Page 1

VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating

   

  from 

 


Industrial heating    2    Dimensioning guide

VärmeKabelTeknik

This manual contains all necessary information to  dimension heating and frost protection of pipes, tanks  and cisterns. You get help to choose cables and  accessories for your application.  A dimensioning guide for pipe systems is also available  on a 5 1/4" or 3 1/2" disk for PC (The programme  requires only 512 KB).  The calculation programme is adapted so that you easily  could feed the values which are required to project  heating cable application and you obtain a complete  material list after running. 

Introduction In order to be able to take out a correct solution for a  heating cable application it is important to have some  basic knowledge. It is the heating cables task to  compensate for heatloss from the construction part  through the thermal insulation and in some cases  increase the temperature on the encased medium.  We also deliver an extensive assortment of heating  products above heating cables. You will find these in our  catalogue. Is there something you miss? Give a call to  any of our offices and tell us about your needs and we  help you in the best possible way to make a solution.     


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 3

Chapter 1 

Product overview  Products for electrical heating on pipes and containers and other heat demanding applications 

VÄRMEKABELTEKNIK have a complete assortment of  heating cables adapted for various purposes from frost  protection to heating with a supplementary product  programme with heating system for the industry. 

Värmekabeltekniks programme

• Parallel resistive heating cable with constant output. • Self‐limiting heating cable • Series resistive heating cable. PVC‐, Teflon and  Mineral insulated, with or without return‐wire.

• Immersion heaters • Heating foils made of polyester (80°C) Silicone  (250°C)

• Nozzle heaters • Ceramic infra heaters for contactless heating  • Surrounding equipment, control equipment, etc.  Our speciality VärmeKabelTeknik have by its comprehensive  knowledge and wide assortment the possibility to help  to take out complete package solutions for special  applications on products where heat supply is required.  We can also in certain cases assist with installing our  heating products on the customers provided machine  component, container, portable pipes, etc.  Contact us with your inquiry for a profitable suggestion. 

Projecting guide With this manual we want to give you information on  the range of applications of our products.  The manual describes the characteristics of the products  and gives you an insight in calculations of energy  requirement for the most common applications.  In the following chapter you can also see how an  application is calculated, dimensioned and which  specifications required doing these calculations. 

This help you to get out all information when you wants  help of any of VärmeKabelTeknik s technicians or when  you will prepare for your own calculation. 

Värmekabeltekniks support You can safely leave your drawings or verbal  information on your application to our experienced  sellers to get help with calculations and projecting and  quotation on your object.  You will get a complete suggestion with material,  specification and price on heating source, assistance at  installation and control.  On request you obtain a installation instruction  especially designed for your application and you can  always give us a call if any questions occur during the  work.  You can also get help with relation papers on the  heating cable application and sketch of the heating  cable installation on one by you provided drawing.  VärmeKabelTeknik can adapt heating products to your  application or help you with apply heat on your portable  instrument/equipment. 

Series resistive heating cables The first heating cable that was produced was of a series  resistive type. Today there are several types series  resistive heating cable available. These are  manufactured in qualities from PVC to mineral insulated  high‐temperature cable with rustless sheath. The  biggest advantage with these is the possibility to obtain  long element lengths, from only one point of  connection.   In contrary to parallel resistive and self‐limiting heating  cables which maximum length are limited by the voltage  drop in the conductors, this is used as a heat emitting  part in a series resistive cable. The heating conductor is  manufactured of an alloy that gives required resistance  per meter. By combining a required length with the  available cable resistance’s and supply voltages can  advantages be obtained such as varying outputs, lengths  from a couple of meter to lengths on 800‐1000m from  one point of supply. 


Industrial heating    4   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 1 

Procut overview  Products for electrical heating on pipes and containers and other heat demanding applications 

Som nackdel kan ses att kabeln vanligtvis måste It is a    disadvantage that the cable normally must be finished  on the factory, which means you have to know the pipe  lengths in advance to be able to pre order required  lengths. (AT long high‐temperature lengths where the  heating conductor contains copper (CC‐cables) shall  consideration be taken to the temperature coefficient of  the heating conductor which influence the output of the  length negatively).  For installations within the EX‐surface a number of  supplementary safety devices is required, and  exemption from the touched authorities. 

Constant wattage cables

The insulation material and the sheath consist normally  of teflon material.  There is more detailed information in the cable date  sheets.  The heating cable is designed with earth braid that also  works as an armouring and corrosion protected sheath  of teflon where this is not possible by high  temperatures.  Parallel resistive heating cables gives a solid output per  meter independent of the ambient temperature. They  have no starting current and can therefore be  connected in relatively long lengths, (se cable data). 

Self-limiting heating cables

Parallel resistive cables can be bought as running metre  for making‐up on the site. This admits a good flexibility  both at new production and repairs. The cable has a  constant output per metre irrespective of length and  temperature and can be cut on regular distances, most  often between 0,5 ‐ 1,2 metres dependent on module  lengths from different suppliers.  The heating element in a parallel resistive cable consists  of a resistance wire which is coiled round the insulated  front conductors, at the so called contact points (these  have been marked as waist on the outer side of the  cable) have the resistance wire contact against one of  the conductors alternating for each contact point. 

Self‐limiting heating cables can be bought in running  metre for make‐up on the site. The cable has a varying  output depending on the ambient temperature, which  guard against overheating even if the cables crosses  itself. This also allows installation in Ex‐surfaces (all  Värmekabeltekniks self‐limiting cable types are Ex‐ rated).  The self‐limiting cable have a unique capacity in  proportion to the sheath temperature of the cable,  reduce the emitted output. These cables are often  mentioned as self‐regulated cables but this is a wrong  denomination, as a required temperature not can be  guaranteed without temperature control. 

Heating cable of series resistive, mineral insulated type 

On the other hand, the cables make it possible to give  an even temperature on a pipe even if the ambient  temperature varies along piping. 

 

Värmekabeltekniks self‐limiting cables are approved  within Ex‐surfaces when the cables have a stated T‐ Rate, i.e. a maximum temperature that the cable reach.  The T‐rates varies for different output/m. 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 5

Chapter 2 

Range of application for heating cable/Other   

Diagramme - load/temperature series resistive cables

VKT:s heating cable products characteristics - industrial cables  

Mineral insulated cable 

Features

SRL

SRM

CWM

Koppar Cu/Nickel

Incoloy

TCT

TCTR

Max. maintenance temp.(°C) 

85

150

120

200

300

450

160

160

Max. exposed temperature (°C) 

130

180

200

250

350

600

200

200

Max. Wattage/m 

33

65

30

Max circuit length 

See data  sheet 

See data  sheet 

See data  sheet 

Votlage

120, 240 

120, 240

240/440

1‐600V

1‐600V

1‐600V

1‐440V

1‐440V

Ex‐approved

Yes

Yes

No

No*

No*

No*

No

No

Usable on plastic pipes 

Yes

No

No*

No**

No**

No**

Can be cut on site 

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

No

Can cross itself 

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

No

No

Varying output/temperature 

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

No

No

Varying output along cable run

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

No

no

Dependant on process temp  Dependent on temp Dependent on suply voltage 

Dependent on  supply (U) 

Depend. On power

* The cables are Ex‐approved in a number of countries. At use in for example Sweden shall exemption be applied for.  **  Suitability depend on load/metre 


Industrial heating    6   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 2 

Range of application for heating cable/Other   

Maximum cable temperature

Heating cables has a limited max. temperature in  consequence of the material which is used at their  construction. If the temperature exceeds recommended  values, the lifetime is shortened or at worst the cable is  destroyed.   *  Therefore find out which maximum temperature can  arise in consequence of the process –where the  heating cable application is included.  *  Also find out if so called steam purifying occurs when  steam can give temperatures up to approx. 200°C.  There are two different maximums:  A. Max. temperature when cable is switched on  This information of max. temperature indicates the  maximum temperature the cable could maintain.  (Consideration should however be taken to the  calculation of the sheath temperature on the  previous page where the real temperature is  related to the stated output of the cable).  B. Max. temperature when the cable is switched off  This information mentions what the cable can  handle when switched off at frost protection of for  example steam conduit or heating of a heavy oil  conduit where the operation temperature is  considerable above the required heating  temperature.    Here the function is that one in the intake end of  the pipe place the transmitter of the  thermostat/regulator so that the supply voltage of  the cable disconnects when the process exceeds  the heating temperature.   

The diagram shows a comparison of the maximum  exposure temperature of our heating cable products,  with the heating cable disconnected. 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 7

Chapter 2 

Range of application for heating cable/Other  TCT – Series resistive single‐wire 

VELOX TCT Series resistive single wire is built‐up with a  heating conductor of high‐temperature type. The  heating conductor has an insulation of teflon material.  On this an earth screen placed of tinned copper, which  is covered by an outer layer of teflon. The heating cable  can be exposed of temperatures up to 220°C and  manages heating up to approx. 200°C depending on the  load (see diagram on the data sheets).  

The heating cable with its small dimensions (3‐3,5 mm)  and its soft construction usable to the most  applications. 

The TCT is series resistive, which admits long heating  lengths (approx.250m). This is an advantage at long  pipings and minimises the number of connection points  at all types of installations.  Example on common applications of TCT is asphalt  work, oil pipes and filter bunkers. The heating cable  shall always be connected via thermostat control. 

The cable manages most of the chemical environments  and is well suited for frost protection to heating of  various objects.     

TCTR – series resistive return wire 

VELOX TCTR Series resistive heating cable with return  wire which is built on a TCT, but with a further screen  and layer of teflon. In this case the inner screen is used  as a return wire and the outer as earth screen. 

This cable is especially suited for installation where long  lengths are required and/or where it is hard or  unpractical to return to the starting point. 

Example where the TCTR gives an extra economical  solution is a long pipe length where one cable run is  enough. 

Max. ambient temperature is approx. 220°C. Max. ope‐ ration temperature, approx. 190‐200°C.   

 


Industrial heating    8   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 2 

Range of application for heating cable/Other  LMI – mineral insulated heating cable 

Mineral insulated cables consist of a conductor of  copper alternatively an alloy. The conductor insulation  consists of a hard packed magnesium oxide (MgO). The  cable is supplied with a solid‐drawn sheath of copper,  copper/nickel or stainless steel, which also serves as an  earth wire. The cable has a smaller diameter than other  types of cables and is furthermore slightly flexible and  can with no problems be installed in complicated cable  runs. The cables are meant for applications with  operating temperatures up to 200°C. Can be provided  with a corrosion protected outer sheath.  The advantages with mineral insulated cables are many,  below you’ll find some of them:    Flame‐resistant  Värmekabeltekniks MI‐cable has a sheath of  incombustible material. The most compact insulation  prevents transfer of steam, gases and flames between  equipment parts, which are connected through the  cable. Bare cables emits no smoke or toxic gas and do  not spread fire. When corrosion protection is required,  the volume is very small which gives a reduced  discharge of Halogen. 

Example on range of applications

Chemical industries Heating of pipes and bearing tanks to keep the products  at correct temperature during the processing. 

Power stations Electrical heating of pipes with fuel oil and to prevent  the instruments from freezing during the winter. 

Nuclear industry Mineral insulated heating cables can be used within  several ranges of applications in the nuclear industry.  The are used to heat pipes, ventilators, cisterns and to  preheat the sodium circuits of the reactor. 

Dock yards Frost protection cables to protect instrument and pipe  bridges from ice formation. 

Waterproof  Värmekabeltekniks MI‐cable has a seamless metallic  sheath, which do not let water, oil or gas lose.    Corrosion‐proof  Since the MI‐cable from VärmeKabelTeknik has a  metallic sheath, it is also very corrosion‐proof and does  not need extra protection when used in normal  environments. If the cable is exposed to difficult  chemicals, it can be protected with an outer sheath.   High operating temperatures  Värmekabeltekniks MI‐cables manages continuous  operating temperatures up to 600oC. The maximum  continuous operating temperature at the corrosion  protected cable is approx. 200oC (HDP). Other insulation  material can be ordered specially. The most common is  yet that the cable is installed without outer protected  jacket.   


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 9

Chapter 2 

Range of application for heating cable/Other  RSL‐CR‐CT–Self‐limiting heating cable 

APPLICATION 

• Outdo heating with steam. Lower installation costs  and a more safe operation. 

SRL self‐limiting heating cable gives a reliable frost  protection of pipes, ventilators, cisterns and similar  applications. Max maintenance temperature 65°C  (Exposure temperature, switched off 85°C)  

• Self‐limiting output makes over temperature  impossible. 

• Värmekabelteknik:s connection‐/end termination kits 

Advantages:

and connecting material with detailed descriptions is a  good help at the installation. 

• Approved for installation in Ex‐surfaces (T5‐T6)   

• The heating cable can be crossed at installation (for  example at ventilators) when the cable reduces its  output at rising temperatures. 

• Can be cut in required length and made‐up on the  site. (Take consideration to the max. connection  lengths stated in the data sheets).   

RSM‐CR –Self‐limiting heating cable 

APPLICATION 

SRM can be cut and completed on site. (Take  consideration to the maximum circuit length, see  data sheet). 

SRL self‐limiting heating cable gives a reliable frost  protection of pipes, ventilators, cisterns and similar  applications. Max maintenance temperature 65°C  (Exposure temperature, switched off 85°C) 

The cable can cross itself (for example at installations  on ventilators) without risk of overheating.  Outdo heating with steam. Lower installation costs  and maintenance cost than steam.  

Advantages:

• Approved for installation in Ex‐surfaces (T5‐T6)  • The heating cable can be crossed at installation (for 

Self‐limited output makes overheating impossible.  Värmekabelteknik:s connection‐/end termination  kits and connecting material with detailed  descriptions is a good help at the installation. 

example at ventilators) when the cable reduces its  output at rising temperatures. 

• Can be cut in required length and made‐up on the  site. (Take consideration to the max. connection  lengths stated in the data sheets).     


Industrial heating   10   

Chapter 2 

VärmeKabelTeknik

Range of application for heating cable/Other  EST/CWM – parallel resistive heating cable 

Parallel resistive heating cables with constant    output/metre irrespective of length may very well be  cut and completed on the site. Parallel resistive cables  were introduced in Sweden on the 1970’s, but first  during the 80’s the cables come into use in an increasing  extent.   Cables of parallel resistive type have two conductors,  which are separately insulated. Round these  conductors, a NiCr‐wire is winded which are connected  at regular intervals to the conductor, alternating so that  each zone becomes –a separate element. The electric  conductor of the parallel resistive cable is constructed  by twisted, tinned copper braid.   Conductor areas from 1,5 mm² to 3,5 mm². The  conductor insulation and the armouring bed is made out  of teflon material.  The cable is braided of tinned copper wire as  armouring/earth screen and a outer sheath of teflon  material. 

Parallel resistive heating cables are available in a  number of different running metres/outputs. EST/CWM  is meant for exposure temperatures up to 200°C  (switched off) and could maintain pipe temperatures up  to approx. 170°C (10W/m). The cable is installed with an  aluminium tape or glass fibre tape for example, for  attachment. For connection‐ and end termination is  mounting kits used for cables of parallel resistive type.  For more information, see data sheets.  The cables are complete simply by follow the  instructions available in the mounting instructions step  by step. Consideration should be taken to the  recommended maximum connection lengths valid for  the different outputs on the parallel resistive cables.  Regarding the lengths, have consideration been taken to  the voltage drop in the electric conductors of the cable  and other technical data can be found in the data  sheets. 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 11

Chapter 2 

Range of application for heating cable/Other  Other heating products for the industry 

Heating foils of silicone

Heating foils made of silicone are meant for applications  where high outer temperatures are required. They are  kept in stock in Sweden in a number of different sizes  with outputs up to 1.5 W/cm² with operating  temperatures on max 250°C.  On request can special shapes (element with hole  patterns, built‐in thermostats etc) and outputs be  delivered. However, a minimum of 25pcs must be  ordered of special foils.  

 

The heating foil is manufactured with a resistance wire,  which is vulcanised in the middle of two silicone plates.  The elements are installed with special glue, feather or  screw unions and shall be temperature controlled by a  thermostat or regulator with transmitter mounted in  direct connection to the element. 

The heating foil is also available in a special design as  can heaters and are supplied with earth‐leakage‐circuit‐ breaker mounted on rubber tube for connection. 

• Easy and quick installation.  • Resistant against most of the chemicals.  • Flexible at temperatures down to ‐28°C. Make it  easier at installations in the winter. 

• Are available in a large number of standard  elements. 

• Operating temperatures up to +250°C.  • The construction is easy to apply in the most  applications where the object is constructed of a  heat discharging material, this admits its also an  excellent heat transfer from the element to the  object, which gives a long lifetime and a low energy  consumption.  Nozzle heaters for mounting on round object, as for  example pipes where extremely high outputs (4‐ 6W/cm²) is required, available in standard sizes. Max  continuous operating temperature 450°C.  Immersion heaters for high outputs (30‐40W/cm²).  Operating temperature max.1000°C Continuous.   


Industrial heating   12   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 3 

Calculations Frost protection and heating of pipes 

Formulas for pipe heating 1.

Frost protecting/heating of pipes. Pipes are  covered with heating cable in order to  compensate the heat losses through the  thermal insulation and maintain a temperature  over 0°C, maintain the required temperature. 

Formulas Heat loss calculation  Q  = 2 x Π x Δt x k x 1,16 x s     ln (dy / di)  Q  =  The heat loss (W)  Δt  =  Difference in temperature between the pipe and  environment (°C)  K  =  The permeability of the insulation material in  W/m°C (Mineral wool =0,045)  dy  =  The exterior diameter (mm)  di  =  The interior diameter (mm)  s  =  Safety factor (0=indoor/1,5=quay berth) 

2.

Heating of pipes (unprogressive fluids). Pipes    are covered with heating cable to rise the  original temperature to a required temperature  and to compensate heat losses through the  thermal insulation.   

Calculation of required energy at heating of  unprogressive fluids  P = Q + ph  Ph =  G  x  V  x  c  x   th    h    P  =  Total required power for the required  temperature rise (W)  Q  =  Heat loss through the thermal insulation  according to above (W)  Ph  =  Required power to increase the temperature(W)   G  =    Density (Kg/dm³)  V  =  Volume dm³  (l)  c  =  Heat permittivety (Wh/Kg°C)  th  =  Required temperature rise (°C)  h  =  Required heating time 

3.

Heating of flowing fluids. Pipes are covered  with heating cable to rise the temperature on a  flowing fluid a number of degrees, while it  passes the actual pipe length. At the same time  the heat loss through the thermal insulation be  compensated. 

Calculation of energy requirement for heating of flowing  fluids     

P  =  Q + Phs  Phs= V x G x c x th 

P  =  Total required power (W)  Phs=  Required power for required temperature rise (W)  Vh =  Flowing volume (Litre/hour)  c   =  Heat permettivety (Wh/Kg°C)  th   =  Required temperature rise (°C) 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 13

Chapter 3 

Calculations Frost protection and heating of pipes 

Need of compensation for heat loss A pipe system does no only consist of the pipe itself, it  also includes pipe supports, ventilators, flanges, pumps  and instrument. All these components contribute to heat  losses and they have often a larger surface than the pipe  itself. The heat loss is therefore bigger on these places  than for the pipe in general.  For ventilators, pipe supports, pumps can the factors  below be used to calculate increased heat losses on  these. A pump has approximately the double heat loss  than the ventilator as for example.   Supplementary factors for ventilators and mounting  details  Key ventilator  1.3 x Q/m pipe  0.7 x Q/m pipe  Moving butterfly valve  Bullet valve  0.8 x Q/m pipe  Mushroom valve  1.2 x Q/m pipe  Flange  4 x Dflange x Dpipe  Pipe support  2 x width of the pipe support + 0.4m  Heat losses from a pump can also be calculated  approximately as a barrel. The diameter of this barrel is  the same as the distance between outlet flange and the  base plate. The length is the same as the distance  between the inlet flange and the opposite end of the  pump. The heat loss from the shell of the pump can be  determined by using this formula: 

Which information must be available as a minimum to  be able to project? 

HEATING UP ‐ Type of insulation and thickness  ‐  Lowest ambient temperature  ‐  Required temperature  ‐  Pipe dimension  ‐  Type of insulation and thickness (k‐value)  ‐  Maximum process temperature 

HEATING UP – Supplement to keeping warm ‐ Pipe material and its thickness  ‐  The content of the pipe: Density, heat permittivity  ‐  Inlet temperature of the pipe/its content  ‐  Final temperature after heating  Required heating‐up time  *At percolation even fluid volume  In both cases this is the absolute minimum demand  which is required for a projection. To do a complete  projection you also must take in consideration a couple  of factors according to below. 

FURTHER INFORMATION ‐ If the application is located within an Ex‐rated area  or not.  ‐  Maximum operating temperature 

Q pump =k  π D (0,5 x D+L)x Δt  (W)    d     Instrument included along the pipe is most often covered  by the heating cable which runs on the piping are laid  around the instrument. You must specially consider the  electronically equipment which are used. The does in  general not handle temperatures above 80 ‐ 100°C due  to incoming electronically component, solderings etc. 

Projecting a heating cable application

‐ Eventual steam bubbling (choose of cable)  ‐  Available supply voltage  ‐  Which direction of the fluid (placement of  transmitter)  ‐  Type of control equipment (existing/required)  ‐  If there is need of a limiting thermostat  (temperature sensitive fluids, substances)  ‐  Valves, pumps, instruments  ‐  Required special cable type  ‐  If the application is located indoors or outdoors 

Projecting can be divided into two directions which has  their own:

‐ High gradients on pipes (chimney effect) 

a.

Heating – heat loss compensation/frost protection 

‐ Suitable material to fix the heating cable 

b.

Heating up 

‐ Surrounding environment (acids etc.) 

‐ Type of insulation (k‐value) 


Industrial heating   14   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 3 

Calculations Frost protection and heating of pipes 

Example on calculations Calculating heat loss for pipes

Example Operating temperature:   +40 °C  

Calculating heat loss for pipes: To do a calculation of  heat losses on an insulated pipe your have to know  certain data: required operating temperature, pipe  dimension, the thickness of the insulation and  conductivity, the nature of the environment.  

Ambient temperature: 

+10°C indoor  

Pipe dimension:  

Ø 30 mm  steel 

Insulation:

Pipe tray 30 mm glass wool

Dt =  Difference of temperature (the difference  between the operating temperature and the  lowest ambient temperature) 

Insulation k‐value: 

0,036

Safety factor: 

1,2

k =  The heat permeability of the insulation (W/moC)  (Mineral wool 0.04) 

 

Q =  2 x π x Dt x k 1,16 x s        ln (dy / di)  

dy =  The exterior diameter ( mm )  di  =  The exterior diameter of the pipe (mm) 

 

Q =2 x π x 0 x 0,036 1,16 x1,2     ln  (90 / 30) 

S =  Safety factor 1,2 ‐1.5 (1,2 indoor ‐ 1,5 outdoor) 

Q = 8,6 W / m 

Q  =     

2 x   x Dt x k x 1,16 x S  ln  (dy  / di)       

 

Q =  Heat loss per meter pipe (W/m)  The required power (Q) can also be read from the table  xx.  NOTE!   If the pipe is made of plastic and the required power  (Q) exceeds 10 W/m can heating cable of parallel  resistive or series resistive type only be used at frost  protection and if double insulation is done, i.e. you  insulate the pipe with a thin insulation and then lay  an aluminium foil which the heating cable is applied  and cover with a extra layer of aluminium foil as the  final insulation layer is laid.     

Choice of cable, see page 21 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 15

Chapter 3 

Calculations Frost protection and heating of pipes 

Choosing cable

Now when we have calculated the heat loss from the  pipe, we need to decide which cable we shall use.   For this one have to know the information below:.  Construction data:  Max. operating temperature (ev. steam purifying)   °  

Table 2.Choosing cable type  Type of cable 

Cable on 

Cable off 

Self‐limiting SRL  SRM 

65°C 120°C 

85°C 190°C 

Parallel resistive  CWM 

120°C

200°C

Series resistive  Teflon insulated  TCT/TCTR 

Depending on load 

200°

Chemical environment ‐ required sheath type  __________

Mineral insulated  COPPER 

Depending on load 

250°C

T‐rate/Ex‐zone ___________________________________

COPPER/NICKEL

Depending on load 

450°C

Pipe material (Metal/Plastic) ________________________

STAINLESS*

Depending in load 

600°C

1.  Considering temperatures 

*In environments saturated with salt can stainless  cables corrode with short‐circuiting as a result. 

Tp =                             C  Required maintenance temperature  Tm =                            ° C 

Decide the cable type, which is suitable for the  operating temperature of the application and  maintenance temperature in the design with help of our  data sheets. Control that the stated values for  temperatures, switched on and off not is exceeded. 

Example: Environment Voltage  Pipe material 

2.  Choose the material for the sheath 

Tp    

To decide the outer sheath of the cable you should take  into the consideration to the environment where the  cable shall be installed. Process temperature, steam  purifying, aggressive fluids, ex‐zones, moisture etc, see  diagram on page 11. 

Tdrift       = 40oC  Required power = 10W/m  1.

2.

1.Both temperatures are below the maximum  temperature data for all cable types (all cable  types can be used).  SRL ‐5‐ gives 10 W/m at 40oC. 

3.

3.EST/CWM 12‐4  gives 10 W/m cable at 230V  

4.

Series resistive cables, see page 23. 

3.  Choosing cable  Self‐limiting cable type is decided from our data sheets,  in the diagram can the output be read which the  different cables emit at your required operating  temperature. The cable is very well suited for coiling to  obtain required output.  

If required running meter output not can be obtained 

Parallel resistive cable is chosen so that the output per  meter corresponds to the calculated required power (Q)  or higher. You can also obtain the required power by  coiling (without crossing the cable). Control the diagram  in the data sheets for the heating cable that the sheath  temperature (Tm) not is exceeded.  Series resistive cables Mineral insulated Teflon and PVC‐ cables are chosen from our data sheets. Calculation of  the ohm‐value for the required cable length and output  (see page 23). To determine the cable type is the power  loading related per meter with the process  temperature. (See page 31.) 

 = Exposed to moisture   = 230 V  = Metal    = 65oC,  

Possible steps: 

Coil or lay several runs with cables. 

Increase the thickness of the insulation or choose  insulation with better k‐value.  

Choose any of our miscellaneous heating products  (for example silicone element or nozzle heaters). 


Industrial heating   16   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 3 

Calculations Frost protection and heating of pipes 

Calculating the amount of cable

CabLe Length

Fusing – self‐limiting cable 

Pipe length (Lpipe) 

= ______________________ m

Type of valve 

= _______________________

Number of valves 

= _____________________ pc

Flanges

= _____________________ pc

Number of pipe supports  = _____________________ pc The total length of cable needed is obtained by add the  pipe length and the components.  L  

=  

Lpipe  x coiling + Lsupplement 

Lr

=  

The pipe length A is known from above 

Lsuppl.

=

(Qpipe x number of valves x factor for the  type/Qcable) 

+ (Number of pipe supports x 2 x pipe diameter(m) +  (Number of flanges x 2 x pipe diameter(m)  The factor for the heatloss in valves, see table on page  19.  Be sure that the cable length not exceeds the maximum  recommended length, which is shown in table 3 below. 

Table 3. Max connection lengths Cable symbol 

Calculate maximum circuit lengths

Max. connection length  (m) at 240V 

Calculate the starting current with help of the formula  below to determine supply cable and fusing.  Formula:  I (A) 

= L x Istart 

L(m)

= Length of cable  

Istart(A) =  Starting current/m see table below  Table Start current Self‐limiting cable  Start current (A/m) – Start temperature (°C)  Type of cable 

Operating temperature 

‐20°C

0°C

+10°C +20°C 

SRL3 SRL5  SRL8  SRL10 

0,162 0,333  0,526  0,625 

0,137 0,25  0,4  0,54 

0,125 0,206  0,323  0,488 

0,112 0,162  0,27  0,465 

SRM3 SRM5  SRM8  SRM10  SRM15  SRM20 

0,161 0,25  0,339  0,37  0,41  0,5 

0,137 0,217  0,297  0,345  0,382  0,457 

0,125 0,206  0,287  0,333  0,369  0,432 

0,112 0,192  0,272  0,313  0,355  0,41 

Example

Self‐limiting SRL3  SRL5  SRL8  SRL10  SRM3  SRM5  SRM8  SRM10  SRM15  SRM20 

211 166  127  109  237  228  185  149  128  106 

Parallel resistive  CWM12‐4  (10/30 W/m)  CWM8‐2  (24 W/m)  CWM12‐2  (36 W/m) 

300/180 160  120 

We obtain a total length of 114 meter of the chosen  cable SRL‐5 2CR. The cable thermostat switch on the  current at +40°C  The cable can be connected in one end but is then  require a 25A time fuse due to the starting current of  the cable (see table above). You can instead divide the  cable in two parts in the same size and carry out the  connection on the middle to 2 x 16A. This also gives a  more even load of the fuses. 

Series resistive teflon‐ and mineral insulated cables, see  data sheets.   

 Length A  =  100    Type of valve  =1 pcs claw valve    Flanges  =  8    Pipe supports  =  8    We calculates the total length of cable 

 LTot 

= 100 +14 = 114 meter 

 Lsupport 

= (8,6 x 1,3/10) + (8 x  3 x 0,3) +  (8x2x0,3) m= 13,11 m 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 17

Chapter 3 

Calculations Frost protection and heating of pipes 

Choose the cable type

Series resistive heating cables are a good alternative for  longer pipe systems except for Ex‐rated zones. 

For these cables a α–value often is stated which can be  put in the formula below.  Recalculate the cable resistance with help of the  formula at the required maintenance temperature 

For frost protection can for example TCP/TCPR be used  if the environment allows pvc‐sheaths.   For heating‐up to 180°C, use TCT/TCTR which is teflon  sheathed and therefore works excellent in the most  aggressive environments.  Mineral insulated heating cables are a good alternative  for long pipings or when high outputs or temperatures  up to 500°C shall be maintained or are obtained in a  pipe system. 

R/m = R20°C @ (1+(T‐20))  Calculate the output, which the cable obtains at  operating temperature and see if this fall below your  required power. If so, choose the closest lower  resistance and check calculate this. 

Exempel:

Take out the values according to the points below:  * Heat loss in Watt per meter, Q (W/m)    Use values calculated according to the formula on  page 18.  * Length of cable, L (m) The length is made double at  single wire.    Use lengths calculated according to page 22.  * Supply voltage U  

=

8,60 W/m.  

L

=

114m.

U

=

230 Volt. 

P/m

=

8,6 W/m 

Ptot

=

114 x 8,6 = 980W  

Tmax

=

500C

R/m  

=

2302 / 980 / 114 = 0,473W/m 

CHOICE OF CABLE:

Find out which supply voltages are available. 

Bearing the low output in mind and the relatively low  operating temperature can all type of cables be used,  for example series resistive PVC and teflon‐cables or  SRL self‐limiting. 

* Calculate requisite cable resistance per meter    R/m  = U2 /(LxQ) / L  * Choose the correct resistance value 

Wee choose TCTR 0,42 from the data sheets under the  red patch on page HD:100 

Choose a cable, which have the calculated resistance  value or the cable closest below the calculated value  from the table for required type of cable. 

Check calculation: 

* Sheath temperature    Always check that your calculated heating loop not  exceeds the maximum sheath temperature for the  cable type in question, see diagram on the data  sheets.  * Calculate the current consumption of the loop    I (A)   =  Qtot / U (V)  * Choose cold‐lead‐in cable area and length.    Cold‐lead‐in cable is chosen in the same way as the  installation cable with consideration to fusing.  * Divergent resistance as a result of high temperatures    In heating cables with high copper‐bear in the heating  conductor, the resistance is influenced proportionally  to the temperature. 

Q

P = 2302 / 114 / 0,42  =  1105W  P/m = 1105 / 114  =  9,7 W/m   


Industrial heating   18   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 3 

Calculations Frost protection and heating of pipes 

Choosing type of cable

Projecting with parallel resistive heating cable

Example:

To be able to determine the consumption of material in  an application with parallel resistive heating cable you  should take out following data: 

Q

= 14 W/m. 

L       

= 114m. 

• Number of meter pipe 

U

= 230 Volt. 

• Required power for the different pipes (see page 18) 

P/m

= 14 W/m 

The coiling rate is stated according to below: S Q/P S = Coiling factor Q = The required power of the pipe P = (The output/m of the cable)

Ptot

= 114 x 14 = 1596W 

Tmax

= 500C 

Environment  

= Leakage of acid can occur  

• Decide which cable power giving the best economy.  If a piping has several different dimensions, this can  be compensated of increased insulation thickness,  multiple cable runs or *coiling of the cable. 

Cable choice: Bearing the low output in mind and the relatively low  operating temperature can all type of cables be used,  for example series resistive PVC and teflon‐cables or  SRL self‐limiting. 

• Other valves, flanges, pumps etc.  Parallel resistive heating cable is used at piping systems  where you require relatively low connection lengths,  but not in advance can determine the exact sizes of the  pipe length. At installations where the pipe has a T‐ branching these are carried out with a box on the  exterior side of the insulation where the heating cables  are connected in parallel. 

We choose CWM 12 from the table in the left‐hand  column. The cable is designed in teflon, which makes  it resistant in most chemical environments.   Since the heating cable emit 12W/m we must spiralise  according to the formula: 

VÄRMEKABELTEKNIK:s EST/CWM‐cables has a layer of  insulation and sheath of teflon and is available with  three outputs  Type of cable  CWM 

Power (W/m) 

Voltage (V) 

Max. length (m) 

12‐4 CT 

10/30

230/400

300/180

8‐2 CT 

26

230

160

12‐2 CT  36  230  120  The above max. connection lengths are established on  max. 10% voltage drop in the conductors. This to  maintain a max. 20% power drop in the final end of the  cable. (Max. connection length includes the length,  which can be connected from one place of connection).  The EST/CWM‐cables can easily be spiralised or be  installed in several cable runs to obtain required power.   Maximum process temperature, see data sheet  EST/CWM  The cables are bought in running metre and is easily  completed with our connection/end termination kits on  the site with help of some tongs and a hot air pistol or  bottled gas burner.   

S =  Q / (P/m)  = 14 / 12=  1,17 m  cable / meter pipe  Our cable need is then  1,17 x 114m = 134 meter + 1  meter to connection‐ & end termination end.   


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 19

Chapter 4 

Calculations Frost protection, heating of cisterns, containers, bunkers & screens 

Calculating the energy requirement

MAIN GROUPS  1.

Formulas Heat loss calculation 

Frost protection/heating of tanks, containers,  screens, bunkers, cisterns etc.    The object is covered with heating cable,  aluminium foil and thermal insulation to prevent  freezing (heat losses through thermal insulation). 

Q  = A x k x  t x s    

S  x E 

Q =  Heat loss through the thermal insulation (W)  A  =  The total frozen area of the object area (m²)  k 

= The permeability of the insulation material 

Δt =  The difference in temperature between the  object and environment  S 

=   The thickness of the insulation (m) 

E

= Correcting factor normally 0,8 

s =  Safety factor (0=indoor/1,5=quay berth)    2. Heating of tanks, containers, screens, cisterns etc.  

The object is covered with heating cable, aluminium  foil and thermal insulation, partly to compensate  the heat loss through the insulation and to rise the  temperature at the object. 

Calculating the energy requirement for heating P  =  Q  +  Ph  Ph = V x G x c x th   

The heating‐up time depends on installed power  according to formula. 

When calculating considerations should be taken to  heat losses through the thermal insulation since this  can prolong the calculated heating‐up time some. 

P

h   =   Required power (W) 

Q =   Heatloss through the insulation (W)  Ph  =   Required power to increase the temperature on  the object to required temperature in hours (W)  V  =  The volume of the object dm³  (Litre)  G  =   The density of the content (Kg/dm³)  c 

=   Heat permittivity (Wh/Kg°C) 

th =  Required temperature increase (°C)  h 

= Heating‐up time 


Industrial heating   20   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 4 

Calculations Frost protection, heating of cisterns, containers, bunkers & screens 

Heat on cisterns, containers, screens and bunkers Calculate the heat loss for containers  To calculate heat losses on an insulated container, you  have to know certain data. Required operating  temperature, ambient temperature, the thickness of the  insulation and conductivity, the total cooling area of the  outer sheath and the nature of the environment. 

Example Frost protection of a round, standing tank  Diam. 

= Ø 1500 mm 

Height

= 3 meter 

Dt

= 40°C 

A =  The total cooling sheath surface (m²) 

S(m)

Dt =  Difference in temperature (the difference  between the operating temperature and the  lowest ambient temperature) 

= The thickness of the insulation 50  mm mineral wool 

k‐Value

= 0,04 

k =  The permeability of the insulation material  

Environment =  The tank is placed within flammable  surface 

(W/m°C) (Mineral wool 0.04) 

S =  The thickness of the insulation ( m )  s  =  Safety factor 1,2 ‐1.5 (1,2 indoor ‐ 1,5 outdoor) 

Q = 

A x Dt x k x s  S x E 

Q =   

Q =  Total heat loss (W)  NOTE!   If the object is made of plastic material or if the  content is temperature sensitive it is always  recommended using self‐limiting cable. If a cable of  parallel resistive or a series resistive type is chosen,  shall the sheath temperature be calculated so that it  does not exceed the temperature for the –material or  the medium in the container.   

A x k x Dt x s  (W)  S  x E   6,5 x 0,04 x 40 x 1,2    = 313W   0,05 x 0,8 

The required power to keep the tank on plus degrees  at ‐ 35°C will be 313W. The cable is chosen so that the  c/c distance does not exceed 30cm to prevent freezing  against the tank wall between cable runs.  Since the application is located within a flammable  surface, we choose a self‐limiting cable, SRL. This cable  is EX‐rated and T‐rated which means that it can be  used within the most flammable and explosive  environments.  To obtain the most economical choice of cable and at  the same time handle both the required power and  the maximum c/c‐distance we choose a 22 meter SRL‐ 5 which gives 17W/m at +5°C which gives a total  output of 375W / 230V. 

Q  = 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 21

Chapter 4 

Calculations Frost protection, heating of cisterns, containers, bunkers & screens 

Calculation of requisite power to heat containers and  its content.  * 

*

*

At heating of containers, must also the heat loss  through the thermal insulation be taken into  consideration.   The calculation for this is carried out according the  previous page and be added to the calculated  required power for heating.  The calculation of the required power to increase  the temperature in a container to a required  temperature on an appointed time, data is required  according to following: 

Final temperature after heating, start temperature,  thickness and conductivity, the thickness of the  insulation and conductivity, the total cooling surface of  the outer sheath and the nature of the environment.  Also information about the volume of the container, the  density of the content and heating permittivity and  required heating‐up time is required.  Ph =  V x G x c x th + Q   

h   

Q =  Heat loss through the insulation (W)  Ph   =  The required power to increase the temperature  th degrees on h hours. 

EXAMPLE Heating a round, standing tank of steel Containing oil Diameter 

= Ø 1500 mm 

Height

= 3 meter 

Ambient & start temp.  =  20°C  Required temp. 

= 80°C 

Insulation D(m) 

= Mineral wool 0,05m 

k‐Value  

= 0,04 

Environment

= The tank is located  indoors, oil retains can  occur. 

The density of   The content (G) 

= 0,9 (Kg/dm3) 

Heat permittivity (c) 

= 0,58(Wh/Kg°C) 

Heating‐up timeh 

=  24 hours 

Ph

= The required power to  increase the temperature  on the object to required  temperature on h hours  (W) 

V =  The volume of the container (dm3 )  G  =  The density of the content (Kg/dm3)  c  =  The heating permittivity of the content  (Wh/Kg°C)  th  =  Required temperature rise (°C )  h 

= Heating‐up time (Hours) 

NOTE!   If the object is made of plastic material or if the  content is temperature sensitive it is always  recommended using self‐limiting cable. If a cable of  parallel resistive or a series resistive type is chosen,  shall the sheath temperature be calculated so that it  does not exceed the temperature for the –material or  the medium in the container. 

Volume V(l)= π x r² x h =π x 7,5² x 30=5298 dm3  Ph =  V x G x c x th 

=

5298 x 0,9 x 0,58 x 60 = 

24

h  

Ph=  6913 W  P  =   

Total required power (W) 

P  = 

Q  +  Ph = 468 + 6913 = 7381 W 

The tank is made of steel and the oil withstands high  temperatures so we choose a series resistive cable of  teflon with high power per meter. Connection is done  by temperature control.  We choose the TCTR‐cable with 28W/lm. This gives: 

3 pcs heating cable loops á 86 meter TCTR 0,25 ohm  2460W / 230V 


Industrial heating   22   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 4 

Calculations Frost protection, heating of cisterns, containers, bunkers & screens 

Screens and bunkers, silicone rubber element Elements of silicone rubber gives may advantages: 

Applications with silicone rubber element should  normally be equipped with a quick control, for example  a time proportional regulator with the transmitter  placed against the heated surface or on the silicone  element. 

*

Easy and quick installation. 

*

Resistant against the most frequent chemicals. 

*

Flexible at temperatures down to ‐28°C. Makes it  easier to install during the cold period. 

Heating of a round, standing tank of steel containing  oil 

*

Available in a large number of standard elements. 

*Diameter

= Ø 1500 mm 

*

Operating temperatures up to +250°C. 

*Height

= 3 meter 

*

The construction is easy to install in the most  applications where the object is made of a heat  conducting material, this admits also an excellent  heat transfer from the element to the object. 

*Ambient‐& start.temp. 

= 20°C 

*Required Temp 

= 80°C 

*Insulation D 

= 0,05 m Mineral wool 

*k‐Value

= 0,04 

Environment

= The tank is placed  indoors. Oil detarding  can occur. 

At high power requirements or when the object has few  free plain surfaces to cover with heat (a filter can be full  of openings and a tank can be armoured), then  elements of silicone rubber is a good alternative. They  handle temperatures up to 250°C and have an output of  1W/ cm²  

The density of the  

To obtain a good heat transfer from the panel to the  cistern (air is as is well known, a very good insulation),  the panel is glued with silicone glue, type 732 RTV. A  tube 732 RTV is enough to 2 panel’s 600 x 600 mm. This  can be done in the following way:  1.

Remove the grease from the element and the  surface where the element shall be installed with  trikloretylen or equivalent. 

2.

Distribute the glue evenly over the whole surface of  the element, with a toothed glue spreader  (minimum layer of glue approx. 0.5mm). 

3.

4.

Correct placement of the element is important in  order to obtain the best functioning and best life  time (if it is a cistern containing fluids in varying  levels, shall the element be mounted so it will be  under the fluid level. Is this not possible you can  divide the application in two parts on the height  with separate control. 

Heat permittivity c 

= 0,58(Wh/ Kg°C) 

Heating‐up time h 

= 24 hours 

Ph =  V x G x c x th 

=

5298 x 0,9 x 0,58 x 60  

h     Ph=  6913 W 

24

Ph =   The required power to increase the  temperature to a required temperature on h  hours (W)  P  =   

Total required power (W) 

P  =  Q  +  Ph = 468 + 6913 = 7381 W 

Mount the element against the cleaned surface and  press out all air bubbles with a rubber roller or  another round thing which is reeled on the outside  of the element from the middle and outwards the  edges. You can fix the elements with aluminium  tape to keep them on place until the glue gets dry.  NOTE! The glue will dry in the edges first and at last  in the middle. 

The tank is made of steel and the oil withstands high  temperatures so we choose silicone rubber element,  which is glued against the outer side of the tank with  silicon glue. Connection is done via temperature  control.   We choose 6 elements 200 x 900 mm 1285W 230V  which gives a total power of 7700W /230V   

= 0,9 (Kg/dm3) 

Volume V= π x r² x h =π x 7,5² x 30=5298 dm3 

Content G 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 23

Chapter 4 

Calculations The sheath temperature of the heating cable 

Determining sheath temperatures in applications against the pipes

Series resistive cables TCTR    Ts = 

20        0,016 x 57 

+ 50°C = 72°C 

If the cable is free in air, the heat transfer will be poor,  but if the cable is fixed with aluminium tape the heat  transfer will increase considerably. 

Heating cable 20W/m mounted with aluminium tape,  process temperature 50°C. 

This gives us the following formula: 

Parallel resistive cable EST/CWM 

Ts = 

Ts = 

Q uA  + Tp 

20        0,024 x 57 

+ 50°C = 65°C 

Q =  W/m  The output of the heating cable per  meter  

Heating cable 20W/m mounted with aluminium tape,  process temperature 50°C. 

A =  m²/m  cable. 

Self‐limiting cable SRL 

The surface of the heating cable/m 

u =  W/m²°C  Heat transfer coefficient   

u = Loose cable against pipe 17 ‐ 28W/m²°C 

u = With aluminium tape 57W/m²°C 

Ts = 

15 (SRL‐10)       0,032 x 57  + 50°C = 59°C 

The heating cable gives approx. 15W/m at process  temperature 50°C mounted with aluminium tape. 

Ts =  °C Sheath temperature 

Self‐limiting cable SRM 

Tp =  °C Process temperature 

Ts = 

A is determined in accordance to following: 

20 (SRM‐8)       0,032 x 57  + 50°C = 61°C 

A (m²) = π x D (m) 

The heating cable gives approx. 20W/m at process  temperature 50°C mounted with aluminium tape.. 

D = The diameter of the heating cable (m) 

The determination of parallel resistive and series  resistive heating cables sheath temperature is easy,  since the output is constant which it isn’t for self‐ limiting heating cables.   To be able to determine the sheath temperature for a  self‐limiting heating cable you should go to the data  sheet and in the output diagram read the emitted  output at the required process temperature, i.e. the  temperature that the thermostat/regulator of the  heating cable is set on. 

Example Series resistive cables TCT    Ts = 

20        0,009 x 57 

+ 50°C = 87°C 

Heating cable 20W/m mounted with aluminium tape,  process temperature 50°C   


Industrial heating   24   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 5 

Installations within explosive areas   

Area classification

Within chemical, petroleum and technical industry there  is ex‐rated and flammable environments. Depending on  the substances which are considered to make up the  risks and the extent of their occurrence, these areas has  been divided into zones.  Zone 0  ‐  Constant presence of explosive substances.  Zone 1  ‐  Temporary presence of explosive substances  at normal operation.  Zone 2  ‐  Occasional presence of explosive substances  (not present during normal operation).  For the zone grouping there is determined norms. The  authority that can be asked at uncertainty regarding  work and zone groups and material allowed to be used  is ”Sprängämnesinspektionen” (Inspection for  explosives). To make installation work easier, there is on  the most industries a rating map. This map informs  about the different zones present within the industrial  surface. In the case a map is not available a judgement  of the area must be carried out. 

The temperatures which are stated in the table is the  maximum temperatures which may be present on the  material, for example heating cable which may be used  at an ambient temperature of 40°C.  Special attention is directed against group II C  2 H2O + O2.   (hydrogen). 2 H2O2  If two gas groups are mentioned in same specification,  for example II B and II A, the whole surface is rated as II  B.  All equipment, which shall be installed in an Ex‐rated  surface, must meet the sealing class, which are  prescribed for the zone.  Below is a list over the symbols that are used.  Exe 

‐ Increased safety 

Exd

‐ Inflammable 

Exp

‐ Pressure adapted 

Exs

‐ Special protection 

Exm

‐ Casted design 

Explanation of zone division 

Exo

‐ Filled with oil 

Zone 0 There it always is a risk of explosion. This is  found inside tanks, cisterns and in pump rooms and  such spaces where fluids, easily set on fire and gases are  expected to be present continuously. 

Exi

‐ Interior safety 

Exq

‐ Filled with sand 

Zone 1 Here an explosive risk at for example reloading,  fillings, valves and at taps of fluids, easily set on fire and  gases, valves etc. 

Description of the norms is available in Europanormer  EN‐50014‐50020. 

Zone 2 areas except zone 1 within an Ex‐area.  As a complement to the zone division, is temperature‐  and gas group classification. According to the Cenelec  norm (Cenelec stands for Comite Europeen de  Normalisation Electrotechnique) it is decided upon  following temperature classes.  Class  T1  T2  T3  T4  T5  T6   

Max.temp. above 450°C  300°C  200°C  135°C  100°C   85°C 

Gas group identification 

IIA IIB  IIC 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 25

Chapter 5 

Installations within explosive areas   

EX-approved material

Products can be approved in accordance with local  regulations or European norms. The European norm is  market with an extra E in front of the Ex‐symbol.  Example  Exd 

II B 

T6

Flame proof to local norms 

Gas group  Temp.class 

Eexd

II B 

Flame proof to European‐  norms 

Gas group  Temp.class

T6

There are still countries which norms not is  harmonic/corresponding. The testing authority of the  different countries has different interpretations of the  norms. Heating cables are still an open question in many  countries. This implies that for example in Belgium or in  England can be possible to use a cable, which is not  accepted, in Germany or in Sweden and in contrary. 

Ex-approved junction boxes with a pipe support, which are integrated in the insulation and in the same time protects the heating cable.

Ex-approved heating cables SRL and SRM.

Testing authorities available are:  Netherlands 

Germany

Sweden

INIEX

P.T.B

SEMKO

Norway

Denmark

Finland

NEMKO

DEMKO

FIMKO

Except from the flame‐proof tests there is also electrical  and mechanical tests on for example the thickness of  the insulation in the temperature class, heat‐ and cold  resistance in the screen, heat from the cable, sheathing,  tensile strength, flexibility, bending strength,  temperature strength etc. These tests can be carried out  by:  Netherlands 

Germany

Sweden

INIEX

V.D.E

SEMKO

E.P.M.

SP ‐ Statens  Provningsanst alt i Borås 

Norway

Denmark

NVD

DEMKO

DNV

Ex-approved connection- and end termination kits for heating cables where fitting is included


Industrial heating   26   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 5 

Installations within explosive areas   

Sealing classes SS EN 60529 First number: 

Protection against contact and penetrating objects 

Second number: 

Protection against fluids 

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

0

IP00

1

IP10

IP11

IP12

2

IP20

IP21

IP22

IP23

3

IP30

IP31

IP32

IP33

IP34

4

IP40

IP41

IP42

IP43

IP44

5

IP50

IP54

IP55

6

IP60

IP65

IP66

IP67

IP68

First number: degree of protection against contact and  penetrating of fixed objects 

Second number: Degree of protection against  penetrating fluids 

0

No protection against penetrating objects. 

0

No protection. 

1

Protection against contact of dangerous parts with the  backside of the hand or object with a diameter larger  than 50mm. 

1

Protection against vertical falling water drops. 

2

Protection against contact of dangerous parts with a  2  finger or fixed objects with a diameter larger than 12mm 

Protection against vertical falling water drops when  the sealing inclines max. 15°C. 

3

Protection against contact of dangerous parts with tools  3  or fixed objects with a diameter larger than 2.5mm 

Protection against sprinkling water. 

4

Protection against contact of dangerous parts with wire  or fixed objects with a diameter larger than 1mm. 

4

Protection against sprinkling. 

5

Protection against contact of dangerous parts with wire.  5  Dust guard. 

Protection against water jets. 

6

Protection against contact of dangerous parts with wire.  6  Dust guard. 

Protection against heavy water jets. 

7

Protection against influence at short immersion in  water. 

8

Protection against influence at long immersion in  water. 

When you choose material to an application you shall make sure that the IP-rate of the chosen material at least corresponds to the zone class available for the area or as in description stated class for the application.


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 27

Chapter 6 

Electrical installation   

Electrical design

a) Parallel resistive cables CWM/EST   

Voltage 230 ‐ 400 V 

Output 10 ‐ 36 W/m 

10% voltage drop = 23 V/40V.  If you allow a higher voltage drop this can bring a too  low output in the end of the cable. 

At a normal electrical installation within the industry the  fuses most often is maximised to 16Amp. The fuses  should have C‐characteristic. This means that you per  circuit can load maximum 3680W/230V and  6400W/400V 2‐phase. It is though realistic to use 80%  of the fuse capacity, when the fuse at group mounting  on a bar emit self heat which influences the release  circuit and partly to be able to do smaller supplements  in the application without changing the sizes of the  fuses and supply cables.  Max. capacity at 230V will be 3680 x 0,8 = 2945 W. I.e.  when EST‐10 has been used with a maximum length:  L1 = 512m

2495 10

= 294m

L2 =

5120 10

=

Voltage drop in the conductors:  UL = RI / UL = L x W copper x number of conductors x  current  At 230V    UL1 = 

294 x 0,017 x 2  2,5  x 12.8A = 51 V 

Vid 400V    UL2 = 

512 x 0,017 x 2  2,5  x 12.8A = 89 V 

it means an decrease of the output in the end of the  circuit on approx.:    U% = 

(1‐U²end) x 100  U²feed 

At 230V  x100=39%     

At 400V    (1‐311²)  230²  400² 

(1‐179²) x 100 = 39%   

It is too much, in case that we allow a 10% voltage drop,  it should mean a voltage loss of 19%.  

b) Self‐limiting cables (SRL, SRM)  When using self‐limiting heating cables the connection  lengths are limited as a function of their start currents  and the fuse of the circuit.  The start current is instantaneously operating and the  max. lengths stated as a result of the starting currents  are therefor not be the cause of any considerable power  loss in the end of the cable.  NOTE! Use fuses which manages the requirements of  the industry  VÄRMEKABELTEKNIK use fuses from Siemens in their  control cabinets.  Type of cable      SRM3‐2CT  SRM5‐2CT  SRM8‐2CT  SRM10‐2CT  SRM15‐2CT  SRM20‐2CT 

Nominal output  (+10°C)  (10W/m)  (16W/m)  (26W/m)  (33W/m)  (49W/m)  (65W/m) 

Start‐ current/  meter  0.091  0.153  0.195  0.296  0.421  0.5 

A*start‐ current‐  factor  A/m 1,6  A/m 1,8  A/m 1,5  A/m 1.8  A/m 1,8  A/m 1.5 

The starting current is based on the temperature 20°C at 230V. Type of cable  Nominal  Start‐  A*start‐    output  current/  current    (+10°C)  meter  factor  SRL3‐2  (10W/m)  0.12  A/m 2,8  SRL5‐2  (16W/m)  0.266  A/m 3,8  SRL8‐2  (26W/m)  0.421  A/m 3,8  SRL10‐2  (33W/m)  0.5  A/m 3,5  The starting current is based on the temperature ‐ 20°C  at 230V. 


Industrial heating   28   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 6 

Electrical installation   

Available supply voltage

Electrical installation EX-rated areas

The available supply voltage have some importance  when also parallel resistive cables in spite of that they is  specified to a certain output and the supply voltage can  be connected to varying supply voltages to obtain  varying outputs. 

It is quit normal than you within a classified area must  choose material that meets requirements available. It  means that all cables, connection boxes, fittings, end  terminations, must be approved for this range of  application. 

Parallel resistive cables can be used from 100V up to  400V by following calculation: 

To be more specific: 

U² disposable U²cable

x Pcable = Pemitted (W)

You have to consider not exceeding the highest stated  rated voltage for the cable and the maximum output,  which the cable withstands considering the max.  operating temperatures.  See further on the cable data sheets.  e.g.  CWM/EST 10/36  gives 10 W/m on 230V   

gives 36 W/m on 400V 

CWM/EST 24 

gives 24 W/m on 230V 

CWM/EST 36 

gives 36 W/m on 230V 

Self‐limiting heating cables (SRL, SRM) can only be  connected to 230V (+‐20V) (can be specially ordered for  110V). The material in the cable core is adapted to the  stated voltage. You can not, regarding self‐limiting  heating cables, use a 230V cable on a 400V installation.  For series resistive cables the conditions are the  reversed since the output is a function of: 

The cable must be Ex‐approved and meet the  temperature class required for the surface. The  connection in the junction box must be Ex‐approved and  have required IP‐class. Even components that are used  inside the boxes shall be Ex‐approved. Clips, clamps and  fittings must be approved and have the same class as  the boxes. In short, the whole application is rated after  the weakest link. It is not of any help to use a classified  junction box if you use a standard fitting.  In the most countries in Europe it is not permitted to do  T‐joints under the insulation. It should be done in a box  outside the insulation so that it is easy to reach. In some  installations the thermostat is placed outside the  application. Thermostat and enclosure should in these  case be Ex‐approved.  Thermostats and other automatic equipment can very  well be placed outside the Ex‐zone, if the thermostat  don’t have Ex‐approval, this requirement can be  provided with a Zener‐barrier on the conductor.

a) The resistance of the cable (Ohm/m)  b)  The length  c)  The connection voltage  Regarding series resistive cables can the required  lengths and connection voltages be varied free to obtain  required lengths with adapted outputs. Though, you  have to consider the test voltage of the cable and the  recommendations from the supplier regarding output  per meter at varying temperatures and way of  installation.  Note. Lengths of series resistive type are finished on the  site, which limits the flexibility for this product in  contrary to the both earlier mentioned cable types.   

Velox cable protection is used to obtain a protected connection of heating cable on insulated pipes.


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 29

Chapter 6 

Electrical installation   

Fusing of heating cable

Circuit breakers of standard type have a breaking curve,  which allows an instantaneously operating current,  three to five time its nominal value. The breaking curve  admits only one very short current pulse.  This mean if consideration is not taken to the starting  current of a self‐limiting cable, the fuse will  unconditionally switch off in the moment of switching  on.  As soon as the current in for example a self‐limiting  cable pass the limit for the field where magnetic release  of the fuse is done the current is switch off instantly. 

This can be solved in two ways: 

1) Over dimensioned fuses (five times larger than the  operating current). This causes a negative effect  since the areas of the supply cables must be  increased with much more than the ones required  for the operating current.  2)  Limitation of the lengths together with switch delay  between the cable groups gives an economical  design of the heating cable application. 

Limitation of cable lengths as a result of the cable construction Max. lengths as a result of voltage drop in the electric  conductor of the heating cable extend both self‐limiting  and parallel resistive cables. If you exceed the stated  max. length in the data sheet, will the voltage drop give  a lower output in the end of the cable.  When using self‐limiting heating cable should the  voltage drop in the electrical conductors be calculated  at the output at operating temperature. As a rule, the  voltage drop in the conductor is not determining the  length for a self‐limiting heating cable when starting  currents related to fusing and supply cables limits the  cable lengths to relatively moderate number of meter.   

This does not influence heating cables of series resistive  type when the same current traverses the whole loop  irrespective of length. It should be mentioned that with  series resistive lengths with build‐in return‐wire,  considerations should be taken to the resistance of the  return wire at lengths over approx. 200m and high  outputs.  When using series resistive at high temperatures  (normally mineral insulated heating cables, MI‐cable)  where some types have high copper content in the  heating conductor, have an increasing resistance as a  result when the conductivity of the copper is decreased  with rising temperature. Formula and temperature  coefficient is available in the data sheets for these  cables. 


Industrial heating   30   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 7 

Control and Alarm   

Thermostats, limiters, supervising, alarm The market of today offers a large number of  thermostat‐, regulator types and computer based  control systems.  This gives possibilities to exquisite functions for high and  low alarms, temperature readings, logging of  temperatures and ratings and control with  miscellaneous control curves and soft starts with  learning functions which neutralises overshoot at start‐ up. Different applications require different accuracy and  by that suitable equipment is chosen.  Ex‐areas requires increased safety and high sealing  classes.  Thermostat/limiter used in hazardous areas can be  designed in different ways:  1.  Mechanical thermostats  2.  Electronically thermostats  3.  Regulators   1.Mechanical thermostats  Mechanical thermostats use the expansion in fluid  included in a bulb, which is transferred via a capillary  tube to a membrane, which influence the electrical  contact of the thermostat. The capillary tube has often a  max. length of approx. 3 meter.  2. Electronical thermostats   An electronic circuit influence a relay which control the  heating cable directly or via a contactor (at loads over 2  kW, a contactor is normally required). The electronic  circuit is connected to a temperature sensor (NTC, PT‐ 100 or thermocouple) in a low‐tension connection (as a  rule 6‐12V) and to these there is zener barriers available  when the transmitter is placed in a Ex‐area.  The advantages with these thermostats compared to  capillary thermostats are partly that on large distances  and those electronical thermostats most often has a  larger precision.  Electronical thermostats can be obtained with a couple  of extra refinements such as alarm, adjustable after‐ effects, temperature reading etc.   

3 Regulators The regulators are the most advanced form of control  system. They are built upon the same principals as the  electronical thermostats but here you can chose time  proportional control via solidstate‐relays which is of  advantage in soft starts etc. Memory based functions to  avoid overshoot at start etc.  Regulators is also available with several channels and  with external connection to a computer for example,  where reading and set‐up can be managed from  optional place on earth (where a operating  thread/mobile telephone is available) via a modem.  Such a function can give great benefits at for example  an unmanned depot for thick oil where the heat on  loading shall be connected a couple of days before  loading from incoming boat can be done. Here is often  possibilities to connection of all types of transmitters  which can be of a great advantage at reparation of old  applications where existing transmitters are difficult to  reach. Värmekabelteknik have a complete program from  VärmeKabelTeknik with advanced products for the  industry. 

Control – Parallel resistive heating cables The output of the parallel resistive cables are  independent of the temperature, they can of that  reason no be temperature rated. Parallel resistive cables  shall therefore always be equipped with a overheating  protection, for example a thermostat which in the same  time can control the operating temperature. Each circuit  is supplied with at least one thermostat.  Parallel resistive cables have no general approval for Ex‐ surfaces and exemption must be applied for each  application. 

Control – Self-limiting heating cables The self‐limiting cables have in the EX‐approval been  supplied with a T‐Class, which states the maximum  sheath temperature the cable can accept during all  circumstances.  Cables with a semiconductor core reduces its output  with rising temperature but this does not mean that the  cable control an application temperature. Heating  cables never comes down to an output of 0 W and this  means to be able to maintain a required temperature  on a piping, a control device should be supplied.  The control device can consist of a thermostat or a  regulator with a temperature transmitter mounted  against the heated object.   


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 31

Chapter 7 

Control and Alarm   

Control – series resistive heating cables

Self-limiting cable

All series resistive cables require a thermostat. The need  is equal with parallel resistive cables. 

Placement of the thermostat transmitter Thermostats can be used in different ways, as already  been determined:   ‐  To maintain a pre‐set temperature  ‐  Switch on/off frost protection functions  ‐  As overheating protection (limit the sheath  temperature on a cable in Ex‐applications or to  protect the cable against overheating).  ‐  To protect applications (plastic material).  ‐   To protect temperature sensitive products.  The process of flow the pipe‐system, lengths with in‐ /outdoor length and high risings with chimney effect,  which as consequence is important details to determine  the placement of the temperature transmitter. 

Plan the application In a system with varying ambient temperatures, large  risings and many branchings or if the temperature is  close the upper limit for the max. temperature of the  cable, it can be suitable to divide the application with  separate cables and temperature transmitters for each  reference area, respectively.  When designing a heating cable application one must  consider to some parts of the pipe system such as  expansion vessels, fillings and drainage’s not have part  in the normal circulation in the system. This brings you  to supply these branchings with a separate circuit with a  separate temperature control.  The reason is when operating the other system, heat is  spread with the circulating fluid, while de above  mentioned parts has a not moving content and is not  influenced by supplementary heat from processes etc. 

Self-limiting cable At such applications can the number of thermostats be  held down if using self‐limiting heating cables since this  cable reduces it’s output at rising temperatures, which  eliminates the risk of overheating.   

Direction of flow

In an application as in the sketch below, the transmitter  shall be mounted near the heated tank in order to break  from feeding to the heating cable at the percolation  from the tank to protect against overheating. 

Control cabinets VÄRMEKABELTEKNIK offers a large assortment of  control cabinets in standard designs. We construct and  also build special cabinets after your requirements and  specifications.  The standard cabinets are available with electronic  thermostat and ice‐/snow alarms for –roofs and ground  surfaces.  Special cabinets can be supplied with communication  possibilities for DUC, alarm senders, alarm functions for  earth faults, released fuse current sensing alarm or  another special function. Control can be done with  thermostat, simple or with multi‐channel regulator with  or without telecommunication via PC.   


Industrial heating   32   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 8 

Installation and Thermal insulation   

Thermal insulation and installation

To obtain a well functioning application, a good  insulation is required. As already been mentioned, we  compensate the heat loss through the insulation by  supplying heat. A poor insulation gives an application  with defective function and a bad operating economy.  Here are some tips that can improve the insulation:  *  The controller of the vents shall be supplied with  plastic insulation against openings in the insulation  sheath, downward openings in shall be sealed with  sealing compound.  *  Most of the insulation material is hygroscopic.  Insulation material with closed cell structure (foam)  is not hygroscopic, but have in general a lower  operating temperature, max. +100°C.Therefore  choose insulation with closed cell structure if the  temperature admits it. 

Passage for leading‐in of connection cables to heating  cables and transmitters, are best done from the  underside of the pipe when risk of moisture penetrating  is nearly non‐existent. 

* Conduit entries through the insulation are carried  out on the underside of the pie, if possible, so they  are protected against moisture.  *  Vents and flanges etc, has a larger diameter than the  pipe. Of this reason shall the heating cable be  installed with an extra coiling at those and to be  extra careful so that the insulation not get thin to  give a straight and facilitated outer sheath. Another  advantage with extra cables at vents is when these  have to be dismounted at leakage and a extended  cable must be cut.  If cable of self‐limiting type is used the emitted output is  reduced if the cable don’t have or have poor contact  with the object which are to be heated.  Heating cables shall always be covered with aluminium  tape or aluminium foil before insulation. This in order to  secure the fit‐up of the heating cable against the object  and to avoid that the heating cable (due to movements  in the application and heating cable), is covered with  insulation with cable rupture or poor heat transfer as a  result.  At applications with self‐limiting heating cable the  output curves presented for the heating cable presumes  that installation is done with aluminium tape or foil.  The insulation around pumps and small vessels must be  fixed so that it does not came loose (insulation support  is welded on the outside of the tank wall).   

Important general instructions These instructions must be followed at installations of  VärmeKabelTeknik’s industrial cables on pipes.  VärmeKabelTeknik’s heating cables are available in  three basic types: Self‐limiting, parallel resistive and  series resistive. Below you will find a table, which shows  some of the characteristics which separate the cable  from VärmeKabelTeknik from each other.  Self‐limiting    Applicable in Ex‐zone  Applicable on plastic pipes  Can be cut in lengths on site  Protects against overheating  Can be installed in long lengths  Max. temperature °C 

Parallel resistive  Yes  yes  Yes  Yes  No  5 200  

Series resistive No1  Yes2  Yes  No  Yes  2005 

1 Exemption can be applied for specific applications 2 With outputs up to 12W/m 3 Emitted output is reduced with rising temperature 4 Can be dimensioned with low outputs/running meter 5 With the supply voltage switched off

No1 Yes4  No  No  Yes  600 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 33

Chapter 8 

Installation and Thermal insulation   

Control of delivered material

1. Open the package and control by hand after  ruptures or damages on the sheath of the cable.  Report immediately if any damages been discovered  and keep the package (Reclamation to the transport  business).  2.  Never connect the heating cable to the supply  voltage when it is coiled or on drum.  3.  Control after installation the insulation resistance  with a 500VDC megger in order to ensure that the  cables have not been damaged during transport and  handling. WARNING: cables with an insulation  resistance smaller than 10 megaohms insulation  resistance can be defect (contact your supplier!)  4. 

The heating cables shall be stored in their package  or on drums in a dry environment until the  installation. The heating cables should be kept in  surfaces with temperatures over 0°C, at least 2‐3  days before installation in order to prevent  damages on the insulation material at installation. 

Important regarding installation of heating cables 1. Installation and installation material shall meet  electrical standards and be installed by authorised  personnel. Read this instruction sheet to be  acquainted with the products.  2.  Always use the same manufacture on mounting kits  as for the heating cable. Always follow the enclosed  instructions at mounting of installation accessories.  3. When applications are carried out in explosive areas  must junction boxes and other connecting material  be consistent with the Ex‐class for the area.  4.  Make sure that all pipes, tanks etc, have been tested  hydrostatic before installation of heating cable. 

10.At installations with more than one cable run or  spiral winding of self‐limiting cables where the  distance between the cables will be lesser than  50mm, can interference between the cables  influence the emitted output negatively in relation  to the recorded value in the output table.  11. Always install heating cable on the outer radius on  elbows to obtain sufficient power.  12.Never install the heating cable above expansion  joints with giving the heating cable drift space, see  figure on page 49.  13.Never use binders or clamps which can damage the  outer sheath to fix heating cables. (Exceptions can  be done at mineral insulated cables).  14.Pumps and small vessels which are provided with  heating cable and temperature control, shall the  temperature transmitter be mounted at inlet. The  cable on the pump/vessel should be physically  separated from connecting piping cables in order to  admit dismounting of pump/vessel.  15.Always cover the heating cable with aluminium‐ tape/foil in order to improve dissipation of heat  from the heating cable against the object and to  avoid that the cable is pressed into the insulation  material.  16.Longer stirring stick and parts of system with  divergent percolation or dimensions should, if – possible, be provided with separate control and  heating length. Also consider that a “nude”couple on  the conductor must be compensated with an extra  heating cable.  17.Take into consideration the chimney effects and heat  variations in media at heavy risings in a pipe system.  To avoid negative efficiencies, a separate control and  heating length is installed. 

Always install the heating cable with position “five a  clock or seven on a pipe. 

18.Take into consideration the stated lowest installation  temperature at mounting in the data sheet. 

6. OBSERVE! All heating cable applications require  some form of thermal insulation to be able to supply  heat to an object. 

19.If the application contain temperature sensitive pipe  material (for example plastic) or if the application  include temperature sensitive substances, take this  into consideration when choosing cable and  dimensioning. Contact the supplier for advice. 

5.

7. Do not install heating cable on equipment, which  gets warmer than the maximum exposure  temperature of the cable.  8.  Do not install heating cables on a surface or on  equipment containing potential caustic material  without suitable outer sheath on the cable.  9. 

Don’t be below the stated minimum bending  radius for the heating cable. 

B. Installation instruction for heating cable with a single length along a pipe 1. Fix the cable end at the pipe and put the cable reel  on a holder. Reel out the cable so that it doesn’t  turns or that loops are formed.    


Industrial heating   34   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 8 

Installation and Thermal insulation   

2. Ensure that the cable follows the pipe when crossing  obstacles. For example, an upright or a pipe support  which passes or when pipes cross each other.  WARNING: Be careful to avoid things as:  ‐  pull the cable over sharp edges.  ‐  pull the cable free with violence if it get caught  while it is installed.  ‐  Handle the heating cable so that it gets damaged  mechanically, for example by smash or walking  traffic. Consider that other contractors taking part  in the same application maybe is without  knowledge about the nature of electrical material.  3.  When reaching the end of the circuit, secure the  heating cable against the pipe by using a glass fibre  tape or another material corresponding to the  requirements of the application.  4.  (If the heating cable shall be spiral winded, go to  step 4A.). Begin to fix the cable against the pipe  every three‐meter. Place the cable on the lower half  of the pipe at the placement “5 or 7 a clock”.  4A Spiral winding of the heating cable  .   An easy way to handle the spiraling factor is: A1.1  spiral factor means install 1,1m heating cable every  meter of the pipe. Then begin to mark the pipe in  sections of 3 meter, measure of 3m x spiraling factor  and fix this point at the first 3 meter mark and let  the cable hang down under the pipe, repeat until the  whole length of the pipe is laid.  4B  Grasp in the middle of the hanging heating cable and  wind the cable on the pipe. Fix the middle point with  glass fabric tape and level out the cable so that it  obtains an even distribution and a good fix‐up  against the pipe. Fix with a distance of one meter.  5.  At details that requires extra supply of heat (pipe  supports, vents, pumps, restrictions etc.). Fix the  heating cable against the pipe exactly before the  detail. Refer to sketches to determine the amount of  cables you shall install on the detail. Pull this cable to  a loop, attach the heating cable on the other side of  the detail and continue to fix the cable down against  the pipe as before.  6.  Fix the heating cable in regular intervals along the  pipe and distribute and fix the cable against details.  Make sure that approx. 20cm heating cable stretches  out where the end termination shall be carried out  and sufficient heating cable length to carry out a  connection end and connect to junction box.   

7. It is important with enough amount of heating cable  on vents, flanges etc. Use your judgement to  determine if the detail can be dismounted without  damage the heating application.   

WARNING: Do never cross parallel resistive or series  resistive heating cables.   

‐ By installing self‐limiting heating cable in this  way, it can easily be removed from the detail to  undertake repairs or modifications in the pipe  application without damage the heating cable  application. 

Installation of more than one heating cable on a pipe length There are different reasons for installing more than  one heating cable on a pipe.  ‐  At larger pipe dimensions and/or to manage the  required power of a pipe.  ‐  When building a system where all functions is of  such importance that you choose to install a spare  cable as back‐up.  There are several procedures. One is to use two or more  heating cable reels and feet one cable from each. This  method works for all type of pipings. The disadvantage  with this method is that it can increase material waste  by leaving useless lengths from two reels. The other way  is to feed both cables from one reel. This method is  normally the easiest for a straight, simple tubing. 

A. Feed the cable from two reels. 1. At each detail where extra heating cable shall be  mounted, the easiest way is to do this from only one  heating cable.   2.  At pumps and flanges and other places where  dismounting can be necessary, must extra cable be  left from all lengths.  3.a INSTALLATION OF SEVERAL HEATING CABLE FROM  ONE REEL  Is carried out in the same way as above but here the  cable must be cut to lay the other run, which requires  that you have ensured extra cable for details and  connection‐/end termination ends before cutting.  NOTE! When you reached the end of the pipe, take  some extra cable for connection‐ and end  termination, which shall be mounted and carried  out.   

‐ Self‐limiting heating cables are very flexible and can  be overlapped to facilitate the installation. 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 35

Chapter 8 

Installation and Thermal insulation   

B. Installation with back-up-length The purpose with a back‐up system is that each cable  can emit sufficient with output for a normal function  even if one of the cables should fail. Therefore must  each cable be installed so that it covers the whole  application. 

IMPORTANT TO THINK ON BEFORE YOU ORDER! On pipes with smaller diameter than 25mm it can be  difficult to attach two heating cables with good contact  against the pipe.  Choose a cable with higher power/m or increase the  thickness of the insulation as compensation.  4.  All equipment must be earthed. 

Control after installation When heating cable application and connections for a  circuit is ready, then immediately carry out following  controls:  1.  Inspect the heating cable and temperature controls  by hand after marks of mechanical damages. If a  damage is found, the whole cable should be  replaced or cut out the damaged part and joint the  cable with help of a jointing kit from the cable  supplier.  2.  Control connections and inlet nipples and that  closing cover of the box are correctly sealed.   

Control 1. All heating cable circuits shall be equipped with  temperature control in form of thermostats or  regulators. At high outputs or temperatures near the  heating cable/heated medias max. temperature,  shall each circuit be supplied with separate control  at pipings with long, vertical risings with risk of  overheating as a result of the “chimney effect”.  2.  Contactors must be used when the current in the  circuit exceeds the stated current for the  thermostat. Observe that when the application is  carried out with self‐limiting heating cable must  consideration be taken to start currents (see data  sheet).  3.  The control equipment shall be installed so that it  not is exposed for vibrations and as far as possible  tempered surface to avoid hot well.  4.  Conductive sensitive temperature transmitters shall  be mounted in accordance to the instructions.  5.  Ambient temperature transmitters shall be placed at  a point, which can be considered as typical for the  connected application. Take consideration to heat  leakage and solar radiation.  6.  Capillary thermostats shall be mounted protected in  a box on the pipe. Observe that the capillary must be  protected mechanically.  WARNING:   Handle the body of the thermostat and capillary with  care. Rotary damages and folds can destroy the  accuracy of the thermostat.     

Measure the insulation resistance with a 5000V  megger. All cables with an insulation resistance less  than 10 megaohm shall be removed and discarded. 

4. Vents and flanges, pipe supports and the like,  requires more heat than the other pipe and  therefore requires, if this is not compensated with  extra heating cable, thicker insulation.  5.  If using a metallic sheath and screw, be sure that the  screws not are so long that they can pierce through  the insulation and damage the heating cable.   


Industrial heating   36   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 8 

Installation and Thermal insulation  Installation examples 

Positioning and attachment of heating element 

Spiral installation of heating element 

NOTES. 1.

1.

Power connection kit/Mounting detail/Ordinary and  hazardeous areas 

If ratio of heater footage to pipe is greater than 1.5 – use two parallel heaters or select higher wattage heater. If ratio is less than 1.0 – use one parallel heater. When installing the heater on non-metal pipe secure the heater to the pipe with aluminium tape. Refer to pitch chart on isometric drawings for proper pitch length.

Heating element termination 

   

NOTES 1. For more specific details and full materials list refer to installation instruction sheet packed with connection kit.

Thermostat sensor positioning and attachment on tanks 

Positioning and attachment of thermostat sensor on pipe 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 37

Chapter 8 

Installation and Thermal insulation  Installation examples 

Heat tracing of fittings, valves and process equipment 

Notes: This detail is shown as an illustration of a method of taking advantage of the shape of a piping configuration to attain good pipe contact. To simply trace the inside radius of the corner would not be considered correct. Although a tee-splice might also be used to trace the third leg of the tee. The objective of this detail is to emphasize that it is advisable to get more heater on any area where the thermal insulation might not be fitted as well as on straight pipe. This method is intended to be used on other fittings besides tees. 

 

Notes. 

1.

Exact configuration may vary per valve type. 

2.

For removable valve bodies leave a loop of tracing of  the proper length when tracing the pipe. 

3.

See installation chart for correct amount of tracing per  valve size. 

4.

Take care to keep the flat side of the heater in as good  physical contact with the valve body as possible. 

5.

Fully insulate and weather protect. 


Industrial heating   38   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 8 

Installation and Thermal insulation  Installation examples  Heat tracing of fittings, valves and process equipment 

NOTES   1.

See National Electrical Code paragraph 427‐12(E). 

2.   Fully insulate and weatherproof (if outdoors).  Heat tracing around pipe supports 

  NOTES  All forms of rigid pipe supports directly in contact with the  pipe surface act as a heat sink. Heat tracing should be  doubled over at these points and the supports should be  insulated as much as practicable to limit heat loss. 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 39

Chapter 8 

Installation and Thermal insulation  Installation examples  Heat tracing of line mounted instruments 

 

NOTES  Treat turbine flow meter as a valve of the same pipe diameter. Leave a loop of material the same as for a valve. 


Industrial heating   40   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 8 

Installation and Thermal insulation  Installation examples  Heat tracing of line mounted instruments 

  Notes:  1. 2. 3.   4.

 

Fully insulate and weatherproof.  Exact configuration may vary.  refer to installation isometrics for proper tracer type  and amount.  Where the heater is applied in the region designated  as “Bolt Area” aluminium tape should be used to aid  heat transfer because of the excessively irregular  surface. 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 41

Chapter 8 

Installation and Thermal insulation  Start‐up of the application 

1. Once again inspect by hand the conduits and  connections for the heating cable, to be certain that  no mechanical damage have occurred if some time  have passed between the installation and the start‐ up.  2.  Insulate test the system in order to determine that  no earth faults occurred as a result of mechanical  damage.   

For application with thermostat feeling the ambient  temperature: 

1 If the temperature is higher than the set‐up of the  thermostat, change the set‐up to sufficient high for  switch.  2.  Switch on the main circuit breaker.  3.  Switch on the operating breaker one by one until  every on is on.  4.  Run the system at least four hours to let all pipes  reach the operating temperature.  5.  Measure the current value, ambient temperature  and pipe temperature for each circuit and write it  down in the installation protocol. This information  can be needed for future maintainances and location  of faults.  6.  When the system is totally checked, reset the  thermostat to prescribed value.   

For system which have been supplied with fit‐up  transmitter: 

1. Set the required temperature on the thermostat.  2.  Switch on the main circuit breaker.  3.  Switch on the operating breaker one by one until  everyone is on.  4.  Allow the pipe temperature to increase to operating  temperature. This can take 5‐10 hours (large, full  tanks can take longer time).  5.  Measure the current value, ambient temperature  and pipe temperature for each circuit and write it  down in the installation protocol. This information  can be needed for future maintenance and location  of faults 


Industrial heating   42   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Chapter 8 

Installation and Thermal insulation  Maintenance protocol 

Reference information  Circuit number 

Fuse number 

Drawing number 

Circuit length 

Initial

Date

Initial

Date

Initial

Date

Megaohm test (500V) 

Meg ohms 

(bypass‐control)

Date

Ampere

Amb.temp

Date

Resistance

Date

Set point 

Date

Initial

Date

Initial

Date

Initial

Date

Initial

Date

Visual inspection of heating cable length  No signs of moisture, or rust formation 

Correct electrical connections 

Correct earthing 

Electrical control of heating cable length 

Current measurement (self‐limiting cable at operating temperature)  Compare with mark sign or electrical drawing 

Control of the resistance of the length 

Control/Temperature transmittor  Temperature control, correctly settled 

Transmitter in function 

Sealings and junction boxes, intact 

Control of thermal insulation  Passages in the outer sheath of the insulation, intact 

The insulation is complete, dry and protected for the weather 


VärmeKabelTeknik    

Industrial heating 43

Chapter 8 

Installation and Thermal insulation  Fastening material 

E89 992 44 Aluminium tape 

E89 992 36 Glass fabric tape 

Clamp Kit E89 992 38 (Band)‐39 (lock)  Expediter (pipe support) with junction  box E8999262 (Ryton)‐64 (ABS) 

Hose clamp 

E89 992 60 Junction box 

Termostats

Capillary thermostats 

Electronic thermostats 

Termination materials

Regulators

89 892 50 Connection kit SRL/SRM 

89 992 52 Connection kit SRL‐CR 

899 892 54 End termination SRL/CRM‐ CT 


Industrial heating   44   

VärmeKabelTeknik

Telephone: +46‐301‐418 40 – Email: info@vkts.se – Homepage: www.vkts.se   

Industrihuset

Södra Hedensbyn 43 

S‐430 64 HÄLLINGSJÖ 

S‐931 91 SKELLEFTEÅ 

Sweden

Sweden

Fax: +46‐301‐418 70 

Fax: +46‐910‐881 33   

Industrial heating  

Industrial heating from Varmekabelteknik