American Precision Museum Annual Report 2021-2022

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Preserving the dynamic stories of the machines and people which form the foundation and the future of the manufacturing industry in America

ANNUAL REPORT TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY

Shaping the Next Generation of Innovators

2021-2022

Chairman’s Message

Hello to all friends of The American Precision Museum,

The Museum has navigated a second pandemic year with a continued sense of purpose and a healthy inventory of accomplishments. Daily visits are up substantially, and as the school year begins, inbound field trips are booked beyond any prior experience. With winter in sight, our new heating system allows our staff to plan for programs and displays to intrigue our visitors throughout Vermont’s cold months. No more closing down at the end of October! Dare we say, no more pandemic!

For full appreciation of what our institution has accomplished with your financial support, please read Steve Dalessio’s comments in Message from the Executive Director. We have added to exhibits, improved our building, expanded our reach, and most importantly used our platform to inspire students to explore STEM education and learn about the joy of making things.

In May of this past year, the Museum’s highly active Board met to consider “what is next?” Using our existing Strategic Statement as a backdrop we performed a disciplined SWOT analysis, cataloging strengths and weaknesses as we exist today and identifying opportunities and threats in the world around us. The exercise produced no shortage of initiatives for the Board and Museum staff to pursue. The important ones for the year ahead are:

Exhibits: Continuation of the “Made by Hand to Made by Machine” exhibit through the 1851 Crystal Palace Exhibition where precision, interchangeable components machined in Windsor, Vermont were considered representative of a new “American System of Manufacturing.”

Education: On the path to broader geographic impact, a regional commitment to provide elementary students in underserved communities with STEM kits with compelling lessons that lead to manufacturing awareness.

Continuity: Enhance Museum perpetuation by implementing a management succession plan.

Our employee team may be small, but our industry reach is ever increasing. In early September, we had a significant presence at the International Manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago. Our small booth at the Student Summit was visited by most of the 11,700 students that attended. Support for our Museum was on display in several exhibitor booths, and also in the Gardner Business Media mini pavilion.

We are indeed fortunate that favorable word is spreading on our historical importance and our modern day relevance. Thanks to all for your support!

GREETINGS!
American Precision Museum / Annual Report 2021-2022 2

OUR MISSION

Capturing the imaginations of young and old with the spirit of innovation, problem solving, and design, demonstrated through the dynamic story of the machines and people which form the foundation and future of the manufacturing industry in America.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

• Lee Morris (Chair), Windsor, CT

• Barbara George (Vice Chair), Brattleboro, VT

• Bill Lynn, (Treasurer-Secretary) West Lebanon, NH

• Rob Caron, Wells, ME

• Chris Gray, Springfield, VT

• Eric Hagopian, South Deerfield, MA

• Greg Jones, McLean, VA

• Richard Kline, Cincinnati, OH

• Toni Neary, Cleveland, OH

• Larry Schwartz, Clear Spring, MD

STAFF

• Steve Dalessio, Executive Director

• Alice Cable, Associate Director

• Lisa Yordy, Visitor Services Manager

• John Alexander, Collections Technician

• Barbara Cieslicki, Collections Technician

• Kathy Marsh, Bookkeeper

The Manufacturing Ledger

The Manufacturing Ledger is a digital exhibit and fundraising initiative from the American Precision Museum featuring the stories of the people who have contributed to American manufacturing.

“It’s the people behind the innovations who are so compelling. Along with the machinery that they have created, we also need to collect, share, and preserve personal stories of the manufacturing innovators who have so strongly influenced the United States throughout the years.”

—Lee Morris, Chairman of APM

2021-2022

Entries

Ron Popolizio Richard Simons

Robert B. Mlakar Marvin Daniel

A.J. “Hoppe” Hagopian

Cindy Daniel

Ralph Nappi

Gregory Chambers

Robert Huber Donald G. Gardner Kenneth M. Gettleman

Cesar Gutierrez Montez King Richard Slattery LeNoir E. Zaiser Thomas Gorman Jack Anderson

Participating in The Manufacturing Ledger supports the American Precision Museum financially and physically. Contributing your story, or that of a family member, employer, employee, colleague, mentor, or educator enriches the content of the exhibit itself. The financial donation to sponsor each profile helps fund museum operations.

Our goal is to capture the stories of the people of manufacturing to be preserved for historical purposes and even more importantly, to inspire the next generation.

VISIT LEDGER.AMERICANPRECISION.ORG GET TO KNOW
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Message from the Executive Director

It is hard to imagine that it has been three years since I became the American Precision Museum’s Executive Director. The generosity of our Corporate and Individual donors and members is genuinely humbling. Thank you for being so supportive. With your donations, we have accomplished many of our goals and established new ones.

Our new exhibit, Made By Hand to Made By Machine, opened with terrific reviews. Visitors begin their visit by seeing how products evolved from being made by hand to being created by machine. Plans include expanding on the importance of the Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in London, the benefits of the American System of Manufacture, and how machines make machines. Thank you to all those that contributed to making this new display possible.

We continue to have “Pop Up” exhibits every six to eight weeks. These are small exhibits based on different themes, and on display are rarely seen objects from our historical collection.

As we look to inspire the next generation of manufacturers, the museum, in collaboration with SparkShop, a Chicago area non-profit, launched a series of STEM education kits. The museum provides fourth-fifth grade classes with a STEM education kit that contains a history lesson, five hands-on activities, and a video on a career in manufacturing. More than thirty-five schools have used over five hundred kits since January 2022. Plans include expanding this program with two additional kits and providing classroom support. With the hire of an Education Specialist, our goal to go beyond the region with our education programs is within reach.

Work on installing heat in the exhibit began in the spring, thanks to two generous donors. Heating the exhibit area will give schools more access to field trips and visitors annually. In the past, the museum has been open from May 1st to October 31st.

The first and second-story south-side windows were restored to Department of Interior standards for historic buildings thanks to two foundation grants. Restoring building elements that have deteriorated over time will continue to be a priority. The next phase includes the restoration of several doors.

We are looking forward to an exciting 2022 - 2023 season with new exhibits, an expanded education program, and developing a dedicated and knowledgeable staff. If you are visiting the museum, please take a moment to offer your comment; we love to hear from you.

If you are in the area, please stop by to see how your support helps the museum and promotes the next generation of manufacturers firsthand.

Yours Truly, Steve Dalessio, Executive Director
/ Annual Report 2021-2022 4
American Precision Museum

MEMBERSHIP

SOURCES OF FUNDS $680,892 USE OF FUNDS $521,560 SOURCES OF FUNDS $997,825 USE OF FUNDS $680,170 SOURCES OF FUNDS $680,892 USE OF FUNDS $521,560 Financial Information REVENUE EXPENSES We are grateful to our many contributors who support the museum through memberships and donations. Each gift we receive is important. Your contributions come in many forms – membership, annual fund, special purpose gifts, in kind, and those made in honor or memory of a loved one. We also recognize our volunteers, vendors and employees who are generous with their valuable time and talent. We received 593 total gifts to the Annual Fund and 291 members joined or renewed. The charts below and the gifts on the following pages reflect our fiscal year, May 1, 2021 - April 30, 2022. How to Support Us DONATIONS Donations not only help us to continue operations but additionally allow us to build and improve. Your donation supports new exhibits, acquiring new equipment for our Learning Lab or Innovation Station, offering programs in schools, as well as supporting year-round operations and building preservation. PLANNED GIVING The Mill Brook Society: The museum has partnered with the Vermont Community Foundation to offer charitable gift annuities, charitable remainder trusts, and charitable lead trusts. Bequests, retirement plans, cash, or securities are additional ways to give. CORPORATE With three robust corporate membership levels, it’s easy to donate to the museum as a company. Enjoy special benefits as a corporate member and show everyone you support the mission of APM! • Patron ($250-$999 annually) • Partner ($1,000-$4,999 annually) • Leader ($5,000+ annually)
Membership revenue is unrestricted and, unlike donations, can be relied upon year after year. We’ve simplified the levels of membership to the following: • Individual ($35 annually) • Family/Dual ($55 annually) • Associate Membership ($100 annually) includes membership in North American Reciprocating Museum Association • Friend of APM ($250 annually) includes membership in North American Reciprocating Museum Association Each level of membership comes with perks and our deep gratitude. American Precision Museum / Annual Report 2021-2022 5

Thank You, Members, Donors & Volunteers

ROBBINS AND LAWRENCE SOCIETY ($2500 AND UP)

• Richard Kline

• Barry Laven

• Douglas Loudon

• Morris Group

• Lee and Diane Morris

• Tony Morris

• Jane Osgood

• Frederick A. Roesch

• Merritt Roe Smith, In Honor of Ed Battison

• Camiel E. Thorrez

INNOVATORS SOCIETY ($1000 - $2499)

• Lawrence A Allen

• Steve Dalessio

• Thomas A. Dembik

• Bob Garneau

• Robert M. Holter

• Robert Jacobs, In Honor of Lewis R. Heim

• Nicholas Layo, In Honor of Richard Layo

• Lisa Martin, In Honor of Lee Morris

• Richard P. Pitkin

• Richard Powers, In Honor of Bob and Dot Morris

• Peter D. Rebar

• Alexander H. Slocum

• Debra L. Slocum

• Kirk D. Stackhouse

• Vermont Automobile Enthusiasts

EDWIN BATTISON SOCIETY

($250-$499)

• Jamison Abbott

• Mark Aldrich

• Liora Alschuler

• Kimbal L. Bergstrom

• Donald Brehm

• Christopher Brown

• Leanne Carlson

• Huong Do

• Mason Ferry

• Chris Fortin

• Darlyne Franzen, In Honor of Eric Gilbertson & Don Whitney

• Michael Gallagher

• Eric Gilbertson

• Kimo Griggs

• Diane Guidone, In Honor of Daniel L. Hertz, Jr.

• David Hallenbeck

• John Hamre

• Jeff Haught

• Glenn Hopkins

• Alan R. Huffman

• Thomas H. Hughes

• Ralph H Hegman III

• Greg Kaufman

• Ken Kranzusch

• Alan Lockery

• Scott Martin

• William C. Martin

• Ernest Morris

• Toni Neary

• Peggy Lou Pschirrer

• Richard C. Rattenbury, In Honor of R. L. Wilson

• John Ricardi

• James A. Carlson

• Thomas Jack Carpenter

• Gene Cesari

• Gregory Colling

• Edmond Cooley

• Russell P. Craig

• James H. Cudlip

• Steve Cuipa

• Emery Dewitt

• Jerome B. Doolittle

• Silas Felton

• William Finch

• Michael Firczuk

• Mario Fortin

• William R. Fosdick

• Judith Foulke

• Harold J. Frost

• James L. Garvin

• Edward J. Goldman, In Honor of Don Whitney

• Clark Griffiths

• James Haaf

• Robert R. Hall

• Jonathan Hall

• James L. Hanna

• Allen Hase

• Richard H. Hoertel

• James Howard

• Allan Bentsen II

• Joseph W. Martin III

• Eric A. Jautz

• Steve Jenne

• W. Thomas Johnson

• Larry Jones

• William Kelley Jr.

• Robert Kancir

• Christopher Kann

• E. Burr Nash

• David Noyes

• Charles M. Nystedt

• John C. Ohaus

• John Osborn

• Rudy Parhaniemi

• Richard C Powalka , In Honor of Robert W. Powalka

• Michael Read

• William Rewinski

• Gordon Richardson

• Brian J. Richardson

• Clayton W. Robson

• John H. Rohlfs

• Scott Rossiter

• Harvey Sachs

• Sheafe Satterthwaite

• Michael P. Schaefer

• Timothy V. Schafer

• Dale Schafer

• Matt Sears

• Ralph H. Shepard

• Jane E. Sherman

• Gerhard G. Sihler

• Paul Singley

• Allan D. Smith

• Martin L Sornborger

• T. Michael Speidel

• Sandra-Leigh Sprecker

• Ronald Gagne Sr.

• Byron W. Stutzman

• Joshua Sussen-Soechting

• Donna G. Sweaney

• David P. Talbott

• Phil Teague

• Derek Trelstad

• Edmund J. Tremblay

VALLEY SOCIETY ($500 - $999)

PRECISION

• Jay Boeri

• Maria Day

• Chris Dubrowski

• Domingo Franciamore

• Barbara George

• Network for Good

• Karl Gurcke

• James N. Heald

• James R. Payne III

• Michael Andrew Protenic Jr.

• Bill Lewis

• David S. Lindquist

• Nelson J. Lock

• Diane S. Morris

• John Murphy

• Douglas G Schulte

• Laura Wooton

• Kermit Wright

• Bernard Rosselli

• John Schamarek

• Mark Sharnoff

• Richard L Simons

• James Thompson

• Larry Vanice

THE 1966 SOCIETY ($100-$249)

• Betsy Bechdolt, In Honor of Frank Bechdolt

• Philip Bell

• Robert W. Bernstein

• Arthur Beutler

• Robert T. Blomberg

• Judith B. Boucher

• Joseph Bozik

• Timothy Brown

• Michael Brown

• Tara and Tyler Price and Calandera

• Benjamin E. Kaplan

• Francis E. Kennedy

• Justin Ketterer

• David Klumb

• Webster Kohlhase

• James Koontz

• Charles Leni

• Robert Lloyd

• Thomas H. Lowry

• Bill Lynn

• Bruce A. Magnell

• Robert McAllister

• Paula McFarland

• James L. McRae

• Roger C. Melzer

• Glenn W. Meurer

• D. Bruce Montgomery

• Chris Morley

• John Muendel

• Jeffrey Myers-Hayer

• Barbara M. Walker

• Donald Weigt

• Jeffrey A. White

• Michael A. Whitney

• Anne C. Wing

• Roger Young

• Seidler Tool Company

DONORS

($35 - $99)

• Joseph Alford

• Robert K. Allen

• Rick Angelini

• David Arendash

• Tony Ashby

• David E Bazilchak

• Iris M. Berezin

• Alexander Block

• Katherine D. Carter, In Honor of Charles Carter

• Ronnie Clapp

American Precision Museum / Annual Report 2021-2022 6

• Angela Cottrill

• Gary Course

• Pama Dangelo

• Lloyd P. Davis

• Wallace H. Day

• Christine Delaney, In Honor of Joseph Carl of Martin Brass Works

• Philip DeWitt

• Rolf Diamant

• Alexandra Dodge

• Doric L. Dods

• Chris Downs

• Raymond Dreher, In Honor of John M. Ordyk

• Timothy Dubeau, In Honor of William Mitchell

• Michael Dudley

• Steve Edwards

• Joe Fedora

• Edward Ferguson

• Robert B. Finucane

• Wayne Fischer

• Jared Fitzpatrick

• Kelly Flynn

• Eric Fogg

• Daniel Fox

• Todd L. Friberg

• Robert W. Gardner

• Kris Garnjost

• Robert L. Geddes

• Dale Gephart

• Charles Giurtino

• Peter R. Gorst

• Thomas Graham

• Jason and Lauren Fortin and Greenhalgh

• Rutger and Paige Tupper and Greenleaf

• Thomas L. Hale

• Mason Hall

• Ryan Hebert

• Michael Helms

• Herbert C. Hothan

• Robert A. Hummel

• James Macintyre III, In Honor of John Wesley McLaw

• Joseph Jablonowski

• Will Johnson

• Greg Jones

• John S. Kauer

• Daniel J. Keebler

• Ray Kelley

• Larry Kent

• Dan Kester

• Robert Knox

• Richard Kremer

• John E. Ladd

• Ann Lawless

• Walter W. Lawrence

• Thomas O’ Leary

• Dan Leatzow

• Michael Locke

• Michele and Frank Figlioulo and Loffreno

• Perley Lund

• Larry Magee

• John H. Mandell

• Virginia Markle, In Honor of William Mitchell

• Carol B. Martin

• Jeff May

• John Mayo-Smith

• Dave McCallen

• Courtney Mead

• David Mellen

• Richard S. Meyer

• Lucy Miller

• Michael Miller

• Bruce M. Moseley

• Barbara M. Naef

• Paul O’Shaughnessy

• Bill Ostroska

• Steve Petraitis

• Eric Mitchell Ph.D., In Honor of William Mitchell

• Elizabeth Phelps, In Honor of William Mitchell

• Marjory Pierce

• Brian St Pierre

• Willis L. Platt

• David C. Pommert

• Michael Potter

• James Prentice

• Thomas J. Pryzby

• William Quale

• Peter C Rees

• James Riley

• John F. Robb

• Charles Roberts

• John Rochelle

• Roberto Rodriquez

• Rebecca Rogers

• George Rogers

• Robert H. Romer

• Howard De Rosa

• John Rosenfelder

• Karl Ruger

• Mark Sandefur

• Pieter van Schaik

• Asher Schlusselberg

• Patrick Scukas

• Patrick M. Sheary

• Michael Sher

• Jim Sindelar

• John Smith

• Jeff Smith

• Edward E. Smith

• Ken Staner

• Jim B. Steiner

• Sheldon Stokes

• Jamie Swan

• Christopher Sweet

• John Tansey

• Don Thomas

• Pete Thomas

• Bruce Tillinghast

• Robert Tregaskis

• Rich Tremblay

• Bailey Howe Library UVM

• Tiffany Vincent

• Robert M. Vogel

• Paul Wade

• Glenn Wallberg

• Kimberly Ward

• Rhoda L. Whitney, In Honor of Don Whitney

• Patryc Wiggins

• Scott Wright

• A. David Wunsch

• Hannah Zinn

• Gabrielle Zwain

LIFETIME MEMBERS

• Suzanne Richardson Daniels

• J. Douglas Graham

• Clark Griffiths

• James N. Heald

• Douglas Loudon

• Janice Moore

• Lee B. Morris

• Robert E. Morris Jr.

• Tony Morris

• Michael Newbold

• Alfred Purcell Jr.

• Frederick A. Roesch

• Margaret Rothchild

• Alden Sherman

• Jane E. Sherman

• Merritt Roe Smith

• Camiel E. Thorrez

• E. Hubbard Yonkers

EXTRA THANKS

• Paul Dana

• HFO Trident

• Nancy Pitkin

• Quality Mailing House

• Shire Digital

• Thresher Electric

• Town of Windsor

• Windsor On Air

• Crafted Agency

• Liza Draper

• Dragonfly Designs

VOLUNTEERS

• Dave Barber

• Dan Fox

• Ralph Hegman

• Will Johnson

• Christina Mantas

• Lisa Martin

• Clint Smith

• Steve Wright

• Darlyne Franzen

• Brooke Krancer

• Rice Yordy

Bryant Chucking Grinder Charitable Foundation
Caterpillar Foundation Matching Gifts
Cone Automatic Machine Co. Charitable Foundation
Couch Family Foundation
Farley Family Charitable Foundation
Kelson Foundation
New Hampshire Charitable Foundation
Old Stones Foundation
The Forster Family Foundation
The Irene E. & George A. Davis Foundation
The Lehrer Family Foundation
Vermont Community Foundation GRANTS & SPECIAL PURPOSE GIFTS American Precision Museum / Annual Report 2021-2022 7
Patron ($251$999)
Partner ($1,000-$4,999) American Precision Museum / Annual Report 2021-2022 8
Thank You, Corporate Members Our Corporate Members donate annually to support the museum. We welcome companies to join as corporate members and particularly encourage those in the machine tool and manufacturing industries to help us preserve industrial history and inspire the next generation.
LAKE MACHINE COMPANY INC.
Leader ($5,000+) American Precision Museum / Annual Report 2021-2022 9

American Precision Museum

Board Chair, Lee Morris Receives Industry Award

The Al Moore Award is given to members of the manufacturing technology community who have demonstrated a lifetime of dedication to the industry. Al Moore was executive vice president-operations for Gleason Corp. and former AMT president and board chairman, guiding the transformation to AMT from the National Machine Tool Builders Association.

After sales experience with IBM, Lee Morris joined his parent’s machine tool distribution business in 1968. Under his leadership, family enterprise has grown consistently. Now under third generation leadership, Morris Group, Inc. employs over 800 people devoted to serving the machine tool user throughout North America. Lee Morris has served as Chairman of the American Machine Tool Distributors Association and as a 2 term Board Member of the Association for Manufacturing Technology.

THE AL MOORE AWARD

The Association For Manufacturing Technology represents and promotes U.S.-based manufacturing technology and its members – those who design, build, sell, and service the continuously evolving technology that lies at the heart of manufacturing. Founded in 1902 and based in Virginia, the association specializes in providing targeted business assistance, extensive global support, and business intelligence systems and analysis. AMT is the voice that communicates the importance of policies and programs that encourage research and innovation, and the development of educational initiatives to create tomorrow’s Smartforce. AMT owns and manages IMTS – The International Manufacturing Technology Show, which is the premier manufacturing technology event in North America.

NOV 2021
LEE MORRIS (LEFT) ACCEPTS HIS AWARD FROM AMT PRESIDENT DOUG WOODS.
“I’ve been in the industry for more than 53 years and built a business consistently during that time. ‘Grow or Die’ has been a core business belief I’ve stuck with. Receiving the Al Moore Award now is very fulfilling.”
American
/ Annual Report 2021-2022 10
— Lee Morris
Precision Museum

ATNEWAPM!

Audio Guides GUIDE ID AUDIO GUIDES

Stories make exhibits come alive, especially those told by history. These stories are heard and learned from without any distractions. That’s why the American Precision Museum offers visitors audio-only guides to ensure all eyes are on the object; all ears are on the story. We have kept things simple with Guide ID. Just point the handheld device at the audio pod at each display and listen as our story of Made By Hand to Made By Machine comes alive.

MOST POPULAR STOPS

1. FOUNDERS “One day, in the winter of 1844, Mr. S. E. Robbins came into the shop…”

2. DRILL PRESS “…new concept for doing multiple machining operations using one machine, having four to five spindles.”

3. RIFLING MACHINE “This is a rifling machine. It will produce a groove inside the barrel that would improve the accuracy of the rifle.”

Ten “Podcatchers” were ordered from Guide Id. They are stored and charged in the dock. The podcatchers are activated at the front desk free of charge for our guests.

Throughout the museum are the triggers that we call bricks. We have the ability to change the audio for each trigger anytime.

All guests have to do is put the podcatcher close to the brick and listen to the stories!

1,248
AUDIO TOURS TAKEN
10,115 STORIES TOLD 97% OF STORIES FINISHED NUMBER OF TOURS BY MONTH 238 OCT 229 SEP 279 AUG 243 JUL 146 JUN 64 MAY APR 35 American Precision Museum / Annual Report 2021-2022 11

Exhibit Updates

KIDS DAY OF ENGINEERING

Kids earned an APM Patent by designing a product at the Inventor Station

PATTERNS AND MOLDS

Visitors explored a whole host of patterns used to make the castings for the various line shaft supports within the museum. Also on display was a mold used to make chocolate gears.

Kids learned about river flow and erosion at the Vermont Transportation water table Gear mold made out of silicone Molded chocolate gear Mold patterns for line shaft supports on display FEBRUARY
2022 JANUARY 2022 JANUARY 2022
/ Annual Report 2021-2022 12
American Precision Museum

WOMEN INVENTORS MONTH

COLLECTIONS & PRESERVATION

First impressions are essential, and we’re pleased to report the conclusion of our window repair and repainting project last fall. Window sash, sills, and trim on the lower two floors of the south side of the building can be admired daily by visitors on their way to the entrance of our 176-year-old landmark building. The project was funded by a $20,000 grant from the Vermont Historic Preservation, matched by an existing donation from the Timken Foundation; of course, with 166 windows in the building, this kind of proactive maintenance needs to continue routinely, and we look forward to working on the upper floors.

Other building-related projects advanced through the planning stages during the fiscal year. A heating system for the exhibit area was designed and the contract awarded. In the spring, the 1772 Foundation approved our grant application for $10,000 to repair three historic but deteriorated exterior wooden doors . Analysis of the contents of our off-site storage began. There are more than 50 collection objects - some very large - in rented warehouse space in Windsor. We expect to move some of these items to the Armory building and find new homes for those not relevant to our mission.

And we found a new and better home for one huge machine loaned to the Smithsonian many years ago. After being exhibited, the Norwalk steam engine was in storage at the National Museum of lndustrial History in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and NMIH contacted us to come and get it. Since it doesn’t fit our collections’ scope, we arranged to donate it to them.

Other new and continuing collection development projects include evaluating several thousand books , begun last year. More than 500 have been sold to visitors in our gift shop, and the ones we keep are being cataloged. A volunteer is scanning some of our most fragile documents so that we can access them digitally and the originals stored and protected. Staff is photographing and cataloging some objects missed in earlier surveys in preparation for complete inventory over the coming years.

The American Precision Museum exists because of its important building and collections. We honor that responsibility by caring for them so that you and future generations can learn from and enjoy them.

Completed south side windows
Detail of door with damage to brick work Barbara Cieslicki & Steve Dalessio selling books at MES 2021
OCTOBER
MARCH
OCTOBER
American Precision Museum / Annual Report 2021-2022 13
The museum celebrated Women Inventors Month in collaboration with the Smithsonian Institute
2021
2022
2021

This year in education we created a focused approach to connecting with 4th through 6th grade students through STEM kits in partnership with SparkShop. This provides an in-class opportunity to tie the history of the museum to relevant STEM activities and provide a connection to a career in manufacturing.

Education Strategy APM × SPARKSHOP STEM KIT UPDATE 1,333 KITS REQUESTED 53 CLASSROOMS 684 KITS DELIVERED EXPERIMENTING WITH ENERGY ACHIEVING REPEATABILITY MEASURE THE WORLD KITS SENT BY TYPE 4TH 5TH 6TH DISTRIBUTION BY GRADE MEASURE THE WORLD ACHIEVING REPEATABILITY EXPERIMENTING WITH ENERGY American Precision Museum / Annual Report 2021-2022 14

National Relevance

NEW ONLINE LEARNING RESOURCE TEAMING UP WITH NMIH

MACHINE OF THE MONTH

In the monthly newsletters, we began highlighting a different machine every month. MotM has proved to be wildly popular and is the most clicked item in the monthly newsletter. We also receive a lot of emails from our subscribers telling us how much they enjoy this new content.

TOP 5 MACHINES

Lincoln Mill, early 20th century, Pratt & Whitney

Parker Mechanical Press, c. 1870, Parker Bros., Meriden CT

Patterns & Molds, various Heim Centerless Grinder, 1918, Ball and Roller Bearing Company, Danbury, CT Blick No. 5, 1893, Blickensderfer Manufacturing Company, Stamford, CT

NEW TECHNOLOGY

UR-5 COBOT FROM UNIVERSAL ROBOTS

The museum is lucky to have so many great relationships in the manufacturing industry. Universal Robots is no exception. They donated a robot arm to show how automation and humans can work side by side safely and efficiently.

APM joined with the National Museum of Industrial History to celebrate the First US World’s Fair in 1876. LINCOLN MILL PARKER PRESS UR-5 ROBOT
American Precision Museum / Annual Report 2021-2022 15
1875 Metal Shaper from 1876 Centennial Exposition on loan from APM 1874 Automatic Lathe on loan from APM
You Make This Possible NON PROFITORG US POSTAGE PAID WHTRIV JCTVT PERMIT 86 AMERICAN PRECISION MUSEUM 196 MAIN ST P.O. BOX 679 WINDSOR, VT 05089 “MECHANICAL ENGINEER’S DREAM MUSEUM. THANKS SO MUCH!” MUSEUM VISITOR “THAT AMERICAN PRECISION MUSEUM IS SMALL, BUT REALLY PUNCHES ABOVE ITS WEIGHT IN TERMS OF HISTORICAL INTEREST.” GOOGLE REVIEWER “HIDDEN GEM IN THE WINDSOR AREA. FOR ANYONE EVEN REMOTELY INTERESTED IN HISTORY OR TECH, THIS IS A MUST-SEE.” GOOGLE REVIEWER “HANDS DOWN, ONE OF THE MOST INTERESTING AND UNIQUE MUSEUMS I HAVE EVER BEEN TO! ” MUSEUM VISITOR “THIS WAS AN EYE OPENING VISIT. I HAD NO IDEA ABOUT THE HISTORY AND IMPACT OF THIS PLACE.” GOOGLE REVIEWER
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