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M/T “VSLNAME” IMO No: 9999999

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BIOFOULING MANAGEMENT PLAN

ALPHA MARINE CONSULTING LTD. MARINE CONSULTANTS & SURVEYORS T: +30 210 4518717 (5 LINES), F: +30 210 4283253 mail@alphamrn.com | www.alphamrn.com


Revision

Date

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TOTAL THIRTY-ONE (31) SHEETS WITH COVER (EXCL. APPENDICES) VESSEL: TITLE:

M/T “VSLNAME”

IMO NO.:

9999999

BIOFOULING MANAGEMENT PLAN ALPHA MARINE CONSULTING LTD.

DWG. NO.:

xxxx-BFP

MARINE CONSULTANTS & SURVEYORS T: +30 210 4518717 (5 LINES), F: +30 210 4283253 mail@alphamrn.com | www.alphamrn.com

REVISION NO.: DATE:

0

24/09/2012


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AMENDMENT RECORD

Amendment Date

Description

Approved by

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Amendment Number

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE INTRODUCTION...................................................................................................... 5

1.1.

SCOPE..................................................................................................................... 5

1.2.

GENERAL ................................................................................................................ 5

1.3.

DEFINITIONS........................................................................................................... 6

2.

VESSEL PARTICULARS ...................................................................................... 11

2.1.

GENERAL PARTICULARS .................................................................................... 11

2.2.

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS..................................................................................... 11

3.

DESCRIPTION OF VESSEL’S ANTI-FOULING SYSTEMS ................................. 12

4.

DESCRIPTION OF VESSEL’S OPERATING PROFILE ....................................... 13

4.1.

TYPICAL OPERATING AREAS / TRADE ROUTES.............................................. 13

4.2.

TYPICAL VOYAGE TIME DISTRIBUTION ............................................................ 14

4.3.

TYPICAL OPERATING SPEED ............................................................................. 15

4.4.

PLANNED DURATION BETWEEN DRY-DOCKINGS ........................................... 15

5.

DESCRIPTION OF VESSEL’S AREAS SUSCEPTIBLE TO BIOFOULING ......... 16

6.

OPERATION & MAINTENANCE OF VESSEL’S ANTI-FOULING SYSTEM........ 21

6.1.

TIMING OF OPERATIONAL AND MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES .......................... 21

6.2.

MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES DURING DRY-DOCKING ................................. 22

6.3.

IN-WATER CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES ............................ 24

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1.

OPERATION OF ONBOARD TREATMENT PROCESSES................................... 27

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SAFETY PROCEDURES FOR SHIP AND CREW ................................................ 28

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DISPOSAL OF BIOLOGICAL WASTE ................................................................. 29

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6.4.

9.

RECORDING REQUIREMENTS ........................................................................... 30

10.

CREW TRAINING AND FAMILIARIZATION......................................................... 31

APPENDIX I – DESCRIPTION OF VESSEL’S ANTI-FOULING SYSTEMS APPENDIX II – BIOFOULING RECORD BOOK FORM APPENDIX III – DECISION SUPPORT TOOL FOR IN-WATER CLEANING APPENDIX IV – TYPES OF ANTI-FOULING COATINGS APPENDIX V – INFORMATION ON CURRENTLY AVAILABLE IN-WATER CLEANING TECHNOLOGY APPENDIX VI – RELEVANT INFORMATION ALPHA MARINE CONSULTING LTD.


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1. INTRODUCTION

1.1.

SCOPE

This Plan has been developed pursuant to the 2011 Guidelines for the Control and Management of Ships’ Biofouling to Minimize the Transfer of Invasive Aquatic Species, Resolution MEPC.207(62), adopted on 15 July 2011, as well as according to the State of California’s Biofouling Management Regulations (Title 2, Division 3, Chapter 1, Article 4.8).

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The aim of this Plan is to provide effective procedures and practical guidance to the vessel’s master, operator and owner and any other interested parties, on biofouling management measures in order to minimize the risk of transferring invasive aquatic species from ships' biofouling. It is important that these biofouling management procedures be effective as well as environmentally safe, practical and designed to minimize costs and delays to the vessel. The management measures outlined herein are intended to complement current maintenance practices carried out within the Company.

1.2.

GENERAL

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This Plan is to be available for viewing on request by a Port State Authority and is written in the English language which is the working language of the crew.

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Studies have shown that biofouling can be a significant factor for the transfer of invasive aquatic species. Biofouling on may result in the establishment of invasive aquatic species which may pose threats to human, animal and plant life, economic and cultural activities and the aquatic environment.

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While the International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-Fouling Systems on Ships, 2001 (AFS Convention) addresses anti-fouling systems on ships, its focus is on the prevention of adverse impacts from the use of anti-fouling systems and the biocides they may contain, rather than preventing the transfer of invasive aquatic species.

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The potential for invasive aquatic species transferred through biofouling to cause harm has been recognized by the IMO, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), several UNEP Regional Seas Conventions (e.g., Barcelona Convention for the Protection of the Mediterranean Sea Against Pollution), the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation forum (APEC), and the Secretariat of the Pacific Region Environmental Program (SPREP). All ships have some degree of biofouling, even those which may have been recently cleaned or had a new application of an anti-fouling coating system. Studies have shown that the biofouling process begins within the first few hours of a ship's immersion in water. The biofouling that may be found on a ship is influenced by a range of factors, such as: .1 .2

design and construction, particularly the number, location & design of niche areas; specific operating profile, including factors such as operating speeds, ratio of time underway compared with time alongside, moored or at anchor, and where the ship is located when not in use (e.g., open anchorage or estuarine port);

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.3 .4

places visited and trading routes; and maintenance history, including: the type, age and condition of any anti-fouling coating system, installation and operation of anti-fouling systems and drydocking/slipping and hull cleaning practices.

Implementing practices to control and manage biofouling can greatly assist in reducing the risk of the transfer of invasive aquatic species. Such management practices can also improve a ship's hydrodynamic performance and can be effective tools in enhancing energy efficiency and reducing air emissions from ships.

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The procedures contained herein are intended to provide useful recommendations to the ship’s crew and Company personnel on general measures to minimize the risks associated with biofouling for this particular ship.

1.3.

DEFINITIONS

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To minimize the transfer of invasive aquatic species, the ship should implement biofouling management practices, including the use of anti-fouling systems and other operational management practices to reduce the development of biofouling. The intent of such practices is to keep the ship's submerged surfaces, and internal seawater cooling systems, as free of biofouling as practical. Following this Plan and minimizing macrofouling would have a reduced potential for transferring invasive aquatic species via biofouling.

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Adequate documentation means records of the recent history of anti-fouling installation and hull maintenance undertaken on a ship or movable structure. AFS Convention means the International Convention on the Control of Harmful AntiFouling Systems on Ships, 2001.

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Anti-fouling coating means a coating used on a vessel to prevent or reduce the accumulation of biofouling. Common types of anti-fouling coating are described in Appendix IV.

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Anti-fouling coating system means the combination of all component coatings, surface treatments (including primer, sealer, binder, anti-corrosive and anti-fouling coatings) or other surface treatments, used on a vessel to control or prevent attachment of unwanted aquatic organisms. Anti-fouling system means a coating, paint, surface treatment, surface, or device that is used on a vessel to control or prevent attachment or association of unwanted organisms and / or biofouling. Anti-fouling System (AFS) Certificate means the International Anti-fouling System Certificate that ships greater than 400 gross tonnes and registered to a Flag State that is a Party to the AFS Convention, 2001 are required to carry. This certificate indicates that the ship’s anti-fouling system complies with the Convention. Biocide means a chemical substance that is incorporated into anti-fouling coatings to prevent the settlement or survival of aquatic organisms.

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Biofouling, also referred to as hull fouling or marine growth, means the accumulation of aquatic organisms such as micro-organisms, plants, and animals on surfaces and structures immersed in or exposed to the aquatic environment, including, but not limited to, sea chests, propellers, anchors and associated chains, and other niche areas. Biofouling can include microfouling and macrofouling (see below). Biosecurity means the exclusion, eradication or effective management of pests and diseases that threaten the economy, environment, human health, social and cultural values.

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Biosecurity risk means the potential harm to the economy, environment, human health and social and cultural values posed by pests and diseases entering, emerging, establishing or spreading. Contaminant means any undesirable substance occurring in the environment as a result of human activities, without adverse effects being observed. Contamination means the presence of a contaminant in the environment, or the process whereby a contaminant is introduced into the environment.

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Controlled waste means material or liquid waste that is regulated because of its toxicity or imminent hazardous nature.

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Declaration on Anti-fouling System means the declaration required to be carried by vessels of less than 400 gross tonnes but greater than 24m, and registered to a Flag State that is Party to the AFS Convention, 2001. This declaration ensures that their anti-fouling coating system complies with the Convention. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) means those waters beyond the limits of the Territorial Sea out to 200 nautical miles.

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In-water cleaning means the physical removal of biofouling and / or anti-fouling coating surface deposits from a ship while in the water.

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In-water inspection means underwater survey or inspection by divers (including inspections conducted with remotely operated vehicles). Inspections for purposes other than surveying biofouling may be considered opportunities for evaluating biofouling extent. In-water treatment means any method or process that is aimed at sterilizing biofouling from the wetted portions of a vessel while the vessel remains in the water. Invasive aquatic species means a species which may pose threats to human, animal and plant life, economic and cultural activities and the aquatic environment.

Local water quality standards means the concentrations or discharge of contaminants (such as those arising from hull maintenance operations) that are regarded as acceptable by the relevant authority. Maintenance facility refers to any location or facility where on-shore maintenance of ships is carried out. This includes the maintenance, removal and application of anti-fouling coatings and the removal of biofouling organisms.

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Marine Growth Prevention System (MGPS) means an anti-fouling system used for the prevention of biofouling accumulation in internal seawater cooling systems and sea chests and can include the use of anodes, injection systems and electrolysis. Member States means States that are Members of the International Maritime Organization.

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Macrofouling means large, distinct multicellular organisms visible to the human eye such as barnacles, tubeworms, or fronds of algae and other large attached or mobile organisms.

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Microfouling means microscopic organisms including bacteria and diatoms and the slimy substances that they produce. Biofouling comprised of only microfouling is commonly referred to as a slime layer and can be usually removed by gently passing a finger over the surface.

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Niche areas mean areas on a vessel that may be more susceptible to biofouling due to different hydrodynamic forces, susceptibility to coating system wear or damage, or being inadequately, or not, painted, e.g., sea chests, bow thrusters, propeller shafts, inlet gratings, dry-dock support strips, etc. Organization means the International Maritime Organization. Out-of-water maintenance means removal of the vessel from the water and into a dry-dock or slipway for inspection or maintenance.

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Out-of-water support strips means sections of the hull that rested on support blocks while the vessel was out of water in a dry-dock or slipway. These areas are typically not cleaned or treated with fresh anti-fouling systems, resulting in reduced antifouling protection. Percentage cover means the percentage of the total surface area under examination that is occupied by biofouling.

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Planned in-service period means the intended interval (decided at the time of antifouling coating application) until the next scheduled application of anti-fouling coating on a vessel.

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Port State authority means any official or organization authorized by the Government of a port State to verify the compliance and enforcement of standards and regulations relevant to the implementation of national and international shipping control measures. Relevant authority means the authority that has responsibility for managing the environmental effects of activities.

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Service life means the period of time an anti-fouling coating system is expected to protect a treated surface from biofouling and/or corrosion if the coatings are applied in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications.

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Ship means a vessel of any type whatsoever operating in the aquatic environment and includes hydrofoil boats, air-cushion vehicles, submersibles, floating craft, fixed or floating platforms, floating storage units (FSUs) and floating production storage and off-loading units (FPSOs). It is noted that for the State of California ship means a vessel of more than 300 GT. Statement of Compliance means a document (and associated evidence) issued by a Classification Society to ships greater than 400 gross tonnes that are registered in Flag States not Party to the AFS Convention, 2001. States means coastal, port or Member States as appropriate. Treatment means a process which may use a mechanical, physical, chemical or biological method to remove or render sterile, invasive or potentially invasive aquatic species fouling a ship.

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Waterline means the area along the external hull of a vessel where the surface of the water interfaces with the air. The waterline is not a fixed location; its placement is dependent on loading and ballasting operations.

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Wetted portion of a vessel means all parts of a vessel’s hull and structures that are either submerged in water when the vessel is loaded to the deepest permissible legal draft or associated with internal piping structures in contact with water taken onboard.

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2. VESSEL PARTICULARS

2.1.

GENERAL PARTICULARS

Ship’s Name:

VSLNAME

Ship’s Type: Flag: Port of Registry:

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Call Sign: MMSI: IMO Number: Gross Tonnage: Net Tonnage: Year Built:

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS

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Built by:

Length O.A.: Length B.P.:

Breadth (mld.):

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Depth to Main Deck (mld.):

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3. DESCRIPTION OF VESSEL’S ANTI-FOULING SYSTEMS

Anti-fouling systems and operational practices are the primary means of biofouling prevention and control for existing vessels' submerged surfaces, including the hull and niche areas. An anti-fouling system can be a coating system applied to exposed surfaces, biofouling resistant materials used for piping and other unpainted components, marine growth prevention systems (MGPSs) for sea chests and internal seawater cooling systems, or other innovative measures to control biofouling.

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type(s) of anti-fouling coating systems applied; details of where anti-fouling systems are and are not applied or installed; manufacturer and product names of all coatings or products used in the anti-fouling coating systems; and anti-fouling system specifications (including dry film thickness for coatings, dosing and frequency for MGPSs, etc.) together with the expected effective life, operating conditions required for coatings to be effective, cleaning requirements and any other specifications relevant for paint performance

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Details for the anti-fouling systems in place for different parts of the vessel, including as follows:

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are set out / referred to in Appendix I.

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Previous reports on the performance of the vessel's anti-fouling systems, the AFS certificate or statement of compliance or other documentation are included in Appendix VI or in the vessel’s Certificates File. It is noted that the anti-fouling system used complies with the AFS Convention.

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4. DESCRIPTION OF VESSEL’S OPERATING PROFILE

The vessel's operating profile that has determined the performance specifications of the vessel's anti-fouling systems and operational practices is described below: TYPICAL OPERATING AREAS / TRADE ROUTES

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4.1.

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TYPICAL VOYAGE TIME DISTRIBUTION

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4.3.

TYPICAL OPERATING SPEED Speed (knots) Laden Ballast

PLANNED DURATION BETWEEN DRY-DOCKINGS

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4.4.

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5. DESCRIPTION OF VESSEL’S AREAS SUSCEPTIBLE TO BIOFOULING

The hull areas, niche areas and seawater cooling systems on the vessel that are particularly susceptible to biofouling (including access points in the internal seawater cooling systems) are identified in the diagram below.

Rudder Propeller

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Bow Thruster

Sea Chest

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Drydocking support strips

SW Cool. System

Drydocking support strips

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Bilge Keel

Bilge Keel

SW Cool. System

Sea Chest Propeller Rudder

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Bow Thruster


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The management actions required for each area and the actions to be taken if the vessel is operating outside of the desired operating profile, or if excessive unexpected biofouling is observed, and any other actions that can be taken to minimize the accumulation of biofouling on the vessel are described in the action plan provided below: Biofouling Management Action Plan Areas of the vessel which are particularly susceptible to biofouling

Management actions required for each area (e.g., inspections, cleaning, repairs and maintenance)

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External hull surfaces: - Vertical sides - Flats - Boottop - Bow dome - Transom

Management actions to be undertaken if vessel operates outside its usual operating profile

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Plans / diagrams of the vessel identifying relevant locations: Hull appendages and fittings: - Bilge keels - Echo sounder probes - A-brackets - Stabilizer fins - CP anodes Plans / diagrams of the vessel identifying relevant locations: Steering and propulsion: - Propeller

Plans / diagrams of the vessel identifying relevant locations:

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Areas of the vessel which are particularly susceptible to biofouling

Management actions required for each area (e.g., inspections, cleaning, repairs and maintenance)

Management actions to be undertaken if vessel operates outside its usual operating profile

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Plans / diagrams of the vessel identifying relevant locations: - Anchor chain

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- Stern tube seal

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Plans / diagrams of the vessel identifying relevant locations: - Chain locker

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Areas of the vessel which are particularly susceptible to biofouling

Management actions required for each area (e.g., inspections, cleaning, repairs and maintenance)

Management actions to be undertaken if vessel operates outside its usual operating profile

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- Rope guard

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- Rudder

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Plans / diagrams of the vessel identifying relevant locations: - Bow / Stern thrusters - Propeller - Thruster body - Tunnel - Tunnel grates

Plans / diagrams of the vessel identifying relevant locations: ALPHA MARINE CONSULTING LTD.


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Management actions required for each area (e.g., inspections, cleaning, repairs and maintenance)

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Seawater intakes and internal seawater cooling systems: - Engine cooling system - Sea chests (identify number and position) - Sea chest grate - Internal pipework and heat exchanger - Fire-fighting system - Ballast uptake system - Auxiliary services system

Plans / diagrams of the vessel identifying relevant locations:

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Management actions to be undertaken if vessel operates outside its usual operating profile

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Areas of the vessel which are particularly susceptible to biofouling


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6. OPERATION & MAINTENANCE OF VESSEL’S ANTI-FOULING SYSTEM

This Section contains a detailed description of the operation and maintenance of the antifouling system(s) used, including schedule(s) of activities and step-by-step operational procedures.

6.1.

TIMING OF OPERATIONAL AND MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES

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6.1.1. Annual inspections

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This Section stipulates the schedule of planned inspections, repairs, maintenance and renewal of the anti-fouling systems.

6.1.2. Inspections prior to arrival to a California port or place

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MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES DURING DRY-DOCKING

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When re-installing or repairing the anti-fouling system, care should be taken in surface preparation to ensure all biofouling residues, flaking paint, or other surface contamination is completely removed, particularly in niche areas, to facilitate good adhesion and durability of the anti-fouling system For sea chests the following should be considered when re-installing or repairing their antifouling systems:

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Other niche areas can also be particularly susceptible to biofouling growth. Management measures for niche areas are outlined below.

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6.3.

IN-WATER CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES

Despite the use of effective anti-fouling systems and operational practices, undesirable amounts of biofouling may still accumulate during the intended lifetime of the anti-fouling system. To maintain the vessel as free of biofouling as practical, it may be advisable for the vessel to undertake in-water inspection, cleaning and maintenance.

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6.3.1. In-water inspection

6.3.2. In-water cleaning and maintenance Hull cleaning should be carried out based on a condition assessment basis and if there is significant growth on the hull (see below note), an immediate decision to clean the hull should be made taking into account the inspection report / notification by the Master.

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6.3.3. In-water inspection / cleaning reports

Divers’ reports (including photographic / video material) should be kept both in the Company and onboard. 6.3.4. Extended stay at port or anchorage

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6.3.5. Procedures for Sediment Removal (if not included in the WBMP)

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OPERATION OF ONBOARD TREATMENT PROCESSES

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6.4.

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6.4.1. Requirements prior to arrival to a California port or place

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7. SAFETY PROCEDURES FOR SHIP AND CREW

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8. DISPOSAL OF BIOLOGICAL WASTE

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9. RECORDING REQUIREMENTS

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10. CREW TRAINING AND FAMILIARIZATION

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APPENDIX I – DESCRIPTION OF VESSEL’S ANTI-FOULING SYSTEMS


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APPENDIX II – BIOFOULING RECORD BOOK FORM


BIOFOULING RECORD BOOK Page 1 of ____ Ship’s Name:

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Ship’s Type: Flag: Port of Registry: Registry Number: Call Sign: IMO Number:

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Gross Tonnage: Net Tonnage:

The ship is provided with a Biofouling Management Plan

Diagram of ship indicating underwater hull form and recognized biofouling niches:

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Rudder

Bow Thruster

Propeller

SW Cool. System

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Sea Chest

Bilge Keel Bilge Keel

SW Cool. System

Sea Chest Propeller Rudder

Bow Thruster


BIOFOULING RECORD BOOK Page 2 of ____ Guidelines for completing the Biofouling Record Book 1.

Introduction

The IMO “Guidelines for the control and management of ships' biofouling to minimize the transfer of invasive aquatic species� adopted by Res. MEPC.207(62) on 15 July 2011 recommend that a Biofouling Record Book is maintained for each ship, in which should be recorded the details of all inspections and biofouling management measures undertaken on the ship. Entries in the Biofouling Record Book

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2.

The following information should be recorded in the Biofouling Record Book:

After each dry-docking: a. Date and location that the ship was dry-docked. b. Date that ship was re-floated. c. Any hull cleaning that was performed while dry-docked, including areas cleaned, method used for cleaning and the location of dry-dock support blocks. d. Any anti-fouling coating system, including patch repairs, that was applied while drydocked. Detail the type of anti-fouling coating system, the area and locations it was applied to, the coating thickness achieved and any surface preparation work undertaken (e.g., complete removal of underlying anti-fouling coating system or application of new anti-fouling coating system over the top of existing anti-fouling coating system). e. Name, position and signature of the person in charge of the activity for the ship.

2.2

When the hull area, fittings, niches and voids below the waterline have been inspected by divers: a. Date and location of ship when dive surveyed and reason for survey. b. Area or side of the ship surveyed. c. General observations with regard to biofouling (i.e. extent of biofouling and predominant biofouling types, e.g., mussels, barnacles, tubeworms, algae and slime). d. What action was taken, if any, to remove or otherwise treat biofouling. e. Any supporting evidence of the actions taken (e.g., report from the classification society or contractor, photographs and receipts). f. Name, position, signature of the person in charge of the activity.

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2.3

When the hull area, fittings, niches and voids below the waterline have been cleaned by divers: a. Date and location of ship when cleaning / treatment occurred. b. Hull areas, fittings, niches and voids cleaned/treated. c. Methods of cleaning or treatment used. d. General observations with regard to biofouling (i.e. extent of biofouling and predominant biofouling types, e.g., mussels, barnacles, tubeworms, algae and slime). e. Any supporting evidence of the actions taken (e.g., report from the classification society or contractor, photographs and receipts). f. Records of permits required to undertake in-water cleaning if applicable. g. Name, position and signature of the person in charge of the activity.


BIOFOULING RECORD BOOK Page 3 of ____ Guidelines for completing the Biofouling Record Book (cont’d) When the internal seawater cooling systems have been inspected and cleaned or treated: a. Date and location of ship when inspection and/or cleaning occurred. b. General observations with regard to biofouling of internal seawater cooling systems (i.e. extent of biofouling and predominant biofouling types, e.g., mussels, barnacles, tubeworms, algae, slime). c. Any cleaning or treatment undertaken. d. Methods of cleaning or treatment used. e. Any supporting evidence of the actions taken (e.g., report from the classification society or contractor, photographs and receipts). f. Name, position and signature of the person in charge of the activity.

2.5

For ships with a MGPS fitted: a. Records of operation and maintenance (such as regularly monitoring the electrical and mechanical functions of the systems). b. Any instances when the system was not operating in accordance with the biofouling management plan.

2.6

Periods of time when the ship was laid up / inactive for an extended period of time: a. Date and location where ship was laid up. b. Date when ship returned to normal operations. c. Maintenance action taken prior to and following the period laid up. d. Precautions taken to prevent biofouling accumulation (e.g., sea chests blanked off).

2.7

Periods of time when ship operating outside its normal operating profile: a. Duration and dates when ship not operating in accordance with its normal operating profile. b. Reason for departure from normal operating profile (e.g., unexpected maintenance required).

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2.4

Details of official inspection or review of ship biofouling risk (for ships arriving internationally, if applicable): a. Date and location of ship when inspection or review occurred. b. Port State authority conducting the inspection/review and details of procedures followed or protocol adhered to and inspector/s involved. c. Result of inspection / review. d. Name, position, signature of the person in charge of the activity for the ship.

S

2.8

2.9

Any additional observations and general remarks: a. Since the ship was last cleaned, has the ship spent periods of time in locations that may significantly affect biofouling accumulation (e.g., fresh water, high latitude (Arctic and Antarctic) or tropical ports).


BIOFOULING RECORD BOOK Page 4 of ____ EXAMPLES OF BIOFOULING RECORD BOOK ENTRIES HULL INSPECTION Date 20 Feb 2012

Item (number) 2.2.a

Record of management actions

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2.2.b 2.2.c 2.2.d 2.2.e 2.2.f

PROPELLER CLEANING

20 Apr 2012

Item (number) 2.3.a

Signature of officers in charge

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2.3.b 2.3.c 2.3.d 2.3.e 2.3.f 2.3.g

Record of management actions

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Date

Signature of officers in charge

WEEKLY MGPS INSPECTION Date

S

20 Jun 2012

Item (number) 2.5.a

Record of management actions

Signature of officers in charge


BIOFOULING RECORD BOOK Page 5 of ____ Item (number)

Record of management actions

Signature of officers in charge

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Date

Signature of Master

________________________________


APPENDIX III – DECISION SUPPORT TOOL FOR IN-WATER CLEANING

This Decision Support Tool for in-water cleaning is designed to assist relevant authorities with making decisions about in-water cleaning practices in their jurisdictions. The Decision Support Tool also helps owners or operators of ships and other movable structures to determine the types of information and documentation that relevant authorities may require of them to make decisions on in-water cleaning. Relevant authorities may require additional information for their risk-assessment and decision making processes. Persons who wish to in-water clean ships or movable structures must contact the relevant authority.

(b) (c) (d)

If the type of a coating (e.g. biocidal; biocide-free) cannot be reliably determined, then it should be assumed that the coating contains biocides. If the age of a coating cannot be reliably determined, then it should be assumed that the coating has reached the end of its service life. Where the type of biofouling on a ship or structure is unknown, it should be assumed that macrofouling is present. If the origin of the biofouling on a ship or movable structure is unknown, then it should be assumed that it is of international origin. If the biofouling is likely to be from more than one origin category (e.g. regional and international) then decisions on in-water cleaning should be based on the furthest likely origin (i.e. international).

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(a)

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When information and/or documentation required for making decisions on in-water cleaning is not available, the following default assumptions apply:

Microfouling, regardless of origin, may be removed without the need for full containment of biofouling waste, provided the cleaning method is consistent with the coating manufacturer’s recommendations. Where microfouling is removed using a gentle, nonabrasive cleaning technique, the contamination risk is likely to be acceptable.

A

1.

M

The Decision Support Tool should be used in conjunction with the following recommendations:

Macrofouling of regional origin (as defined by relevant authority) may be removed without the need for full containment of biofouling waste provided the cleaning method is consistent with the coating manufacturer’s recommendations and contaminant discharges meet local water quality standards.

S

2.

3.

Macrofouling of domestic origin may be removed without the need for full containment of biofouling waste following risk assessment by the relevant authority. If the relevant authority determines containment of biofouling waste is required, then methods should be used to ensure that unacceptable amounts of biological material are not released into the water column. In-water cleaning technologies should aim to, at least, capture debris greater than 50 µm in diameter which will minimise the release of viable adult, juvenile and larval stages of macrofouling organisms. Any cleaning debris collected must be disposed of on land and in compliance with the waste disposal requirements of the relevant authority. In either case, the cleaning method must be consistent with the coating manufacturer’s recommendations and contaminant discharges must meet local water quality standards.

4.

Macrofouling derived from international locations should only be removed using cleaning methods that are able to minimise the release of all organisms, or parts of organisms, and antifouling coating debris, using the guidance described above. The cleaning method must be consistent with the coating manufacturer’s recommendations and contaminant discharges must meet local water quality standards.


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APPENDIX IV – TYPES OF ANTI-FOULING COATINGS

Biocidal coatings are coatings that release chemicals such as copper compounds or other pesticides that aim to deter biofouling organisms. There are four general types of biocidal coatings: Soluble matrix, Controlled depletion polymer or Ablative anti-fouling coatings contain a binder that is slightly soluble in seawater. Hydration causes the coating surface to slowly dissolve, releasing the freely associated biocide.

2.

Insoluble matrix, Contact leaching, Longlife or Diffusion anti-fouling coatings use an insoluble binder that contains a high concentration of biocide that is released from the coating through a diffusion process.

3.

Self-polishing copolymer anti-fouling coatings release biocides as a result of hydrolysis causing the coating to “erode” when a vessel is moving.

4.

Metallic anti-fouling coatings use copper or copper nickel alloy as either metal sheathing or metal particles mixed into a coating.

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1.

Biocide-free coatings are coatings that do not depend on chemicals or pesticides for their anti-fouling properties, instead relying on their physical nature. They are further split into two sub-categories: Fouling release coatings rely on non-stick, low surface energy compounds such as silicone or fluoropolymers to impair the adhesive attachment of biofouling.

6.

Mechanically resistant coatings (epoxy, ceramic/epoxy, and epoxy/glass) are tough and highly durable coatings. They do not have any anti-fouling properties. They allow biofouling organisms to accumulate and are designed to withstand regular in-water cleaning (including abrasive methods).

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A

M

5.


APPENDIX V – INFORMATION ON CURRENTLY AVAILABLE IN-WATER CLEANING TECHNOLOGY

The most commonly available in-water cleaning technologies are currently brushing/scraping, use of soft cleaning tools, and water or air jet systems. These methods vary in their effectiveness in removing and containing biofouling organisms, and in their suitability for use on different anti-fouling coating types. Brief descriptions of their use and limitations are provided below: Brush systems - Brushes are a widely used method for in-water hull cleaning because of their ability to remove surface deposits and low levels of biofouling from biocidal coatings. They can have a rejuvenating effect on the performance of some coating types. Existing brush systems are not able to remove all biofouling from a surface or contain all of the removed material. The use of abrasive brushes can also result in the exacerbated release of biocidal coating material. Use of brushes on fouling-release coatings can damage the coating surface and is not recommended unless the brushes are sufficiently soft and will not harm the integrity of the coating. Advice should be sought from the coating manufacturer or supplier prior to using any brush system on an anti-fouling coating.

Soft tools - Fouling release coatings prevent firm attachment of biofouling organisms. Soft cleaning tools, such as cloths, squeegees and wiping tools can be used to remove micro and macrofouling effectively from surfaces coated in fouling release coatings without harming the integrity of the coating. These coatings are delicate and scratching of the surface should be avoided. If cloths are used for cleaning, it is necessary to ensure that no shell fragments or other hard objects are trapped beneath the cloths that could scratch and damage the coatings.

Water jet and air jet (blast) systems - Water and air jet cleaning systems are versatile tools because their operating pressure (and jet pattern) can be varied according to coating type and biofouling extent. The effects of water jet technology on biocidal coatings are not fully understood. Currently available water jet systems are not able to contain all of the removed biofouling or coating material. Water pressures should be used that do not harm the integrity of the anti-fouling coating.

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Other technologies:

Technologies that kill, but not necessarily remove biofouling - Several types of biofouling treatment are available that kill biofouling organisms but do not actively remove them from a surface. These include the use of heat (in the form of steam or heated water) or enveloping technologies (wrapping of a vessel or movable structure in plastic sheets or canvas sleeves to suffocate biofouling). These are generally developing technologies and their effectiveness and effects on anti-fouling coatings have not been evaluated.

Developing technologies - A number of technologies that collect biofouling and coating material are under development.


APPENDIX VI – RELEVANT INFORMATION

The following information related to this plan is attached: No.

Title General Arrangement Plan

2.

Docking Plan

3.

AFS certificate or statement of compliance or other documentation

4.

Reports on the performance of the ship's anti-fouling systems

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1.

Dwg. / Cert. No.

5. 6.

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7.


BIOFOULING MANAGEMENT PLAN SAMPLE  

This ship-specific Plan is prepared in accordance with IMO’s “2011 Guidelines for the Control and Management of Ships’ Biofouling to Minimiz...

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