Issuu on Google+

COMPANYNAME

S

A

M

P

LE

Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) PART A COMPANY-SPECIFIC

CONTINUOUSLY IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 2 of 140

MANUAL CONTROL

Holder’s Name

Approved by

S

A

M

P

LE

Manual / Copy No.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 3 of 140

RECORD OF REVISIONS

Revision Date

Description of Change

Approved by

S

A

M

P

LE

New Revision Number

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 4 of 140

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE MANUAL CONTROL .........................................................................................................................2 RECORD OF REVISIONS.................................................................................................................3 TABLE OF CONTENTS.....................................................................................................................4 GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS .............................................................................7 POLICY ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT ............................................................10

2.

INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................11

LE

1.

1.1. GENERAL ................................................................................................................................11 1.2. SCOPE .....................................................................................................................................15 1.3. REGULATORY BACKGROUND ..............................................................................................16 3.

APPLICATION .........................................................................................................................17

P

3.1. PLANNING ...............................................................................................................................18 3.1.1. Ship-specific measures ............................................................................................18 3.1.2. Company-specific measures ....................................................................................18 3.1.3. Human resource development .................................................................................18 3.1.4. Goal setting ..............................................................................................................19

M

3.2. IMPLEMENTATION..................................................................................................................19 3.2.1. Establishment of Implementation System ................................................................19 3.2.2. Implementation and Record-keeping........................................................................19 3.3. MONITORING ..........................................................................................................................19

4.

A

3.4. SELF-EVALUATION AND IMPROVEMENT ............................................................................19 MEASURES FOR IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY.........................................................20

S

4.1. VOYAGE OPTIMIZATION ........................................................................................................20 4.1.1. Speed Selection Optimization ..................................................................................20 4.1.2. Optimized Voyage Planning .....................................................................................22 4.1.3. Weather Routing.......................................................................................................23 4.1.4. Optimized Heading Control / Auto-Pilot Function .....................................................25 4.1.5. Trim and Ballast Optimization...................................................................................25 4.1.6. Just in Time Arrival / Virtual Arrival...........................................................................29 4.2. PROPULSION RESISTANCE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM....................................................32 4.2.1. Hull and Propeller Cleaning Program .......................................................................32 4.2.2. Propulsion Hydrodynamic Improvement Devices .....................................................34 4.2.3. Resistance Monitoring Programs .............................................................................50

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 5 of 140

PAGE

LE

4.3. MACHINERY OPTIMIZATION .................................................................................................51 4.3.1. Performance Monitoring Systems ............................................................................51 4.3.2. M/E Performance Monitoring System .......................................................................61 4.3.3. D/G Performance Monitoring System .......................................................................61 4.3.4. Installation of Electronically Controlled Main Engines ..............................................62 4.3.5. Part Load and Low Load Operation..........................................................................63 4.3.6. Installation of De-rated Engines ...............................................................................67 4.3.7. M/E Cylinder Oil and Lubrication Control .................................................................68 4.3.8. D/G Engine Load Optimization and Electric Load Demand Minimization.................74 4.3.9. Waste Heat Recovery...............................................................................................80 4.3.10. Heating Ventilation & Air Conditioning (HVAC) System ...........................................83 4.3.11. Compressed Air System ...........................................................................................85 4.3.12. Lighting Loads ..........................................................................................................90 4.3.13. On-shore Power Supply (Cold Ironing).....................................................................92 4.3.14. Renewable and / or Alternative Energy Sources ......................................................92

M

P

4.4. CARGO HANDLING OPTIMIZATION ......................................................................................94 4.4.1. Cargo Temperature Control Optimization.................................................................94 4.4.2. Cargo Pumps Operation Optimization ......................................................................97 4.4.3. Auxiliary Boiler(s) Maintenance ..............................................................................101 4.4.4. Steam Distribution and Condensate Return System ..............................................101 4.4.5. Cargo Vapour Control Procedure on Crude Oil Tankers ........................................104 4.4.6. Independent Inert Gas Generator...........................................................................108

S

A

4.5. BUNKER MANAGEMENT......................................................................................................109 4.5.1. Fuel Oil Purchasing ................................................................................................109 4.5.2. Fuel Oil Analysis.....................................................................................................109 4.5.3. Sludge Generation Monitoring................................................................................109 4.5.4. Fuel Oil Measurement and Reporting.....................................................................109 4.5.5. Fuel Oil Additives....................................................................................................110 4.5.6. Fuel Oil Homogenizers ...........................................................................................110 4.5.7. Lube Oil Sampling ..................................................................................................111 4.5.8. Measuring and Monitoring NOx, SOx and CO2 Emissions.....................................112 4.6. IT AND OTHER HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT ............................................112 4.7. MINIMIZE THE USE OF THE INCINERATOR .......................................................................113 4.8. PERSONNEL AWARENESS AND TRAINING.......................................................................113 4.9. VESSEL SUSTAINABILITY NOTATIONS..............................................................................114 4.9.1. Environmental Notations ........................................................................................114 4.9.2. Green Passport ......................................................................................................114

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 6 of 140

PAGE 5.

FLEET ENERGY EFFICIENCY MONITORING / BENCHMARKING ....................................115

5.1. VOLUNTARY INDEXING .......................................................................................................115 5.1. BENCHMARKING ..................................................................................................................115 5.2. DATA COLLECTION ..............................................................................................................115 5.3. DATA CORRECTION .............................................................................................................115 SYNOPSIS .............................................................................................................................116

LE

6.

ANNEX I – GUIDELINES FOR CALCULATION OF THE SHIP’S ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPERATIONAL INDICATOR (EEOI) ........................................................................................... 121 GENERAL ..............................................................................................................................121

2.

DATA AND DOCUMENTATION PROCEDURES ..................................................................121

3.

CALCULATION OF EEOI.......................................................................................................121

4.

EXAMPLE...............................................................................................................................122

P

1.

ANNEX II – GUIDELINES FOR CALCULATION OF THE SHIP’S SOx EMISSIONS..................124 GENERAL ..............................................................................................................................124

2.

DATA AND DOCUMENTATION PROCEDURES ..................................................................124

3.

CALCULATION OF SOxI .......................................................................................................124

4.

EXAMPLE...............................................................................................................................125

M

1.

ANNEX III – GUIDELINES FOR CALCULATION OF THE SHIP’S NOx EMISSIONS ................127

2. 3.

DATA AND DOCUMENTATION PROCEDURES ..................................................................127 CALCULATION OF NOxI .......................................................................................................127 EXAMPLE...............................................................................................................................128

S

4.

GENERAL ..............................................................................................................................127

A

1.

ANNEX IV – ENERGY EFFICIENCY BEST PRACTICES ............................................................129 ANNEX V - ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FORM............................................134

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 7 of 140

GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS Benchmarking: The process of comparing the performance and practices of the Company preferably with leaders of the maritime industry, with the purpose of identifying, understanding and adopting available best practices, in order to assist the Company in improving its performance. CFL: Compact Fluorescent Light. Domestic shipping: Shipping between ports of the same country, as opposed to international shipping. Domestic shipping excludes navy ships and fishing vessels. By this definition, the same ship may frequently be engaged in both international and domestic shipping operations.

LE

EFF1: High efficiency motors according to motor classification of ANSI/NEMA MG 1-2006. Energy audit / Energy consumption survey: This is an independent ship-specific survey and assessment in order to define recommendations for improvement of overall onboard energy consumption and energy efficiency. The basic goals of the energy audit are to: Establish energy consumption Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) or Environmental Performance Indicators (EPIs), calculate corresponding values and compare against reference values from sea and shop trials regarding the ship’s main energy consumers. KPIs (or EPIs) may also be used for comparison with any future measurements, thus timely identifying deteriorating trends and corrective actions to be taken. Such KPIs are, for example, the EEOI, the diesel engines SFOC, the generator and electric motors load factor, the ship fuel consumption per mile or metric tonne of cargo transported, etc. Identify a number of Energy Saving Potentials (ESPs) by comparing the energy performance of the ship and its machinery as well as crew practices against industry standards and best practices. ESPs may require modifications that may be implemented only on new buildings or during major repair periods on existing ships.

M

P

A

Energy Conservation: Reduction in energy consumption associated with reduction of services and quantity of transported goods.

S

Energy Conservation Awareness Training Program: Training and associated campaigns to improve the awareness of the crew regarding onboard energy efficiency and conservation. The aim is to integrate energy saving management into general ship management operations and to ensure that all relevant information is being used and understood by the ship’s crew. Energy Efficiency: A ratio between an output of performance, service, goods, energy and an input of energy. Energy efficiency is making the best use of the energy expended to obtain the maximum work done in order to achieve fuel savings. An increase in energy efficiency is when either energy inputs are reduced for a given level of service, or there are increased or enhanced services for a given amount of energy input. Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI): With a view to assessing the design of new ships and making assignment of design indices to ships to be built in the future, the IMO has developed Guidelines for the Assignment of Design Index to New Ships (MEPC.1 /Circ.681).

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 8 of 140

Energy Efficiency Operational Indicator (EEOI): IMO Assembly adopted Resolution A.963 (23) related to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from ships, which requested the MEPC to develop a greenhouse gas emission index for ships, and guidelines for use of that index. The MEPC has introduced the EEOI and through MEPC.1/Circ.684 guidelines are provided for its use. Energy Savings: An amount of energy saved determined by measuring before and after implementation of energy efficiency improvement measures. For example, changing incandescent lamps with compact fluorescent lamps providing the same luminosity with lower energy consumption increases the energy efficiency of the lighting system.

LE

Energy Saving Potential (ESP): The room for improvement (to procedures, processes or equipment or replacement of equipment with more efficient and / or better-sized units, etc.) identified when measuring and analyzing an energy consuming / converting system, which can lead to increased energy efficiency and decreased energy consumption. HCFC: The hydro-chlorofluorocarbons that are permitted until 1 January 2020.

GHG: Green House Gas.

P

HFC: Hydro-fluorocarbons are a group of man-made compounds containing hydrogen, fluorine and carbon. They are not found anywhere in nature. HFCs are used for refrigeration, aerosol propellants, foam manufacture and air conditioning. HFCs are the hydro-fluorocarbons that are more environmental friendly, as they do not contain chlorine ions.

M

GWP: Global warming potential is a measure of how much a given mass of greenhouse gas is estimated to contribute to global warming. It is a relative scale which compares the gas in question to that of the same mass of carbon dioxide (whose GWP is by definition 1). A GWP is calculated over a specific time interval and the value of this must be stated whenever a GWP is quoted otherwise the value is meaningless.

A

International shipping: Shipping between ports of different countries, as opposed to domestic shipping. The International shipping excludes navy ships and fishing vessels. By this definition, the same ship may frequently be engaged in both international and domestic shipping operations.

S

Improved Fleet Management: Better utilization of the fleet capacity may be achieved by improved fleet planning. An increased fleet utilization will result in reduction of total fleet fuel consumption and hence in reduction of GHG emissions, e.g. by reduced time and distance of ballast voyages. Management Tools: Systems & mechanisms for directing and controlling a group of one or more people for the purpose of coordinating and harmonizing that group towards accomplishing a goal. MCR: Maximum Continuous Rating.

NOx: Nitrogen Oxides produced as a result of combustion of fuel in an internal combustion engine. PM: Particulate matters are tiny particles of solid or liquid suspended in a gas or liquid phase. PEMFC: Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell. PMS: Planned Maintenance System (or schedule).

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 9 of 140

RF: Radiative Forcing; a common metric to quantify climate impacts from different sources in units of W/m2, since there is an approximately linear relationship between global mean radiative forcing and change in global mean surface temperature. RF refers to the change in the Earth-atmosphere energy balance since the pre-industrial period. If the atmosphere is subject to a positive RF from, for example, the addition of a GHG such as CO2, the atmosphere attempts to re-establish a radiative equilibrium, resulting in atmosphere warming. SFOC: Specific Fuel Oil Consumption. SOx: Sulphur Oxide; it is produced as a result of burning fuel in an internal combustion engine.

LE

Sustainable energy has two key components; renewable energy and energy efficiency. Sustainable ships are ships that have a long term future that will meet future trading requirements, will burn less fuel, cost less to run and be safer to operate. Reductions will come about from a combination of the following: Different fuels (gas, higher distillates, bio-fuels, fuel cells, other).

Alternative propulsion systems.

More efficient machinery systems.

More fuel efficient operations (energy monitoring, more effective maintenance, improved routing and better maintenance, ship pooling, etc.).

P

A

M

Sustainability: With regards to the provision of shipboard energy, sustainability is the marine industry's greatest challenge. Sustainable ships are ships that have a long term future that will meet future trading requirements, will burn less fuel, cost less to run and be safer to operate. This will be the era of low carbon being suggested to meet global targets; all aspects of ship design, construction, operation, maintenance and dismantling will need to be critically examined to identify the best ways of reducing the emission levels during ship building process and operations. UWHR: Under water roughness of the hull (measured in μm).

S

WSNP: Weather and Safe Navigation Permitting.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

1.

Page 10 of 140

POLICY ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT

S

A

M

P

LE

Energy Efficiency Management Policy

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

2.

INTRODUCTION

1.1.

GENERAL

Page 11 of 140

A

M

P

LE

Some of the sun’s energy is trapped inside our atmosphere as it is reflected back from the earth towards space. This natural process is called the greenhouse effect, as the atmosphere acts like the glass walls of a greenhouse, which allows the sun's rays to enter, but keeps the heat in. The gases which make this happen ("greenhouse gases") are mainly water vapour and CO2. As humans emit more CO2 and other GHGs into the atmosphere, the greenhouse effect becomes stronger. This causes the earth's climate to change unnaturally.

S

Fig. 1: Greenhouse Effect Formulation

Global warming is a globally recognized and complex to understand problem. It is also tangled up with difficult issues such as poverty, economic development, and population growth. The challenge is how to stabilize atmospheric levels of GHGs while providing the society with the energy it needs to develop. Dealing with the problem will not be easy. Ignoring it will be worse.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 12 of 140

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Fig. 2: Shipping Related Air Emissions Estimate (Source: IMO)

A

effectively reduce CO2 emissions; be binding and include all flag states; be cost effective; not distort competition; be based on sustainable development without restricting trade and growth; be goal-based and not prescribe particular methods; stimulate technical research and development in the entire maritime sector; take into account new technology; and be practical, transparent, free of fraud and easy to administer.

S

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

M

P

This issue is one of the most important ones in the international environmental agenda. In November 2003, IMO adopted Resolution A.963(23) “IMO Policies and practices related to the reduction of GHG emissions from ships”. Furthermore, the IMO MEPC has developed a package of measures aimed at reducing shipping’s CO2 emissions. Governments at IMO have also agreed on key principles for the development of regulations on CO2 emissions from ships so that they will:

The energy used for the operation of each ship comes from the burning of fossil fuels. This operation has an environmental aspect as well as a financial one. The financial aspect is related to the cost of bunker fuel consumed. Fuel is a major cost element of ship operational expenditure. The environmental aspect relates to the emission of exhaust gasses from the burning of fuel oil. The exhaust gas emissions are carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2,), sulphur oxides (SOx), nitrogen oxides (NOx), unburned hydrocarbons (HxCx) and particulate matters (PM). These emissions have an environmental impact since they are known to contribute to global warming, acid rain, eutrophication, rising levels of ground level ozone, affecting also ecosystems and human health.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 13 of 140

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Fig. 3: Schematic of Energy Flow in Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engine (Source: MAN B&W)

P

Regulations for the reduction of SOx and NOx emissions from shipping are already in place including the use of low-sulphur fuel oil and the installation onboard of engines with maximum NOx emission limits. Regulations for the reduction of CO2 emissions are not yet in place. Almost all carbon entering the engine combustion is oxidized to form CO2 which is emitted to the atmosphere with the exhaust gases. Hence, the CO2 emissions from the engine are directly proportional to the carbon content of the fuel and fuel consumption.

S

A

M

The overall impact of exhaust emissions on climate for the shipping sector is a complex issue and is summarized conceptually in Fig. 4.

Fig. 4: Emission Pollutant Formulation and Impact (Source: Lee et al., 2009)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 14 of 140

Emissions give rise to changes in the abundance of trace species in the atmosphere. Through atmospheric processes, these emission species may undergo atmospheric reactions, alter microphysical processes, or be absorbed / removed by various sinks (land and water surfaces) through wet and dry deposition.

LE

These changes may then affect the radiative balance of the atmosphere through changes in the abundance of trace species, in atmospheric composition, and in the properties of clouds and aerosols. Such changes in RF may then affect climate in a variety of ways, e.g. global and local mean surface temperature, sea level, changes in precipitation, snow and ice cover, etc. In turn, these physical impacts have societal impacts through their effects on agriculture, forestry, energy production, human health, etc. Ultimately, all of these effects have a social cost, which can be very difficult to quantify. Clearly, as one steps through these impacts, they become more relevant but correspondingly more complex and uncertain in quantitative terms. The world fleet in 2011 comprises around 100,000 ships of more than 100 GT, of which just less than half are cargo ships. The shipping industry carries 90% of world trade. However, cargo ships account for 89% of total gross tonnage, clearly indicating the relatively large size of cargo ships.

P

Sea transport has a justifiable image of conducting its operations in a manner that creates remarkably little impact on the global environment. International shipping is already, by far, the most carbon efficient mode of commercial transport.

S

A

M

In 2007 it is estimated that international shipping was responsible for approximately 870 million tonnes of CO2 emissions, or 2.7% of global anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Domestic shipping and vessel activity bring these totals to 1050 million tonnes of CO2 or 3.3% of global anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Despite the undoubted CO2 efficiency of shipping in terms of grams of CO2 per tonne-mile, it is recognized within the maritime sector that reductions in these totals must be made. Shipping emissions are comparable to those of Germany as can be observed from Fig. 5.

Fig. 5: CO2 emissions of Major Country Economies versus Shipping Emissions (Source: IMO, 2009)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 15 of 140

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Fig. 6: Comparison of CO2 Emissions according to Transportation Mean Type (Source: NMT, Sweden)

1.2.

SCOPE

M

P

Nevertheless, the enhancement of efficiencies can reduce fuel consumption, save money and decrease environmental impact of individual ships. While the yield of individual measures may be small, the collective effect will be significant. In global terms it should be recognized that operational efficiencies delivered by a large number of ship operators will make a valuable contribution to reducing global GHG emissions.

A

The purpose of this Plan is to

The Plan, which contains:

the procedures and measures designed to be implemented on a Company level (Part A) with the aim of improving the energy efficiency of the fleet levels (contains all procedures and measures either already adopted by the Company or under consideration to be adopted in the future); and

S

(a)

(b)

the vessel-specific Energy Efficiency Measures (Part B);

seeks to improve a ship’s energy efficiency through four steps: planning, implementation, monitoring, and self-evaluation and improvement. These components, which are further explained in Section 3, play a critical role in the continuous cycle to improve ship energy management. With each iteration of the cycle, some elements of the Plan will necessarily change while others may remain as before.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 16 of 140

Furthermore, this Plan provides guidance and standard practices on best energy management under the various operational modes of the ship, as well as information for raising awareness on energy efficiency matters. This Plan applies to all fleet vessels. 1.3.

REGULATORY BACKGROUND

LE

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) has adopted Guidance on the Development of a Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) which has been circulated by means of MEPC.1/Circ.683.

S

A

M

P

This Plan has been developed taking into account the IMO SEEMP Guidelines as well as the INTERTANKO’s Guide for Tanker Energy Efficiency Management Plan and the OCIMF Guide for Energy Efficiency and Fuel Management.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

3.

Page 17 of 140

APPLICATION

planning; implementation; monitoring and measuring; and Self-evaluation and improvement.

P

• • • •

LE

COMPANYNAME, recognizing the need to develop management tools to assist in managing the on-going environmental performance of its ships, has issued this SEEMP, which provides an approach for monitoring ship and fleet efficiency performance over time as well as measures to be considered when seeking to optimize the performance of the ship. The SEEMP is linked to a broader corporate Energy Efficiency Management Policy and has been developed with the aim to establish a mechanism for the Company to improve the energy efficiency of its fleet operation. In this respect, the SEEMP has been prepared as management guidance with the aim to implement CO2 and other emissions reducing practices and technologies, as part of a culture of fostering continual improvement. However, for its implementation, roles and responsibilities need to be defined and targets need to be set. The SEEMP seeks to improve a ship’s energy efficiency through four steps:

M

These components play a critical role in the continuous cycle to improve ship energy management. Furthermore, the SEEMP provides standard procedures and practices on best energy management under the various operational modes of the ship as well as information regarding industry and IMO initiatives in order to reduce GHG Emissions from ships.

S

A

The SEEMP is reviewed by the Company’s Top Management on an annual basis or when necessary.

Fig. 7: Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) Working Spiral

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

3.1.

Page 18 of 140

PLANNING

Planning is a crucial stage of the SEEMP since it primarily determines both the current status of ship energy usage, as well as expected improvement of energy efficiency. Therefore, planning is crucial so that the most appropriate, effective and implementable plan can be developed. 3.1.1. Ship-specific measures

M

P

LE

There is a variety of options to improve efficiency – e.g. speed optimization, weather routing, hull maintenance, etc. The best set of measures for each ship to improve its energy efficiency differs to a great extent depending upon the ship’s type, cargoes, routes and other factors. The specific measures for the ship to improve its energy efficiency are therefore first identified. These measures are listed as a set of measures to be implemented, hence providing an overview of actions to be taken for the specific ship.

3.1.2. Company-specific measures

S

A

The energy efficiency improvement of ship operation does not necessarily depend upon COMPANYNAME alone. It may also depend upon various stakeholders such as ship repair yards, charterers, cargo owners, ports and traffic management services. For example, “just in time” arrival requires early and efficient communication among COMPANYNAME, ports and traffic management service providers. The better coordination among such stakeholders, the more improvement can be expected. In this sense, the Company has established this Plan to manage its fleet and try to achieve the best necessary coordination among relevant stakeholders. All energy efficiency measures applicable to the Company’s fleet, either adopted by the Company or under consideration to be adopted in the future, are summarized in Part A Section 7 – Furthermore, Part B defines responsible personnel (both ashore and onboard), relevant monitoring methods, associated targets, etc. for each measure. 3.1.3.

Human resource development

Raising personnel awareness and providing appropriate training and communication methods to both shore and sea-going personnel are important elements to achieve effective and continual implementation of the adopted measures. Such human resource development is considered an important component of planning, thus playing also a critical part to implementing the SEEMP.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 19 of 140

3.1.4. Goal setting The last part of planning is goal setting. The purpose of goal setting is to serve as a signal which the personnel involved should be conscious of, to create an incentive for proper implementation, and to increase commitment to the improvement of energy efficiency. The goal should be measurable and easy to understand and can take any form, such as the annual fuel consumption or a specific target of Energy Efficiency Operational Indicator (EEOI). 3.2.

IMPLEMENTATION

Implementation means the application of the theoretic procedures on the Company’s current fleet.

LE

3.2.1. Establishment of Implementation System

After identifying the measures to be implemented, a system for their implementation needs to be established for the Company’s fleet by developing the procedures for energy management, defining relevant tasks and assigning them to qualified personnel. The SEEMP will thus describe how each measure shall be implemented as well as different personnel responsibilities. Implementation and Record-keeping

P

3.2.2.

3.3.

M

Record-keeping for the implementation of each measure is beneficial for self-evaluation at a later stage. If any identified measure cannot be implemented for any reason(s), the reason(s) should be recorded for internal use. MONITORING

A

Continuous and consistent data collection is the foundation of monitoring. The energy efficiency of the ship shall be monitored quantitatively. A monitoring system for the Company’s fleet, including the procedures for data collection and responsible personnel assignments, has been developed. 3.4.

SELF-EVALUATION AND IMPROVEMENT

S

Self-evaluation and improvement is the final phase of the management cycle. This phase should produce meaningful feedback for the subsequent first stage, i.e. planning stage of the next improvement cycle. The purpose of self-evaluation is: •

to evaluate the effectiveness of the planned measures and of their implementation;

to deepen the understanding of the overall characteristics of the ship’s operation such as what types of measures can or cannot function effectively and how / why;

to comprehend the trend of the efficiency improvement of the ship; and

to develop an improved SEEMP for the next cycle.

In this respect, internal auditing procedures for self-evaluation of the ship energy management shall be implemented. Self-evaluation shall be implemented quarterly, by using data collected through monitoring, and shall include the identification and implementation of appropriate improvement measures. In addition, effort will be made to identify the cause-and-effect of the performance during the evaluated period for improving the next stage of the SEEMP. Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.

MEASURES FOR IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY

4.1.

VOYAGE OPTIMIZATION

Page 20 of 140

4.1.1. Speed Selection Optimization

A

M

P

LE

Ship speed and propulsion power are not linearly related, which means that in order to increase the speed by 1 knot to reach 14 knots, much more power is needed than to do the same when at 12 knots. As the speed increases, more power is needed to achieve the desired speed. Eventually, a speed barrier is reached, often called the “wave wall”. This enormous increase in power for further acceleration of the ship is caused by the equally enormous increase of the hull’s wave resistance, i.e. the resistance caused by the waves produced when the ship is moving through the water.

Fig. 8: Typical Vessel Speed and Power Output Curve

S

Therefore, depending on the prevailing wind and sea conditions, increasing the M/E load when no benefit in ship’s speed is observed should be avoided. Furthermore, the SFOC per power output increases under certain engine loads, with an optimum load usually ranging between 70%-75% of the M/E’s Maximum Continuous Rating (MCR). Speed optimization can produce significant savings. However, optimum speed means the speed where the fuel used per tonne-mile is at a minimum level for that voyage. It does not mean minimum speed; in fact, sailing at less than optimum speed will eventually burn more fuel rather than less. Reference should be made to the engine manufacturer’s power / consumption curve and to the ship’s propeller curve. The following definitions of speed are applied:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 21 of 140

Most Economical Speed

P

M

Normal Service Speed

LE

Practical Economical Speed

A

Super Slow Steaming Speed

Attention: Any instruction to the vessel to run at super slow steaming speed must be approved by the Operations Department as well as by the Technical Department. Vessels on Time-charter

S

4.1.1.1.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Vessels employed in the Spot Market

P

LE

4.1.1.2.

Page 22 of 140

M

4.1.2. Optimized Voyage Planning

The optimum route and improved efficiency can be achieved through careful planning and execution of voyages.

A

Voyage routes can be charted with the use of Rhumb Lines or the Great Circle methodology.

S

A Rhumb Line is a line on the chart which intersects all meridians at the same angle. Meridians and parallels of latitude are special cases of Rhumb Lines, their angles of intersection being respectively 0° and 90°. Rhumb Lines which cut meridians at oblique angles are loxodromic curves spiraling towards the poles. A line of constant course is a Rhumb Line. On a plane surface this would be the shortest distance between two points. Over the Earth's surface at low latitudes or over short distances it can be used for plotting ship's course. Over longer distances and / or at higher latitudes Great Circle routes provide the shortest distances. Great Circle route follows the intersection of the earth and the plane which passes through the center point of the earth, the vessel’s current position and the final destination.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 23 of 140

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Fig. 9: Great Circle and Rhumb Line

4.1.3. Weather Routing

P

For all cross ocean voyages the plotting of the intended route should be carried out by using the Great Circle methodology and the Company’s procedures for passage plan must be implemented.

M

Weather Routing is the use of meteorological data to assist the Master in planning routes, when possible, in order to take advantage of favorable weather and to avoid adverse weather in order to obtain the best performance in speed or consumption and increase the safety of the ship. Weather Routing has a high potential for fuel savings for ocean crossings where the Master has a choice of a large number of routes to follow, and in particular during bad weather seasons such as winter in the northern hemisphere and monsoon seasons in the Indian Ocean.

the effects of ocean currents and tides; the effects of weather systems; and the crew safety and comfort, based on trade and route.

S

• • •

A

Weather Routing to avoid high storm or wave frequency and maximize calm sea state takes into consideration:

The Weather Routing system provider forwards daily weather forecasts to the ship via email. This data is then used to generate color-enhanced maps and graphics that allow the ship’s Master to easily view and interpret potential problem areas in advance, or even suggest an optimized route. For example, the Master can calculate the least time or the least fuel track. Both weather-induced constraints and no-go zones can be set to account for the special requirements of each particular voyage.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 24 of 140

Description

S

A

M

P

LE

The Weather Routing Program consists of two parts:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 25 of 140

M

P

LE

4.1.4. Optimized Heading Control / Auto-Pilot Function

A

4.1.5. Trim and Ballast Optimization

S

Another operational factor affecting the fuel consumption is the ship’s trim and ballast quantity. In a recent case study of tanker operations, savings of more than 0.6% were estimated for trim and ballast optimization. Higher figures may be relevant for specific ship types that carry significant amounts of ballast during operation. Most ships are designed to carry a designated amount of cargo at a certain speed with certain fuel consumption. This implies the specification of set trim conditions. Loaded or unloaded, trim has a significant effect on ship’s resistance and optimizing the trim may result in significant fuel savings. For any given draught there is a trim condition that results in minimum resistance.

Ship’s resistance may be broken down in 4 components, i.e. friction, wave, eddy and air resistance. The first three components increase with draught increase, the 4th with draught decrease. The main components however are the friction resistance of the hull surface and the wave making resistance.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 26 of 140

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

S

Fig. 10: Ship Resistance Components (Source: MAN B&W)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 27 of 140

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Trim Optimization software

S

Various software tools (e.g. ECO-Assistant) combine hull, propeller pitch, main engine behavior and water depth in order to calculate the most efficient operating condition. The advantage of such software tools is that they are usually stand-alone software applications which require no interfacing with the vessel's systems and sensors, and which can be installed on any computer. Their key component is the ship-specific resistance data, which is generated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools for a variety of different operating conditions.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 28 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 29 of 140

4.1.6. Just in Time Arrival / Virtual Arrival It is inherently wasteful for a vessel to steam at full speed to a port where delays to cargo handling have been identified. By reducing speed to reach the destination at a mutually agreed arrival time, the vessel can avoid spending time at anchor awaiting berth, tank space or cargo availability. Emissions could thus be reduced, congestion could be avoided and safety in port areas could be improved. The potential energy savings for just-in-time arrival is assessed at 1-5%. The highest potential savings would be expected where economic considerations (incentives from contractual agreement) favor inefficient operational arrival.

S

A

M

P

LE

The Virtual Arrival concept is one example of the coordination between the owner and charterer having been further developed.

4.1.6.1.

How the Virtual Arrival works

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 30 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.1.6.2.

Page 31 of 140

Estimated benefits for given scenarios

P

LE

A typical operational profile of a VLCC using voyage data for one year is given in Fig. 11 which provides the percentage of time for the various ship’s operating modes (sea passage - in ballast and laden conditions, anchored - drifting, loading, discharging, pilotage and alongside).

S

A

M

Fig. 11: Typical Vessel Operational Profile by Mode

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.2.

Page 32 of 140

PROPULSION RESISTANCE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

4.2.1. Hull and Propeller Cleaning Program Ship resistance is improved by keeping the propeller and hull clean. Hull and propeller cleaning (polishing) is a very effective way to reduce hull resistance and improve overall efficiency.

A

M

P

LE

An easily calculated indication of the efficiency of the M/E – propeller system is the apparent slip ratio, i.e. the difference of the ideal propeller speed (p x n, where p is pitch and n is RPM of the propeller) minus the ship speed V divided by the ideal propeller speed (refer to Fig. 12).

S

Fig. 12: Apparent and Real Propeller Slip Ratio Relationships

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 33 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

LE

Propeller Polishing

Fig. 13: Underwater Propeller Polishing

A

M

P

4.2.1.1.

Page 34 of 140

Hull Cleaning

S

4.2.1.2.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 35 of 140

4.2.2. Propulsion Hydrodynamic Improvement Devices 4.2.2.1.

Pre-swirl stator

M

P

LE

A pre-swirl stator consists of four asymmetric blades fixed in front of the propeller, directly fitted on the stern frame by full penetration welding. It has been developed by DSME and the purpose of this system is to produce a swirling flow opposed to the direction of rotation of the propeller, thereby annulling the swirl induced by the propeller and at the same time increasing the relative tangential velocity of the propeller blades. Thus, propulsive efficiency is increased and the cavitation of the propeller is reduced. Pre-swirl stators must be optimized to the given ship lines and propeller. In the optimization process a fair balance must be found between the improvements of the wake field in which the propeller works and the, presumably negative, thrust forces on the stator blades.

A

Fig. 14: Pre-swirl Stators installed on a VLCC (right) and Propeller Flow Before and After the Installation of Pre-swirl Stators (Source: DSME)

S

Based on test results during the sea trials of a VLCC and from the review of ship’s operation data, it seems that pre-swirl stator has the potential to increase the vessel’s propulsion efficiency of about 4% and hence to reduce fuel consumption. These results were obtained by the comparison between two sister ships (one fitted with Pre-swirl stator). 4.2.2.2. .1

Propeller Duct Systems

Accelerating and Decelerating Ducts

There are two types of ducts that are applicable to marine propellers. The first type is called accelerating duct and the second decelerating. In the first case, the duct accelerates the flow inside the duct (Fig. 15a). The accelerating ducted propeller provides higher efficiency in conditions of high thrust loading, with the duct thrust augmenting the thrust of the propeller due to the small clearance between the propeller and duct which reduces tip vortex, thus increasing efficiency. The application of this type is to tugs when towing and trawlers when trawling. This type can also be steerable. The proprietary brand of accelerating propeller is the Kort nozzle. Nozzles have the additional benefits of reducing paddlewheel-effect (e.g. the tendency of a right-hand wheel to back Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 36 of 140

LE

to the left) and reduce bottom suction while operating in shallow water. Attention should be paid to the fact that the efficiency of ducted propellers when free-running and lightly loaded tends to be less than that of a non-ducted propeller because of the additional shrouding which adds drag, resulting the Kort nozzles to lose their advantage at around 10 knots.

Fig. 15: (a) Ducted propeller (accelerating), (b) Ducted Propeller (decelerating) (Source: Molland et al., 2011)

S

A

M

P

The decelerating Duct circulation reduces the flow speed inside the duct (Fig. 15b). There is a loss of efficiency and thrust with this duct type. Its purpose is to increase the pressure, thus decreasing velocity at the propeller in order to reduce cavitation and its associated noise radiation. Its use tends to be restricted to military vessels where minimizing the level of noise originating from cavitation is important.

.2

Mewis Duct

The Mewis Duct is a novel power-saving device which has been developed for slower ships with full form hull shape, that allows either a significant fuel saving at a given speed or alternatively for the vessel to travel faster for a given power level. The Mewis Duct consists of two strong fixed elements mounted on the vessel: a duct positioned ahead of the propeller together with an integrated fin system within. The duct straightens and accelerates the hull wake to the propeller and also produces a net ahead thrust. The fin system provides a pre-swirl to the ship wake which reduces losses in propeller slipstream, resulting in an increase in propeller thrust at given propulsive power. Both effects contribute to each other. The achievable power savings from the Mewis Duct are strongly dependent on the propeller thrust loading, from 3% for small multi-

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 37 of 140

LE

purpose ships up to 9% for large tankers and bulk carriers. The power saving is virtually independent of ship draught and speed. The Mewis Duct ideally suits both to new-buildings and to retrofit applications (e.g. on Tankers, Bulk Carriers).

Fig. 16: Fluid Flow at Stern where a Mewis Duct is Present

P

How does it work? High blocked ships have low propulsion efficiency. The reasons are the bad wake field and the high propeller loading. The water inflow has such an unfavorable characteristic that the propeller is working in bad inflow conditions. The Mewis Duct harmonizes and stabilizes the flow and generates a pre-swirl to reduce the rotational losses in the propeller slipstream.

S

A

M

The integrated fins have a stator effect by generating a pre-swirl in counter direction of the propeller operation. This generates more thrust. The fins are asymmetrically profiled and arranged to generate a perfectly homogenous flow distribution.

Fig. 17: Detailed Schematic of Mewis Duct System (Source: Becker Marine Systems)

4.2.2.3. .1

Wake Equalizing Ducts

Schneekluth Duct

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 38 of 140

Sumitomo Integrated Lammeren Duct (SILD)

S

A

.2

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.2.2.4.

Page 39 of 140

Propeller Boss Cap Fins (PBCF)

A propeller generates vortices from its hub, which reduce its efficiency, and is prone to cavitation. The magnitude of these vortices will depend on the blade radial loading distribution, and on the size and design of the hub. Vortices from the hub tend to be steadier than those generated from the propeller tips, and consequently have an influence at the higher frequency range, rather than direct harmonics of the blade rate frequency. An investigation has shown how properly designed hub caps can reduce the hub vortex cavitation, and consequently the hydro-acoustic noise, rudder surface erosion, as well as improving propeller efficiency, particularly for controllable pitch propellers (Abdel-Maksoud et al, 2004).

A

M

P

LE

Propeller Boss Cap Fins (PBCF) are small fins attached to the propeller hub which are designed to reduce the magnitude of the hub vortices, thereby recovering the lost rotational energy, and reducing the cavitation. This concept has been developed by Mitsui OSK Lines Ltd. A photograph of a PBCF fitted to a propeller is given Fig. 18.

Fig. 18: Propeller Boss Cap Fin Installed (left) and Effect of PBCF on Cavitation (right, Source: Mitsui O.S.K. Techno-Trade)

S

There are a number of publications, largely by the proponents, discussing the benefits of the PBCF, however these are also well summarized by the International Towing Tank’s specialist committee on unconventional propulsors (ITTC, 1999). Gains in efficiency of up to 7% have been reported, although gains of the order of 3-5% appear to be more common. Manufacturers claim that PBCF increases thrust over by 1%, reduces shaft torque by over 3% and lightens the propeller torque-rich conditions. Moreover, the produced effect covers a wide range of operating speeds. The main advantages of the system are that PBCF is applicable to every ship type and it is a simple structure like an ordinary boss cap with added fins shape. This is a robust system with low maintenance as no rotating parts are involved. The PBCF is made of the same material as the propeller and is installed following the same procedure as the boss cap. No modification for propeller and of the ship’s hull is required, expect for vessels fitted with Controllable Pitch Propellers (CPP). Furthermore, PBCF needs polishing only during dry-docking.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Ax-Bow Shape

S

A

M

P

LE

4.2.2.5.

Page 40 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Rudder Surf Bulb (Costa bulb type and transversal fins (thrust fins))

S

A

M

P

4.2.2.6.

Page 41 of 140

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


4.2.2.7.

Page 42 of 140

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Use of Anti-fouling Paints based on Silicone / Fluoropolymer Technology

S

A

M

P

Anti-fouling coatings are used to improve the speed and energy efficiency of ships by preventing organisms such as barnacles and weed from building-up on the underwater hull surface, thus increasing the ship’s friction resistance. They may contain biocides or be biocide-free. Biocidal antifoulings’ effectiveness depends on both the biocide itself and the technology used to control the biocide release, polishing or leaching rate. All the anti-fouling coatings must be in compliance with the International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-Fouling Systems on Ships (AFS Convention) which restricts the use of organotin biocides in anti-fouling paints used on ships. Some of the traditional AFS-compliant paints act as biocidal anti-fouling systems and are formulated as self-polishing polymer coatings that hydrolyze and polish. Some other coatings - to a degree - wear away as the ship is propelled through the water, to expose a fresh layer of biocide, thus having an inherent added resistance by formulation.

Fig. 19: Application of Silicon Paint

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 43 of 140

LE

However, there is a new generation of paints which are employing a Foul Release mechanism. Foul release is the name given to the technology which does not use biocides to control fouling but provides an ultra-smooth, slippery, low friction, hydrophobic or hydrophobic / hydrophilic combination surface onto which fouling organisms have difficulty settling. The Foul Release products available contain no added biocides and are based on silicone / fluoro-polymer based technology. Therefore, in addition to the above positive environmental impact, paint manufacturers claim that the advanced technology of the silicon based systems provides a high performance solution to fouling control in comparison to traditional (contact leaching) and polishing antifouling technologies, which could improve fuel efficiency and speed increase up to 4%. These coatings do however develop micro-fouling at a rate, and to a degree, depending mainly on service conditions. Such micro-fouling will increase the hull resistance, and should be removed by regular “soft-brush” cleaning to ensure that the benefits of the coating are realized. Coating systems may be used to improve smoothness and hydrodynamic performance of the propeller as well leading to increase of ship’s speed by up to 0.5 kn. Controllable Pitch Propellers

S

A

M

P

4.2.2.8.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Contra Rotating Propellers

S

A

M

P

4.2.2.9.

Page 44 of 140

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.2.2.10.

Page 45 of 140

Installation of Fins in front of the Propeller

The purpose of these devices is generally to improve the hydrodynamic flow before the propeller. The main application is to reduce the swirl resistance of the hull form, hence reducing the viscous pressure resistance. Sanoyas Tandem Fins (STF)

.2

IHI Low Viscous Resistance Fin

M

P

LE

.1

S

A

This energy device is almost identical to the Sanoyas Tandem Fins. However, the device consists only of one pair of fins in front of the propeller. The purposes are to reduce the swirl resistance of the hull form and consequently decrease the viscous pressure resistance. According to DSME, in tankers and bulk carriers, fuel savings are expected up to 2%.

Fig. 20: IHI Low Viscous Resistance Fin (Source: DSME)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Grotheus Spoilers (Flow Spoilers)

S

A

M

P

LE

.3

Page 46 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Oshima Wake Acceleration Fin and Namura Flow Control Fin

S

A

M

P

LE

.4

Page 47 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Vortex Generator Fins

S

A

M

P

LE

.5

Page 48 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.2.2.11.

Page 49 of 140

Air Lubrication

LE

The decrease of ship resistance is one of the most effective ways to reduce operating costs and CO2 production. The main components of ship resistance consist of resistance due to wave drag, pressure drag, and frictional drag. The wave and pressure (form) drag can be optimized by carefully manipulating the lines of the vessel, but frictional resistance remains proportional to the wetted surface and the square of the ship’s speed. As this resistance drag is by far the largest resistance component in normal operating speed ranges, any reduction of this component will have an immediate and favorable influence on the performance of the ship. Such reductions can be achieved by compliant coatings, ribblets, polishing the surface, or polymer injection. A promising alternative technique to obtain lower frictional resistance is to use air as a lubricant in order to reduce the wetted surface of the ship. Three distinct approaches are identified: the injection of bubbles, air films, and air cavity ships. The first technique, bubble injection, is a direct means to reduce the friction of the ship by positive interaction with the boundary layer. Micro-Bubbles

Air Layers

S

.2

A

M

P

.1

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Air Cavity Ships

S

A

M

P

LE

.3

Page 50 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 51 of 140

4.2.3. Resistance Monitoring Programs CASPER

S

A

M

P

LE

4.2.3.1.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.3.

Page 52 of 140

MACHINERY OPTIMIZATION

4.3.1. Performance Monitoring Systems 4.3.1.1.

KYMA Performance Monitoring System

P

LE

A number of vessels are equipped with the KYMA Performance Monitor. The KYMA Performance Monitor is an instrument for continuous measurements of energy input (fuel flow) to the engine and energy output (power) to the shaft. This instrument provides continuous measurements of torque, power and revolutions of rotating propeller shaft (using strain gauge technology), fuel consumption and ship’s speed. Performance data, such as specific fuel consumption and ship efficiency is presented on the shaft power meter display unit.

M

Fig. 21: KYMA Display Unit (KDU)

A

A typical system arrangement consists of a Master KDU (KYMA Display Unit) connected to one SPS (Shaft Power Sensor) and a repeater KDU located in the Wheel House. Normally the display unit in the Engine Control Room has pulse signal inputs from flow meters and analog signal inputs from temperature sensors, while the repeater in the Wheel House has a pulse signal input from the speed log (refer to KYMA System Layout below).

S

The Shaft Power Sensor measures shaft torque and thrust using strain gauge technique. The instrument consists of an aluminium ring clamped onto the shaft, a stationary unit located next to the shaft and a terminal junction box for signal and power connection. The shaft ring contains electronic components for signal processing and transmission and will also serve as protection for the strain gauges which are glued onto the shaft. Values for torque and thrust are transferred, as are frequency modulated signals to the stationary unit through contact-free transmission. Shaft revolutions are measured by detecting magnets on the shaft ring. Shaft power and total energy are then calculated by the signal processor in the stationary unit.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 53 of 140

KYMA Performance Monitor – General System Arrangement

S

A

M

.1

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

KYMA Diesel Analyzer

S

A

M

P

LE

.2

Page 54 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

PMI (Cylinder Pressure Analyzer) System

S

A

M

P

LE

4.3.1.2.

Page 55 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

CoCoS-EDS Engine Diagnostics Software and CoCoS Maintenance Software

A

M

P

LE

4.3.1.3.

Page 56 of 140

Shaft Torque Meters and Thrust Meters

S

4.3.1.4.

Torque Meters

This is equipment installed on the main shaft which measures the developed torque of the M/E. It is a digital measuring system using a laser beam for detection of shaft torque, shaft RPM and consequently the transferred power. The system offers high accuracy and good long term stability. The main benefits of the system are:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 57 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 58 of 140

A

M

P

LE

Thrust Meters

BMT Smart Power Monitoring System

S

4.3.1.5.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 59 of 140

P

LE

Features

S

A

M

Benefits

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

SEC Measuring and Monitoring System

S

A

M

P

LE

4.3.1.6.

Page 60 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 61 of 140

4.3.2. M/E Performance Monitoring System M/E performance monitoring is established within the PMS and it is carried out on a monthly basis. Performance monitoring includes recording and reviewing of M/E operating parameters (e.g. cylinder pressure, exhaust gas temperature, jacket cooling water temperature, piston cooling oil temperature, turbocharger temperature / rpm / Δp, scavenge air pressure, air cooler temperature) as well as regular assessment / inspection of M/E parts (pistons / piston rings) to ensure their good operating condition.

S

A

M

P

Performance Monitoring Devices

LE

Attention: the monthly M/E performance measurements should be taken in good weather conditions.

4.3.3. D/G Performance Monitoring System D/G performance monitoring and guidance regarding which measurements must be taken is established within the PMS. For a better understanding of the use of the measured data, the Chief Engineer should also study the relevant section of the D/G manual. In addition to the above, the KYMA Diesel Analyzer or other equivalent system may be used with the aim of recording and analysis of the combustion process as explained above. The manufacturers of diesel generators provide the ISO corrected SFOC curve, but the actual SFOC is usually considerably higher than that. The ISO corrected SFOC is increasing as the engine load decreases. A typical curve showing this is presented below:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 62 of 140

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

S

4.3.4. Installation of Electronically Controlled Main Engines

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 63 of 140

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

S

A

4.3.5. Part Load and Low Load Operation

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.3.5.1.

Page 64 of 140

Part Load Optimized Main Engines

S

A

M

P

LE

In order to meet the charter party agreement and reduce fuel oil consumption, the ship’s speed is altered to maximize economy. Moreover, the transportation chain currently does not require noncritical cargo to be transported at high speeds. This drive often results in operating the engine at a reduced load, which in turn has placed more emphasis on operational flexibility in terms of demand for reduced SFOC (Specific Fuel Oil Consumption) at part- / low-load operation of the main engine. However, on two-stroke engines (camshaft or electronically controlled), reduction of the SFOC is affected by NOx regulations in order to maintain compliance with the IMO NOx Tier II demands. As it can be observed from Fig. 22, the fuel savings are up to 2 g/kWh at the part-load tuned point, while maintaining NOx compliance. It has been reported from the industry that fuel savings can reach up to 1.5% compared to similar ships without part-load optimized Main Engine. As mentioned above, the SFOC is limited by NOx regulations on two-stroke engines. In general, the NOx emissions will increase if the SFOC is reduced and vice versa. The engine is optimized close to the IMO NOx limit, which is why the NOx emissions cannot be increased. Furthermore, the new configuration of part-load has an Exhaust Gas Bypass (EGB) system. The EGB system is tailored at 6%. The Main Engine is matched with a Variable Turbine Area (VT) Turbocharger. With this method, the area of the nozzle ring is altered increasing the part-load efficiency of the T/C.

Fig. 22: Effect of Part-load Optimization in Specific Fuel Oil Consumption of Main Engine (Source: MAN Diesel)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Turbocharger cut-out

S

A

M

P

LE

4.3.5.2.

Page 65 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Cylinder cut-out

4.3.5.4.

Fuel Injection Slide Valves

A

M

P

LE

4.3.5.3.

Page 66 of 140

S

Slide Fuel valves have shown significant savings, lower emissions and lower fuel consumption. The slide fuel valves both optimize the combustion of the fuel and ensure a cleaner engine. The spray pattern of the fuel is further optimized and therefore leads to an improved combustion process.

Fig. 23: Sliding Fuel Valve 3D Model

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 67 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 68 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

4.3.6. Installation of De-rated Engines

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 69 of 140

4.3.7. M/E Cylinder Oil and Lubrication Control 4.3.7.1.

Alpha Lubrication system

The Alpha Lubricator System has an algorithm controlling cylinder oil dosage proportional to the Sulphur content of the fuel. This algorithm is referred to as Alpha Adaptive Cylinder-oil Control (Alpha ACC). The electronically controlled Alpha Lubricator System helps reducing the cylinder oil consumption. An added benefit is that such savings in cylinder oil consumption reduce the environmental impact from operating ships with the Alpha ACC. Moreover, uniform and optimal cylinder liner wear rates can be expected.

M

P

LE

The principle of the Alpha ACC is that the cylinder oil amount is controlled in such a way that it is proportional to the amount of Sulphur entering the cylinder with the fuel as shown in Fig. 24.

Fig. 24: Cylinder Oil Amount vs. Sulphur Amount of HFO (Source: MAN B&W) The following two criteria determine the control:

The cylinder oil dosage should be proportional to the Sulphur percentage of the fuel. The cylinder oil dosage should be proportional to the engine load (i.e. the amount of fuel entering the cylinders).

A

• •

S

The implementation of the above two criteria is performed by the Chief Engineer. The above principle is founded on the observation that the main part of the cylinder liner wear is of a corrosive nature, and the amount of neutralizing alkaline components needed in the cylinder should therefore be proportional to the amount of Sulphur (generating Sulphurous acids) entering the cylinders. A minimum cylinder oil dosage is set, in order to account for other duties of the cylinder oil (securing sufficient oil film, detergency, etc.). Fig. 25 shows control of cylinder oil dosage proportional to the Sulphur percentage in the fuel. A minimum dosage of 0.5 g/BHPh is indicated. This minimum value is preliminary and, given the efficient lubrication, achievable with the Alpha Lubricator System. The control is based on standard TBN 70 cylinder oil. For operation for more than 14 days with fuels with Sulphur content below 1%, changing to cylinder oil with lower TBN (i.e. TBN 40 cylinder oils) is required by the Company.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 70 of 140

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Fig. 25: Cylinder Oil Usage vs. Sulphur Content (Source: MAN B&W)

S

A

M

P

Fig. 25 describes the control of the cylinder oil dosage proportional to the engine load, together with RPM-proportional and Maximum Effective Pressure (MEP)-proportional lubrication. At part load, load-proportional cylinder oil dosage will provide large cost savings and also reduce the environmental impact from excessive lubrication. Below 25% load, the load-proportional lubrication is stopped, and RPM-proportional lubrication takes over.

Fig. 26: Cylinder Part Load Dosage vs. Engine Power Output (Source: MAN B&W)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Pulse Lubricating System (PLS)

S

A

M

P

LE

4.3.7.2.

Page 71 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Hans Jensen Lubricator System

S

A

M

P

LE

4.3.7.3.

Page 72 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Vogel Lubrication System

S

A

M

P

LE

4.3.7.4.

Page 73 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.3.7.5.

Page 74 of 140

Cylinder Oil Feed Rate Optimization (FRO) / Scrapedown Analysis

S

A

M

P

LE

Feed rate optimization is a balance between the cost of a specific oil feed rate vs the expense generated by wear. Scrapedown samples are drawn and analyzed in order to identify the optimum cylinder oil feed rate based on the type of engine, quality of cylinder oil consumed and prevailing operational and / or environmental conditions, which may impact the BN and iron levels in scrapedown oils, and hence the amount of ring and liner wear being experienced.

4.3.8. D/G Engine Load Optimization and Electric Load Demand Minimization Low D/G loads (below 40%) have an adverse effect to the operation of the engine (particularly the FO system and cylinders) leading to increased maintenance costs and accelerated wear of engine components. Due to these reasons it is prudent to exercise efficient load management, with the aim to minimize the number of running generators and maximize their load factor, when possible and safety permitting. The total electricity demand will be the same, but less operating engines at higher load, i.e. lower SFOC, translates to reduced fuel consumption. Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


4.3.8.1.

Page 75 of 140

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Use of pumps

M

P

.1 Steering gear hydraulic pumps A simple example of efficient electric load management is the operation of the steering gear pumps. According to the ship’s Electric Load Analysis booklet, steering gear hydraulic pumps are not required to run whilst the vessel is in port. Reduction of steering gear hydraulic pumps running hours, via switch-off when the vessel is in port, is suggested. The instruction to the deck officers would be: Stop steering pump in port after “finished with engine”. If the subject pumps are not switched off during port stay then the expected increase in the fuel consumption can be up to 100 MT per year for a VLCC.

FW and SW cooling system and pump management

S

.3

A

.2 M/E LO and the Camshaft LO Pumps Another example is the M/E LO and the Camshaft LO Pumps, which can be switched off in port. Many terminals require the M/E to be ready on short notice so it might not be possible to implement the above strategy at all times, but same should be considered when possible. The implementation of this instruction is up to the Chief Engineer‘s discretion.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.3.8.2.

Page 76 of 140

E/R Fans operation management

LE

The E/R fans role is to supply air for combustion to the diesel engines and to ensure adequate air circulation in the E/R.

Fig. 27: Engine Room Fan Vertical Layout (Source: MAN B&W)

4.3.8.3.

P

The following should be always considered:

Eliminate Voltage Unbalance

S

A

M

Voltage unbalance degrades the performance and shortens the life of a three-phase motor. Voltage unbalance at the motor stator terminals causes phase current unbalance far out of proportion to the voltage unbalance. Unbalanced currents lead to torque pulsations, increased vibrations and mechanical stresses, increased losses, and motor overheating, which results in a shorter winding insulation life.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 77 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 78 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 79 of 140

4.3.9. Waste Heat Recovery 4.3.9.1.

Exhaust Gas Economizers (EGE)

The use of EGE should be maximized with the aim of minimizing the need for operating the Auxiliary Boilers. The EGE should be maintained in a clean condition so as to maximize its efficiency. Slow Steaming and Exhaust Gas Economizers

S

A

M

P

LE

4.3.9.2.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.3.9.3.

Page 80 of 140

Maintenance

EGE proper maintenance not only improves energy efficiency but also reduces maintenance overall costs and reduces safety risks associated with soot fires. The EGE efficiency is maximized by frequent soot blowing (sonic cleaning may also be used) which should be carried out at least at 75% of main engine load and in accordance with the frequency set by the maker. The exhaust gas temperature difference and pressure drop which are indications of EGE cleanliness should be regularly recorded (during main engine performance tests). Water washing of the EGE should be scheduled during major repair periods. Cargo Operations

4.3.9.5.

Frequency and Quantity of Blow-downs

M

P

LE

4.3.9.4.

Adjust frequency and especially quantity of boiler water blow-downs to minimize dissolved solids as well as clean hot water loss. Auxiliary Boiler(s) Operation Optimization

S

A

4.3.9.6.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.3.9.7.

Page 81 of 140

Composite Boilers

P

LE

A Composite Boilers is a combination of oil-fired boiler and exhaust gas economizer. When the diesel engine is at the desired load, the fuel oil burner starts only if the steam demand exceeds the steam production achieved from the diesel engine’s exhaust gases. Most Composite Boilers nowadays have separated sections for the diesel engines exhaust gases and the flue gases from the fuel oil burners. It is rare but there is still a possibility to find composite boilers that mix the diesel engine’s exhaust gases and the flue gases from the fuel oil burner.

S

A

M

Fig. 28: Composite Boiler Schematic

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 82 of 140

4.3.10. Heating Ventilation & Air Conditioning (HVAC) System The HVAC system includes the Air Handling Unit (AHU) and the refrigeration system. There are a number of improvements, operational and hardware, which can be made to an HVAC system to increase the energy efficiency, e.g. annual inspection, prompt repairs, etc. As far as the crew is concerned, the main intervention is the maintenance of the refrigerating plant and the AHU. Additionally, adjustments can be made, mainly to the AHU “front end”, i.e. the dampers controlling the fresh air inlet and recirculation. These adjustments depend on the external ambient air conditions and the internal comfort and in certain cases can lead to significant energy savings.

P

LE

HVAC Utilization and Load Factor - Thermostat Adjustment.

S

A

M

“Front End” dampers adjustment

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 83 of 140

Fresh Air Inlet

Return Air

Cooler Outlet

(after alleyways)

LE

Average Space Condition

Fig. 29: HVAC Diagram

S

A

M

P

Black: Measured condition with higher fresh air ratio. Red: Proposed condition with higher return air ratio, cooling load reduction 30%.

Fig. 30: Example of AHU and space condition for low fresh air temperature (about 190 deg. C), but high humidity. In this case the AHU mainly plays the role of a de-humidifier. Refrigerants’ quantity

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 84 of 140

LE

Reducing emissions of HCFCs

Replacement of refrigerants containing HCFCs with HFCs

P

They may not be significant in volume but HFCs have a zero Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP) and a moderate climate change.

A

M

Maintenance of the cooling plant and AHU

Windows effect

S

Windows account for nearly 50% of the heat inflow or loss (depending on the season) which in turn accounts for close to 50% of the workload on the air conditioning or heating system. Untreated windows will allow about 20 times more heat into a space than an equal amount of insulated wall space. Personnel onboard can limit the consumption by keeping the blinds closed when sun light is not needed or the space is unoccupied.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 85 of 140

4.3.11. Compressed Air System Selection of Proper Compressors for Serving the Proper Consumers

S

A

M

P

LE

4.3.11.1.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Control Air & Service Air Supply - Advantages of Using Screw Type Compressors

S

A

M

P

LE

4.3.11.2.

Page 86 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.3.11.3.

Page 87 of 140

System Pressure Adjustments

The higher each system pressure is maintained (starting air, control air, deck service air), the greater will be the energy required to compress that air. Especially in the case of control and deck service air systems, the pressure demand of the various consumers (pneumatic valves, back flush filters, chipping tools, diaphragm pumps) should be checked and the pressure should be adjusted to being not higher than the higher required consumer pressure. Check the pressure at the most distant consumer to compensate for pressure drop effects. 4.3.11.4.

Compressed Air System Leakages

LE

Use minimum air pressure for each required use to minimize leakages. Install pressure regulators before each control and service consumer (e.g. diaphragm pump), and ensure it is adjusted to the pressure required for the particular consumer. Regularly check all piping connections, valves and hose quick couplings to ensure that any leakages are rectified. Monthly checks and recordings of the air compressors’ running hours should be carried out during periods when maintenance works are not carried out (i.e. during night time over a 12-hour period) aiming at identifying air leakages. 4.3.11.5.

Minimize Use of Compressed Air System Tools

Stop Unregulated Uses of Compressed Air

M

4.3.11.6.

P

Remember that the compressed air system efficiency is only about 10%. Avoid the use of pneumatic equipment and tools if there is no safety restriction indicating their use. Use electric or manually operated tools where possible.

S

A

Avoid unregulated uses of compressed air. Such uses are:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.3.11.7.

Page 88 of 140

System Pressure Drop

A

M

P

LE

There is always a pressure drop from the compressor down to the pneumatic consumers. Since the latter need to operate at a certain pressure, the higher the pressure drop, the higher the compressor and receiver pressure settings. Pressure drop is affected by the condition of piping, the cleanliness of the air dryers and filters downstream of the compressors, the condition of pressure regulators and the consumers. To reduce pressure drop, maintain the filters and air dryers clean and minimize sources of piping corrosion (mainly moisture).

S

Fig. 31: Pressure Drop from Supply to Consumers

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Compressed Air Quality

S

A

M

P

LE

4.3.11.8.

Page 89 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 90 of 140

4.3.12. Lighting Loads

LE

Lighting onboard ships is nowadays mainly realized by use of tube fluorescent lamps (TFLs). Incandescent bulbs consume more energy and have a shorter lifespan than compact fluorescent bulbs. Fixtures with tube fluorescent lamps contain the starter, used for preheating the lamp gas / mercury vapour mixture and the ballast, mainly used to start the spark ionizing lighting up the heated gas and then limit the current flowing through the lamp electrodes and the gas/mercury vapour mixture. Limiting of the current is required because if a TFL is connected to a voltage source without ballast, increasing current flow causes resistance to drop, consequently allowing more current to flow, ultimately leading to destruction of the lamp. Older ballasts are magnetic coils, having a considerable resistance. Newer ones employ electronic circuits to carry out the previously mentioned functions and are more energy efficient. TFL lighting fixtures with magnetic ballasts contain a capacitor used for power factor correction. It is estimated that the use of energy saving light bulbs will save 33 megawatts per year per ship. Lights Management

S

A

M

P

4.3.12.1.

4.3.12.2.

TFL Selection

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.3.12.3.

Page 91 of 140

Lighting Fixture Maintenance

Replacement of Incandescent Lamps Installed Onboard

A

M

P

4.3.12.4.

LE

Establish a preventive lighting fixture cleaning program to maintain space illuminance close to the “design� levels. Yearly inspection and cleaning of lighting fixtures in the accommodation spaces would be suggested as a starting inspection interval.

S

4.3.13. On-shore Power Supply (Cold Ironing) Power supply from the shore is available in certain ports. This aims to avoid air pollution near the port area by not using the power generator onboard the ship. In terms of total air emissions, it depends on how the power supplied from the shore is generated, but this is a responsibility of the State that supplies the power. The use of on-shore power supplies for 'cold-ironing' while in port may become a de facto facet of port operations in the future. Regulators have begun to encourage the use of such installations. 'Cold-ironing' is the US Navy's way of describing the practice of connecting a ship to a shore-side power supply in port, allowing the ship's machinery to be shut down. The term is now commonly used to describe a new generation of different high-voltage shore connections with fast plug connections and seamless load transfer without blackouts, which allow the full range of in-port activities to continue while the ship is discharging and loading cargo.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 92 of 140

Use of Wind Power

4.3.14.2.

Use of Solar Power

A

M

P

4.3.14.1.

LE

4.3.14. Renewable and / or Alternative Energy Sources

4.3.14.3.

Use of Alternative Fuel

S

Use of emerging alternative fuels, such as LNG, biofuel and fuel cell would certainly reduce CO2 emissions.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 93 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.4.

Page 94 of 140

CARGO HANDLING OPTIMIZATION

4.4.1. Cargo Temperature Control Optimization In order to reduce fuel consumption and heating costs, the cargo / voyage specific heating requirements should be planned by the Master taking into account the Charterer / Cargo Receiver requirements. The following should be considered: Vessel tank configuration. Number of heating coils and surface area. Auxiliary boilers specifications. Cargo details including specific heat and pour point. Cloud point, viscosity, and wax content. Weather en route including ambient air temperatures. Sea water temperatures, wind force, sea and swell. Estimated heat loss and drop in temperatures. Recommended return condensate temperatures. Estimated daily heating hours and consumption.

LE

• • • • • • • • • •

4.4.1.1.

M

P

Various parameters such as daily air / sea temperatures, weather, cargo temperatures at three levels, steam pressures, return condensate temperature, actual against estimated consumptions and temperatures should be considered by the Master and the heating plan should be reviewed and revised appropriately throughout the voyage. Selecting the Optimum Cargo Heating Temperature

The optimum temperature to which cargo should be heated for carriage and discharge largely depends on the following factors:

S

Pour Point: It is the lowest temperature at which the cargo will pour or flow under prescribed conditions. It is a rough indication of the lowest temperature at which oil is readily pumpable. General principle is to carry cargo at 10 0C above pour point temperature. Cloud Point: It is the temperature at which dissolved solids are no longer completely soluble, precipitating as second phase and is synonymous with wax appearance temperature (WAT) and wax precipitation temperature (WPT). Once separated, it requires temperature over 80 0C to dissolve the wax. Cargo temperature should not be allowed to fall below the cloud point of the temperature. Wax Content: High wax crudes tend to deposit sludge, and you need to maintain loaded or higher recommended temperature from commencement of loading to prevent wax fall out. Viscosity: High viscosity oils do not necessarily deposit sludge, and may be carried at lower than the discharge temperatures. Optimum viscosity for main cargo pumps is about 250cst while for stripping pumps viscosity should not exceed 600cst. COW Requirement: When COW is required, the slop tank should be heated up to 5 0C above the bulk cargo temperature. Ambient Weather and Sea Conditions: This will also influence the carriage and discharge temperatures.

A

• •

• •

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.4.1.2.

Page 95 of 140

Cargo Heating Plan

Different cargoes can be transported with different heating plans. Provided that charterer does not object, the cargo does not need to be heated to the cargo discharge temperature throughout the voyage. On some cargoes it is therefore possible to lower the temperature, taking note of the safety precautions and avoiding any possible coagulation, raising the temperature only when required for discharge. This is best suited to longer voyages and assumes that the heating capacity is adequate and the heating coils are in good condition to easily raise the temperature at the end of the voyage. Attention should be paid to prevent cargo temperature falling below the cargo’s cloud point.

Passage Weather Receiver requirements Cargo Specifications

P

• • •

LE

It is prudent to have and follow a proper cargo heating plan / log to monitor and verify the effectiveness of the actual heating progress. A heating plan should be made soon after loading cargo and it should contain at least the following information: loading temperature, expected ambient temperature during the transit, minimum planned cargo temperature and expected average cargo temperature increase per day of heating and cargo discharge requirements. The ship should send the heating plan to the Operations Department. A discussion related to the following should take place between Operations Department and the Master in finalizing the plan:

Best Practices

S

Seek the Charterer / Cargo Receiver’s permission for allowable range of cargo temperature. Follow the recommended condensate temperature and optimum boiler settings for efficient cargo heating. Heating instructions, accompanying the heating plan, should further highlight these points. Create and follow the proper cargo heating plan to verify the effectiveness of actual heating progress. Heating instructions shall be reviewed after loading cargo and permission to carry and discharge the cargo at optimum temperatures shall be requested. Closely monitor and analyze cargo heating reports. Monitor heating daily to address deviations from the heating plan. Avoid heating during adverse weather periods. Do not heat for short frequent periods, thus running the boiler at low loads. Maintain efficient and good communication between the vessel and the Operations Department about the plan and its execution. Review the Heating Log after completion of discharge for gap identification and continuous improvement.

A

• •

M

The vessel should complete a Heating Log abstract during the voyage which should contain for each voyage date the following information on a tank basis: actual cargo temperature; FO consumption (MT); heating time (hrs); actual heating time (hrs); ambient temperature and condensate temperature.

• • • • • • •

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 96 of 140

A

M

P

LE

Examples of Cargo Heating Patterns are presented below:

S

Fig. 32: Shipboard Cargo Heating Practices

Note1:

Use crude oil heating specification to determine the heating temperature.

Note2:

Keep in mind that heating at the end of the cargo passage may cause off gassing which in turn could delay cargo discharge from high H2S usually above 10 ppm.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 97 of 140

4.4.2. Cargo Pumps Operation Optimization In order to achieve economical operation of the Cargo Oil Pumps (COPs) the following should be noted: COP optimum operating point

S

A

M

P

LE

4.4.2.1.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Operating 1 COP vs. 2 or 3 COPs

4.4.2.3.

FRAMO Pump System

S

A

M

P

LE

4.4.2.2.

Page 98 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 99 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

MARFLEX Deepwell pumps

S

A

M

P

LE

4.4.2.4.

Page 100 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 101 of 140

M

P

LE

4.4.3. Auxiliary Boiler(s) Maintenance

4.4.4. Steam Distribution and Condensate Return System .1

Drainage of Hot Water and Steam Exhaust

.2

A

Minimize steam and condensate piping drainage as far as possible. Draining steam lines prior to operation of steam turbines is required so as to avoid damage to the turbine. The above process is of great importance. However, the drained water and steam that follows is never returned into the system, thus some energy loss is inevitable. Steam Losses at Steam Traps, Safety Valves etc.

S

Steam traps installed at the outlet of the various steam consumers in the E/R should be regularly inspected, as well as the safety valves installed on the boilers and at other parts of the steam system. Steam traps proper operation can be checked by installing cocks and brass drain pipes to the trap lower part (at the bottom of the filter housing). By opening the cock it can be verified if condensate or live steam is extracted. In the latter case the trap is not fulfilling its purpose of stopping steam to enter the condensate return system. Safety valves occasionally installed at the piping can also be checked by drain cocks or by an IR thermometer pointed at the outlet piping. The latter should not be hotter than ambient temperature if the safety valve is not leaking. Escaping steam represents energy loss. Inspection frequency depends on the age and size of the installation but it must be conducted as a minimum at yearly intervals. Due to the relatively short piping on ship systems, steam loss can also be observed at the cascade tank return.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 102 of 140

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

M

P

Fig. 33: Disk Type Steam Trap

Fig. 34: 16K/7K Steam Pipe after Leaking Safety Valve (Sp1: 96.4째C) .3

Insulation Inspection and Maintenance

S

A

Steam and condensate return piping insulation should be regularly inspected. External surface temperatures shall generally not exceed 500 deg. C. Ensure valve blankets and piping insulation is restored to original condition after repairs.

Fig. 35: Thermal image of locally worn steam valve insulation (left) and the actual valve insulation onboard (right) Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Steam turbine generator

S

A

M

P

LE

.4

Page 103 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 104 of 140

4.4.5. Cargo Vapour Control Procedure on Crude Oil Tankers For ships provided with a Vapour Emission Control System (VECS) as per IMO or USCG regulations, the control of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions (i.e. cargo vapours that have an adverse effect on the environment and act as a precursor to the formation of Tropospheric Ozone – commonly termed “smog”) will be through returning VOC to the shore terminal in accordance with the procedures found in the onboard VECS manual. There are various operational procedures / equipment available that aim at reducing VOC emissions from crude oil tankers. Some of them are briefly described below: 4.4.5.1.

VOCON Procedure

LE

Reference should be made to each vessel’s approved VOC Management Plan (where applicable) as required by Regulation 15 of Annex VI to MARPOL. The proper implementation of the VOCON process would assist in minimizing unnecessary losses of cargo tank pressure and as such it would minimize the need for frequent topping up.

P

During the laden passage and in order to reduce VOC emissions resulted from the release of the build-up of excessive gas pressure and in turn reduce in-transit atmospheric pollution and cargo losses, both venting and vapour loss have to be monitored. Depending on the actual physical properties of the cargo, unnecessary de-pressurization may result in:

2.

the pressure in the ullage spaces to become less than the saturated vapour pressure (equilibrium pressure) of the oil cargo (liquid phase); and the liquid phase of the cargo to produce more saturated hydrocarbon vapours which would end up in the atmosphere. During an average passage a 0.2% of the cargo can be lost through vapour emissions.

M

1.

S

A

Fig. 36 shows a pressure drop profile using the Mast Riser and the inflection in the pressure drop, where the mast riser valve should be manually shut:

Fig. 36: Pressure Drop vs. Time using Mast Riser Inflection of Pressure Drop when Riser Valve is Shut Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.4.5.2.

Page 105 of 140

Vapour Pressure Release Control Valve (VOCON valve)

P

LE

The VOCON valve operates as a hydraulically controlled valve that controls the closing pressure for the valve and therefore undertakes a similar procedure to the manual VOCON procedure as described below. However, for the loading program, the valve also allows a higher pressure to be maintained throughout the loading process in order to limit the extent of vapour evolution from the crude oil once saturated vapour pressure is achieved within the tank vapour system. This valve is normally a single valve facility and located at the bottom of the mast riser by way of a by-pass pipeline to the mast riser control valve. The relevant closing pressure setting for the valve may be done locally or remotely in the Cargo Control Room depending upon the sophistication of the installed system.

M

Fig. 37: Hydraulically Controlled VOCON Valve

A

Similar valves with fixed pressure arrangements are to be found and are currently installed on tankers and located at the same position; namely at the bottom of the mast riser by way of a bypass pipeline to the mast riser control valve. These valves operate as a form of "tank breather" valve but release vapour through the mast riser. 4.4.5.3.

Cargo Pipeline Partial Pressure Control System (KVOC)

S

The purpose of the KVOC system installation is to minimize VOC release to the atmosphere by preventing the generation of VOC during loading and transit. The basic principle of KVOC is to install a new drop pipeline column, specially designed for each tanker with respect to expected loading rate. The new drop pipeline column will normally have an increased diameter compared to an ordinary drop line. This increased diameter will reduce the velocity of the oil inside the column and by ensuring that the pressure adjusts itself to approximately the boiling point of the oil independent of the loading rate. In the initial phase of the loading process, some VOC might be generated. The pressure inside the column will adjust itself to the Saturated Vapour Pressure (SVP) of the oil so that there is a balance between the pressure inside the column and the oil SVP. When this pressure has been obtained in the column the oil will be loaded without any additional VOC generation. This means that KVOC column prevents under pressure to occur in the loading system during charging.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.4.5.4.

Page 106 of 140

Vapour Recovery Systems – Condensation and Absorption Systems

The annual evaporation from oil tankers excess 3.2 million tonnes of oil worldwide, which corresponds to the equivalent cargo of 15-20 VLCCs. VOC recovering units are decreasing loading losses considerably, and completely eliminate transit losses. In addition, the H2S gas levels are kept low, improving the crewmembers’ safety.

LE

This kind of process not only meets environmental regulations, but has also payback benefits. The main operational principal of VOC recovering units is to control the tank pressure during loading in order to reduce evaporation, and to reabsorb evaporated VOC back into the cargo. This is done by relatively simple and lightweight equipment that easily integrates into the ship’s structure and power supply.

A

M

P

.1 Vapour Recovery Systems - Condensation Systems The principle is similar to that of re-liquefaction plants on LPG carriers, i.e. condensation of VOC emitted from cargo tanks. In the process, the VOC passes through a knock out drum before it is pressurized and liquefied in a two stage process. The resulting liquefied gas is stored in a deck tank under pressure and could either be discharged to shore, or be used as fuel (possibly including methane and ethane) for boilers or engines subject to strict safety requirements. It is also conceivable that the stored gas could be used as an alternative to inert gas subject to the Administration's acceptance.

S

Fig. 38: Vapour Condensation System Schematic (Source: IMO)

.2 Vapour Recovery Systems - Absorption Systems The technology is based on the absorption of VOCs in a counter-current flow of crude oil in an absorber column. The vapour is fed into the bottom of the column, with the side stream of crude oil acting as the absorption medium. The oil containing the absorbed VOC is then routed from the bottom of the column back to the loading line where it is mixed with the main crude oil loading stream. Oil pumps and compressors are used to pressurize the oil and gas. Unabsorbed gases are relieved to the riser to increase the recovery efficiency. Similar concepts have been developed using swirl absorbers instead of an absorption column

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 107 of 140

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Fig. 39: Vapour Absorption System Schematic (Source: IMO)

S

A

M

P

.3 Vapour Recovery Systems - Absorption Carbon Vacuum-Regenerated Absorption In the CVA process, the crude oil vapours are filtered through active carbon, which adsorbs the hydrocarbons. Then the carbon is regenerated in order to restore its adsorbing capacity and adsorb hydrocarbons in the next cycle. The pressure in the carbon bed is lowered by a vacuum pump until it reaches the level where the hydrocarbons are desorbed from the carbon. The extracted, very highly concentrated vapours then pass into the absorber, where the gas is absorbed in a stream of crude oil taken from and returned to the cargo tanks.

Fig. 40: Vapour Recovery System with Regenerated Absorption Installed on Tanker (Source: IMO)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 108 of 140

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Fig. 41: Schematic of Vapour Recovery System with Regenerated Absorption (Source: IMO)

P

As carbon bed adsorption systems are normally sensitive to high concentrations of hydrocarbons in the VOC inlet stream, the VOC feed stream first passes through an inlet absorber where some hydrocarbons are removed by absorption. The recovered VOC stream may be reabsorbed in the originating crude oil in the same inlet absorber.

S

A

M

4.4.6. Independent Inert Gas Generator

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.5.

Page 109 of 140

BUNKER MANAGEMENT

4.5.1. Fuel Oil Purchasing

M

P

LE

All fuels are purchased against the internationally recognized standard ISO 8217:2010. In addition, all distillates bunker supplies arranged by the Company should comply with the DMZ specification (as per the ISO 8217:2010) with maximum Sulphur content of 0.1% m/m.

S

A

4.5.2. Fuel Oil Analysis

4.5.3. Sludge Generation Monitoring

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 110 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

4.5.4. Fuel Oil Measurement and Reporting

4.5.5. Fuel Oil Additives Fuel additives are compounds formulated to enhance the quality and efficiency of the fuels used. Environmental legislation to reduce emissions and improve fuel economy is having a great impact on fuel formulations and engine system design. Typical types of additives are metal deactivators, corrosion inhibitors, oxygenates and antioxidants. Fuel performance additives have been delivering flexible and advanced solutions to the ever-changing market environment. Over many years, additive products have demonstrated benefits in marine applications.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 111 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

4.5.6. Fuel Oil Homogenizers

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 112 of 140

LE

4.5.7. Lube Oil Sampling

A

M

P

4.5.8. Measuring and Monitoring NOx, SOx and CO2 Emissions

IT AND OTHER HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT

S

4.6.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.7.

Page 113 of 140

MINIMIZE THE USE OF THE INCINERATOR

The incineration of waste involves the generation of climate-relevant emissions. These are mainly emissions of CO2 as well as N2O, NOx, NH3 (ammonia) and organic carbon, measured as total carbon. CH4 (methane) is not generated in waste incineration during normal operation. It only arises in particular, exceptional cases and to a small extent (from waste remaining in the waste bunker), so that in quantitative terms CH4 is not to be regarded as climate-relevant. CO2 constitutes the chief climate-relevant emission of waste incineration and is considerably higher, by not less than 102, than the other emissions.

4.8.

LE

Ships should make effort to reduce the incinerator ash by minimizing the generation of waste and maximizing recycling opportunities. The remaining quantities of sludge and garbage should be delivered ashore to the extent possible.

PERSONNEL AWARENESS AND TRAINING

P

It has been reported in the industry that even the same ship could differ as much as 12% in energy efficiency from one crew to another. This means that without a diligent involvement of each crew member, energy is lost. Company’s personnel (ashore and onboard) should be aware of the energy management procedures and initiatives that are in place with the aim of continually improving energy efficiency. Therefore, the following actions should be implemented:

M

Energy Efficiency Best Practices

S

A

Shipboard Familiarization

Training

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.9.

Page 114 of 140

VESSEL SUSTAINABILITY NOTATIONS

4.9.1. Environmental Notations Environmental legislation will become increasingly strict over the next few years with regards to air emissions (such as SOx and NOx) and sea pollution (such as bilge and ballast water and waste oil). By adopting the Environmental Class Notations the Company chooses to comply with all voluntary regulations for environmental protection, as well as a set of additional criteria which clearly demonstrate the Company’s commitment towards continually improving its environment performance.

LE

The voluntary Environmental Class Notations are limiting the emissions of harmful pollutants, and the probability and consequences of accidents. The Environmental Class Notation contains requirements stipulating how to control and limit operational air emissions and sea discharges. 4.9.2. Green Passport

P

A green passport is a term that came about through the Basel Convention and following discussions over safer ship recycling. The idea of a green passport requires from all vessels to carry a document listing all the potentially hazardous materials onboard.

S

A

M

Having such a document would ensure that no workers onboard or at the ship-breaking yard would have to take the risk of being exposed to dangerous materials such as asbestos, PCBs, TBTs and others. In 2009 the Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships was held in Hong Kong. The convention turned the ‘green passport’ into an ‘inventory of hazardous materials’ as it is now better known. Once the Hong Kong Convention enters into force, all vessels over 500 GT worldwide will have to carry onboard this inventory of hazardous materials (or green passport as it was previously known). The inventory will list all known hazardous materials and their locations onboard, thereby ensuring the safety of crew and workers.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 115 of 140

5. FLEET ENERGY EFFICIENCY MONITORING / BENCHMARKING 5.1.

VOLUNTARY INDEXING

The Company has decided to adopt voluntary indexing of its ships’ environmental performance by using the EEOI as defined by IMO. A Rolling Average Index of the EEOI values may also be calculated to monitor energy efficiency of a ship over operational time. Guidelines for the calculation of a ship’s EEOI are provided in Annex I. Furthermore, the Company has adopted additional monitoring tools for calculating the SOx and the NOx emitted from its ships’ operation. Guidelines for the subject formulae are provided in Annex II and III respectively. BENCHMARKING

LE

5.1.

The Company is carrying out internal and external benchmarking as regards ship energy efficiency. The EEOI for every vessel is benchmarked against other fleet vessels of the same type with the aim of identifying energy improvement opportunities. In addition, the average EEOI for our fleet vessel types is benchmarked against industry available data. DATA COLLECTION

P

5.2.

M

The implementation of benchmarking relies on accurate and verifiable data. Since collection of quality data is normally a practical issue, it is important that the available data sources are identified and used. For ship performance benchmarking / rating purposes, the following data sources shall be used: • Ship’s technical specification. • Speed trial reports. • Engine’s “NOx Technical File” that includes engines’ performance data. • Operational data logs. • Data from dedicated trials.

A

To ensure consistency, benchmarking should be carried out using either commissioning trial data (design rating) or data from dedicated in-service trials (operation rating). For engines, shop test data and data from dedicated in-service trials may be used. DATA CORRECTION

S

5.3.

To enable effective and wider use of ship performance benchmarking / rating, it should be carried out under standard reference conditions. The standard reference conditions should specify the following as a minimum: • Ship draught (normally the design draught). • Standard reference ship speed (normally a fixed speed per ship type). • Reference fuel. • Reference ambient conditions, normally taken as operation in calm water and low / zero wind and at a reference sea water and air temperatures.

If the data available relate to any other condition, they should be corrected to the reference conditions for use in the benchmarking / rating schemes. To avoid complications due to sea state and wind, it would be best to carry out dedicated trials in calm sea and with low wind velocity. Alternatively, internationally acceptable standard procedure such as ISO 15016 or other industry accepted practices may be used for data correction purposes. Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 116 of 140

6. SYNOPSIS Table 1 presents the Energy Efficiency Measures (EEMs) the Company has either already adopted or are under consideration to be adopted in the future, aiming at improvement of the Ship Energy Efficiency.

Energy Saving Measure Optimized Voyage Planning The optimum route and improved efficiency can be achieved through the careful planning and execution of the voyages.

Ref. 4.1.3

4.1.2

Ref.

4.1.6

Energy Saving Measure Weather Routing Software availability / weather charts / consideration of current and tide optimization. “Just in Time” / Virtual Arrival Virtual Arrival involves reducing speed to meet a revised arrival time. The reduction in speed will result in lower fuel consumption and reduced GHG emissions. Propulsion Hydrodynamic Improvement Devices New designs to deliver greater fuel economy.

A

4.2.1.2

Propeller Polishing Hull Cleaning Propeller polishing should be carried Hull cleaning should be carried out based out when possible. The polishing on a condition assessment basis. standard should be of no less than Rupert B on any parts, confirmed by the polishing provider. Resistance Monitoring Programs Software to compare the actual performance of the ship to the sea trial performance when it was built with a completely clean and smooth hull.

4.2.2

M

P

Trim & Ballast Optimization Each draught has an assigned best trim.

4.1.5

Energy Saving Measure Speed Selection Optimization Speed reduction may reduce emissions, when Charter Party terms permit. Encourage the ship to operate at optimum speed in order to maximize energy efficiency. Optimized Heading Control / Autopilot Function Minimize the distance sailed “off track”.

S

4.2.3.

4.2.1.1

4.1.4

4.1.1

Ref.

LE

Table 1: Synopsis of Energy Efficiency Measures

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

4.3.3 4.3.5.4

4.3.1.3 4.3.1.6 4.3.6

M/E Fuel Injection Slide Valves Installation of fuel valves of sliding type in order to achieve significant savings, lower emissions and lower fuel consumption. The slide fuel valves both optimize the combustion of the fuel and ensure a cleaner engine.

4.3.4

P

BMT Smart Power Monitoring System Advanced onboard real-time performance monitoring and reporting system which acquires data from ship sensors in order to display ship performance information to the crew. D/G Performance Monitoring System D/G performance monitoring is established within the PMS and it is carried out on a monthly basis aiming at early identification of any deteriorating trend in the performance of the D/Gs.

A

Revision No. 0

Ref.

Energy Saving Measure CoCos-EDS Performance Monitoring System Alternative to KYMA Performance Monitoring System.

LE

4.3.1.2

Energy Saving Measure MAN PMI System System to monitor M/E cylinders’ pressure.

M

M/E Performance Monitoring System M/E performance monitoring is established within the PMS and it is carried out on a monthly basis. It includes recording and reviewing of M/E operating parameters (using KYMA Diesel Analyzer where applicable) as well as regular assessment / inspection of M/E parts. Part Load and Low Load Operation The increased demand for continuous running in slow speeds has lead the industry to consider technical systems and modifications to marine Diesel engines, in order to operate the machinery plant for long periods of time at low or ultra-low speeds.

Ref.

4.3.1.5

Energy Saving Measure KYMA Performance Monitoring System M/E and D/G combustion parameters are regularly monitored in detail. Hull performance and shaft power requirement are measured. Cylinder pressure monitoring and software for decision support for optimized operation is recommended. Shaft Torque Meters Digital measuring system using a laser beam for detection of shaft torque, shaft RPM and consequently the transferred power.

S

4.3.5

4.3.2

4.3.1.4

4.3.1.1

Ref.

Page 117 of 140

SEC Measuring and Monitoring System Performance monitoring suite that monitors fuel consumption rate and shaft horsepower and provides realtime data. Installation of Electronically Controlled Main Engines Improved efficiency in almost all loads, smokeless operation, NOx reduction, enhanced reliability and less CO2 emissions.

Installation of De-rated Engines Better fuel efficiency, NOx compliance. Retrofitting of the propeller is required for existing ships and improved selection for new-buildings is decisive.

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Revision No. 0

Optimum Cargo Pumps Operation The minimum number of pumps to be used for maintaining the pressure at ship’s manifolds. Operation of two pumps close to their full capacity is more efficient than using three pumps at reduced RPM.

4.3.8 4.3.11 4.3.14

On-Shore Power Supply (Cold Ironing) Use on-shore power, whenever circumstances allow.

4.4.3

4.3.7.5 4.3.13 4.4.2

Ref.

Energy Saving Measure D/G Engine Load Optimization and Electric Load Demand Minimization Optimum E/R Fans / Pumps Operation – Voltage Unbalance Review electric load analysis and operate system pumps accordingly. Use port cooling pumps at port or anchorage, when available. Minimize piping system resistance when possible. Review air balance study and operate E/R fans accordingly. Compressed Air System Operate service and/or control air compressors for E/R control pneumatic loads and deck service loads. Operate main air compressors only for keeping main air receivers pressurized for engine starting.

LE

P

HVAC System Optimization and Load Factor - Thermostat Adjustment Set the air inlet thermostat to 23 deg. C in the summer and 21 deg. C in the winter.

A

Lighting Loads It is estimated that the use of energy saving light bulbs will save 33 megawatts per year per ship. Replacement of Incandescent Bulbs with Fluorescent Tubes Cargo Heating & Temperature Control Optimization Optimization of cargo temperature taking into consideration cargo/voyage specific heating and Charterer / Cargo Receiver requirements.

Issue No. 1

Energy Saving Measure Cylinder Oil Feed Rate Optimization (FRO) / Scrapedown Analysis Scrapedown samples are analyzed in order to identify the optimum cylinder oil feed rate resulting in reduced consumption without affecting wear rate.

M

Waste Heat Recovery – Exhaust Gas Economizer (EGE) Maintenance EGE proper maintenance not only improves energy efficiency but also reduces maintenance overall costs and reduces safety risks associated with soot fires.

Ref.

4.3.10

Energy Saving Measure Main Engine Cylinder Oil and Lubrication Control • Alpha lubricator or • Hans Jensen Lubricator System or • Pulse Lubricating System • Vogel Central Lubrication for reduction of Cylinder Oil consumption

S

4.4.1

4.3.12

4.3.9

4.3.7

Ref.

Page 118 of 140

Renewable and / or Alternative Energy Sources Use of Wind Power, Use of Solar Power, Use of alternative fuel. Auxiliary Boilers Maintenance Auxiliary boilers operation to be optimized minimizing unnecessary fuel consumption Steam production and fuel oil consumption to follow maker’s instruction manual.

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

4.4.6 4.5.3 4.5.6 4.6

Measuring and Monitoring NOx, SOx and CO2 Emissions Use of NOx, SOx and CO2 monitoring devices.

A

4.5.8

Ref.

Energy Saving Measure Independent Inert Gas Generator Installation of independent IG generator limits the use of larger generators / boilers.

LE

Bunker Management – Fuel Oil Analysis Fuel samples are analyzed for every bunkering. Review FO analysis reports with instructions are forwarded to the vessels, as necessary. Appropriate corrective action to be taken in case out of spec bunkers are delivered onboard. Fuel Oil Additives FO additives improve the M/E combustion, performance and efficiency.

P

4.4.5

Energy Saving Measure Cargo Vapour Emission Control Procedure on Crude Oil Tankers Implementation of VOC Management Plan as required by Regulation 15 of Annex VI of MARPOL.

M

Fuel Oil Measurement & Reporting / Fuel Oil Purifiers Flow meter accuracy measurements / Optimum selection of purifier gravity discs. Lube Oil Sampling The quality of LO of some vessel’s equipment should be regularly monitored in order to minimize the risk of catastrophic equipment failure.

4.5.2

Bunker Management – Fuel Oil Purchasing Purchasing only fuel meeting ISO 8217:2010 standard.

Ref.

4.5.5

Energy Saving Measure Steam Distribution and Condensate Return System – Insulation Maintenance Piping insulation should be regularly inspected.

Sludge Generation Monitoring The average ratio % of sludge generated / HFO consumed not to exceed 1.50%, through continuous monitoring of the waste stream development. Fuel Oil Homogenizers Installation of FO Homogenizers improves FO quality and reduces sludge production. IT & Other Household Equipment Replacement The policy of installing “energy saving” devices should also be applied to the procurement of other household devices such as refrigerators, microwave ovens, washing & drying machines.

S

4.5.7

4.5.4

4.5.1

4.4.4

Ref.

Page 119 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) Energy Saving Measure Personnel Awareness and Training The personnel onboard taking the readings should be aware of the importance of the tasks.

Ref.

Energy Saving Measure Sustainability Certificates Green Passport / CleanShip, ENVIRO, ENVIRO+ and CLEAN Notations Certificates for green ship construction, operation and recycling.

P

LE

4.9

Ref.

4.8

Energy Saving Measure Minimize the Use of Incinerator Ships should make effort to reduce the incinerator ash by minimizing the generation of waste and maximizing recycling opportunities. Sludge generation should be minimized by the use of purifiers and homogenizers. The rest inevitable quantities of sludge and garbage should be delivered ashore. Energy Audit / Energy Consumption Survey Independent survey, assessment and recommendations for energy consumption and efficiency of the ship.

S

A

M

Glossary of Terms

4.7

Ref.

Page 120 of 140

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 121 of 140

ANNEX I – GUIDELINES FOR CALCULATION OF THE SHIP’S ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPERATIONAL INDICATOR (EEOI)

1.

GENERAL

2.

LE

IMO Assembly adopted the Resolution A.963(23) on IMO policies and practices related to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from ships, which requested the MEPC to develop greenhouse gas emission guidelines and indices for ships. The MEPC has introduced the Energy Efficiency Operational Indicator (EEOI) and guidelines are provided through the MEPC.1 /Circ.684. The methodology and the use of EEOI, as described below, provide a transparent and recognized approach for assessment of the GHG efficiency of a ship with respect to CO2 emissions. DATA AND DOCUMENTATION PROCEDURES

3.

P

Primary data sources selected could be the ship’s logbook (bridge logbook, engine logbook, deck logbook and other official records). The collection of ship data includes the quantity (in metric tonnes) and type of fuel used, the cargo carried (in metric tonnes) and the distance (in nautical miles) corresponding to the transported cargo. CALCULATION OF EEOI

M

In its most simple form the EEOI is defined as the ratio of mass of CO2 (M) emitted per unit of transport work: Indicator = MCO2/(transport work) The basic expression for EEOI for a voyage is defined as:

∑ FC × C j

A

EEOI =

Fj

j

S

(1) mc argo × D Where average of the indicator for a period or for a number of voyages is obtained, the Indicator is calculated as:

Average EEOI =

∑ ∑ (FC i

ij

× CFj )

j

∑ i

(2)

(m c arg o,i × Di )

Where: ƒ j is the fuel type; ƒ i is the voyage number; ƒ FCij is the mass of consumed fuel j at voyage i (metric tonnes); ƒ CFj is a non-dimensional conversion factor between fuel j consumption measured in grams and CO2 emission also measured in grams based on carbon content. The value of CF is given in Table 6; ƒ mcargo,i is the cargo mass carried during voyage i (metric tonnes); and ƒ Di is the distance in nautical miles corresponding to the cargo carried during voyage i. Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 122 of 140

The unit of EEOI depends on the measurement of cargo carried e.g. tonnes CO2 / (tonnes x nautical miles). It must be noted that Equation (2) does not give a simple average of EEOI among number of voyage i. Table 2: Fuel Mass to CO2 Mass Conversion Factors (CF) CF (t-CO2/t-Fuel) 3.206000

Light Fuel Oil (LFO)

ISO 8217 Grades RMA through RMD

0.86

3.151040

Heavy Fuel Oil (HFO)

ISO 8217 Grades RME through RMK

0.85

3.114400

Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)

Propane

0.819

3.000000

0.827

3.030000

0.75

2.750000

Reference

Diesel / Gas Oil

Butane

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)

LE

ISO 8217 Grades DMX through DMC

Carbon Content 0.875

Type of fuel

P

Data on fuel consumption / cargo carried and distance sailed in a continuous sailing pattern will be collected in the ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FORM contained in Annex V. NOTES:

3. 4.

S

5.

M

2.

Ballast voyages, as well as voyages which are not used for transport of cargo, such as voyage for docking service (mcargo =0), should also be included. Voyages for the purpose of securing the safety of a ship or saving life at sea should be excluded. Fuel consumption (FC) is defined as all fuel consumed at sea and in port for a voyage or for a period in question, e.g. a day, by main and auxiliary engines, boilers and incinerators. Distance sailed (D) means the actual distance sailed in nautical miles (deck log-book data) for the voyage or period in question. Voyage generally means the period between the departure from a port to the departure from the next port. Alternative definitions of a voyage could also be acceptable. The CO2 indicator may be converted from g/tonne-mile to g/tonne-km by multiplication by 0.54.

A

1.

4.

EXAMPLE

An example including two ballast and two laden voyages, for illustration purposes only, is provided below. The example illustrates the application of the formula based on the data entered in the relevant fields of the ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FORM. The formula (2) is applied as follows:

EEOI =

2300 × 3,114,400 + 19 × 3,206,000 = 2.43 (5,100 × 250,000) + (0 × 5,000) + (6,500 × 262,000) + (6,800 × 0)

Unit: gr CO2/(tonnes x nautical miles).

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 123 of 140

CO2 EMISSIONS CALCULATION (ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPERATIONAL INDICATOR-E.E.O.I)

LE

Fuel consumption (FC) in tonnes (M/E, A/E, Boiler, Incinerator) Type of Fuel - ISO Specification ISO 8217 ISO 8217 Grades ISO 8217 Grades Grades DMX RME through RMΑ through RMD through DMC RMK

PRODUCT (Tonnes Nautical Miles)

Voyage data

VOYAGE No.

Diesel / Gasoil (Tonnes)

Heavy Fuel Οil (HFO) (Tonnes)

1

2

480

250,000

Distance (D) (Νautical Μiles) 5,100

2

5

490

0

5,000

3

2

700

262,000

6,500

4

10

630

0

6,800

512,000

23,400

… …

P

A

6

M

5

Light Fuel Οil (LFO) (Tonnes)

FD

FHFO

FLFO

Cargo (mcargo) (Tonnes)

(mcargo x D) 1,275,000,000 1,703,000,000

S

TOTAL 19 2,300 0 Σ(mcargo xD) 2,978,000,000 NOTE: The term VOYAGE refers to the period between a departure from a port to the departure from the next port (both Ballast & Laden voyages). Voyages for the purpose of securing the safety of a ship or saving life at sea are excluded. ONLY voyages which have been completed during the quarter (i.e. departure ->departure) are reported.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 124 of 140

ANNEX II – GUIDELINES FOR CALCULATION OF THE SHIP’S SOx EMISSIONS

1.

GENERAL

Ship-generated SOx emissions are defined as the amount of sulphur oxides produced by the combustion of fuel in ship's diesel engines. 2.

DATA AND DOCUMENTATION PROCEDURES

3.

LE

The amount of sulphur oxides emitted to the atmosphere is almost directly proportional to the amount of sulphur in the fuel (% m/m) burnt in the vessel's engines. Therefore primary data sources for the assessment of ship's SOx emissions performance should be the ship’s bunkering related records (i.e. bunkering operations log, bunker delivery notes, etc.) which provide a clear view of the fuel type1, quality (in terms of sulphur content) and quantity received by the ship over a given period (e.g. quarterly, biannually). CALCULATION OF SOxI

M

P

Taking into account the proportional interrelation of SOx emissions and the % sulphur content of the fuel burnt in order to assess the ship's SOx emissions performance, it is important to calculate the weighted average of the % of sulphur content (% m/m) of each type of fuel (e.g. HFO, MDO, LSFO) received by the vessel over a given period. This assessment is based on the simplification that the fuel received (type, quantity, quality) during the reported period is the same in terms of type, quantity and quality with the fuel used for propulsion and auxiliary services (auxiliary generators, boilers). Despite the fact that this process imposes a certain degree of uncertainty to the calculations, the errors over a continuous reporting period are smoothed out and become negligible. The weighted average of the sulphur content of each type of fuel used is calculated by the following equation: Sx =

∑ (A

x, j

× B x, j )

j =1

(1)

n

∑ (A

x, j )

j =1

S

A

n

where,

1

ƒ

x is the fuel type (e.g. HFO, LSFO, MDO etc.) received by the vessel;

ƒ

n is the number of bunkering operations in the reporting period;

ƒ

Sx is the weighted average of % sulphur content of fuel type x;

ƒ

Ax,j is the quantity of fuel of type x received during bunkering operation j;

ƒ

Bx,j is the sulphur content (% m/m) of fuel type x received during bunkering operation j (as per the Bunker Delivery Note received by the vessel).

Fuel Oil type categorization as per ISO 8217 Standard.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 125 of 140

However, in order to assess the vessel’s environmental impact, the following two formulae are used: n

k

i =1

x =1

∑ ∑ (FC

SO 2I = 0.02 ×

i, x

(2)

n

∑ (m

× Si, x )

c arg o,i

× Di )

i =1

where, Si,x is the weighted average of % sulphur content of fuel type x calculated by equation (1);

ƒ

x is the fuel type;

ƒ

i is the voyage number;

ƒ

FCi,x is the mass of consumed fuel x during voyage i [metric tonnes];

ƒ

mcargo,i is the carried cargo mass during voyage i [metric tonnes]; and

ƒ

Di is the distance in nautical miles corresponding to the voyage i

LE

ƒ

P

The following expression is also found in the literature and gives the equivalent sulphur content per tonne-nautical mile: k

i =1

x =1

∑ ∑ (FC

i, x

∑ (m

× Si, x )

(3)

n

M

SOxI =

n

c arg o,i

× Di )

i =1

A

Note that equation (2) is exact and provides the equivalent SO2 emissions (which occur because of the occurring chemical reactions during the combustion of hydrocarbons in Marine Diesel Engines) in tonnes SO2 per tonne nautical mile. Nonetheless, in order to convert the results to equivalent grams SO2 / tonne nautical mile, equation (2) should by multiplied by 106 [g/tonne].

S

All required data (i.e. bunkering operations during the period of question, type and quantity of fuel oil received in the same period, % S content of fuel), will be collected by the ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FORM included in Annex V. Once the above bunkering operations data are entered correctly, the form automatically calculates the weighted average of sulphur content of each type of fuel received onboard during the reporting period.

4.

EXAMPLE

In the below table (which is a screenshot of the ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FORM) the vessel has conducted 2 bunkering operations on 25/1 and 15/2 respectively. The bunkering operations data (quantity and % sulphur content) for each type of fuel received onboard are entered by the C/E in the appropriate fields of the table (see below). The formula (3) is applied as follows: (500 × 3.15 + 50 × 0.10) + (700 × 2.95 + 45 × 0.10) 106 SOxI = ⋅ = 0.029 100 (5,100 × 250,000) + (0 × 6,000) Unit: gr SOx/(tonnes x nautical miles). Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 126 of 140

SOx EMISSIONS CALCULATION

BUNKERING No.

DATE

HEAVY FUEL OIL (HFO) RECEIVED (TONNES)

HFO sulphur content (%) acc. to BDN

25/1

500

3.15

# 2 (if applicable)

15/2

700

2.95

DIESEL OIL/GAS OIL RECEIVED (TONNES)

DO sulphur content (%) acc. to BDN

50

0.1

45

0.1

LIGHT FUEL OIL (LFO) RECEIVED (TONNES)

LFO sulphur content (%) acc. to BDN

P

# 1 (if applicable)

LE

BUNKERING OPERATIONS DURING REPORTING PERIOD - QUARTER 1 (If any, otherwise leave blank)

# 3 (if applicable) # 4 (if applicable)

M

# 5 (if applicable) # 6 (if applicable)

A

TOTAL HFO (tonnes)

TOTAL DO (tonnes)

TOTAL LFO (tonnes)

95

0

1200

AVERAGE % SULPHUR CONTENT IN DIESEL OIL SD= %

0.10

AVERAGE % SULPHUR CONTENT IN LIGHT FUEL OIL SLFO= %

S

AVERAGE % SULPHUR CONTENT IN HEAVY FUEL OIL SHFO= %

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

3.03

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 127 of 140

ANNEX III – GUIDELINES FOR CALCULATION OF THE SHIP’S NOx EMISSIONS

1.

GENERAL

NOx emissions are defined as the amount of NOx produced by the ship’s Main Engine. 2.

DATA AND DOCUMENTATION PROCEDURES

LE

Primary data sources selected could be the ship’s log-book (bridge log-book, engine log-book, deck log-book, Engine’s technical file and other official records). The collection of data from ships includes the quantity (in metric tonnes) of fuel used, the cargo carried (in metric tonnes), the distance (in nautical miles) corresponding to the transported cargo, the main engines and diesel generators’ operating hours, the main engine’s average power (in kW), the diesel generator’s average power (in kW) and the certified NOx emissions per kWh of main engine and diesel generators for corresponding power/RPM. CALCULATION OF NOxI

P

3.

The basic expression for NOxI for a voyage is defined as: n

M

∑ (H

ME,i

NOxI =

× PME,i × E ME,i )

i=1

n

∑ (m

c arg o,i

× Di )

i=1

A

Where:

i is the voyage number; ΗME,i is the main engine’s operating hours during voyage i; PME,i is the main engine’s power for average RPM during the voyage i; EME,i is the certified NOx emissions per KWh for given RPM for the main engine during voyage i; mcargo,i is the cargo mass carried during voyage i (metric tonnes); and Di is the distance in nautical miles corresponding to the cargo carried during voyage i.

S

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

All required data i.e. engine power, cargo carried distance sailed, etc. will be collected in the ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FORM contained in Annex V.

NOTES:

1. 2.

Ballast voyages, as well as voyages which are not used for transport of cargo, such as voyage for docking service (mcargo =0), should also be included. Voyages for the purpose of securing the safety of a ship or saving life at sea should be excluded. Distance sailed (D) means the actual distance sailed in nautical miles (deck log-book data) for the voyage or period in question.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

3.

Page 128 of 140

4.

Voyage generally means the period between the departure from a port to the departure from the next port. Alternative definitions of a voyage could also be acceptable. The NOx emissions per kWh are provided in the engines’ “NOx Technical File”.

4.

EXAMPLE

LE

In the table below (which is a screenshot of the ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FORM) depicts the vessel’s M/E running hours equal to 1862 during the reporting period and the total revolutions which are counted and equal to 8955515. The RPM of the M/E for this period is automatically calculated (i.e. 80.2 RPM). The M/E’s NOx emissions for the calculated RPM derive from the M/E’s Engine International Air Pollution Prevention Certificate (NOx technical file relevant table, i.e. 15 gr NOx/kWh). The M/E’s operating power (nominal) for the calculated RPM is derived from M/E’s manufacturer’s manual (i.e. 10535 kW). The form automatically calculates the NOx emitted by the vessel per tonne x mile (i.e. 0.099 gr NOx/tonne x mile). NOx EMISSIONS CALCULATION

80.2

15

M

P

(M/E TOTAL RUNNING HOURS IN QUARTER 1) HT=

RPM

NOX EMISSIONS (gr NOx/kWh) FOR GIVEN RPM (see Note 2 below)

8955515

A

(M/E TOTAL REVOLUTIONS COUNT IN QUARTER 1) RT=

1862

S

Note 2: Average Certified ΝΟx emissions per KWh for given RPM from Engine International Air Pollution Prevention Certificate, or if not available, the upper considered limit from MARPOL 73/78 Annex VI (i.e. 17 gr NOx/ kWh) M/E OPERATING POWER FOR GIVEN RPM in kW (See Note 3 below)

10535

Note 3: Average Main Engine Operating Power for given RPM – refer to Manufacturer’s Manual. NOx EMISSIONS DURING QUARTER 1 (gr NOx)

294242550

NOx EMISSIONS (gr NOx) PER TONNE N. MILE

0.099

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 129 of 140

ANNEX IV – ENERGY EFFICIENCY BEST PRACTICES

A number of best practices which generally help towards increasing the energy efficiency of Company ships and their systems have been identified. These are categorized below:

M

P

LE

Propulsion System

S

A

Diesel Generators and Electric Distribution System

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 130 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

Auxiliary Boilers, Steam Distribution and Condensate Return System

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 131 of 140

M

P

LE

Compressed Air System

S

A

Auxiliary machinery

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 132 of 140

LE

HVAC System

S

A

M

P

Lighting Loads

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 133 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

Accommodation

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Page 134 of 140

ANNEX V - ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FORM

LE

This form is kept in electronic format. A screenshot is included for reference only.

YEAR:

WELCOME TO THE VESSEL'S ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE REPORTING WORKBOOK

P

VESSEL NAME (Select from dropdown list):

VESSEL

M

The purpose of this form is to gather all necessary data in order to evaluate vessel's environmental performance with emphasis to aerial emissions (CO2,SOx,NOx)

QUARTER 2

QUARTER 3

QUARTER 4

S

QUARTER 1

A

Vessel's performance data is collected on a QUARTERLY basis by completion of the relevant Report. All cells highlighted with grey color are calculated automatically. NO DATA SHOULD BE ENTERED IN THESE CELLS. In order to complete the quarterly Report click below on the respective reporting Quarter:

VESSEL's YEAR ( Please enter the year that best reflects the vessel's M/E year of installation or the year of M/E major conversion):

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 135 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 136 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 137 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 138 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 139 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Page 140 of 140

S

A

M

P

LE

SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP)

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


COMPANYNAME

S

A

M

P

LE

Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) PART B M/T “VSLNAME” IMO No. 9999999

CONTINUOUSLY IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 2 of 81

MANUAL CONTROL

Holder’s Name

Approved by

S

A

M

P

LE

Manual / Copy No.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 3 of 81

RECORD OF REVISIONS

Revision Date

Description of Change

Approved by

S

A

M

P

LE

New Revision Number

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 4 of 81

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE MANUAL CONTROL................................................................................................... 2 RECORD OF REVISIONS .......................................................................................... 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS .............................................................................................. 4 VESSEL PARTICULARS .................................................................................... 6

2.

SHIP-SPECIFIC MEASURES FOR IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY......... 7

LE

1.

S

A

M

P

Speed Selection Optimization.............................................................................. 7 Optimized Voyage Planning................................................................................. 8 Weather Routing .................................................................................................. 9 Optimized Heading Control................................................................................ 10 Trim and Ballast Optimization ............................................................................ 11 Just in Time Arrival / Virtual Arrival .................................................................... 12 Propeller Polishing ............................................................................................. 13 Hull Cleaning...................................................................................................... 14 Pre-Swirl Stator.................................................................................................. 15 Mewis Duct ........................................................................................................ 16 Wake Equalizing Duct (Schneekluth)................................................................. 17 Sumitomo Integrated Lammeren Duct (SILD).................................................... 18 Propeller Boss Cap Fins (PBCF) ....................................................................... 19 Ax-Bow Shape ................................................................................................... 20 Rudder Surf Bulb (Costa Bulb) .......................................................................... 21 Silicon Anti-Fouling Paint ................................................................................... 22 Controllable Pitch Propellers (CPP)................................................................... 23 Contra Rotating Propellers................................................................................. 24 Pre-Swirl Fins..................................................................................................... 25 Resistance Monitoring Program (CASPER) ...................................................... 26 KYMA Performance Monitoring System ............................................................ 27 KYMA Diesel Analyzer....................................................................................... 28 MAN B&W PMI System ..................................................................................... 29 CoCoS-Engine Diagnostics Software ................................................................ 30 Shaft Torque / Thrust Meters ............................................................................. 31 BMT Smart Power Monitoring System............................................................... 32 SEC Measuring and Monitoring System ............................................................ 33 M/E Performance Monitoring System ................................................................ 34 D/G Performance Monitoring System ................................................................ 35 Installation of Electronically Controlled Main Engine ......................................... 36 Part-Load Optimized Main Engine ..................................................................... 37 Turbocharger Cut-out......................................................................................... 38 Cylinder Cut-out ................................................................................................. 39 Fuel Injection Slide Valves................................................................................. 40 Installation of De-rated Main Engine.................................................................. 41 Alpha Lubricator System.................................................................................... 42 Pulse Lubricating System (PLS) ........................................................................ 43 Hans Jensen Lubricator System ........................................................................ 44

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 5 of 81

PAGE

S

A

M

P

LE

Vogel (CLU 4 Zentral) Lubricator System .......................................................... 45 Cylinder Oil Feed Rate Optimization (FRO) / Scrapedown Analysis ................. 46 Efficient Use of E/R Pumps and Fans................................................................ 47 Efficient Use of E/R Pumps................................................................................ 48 Efficient Use of E/R Fans................................................................................... 49 Elimination of Voltage Unbalance ...................................................................... 50 Exhaust Gas Economizer (EGE) Maintenance.................................................. 51 Composite Boiler................................................................................................ 52 Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning (HVAC) System Optimization............... 53 Compressed Air System Optimization ............................................................... 54 Lighting Management ........................................................................................ 55 Replacement of Incandescent Lamps................................................................ 56 On-shore Power Supply (Cold Ironing) .............................................................. 57 Renewable and / or Alternative Energy Sources ............................................... 58 Cargo Temperature Control Optimization .......................................................... 59 Cargo Pumps Operation Optimization ............................................................... 60 FRAMO Pumps.................................................................................................. 61 MARFLEX Pumps.............................................................................................. 62 Auxiliary Boiler Maintenance.............................................................................. 63 Steam & Condensate Return Piping Insulation Maintenance ............................ 64 VOC Emission Control (VOCON Procedure)..................................................... 65 VOCON Valve.................................................................................................... 66 Cargo Vapour Recovery System ....................................................................... 67 Independent Inert Gas Generator ...................................................................... 68 Fuel Oil Purchasing............................................................................................ 69 Fuel Oil Analysis ................................................................................................ 70 Sludge Generation Monitoring ........................................................................... 71 Fuel Oil Measurement and Reporting / Fuel Oil Purifiers .................................. 72 Fuel Oil Additives ............................................................................................... 73 Fuel Oil Homogenizers ...................................................................................... 74 Lube Oil Sampling.............................................................................................. 75 Measuring and Monitoring NOx, SOx and CO2 Emissions ............................... 76 IT and other Household Equipment Replacement ............................................. 77 Minimize Incinerator Use ................................................................................... 78 Personnel Awareness and Training ................................................................... 79 Environmental Notations / Green Passport........................................................ 80 Energy Audits..................................................................................................... 81

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 6 of 81

1. VESSEL PARTICULARS

Ship’s Name:

VSLNAME

Ship’s Type: Flag: Port of Registry: Call Sign: IMO Number:

9999999

LE

Classification: Gross Tonnage: Net Tonnage: Built by: Year Built:

P

Hull Number: Length O.A.: Length B.P.:

M

Breadth (mld.): Depth (mld.):

Summer Load Draught (extr.): Deadweight (Summer):

A

Navigation Area: Service Speed:

Main Engine Particulars:

S

Maker: Model: MCR:

RPM (at MCR): NCR: RPM (at NCR):

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 7 of 81

2. SHIP-SPECIFIC MEASURES FOR IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY Speed Selection Optimization (see Part A 4.1.1) Responsible personnel ashore:

Operations Department / Operator or Manager.

Master / Chief Engineer.

Records:

Daily Noon Reports / Passage Plans / Voyage Abstracts

Implementation Period:

Continuous (whenever possible and taking into account Charter Party restrictions and safe navigation).

Target:

- During ballast voyages: Reduce vessel’s speed to be within ±0.5 knots of the vessel’s Practical Economical Speed.

P

LE

Responsible personnel onboard:

M

- During laden voyages: Taking into account the restrictions imposed by the Charter Party, optimize the speed in order to keep the used fuel per tonne-mile at a minimum level so as to ultimately reduce time spent in anchorage or drifting at waiting areas annually by 1%.

S

A

Monitoring Method:

Notes / Follow-up: •

The Operator should provide the desired ETA at ports to allow the ship's crew to better manage the speed and fuel consumption of the vessel.

• • •

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME� Optimized Voyage Planning (see Part A 4.1.2) Responsible personnel ashore:

Page 8 of 81

Operations Department / Operator or Manager.

Master / Chief Officer / Navigation Officers.

Records:

Passage Plans / Noon Reports / Voyage Performance Reports.

Implementation Period:

Continuous.

Target:

For cross-ocean voyages the plotting of the intended route to be done using the Great Circle methodology (WSNP), taking into account weather forecast and prevailing currents or consulting the weather routing software (if applicable), in order to achieve the most favorable voyage conditions.

Monitoring Method:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow up:

P

LE

Responsible personnel onboard:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME” Weather Routing (see Part A 4.1.3) Responsible personnel ashore:

Page 9 of 81

Operations Department.

Master.

Records:

Post-voyage analysis report.

Implementation Period:

During transoceanic crossings.

Target:

Maximize the use of Weather Routing services, when possible, to minimize fuel consumption.

A

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Responsible personnel onboard:

Notes / Follow up:

S

During the voyage, the Master should contact the Company or the Weather Routing Provider (WRP), if the experienced weather differs from the forecasted weather.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 10 of 81

Optimized Heading Control (see Part A 4.1.4) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 11 of 81

Trim and Ballast Optimization (see Part A 4.1.5) Operations Department/ Operator Responsible personnel ashore: Technical Department/ Superintendent Engineers. Responsible personnel onboard:

Master / Chief Officer.

Implementation Period:

M

Monitoring Method:

P

Target:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 12 of 81

Just in Time Arrival / Virtual Arrival

Implementation Period: Target:

Record time while in: − Sea Passage - Ballast − Sea Passage - Laden − Anchored / drifting The waiting (idle) and ballast time to be monitored.

M

Notes / Follow-up:

Master/ Chief Officer/ Chief Engineer.

P

Monitoring Method:

Operations Department/ Operator, Charterer.

LE

(see Part A 4.1.6) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records:

A

The concept of Virtual Arrival is about identifying delays at discharge ports so as to better manage the vessel's arrival time by managing/reducing the vessel's speed, aiming to reduced fuel consumption and emissions.

S

Anyone involved in the decision making process should be aware of the cost/benefit before defining a ship's arrival time. Small speed adjustments can save huge amounts of energy. The relationship between speed and fuel consumption should be considered during the voyage planning process.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME” Propeller Polishing (see Part A 4.2.1.1) Responsible personnel ashore:

Page 13 of 81

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers

Responsible personnel onboard:

Master, Chief Engineer, Chief Officer.

Records:

Underwater survey report or visual inspection after discharge, when possible. Dry docking report.

Implementation Period:

M

P

Target:

LE

Daily Noon Reports.

S

A

Monitoring Method:

Notes / Follow up: Close monitoring of vessel’s performance, speed, slip and consumption. Establishment / adjustment of policy for propeller underwater survey or visual inspection. Consider propeller polishing between dry-dockings.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 14 of 81

Hull Cleaning (see Part A 4.2.1.2) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers

Master, Chief Engineer, Chief Officer.

Implementation Period:

M

Monitoring Method:

P

Target:

LE

Records:

Notes / Follow-up:

A

Close monitoring of vessel’s performance, speed, slip and consumption.

S

Establishment / adjustment of policy for underwater hull inspection. Consider hull cleaning between dry-dockings.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME” Pre-Swirl Stator (see Part A 4.2.2.2.1) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Page 15 of 81

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers

Master, Chief Engineer.

Implementation Period:

M

Monitoring Method:

P

Target:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME” Mewis Duct (see Part A 4.2.2.2.2) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Page 16 of 81

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers

Master, Chief Engineer.

Implementation Period: Target:

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 17 of 81

Wake Equalizing Duct (Schneekluth) (see Part A 4.2.2.3.1) Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Master, Chief Engineer.

Implementation Period:

M

Monitoring Method:

P

Target:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 18 of 81

Sumitomo Integrated Lammeren Duct (SILD) (see Part A 4.2.2.3.2) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period:

M

Monitoring Method:

P

Target:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 19 of 81

Propeller Boss Cap Fins (PBCF) (see Part A 4.2.2.4) Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Master, Chief Engineer.

Records:

Engine Performance Reports, Noon Reports. Dry docking report.

LE

Daily Noon Reports. Builder’s / Maker’s analysis report (where available).

Start retrofit as of 2013 – onwards. New buildings to incorporate PBCF.

P

Implementation Period:

Reduce the magnitude of the hub vortices and cavitation.

Target:

M

Reduce the loss of rotational energy due to the propeller operation.

A

Increase fuel efficiency by up to 2% (compared to ship’s data prior fitting of PBCF and based on Builder’s / Maker’s analysis report – where available) Assessment of vessel’s performance, slip, current, prevailing weather conditions etc. Review PMS records.

S

Monitoring Method:

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME” Ax-Bow Shape (see Part A 4.2.2.5) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Page 20 of 81

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers

Master, Chief Engineer.

Implementation Period: Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 21 of 81

Rudder Surf Bulb (Costa Bulb) (see Part A 4.2.2.6) Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Master, Chief Engineer.

Implementation Period: Target:

A

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

S

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME” Silicon Anti-Fouling Paint (see Part A 4.2.2.7) Responsible personnel ashore:

Page 22 of 81

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers

Master.

Records:

“Statement of Compliance” with the International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on Ships.

Implementation Period:

2013.

LE

Responsible personnel onboard:

Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 23 of 81

Controllable Pitch Propellers (CPP) (see Part A 4.2.2.8) Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Chief Engineer.

Implementation Period: Target:

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

S

A

Benchmarking against sister ships without CPP, when possible.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME” Contra Rotating Propellers (see Part A 4.2.2.9) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Page 24 of 81

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers

Chief Engineer.

Implementation Period: Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 25 of 81

Pre-Swirl Fins (see Part A 4.2.2.10) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records:

LE

Implementation Period: Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 26 of 81

Resistance Monitoring Program (CASPER) (see Part A 4.2.3.1) Responsible personnel ashore:

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers

Responsible personnel onboard:

Master, Chief Officer, Chief Engineer.

Records:

CASPER Reports.

Implementation Period:

Continuous.

LE

Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 27 of 81

KYMA Performance Monitoring System (see Part A 4.3.1.1) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 28 of 81

KYMA Diesel Analyzer (see Part A 4.3.1.1.2) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 29 of 81

MAN B&W PMI System (see Part A 4.3.1.2) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 30 of 81

CoCoS-Engine Diagnostics Software (see Part A 4.3.1.3) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records:

Implementation Period:

LE

Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 31 of 81

Shaft Torque / Thrust Meters (see Part A 4.3.1.4) Responsible personnel ashore:

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers.

Responsible personnel onboard:

Chief Engineer.

Implementation Period: Target:

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 32 of 81

BMT Smart Power Monitoring System (see Part A 4.3.1.5) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 33 of 81

SEC Measuring and Monitoring System (see Part A 4.3.1.6) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 34 of 81

M/E Performance Monitoring System (see Part A 4.3.2) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

Notes / Follow-up:

A

Early identification of any deteriorating trend in ship’s performance by continuous monitoring of specific indicators of the condition of the M/E and the ship’s overall propulsion system.

S

In case vessel is underperforming, appropriate corrective action may be needed (i.e. M/E maintenance, excessive fuel oil consumption, hull / propeller cleaning etc.).

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 35 of 81

D/G Performance Monitoring System (see Part A 4.3.3) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow up:

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 36 of 81

Installation of Electronically Controlled Main Engine (see Part A 4.3.4) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

S

A

M/E operation can be optimized at all operation loads. NOx emissions can be reduced, smokeless operation can be achieved and lower specific fuel oil consumption can be obtained.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 37 of 81

Part-Load Optimized Main Engine (see Part A 4.3.5.1) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 38 of 81

Turbocharger Cut-out (see Part A 4.3.5.2) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

A

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

Notes / Follow-up:

S

On engines with 3 turbochargers, one turbocharger cut-out enables operation at loads from 20% to 66% MCR, delivering: • an expected SFOC reduction of 5 g/kWh and a 0.25 bar increase in scavenge-air pressure at 25% power; • an expected SFOC reduction of 3 g/kWh and a 0.52 bar increase in scavenge air pressure at 50% power; • turbine-out temperature drops by up to 30 degrees.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 39 of 81

Cylinder Cut-out (see Part A 4.3.5.3) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period:

A

M

Monitoring Method:

P

Target:

LE

Records:

Notes / Follow-up:

To be used when Engine’s speed is less than 40% of maximum RPM. The speed limit is evaluated by the manufacturer. The Chief Engineer should refer to the Engine’s manual.

S

• •

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 40 of 81

Fuel Injection Slide Valves (see Part A 4.3.5.4) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period:

M

Monitoring Method:

P

Target:

LE

Records:

Notes / Follow-up:

S

A

Benchmarking with sister ships without fuel injection slide valves, when possible.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 41 of 81

Installation of De-rated Main Engine (see Part A 4.3.6) Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers. Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Chief Engineer.

Records:

Sea trial reports. Engine logs.

LE

Daily Noon Reports. Implementation Period: Target:

From construction / retro-fit onwards.

Monitoring Method:

Review and assessment of Engine logs / M/E Performance Reports.

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Review of Daily Noon Reports and assessment of vessel’s performance, slip, etc. in conjunction with prevailing weather conditions.

S

A

Benchmarking with sister ships without De-rated Main Engine, when possible.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 42 of 81

Alpha Lubricator System (see Part A 4.3.7.1) Responsible personnel ashore:

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers.

Responsible personnel onboard:

Chief Engineer.

Records:

Monitoring of LO consumption. Cylinders inspection / consumption report.

LE

M/E Performance Reports. Continuous.

Target:

Reduce LO consumption. Average LO specific consumption of the fleet to be less than 0.75 gr/BHPh

Monitoring Method:

Cylinder oil monthly consumption report. Superintendent engineers visits on board.

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Implementation Period:

S

A

M

The electronically controlled Alpha lubricator System helps reducing the cylinder oil consumption. The cylinder oil dosage is proportional to the sulphur percentage of the fuel oil. Maintain LO specific consumption according to the sulphur content of FO, as per maker’s manual.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 43 of 81

Pulse Lubricating System (PLS) (see Part A 4.3.7.2) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 44 of 81

Hans Jensen Lubricator System (see Part A 4.3.7.3) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records:

LE

Implementation Period:

Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 45 of 81

Vogel (CLU 4 Zentral) Lubricator System (see Part A 4.3.7.4) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records: Implementation Period:

LE

Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 46 of 81

Cylinder Oil Feed Rate Optimization (FRO) / Scrapedown Analysis (see Part A 4.3.7.5) Responsible personnel ashore:

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers.

Responsible personnel onboard:

Chief Engineer.

Records:

Monitoring of cylinder oil consumption Cylinders inspection report

LE

Scrapedown analysis report Continuous.

Target:

Optimize cylinder oil feed rate in order to reduce average cylinder oil consumption with little (if any) cylinder wear rate increase. Average cylinder oil consumption to be reduced by up to 10%.

Monitoring Method:

Cylinder oil consumption report.

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Implementation Period:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 47 of 81

Efficient Use of E/R Pumps and Fans (see Part A 4.3.8) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period:

Target:

S

A

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 48 of 81

Efficient Use of E/R Pumps (see 4.3.8.1) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records:

LE

Implementation Period: Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 49 of 81

Efficient Use of E/R Fans (see 4.3.8.2) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records:

LE

Implementation Period:

Target:

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

S

A

When switching off the fans, those fans that supply air to auxiliary engines, boilers and air compressors’ spaces is best to remain on. Monitoring of E/R pressure can be used for deciding on the exact number of fans that could be switched off.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME�

Page 50 of 81

Elimination of Voltage Unbalance (see Part A 4.3.8.3) Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers.

Responsible personnel onboard:

Chief Engineer, Electrician.

Records:

Voltage Unbalance Test Report.

Implementation Period:

Within 2013.

Target:

To increase motor efficiency, operating life, reduce overheating, unbalanced currents and ultimately save energy.

LE

Responsible personnel ashore:

Voltage unbalance should be less than 1%.

Voltage Unbalance Test Report to be analyzed by the Technical Department and based on the identified source of voltage unbalance an appropriate strategy (e.g. motor de-rating) to be implemented and results monitored.

M

P

Monitoring Method:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 51 of 81

Exhaust Gas Economizer (EGE) Maintenance (see Part A 4.3.9.3) Responsible personnel ashore:

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers.

Responsible personnel onboard:

Chief Engineer.

Records:

PMS records for the internal cleaning of the exhaust gas economizer.

Implementation Period: Target:

M

Notes / Follow-up:

Continuous.

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Engine log book.

A

The exhaust gas economizer should be maintained in a clean condition so as to maximize its efficiency. Under normal operating condition of main engine the steam production by the exhaust gas economizer should cover the domestic use without the operation of the auxiliary boilers. Slow steaming may cause a higher/faster fouling of the heating surface of exhaust gas economizer.

S

Soot blowing to be performed as per Maker’s instructions.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 52 of 81

Composite Boiler (see Part A 4.3.9.7) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers.

Chief Engineer.

Records:

LE

Implementation Period: Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 53 of 81

Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning (HVAC) System Optimization (see Part A 4.3.10) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period:

A

M

Monitoring Method:

P

Target:

LE

Records:

S

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 54 of 81

Compressed Air System Optimization (see Part A 4.3.11) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records: Implementation Period:

LE

Target: Monitoring Method:

S

A

M

P

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 55 of 81

Lighting Management (see Part A 4.3.12.1) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 56 of 81

Replacement of Incandescent Lamps (see Part A 4.3.12.4) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records: Implementation Period:

LE

Target:

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

S

A

M

Benefits to be quantified through relevant calculations / study.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 57 of 81

On-shore Power Supply (Cold Ironing) (see Part A 4.3.13) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records: Implementation Period:

LE

Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 58 of 81

Renewable and / or Alternative Energy Sources (see Part A 4.3.14) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 59 of 81

Cargo Temperature Control Optimization (see Part A 4.4.1) Responsible personnel ashore:

Operations Department.

Master, Chief Officer, Chief Engineer.

Records:

Cargo Heating Plan / Heating Log abstract.

Implementation Period:

Whenever a heated cargo is transported.

Target:

Optimize the FO consumption for cargo heating. Make sure that cargo heating system consumption does not exceed the heating figure mentioned in the steam consumption table fro maintenance and heating up.

Monitoring Method:

Prepare and implement a heating plan after loading a cargo. Once en route, the heating plan should be reviewed and updated daily, taking into consideration the various factors that affect the heating and customer’s requirements. Review of voyage reports.

P

M

Notes / Follow-up:

LE

Responsible personnel onboard:

S

A

Prepare and implement a heating plan after loading a cargo. Once en route, the heating plan should be reviewed and updated daily, taking into consideration the various factors that affect the heating and customer’s requirements. • vessel to be aware of the Operator’s / Charterer's heating instructions: • avoid heating during adverse weather periods: • closely monitor and analyze cargo heating reports: • follow the proper cargo heating plan: • verify the effectiveness of actual heating progress: • monitor cargo heating daily to address deviations from the heating plan: • do not heat for short frequent periods: • avoid running boiler at low loads: • confirm boilers water side and exhaust side are clean: • Maintain steam traps in good order: • follow the recommended condensate temperature and optimum boiler settings for efficient cargo heating. Heating instructions, accompanying the cargo heating plan, should further highlight these points: and • develop a Heating Abstract after completion of cargo discharge for gap identification and continuous improvement.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 60 of 81

Cargo Pumps Operation Optimization (see Part A 4.4.2.1) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records: Implementation Period:

LE

Target:

M

P

Monitoring Method:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 61 of 81

FRAMO Pumps (see Part A 4.4.2.3) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 62 of 81

MARFLEX Pumps (see Part A 4.4.2.4) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 63 of 81

Auxiliary Boiler Maintenance (see Part A 4.4.3) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records: Implementation Period:

LE

Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up: •

P

Monitoring Method:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME�

Page 64 of 81

Steam & Condensate Return Piping Insulation Maintenance (see Part A 4.4.4.3) Responsible personnel ashore:

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers.

Chief Engineer.

Records:

PMS records. Visual inspection to assess the condition of piping insulation.

Implementation Period:

Continuous.

Target:

To have the piping systems properly insulated with special care at the valve points for minimizing steam losses and unnecessary steam consumption.

Monitoring Method:

Maintenance records, Shipboard attendances by superintendents.

LE

Responsible personnel onboard:

P

Notes / Follow-up:

S

A

M

Steam and condensate return piping insulation should be regularly inspected. External surface temperatures shall generally not exceed 500 deg C. Ensure valve blankets and piping insulation is restored to original condition after inspection and repairs.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 65 of 81

VOC Emission Control (VOCON Procedure) (see Part A 4.4.5.1) Responsible personnel ashore:

Operations Department

Chief Officer.

Records:

VOC-1 (Voyage VOC Emissions Calculation Spreadsheet)

Implementation Period:

Whenever crude oil is transported.

Target: Monitoring Method: Notes / Follow-up:

S

A

M

P

LE

Responsible personnel onboard:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 66 of 81

VOCON Valve (see Part A 4.4.5.2) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target: Monitoring Method:

P

Notes / Follow-up:

LE

Records:

S

A

M

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 67 of 81

Cargo Vapour Recovery System (see Part A 4.4.5.4) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records: Implementation Period:

LE

Target: Monitoring Method: Notes / Follow-up:

S

A

M

P

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 68 of 81

Independent Inert Gas Generator (see Part A 4.4.6) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 69 of 81

Fuel Oil Purchasing (see Part A 4.5.1) Responsible personnel ashore:

Technical Department.

Responsible personnel onboard:

Chief Engineer.

Records: Implementation Period:

LE

Target:

Monitoring Method:

S

A

M

P

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 70 of 81

Fuel Oil Analysis (see Part A 4.5.2) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME�

Page 71 of 81

Sludge Generation Monitoring (see Part A 4.5.3) Responsible personnel ashore:

Technical Department / Superintendent Engineers.

Responsible personnel onboard:

Chief Engineer.

Records:

Data on sludge generation onboard. Oil Record Book.

LE

Daily Noon Reports. Vessel Environmental Performance Report. Continuous.

Target;

The average ratio % of sludge generated / HFO consumed not to exceed 1.50%.

Monitoring Method:

Through continuous monitoring of the waste stream development.

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Implementation Period:

S

A

M

Sludge (oil residue) is considered to be the residual waste oil products generated during the normal operation of a ship such as those resulting from the purification of fuel or lubricating oil for main or auxiliary machinery, separated waste from oil filtering equipment, waste oil collected in drip trays, and waste hydraulic and lubricating oils. Excessive sludge in the fuel oil is a parameter that reduces the fuel efficiency of the bunkers purchased. Therefore, the Company is monitoring the sludge production onboard fleet vessels in relation to the fuel consumption and take the necessary corrective action in case it is needed.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 72 of 81

Fuel Oil Measurement and Reporting / Fuel Oil Purifiers (see Part A 4.5.4) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Implementation Period: Target:

M

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 73 of 81

Fuel Oil Additives (see Part A 4.5.5) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records:

LE

Implementation Period:

Target;

M

P

Monitoring Method:

S

A

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 74 of 81

Fuel Oil Homogenizers (see Part A 4.5.6) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records:

LE

Implementation Period: Target: Monitoring method:

S

A

M

P

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 75 of 81

Lube Oil Sampling (see Part A 4.5.7) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records:

LE

Implementation Period: Target: Monitoring Method:

S

A

M

P

Notes / Follow-up:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 76 of 81

Measuring and Monitoring NOx, SOx and CO2 Emissions (see Part A 4.5.8) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard: Records: Implementation Period:

LE

Target:

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

S

A

M

Benchmarking quarterly within the fleet and annually across the industry on CO2, SO2, NOx, etc.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 77 of 81

IT and other Household Equipment Replacement (see Part A 4.6) Responsible personnel ashore:

Purchasing Department / IT officer.

Responsible personnel onboard:

Master / Chief Officer / Chief Engineer.

Records:

Purchasing specifications / orders. IT equipment inventory.

LE

Implementation Period: Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 78 of 81

Minimize Incinerator Use (see Part A 4.7) Responsible personnel ashore: Responsible personnel onboard:

Technical Department.

Chief Engineer.

Implementation Period: Target:

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

P

Monitoring Method:

LE

Records:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 79 of 81

Personnel Awareness and Training (see Part A 4.8) Responsible personnel ashore:

Training department, Department.

Seagoing

Personnel

Master, Chief Officer, Chief Engineer.

Records:

Personal training records, energy savings checklist

Implementation Period:

Continuous.

Target:

Continuous improvement of personnel awareness through Superintendents’ attendances and use of energy savings checklist.

LE

Responsible personnel onboard:

Carry out in-house training on “Shipboard energy efficiency and management”.

M

Notes / Follow-up:

Personnel awareness and training to be part of the agenda of the management review meeting.

P

Monitoring Method:

Officers should be familiarized on the procedures and practices contained in this Plan as part of their familiarization program ashore and onboard. A list of energy best practices should be developed on what the major onboard consumers are and what can be done to save energy.

S

A

An in-house training course on “Shipboard energy efficiency and management” should be carried out during officers-on-leave meetings at the Company’s training center with the view to improving officers’ awareness of onboard energy efficiency and areas in which energy can be conserved. The aim is to integrate energy saving management into general ship management operations and to ensure that all relevant information is being used and understood by the crew

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 80 of 81

Environmental Notations / Green Passport (see Part A 4.9) Responsible personnel ashore:

Technical Department.

Master.

Records:

Relevant Class Certificates

Implementation Period:

Continuous.

Target:

Maintain in force all relevant certificates.

Monitoring Method:

Review of relevant certificates.

LE

Responsible personnel onboard:

Notes / Follow-up:

S

A

M

P

Consider applying relevant notations to all newbuildings.

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


SHIP ENERGY EFFICIENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN (SEEMP) M/T “VSLNAME”

Page 81 of 81

Energy Audits (see Part A Glossary of Terms) Technical Department /Superintendent Engineers.

Responsible personnel onboard:

Master, Chief Officer, Chief Engineer.

Records:

Energy Audit Report.

Implementation Period:

Within 2013.

Objectives:

To assess the vessel’s energy efficiency and identify Energy Saving Potentials (ESPs).

Monitoring method:

Energy Audit Report to be analyzed by the Technical Department and based on the identified ESPs an appropriate energy conservation program to be implemented and monitored.

P

S

A

M

Notes / Follow-up:

LE

Responsible personnel ashore:

Issue No. 1

Revision No. 0

Effective Date: DD/MM/YYYY


Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plans (SEEMP)