Jacket: Django Steenbakker Trousers: Balenciaga


Left: Sweater: By Tougaard Shoes: Joline Jolink Tights: H&M Right: Dress: Maison Martin Margiela Shoes: Invito


Left: Sweater: By Tougaard Shoes: Joline Jolink Tights: H&M Right: Dress: Maison Martin Margiela Shoes: Invito


GREED We can’t escape it Written by Rianne Duursma Image: Rutger Termohlen

According to psychologist and publicist Susanne Piët, greed is both a destroyer and sustainer of our world. Human beings are greedy by nature and they always want more, but if we do not create social capital greed may pull us under. “Our society is very achievement oriented. This interests me, but worries me at the same time. Everybody wants everything, and then some. A career, children, two cars, a walk-in closet. Think of how much stress a consumer has to deal with when making a purchase. I often think it is pathetic, but am part of it just the same. I just bought a smartphone, but it is really driving me crazy. If you want too much you often can not keep up.

I find that I do not know what that is, maybe because I am getting older? I do write too many books and I own too much stuff. Sometimes I wonder where to put it all! In the US the storage rental business is booming, partly because people own too much and partly because it is no longer considered appropriate to have all of your possessions on display. I really think this is a sign of the times, that storage has become such a necessity.

I am not sure if I always perform to the best of my abilities, but I love to learn. I want to know what is going on in the world, how things work and how people operate. I really want to absorb everything that inspires me. My inspiration could be science, art or philosophy and at the same time day-to-day stuff such as the sort of shoes that are currently fashionable. Learning gives me energy and it is what keeps me going.

People use labels or brands and what they communicate. All expressions of a brand tell us something about us as people. I know of an oil baron who only travels first class because of the brands on his luggage and clothing. People attach a certain value to him because of the brand of the things he uses or wears. He is not considered to be a good person because of his achievements, his thoughts, his sense of humour or how he treats his employees. He is only appreciated because of the fashionable labels he chooses to buy. To me this is a rather tragic and disturbing sign of the society we now live in.”

Nature is important to me and I live in the country which provides me with the opportunity to retreat if I am in need of silence. I want to learn from and be around other people, but I also require solitude so that I can recover from all the stimuli and put in order all the things that I may have learnt. If I am not able to recover I become upset.”

Sign of the times

“Everyone should know their ideal image.

60

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

The age of consciousness

“In my book ‘The Emocode’ I describe the various phases in life: toddler, childhood, teenager, etc. I am fairly sure that we are heading towards a phase of consciousness. I just saw ‘The Age Of Blood’ and I thought it was a rather remarkable story for an American movie. The entire movie is about

ART & DESIGN - GREED

oil fever and the evil, greed and lack of consciousness caused by that, but it does not moralise. I believe greed ruins the world, it will destroy us unless someone can bring a halt to this phase. Presently I am working on a new book titled ‘Where I Walk The Sun Shines’. It is about how to be happy during gloomy times. It is a plea for the creation of social capital. People should accept themselves for who they are, not for what they are, and accept others in the same way. I am incredibly irritated by all the bullshit about climate change and sustainability because no-one is really listening to each other. Sustainability of the human being should be the topic of discussion. If we appreciate each other for who we are then we are working towards creating a social capital. Fashion can play a part. You can adorn yourself, pull a joke or do something unexpected and make the world more colourful. Using materialism as the basis for rejecting a human being is wrong. In economic terms things will probably never change, greed will always be the driving force, but it would be great if fashion could be a part of building a new social capital. The way people judge and assess each other – which means rejecting or excluding others – based on their clothing, shoes or hairstyle is ridiculous. Clothing codes used to be a privilege of the church or royal courts. Later the bourgeoisie also began to use these codes of adornment. Judgement by appearance is therefore nothing new, however this ‘privilege’ has now been democratised and accessible to everyone. The internet has played a role in this process and playing tribes can lead to a form of war, real or virtual. Looking at this more deeply I see greed as a part of every real war, a particular self-interest can start or exacerbate a war. You could state that war is a part of mankind, that the human being created war.”

Emotion management

“I have always been an outsider. Even though I am always in the front row I am just an observer. I anticipate trends by not participating and this trait manifests itself

in my books. I need to know everything about all trends, but I am a bit stubborn when it comes to my own lifestyle... I still do not have a walk-in closet! Emotion management is the capacity to manage the emotions of yourself and others. You receive different stimuli that create a certain mood. You then have to contemplate whether to express those feelings or replace or suppress them. The way you handle this process can depend on the environment you are in at the time. Take for instance the ultimate tear jerker movie, on the couch at home you may cry freely, but in the cinema with your partner you may try to quickly think of something happy. As a professional you can work on the emotions of others. Fashion plays with principles as well. If bright colours are big this summer you can imagine that all the colours may create a happy mood on the streets. Fashion has a tendency to respond to the current economic climate through the use of differing colour palettes. You can use it to mobilise people positively and negatively. The Geert Wilders movie is a typical example of emotion management. The situation surrounding his movie could have got completely out of control and not been held back by any boundaries.

“ Even though

I am always

in the front row I am

just an observer”

You can influence emotion and experience by intervening in behaviour or thought. The systems of thought, action and feeling are closely related. Through an anti-smoking campaign the process of thinking is targeted with the use of thoughts about safety, health and social acceptability. Smoking used to be seen as tough, and even stylish. Now it is considered to be the exact opposite and non-smoking is labelled positively. As soon as the positive statement becomes common property you can start banning something. That is a primary example of emotion management, as is the whole ‘don’t drink and drive’ campaign. They influence common behaviour through thought.”

GREED - ART & DESIGN

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

61


GREED We can’t escape it Written by Rianne Duursma Image: Rutger Termohlen

According to psychologist and publicist Susanne Piët, greed is both a destroyer and sustainer of our world. Human beings are greedy by nature and they always want more, but if we do not create social capital greed may pull us under. “Our society is very achievement oriented. This interests me, but worries me at the same time. Everybody wants everything, and then some. A career, children, two cars, a walk-in closet. Think of how much stress a consumer has to deal with when making a purchase. I often think it is pathetic, but am part of it just the same. I just bought a smartphone, but it is really driving me crazy. If you want too much you often can not keep up.

I find that I do not know what that is, maybe because I am getting older? I do write too many books and I own too much stuff. Sometimes I wonder where to put it all! In the US the storage rental business is booming, partly because people own too much and partly because it is no longer considered appropriate to have all of your possessions on display. I really think this is a sign of the times, that storage has become such a necessity.

I am not sure if I always perform to the best of my abilities, but I love to learn. I want to know what is going on in the world, how things work and how people operate. I really want to absorb everything that inspires me. My inspiration could be science, art or philosophy and at the same time day-to-day stuff such as the sort of shoes that are currently fashionable. Learning gives me energy and it is what keeps me going.

People use labels or brands and what they communicate. All expressions of a brand tell us something about us as people. I know of an oil baron who only travels first class because of the brands on his luggage and clothing. People attach a certain value to him because of the brand of the things he uses or wears. He is not considered to be a good person because of his achievements, his thoughts, his sense of humour or how he treats his employees. He is only appreciated because of the fashionable labels he chooses to buy. To me this is a rather tragic and disturbing sign of the society we now live in.”

Nature is important to me and I live in the country which provides me with the opportunity to retreat if I am in need of silence. I want to learn from and be around other people, but I also require solitude so that I can recover from all the stimuli and put in order all the things that I may have learnt. If I am not able to recover I become upset.”

Sign of the times

“Everyone should know their ideal image.

60

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

The age of consciousness

“In my book ‘The Emocode’ I describe the various phases in life: toddler, childhood, teenager, etc. I am fairly sure that we are heading towards a phase of consciousness. I just saw ‘The Age Of Blood’ and I thought it was a rather remarkable story for an American movie. The entire movie is about

ART & DESIGN - GREED

oil fever and the evil, greed and lack of consciousness caused by that, but it does not moralise. I believe greed ruins the world, it will destroy us unless someone can bring a halt to this phase. Presently I am working on a new book titled ‘Where I Walk The Sun Shines’. It is about how to be happy during gloomy times. It is a plea for the creation of social capital. People should accept themselves for who they are, not for what they are, and accept others in the same way. I am incredibly irritated by all the bullshit about climate change and sustainability because no-one is really listening to each other. Sustainability of the human being should be the topic of discussion. If we appreciate each other for who we are then we are working towards creating a social capital. Fashion can play a part. You can adorn yourself, pull a joke or do something unexpected and make the world more colourful. Using materialism as the basis for rejecting a human being is wrong. In economic terms things will probably never change, greed will always be the driving force, but it would be great if fashion could be a part of building a new social capital. The way people judge and assess each other – which means rejecting or excluding others – based on their clothing, shoes or hairstyle is ridiculous. Clothing codes used to be a privilege of the church or royal courts. Later the bourgeoisie also began to use these codes of adornment. Judgement by appearance is therefore nothing new, however this ‘privilege’ has now been democratised and accessible to everyone. The internet has played a role in this process and playing tribes can lead to a form of war, real or virtual. Looking at this more deeply I see greed as a part of every real war, a particular self-interest can start or exacerbate a war. You could state that war is a part of mankind, that the human being created war.”

Emotion management

“I have always been an outsider. Even though I am always in the front row I am just an observer. I anticipate trends by not participating and this trait manifests itself

in my books. I need to know everything about all trends, but I am a bit stubborn when it comes to my own lifestyle... I still do not have a walk-in closet! Emotion management is the capacity to manage the emotions of yourself and others. You receive different stimuli that create a certain mood. You then have to contemplate whether to express those feelings or replace or suppress them. The way you handle this process can depend on the environment you are in at the time. Take for instance the ultimate tear jerker movie, on the couch at home you may cry freely, but in the cinema with your partner you may try to quickly think of something happy. As a professional you can work on the emotions of others. Fashion plays with principles as well. If bright colours are big this summer you can imagine that all the colours may create a happy mood on the streets. Fashion has a tendency to respond to the current economic climate through the use of differing colour palettes. You can use it to mobilise people positively and negatively. The Geert Wilders movie is a typical example of emotion management. The situation surrounding his movie could have got completely out of control and not been held back by any boundaries.

“ Even though

I am always

in the front row I am

just an observer”

You can influence emotion and experience by intervening in behaviour or thought. The systems of thought, action and feeling are closely related. Through an anti-smoking campaign the process of thinking is targeted with the use of thoughts about safety, health and social acceptability. Smoking used to be seen as tough, and even stylish. Now it is considered to be the exact opposite and non-smoking is labelled positively. As soon as the positive statement becomes common property you can start banning something. That is a primary example of emotion management, as is the whole ‘don’t drink and drive’ campaign. They influence common behaviour through thought.”

GREED - ART & DESIGN

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

61


designer you know the trends. You can add something to them, leave something out or turn it all upside down. Your appearance sends out codes that give you access to a certain group or environment. By just looking at someone’s shoes you can predict what they will drink, the sort of music they may like or if they care for the planet. This process can be quite judgemental and it takes place in public areas. While people used to be happy because they owned a Rolex, today we want more. At this time the emocode is extremely important because it is hard to be acknowledged as a person. Your appearance and therefore your code, is indispensable in giving people an entrance to the real you. The same goes for brands. Nike, Nokia, Prada, Hema, Ikea and McDonalds: they all got it right. The code provides and entry point to people and communities, you can speak the language of brands. Surviving socially has almost become more important than surviving physically. I just visited Africa where I saw people walking around with mobile phones and they had to go to special booths to charge them. They would rather pay for electricity than for food.”

Identity crisis

The Emocode

“Owning a Rolex

used to be

Todayenough.

62

we want

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

more”

“Now is the turn of the consumer. At first we were a bit naïve, everyone wanted to feel happy, to enjoy was enough. Now the consumer has become more demanding. He wants to be recognised as a person. People are confused. Consciousness and the way we relate to each other will be important. Another book I am writing is about love, about gradations of qualities and values. We are developing more and more, we want less of the mainstream stuff and more of the avantgarde. The emocode represents a system in which you as a person send signals that have an emotional value. You can shape who you are and who you want to be, and show it to others. Show everybody that you are special, from head to toe or from the balcony to the floor. As a fashion

ART & DESIGN - GREED

“Everybody goes through an identity crisis. Take for instance teenagers that become adults and have to suddenly deal with all the responsibilities that entails. Or children of divorced parents that act differently according to whether they are with their mother or father. You can observe the identity crisis in other cultures as well, like in Africa. In Namibia I visited a tribe and on the way back I gave a young mother a lift. She was dressed traditionally and her daughter

was wrapped in a blanket only. But after a while I found out that she spoke very good English and while we were driving she changed into western clothes. During a 100 km drive she completely transformed. Another example is that of the Afghani version of Idols. The top favourite is a woman, who would usually have to wear a burka, but in the show she is a completely different person and completely accepted by most viewers. The same goes for some Muslims in The Netherlands, who behave very traditionally at home, but in a western way in public life. Yet another example is China, where western influences have become far more common. Some Chinese bleach their hair to look more western, but they can act in a very traditional Chinese way once they are at home. The world seems to be upside down at times.”

Greed, our destiny

“Greed is our destiny, and it may be our ending. People come to grief. It is a destroyer, it tears down relationships and it can start a war. If we did not suffer from greed, the world would be a better place. However, greed and jealousy maintain each other and have economic value. Greed obviously needs to be fed, thus sustaining our economy. Research has shown that you have to obtain a certain level of prosperity to be happy, but people are never satisfied and will always want to have more. I do not drink or eat much, and if I behave greedily it shows immediately. My body just can not handle it, and neither can my mind. My greed is for knowledge and novelties. I obviously have too much stuff as well. So I can not say I am not greedy. It is human nature.”

Susanne Piët on Susanne Piët

“As a psychologist I specialise in communication and emotions. I have also worked as a journalist and I am an author. In my work I combine all of my expertise whether I am working for companies, governments or other organisations. If you google me you will see that some label me as a trendwatcher. I think that is a nice addition to my field of work.” Susanne was a lecturer at the University of Amsterdam and the Erasmus University in Rotterdam. She has also worked in television. She wrote a.o. De Emotiemarkt (2003), Emotiemanagement (2005), Het Groot Communicatie Denkboek (2005), De Emocode (2007, translated in English: The Emocode)

REED - ART & DESIGN

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

63


designer you know the trends. You can add something to them, leave something out or turn it all upside down. Your appearance sends out codes that give you access to a certain group or environment. By just looking at someone’s shoes you can predict what they will drink, the sort of music they may like or if they care for the planet. This process can be quite judgemental and it takes place in public areas. While people used to be happy because they owned a Rolex, today we want more. At this time the emocode is extremely important because it is hard to be acknowledged as a person. Your appearance and therefore your code, is indispensable in giving people an entrance to the real you. The same goes for brands. Nike, Nokia, Prada, Hema, Ikea and McDonalds: they all got it right. The code provides and entry point to people and communities, you can speak the language of brands. Surviving socially has almost become more important than surviving physically. I just visited Africa where I saw people walking around with mobile phones and they had to go to special booths to charge them. They would rather pay for electricity than for food.”

Identity crisis

The Emocode

“Owning a Rolex

used to be

Todayenough.

62

we want

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

more”

“Now is the turn of the consumer. At first we were a bit naïve, everyone wanted to feel happy, to enjoy was enough. Now the consumer has become more demanding. He wants to be recognised as a person. People are confused. Consciousness and the way we relate to each other will be important. Another book I am writing is about love, about gradations of qualities and values. We are developing more and more, we want less of the mainstream stuff and more of the avantgarde. The emocode represents a system in which you as a person send signals that have an emotional value. You can shape who you are and who you want to be, and show it to others. Show everybody that you are special, from head to toe or from the balcony to the floor. As a fashion

ART & DESIGN - GREED

“Everybody goes through an identity crisis. Take for instance teenagers that become adults and have to suddenly deal with all the responsibilities that entails. Or children of divorced parents that act differently according to whether they are with their mother or father. You can observe the identity crisis in other cultures as well, like in Africa. In Namibia I visited a tribe and on the way back I gave a young mother a lift. She was dressed traditionally and her daughter

was wrapped in a blanket only. But after a while I found out that she spoke very good English and while we were driving she changed into western clothes. During a 100 km drive she completely transformed. Another example is that of the Afghani version of Idols. The top favourite is a woman, who would usually have to wear a burka, but in the show she is a completely different person and completely accepted by most viewers. The same goes for some Muslims in The Netherlands, who behave very traditionally at home, but in a western way in public life. Yet another example is China, where western influences have become far more common. Some Chinese bleach their hair to look more western, but they can act in a very traditional Chinese way once they are at home. The world seems to be upside down at times.”

Greed, our destiny

“Greed is our destiny, and it may be our ending. People come to grief. It is a destroyer, it tears down relationships and it can start a war. If we did not suffer from greed, the world would be a better place. However, greed and jealousy maintain each other and have economic value. Greed obviously needs to be fed, thus sustaining our economy. Research has shown that you have to obtain a certain level of prosperity to be happy, but people are never satisfied and will always want to have more. I do not drink or eat much, and if I behave greedily it shows immediately. My body just can not handle it, and neither can my mind. My greed is for knowledge and novelties. I obviously have too much stuff as well. So I can not say I am not greedy. It is human nature.”

Susanne Piët on Susanne Piët

“As a psychologist I specialise in communication and emotions. I have also worked as a journalist and I am an author. In my work I combine all of my expertise whether I am working for companies, governments or other organisations. If you google me you will see that some label me as a trendwatcher. I think that is a nice addition to my field of work.” Susanne was a lecturer at the University of Amsterdam and the Erasmus University in Rotterdam. She has also worked in television. She wrote a.o. De Emotiemarkt (2003), Emotiemanagement (2005), Het Groot Communicatie Denkboek (2005), De Emocode (2007, translated in English: The Emocode)

REED - ART & DESIGN

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

63


My life as a

COUTURE DRESSER Written by Rosanne van den Bosch Image: Rosanne van den Bosch

You can imagine how ecstatic I was when the email arrived informing me that I had been selected to work as a dresser for the renowned Dutch design duo Viktor & Rolf. I could already sense fame and wondered how it would be backstage at an haute couture show at Paris Fashion Week. 03.00 a.m. Early birdies

The alarm goes off and I get ready for a long day of travel, work and, of course, glitter and glamour. The glamour part disappears shortly after arriving at central station in Amsterdam where I am greeted by 25 other dressers who all look like wrecks and we pile into a bus for the journey to Paris. As soon as we hit the highway most fall asleep, but some of us are far too excited to catch up on any missed sleep.

their attitude, not to mention that they tower over everyone else present – the models have arrived. They head straight to hair and make-up where they will be magically transformed by numerous stylists, each one of whom has a team of at least two assistants.

Who: Rosanne van den Bosch, 3rd years Fashion & Branding student What: Dresser @ Viktor & Rolf Where: Backstage autumn/winter 08/09 Viktor&Rolf Paris Fashion Week Why: Lucky girl choosen out of hundreds of applications When: February 26 2008

2.30 p.m. Backstage stress

With the show fashionably delayed I gaze at the crowd of photographers; the seamstresses putting the all important finishing touches to the dresses; 11.00 a.m. Hello Paris! the story boards for the models; the footwear made Entering Paris we are greeted by a traffic jam and especially for today. I realise: this is fashion! Then eventually reach our destination fashionably late. I wonder: Where are Viktor & Rolf?! Half an hour Le Carreau du Temple, where the show will be before the show starts they enter backstage. Calm held, is a beautiful building that usually functions and seemingly unaware of all the previous frenetic as a second hand clothing market. Today however hours of preparation, they take a seat at hair and it will be filled with VIPs from the fashion world and the international fashion press: invitation only! makeup where they get prepped for a talk to the press.

11.45 a.m. Briefing

Paris is cold and gloomy, and inside the venue it is not any warmer. While we wait for our instructions we keep our winter layers on. We are granted 10 minutes with the head of design who informs us of today’s do’s and don’ts. The main mission: keep the clothing out of the hands of the press, the models and any other interested parties. The haute couture garments are only to be handled by Viktor & Rolf seamstresses, we will be dressing the pret-aporter models. One of the V&R team members tells me how they handmade the couture pieces, while the pret-a-porter garments were designed in Italy under V&R’s supervision. She also talks about the previous week of non-stop work in Paris... I soon realise that I should not really complain about my three hours of sleep last night.

12.30 p.m. Models in the house

Amidst this hive of activity you recognise them as soon as they enter the hall, superslim and flaunting

64

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

3.10 p.m. Showtime!

We are all on alert and finally with a blast of music the first model hits the runway. Immediately every dresser loses their assigned model. Priceless haute couture numbers are hastily peeled off and discarded. Dressers help the seamstresses where possible. One does the shoes, another throws a silk scarf over the model’s head to control any possible collateral damage caused by the makeup. The seamstresses feverishly open and close countless press studs while the director screams for the model to be back on stage.

3.25 p.m. Critical moments

Then it is over! Fifteen hours in a bus for fifteen minutes of showtime. Backstage is chaos. While the press are focussed on that all important shot, interested hands grasp at the garments. We know that now is the most critical time and do our best

STYLE -VIKTOR & ROLF

- STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

65


My life as a

COUTURE DRESSER Written by Rosanne van den Bosch Image: Rosanne van den Bosch

You can imagine how ecstatic I was when the email arrived informing me that I had been selected to work as a dresser for the renowned Dutch design duo Viktor & Rolf. I could already sense fame and wondered how it would be backstage at an haute couture show at Paris Fashion Week. 03.00 a.m. Early birdies

The alarm goes off and I get ready for a long day of travel, work and, of course, glitter and glamour. The glamour part disappears shortly after arriving at central station in Amsterdam where I am greeted by 25 other dressers who all look like wrecks and we pile into a bus for the journey to Paris. As soon as we hit the highway most fall asleep, but some of us are far too excited to catch up on any missed sleep.

their attitude, not to mention that they tower over everyone else present – the models have arrived. They head straight to hair and make-up where they will be magically transformed by numerous stylists, each one of whom has a team of at least two assistants.

Who: Rosanne van den Bosch, 3rd years Fashion & Branding student What: Dresser @ Viktor & Rolf Where: Backstage autumn/winter 08/09 Viktor&Rolf Paris Fashion Week Why: Lucky girl choosen out of hundreds of applications When: February 26 2008

2.30 p.m. Backstage stress

With the show fashionably delayed I gaze at the crowd of photographers; the seamstresses putting the all important finishing touches to the dresses; 11.00 a.m. Hello Paris! the story boards for the models; the footwear made Entering Paris we are greeted by a traffic jam and especially for today. I realise: this is fashion! Then eventually reach our destination fashionably late. I wonder: Where are Viktor & Rolf?! Half an hour Le Carreau du Temple, where the show will be before the show starts they enter backstage. Calm held, is a beautiful building that usually functions and seemingly unaware of all the previous frenetic as a second hand clothing market. Today however hours of preparation, they take a seat at hair and it will be filled with VIPs from the fashion world and the international fashion press: invitation only! makeup where they get prepped for a talk to the press.

11.45 a.m. Briefing

Paris is cold and gloomy, and inside the venue it is not any warmer. While we wait for our instructions we keep our winter layers on. We are granted 10 minutes with the head of design who informs us of today’s do’s and don’ts. The main mission: keep the clothing out of the hands of the press, the models and any other interested parties. The haute couture garments are only to be handled by Viktor & Rolf seamstresses, we will be dressing the pret-aporter models. One of the V&R team members tells me how they handmade the couture pieces, while the pret-a-porter garments were designed in Italy under V&R’s supervision. She also talks about the previous week of non-stop work in Paris... I soon realise that I should not really complain about my three hours of sleep last night.

12.30 p.m. Models in the house

Amidst this hive of activity you recognise them as soon as they enter the hall, superslim and flaunting

64

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

3.10 p.m. Showtime!

We are all on alert and finally with a blast of music the first model hits the runway. Immediately every dresser loses their assigned model. Priceless haute couture numbers are hastily peeled off and discarded. Dressers help the seamstresses where possible. One does the shoes, another throws a silk scarf over the model’s head to control any possible collateral damage caused by the makeup. The seamstresses feverishly open and close countless press studs while the director screams for the model to be back on stage.

3.25 p.m. Critical moments

Then it is over! Fifteen hours in a bus for fifteen minutes of showtime. Backstage is chaos. While the press are focussed on that all important shot, interested hands grasp at the garments. We know that now is the most critical time and do our best

STYLE -VIKTOR & ROLF

- STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

65


to make sure that no costly accessories ‘disappear’. At the same time the seamstresses rapidly start packing away the V&R collection; everything is bagged before the first glasses of champagne are finished.

3.45 p.m. Exodus

As soon as the crowd moves on to the next show, the circus is torn down. The makeup artists pack up. Models return to their everyday wear and head off to a next show. There is no after party, but backstage there is a sense of relief.

SEE THE MELODY

4.00 p.m. Aftermath

We have an hour to kill before we have to be back at the bus for the return trip to Amsterdam and we head to a typical Parisian cafe. Most of us are still overwhelmed by the past few hours and lack of sleep.

11.45 p.m. Back in Amsterdam

Back on the bus there is plenty to talk about. Finally we arrive back at central station. Some run for the last train. Others grab their bike and head home to a shower and bed. I can not remember longing for my bed this much. As my head hits the pillow I realise that I now understand what they mean by fifteen minutes of fame.

After a song has made it to the charts it often starts a new life. Today hits from the past are reinvented to create new ones. We believe that every ending is a new beginning, and this can be seen in music as well. We gave some young creatives copies of the most popular sampled songs. Instead of writing a review we asked them to create a visualisation of the song. Here are the results, so enjoy.

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YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - VIKTOR & ROLF

SEE THE MELODY - MUSIC

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

67


to make sure that no costly accessories ‘disappear’. At the same time the seamstresses rapidly start packing away the V&R collection; everything is bagged before the first glasses of champagne are finished.

3.45 p.m. Exodus

As soon as the crowd moves on to the next show, the circus is torn down. The makeup artists pack up. Models return to their everyday wear and head off to a next show. There is no after party, but backstage there is a sense of relief.

SEE THE MELODY

4.00 p.m. Aftermath

We have an hour to kill before we have to be back at the bus for the return trip to Amsterdam and we head to a typical Parisian cafe. Most of us are still overwhelmed by the past few hours and lack of sleep.

11.45 p.m. Back in Amsterdam

Back on the bus there is plenty to talk about. Finally we arrive back at central station. Some run for the last train. Others grab their bike and head home to a shower and bed. I can not remember longing for my bed this much. As my head hits the pillow I realise that I now understand what they mean by fifteen minutes of fame.

After a song has made it to the charts it often starts a new life. Today hits from the past are reinvented to create new ones. We believe that every ending is a new beginning, and this can be seen in music as well. We gave some young creatives copies of the most popular sampled songs. Instead of writing a review we asked them to create a visualisation of the song. Here are the results, so enjoy.

66

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - VIKTOR & ROLF

SEE THE MELODY - MUSIC

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

67


Sampled Track: Edwin Birdsong- Cola Bottle Baby New Song: Daft Punk- Harder Better Faster Stronger Visualisation: Niels van Egmond, DTP Nerd

Sampled Track: Chicago- Street Player New Song: The Bucketheads- The Bomb Visualisation: Margreet Ligthart,Graphic Designer

Sampled Track: KraftwerkTrans Europe Express

New Song: Afrika BambaataaPlanet Rock

Visualisation: Paul Karsten, 3rd year Fashion & Branding student

Sampled Track: Herbie Hancock- Bring Down The Birds

New Song: Deee-Lite- Groove Is In The Heart

Visualisation: Eva Mooiman, Graphic Designer

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YOUR BIGGEST BANG

MUSIC - SEE THE MELODY

- MUSIC

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

69


Sampled Track: Edwin Birdsong- Cola Bottle Baby New Song: Daft Punk- Harder Better Faster Stronger Visualisation: Niels van Egmond, DTP Nerd

Sampled Track: Chicago- Street Player New Song: The Bucketheads- The Bomb Visualisation: Margreet Ligthart,Graphic Designer

Sampled Track: KraftwerkTrans Europe Express

New Song: Afrika BambaataaPlanet Rock

Visualisation: Paul Karsten, 3rd year Fashion & Branding student

Sampled Track: Herbie Hancock- Bring Down The Birds

New Song: Deee-Lite- Groove Is In The Heart

Visualisation: Eva Mooiman, Graphic Designer

68

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

MUSIC - SEE THE MELODY

- MUSIC

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

69


ALL THAT JEANS

Jeans have been here for decades and we have seen them in a multitude of different styles and shapes, but jeans still rock! From the most masculine workers jeans to the most feminine highwaisted denim. What is next?

Jumpsuit

Photographer: Steven Meyer Styling: Kim Meertins Makeup: Eugénie Andrieux Models: Merel de Jong en Kevin Mack

Coated

Left: Jumpsuit: Dickies Watch: Michael Kors Right: Denim: Pepe Jeans Necklace: Stylist’s own Watch: Michael Kors Bracelet: model’s own


ALL THAT JEANS

Jeans have been here for decades and we have seen them in a multitude of different styles and shapes, but jeans still rock! From the most masculine workers jeans to the most feminine highwaisted denim. What is next?

Jumpsuit

Photographer: Steven Meyer Styling: Kim Meertins Makeup: Eugénie Andrieux Models: Merel de Jong en Kevin Mack

Coated

Left: Jumpsuit: Dickies Watch: Michael Kors Right: Denim: Pepe Jeans Necklace: Stylist’s own Watch: Michael Kors Bracelet: model’s own


Blouse

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YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE -

Denim blouse: Only Hotpants: Zeeman Socks: Albert Cuyp market Shoes: Stylist’s own - STYLE YOUR BIGGEST BANG 73


Blouse

72

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE -

Denim blouse: Only Hotpants: Zeeman Socks: Albert Cuyp market Shoes: Stylist’s own - STYLE YOUR BIGGEST BANG 73


Right: T-shirt: By Malene Birger Skinny High waist: H&M Socks: Albert Cuyp market Shoes: Sacha Left: Denim: Diesel Denim jacket: Stylist’s own Necklace: Stylist’s own Bracelet: Model’s own

Washed High waist


Right: T-shirt: By Malene Birger Skinny High waist: H&M Socks: Albert Cuyp market Shoes: Sacha Left: Denim: Diesel Denim jacket: Stylist’s own Necklace: Stylist’s own Bracelet: Model’s own

Washed High waist


Skinny

Catsuit Left: White shirt: River Island Skinny jeans: Mogul Rings: Ti Sento Shoes: Stylist’s own Right: Kevin: Sleeveless T-shirt: Zeeman Denim: Pepe Jeans Merel: Denim catsuit: Wonder Woman Necklace and Bracelet Stylist’s own


Skinny

Catsuit Left: White shirt: River Island Skinny jeans: Mogul Rings: Ti Sento Shoes: Stylist’s own Right: Kevin: Sleeveless T-shirt: Zeeman Denim: Pepe Jeans Merel: Denim catsuit: Wonder Woman Necklace and Bracelet Stylist’s own


JUNK ADDICT Written by Emily Cusack Image: Stefan Lehner

The cycle of a plastic bottle is simple; first you drink from it, then you simply throw it away. Maybe the bottle could have another use, a new lease of life, maybe a bottle could be more than just a bottle, be reborn and made into something completely different with a completely different function? Artist and designer Stefan Lehner bases his work on these questions.

To understand more about this concept of reforming everyday objects, we visited the Utrecht studio of Stefan Lehner who came to The Netherlands from Switzerland in 2004. Beginning with mundane objects he gives them a completely new use while still taking profit from its original form and function. From umbrellas to coke bottles he can make everything from anything. His obsession began as a child. He would draw and invent machines and collect discarded objects. To this day he continues to collect used materials from scrap yards and factories trying to discover how he can construct the material into a new object and go as far as possible with old materials to find a new function for them. “We can’t just destroy what we don’t want anymore, I read somewhere that two million tons of waste are produced by just an average American during their lifetime. At the moment we are not forced to change,” he explains.

Wheel-Shoe rack

Lehner takes us round his atelier explaining the different objects he has transformed. His first project was produced around Table Lamps

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ART & DESIGN - JUNK ADDICT

JUNK ADDICT - ART & DESIGN

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

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JUNK ADDICT Written by Emily Cusack Image: Stefan Lehner

The cycle of a plastic bottle is simple; first you drink from it, then you simply throw it away. Maybe the bottle could have another use, a new lease of life, maybe a bottle could be more than just a bottle, be reborn and made into something completely different with a completely different function? Artist and designer Stefan Lehner bases his work on these questions.

To understand more about this concept of reforming everyday objects, we visited the Utrecht studio of Stefan Lehner who came to The Netherlands from Switzerland in 2004. Beginning with mundane objects he gives them a completely new use while still taking profit from its original form and function. From umbrellas to coke bottles he can make everything from anything. His obsession began as a child. He would draw and invent machines and collect discarded objects. To this day he continues to collect used materials from scrap yards and factories trying to discover how he can construct the material into a new object and go as far as possible with old materials to find a new function for them. “We can’t just destroy what we don’t want anymore, I read somewhere that two million tons of waste are produced by just an average American during their lifetime. At the moment we are not forced to change,” he explains.

Wheel-Shoe rack

Lehner takes us round his atelier explaining the different objects he has transformed. His first project was produced around Table Lamps

78

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

ART & DESIGN - JUNK ADDICT

JUNK ADDICT - ART & DESIGN

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

79


VINTAGE

AMSTERDAM

Chain - Bed

Written by Billy Pavlovic & Saba Babas-Zadeh Image: Billy Pavlovic

20 years ago. “I wanted to keep the function of the object and give it a different use. I would call this functional recycling”. The first piece was a clothing rack which you could move and store away. It was made from a trolley so it could easily be transported. The idea is to still use the original function of the object but make use of it in another way. As we continue through we are shown a wooden table which he found traveling in Morocco, the wood was beautifully worn and full of character. “I find it more fascinating to use old objects as they have a history.” He reveals that the table was actually made from a door, the original function was still present as you could open the table like a door and store belongings inside. So he was able to combine the object into the form of a table, but still keep the

when you create a new form from an old object. For example, from a plastic bottle he creates a “lamp vase” by adding to the cut bottle a lid with a small led light. With a rose floating in the bottle this piece becomes a magic evening light. He shows that you don’t have to go out and buy something new, but use what you already have, experiment and have fun with the most common objects that you would usually never think to use. “I want to surprise, to be humorous”. Lehner wants to continue to push the boundaries of reused objects, even including bones, which he has transformed into candlestick holders. A project that he would like to work on in the future is to use the bones of his dead grandmother as he believes that if nothing is done with them they will be just moved out of the ground and usually

I intend to bring in our homes the

sober

beauty

of actual

industrial objects

process of a door. His use of mundane objects is truly inspiring “What is inside an object? Turning everyday objects into something new interests me. He shows how beautiful it can be

destroyed. So this personal project will preserve his grand mother in a unique way. He uses bike chains to form the back and front of the seat of a

chair. It would seem as though it would not be comfortable, but the material surprisingly works well to form a chair. Something that you would usually see as old and greasy is given a new form by being clean and modern. Then we are taken to the cellar which is full of materials, plastic bottles, milk and juice cartons, wheels, bulbs. Everything that people would normally just throw in the bin, he pulls out a trolley which seems relatively normal until Lehner takes it apart and it is transformed into a chair. It is interesting as you can still use it as a trolley, the chair was made for a chairman of a supermarket chain. The combination was to form high society with trash, it was made from a trolley but it still has the feeling of something new and modern, “ I intend to bring to our homes the sober beauty of actual industrial objects” a hard metal object is transformed into a household object that you can use again. A broken umbrella is made into a sophisticated structure for a lamp, an old car seat is transformed into an arm chair it is still using the same function, but brought into a totally different environment. He tells us “I don’t have the answer to everything, but I like to have fun and discover something from these objects” www.en-fer.com/en_fer.htm

Amsterdam is famous for its vintage clothing shops. Designers from all over the world come here to browse through the garments seeking inspiration. Two of the leading stores are Lady Day and Laura Dols and their owners, Marije Bijkerk and Laura Dols, shared their secrets with BANG editors Billy Pavlovic and Saba Babas-Zadeh. What makes vintage so appealing? Isn’t the whole idea of fashion that there is something new every six months? Marijke: “I guess fashion sometimes has a

tendency to dictate and people want something unique. Personally I do not like it when people copy a style exactly, so I really enjoy the mix of old and new that is popular these days. It is nice to see that a wardrobe does not only consist of commercial clothing.” Laura: “Vintage has been popular for a very long time, it was fashionable even before you guys were born! Nowadays it has become a trend and sometimes I think it is over-hyped. You can even see clothes in vintage shops that are not vintage at all. I think the real vintage comes from the fifties and before, but who am I to make the definition? I guess I am old school, but most people will think that a seventies garment is already very vintage. Of course all used clothing is secondhand, but vintage is selected with great caution and a way of thinking that stems from the hippie period. Secondhand can be anything, it is something that has already been worn. It can also be a shirt that was bought yesterday. That is why I always put the term “vintage” in my brand: Laura VINTAGE Dols.”

What is it that attracts so many people to your shops? Laura: “I guess the reason why people come back

to Laura Dols is that my style is immediately

80

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

ART & DESIGN - JUNK ADDICT

VINTAGE AMSTERDAM - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

81


VINTAGE

AMSTERDAM

Chain - Bed

Written by Billy Pavlovic & Saba Babas-Zadeh Image: Billy Pavlovic

20 years ago. “I wanted to keep the function of the object and give it a different use. I would call this functional recycling”. The first piece was a clothing rack which you could move and store away. It was made from a trolley so it could easily be transported. The idea is to still use the original function of the object but make use of it in another way. As we continue through we are shown a wooden table which he found traveling in Morocco, the wood was beautifully worn and full of character. “I find it more fascinating to use old objects as they have a history.” He reveals that the table was actually made from a door, the original function was still present as you could open the table like a door and store belongings inside. So he was able to combine the object into the form of a table, but still keep the

when you create a new form from an old object. For example, from a plastic bottle he creates a “lamp vase” by adding to the cut bottle a lid with a small led light. With a rose floating in the bottle this piece becomes a magic evening light. He shows that you don’t have to go out and buy something new, but use what you already have, experiment and have fun with the most common objects that you would usually never think to use. “I want to surprise, to be humorous”. Lehner wants to continue to push the boundaries of reused objects, even including bones, which he has transformed into candlestick holders. A project that he would like to work on in the future is to use the bones of his dead grandmother as he believes that if nothing is done with them they will be just moved out of the ground and usually

I intend to bring in our homes the

sober

beauty

of actual

industrial objects

process of a door. His use of mundane objects is truly inspiring “What is inside an object? Turning everyday objects into something new interests me. He shows how beautiful it can be

destroyed. So this personal project will preserve his grand mother in a unique way. He uses bike chains to form the back and front of the seat of a

chair. It would seem as though it would not be comfortable, but the material surprisingly works well to form a chair. Something that you would usually see as old and greasy is given a new form by being clean and modern. Then we are taken to the cellar which is full of materials, plastic bottles, milk and juice cartons, wheels, bulbs. Everything that people would normally just throw in the bin, he pulls out a trolley which seems relatively normal until Lehner takes it apart and it is transformed into a chair. It is interesting as you can still use it as a trolley, the chair was made for a chairman of a supermarket chain. The combination was to form high society with trash, it was made from a trolley but it still has the feeling of something new and modern, “ I intend to bring to our homes the sober beauty of actual industrial objects” a hard metal object is transformed into a household object that you can use again. A broken umbrella is made into a sophisticated structure for a lamp, an old car seat is transformed into an arm chair it is still using the same function, but brought into a totally different environment. He tells us “I don’t have the answer to everything, but I like to have fun and discover something from these objects” www.en-fer.com/en_fer.htm

Amsterdam is famous for its vintage clothing shops. Designers from all over the world come here to browse through the garments seeking inspiration. Two of the leading stores are Lady Day and Laura Dols and their owners, Marije Bijkerk and Laura Dols, shared their secrets with BANG editors Billy Pavlovic and Saba Babas-Zadeh. What makes vintage so appealing? Isn’t the whole idea of fashion that there is something new every six months? Marijke: “I guess fashion sometimes has a

tendency to dictate and people want something unique. Personally I do not like it when people copy a style exactly, so I really enjoy the mix of old and new that is popular these days. It is nice to see that a wardrobe does not only consist of commercial clothing.” Laura: “Vintage has been popular for a very long time, it was fashionable even before you guys were born! Nowadays it has become a trend and sometimes I think it is over-hyped. You can even see clothes in vintage shops that are not vintage at all. I think the real vintage comes from the fifties and before, but who am I to make the definition? I guess I am old school, but most people will think that a seventies garment is already very vintage. Of course all used clothing is secondhand, but vintage is selected with great caution and a way of thinking that stems from the hippie period. Secondhand can be anything, it is something that has already been worn. It can also be a shirt that was bought yesterday. That is why I always put the term “vintage” in my brand: Laura VINTAGE Dols.”

What is it that attracts so many people to your shops? Laura: “I guess the reason why people come back

to Laura Dols is that my style is immediately

80

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

ART & DESIGN - JUNK ADDICT

VINTAGE AMSTERDAM - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

81


Initially I started buying and selling curtains and tablecloths. I spent the money that I earned from that on my hippie lifestyle. Then I left for America and came back to The Netherlands when I was 21 years old. At that time I wanted more structure in my life, that is when I opened my first shop. It was a tiny place where all the clothes were in washing baskets. People could make their choice, I would weigh their purchases on baby scales and the price was determined by the weight. However, I found that this type of retailing was really only suitable for a small group of customers. Most people want their clothing on a hanger and they did not understand my concept at all. So I moved to a bigger location and, with a little luck, I really got the knack of the vintage business.” Marijke: “When I was 18 I left school and moved to London to work a as an au pair. There I was inspired to start my first shop. I called it ‘Lady Day’, after Billie ” Holiday’s nickname. Later I changed the name to ‘Lady Day’. Back then I was surrounded by people who wore secondhand clothing all the time. In Amsterdam at that time this was not a common occurrence, most people regarded second hand clothing as dirty. With the arrival of the hippie period came dresses with floral prints and Dad’s suits were appearing in a lot of wardrobes. When I came back to The Netherlands I started working in a shop owned by the father of Laura Dols. He sold all kinds of eastern hippie items. When he discontinued his store, I continued on my own and started filling the shop with fine quality secondhand clothing. I would go to the flea market at Waterlooplein early in the morning, buy my precious finds, wash them in the afternoon, iron them in the evening and the next morning they would be hanging in the shop sparkling. In the beginning I only stocked dresses. Now, working with an associate, I have expanded the range of merchandise to include men’s suits. Compared to floral print dresses suits can be boring, but if you find a perfect one they sell instantly.”

“I guess I give clothing

new lease of life

recognisable and I make sure everything is intact. I have a really strong vision when it comes to buying, I guess I was simply born to do this!” Marijke: “The idea is that if you come in looking for something nice, you can leave the shop in a complete outfit. At Lady Day you can find a perfect blend of old and new. For instance, we sell new basic T’s, second hand T’s are usually faded through wear, but the new T-shirts are still made with the same fit as the ones from the 50’s, inspired by Marlon Brando.”

Can you share the secret of the source of your collections? Laura: “My own style preference is the 50’s, the

start of a revolutionary period in the United States. That is one of the reasons why my shops carry a lot of American clothing, it is country from which plenty of beautiful things come. You can find the clothing here as well, but chances are they will be worn out. After the war, the fashion industry was shaken up by Dior’s ‘New Look’ in 1947. The ‘New Look’ symbolised the start of the looms working again, so that material could be made again. He had

82

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

brought us a new silhouette that was feminine and beautifully crafted. The buttons were applied and the finest rolled hems were handsewn with needles that are not even available any more. I am really fond of those old techniques, so that is what I always look for when it comes to buying for the shop.” Marijke: “When I just started, most of the clothing came from America. Now I believe European sources are much better, the American part of the collection is now just a small percentage of my stock. I never buy at wholesalers, which sell in bulk, by the kilo. I avoid Dutch sources, most of our clothing comes from France and Belgium, and I also like to visit new countries for surprising things. There was a period when quite a bit of vintage came from eastern Europe, but you can never be sure of the sellers. A good source can be out of business the next month.”

When did you fall in love with vintage? How did it all start? Laura: “It all started for me with a stall at the

Waterlooplein flea market in Amsterdam, where my partner and I started selling hippie clothing.

STYLE - VINTAGE AMSTERDAM

Is it true that the big names in fashion visit your shops for inspiration? Marijke: “Yes they do and they obviously find it as well.” (smiles) “I met Tommy Hilfiger’s sister and later saw exact copies of the clothing he had purchased here in his collection. Of course he altered some of it, the fabric was not the same, but it had the original cut. We also sold white leather sneakers that later popped up in the collections of

VINTAGE AMSTERDAM - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

83


Initially I started buying and selling curtains and tablecloths. I spent the money that I earned from that on my hippie lifestyle. Then I left for America and came back to The Netherlands when I was 21 years old. At that time I wanted more structure in my life, that is when I opened my first shop. It was a tiny place where all the clothes were in washing baskets. People could make their choice, I would weigh their purchases on baby scales and the price was determined by the weight. However, I found that this type of retailing was really only suitable for a small group of customers. Most people want their clothing on a hanger and they did not understand my concept at all. So I moved to a bigger location and, with a little luck, I really got the knack of the vintage business.” Marijke: “When I was 18 I left school and moved to London to work a as an au pair. There I was inspired to start my first shop. I called it ‘Lady Day’, after Billie ” Holiday’s nickname. Later I changed the name to ‘Lady Day’. Back then I was surrounded by people who wore secondhand clothing all the time. In Amsterdam at that time this was not a common occurrence, most people regarded second hand clothing as dirty. With the arrival of the hippie period came dresses with floral prints and Dad’s suits were appearing in a lot of wardrobes. When I came back to The Netherlands I started working in a shop owned by the father of Laura Dols. He sold all kinds of eastern hippie items. When he discontinued his store, I continued on my own and started filling the shop with fine quality secondhand clothing. I would go to the flea market at Waterlooplein early in the morning, buy my precious finds, wash them in the afternoon, iron them in the evening and the next morning they would be hanging in the shop sparkling. In the beginning I only stocked dresses. Now, working with an associate, I have expanded the range of merchandise to include men’s suits. Compared to floral print dresses suits can be boring, but if you find a perfect one they sell instantly.”

“I guess I give clothing

new lease of life

recognisable and I make sure everything is intact. I have a really strong vision when it comes to buying, I guess I was simply born to do this!” Marijke: “The idea is that if you come in looking for something nice, you can leave the shop in a complete outfit. At Lady Day you can find a perfect blend of old and new. For instance, we sell new basic T’s, second hand T’s are usually faded through wear, but the new T-shirts are still made with the same fit as the ones from the 50’s, inspired by Marlon Brando.”

Can you share the secret of the source of your collections? Laura: “My own style preference is the 50’s, the

start of a revolutionary period in the United States. That is one of the reasons why my shops carry a lot of American clothing, it is country from which plenty of beautiful things come. You can find the clothing here as well, but chances are they will be worn out. After the war, the fashion industry was shaken up by Dior’s ‘New Look’ in 1947. The ‘New Look’ symbolised the start of the looms working again, so that material could be made again. He had

82

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

brought us a new silhouette that was feminine and beautifully crafted. The buttons were applied and the finest rolled hems were handsewn with needles that are not even available any more. I am really fond of those old techniques, so that is what I always look for when it comes to buying for the shop.” Marijke: “When I just started, most of the clothing came from America. Now I believe European sources are much better, the American part of the collection is now just a small percentage of my stock. I never buy at wholesalers, which sell in bulk, by the kilo. I avoid Dutch sources, most of our clothing comes from France and Belgium, and I also like to visit new countries for surprising things. There was a period when quite a bit of vintage came from eastern Europe, but you can never be sure of the sellers. A good source can be out of business the next month.”

When did you fall in love with vintage? How did it all start? Laura: “It all started for me with a stall at the

Waterlooplein flea market in Amsterdam, where my partner and I started selling hippie clothing.

STYLE - VINTAGE AMSTERDAM

Is it true that the big names in fashion visit your shops for inspiration? Marijke: “Yes they do and they obviously find it as well.” (smiles) “I met Tommy Hilfiger’s sister and later saw exact copies of the clothing he had purchased here in his collection. Of course he altered some of it, the fabric was not the same, but it had the original cut. We also sold white leather sneakers that later popped up in the collections of

VINTAGE AMSTERDAM - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

83


“The bags that we sell often get copied

by

designers and

fashion brands”

various labels. I would say that the bags we sell are the most copied.” Laura: “It is true that many designers visit my shops for inspiration, but I can not really see any of the items they bought here in their collections. At least not literally. One day I had a cup of coffee with Jean Paul Gaultier; he was such a nice man. I saw him in the shop and simply asked: ‘Voulez-vous café avec moi?’ His reply was ‘bonne idée’. Afterwards we went back to the shop and I showed him a pair of trousers from one of his early collections and asked him if he maybe wanted them back. He laughed and told me that he never wanted to see them again.”

That you recycle is obvious, but how does the idea of upcycling come to life in your shops? Laura: “I guess I give clothing a new lease of life.

Every item in my shops has been through my hands at least three times. First sorted, then washed and finally revitalised. I now have a team working out of a hangar where all the clothing is mended and adjusted where needed. I do not design anything, but I have become extremely handy with a pair of scissors!” Marijke: “Actually I never adjust the clothing, because I want to have the purest of vintage in my shop. What people do with it after they purchase the

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YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - VINTAGE AMSTERDAM

clothes is amazing. We respect the original, but I think it is fantastic how people can customise their outfits.”

How do you see your shops in regard to what is happening today in fashion or the world? Do you have a deeper philosophy? Laura: “If you mean global warming, I do not

have an specific answer. I do have my own concerns about how we treat our planet. We need to change the way we live, to make a better environment. I think it is great what H&M and others are doing, turning catwalk trends into affordable collections, however the quality is often poor and you can only wear it for one season. From that perspective I do not like them at all. We should make better use of our world. Clothing has to be sustainable and durable, made of good material. I do not think it is right to buy a T-shirt every week, we can not afford to be doing this any more.” Marijke: “I really like what people are doing these days, what I do not like is when people copy a style exactly. More individuals on the street, that is what I would like to see. Showing off a € 1200 bag in my opinion is not fun. I would rather have a handbag that has a real story and was given a second shot at life.”

Tips for shopping vintage Imagination is the beginning of creation; with the right creativity you can create an amazing outfit out of pretty much anything. When visiting a vintage or secondhand store, let your imagination take over!

- Trends come and go, decades are always being reinterpreted in fashion today, so keep hold of items that you no longer consider fashionable. As at some point the trend could be revisited in the next few seasons. - Allow yourself time to rummage through the racks or through the boxes full of hidden treasures. Nine times out of ten you have to look a few times to find that perfect little gem. - Shop online, eBay has recently become a very popular place to find those great vintage pieces. - Think outside the box: Ask your friends and make a day of it. Visit vintage markets as they are one of the best places to find fun clothing. Chances are you’ll find yourself a bargain. Artificial light can cloud your judgement, therefore being out in the open can be a benefit as you can see the condition of the clothing.

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“The bags that we sell often get copied

by

designers and

fashion brands”

various labels. I would say that the bags we sell are the most copied.” Laura: “It is true that many designers visit my shops for inspiration, but I can not really see any of the items they bought here in their collections. At least not literally. One day I had a cup of coffee with Jean Paul Gaultier; he was such a nice man. I saw him in the shop and simply asked: ‘Voulez-vous café avec moi?’ His reply was ‘bonne idée’. Afterwards we went back to the shop and I showed him a pair of trousers from one of his early collections and asked him if he maybe wanted them back. He laughed and told me that he never wanted to see them again.”

That you recycle is obvious, but how does the idea of upcycling come to life in your shops? Laura: “I guess I give clothing a new lease of life.

Every item in my shops has been through my hands at least three times. First sorted, then washed and finally revitalised. I now have a team working out of a hangar where all the clothing is mended and adjusted where needed. I do not design anything, but I have become extremely handy with a pair of scissors!” Marijke: “Actually I never adjust the clothing, because I want to have the purest of vintage in my shop. What people do with it after they purchase the

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STYLE - VINTAGE AMSTERDAM

clothes is amazing. We respect the original, but I think it is fantastic how people can customise their outfits.”

How do you see your shops in regard to what is happening today in fashion or the world? Do you have a deeper philosophy? Laura: “If you mean global warming, I do not

have an specific answer. I do have my own concerns about how we treat our planet. We need to change the way we live, to make a better environment. I think it is great what H&M and others are doing, turning catwalk trends into affordable collections, however the quality is often poor and you can only wear it for one season. From that perspective I do not like them at all. We should make better use of our world. Clothing has to be sustainable and durable, made of good material. I do not think it is right to buy a T-shirt every week, we can not afford to be doing this any more.” Marijke: “I really like what people are doing these days, what I do not like is when people copy a style exactly. More individuals on the street, that is what I would like to see. Showing off a € 1200 bag in my opinion is not fun. I would rather have a handbag that has a real story and was given a second shot at life.”

Tips for shopping vintage Imagination is the beginning of creation; with the right creativity you can create an amazing outfit out of pretty much anything. When visiting a vintage or secondhand store, let your imagination take over!

- Trends come and go, decades are always being reinterpreted in fashion today, so keep hold of items that you no longer consider fashionable. As at some point the trend could be revisited in the next few seasons. - Allow yourself time to rummage through the racks or through the boxes full of hidden treasures. Nine times out of ten you have to look a few times to find that perfect little gem. - Shop online, eBay has recently become a very popular place to find those great vintage pieces. - Think outside the box: Ask your friends and make a day of it. Visit vintage markets as they are one of the best places to find fun clothing. Chances are you’ll find yourself a bargain. Artificial light can cloud your judgement, therefore being out in the open can be a benefit as you can see the condition of the clothing.

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85


My grandma

dresses

better than YOU

Dress, Shoes & Hat: Laura Dols

Photographer: Taufiq Hosen Styling: Roos Smits & Saba Babas-Zadeh Hair & Makeup: Eva Lotte Oosterop Model: Bettie @ Dutch casting agency

Above, Dress: Ted Lapidus Below, Dress: Adriana M. Fur: Stylist’s own


My grandma

dresses

better than YOU

Dress, Shoes & Hat: Laura Dols

Photographer: Taufiq Hosen Styling: Roos Smits & Saba Babas-Zadeh Hair & Makeup: Eva Lotte Oosterop Model: Bettie @ Dutch casting agency

Above, Dress: Ted Lapidus Below, Dress: Adriana M. Fur: Stylist’s own


Dress & Bag: Laura Dols Dresses: Ted Lapidus, Adriana M., Laura Dols, Laura Dols


Dress & Bag: Laura Dols Dresses: Ted Lapidus, Adriana M., Laura Dols, Laura Dols


dummy’s bij. Hierin staan aantekeningen, recensies, artikelen, plaatjes, foto’s en teksten.

_Hoe bewaar je jouw inspiratie? Ik heb eigenlijk geen idee hoe en of ik mijn inspiratie gebruik. Ik heb wel een groot prikbord hangen in

31_

27-3-2008 17:24:46

GET INSPIRED

mijn huis/ atelier waar ik van alles opprik. Aan het einde van een periode is er totaal geen logica meer in te vinden.

_Hoe zet je inspiratie om in iets tastbaar? Kenmerkend voor dit scrapbook is de combinatie van handmatig werk en strak vormgegeven elementen. De reden hiervoor is dat ik graag op beide manieren werk en nooit goed kan kiezen welke manier van vormgeven ik het liefst gebruik.

_Waarom is dit typisch jouw scrapbook?

Production: Lieke Faber, Tara Koppenol, Jessica Put & Femke Verheuvel

blur fashion magazine definitief 2.indd 35

27-3-2008 17:24:55

_32

blur fashion magazine definitief 2.indd 31

The creative process is mostly only experienced through the end product - the interesting article, the wonderful illustration or the beautiful dress. Your Biggest BANG steps back in time to the source of inspiration and shows you how this becomes reality.

Dress, Shoes, & Hat: Laura Dols GET INSPIRED - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

91


dummy’s bij. Hierin staan aantekeningen, recensies, artikelen, plaatjes, foto’s en teksten.

_Hoe bewaar je jouw inspiratie? Ik heb eigenlijk geen idee hoe en of ik mijn inspiratie gebruik. Ik heb wel een groot prikbord hangen in

31_

27-3-2008 17:24:46

GET INSPIRED

mijn huis/ atelier waar ik van alles opprik. Aan het einde van een periode is er totaal geen logica meer in te vinden.

_Hoe zet je inspiratie om in iets tastbaar? Kenmerkend voor dit scrapbook is de combinatie van handmatig werk en strak vormgegeven elementen. De reden hiervoor is dat ik graag op beide manieren werk en nooit goed kan kiezen welke manier van vormgeven ik het liefst gebruik.

_Waarom is dit typisch jouw scrapbook?

Production: Lieke Faber, Tara Koppenol, Jessica Put & Femke Verheuvel

blur fashion magazine definitief 2.indd 35

27-3-2008 17:24:55

_32

blur fashion magazine definitief 2.indd 31

The creative process is mostly only experienced through the end product - the interesting article, the wonderful illustration or the beautiful dress. Your Biggest BANG steps back in time to the source of inspiration and shows you how this becomes reality.

Dress, Shoes, & Hat: Laura Dols GET INSPIRED - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

91


Who are you?

“My name is Sharon Vos, student photography and design. I love to dream about the future. A life without dreaming is not imaginable.”

What is your definition of inspiration?

“The Human 31_

fascinates me

body

because

it contains so many

contradictions ”

Who are you?

“I am Marieke van Enk, and I graduated from Gerrit Rietveld Academy. As an expressive artist I work with different media: film, photography and sketching.”

nitief 2.indd 31

What is your definition of inspiration?

“Inspiration is something that drives me to take action in certain degrees of passion and stimulation. This might seem in the first instance not necessary, but the significance of it can grow. Craving for something is a reason to make something to eat, but it is not a source of inspiration. The way you prepare the meal, in my opinion, has to do with inspiration it has nothing to do with quenching your hunger.”

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YOUR BIGGEST BANG

What inspires you?

“Currently the human body is a central theme in my work. It fascinates me because of the contradiction between beauty, complexity, vulnerability and unpredictability. Adjacent that many things inspire me, like building sites, water, government files, old photos, films and conversations between strangers.” 27-3-2008 17:24:46

How do you convert inspiration into something tangible?

“Often I find images, sound and text that go perfectly together and on which I will continue to work. The feeling that I may get from that can lead to the creation of a new image of collage.”

What makes this your scrapbook?

How do you archive your “Despite the fact that there is an image in the background, the inspiration? “Some things I memorize because they are things I come across often. Images, paper clippings, text and postcards I place in a pile in my office then sort them out again and make use of the ones I can in any of my current projects. Images and texts I also hang on the wall.”

STYLE - GET INSPIRED

photo of the man is prominently positioned. In my work I use two images as a central object. The photo of the man hung above my desk for months when I worked on my final thesis.”

“Inspiration is something I always need. For instance when making an assignment, concept or product. It is an important notion and it can be adopted in different ways. Everyone has their own opinion of what inspiration is exactly. One person may see it as just beautiful colours, while another finds inspiration in the form and texture. That is what is beautiful about inspiration; it is something unique.”

“I

love

What inspires you?

“My inspiration can come from anything, from a movie to a tree and leaves in the woods, from a couple of beautiful sentences to my own dream.”

How do you archive your inspiration?

“I archive inspiration in many ways: in my head, in photographs, on the computer, by writing, by sticking it in booklets or on a mood board.”

How do you convert inspiration into something tangible?

“Every time I do that in a different way. Everyone has their own way of converting inspiration to his or her work.”

to

dream” _36

What makes this your scrapbook?

“My scrapbook is mostly recognisable by the atmosphere and the light colours. I love ‘old’ and that is something you can easily see by looking at it; the old-fashioned powder box, yellowed books, the lace samples and the rosettes. The starfishes, the wooden flower and the heart show that I love nature. I see things for what they are and not with little frills.”


Who are you?

“My name is Sharon Vos, student photography and design. I love to dream about the future. A life without dreaming is not imaginable.”

What is your definition of inspiration?

“The Human 31_

fascinates me

body

because

it contains so many

contradictions ”

Who are you?

“I am Marieke van Enk, and I graduated from Gerrit Rietveld Academy. As an expressive artist I work with different media: film, photography and sketching.”

nitief 2.indd 31

What is your definition of inspiration?

“Inspiration is something that drives me to take action in certain degrees of passion and stimulation. This might seem in the first instance not necessary, but the significance of it can grow. Craving for something is a reason to make something to eat, but it is not a source of inspiration. The way you prepare the meal, in my opinion, has to do with inspiration it has nothing to do with quenching your hunger.”

92

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

What inspires you?

“Currently the human body is a central theme in my work. It fascinates me because of the contradiction between beauty, complexity, vulnerability and unpredictability. Adjacent that many things inspire me, like building sites, water, government files, old photos, films and conversations between strangers.” 27-3-2008 17:24:46

How do you convert inspiration into something tangible?

“Often I find images, sound and text that go perfectly together and on which I will continue to work. The feeling that I may get from that can lead to the creation of a new image of collage.”

What makes this your scrapbook?

How do you archive your “Despite the fact that there is an image in the background, the inspiration? “Some things I memorize because they are things I come across often. Images, paper clippings, text and postcards I place in a pile in my office then sort them out again and make use of the ones I can in any of my current projects. Images and texts I also hang on the wall.”

STYLE - GET INSPIRED

photo of the man is prominently positioned. In my work I use two images as a central object. The photo of the man hung above my desk for months when I worked on my final thesis.”

“Inspiration is something I always need. For instance when making an assignment, concept or product. It is an important notion and it can be adopted in different ways. Everyone has their own opinion of what inspiration is exactly. One person may see it as just beautiful colours, while another finds inspiration in the form and texture. That is what is beautiful about inspiration; it is something unique.”

“I

love

What inspires you?

“My inspiration can come from anything, from a movie to a tree and leaves in the woods, from a couple of beautiful sentences to my own dream.”

How do you archive your inspiration?

“I archive inspiration in many ways: in my head, in photographs, on the computer, by writing, by sticking it in booklets or on a mood board.”

How do you convert inspiration into something tangible?

“Every time I do that in a different way. Everyone has their own way of converting inspiration to his or her work.”

to

dream” _36

What makes this your scrapbook?

“My scrapbook is mostly recognisable by the atmosphere and the light colours. I love ‘old’ and that is something you can easily see by looking at it; the old-fashioned powder box, yellowed books, the lace samples and the rosettes. The starfishes, the wooden flower and the heart show that I love nature. I see things for what they are and not with little frills.”


Who are you?

“My name is Hilde Eijgenraam, a third year student Fashion & Design at AMFI – Amsterdam International Fashion Institute. To find inner peace I visit expositions and search through the books in the library. Next to this I’m addicted to flea markets and recycling shops and in the evening I wander through the streets.”

What is your definition of inspiration?

“Inspiration keeps you busy. It creates enthusiasm and gives you the feeling that you have to do something with it. In most cases an idea will just pop into my mind.”

What inspires you?

which I save notes, reviews, articles, images, pictures and text.”

“Actually, everything inspires me; it can be people on the street, or old pictures from history books. I also have a fascination for other cultures. Something that could be considered contradictory to the work I often create as I tend to work with Old Dutch themes. Durability is something that really intrigues me. Humour in a nuanced manner and the use of strong colour and combinations of fabrics have become prominent in my work.“

How do you convert inspiration into something tangible?

“I make use of a big notice board in my home/studio to which I attach everything, but at the end of a creative period the board doesn’t have any logic anymore.”

What makes this your scrapbook?

“The distinctive aspects of this scrapbook is the combination of manually designed work and solid designed elements. The reason for this is that I prefer to work in both ways and I never can choose which way of designing I would rather use.“

How do you archive your inspiration? “Most of the time I really love something, but I do not know where I can store it. However, I do keep a couple of scrapbooks in

never can choose “ Iwhich way

of designing I

rather use ”

35_

MELTING POT

Here are some of the up and coming talents that we discovered and we decided to share their talent with you. Keep an eye out for them!


Who are you?

“My name is Hilde Eijgenraam, a third year student Fashion & Design at AMFI – Amsterdam International Fashion Institute. To find inner peace I visit expositions and search through the books in the library. Next to this I’m addicted to flea markets and recycling shops and in the evening I wander through the streets.”

What is your definition of inspiration?

“Inspiration keeps you busy. It creates enthusiasm and gives you the feeling that you have to do something with it. In most cases an idea will just pop into my mind.”

What inspires you?

which I save notes, reviews, articles, images, pictures and text.”

“Actually, everything inspires me; it can be people on the street, or old pictures from history books. I also have a fascination for other cultures. Something that could be considered contradictory to the work I often create as I tend to work with Old Dutch themes. Durability is something that really intrigues me. Humour in a nuanced manner and the use of strong colour and combinations of fabrics have become prominent in my work.“

How do you convert inspiration into something tangible?

“I make use of a big notice board in my home/studio to which I attach everything, but at the end of a creative period the board doesn’t have any logic anymore.”

What makes this your scrapbook?

“The distinctive aspects of this scrapbook is the combination of manually designed work and solid designed elements. The reason for this is that I prefer to work in both ways and I never can choose which way of designing I would rather use.“

How do you archive your inspiration? “Most of the time I really love something, but I do not know where I can store it. However, I do keep a couple of scrapbooks in

never can choose “ Iwhich way

of designing I

rather use ”

35_

MELTING POT

Here are some of the up and coming talents that we discovered and we decided to share their talent with you. Keep an eye out for them!


Artist: Andrew Dadson from ‘Lawn Painted Black’ series

Art Direction: Femke Verheuvel part of series published in Blur magazine Photographer: Natalie Biryuchenko part of photo shoot originally in Blur magazine

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YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - MELTING POT

MELTING POT - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

97


Artist: Andrew Dadson from ‘Lawn Painted Black’ series

Art Direction: Femke Verheuvel part of series published in Blur magazine Photographer: Natalie Biryuchenko part of photo shoot originally in Blur magazine

96

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - MELTING POT

MELTING POT - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

97


Illustrator: Kenneth Yuen originally made for Blanc magazine

Stylist: Kim Meertens from photoshoot produced for Next magazine Illustrator: Kje-gwan Leihitu of ‘Earth Intruders’ by Bjork originally published in Back & Front magazine

98

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - MELTING POT

MELTING POT - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

99


Illustrator: Kenneth Yuen originally made for Blanc magazine

Stylist: Kim Meertens from photoshoot produced for Next magazine Illustrator: Kje-gwan Leihitu of ‘Earth Intruders’ by Bjork originally published in Back & Front magazine

98

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE - MELTING POT

MELTING POT - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

99


Artist: Auke Sprangersi originally published in Next magazine

COLOUR FOR TOMORROW Written by Frank Jurgen Wijlens Images: Arturo Rojas Thanks to: Jan Piscaer

Dying techniques from the Incas may be tomorrow’s fashion. While studying Fashion & Management at AMFI Peruvian born Arturo Rojas decided to contribute to sustainable fashion. For his graduation project he researched how fashion brands can introduce natural dyes into their collection.

“The seeds for my graduation research were planted during the last month of my exchange program at ESDI Textile Design School in Barcelona. I read an article about the study of natural dyes found in old Mediterranean textiles. Previously I had completed an internship in Peru and automatically thought of the dying techniques that are particular to that country. I wondered if it would be possible to implement them for a western fashion label. Kuyichi seemed the logical choice. It is an innovative jeans brand that believes in designing fashion with a conscience and purpose. They introduced organic cotton and a socially conscious approach to make their jeans and other apparel. The name ‘Kuyichi’ is derived from the name of an Incan god and means ‘rainbow’ so I was confident that they would be interested in my proposal.

Artist: Rianne Mertens, collage originally from Next Magazine

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YOUR BIGGEST BANG

My aim is to contribute to a more sustainable fashion. To illustrate what history has to offer, to show the beauty of nature and how we can benefit from unknown foreign resources; in this case Peru. And

to offer farmers the prospect of a solid income. Fabrics and colours were extremely important to the Incas. They played a part in their cultural hierarchies and various rituals. The sacrifices -animals or even little children- were wrapped in the most precious fabrics dyed in exquisite colours. I found out that the ancient dying techniques from the Incas are still used today in three Peruvian dye houses. After my field trip to Peru, I brought home numerous samples that were then tested at the Amsterdam Fashion Institute lab. Only a few of the colours matched European standards. To produce the colour red the Peruvians use an insect that is found on cacti, but the pigment derived from the insect is not of the best quality. I discovered that the Dutch company Rubia Pigmenta Naturalia uses the root of the madder plant to produce the colour red. The idea now is to export that plant to Peru and the Peruvian producers are extremely enthusiastic about that proposal.” So besides working ecologically, Arturo also has a bit of the spirit

COLOUR FOR TOMORROW - STYLE

of Marco Polo. Asked what his ambitions are after graduation, he replied: “I’m not sure about it yet, but do I know I want to continue contributing to a more sustainable fashion. Who knows? I might be back in Peru next year to set up a madder plant plantation…?”

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

101


Artist: Auke Sprangersi originally published in Next magazine

COLOUR FOR TOMORROW Written by Frank Jurgen Wijlens Images: Arturo Rojas Thanks to: Jan Piscaer

Dying techniques from the Incas may be tomorrow’s fashion. While studying Fashion & Management at AMFI Peruvian born Arturo Rojas decided to contribute to sustainable fashion. For his graduation project he researched how fashion brands can introduce natural dyes into their collection.

“The seeds for my graduation research were planted during the last month of my exchange program at ESDI Textile Design School in Barcelona. I read an article about the study of natural dyes found in old Mediterranean textiles. Previously I had completed an internship in Peru and automatically thought of the dying techniques that are particular to that country. I wondered if it would be possible to implement them for a western fashion label. Kuyichi seemed the logical choice. It is an innovative jeans brand that believes in designing fashion with a conscience and purpose. They introduced organic cotton and a socially conscious approach to make their jeans and other apparel. The name ‘Kuyichi’ is derived from the name of an Incan god and means ‘rainbow’ so I was confident that they would be interested in my proposal.

Artist: Rianne Mertens, collage originally from Next Magazine

100

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

My aim is to contribute to a more sustainable fashion. To illustrate what history has to offer, to show the beauty of nature and how we can benefit from unknown foreign resources; in this case Peru. And

to offer farmers the prospect of a solid income. Fabrics and colours were extremely important to the Incas. They played a part in their cultural hierarchies and various rituals. The sacrifices -animals or even little children- were wrapped in the most precious fabrics dyed in exquisite colours. I found out that the ancient dying techniques from the Incas are still used today in three Peruvian dye houses. After my field trip to Peru, I brought home numerous samples that were then tested at the Amsterdam Fashion Institute lab. Only a few of the colours matched European standards. To produce the colour red the Peruvians use an insect that is found on cacti, but the pigment derived from the insect is not of the best quality. I discovered that the Dutch company Rubia Pigmenta Naturalia uses the root of the madder plant to produce the colour red. The idea now is to export that plant to Peru and the Peruvian producers are extremely enthusiastic about that proposal.” So besides working ecologically, Arturo also has a bit of the spirit

COLOUR FOR TOMORROW - STYLE

of Marco Polo. Asked what his ambitions are after graduation, he replied: “I’m not sure about it yet, but do I know I want to continue contributing to a more sustainable fashion. Who knows? I might be back in Peru next year to set up a madder plant plantation…?”

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

101


BAS KOSTERS Written by Linda van de Wiel & Stephanie van Hoof Image: Bas Kosters

Bas Kosters, Dutch fashion’s enfant terrible, is a master of appropriationtaking cartoon graphics and relics of popular culture and splashing them across his clothing. Your Biggest Bang met with Bas, who in person is as colourful as his designs. Seven years ago Bas graduated from the Fashion Department of the AKI in Enschede. After two more years of study, he finished his masters degree at the Fashion Institute in Arnhem. Winning the Robijn Fashion Award in 2003 with his ‘Two teacups and a frying pan’ collection gave his career a real jump start. Bas has his own approach to fashion. “I create much more than fashion designs, I create art”, says Bas. Actually he is upcycling fashion in his own way; which is typical of his child-like and obstinate way of working. “I don’t believe in innovating, but I automatically adjust to an environment.” The Robijn Fashion Award got everyone talking about Bas. He was the brightest upcoming talent The Netherlands had at that time. Even though Bas felt a little of the glory of being on top, he kept both feet on the ground. “I haven’t reached the top yet. Actually I really don’t know what it should feel like. I think the fashion industry is pretty exciting and surprising. One day you’re it, and the next you’re nothing. I always listen to my feelings, and judge by perception. Upcoming designers have much to struggle with. It is one uphill battle after another. It is hard to stand alone. With designers such as Mada van Gaans, Daryl van Wouw en Joline Jolink, we really made our mark

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on the small Dutch fashion scene. There is a nice movement in the Dutch fashion industry; young and varied.” Bas is famous for his weird dolls. The long headed creatures are inseparable from every piece of art he creates. Paintings, music and performances are just a few of the ways he expresses himself. He does not care about the rules of the fashion industry, or fashion entertainment as he refers to it: “It is just a joke of course, fashion is a serious business!” However, he could not care less about the fact that every six months fashion designers deliver a whole new collection. “I do whatever I like, when I like. Actually I have two sides, a commercial one and a noncommercial one. I don’t turn my back on commerce and I think it is very interesting to work with big brands.” He designed a baby buggy for the internationally famous brand Bugaboo. The enterprise with Bugaboo was special for Bas: “I would really like to do a thing like that again.” Fashion icon Sarah Jessica Parker has been seen with the colourful buggy designed by our Dutch hero. He thinks that is a positive way of making a statement in this world. “It’s good to have a little brand awareness for the simple reason that we have to earn money.”

STYLE - BAS KOSTERS

“I

don’t

believe

in innovating, but I

automatically adjust

to an environment”

Bas would really like to have his own shop. Unfortunately the time for that has not arrived yet: “Owning a store means investing a lot of money, and that is one thing that I don’t have as a new kid on the block. Every day I learn something new about doing business, big companies and writing business plans. Starting a store is completely different from what I am doing now, but it is certainly one of my dreams.” “My next collection is one with a positive message. I am going to bring some fun and happiness into this miserable world. Now and then I see life as one big hustle. It seems like we just fell from the sky. In every newspaper or on every tv channel I see problems. Global warming; flooding; everyone is getting shot at for no reason, and in every country people are fighting over politics. Everywhere I look I see trouble and disasters. It is time for positive thinking! I am not religious. I believe in nothing. I do not believe in life after death, in God or in ghosts. I only believe in myself. I do not have many questions about life, I am glad that I am doing what I love doing most. To do just that is not so simple for everyone, which is something I think about every day.” Bas sees many opportunities in the future, and has many goals he wants to attain. ‘I think I have a short amount of time to accomplish all of my dreams, but I hope that within ten years, the ‘BAS’ company is thriving, every designer looks up to me, and that I will have built a whole oeuvre of paintings, dolls and clothing. Last, but by no means least, that a museum can be filled with ‘BAS’ in every corner.” www.baskosters.com

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103


BAS KOSTERS Written by Linda van de Wiel & Stephanie van Hoof Image: Bas Kosters

Bas Kosters, Dutch fashion’s enfant terrible, is a master of appropriationtaking cartoon graphics and relics of popular culture and splashing them across his clothing. Your Biggest Bang met with Bas, who in person is as colourful as his designs. Seven years ago Bas graduated from the Fashion Department of the AKI in Enschede. After two more years of study, he finished his masters degree at the Fashion Institute in Arnhem. Winning the Robijn Fashion Award in 2003 with his ‘Two teacups and a frying pan’ collection gave his career a real jump start. Bas has his own approach to fashion. “I create much more than fashion designs, I create art”, says Bas. Actually he is upcycling fashion in his own way; which is typical of his child-like and obstinate way of working. “I don’t believe in innovating, but I automatically adjust to an environment.” The Robijn Fashion Award got everyone talking about Bas. He was the brightest upcoming talent The Netherlands had at that time. Even though Bas felt a little of the glory of being on top, he kept both feet on the ground. “I haven’t reached the top yet. Actually I really don’t know what it should feel like. I think the fashion industry is pretty exciting and surprising. One day you’re it, and the next you’re nothing. I always listen to my feelings, and judge by perception. Upcoming designers have much to struggle with. It is one uphill battle after another. It is hard to stand alone. With designers such as Mada van Gaans, Daryl van Wouw en Joline Jolink, we really made our mark

102

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

on the small Dutch fashion scene. There is a nice movement in the Dutch fashion industry; young and varied.” Bas is famous for his weird dolls. The long headed creatures are inseparable from every piece of art he creates. Paintings, music and performances are just a few of the ways he expresses himself. He does not care about the rules of the fashion industry, or fashion entertainment as he refers to it: “It is just a joke of course, fashion is a serious business!” However, he could not care less about the fact that every six months fashion designers deliver a whole new collection. “I do whatever I like, when I like. Actually I have two sides, a commercial one and a noncommercial one. I don’t turn my back on commerce and I think it is very interesting to work with big brands.” He designed a baby buggy for the internationally famous brand Bugaboo. The enterprise with Bugaboo was special for Bas: “I would really like to do a thing like that again.” Fashion icon Sarah Jessica Parker has been seen with the colourful buggy designed by our Dutch hero. He thinks that is a positive way of making a statement in this world. “It’s good to have a little brand awareness for the simple reason that we have to earn money.”

STYLE - BAS KOSTERS

“I

don’t

believe

in innovating, but I

automatically adjust

to an environment”

Bas would really like to have his own shop. Unfortunately the time for that has not arrived yet: “Owning a store means investing a lot of money, and that is one thing that I don’t have as a new kid on the block. Every day I learn something new about doing business, big companies and writing business plans. Starting a store is completely different from what I am doing now, but it is certainly one of my dreams.” “My next collection is one with a positive message. I am going to bring some fun and happiness into this miserable world. Now and then I see life as one big hustle. It seems like we just fell from the sky. In every newspaper or on every tv channel I see problems. Global warming; flooding; everyone is getting shot at for no reason, and in every country people are fighting over politics. Everywhere I look I see trouble and disasters. It is time for positive thinking! I am not religious. I believe in nothing. I do not believe in life after death, in God or in ghosts. I only believe in myself. I do not have many questions about life, I am glad that I am doing what I love doing most. To do just that is not so simple for everyone, which is something I think about every day.” Bas sees many opportunities in the future, and has many goals he wants to attain. ‘I think I have a short amount of time to accomplish all of my dreams, but I hope that within ten years, the ‘BAS’ company is thriving, every designer looks up to me, and that I will have built a whole oeuvre of paintings, dolls and clothing. Last, but by no means least, that a museum can be filled with ‘BAS’ in every corner.” www.baskosters.com

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

103


ETHICAL FASHION Written by Jennifer Liu

Written by Jennifer Liu

“There are 20,000 fingers cut every year just to make your favourite little black dress.” Fashion & Management student Jennifer Liu explored the darker side of fashion and looked for solutions.

What does it mean when you can buy a

€2T-shirt?

104

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

On the high streets, we are seeing more fashion chains and stores, which stock low cost, fashionable clothing. These stores have been very successful and are making huge profits by selling large quantities of inexpensive clothing. What does this mean for the factories and garment workers who make these clothes? If you can buy a €2 T-shirt that was shipped here from China or Indonesia, what does it mean in terms of wages for the people who made it? As a fashion student myself who has been interested in fashion from a young age, I have always wanted to know where my clothes were made, by whom and under what conditions. I attended conferences about ethical fashion around the world and have visited factories in countries as diverse as Turkey, Indonesia and the Czech Republic. Through seeing the production process in different places I have realized that the garment supply chains

STYLE - ETHICAL FASHION

are often long and complex. Many of the pioneering ethical brands are still small companies, however these brands are growing rapidly. All the clothes we wear have a story behind them. It is quite common for one piece of clothing - say a pair of jeans - to be made up of components from five or more countries, often thousands of miles apart, before they end up in our high street store. I spoke to May Wong who is a coordinator of Globalization Monitor in China. She told me that “the working conditions in China are not comparable with the European working conditions. The workers in the factory work upwards of 7 days per week, 14 hours a day. They have no legal protection, unpaid overtime, and make only 60 to 100 euros per month. A huge percentage of Chinese workers are underage. The factory manager coaches them to lie about their age and to make fake ID-cards

so that they can work at the factory.” Needless to say that a lot of factory employees work in poor conditions. In Europe we complain if we miss out on our 15 minutes coffee break, but after hearing May Wong’s story, we should consider ourselves extremely lucky. Jobs in the fashion industry can bring enormous benefits and steady incomes to support families and communities, if salaries are fair. Unfortunately the reality for many garment workers in these countries is that they are paid very little for their work, often not enough to live on, and have to work in unfair and unsafe conditions. The fashion

garment workers who lose out, being forced to work longer hours for less pay in order to meet targets. So what can you do about it? Next time you are out shopping and spot a fashion bargain, you might take the time to think about it is so cheap. You can even ask the salesperson where it was produced and if the person that made it was paid fairly. Chances are that you may not get a helpful response, but if hundreds of people start asking these questions, it may have an impact. You can also support fashion companies that promote fair fashion, information on some

It is time we realise that the

fashion industry the most exploitative

is one of

in the world

retail industry is dominated by a small number of large chains. At the same time, there are many smaller suppliers all over the world competing for orders from these large companies. This means that the big retail chains have a lot of power over suppliers in poorer countries which enables them to apply pressure to obtain price reductions and faster delivery. In the end it is the

of those organizations you will find at the end of this article. Most people never consider the ethics behind fashion, but I think it is time we all started realizing that the fashion industry is one of the most exploitative in the world. Sweat shops with poor working conditions may have disappeared in the west, but that just means they have moved somewhere else on the planet.

Fashion designers and brands are addressing these issues through working with Fair Trade, which is a trading agreement which tries to ensure that workers in other countries are paid fairly and the community is benefitted via the profits made from the end product. Environmental issues have led to increasing emphasis on growing organic crops and certain types of sustainable fabrics which do not deplete the global resource base. Finally, just think about the fashion that you are buying. The decrease in prices for clothing over the last decade is unprecedented, but at what cost? We can now buy more than ever before, but we can no longer afford the environmental costs. Trying to solve these problems could lead us into a vicious circle, but fortunately many organizations, brands and other sectors of the industry realize big changes are needed. Fashion professionals should be aware of all we could do to break that vicious circle, or fashion will be out of fashion in a few years. If we try to work together, support the rights of workers and address the environmental issues, I know for sure we will be heading in the right direction towards greener fashion and a greener future. www.ethicaltrade.org , www.ethicalfashionforum.com , www.labelbehindthelabel.org

Want to know more?

The website of organisations like The Ethical Trading Initiative (which includes many large high street stores as members) and The Ethical Fashion Forum (representing smaller designers and brands). The book ‘Eco Chic: The Savvy Shoppers Guide to Ethical Fashion’ (by Katherine Hamnett and Matilda Lee) gives you the full story on this fashion phenomenon, and tells you to how you can create your own eco-friendly fashions through recycling and savvy shopping. Sandra Black’s book ‘Eco-chic: The Fashion Paradox’ shows how the fashion and environmental awareness are two concerns that do not comfortably sit side by side. Labour Behind the Label is a campaign that supports garment workers’ efforts worldwide to improve their working conditions. You can become a member and contribute to ethical fashion.

ETHICAL FASHION - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

105


ETHICAL FASHION Written by Jennifer Liu

Written by Jennifer Liu

“There are 20,000 fingers cut every year just to make your favourite little black dress.” Fashion & Management student Jennifer Liu explored the darker side of fashion and looked for solutions.

What does it mean when you can buy a

€2T-shirt?

104

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

On the high streets, we are seeing more fashion chains and stores, which stock low cost, fashionable clothing. These stores have been very successful and are making huge profits by selling large quantities of inexpensive clothing. What does this mean for the factories and garment workers who make these clothes? If you can buy a €2 T-shirt that was shipped here from China or Indonesia, what does it mean in terms of wages for the people who made it? As a fashion student myself who has been interested in fashion from a young age, I have always wanted to know where my clothes were made, by whom and under what conditions. I attended conferences about ethical fashion around the world and have visited factories in countries as diverse as Turkey, Indonesia and the Czech Republic. Through seeing the production process in different places I have realized that the garment supply chains

STYLE - ETHICAL FASHION

are often long and complex. Many of the pioneering ethical brands are still small companies, however these brands are growing rapidly. All the clothes we wear have a story behind them. It is quite common for one piece of clothing - say a pair of jeans - to be made up of components from five or more countries, often thousands of miles apart, before they end up in our high street store. I spoke to May Wong who is a coordinator of Globalization Monitor in China. She told me that “the working conditions in China are not comparable with the European working conditions. The workers in the factory work upwards of 7 days per week, 14 hours a day. They have no legal protection, unpaid overtime, and make only 60 to 100 euros per month. A huge percentage of Chinese workers are underage. The factory manager coaches them to lie about their age and to make fake ID-cards

so that they can work at the factory.” Needless to say that a lot of factory employees work in poor conditions. In Europe we complain if we miss out on our 15 minutes coffee break, but after hearing May Wong’s story, we should consider ourselves extremely lucky. Jobs in the fashion industry can bring enormous benefits and steady incomes to support families and communities, if salaries are fair. Unfortunately the reality for many garment workers in these countries is that they are paid very little for their work, often not enough to live on, and have to work in unfair and unsafe conditions. The fashion

garment workers who lose out, being forced to work longer hours for less pay in order to meet targets. So what can you do about it? Next time you are out shopping and spot a fashion bargain, you might take the time to think about it is so cheap. You can even ask the salesperson where it was produced and if the person that made it was paid fairly. Chances are that you may not get a helpful response, but if hundreds of people start asking these questions, it may have an impact. You can also support fashion companies that promote fair fashion, information on some

It is time we realise that the

fashion industry the most exploitative

is one of

in the world

retail industry is dominated by a small number of large chains. At the same time, there are many smaller suppliers all over the world competing for orders from these large companies. This means that the big retail chains have a lot of power over suppliers in poorer countries which enables them to apply pressure to obtain price reductions and faster delivery. In the end it is the

of those organizations you will find at the end of this article. Most people never consider the ethics behind fashion, but I think it is time we all started realizing that the fashion industry is one of the most exploitative in the world. Sweat shops with poor working conditions may have disappeared in the west, but that just means they have moved somewhere else on the planet.

Fashion designers and brands are addressing these issues through working with Fair Trade, which is a trading agreement which tries to ensure that workers in other countries are paid fairly and the community is benefitted via the profits made from the end product. Environmental issues have led to increasing emphasis on growing organic crops and certain types of sustainable fabrics which do not deplete the global resource base. Finally, just think about the fashion that you are buying. The decrease in prices for clothing over the last decade is unprecedented, but at what cost? We can now buy more than ever before, but we can no longer afford the environmental costs. Trying to solve these problems could lead us into a vicious circle, but fortunately many organizations, brands and other sectors of the industry realize big changes are needed. Fashion professionals should be aware of all we could do to break that vicious circle, or fashion will be out of fashion in a few years. If we try to work together, support the rights of workers and address the environmental issues, I know for sure we will be heading in the right direction towards greener fashion and a greener future. www.ethicaltrade.org , www.ethicalfashionforum.com , www.labelbehindthelabel.org

Want to know more?

The website of organisations like The Ethical Trading Initiative (which includes many large high street stores as members) and The Ethical Fashion Forum (representing smaller designers and brands). The book ‘Eco Chic: The Savvy Shoppers Guide to Ethical Fashion’ (by Katherine Hamnett and Matilda Lee) gives you the full story on this fashion phenomenon, and tells you to how you can create your own eco-friendly fashions through recycling and savvy shopping. Sandra Black’s book ‘Eco-chic: The Fashion Paradox’ shows how the fashion and environmental awareness are two concerns that do not comfortably sit side by side. Labour Behind the Label is a campaign that supports garment workers’ efforts worldwide to improve their working conditions. You can become a member and contribute to ethical fashion.

ETHICAL FASHION - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

105


Jacket: vintage Moschino Top: H&M Corsage & Gloves: Lady Day

MUSICAL

REVOLUTION

- ANDREW SISTERS Boogie woogie bugle boy

Photographer: Dimitri Hoewijk Styling: Emily Cusack, Billy Pavlovic & Roos Smits Hair & Makeup: Andrea Ligthart Model: Nianga Niang @ Skin Model Management

Blouse: Laura Dols Skirt: H&M Belt: Stylist’s own Clutch: H&M Shoes: H&M


Jacket: vintage Moschino Top: H&M Corsage & Gloves: Lady Day

MUSICAL

REVOLUTION

- ANDREW SISTERS Boogie woogie bugle boy

Photographer: Dimitri Hoewijk Styling: Emily Cusack, Billy Pavlovic & Roos Smits Hair & Makeup: Andrea Ligthart Model: Nianga Niang @ Skin Model Management

Blouse: Laura Dols Skirt: H&M Belt: Stylist’s own Clutch: H&M Shoes: H&M


- THE SUPREMES

Dress: Laura Dols Bracelets: H&M

Where did our love go

108

Dress: L’atra Moda Tights: Wolford Shoes: Yves Saint Laurent Bag: Invito Bracelet: H&M

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE -


- THE SUPREMES

Dress: Laura Dols Bracelets: H&M

Where did our love go

108

Dress: L’atra Moda Tights: Wolford Shoes: Yves Saint Laurent Bag: Invito Bracelet: H&M

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

STYLE -


- CINDY LAUPER Girls just wanna have fun

Top: H&M Badges: Kitsch Kitschen

- UFFIE Pop the glock

Above: Dress & Petticoat: Laura Dols Legging: Mads Nørgard Bag & Necklace: Invito Gloves: H&M Boots: Dries van Noten Below: Jacket: Stylist’s own Dress: Laura Dols Legging: H&M Sneakers: Nike Belt: Invito - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

111


- CINDY LAUPER Girls just wanna have fun

Top: H&M Badges: Kitsch Kitschen

- UFFIE Pop the glock

Above: Dress & Petticoat: Laura Dols Legging: Mads Nørgard Bag & Necklace: Invito Gloves: H&M Boots: Dries van Noten Below: Jacket: Stylist’s own Dress: Laura Dols Legging: H&M Sneakers: Nike Belt: Invito - STYLE

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

111


Hat: JC/DC Dress: Keidermarkt

- UFFIE Pop the gock

Left: T-shirt: 8cht Shorts: Episode Right: T-shirt: KTC Legging: Mads Nørgaard Shoes: Balenciaga Headband: Stylist’s own


Hat: JC/DC Dress: Keidermarkt

- UFFIE Pop the gock

Left: T-shirt: 8cht Shorts: Episode Right: T-shirt: KTC Legging: Mads Nørgaard Shoes: Balenciaga Headband: Stylist’s own


&

DEVIL

JOHNSTON

Written by Jurian Glas

With the number of scripted reality TV shows and the ‘true life’ craziness that is shown on screen, it is shocking to see a documentary with a truly complex and disturbed subject. ‘The Devil and Daniel Johnston’ portrays the life of artist/musician Daniel Johnston using art to tell the story of a disturbed creative mind. Following the life story of an artist has been a popular subject for movies lately. Take for instance ‘Control’ (Joy Division) or ‘I’m Not There’ (Bob Dylan). The Devil and Daniel Johnston (2005) directed by Jeff Feuerzeig also draws on the story of an artist. This documentary shows the stirring life of the manic-depressed artist Daniel Johnston. His biography contains enough material for a pleasant and sometimes uncomfortable cinema-experience, raising some interesting questions along the way. The documentary depicts Johnston’s early childhood up until his present day life. Interviews with Johnston, his family, manager and other close friends give insight in his troubled life and the mentally downward spiral he sometimes falls into. The result is a rollercoaster of touching, tragic and hilarious scenes. A good deal of the numerous incidents caused by Johnston’s conviction that the devil is after him. This firm belief is the main theme in all of his artistic creations. We learn about his obsessions: the Beatles and John Lennon; his favorite cartoon Casper the friendly ghost; his unattainable love and muse Laurie, and the devil, his eternal enemy. One of the many highlights in this documentary is the wondrous anecdote of the plane crash Johnston and his father were involved in after a performance. The days approaching his performance Johnston stopped taking his anti-depressants. After the show, while he and his father flew home in his their private plane, Johnston figured that he could fly like Casper in the comic he was reading

114

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

home videos, audio diaries, and drawings at his disposal, documentary filmmaker Feuerzeig had great material to start reconstructing Daniel’s life. The re-use of all these sources does not only tell the story of Johnston’s life, but also shows how a person can become frustrated in his artistic aspirations, and can even become a victim of it. It gives some insight on how mental illness can develop. John-

compositions are really great but he lacks musical talent. Luckily some renowned artists have seen the potential in Johnston’s music and lyrics; Beck, Bright Eyes, Tom Waits, The Flaming Lips, Sonic Youth and David Bowie have all reinterpreted his songs.

At an exhibition showing Johnston’s drawings – some simple cartoons on plain A4-paper which Johnston puts on the wall with tape – we hear the gallery owner explain rather snobbishly how he “does not like movements, is an but people who are their own movement. Or are moving beyond any movement or doing , but slightly things no movement ever thought of”. He continues saying how all the exposed art is sold even before the exhibition has opened. At last it seems Johnston has achieved his goal of becoming famous. ston’s mental problems seem to be caused by his Renowned singers are reinterpreting his music and devout mother who told him as a young boy that he stockholders have bought out his art. Slowly his life corrupts the minds of young people with his satanic evolves in an almost mythical story. Maybe it can be cartoons. That people are laughing at him and viewed as a piece of ‘gesammtkunst’. His fame and think he is crazy, and deeming him an ‘unprofitable glory came at the expense of his mind which was servant of the lord’. Her preaching became a selfcollected by the devil. fulfilling prophecy, when her son’s later extreme religious lunatic behaviour compensated his feelings of religious guilt. Johnston’s disconnection with reality is evident at a few moments in the movie. In www.myspace.com/dannyjohnston one scene he is clearly under some influence dictat- www.rejectedunknown.com ing in rapid pace the symptoms of manic depression from a book, ending with him laughing with “That’s it! I’m a manic depressive with grand illusions.”

Johnston

‘not necessarily unstable character

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nicola-t/787914486/

at the time. He took the keys out of the ignition and threw them out the window, killing the engine. After a short skirmish with his son, Daniel’s father managed to regain control of the plane and manoeuvred it towards some tall trees, breaking the crash which they luckily survived. When Johnston was taken to the hospital they passed an announcement board of the church of Christ which said ‘God promises a safe landing, but not a calm voyage’. Johnston’s compulsive behaviour geared him to document his entire life. Together with the strong autobiographical character of Johnston’s artistic creations and the collection of musical recordings,

MUSIC - DANIEL JOHNSTON

unstable of character’

Butthole Surfers lead-singer Gibby Haynes recounts a bad LSD-trip of Johnston’s during which he smashed his manager’s head with a pipe. Haynes is undergoing a dentist treatment and in between the screeching noises caused by the dentist’s drill he sardonically states how Johnston is “not necessarily an unstable character, but slightly unstable of character”. Johnston is portrayed as the prototype of the misunderstood and slightly mad genius by his artistic friends and several managers. Parallels are drawn with Van Gogh, Virginia Woolf and Brian Wilson. Johnston’s cartoons are rather simplistic and his artistic skill is not on par. The tragedy about his musical aspirations is that his lyrics and musical

DANIEL JOHNSTON - MUSIC

http://www.flickr.com/photos/studiomuscle/32354733/

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

115


&

DEVIL

JOHNSTON

Written by Jurian Glas

With the number of scripted reality TV shows and the ‘true life’ craziness that is shown on screen, it is shocking to see a documentary with a truly complex and disturbed subject. ‘The Devil and Daniel Johnston’ portrays the life of artist/musician Daniel Johnston using art to tell the story of a disturbed creative mind. Following the life story of an artist has been a popular subject for movies lately. Take for instance ‘Control’ (Joy Division) or ‘I’m Not There’ (Bob Dylan). The Devil and Daniel Johnston (2005) directed by Jeff Feuerzeig also draws on the story of an artist. This documentary shows the stirring life of the manic-depressed artist Daniel Johnston. His biography contains enough material for a pleasant and sometimes uncomfortable cinema-experience, raising some interesting questions along the way. The documentary depicts Johnston’s early childhood up until his present day life. Interviews with Johnston, his family, manager and other close friends give insight in his troubled life and the mentally downward spiral he sometimes falls into. The result is a rollercoaster of touching, tragic and hilarious scenes. A good deal of the numerous incidents caused by Johnston’s conviction that the devil is after him. This firm belief is the main theme in all of his artistic creations. We learn about his obsessions: the Beatles and John Lennon; his favorite cartoon Casper the friendly ghost; his unattainable love and muse Laurie, and the devil, his eternal enemy. One of the many highlights in this documentary is the wondrous anecdote of the plane crash Johnston and his father were involved in after a performance. The days approaching his performance Johnston stopped taking his anti-depressants. After the show, while he and his father flew home in his their private plane, Johnston figured that he could fly like Casper in the comic he was reading

114

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

home videos, audio diaries, and drawings at his disposal, documentary filmmaker Feuerzeig had great material to start reconstructing Daniel’s life. The re-use of all these sources does not only tell the story of Johnston’s life, but also shows how a person can become frustrated in his artistic aspirations, and can even become a victim of it. It gives some insight on how mental illness can develop. John-

compositions are really great but he lacks musical talent. Luckily some renowned artists have seen the potential in Johnston’s music and lyrics; Beck, Bright Eyes, Tom Waits, The Flaming Lips, Sonic Youth and David Bowie have all reinterpreted his songs.

At an exhibition showing Johnston’s drawings – some simple cartoons on plain A4-paper which Johnston puts on the wall with tape – we hear the gallery owner explain rather snobbishly how he “does not like movements, is an but people who are their own movement. Or are moving beyond any movement or doing , but slightly things no movement ever thought of”. He continues saying how all the exposed art is sold even before the exhibition has opened. At last it seems Johnston has achieved his goal of becoming famous. ston’s mental problems seem to be caused by his Renowned singers are reinterpreting his music and devout mother who told him as a young boy that he stockholders have bought out his art. Slowly his life corrupts the minds of young people with his satanic evolves in an almost mythical story. Maybe it can be cartoons. That people are laughing at him and viewed as a piece of ‘gesammtkunst’. His fame and think he is crazy, and deeming him an ‘unprofitable glory came at the expense of his mind which was servant of the lord’. Her preaching became a selfcollected by the devil. fulfilling prophecy, when her son’s later extreme religious lunatic behaviour compensated his feelings of religious guilt. Johnston’s disconnection with reality is evident at a few moments in the movie. In www.myspace.com/dannyjohnston one scene he is clearly under some influence dictat- www.rejectedunknown.com ing in rapid pace the symptoms of manic depression from a book, ending with him laughing with “That’s it! I’m a manic depressive with grand illusions.”

Johnston

‘not necessarily unstable character

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nicola-t/787914486/

at the time. He took the keys out of the ignition and threw them out the window, killing the engine. After a short skirmish with his son, Daniel’s father managed to regain control of the plane and manoeuvred it towards some tall trees, breaking the crash which they luckily survived. When Johnston was taken to the hospital they passed an announcement board of the church of Christ which said ‘God promises a safe landing, but not a calm voyage’. Johnston’s compulsive behaviour geared him to document his entire life. Together with the strong autobiographical character of Johnston’s artistic creations and the collection of musical recordings,

MUSIC - DANIEL JOHNSTON

unstable of character’

Butthole Surfers lead-singer Gibby Haynes recounts a bad LSD-trip of Johnston’s during which he smashed his manager’s head with a pipe. Haynes is undergoing a dentist treatment and in between the screeching noises caused by the dentist’s drill he sardonically states how Johnston is “not necessarily an unstable character, but slightly unstable of character”. Johnston is portrayed as the prototype of the misunderstood and slightly mad genius by his artistic friends and several managers. Parallels are drawn with Van Gogh, Virginia Woolf and Brian Wilson. Johnston’s cartoons are rather simplistic and his artistic skill is not on par. The tragedy about his musical aspirations is that his lyrics and musical

DANIEL JOHNSTON - MUSIC

http://www.flickr.com/photos/studiomuscle/32354733/

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

115


YBB

‘Every ending is a new Wrap it, Snap it,

GN REDERSIO WN U O Y FIT OUT RYDAY! EVE

PRODUCTS

beginning.’ This was the starting point for our accessories collection. Clip it to create your own big bangs!

MULTICLOTH €40 The multicloth can be worn in many different ways. Wrap it around as a scarf, snap it into a poncho, or wear it as a hoodie.

PRESS BUTTON JEWELLERY

€20

These recycled products are androgynous, modern and technological. The simple twopiece nickel press button lies at the heart of all the jewellery. Its original function is to close, to open and to connect things. Normally used for their functionality, they are now also used for their beauty and characteristics: a form of the art of upcycling.

€20 CLIP-ON BAG €65

Inspired by old fashioned kit bags, its made up from multiple bags of different sizes and functions. The bags can be clipped onto the handle in any way you desire.

PRESS ON TO CUSTOMISE JEWELLERY

€5 PER FOUR AVAILABLE @ THE INDIVIDUALS STORE, 23 SPUI, AMSTERDAM OR ORDER ONLINE AT WWW.YOURBIGGESTBANG.COM


YBB

‘Every ending is a new Wrap it, Snap it,

GN REDERSIO WN U O Y FIT OUT RYDAY! EVE

PRODUCTS

beginning.’ This was the starting point for our accessories collection. Clip it to create your own big bangs!

MULTICLOTH €40 The multicloth can be worn in many different ways. Wrap it around as a scarf, snap it into a poncho, or wear it as a hoodie.

PRESS BUTTON JEWELLERY

€20

These recycled products are androgynous, modern and technological. The simple twopiece nickel press button lies at the heart of all the jewellery. Its original function is to close, to open and to connect things. Normally used for their functionality, they are now also used for their beauty and characteristics: a form of the art of upcycling.

€20 CLIP-ON BAG €65

Inspired by old fashioned kit bags, its made up from multiple bags of different sizes and functions. The bags can be clipped onto the handle in any way you desire.

PRESS ON TO CUSTOMISE JEWELLERY

€5 PER FOUR AVAILABLE @ THE INDIVIDUALS STORE, 23 SPUI, AMSTERDAM OR ORDER ONLINE AT WWW.YOURBIGGESTBANG.COM


A MAGICAL SYMBIOSIS When Manuhutu was 25 years old a whole a new world opened up for him. From a small town in Holland, called Alphen aan den Rijn, he moved to the city of Amsterdam. While living in his small loft in Amsterdam he came to the conclusion that graphic design was what he was interested in. When the Rietveld Academy denied his application, he moved back to Alphen aan den Rijn, where he met his wife and hasn’t moved from his hometown since. But around the age of 40 the urge to create and to be able to make art was still there and that is when he decided to apply for the evening course of Graphics and Monuments at the Koninklijk Academie for visual arts (art academy) in The Hague. The rest is history.

Written by Cherryl Karijodiriono Images: Billy Pavlovic

What connects a welder to art and fashion? Perhaps it’s Eddy Manuhutu. He is tackling the broader social issues of different cultures while working in his studio by connecting his cultural background with fashion he inspires others to use his objects in their work. In his work as a welder, he gets into contact with numerous types of metal and methods of welding. His years of experience gave him the knowledge to work with the various metals that he uses for his pieces. Seeing his work, and his way of creating art make you want to take a closer look. With each inspection, you see something different. His pieces inspire you and get you to question what else can be done with it. The metals used are left over materials from his job as a welder. In his work, he only uses the best of the best materials. We at Your Biggest BANG see it as the art of upcycling. He creates a visual language that bears the character of natural spirituality; he calls it a magical symbiosis. What Manuhutu does is create a melting pot of different metals, joining them together as one. His work is not only pleasant to look at, but is also beautiful to wear. Fashion agency BRNDX thought so as well. They are agents for three young upcoming Danish labels: Norgmark, by Tougaard and Potz’Braûlein. A couple of months ago they did a shoot using

118

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

Manuhutu’s work as jewellery. His work blended perfectly together with the colours of the clothes used. Whether it was orange or grey, the metal adapted to whatever surfaces it was placed on. This brought his work to a whole new level. After this photoshoot, he worked again on a project together with BRNDX, being asked to style their showroom with his work. This project required him to create some customised mannequins to show the clothes on. This melting pot of today’s fashion and Manuhutu’s creative inspiration and technique clicks well together. It’s a total different approach to what is seen as typical. As a Moluccan, Manuhutu tries to keep the cultural values that have been passed down from generation to generation in his way of working. He describes his work as an almost primitive encounter, which comes from his loyalty to the traditions and culture of the Moluccan people. His background is very important to him and is recognizable in his work. It’s a tribute to his parents and ancestors.

ART & DESIGN - MAGICAL SYMBIOSIS

“ Intuition,

expression, and

technique

drive me to create

Manuhutu is a well know artist in the Moluccan community and today he is working on evolving in the world of fashion. He is a hard worker with a clear vision. “Intuition, expression and technique drive me to create a visual language which appears as a witness of emotional expression.” His strong belief makes him the artist he is today and with this mind he knows how he wants to achieve it. He made quite an impression on me and I truly believe that we will hear and see more of Manuhutu soon. www.eddymanuhutu.com

a visual language”

MAGICAL SYMBIOSIS - ART & DESIGN

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

119


A MAGICAL SYMBIOSIS When Manuhutu was 25 years old a whole a new world opened up for him. From a small town in Holland, called Alphen aan den Rijn, he moved to the city of Amsterdam. While living in his small loft in Amsterdam he came to the conclusion that graphic design was what he was interested in. When the Rietveld Academy denied his application, he moved back to Alphen aan den Rijn, where he met his wife and hasn’t moved from his hometown since. But around the age of 40 the urge to create and to be able to make art was still there and that is when he decided to apply for the evening course of Graphics and Monuments at the Koninklijk Academie for visual arts (art academy) in The Hague. The rest is history.

Written by Cherryl Karijodiriono Images: Billy Pavlovic

What connects a welder to art and fashion? Perhaps it’s Eddy Manuhutu. He is tackling the broader social issues of different cultures while working in his studio by connecting his cultural background with fashion he inspires others to use his objects in their work. In his work as a welder, he gets into contact with numerous types of metal and methods of welding. His years of experience gave him the knowledge to work with the various metals that he uses for his pieces. Seeing his work, and his way of creating art make you want to take a closer look. With each inspection, you see something different. His pieces inspire you and get you to question what else can be done with it. The metals used are left over materials from his job as a welder. In his work, he only uses the best of the best materials. We at Your Biggest BANG see it as the art of upcycling. He creates a visual language that bears the character of natural spirituality; he calls it a magical symbiosis. What Manuhutu does is create a melting pot of different metals, joining them together as one. His work is not only pleasant to look at, but is also beautiful to wear. Fashion agency BRNDX thought so as well. They are agents for three young upcoming Danish labels: Norgmark, by Tougaard and Potz’Braûlein. A couple of months ago they did a shoot using

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Manuhutu’s work as jewellery. His work blended perfectly together with the colours of the clothes used. Whether it was orange or grey, the metal adapted to whatever surfaces it was placed on. This brought his work to a whole new level. After this photoshoot, he worked again on a project together with BRNDX, being asked to style their showroom with his work. This project required him to create some customised mannequins to show the clothes on. This melting pot of today’s fashion and Manuhutu’s creative inspiration and technique clicks well together. It’s a total different approach to what is seen as typical. As a Moluccan, Manuhutu tries to keep the cultural values that have been passed down from generation to generation in his way of working. He describes his work as an almost primitive encounter, which comes from his loyalty to the traditions and culture of the Moluccan people. His background is very important to him and is recognizable in his work. It’s a tribute to his parents and ancestors.

ART & DESIGN - MAGICAL SYMBIOSIS

“ Intuition,

expression, and

technique

drive me to create

Manuhutu is a well know artist in the Moluccan community and today he is working on evolving in the world of fashion. He is a hard worker with a clear vision. “Intuition, expression and technique drive me to create a visual language which appears as a witness of emotional expression.” His strong belief makes him the artist he is today and with this mind he knows how he wants to achieve it. He made quite an impression on me and I truly believe that we will hear and see more of Manuhutu soon. www.eddymanuhutu.com

a visual language”

MAGICAL SYMBIOSIS - ART & DESIGN

YOUR BIGGEST BANG

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BORN

We all know the feeling of looking back at our youth and feeling nostalgic. You may find that who you are now has always been there, it just needed a little push! We wondered what some of Holland’s popular designers used to looked like.

Photographer: Fotopeer Styling: Rianne Duursma & Linda van de Wiel Makeup: Kelly Henkelman

THAT WAY

MARLIES DEKKERS Without a doubt the Dutch queen of lingerie. Her designs give a woman a charisma of power and self-conciousness. Basic principles: clear cut, wrapped, women on top.

DARRYL VAN WOUW

Amsterdam based designer who is never seen in public without his signature headphones. Basic principles: streetwise, melting pot, prints and graphics.


BORN

We all know the feeling of looking back at our youth and feeling nostalgic. You may find that who you are now has always been there, it just needed a little push! We wondered what some of Holland’s popular designers used to looked like.

Photographer: Fotopeer Styling: Rianne Duursma & Linda van de Wiel Makeup: Kelly Henkelman

THAT WAY

MARLIES DEKKERS Without a doubt the Dutch queen of lingerie. Her designs give a woman a charisma of power and self-conciousness. Basic principles: clear cut, wrapped, women on top.

DARRYL VAN WOUW

Amsterdam based designer who is never seen in public without his signature headphones. Basic principles: streetwise, melting pot, prints and graphics.


VIKTOR & ROLF

The most famous and successful designer duo from The Netherlands hardly need any introduction. Basic principles: theatrical, intelligent, luxury with a twist.


VIKTOR & ROLF

The most famous and successful designer duo from The Netherlands hardly need any introduction. Basic principles: theatrical, intelligent, luxury with a twist.


BAS KOSTERS ILJA VISSER

Her infamous trousers with low crotches were her breakthrough statement in The Netherlands. Basic principles: refined, feminine, fashion conscious (but no fashion victim).

Dutch fashion rebel and multi-tasker who is not afraid to create a hullabaloo. Basic principles: eccentric, bright colours and embraces popular culture.


BAS KOSTERS ILJA VISSER

Her infamous trousers with low crotches were her breakthrough statement in The Netherlands. Basic principles: refined, feminine, fashion conscious (but no fashion victim).

Dutch fashion rebel and multi-tasker who is not afraid to create a hullabaloo. Basic principles: eccentric, bright colours and embraces popular culture.


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FASHION RECIPE

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UPCYCLING IMAGES

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WWW.YOURBIGGESTBANG.COM your upcycling fashion recipe

FASHION RECIPE

YOUR OWN MAG

VIDEOS

UPCYCLING IMAGES

USIVE L C X E R U O Y T GE S DOWNLOAD al code at: person sign in with your bang.com/music www.yourbiggest

NTJAMROSIE NELSON & DJOSA

08

01BANGMUSIC

Sponsored by

POWERD BY AMFI - AMSTERDAM FASHION INSTITUTE

SALES LIST American Apparel Django +49 211 38 540 90 Steenbakker by 8cht Spice pr +3120 3207 007 +3120 489 1031 Balenciaga by Van Dries Van Noten Ravenstein +323 221 9090 +3120 63900 67 Diesel Bas Kosters www.diesel.com +3120 617 2100 Episode Beauty V.O.F +3120 320 3000 www.beautyvof.com Edwin By Malene Birger Oudshoorn +45 3326 9620 by Never on by Tougaard by Wednesday BRNDX communication +316 1746 9121 +3120 419 75 76 Converse Francis Massink 888792-3307 by Never On De Streng bv Wednesday www.de-streng.nl communication Dickies +3120 419 75 76 www.dickies.com

Hennes & Mauritz +3120 556 7777 HEMA +3120 311 4411 Invito by CO/ motion pr +3120 627 9291 Individuals +3120 5954 555 JC de Castelbajac +33 155 34 1020 Joline Jolink by Spice PR +3120 489 1031 Kitsch Kitschen +3120 622 8261 Lady Day +3120 6235 820 Laura Dols +3120 6249 066

L’altra moda by Press Only +3120 421 1226 LTB by Little Big +310 521 1071 Mads Norgaard by WIG Anthology pr +3120 4940981 Maison Martin Margiela by Van Ravenstein +3120 63900 67 Marlies Dekkers +3110 476 0414 Michael Kors jewelery by Gassan Diamonds +3120 622 5333 Mogul www. mogulclothing.eu

Moschino +3902 6787731 Nike +3133 434 3100 ONLY +45 99 42 32 00 Pepe Jeans +31 206 160 101 River Island www. riverisland. com Sacha +3113 595 2121 Shoeby fashion +3173 511 8019 Swarovski by Gassan Diamonds +3120 622 5333 Ti Sento by Gassan

Diamonds +3120 622 5333 Underground Music Movement +3908 23 468516 Wolford by Never on Wednesday communication +3120 419 75 76 Wonder Woman by Coolcat +3130 6356300 Young Designers United +3120 6269 191 Yves Saint Laurent www.ysl.com Zeeman +31172482911 Zuntrade www.zuntrade.nl


Your Biggest BANG  

Your biggest BANG is the first upcycling magazine in the Netherlands, made by students of the Amsterdam Fashion Institute, it has a new appr...

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