VOC Management Plans (VOC)

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M/T “VSLNAME” IMO No: 9999999

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VOC MANAGEMENT PLAN

ALPHA MARINE CONSULTING P.C. MARINE CONSULTANTS & SURVEYORS T: +30 211 8881000, F: +30 211 8881039 mail@alphamrn.com | www.alphamrn.com


PLAN HISTORY DESCRIPTION Issued as Final

DATE 01/01/2019

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TOTAL THIRTY-FIVE (35) SHEETS WITH COVER, EXCL. ATTACHED PLANS

CAUTION

THIS DRAWING OR DOCUMENT IS THE PROPERTY OF ALPHA MARINE CONSULTING AND IT MUST NOT BE PARTIALLY OR WHOLLY COPIED OR USED FOR ANY OTHER PURPOSE WITHOUT PRIOR WRITTEN PERMISSION OF AMC.

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TITLE:

SHIP TYPE:

VOC MANAGEMENT PLAN

150,000 DWT SUEZMAX TANKER

SHIP NAME: CHECKED BY: DRAWN BY:

IMO NO.:

VSLNAME PT DF

DWG NO.: REV. NO.:

xxxx-VOC-0 0

ALPHA MARINE CONSULTING P.C.

HULL NO.:

DATE: SIZE:

8184 9999999 01/01/2019 A4 / A3

MARINE CONSULTANTS & SURVEYORS T: +30 211 8881000, F: +30 211 8881039 mail@alphamrn.com | www.alphamrn.com


M/T “VSLNAME” VOC MANAGEMENT PLAN

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RECORD OF REVISIONS

Issue Revision Number Number 0

Reference to Sections – Description of Revision

01/01/2019

Issued for Approval

Approved by Technical Manager

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................. 4

II.

OBJECTIVES...................................................................................................... 5

III.

ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS ..................................................................... 6

1.

THE HULL AND ITS PRESSURE LIMITATIONS .............................................. 7

1.1.

ALLOWABLE CARGO TANK ULLAGE PRESSURE .......................................... 7

1.2.

TYPICAL CARGO TANK VENTING SYSTEMS ................................................. 7

1.3.

TYPICAL SETTINGS OF PRESSURE / VACUUM RELIEF DEVICES ............... 8

1.4.

DESCRIPTION OF THE VESSEL’S ARRANGEMENT & VENTING SYSTEM.............................................................................................................. 9

2.

CRUDE OIL TANKER PRESSURE CONTROL / RELEASE SYSTEMS ......... 11

2.1.

INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................... 11

2.2.

LOAD PORT DISPLACEMENT OF VOC .......................................................... 11

2.3.

VOC RELEASE DURING THE VOYAGE ......................................................... 14

2.4.

A CRUDE OIL TANKER’S VAPOUR PRESSURE CONTROL MECHANISMS .................................................................................................. 15

3.

VOC GENERATION SYSTEMS IN CRUDE OIL .............................................. 18

3.1.

WHY LIMIT VOC EMISSIONS TO THE ATMOSPHERE? ................................ 18

3.2.

THE VOLATILITY OR VAPOUR PRESSURE OF THE CRUDE OIL ................ 18

3.3.

THE TEMPERATURE OF THE CRUDE OIL IN A CARGO TANK ................... 20

3.4.

THE PRESSURE SETTING OR CONTROL OF THE VAPOUR PHASE WITHIN THE CARGO TANK............................................................................. 20

3.5.

THE SIZE OR VOLUME OF THE VAPOUR PHASE WITHIN THE CARGO TANK SYSTEM ................................................................................................. 21

4.

METHODS AND SYSTEMS FOR VOC EMISSION CONTROL ....................... 22

4.1.

VOC EMISSION CONTROL DURING LOADING ............................................. 22

4.2.

VOC EMISSION CONTROL DURING TRANSIT .............................................. 27

4.3.

VOC EMISSION CONTROL DURING CRUDE OIL WASHING ....................... 29

5.

MONITORING AND CONTROL OF VOC RELEASES .................................... 30

6.

TRAINING PROGRAM ..................................................................................... 33

7.

DESIGNATED PERSON................................................................................... 34

7.1.

QUALIFICATIONS ............................................................................................ 34

7.2.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES ........................................................................ 34

8.

INFORMATION ................................................................................................. 35

8.1.

RELEVANT INFORMATION / PLANS .............................................................. 35

8.2.

REFERENCE PLANS / MANUALS ................................................................... 35

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MAIN PARTICULARS

Ship’s Name:

VSLNAME

Ship’s Type:

Crude Oil Tanker

Flag: Port of Registry: Call Sign: IMO Number:

9999999

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Classification: Gross Tonnage: Net Tonnage: Built by:

Length O.A.:

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Length B.P.:

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Year Built:

Breadth (mld.): Depth (mld.):

Summer Load Draught (extr.):

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Deadweight:

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INTRODUCTION

Regulation 15 of Annex VI of MARPOL 73/78, as revised by IMO Resolution MEPC.176(58) (hereinafter referred to as “revised Annex VI”), regulates the Volatile Organic Compound (hereinafter referred to as “VOC”) emissions from a tanker in designated port(s) or terminal(s) of a Party regulating such emissions. Regulation 15.6 requires that a tanker carrying crude oil shall have on board and implement a VOC Management Plan approved by the Administration in accordance with IMO resolution MEPC.185 (59).

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Volatile Organic Compounds are organic chemical compounds that have high enough vapour pressures under normal conditions to significantly vaporize and enter the atmosphere. According to USCG 40 CFR Part 51.100(s), VOCs are defined as “any compound of carbon, excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides or carbonates, and ammonium carbonate, which participates in atmospheric photochemical reactions”. VOCs are a pollutant to the air and act as a precursor to the formation of Tropospheric Ozone – commonly termed “smog”.

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This plan has been written pursuant to the requirements in the revised Annex VI regulation 15.6, and it has been developed in accordance with the Resolution MEPC. 185(59) “Guidelines for the Development of a VOC Management Plan”, having taken into account the provisions of MEPC.1/Circ.680 “Technical Information on systems and operation to assist development of VOC Management Plans”.

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This plan describes the specific arrangement, operations and conditions onboard the vessel with respect to the ability to control VOC emissions. This plan is not a safety guide; to evaluate safety hazards, reference should be made to the International Safety Guide for Oil Tankers and Terminals (ISGOTT) and other relevant publications.

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This plan has been approved by the vessel’s Classification Society on behalf of the Flag Administration and no alteration or revision shall be made to any part of it without the prior approval of the Classification Society.

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The plan is written in English, which is the working language of the crew.

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II.

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OBJECTIVES

The purpose of this plan is to ensure that the operation of the vessel prevents or minimizes VOC emissions to the extent possible, as well as to provide written, shipspecific, operational procedures for the crew in order to minimize VOC emissions during the following operations: 1. 2. 3.

loading; carriage of relevant cargo (transit); and crude oil washing.

1. 2.

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VOC emissions can be prevented or minimized by: optimizing operational procedures to minimize the release of VOC emissions; and / or using devices, equipment or design changes to prevent or minimize VOC emissions.

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To comply with this plan, the loading and carriage of cargoes which generate VOC emissions have been evaluated and procedures written to ensure that the operations of a ship follow best management practices for the preventing or minimizing VOC emissions to the extent possible. Device, equipment or design changes that are implemented to prevent or minimize VOC emissions have also been incorporated and described in the VOC management plan, as appropriate.

the loading procedures should take into account potential gas releases due to low pressure and, where possible, the routing of oil from crude oil manifolds into the tanks should be done so as to avoid or minimize excessive throttling and high flow velocity in pipes (see Section 4.1);

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While maintaining the safety of the ship, this plan encourages and, as appropriate, sets forth the following best management practices:

a target operating pressure is defined for the vessel’s cargo tanks. This pressure should be as high as safely possible and the ship should aim to maintain tanks at this level during loading and carriage of the relevant cargo (see Sections 4.1 and 4.2);

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when venting to reduce tank pressure is required, the decrease in the pressure in the tanks should be as small as possible to maintain the tank pressure as high as possible (see Sections 4.1 and 4.2);

4.

the amount of inert gas added should be minimized. Increasing tank pressure by adding inert gas does not prevent VOC release but it may increase venting and therefore increased VOC emissions (see Sections 4.1 and 4.2); and

5.

when crude oil washing is considered, its effect on VOC emissions should be taken into account. VOC emissions can be reduced by shortening the duration of the washing or by using a closed cycle crude oil washing programme (see Section 4.3).

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ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS

PERSON IN CHARGE OF CARRYING OUT THE PLAN In this plan, a person has been designated to be responsible for implementing the plan; that person may assign appropriate personnel to carry out the relevant tasks (see Section 7). PROCEDURES FOR PREVENTING OR MINIMIZING VOC EMISSIONS

1. 2. 3.

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Ship-specific procedures are provided in this plan to address relevant VOC emissions during the following operations: loading (see Section 4.1); carriage of relevant cargo (transit) (see Section 4.2); and crude oil washing (see Section 4.3).

This vessel is not equipped with VOC reduction devices or equipment, therefore the use of these devices or equipment has not been incorporated into this plan.

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TRAINING

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This plan also describes the training programmes to facilitate best management practices for the vessel to minimize VOC emissions (see Section 6).

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THE HULL AND ITS PRESSURE LIMITATIONS

1.1.

ALLOWABLE CARGO TANK ULLAGE PRESSURE

1.2.

TYPICAL CARGO TANK VENTING SYSTEMS

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TYPICAL SETTINGS OF PRESSURE / VACUUM RELIEF DEVICES

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1.3.

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1.4.

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DESCRIPTION OF THE VESSEL’S ARRANGEMENT & VENTING SYSTEM

This vessel is a __________________________________. Details of cargo and water ballast tanks are presented in the tables below: LOCATION (FRAME NUMBER)

CAPACITY 100% FULL (CUBIC METERS)

CAPACITY 98% FULL (CUBIC METERS)

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TOTAL

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CARGO OIL TANKS

CAPACITY 100% FULL (CUBIC METERS)

WEIGHT (METRIC TONS)

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WATER BALLAST LOCATION TANKS S.G. = 1.025 (FRAME NUMBER)

TOTAL Heating coils are fitted only i.w.o. slop tanks.

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In accordance with SOLAS Ch. II-2 Reg. 11.6 “Protection of cargo tank structure against pressure or vacuum in tankers” the cargo tank venting arrangements must provide for: 1. 2.

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3.

The flow of the small volume of vapour, air or inert gas mixtures caused by thermal variations in a cargo tank in all cases through pressure/vacuum valves (SOLAS II-2/11.6.1.1). This is the so-called thermal breathing. The passage of large volumes of vapour, air or inert gas mixtures during cargo loading and ballasting, or during discharge (SOLAS II-2/11.6.1.2). This is the socalled primary means of venting. Secondary means of allowing full flow relief of vapour, air or inert gas mixtures shall be provided to prevent over-pressure or under-pressure in the event of failure of the arrangements in above sub-paragraph .2 (SOLAS II-2/11.6.3.2). This is the so-called secondary means of venting.

SOLAS II-2/11.6.3.2 stipulates that as an alternative to the secondary means of allowing full flow relief of vapour, air or inert gas mixtures pressure sensors may be fitted in each tank with a monitoring system in the Cargo Control Room which should also provide an over-pressure and vacuum alarm facility.

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Thermal breathing (SOLAS II-2/11.6.1.1) is effected by means of the individual P/V valves fitted in each cargo tank. The primary means of venting (SOLAS II-2/11.6.1.2) and the secondary means of venting (SOLAS II-2/11.6.3.2) are the following:

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This vessel complies with the above mentioned SOLAS requirements as follows:

The allowable cargo tank ullage pressure for this vessel is: Pressure 2,500 mm WG / Vacuum -700 mm WG.

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2. CRUDE OIL TANKER PRESSURE CONTROL / RELEASE SYSTEMS

2.1.

INTRODUCTION

Traditionally, vapour release from crude oil tankers occurs on three discrete occasions; during loading, during the loaded voyage to the discharge port, and during the ballasting of cargo tanks at the discharge port.

LOAD PORT DISPLACEMENT OF VOC

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Since the introduction of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships together with its Protocol in 1978 (MARPOL), tankers built after 1st June 1982 (Regulation 18), termed MARPOL tankers, are all designed with the required totally segregated (designated) ballast tanks. With these Regulations in force, the traditional use of cargo tanks are never used for the loading of ballast, except on the very rare occasions for bad weather purposes where one of the Crude Oil Washed cargo tanks is dedicated to take in ballast water. Therefore, the displacement of vapour from the relevant crude oil cargo’s tank at the discharge port has ceased to occur for the MARPOL compliant type tankers. Given this situation then, only two occasions remain where vapour emissions from crude oil tankers generally occur, namely, on loading and during the transportation of the cargo.

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VOC RELEASE DURING THE VOYAGE

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2.3.

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A CRUDE OIL TANKER’S VAPOUR PRESSURE CONTROL MECHANISMS

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2.4.

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3. VOC GENERATION SYSTEMS IN CRUDE OIL

3.1.

WHY LIMIT VOC EMISSIONS TO THE ATMOSPHERE?

VOCs are a pollutant to the air and act as a precursor to the formation of Tropospheric Ozone – commonly termed Smog. Tropospheric Ozone is identified as a Greenhouse Gas with a greater contribution per unit volume or tonnage to Climate Change than the base gas, namely Carbon Dioxide.

   

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Thus, to control this emission there are four criteria that impact the extent and rate of evolution of gaseous non methane VOC from crude oils and its subsequent release to atmosphere. These are: The volatility or vapour pressure of the crude oil The temperature of the liquid and gas phases phase of the crude oil tank The pressure setting or control of the vapour phase within the cargo tank. The size or volume of the vapour phase within the cargo tank.

THE VOLATILITY OR VAPOUR PRESSURE OF THE CRUDE OIL

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Each of these criteria are defined and briefly explained below together with any interaction between the criteria for general operational circumstances.

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THE TEMPERATURE OF THE CRUDE OIL IN A CARGO TANK

3.4.

THE PRESSURE SETTING OR CONTROL OF THE VAPOUR PHASE WITHIN THE CARGO TANK

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3.3.

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THE SIZE OR VOLUME OF THE VAPOUR PHASE WITHIN THE CARGO TANK SYSTEM

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3.5.

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4. METHODS AND SYSTEMS FOR VOC EMISSION CONTROL

4.1.

VOC EMISSION CONTROL DURING LOADING

This Section describes the procedures and systems in place in order to minimize VOC emissions during loading operations to the extent possible. 4.1.1. Cargo Tank Pressure Control

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In order to minimize VOC emissions during loading operations, the designated person should monitor the cargo tank pressure to ensure that it is as close as possible to the target operating pressure as stipulated below (see Section 4.2.1). As long as the tank pressure is maintained above the Saturated Vapour Pressure of the cargo, then equilibrium is obtained between the liquid and vapour phase of the cargo and no further VOC will evolve from the cargo.

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4.1.2. Condition Monitoring and Maintenance of P/V Valves

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The cargo tank P/V valves should be manually inspected for correct operation (free movement of the pressure and vacuum relief valve) prior to any loading operation by using the check lifts facility. The P/V valve flame screens should be visually inspected at least once every month and checked / cleaned every three (3) months. Prior to loading, the P/V breaker liquid level should also be checked to be within the set limits.

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4.1.3. Condition Monitoring of Gaskets for Hatches and Piping

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Loading operations should be carried out in a “closed” mode (all cargo tank hatches / openings closed). Local gauging and sampling should be carried out through the vapour locks or the fixed closed-ullaging equipment.

4.1.4. Inert Gas Topping Up Procedures

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The procedures included in the vessel’s IGS Manual should always be followed. Inerted tanks should be maintained at a pressure in excess of 200 mm WG at all times. Topping up the pressure with inert gas of not more than 5% oxygen content may be necessary to achieve this. The cargo tank pressure should be monitored on an hourly basis during loading operations. Records should be kept in the Form VOC-1. 4.1.5. Partially Filled Tanks

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Partially filled tanks should be kept at a minimum during and after loading operations, as low cargo oil levels within cargo tanks allow for increase of VOCs inside these tanks.

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4.1.6. Loading Sequence and Rate

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The designated person should ensure that loading rate and cargo tank pressure are monitored and controlled, in accordance with relevant loading plan (see SMS Manual). The cargo tank loading sequence and the rate are planned prior to the loading taking into account, amongst others, the vessel’s maximum allowable loading rate per cargo tank. In case of any abnormal pressure increase, the loading operation should be suspended and the cause of the pressure increase investigated. Excessive throttling and high flow velocity in cargo pipes should be avoided or minimized to the extent possible, throughout loading operations.

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4.1.7. Vapour Emission Control System (VECS)

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The following figures are applicable for this vessel: Contracted cargo loading rate: Total venting capacity of P/V valves: Cargo loading rate per tank: Maximum transfer rate of vapour: Maximum transfer rate of vapour per tank: Based on Vapour growth rate: Vapour air density:

Not applicable for this vessel.

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4.1.8. Vapour Pressure Release Control Valve (VOCON valve)

4.1.9. Cargo Pipeline Partial Pressure Control System (KVOC) Not applicable for this vessel.

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4.1.10. Increased Pressure Relief Settings Not applicable for this vessel.

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4.1.11. Vapour Recovery System

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Not applicable for this vessel.

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4.2.

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VOC EMISSION CONTROL DURING TRANSIT

This Section describes the procedures and systems in place in order to minimize VOC emissions during transit to the extent possible. 4.2.1. Cargo Tank Pressure Control (VOCON Procedure)

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During the laden passage and in order to reduce VOC emissions resulting from the release of the build-up of excessive gas pressure and in turn reduce in-transit atmospheric pollution and cargo losses, both venting and vapour loss have to be monitored. Depending on the actual physical properties of the cargo, unnecessary depressurization may result in: 1. the pressure in the ullage spaces to become less than the saturated vapour pressure (equilibrium pressure) of the oil cargo (liquid phase), and 2. the liquid phase of the cargo to produce more saturated hydrocarbon vapours which would end up in the atmosphere. For as long as the mast riser remains open below 800 mm WG, the unnecessary boil-off continues. During an average passage as much as 0.2% of the cargo can be lost through vapour emissions.

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Close the valve here and stop the release at this inflection point

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Pressure mmWG

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1000 800 600 400 200

0 0

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Time (minutes)

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The designated person should ensure that the procedure below is followed during laden passage:

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Advice Notes

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4.2.2. Condition Monitoring and Maintenance of P/V Valves See Section 4.1.2.

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4.2.3. Condition Monitoring of Gaskets for Hatches and Piping See Section 4.1.3.

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4.2.4. Inert Gas Topping Up Procedures See Section 4.1.4. 4.2.5. Partially Filled Tanks See Section 4.1.5. 4.2.6. Vapour Recovery System Not applicable for this vessel.

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4.3.

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VOC EMISSION CONTROL DURING CRUDE OIL WASHING

This Section describes the procedures and systems in place in order to minimize VOC emissions as a result of crude oil washing (COW) operations to the extent possible. The requirements / procedures of the vessel’s approved COW Manual should be complied with during all COW operations. Relevant records should be kept in accordance with relevant ISM procedures (see SMS Manual). 4.3.1. Duration of Washing

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VOC emissions can be reduced by shortening the duration of the washing. Hence during crude oil washing operations, the designated person shall monitor the duration of operations and decrease the time spent to the extent possible.

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4.3.2. Closed Cycle Crude Oil Washing Program

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MONITORING AND CONTROL OF VOC RELEASES

Record keeping is essential in order to document compliance with the provisions of this plan and the extent of release of gases from the cargo tanks. Records should be kept for VOC releases during loading, transit and crude oil washing operations. The designated person should be responsible for the monitoring and control of VOC releases during loading, transit and crude oil washing operations.

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For this vessel that implements the manual VOC control by the VOCON procedure, the released volume of gas / vapour can be estimated by using the pressure change (opening to closing pressures) relationship to the total gas / vapour volume in the cargo tank vapour system (Ideal Gas Laws – see Section 3). The appropriate record keeping procedure is the following: 

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A record of the time and pressure within the tank gas/vapour system before the release takes place. A record of the time and pressure within the gas / vapour system after the release has been completed.

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The methodology used both for the pressure release records and the resulting calculated tonnes of VOC emitted is set out in Form VOC-1.

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VOC-1 Voyage VOC Emission Calculation Spreadsheet [3]

[4]

[5]

[6]

[7]

Date

Time at Start of Release

Time at Stop of Release

Duration of Release (Minutes)

Tank Pressure at Start of release (mmWG)

Tank Pressure at Stop of Release (mmWG)

Mean Pressure during Release (mWG)

29/9/2009

10:20

10:28

8

1200

800

1.072

[8]

[9]

[10]

[11]

[12]

[13]

[14]

[15]

Mean Velocity of Release (m/sec)

Total Vapour Volume of Release (m3)

% of VOC

VOC Vapour Release (m3)

VOC equiv. Liquid Release (m3)

VOC equiv. Weight Release (Tonnes)

4.22

410.60

80

328.48

1.314

0.716

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[2]

Length of Diameter Release of Release Pipeline pipeline from opening Tank (m) (m) (EXAMPLE) 0.508

30

TOTAL

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[1]

Chief Officer (name/signature)

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VOC-1 Voyage VOC Emission Calculation Spreadsheet

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Explanatory Notes

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1.

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6. TRAINING PROGRAM

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7. DESIGNATED PERSON

The person onboard the vessel designated to be responsible for implementing this plan is the Chief Officer. This person may assign appropriate personnel to carry out relevant tasks according to the procedures outlined in this plan. 7.1.

QUALIFICATIONS

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The designated person shall have adequate knowledge and ability to perform his duties in accordance with this plan, through continuous training or equivalent job experience.

7.2.

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The designated person should have the following qualifications:

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES

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The designated person is responsible for:

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Effective Date: 01/01/2019


M/T “VSLNAME” VOC MANAGEMENT PLAN

PAGE 35 OF 35

8. INFORMATION 8.1.

RELEVANT INFORMATION / PLANS

The following information related to this plan is attached: No.

Title General Arrangement

2.

Capacity Plan (with Deadweight Scale)

3.

Diagram of Cargo Oil and Ballast Pipe

4.

Diagram of Cargo Tank Vent & Inert Gas Pipe

5.

General Arrangement and Equipment of Cargo Vapour Control System

6.

Breather Valve

7.

Pressure Vacuum Breaker

P

REFERENCE PLANS / MANUALS

M

8.2.

LE

1.

Dwg. No.

The following plans / manuals related to this plan are available onboard and ashore: Title

Dwg. No.

A

No.

Hull Piping Diagram Except Living Quarter

2.

Piping Diagram of Cargo Oil and Water Ballast System

3.

Vapour Emission Control System Manual

4.

Inert Gas System

5.

Crude Oil Washing Manual

S

1.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: 01/01/2019


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