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SUSTAINABILITY

WEEK

In partnership

GET READY TO PUT IDEAS IN MOTION

2016 REPORT


POST EVENT REPORT In partnership

HOST CITY

PARTNERS AND SPONSORS

“Sustainability Week is an platform for experts to learn fro engage and drive important s topics in South Afric - Petra Bezuidenhout,

AFFILIATED ORGANISATIONS

INTERVIEWS •• INSIGHTS INSIGHTS •• INTELLIGENCE INTELLIGENCE INTERVIEWS

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CONTENTS 06

n excellent om each other, sustainability ca.” BASF

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African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum Seminars & Side Events Attendance Carbon Footprint Marketing & Communications Sustainability Report CEO’s Message Governance & Management GRI Index Appendix PR Outputs

EXECUTIVE

SUMMARY

Sustainability Week 2016 drew record attendance at the seminal African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum and delivered significant depth and breadth of content through more than 15 conferences, seminars, workshops, and debates. Exhibitors enjoyed a strong flow of relevant and engaging visitors who commented on the high quality of exhibits on display. Youth from various City of Tshwane regions enjoyed the highly interactive Youth & the Green Economy Dialogue, while the Green Home Fair, which was held at a busy Eastern Suburbs shopping centre, succeeded in providing insight and inspiration to the many consumers who interacted with exhibitors. Connecting people across sectors and stakeholder groups is a key objective of Sustainability Week, and 2016 saw the inclusion of cross-sector debates, which effectively linked people attending different sector-focussed seminars in a single conversation. The Climate Change Debate was facilitated by TV personality Peter Ndoro. Sustainability Week is an inclusive event, and in 2016, it incorporated co-located events by WWF, PAGE, UNIDO, City of Tshwane, and SACN, with participation from organisations such as ICLEI and many others. The presentation summaries included in this report were written by a variety of event facilitators, each of whom highlighted issue they considered pertinent. A full copy of each presentation can be found online at www. sustainabilityweek.co.za. We look forward to bringing you Sustainability Week 2017, and expect to make some very exciting announcements in this regard in the near future – see you then.

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AFRICAN CAPITAL CITIES SUSTAINABILITY FORUM On 31 May 2016, the City of Tshwane hosted the second African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum (ACCSF), after its launch the previous year on 23 June 2015 at the CSIR International Convention Centre. The forum was attended by 40 representatives from 20 African capital cities, with a further audience in excess of 450 delegates from a range of sectors, all of whom had a shared interest in the leadership role that capital cities can play in promoting sustainability in urban centres. The voices of the international and domestic community were well represented by C40, ICLEI, UNDP, African Embassies and National Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, with each endorsing the Forum and congratulating Cllr Ramokgopa on its establishment. Speakers shared their own perspectives on the international and African economic, environmental, developmental and institutional contexts around which the Forum had been staged, in so doing also highlighting how apt and timeous it was. The contextual backdrop provided perspectives from two distinct discourses: that of the developmental city, and that of climate change and sustainable development. In so doing, it illustrated very clearly that, internationally, these two discourses have essentially merged, and therein lies the simple genius of the thinking behind the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum. The speakers also emphasised the synergies between the Sustainable Development Goals (in particular Outcome 11) and African Union Agenda 63 and the goals and objectives of the Forum. A predominant South African perspective drew attention to the compelling need to address the sustainability of cities against the historic backdrop of apartheid urban design, with a framework being provided by the recent ly released Integrated Urban Development Framework policy initiative, giving further credence to the Forum’s opportune timing and objectives. Mayors and mayoral representatives from visiting cities shared their unique situations as well as recent histories. They represented stable and internationally connected cities such as Rabat to Monrovia and Juba, the world’s newest capital city.

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What emerged most starkly, however, was not how different their challenges were but rather how similar. In many cases speakers presented on current and recent sustainability related projects and – while they differed greatly in terms of scale, sophistication, and objective – the message was the same: “We want to share and we want to learn”. A highlight in terms of technical inputs came from the City of Barcelona in the form of its mobility plan, which has the potential to fundamentally change the city. The following key learnings emerged: cities can be fundamentally changed and, in order to do so effectively, it is essential to bring in the professionals who have the necessary skills to formulate the strategy and implement the plan and it is important to commit to your plan in spite of resistance from those who may be inconvenienced in the short term. What came through strongly was also that cities should not lack ambition, but set ambitious and progressive plans and targets, then set about achieving these. Mayors also expressed their desire to act decisively in order to form key strategic partnerships and called for investment and access to funding to enable them to implement projects. In response to this challenge, a number of speakers emphasised the availability of funding, with R20 effectively challenging the cities to bring through bankable projects, assuring the Forum that technical and financial support would be available to facilitate such projects. The R20 goal was in fact to facilitate 100 such projects by COP22 in November 2016. A key outcome was the unanimous expression that from an international, African and South African perspective, the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum has merit, locus and purpose. This purpose is to advance the sustainable development of African cities with capital cities assuming a leadership position in this regard. Practically, this will happen through the rollout of multiple related projects in capital cities, through the ongoing sharing of lessons and best practice across this network, and recording and revisiting these actions annually through the Forum, which will be staged in different cities across the network into the future.

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CONFERENCE OUTCOMES AND THE WAY FORWARD Extract from the close out speech by the Executive Mayo r of the City of Tshwane We hereby reaffirm our commitment to advancing the Tshwane Declaration 2015 and further commit to accelerate action. • We will establish a collective think tank of common initiatives that we will present at COP22 being hosted by the City of Marrakesh in December 2016. • We undertake to measure our city’s carbon emissions and establish a baseline Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory in each city. • We will jointly engage with development agencies and other international partners that have a focus on and interest in local government to garner support for climate resilience programmes. • We will establish clear partnerships with the private sector for investment in bankable projects. • We will convene a platform conducive for technical engagements and to develop a clear implementation programme for our cities, focusing primarily on the Sustainable Development Goals and in particular Outcome 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable • In support of this technical panel, we undertake to submit the names of City representatives to the ACCSF secretariat, which is currently hosted by the City of Tshwane • We re-confirm that the City of Tshwane will host the ACCSF 2017 and that between now and June 2017, a process of selecting the next host city for 2018 will be undertaken in preparation for an announcement during ACCSF 2017. To this effect, we would welcome interested cities to indicate their willingness to host ACCSF 2018.


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AFRICAN CAPITAL CITIES SUSTAINABILITY

FORUM SEMINAR

Official opening of the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum Programme Director: Cllr Subesh Pillay, MMC: Economic Development, City of Tshwane Cllr Pillay personally welcomed the visiting mayors, their mayoral delegations and keynote speakers on what was the final day of Africa Month. Mr Bene M’Poko, Ambassador of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Dean of the Diplomatic Corps Opening remarks Mr M’Poko highlighted the fact that African cities are facing major challenges, but added that the forum represented a collective commitment to address these challenges. He emphasised the need to strive to create liveable cities that represent a safe and comfortable home for those who live in them, and to become places that welcome people and allow themto feel safe and wishing to return. Challenges include high rates of unemployment, crime and environmental issues, all of which leave mayors in the unenviable position of having to address these enormous challenges. The forum called upon everyone present to work together and share experiences as that would be the most practical way to move forward. He reiterated the fact that rural areas should not be overlooked as they also need to be sustainable in order that people might choose to live in those areas as well. The other mayors were also challenged to stand as candidates to host this event in future years.

the climate change interventions discussed during the AfriCities Summit. Its main theme was “Shaping the future of Africa with the people: the contribution of African local authorities to agenda 2063 of the African Union”. This is an indication that cities have initiated intensive programmes regarding sustainability in a broader perspective. Urbanisation challenges were outlined with a focus on redesigning cities, especially in South Africa where there is a commitment between governments and all stakeholders to realise sustainable urban development. The Integrated Urban Development Framework released by the Department of Co-operative

Governance and Traditional Affairs was praised for calling for a “new deal” for South African cities based on the 3Cs growth model (compact, connected and coordinated). Initiatives to develop national urban policies in countries such as Malawi and Burundi were welcomed and applauded. UN Habitat’s African Urban Agenda Programme (Urban Agenda), together with the African Union’s Agenda 2063 (Agenda 2063), were noted for providing the direction and inspiration needed to tackle poverty and unemployment at the same time as seeking solutions to create a prosperous continent. This is only possible if there is effective multilevel governance and deliberate engagements

Cllr Parks Tau, Executive Mayor of the City of Johannesburg Topic: Trends arising from the recent AfriCities Summit and other international platforms requiring attention of African Capital Cities Cllr Tau placed urbanisation in the context of international discussions and spoke on various trends displayed by cities and about

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POST EVENT REPORT with other sectors of society. The United Cities and Local Governments of Africa, the UCLGA, have put forward a proposal for a Charter in Decentralisation as a mechanism to ensure closer links with Heads of States and Ministers to ensure the smooth implementation of the African Urban Agenda, the Agenda 2063 and other multi-lateral agreements. These include the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), the Paris Outcome and the New Urban Agenda (the document set to come out of Habitat III this October). Africa needs strong capital cities – be it administrative or financial capital cities - that are on a par with leading cities around the world. The Paris Outcome has implications for cities and local governments. In December 2015, the historic Paris Agreement was concluded at Le Bourget, with tools available such as the Compact of Mayors. The world is now well on its way to cushioning the devastating effects of climate change thanks to the implementation of mitigation and adaptation actions at local level. The New Urban Agenda: at the recent Local Government Hearings on Habitat III, the general sentiment expressed in relation to Vision 2030 was that strengthening of governance was required across all levels. Local governments and cities emphasised that Habitat III is not only about the SDG 11, but that other goals have an urban element to them and, in light of these global developments, stronger mechanisms for financing urban development are required (in line with paragraph 34 of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda). Through the New Urban Agenda it is proposed that a single urban agenda will harmonise the SDGs, the Paris Agreement, and access to finance. For the way forward: we stand at an opportune time in 2016 as African Cities and, indeed, as cities across the globe, with leadership from the UCLG and the New Urban Agenda. Cllr Tau quoted the United Nations’ Secretary General, Mr Ban Ki-moon, who said, in 2012: “Local is global and global is local. The road to sustainability runs through the world’s towns and cities. By building sustainable towns and cities, you will build global sustainability”. Hastings Chikoko, Regional Director for Africa C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group Message of Support: Sustainability leadership from megacities in Africa Mr Chikoko expressed thanks and congratulations on behalf of C40 to the City of Tshwane for convening representatives from the capital cities in Africa in order to discuss ways of making our administrative capitals sustainable. He also thanked them for the leadership role they had provided on sustainability as well as the global leadership role taken by the City of Tshwane to lead the C40 Transit www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

Oriented Development Network of Cities. In offering some words of support based on the experience from the African megacities that are part of the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, Mr Chikoko began by sharing his personal belief that the narrative of Africa is changing: According to the 2016 African Economic Outlook report, “Africa’s growth in real GDP is estimated at 3.6%, higher than the 3.1% for the global economy and 1.5% for the Euro area, and Africa remained the world’s second-fastest growing economy after East Asia. In 2015, sub-Saharan Africa grew faster than the continental average, at 4.2%”. He added that the African Union’s Agenda 2063 is a bold commitment to an agenda for the Africa that Africans want to see, and that it would work collaboratively to achieve this along with its international cooperating partners. However, if not effectively managed, climate change threatens to alter the natural capital and systems on which Africa’s economic and social development depend. Should the continent’s economic progress not seriously take into consideration the anthropogenic factors causing global warming, then the consequences would be potentially catastrophic. A low-carbon development pathway should, therefore, be an integral part of the ‘Africa-rising’ movement, which put into context the importance of meetings and summits between key stakeholders and role-players. Agenda 2063 seeks to achieve a “prosperous Africa based on inclusive growth and sustainable development” and “with climate resilient economies and communities”. This is necessary to climate-proof Africa’s economic and urban growth. Mr Chikoko further provided an overview of how C40 megacities in Africa are responding to the challenges facing them and offered some insight into what African Capital Cities can learn from these cities: It is important to make bold commitments and to hold each other accountable to achieving those commitments: • Megacities in Africa are taking actions to address climate change while, at the same time, also learning from and benchmarking with other cities on the continent and around the world. • Through city-to-city collaboration and benchmarking, C40 megacities in Africa have joined other cities globally in implementing sustainability activities that are of a world-class quality and standard. • The Climate Action in Megacities Repor t indicates that megacities are taking decisive action by investing in sustainability actions. The report indicates that 64% of actions are funded by the cities’ own budgets or savings. • In addition, cities are increasingly finding innovative financing mechanisms to address

climate change. A good example is the City of Johannesburg’s green bonds project, which won the global 2015 C40 Climate Leadership Awards. • C40 megacities are also investing in staffing for sustainability activities and have assigned sustainability roles to staff within the city government, thereby indicating the commitment cities are making to address issues of sustainability. For example, the host of the Sustainability Forum, the city of Tshwane, has its own sustainability unit placed within the Office of the Executive Mayor. • Megacities in Africa are ensuring access to the best available data for planning and measuring the impact of sustainability actions – and the difference between a city having a sustainability programme and actually being more sustainable can be proven through measurement and reporting. • Megacities in Africa are influencing change through high-level city diplomacy on sustainability at international levels. Megacity Mayors from Africa have been part of the conversation at global levels, helping to shape decisions on how sustainability can be arranged against the imperative to grow our economies, reduce poverty, create jobs and improve the quality of life of our people. He added that if these objectives are achieved then meaningful contribution would be made to the Sustainable Development Goals – especially SDG 11 and the AU’s Agenda 2063. The mantra ‘Africa-rising’ could then truly be celebrated and they would achieve ‘the Africa we want to see’. In closing, he highlighted the value of the Summit being held so soon after the signing of the Paris agreement, as that afforded mayors the opportunity to discuss sustainability with their peers and other stakeholders. Areas of major concern included a focus on limiting the temperature increase to 1.5 degrees above preindustrial levels (recognising that this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change); a focus on increasing the ability to adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change and foster climate resilience; and a focus on making finance flows consistent with a pathway towards low greenhouse gas emissions and climateresilient development. Cllr Kgosientso Ramokgopa: Executive Mayor – City of Tshwane Address by the host Mayor: Appropriate policies and frameworks for African urban growth Cllr Ramokgopa personally welcomed the representatives of African Capital Cities, stating that the assembly was in keeping with the various commitments that were made at the inaugural gathering that had been

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POST EVENT REPORT held the previous year. He commented that the gathering had itself been convened in recognition of cities’ innumerable challenges and referencing commitments set out in the Tshwane Declaration. He recalled how they had pledged their support of these programmatic commitments, understanding perfectly well that, between the current reality and the actual realisation of these goals, there would be many obstacles to overcome in these endeavours, but that it was important to hold true to the spirit and guidelines of the Constitutive Act of the African Union. The first task noted for the Forum was to assess where all the capital cities were in relation to the formative processes of the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, and to draw a balance sheet of all achievements and challenges in building the combined new initiative in the past 12 months. The need to meet challenges head on was also stressed (in the face of added challenges such as the financial crisis), but he added that it was essential not to lose sight of the imperative to transform African cities to bring about equitable and egalitarian order, as that is what lies at the heart of this initiative. Without formal and substantive cooperation, the continent stands no chance of reaching the luminous summit of a humane, just and equitable continent in which human worth is judged by precepts and standards that affirm the humanity of each and every person. The entire African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum initiative seeks to promote ideals of humanism, egalitarianism and solidarity, and for these programmes and undertakings to materialise requires not just leadership in general, but also a particular brand and style of leadership – an inclusive, facilitative, accountable and synergistic leadership that elevates the finest talents and qualities embedded within our communities. After the 2015 Forum there was a clearer idea of the challenges facing mayors and their cities, as well as what it will take to significantly surmount them. This would serve as a starting point towards achieving a sustainable developmental trajectory on the continent. Whether or not all stakeholders succeed, and whether or not they also all give it their best effort, will be attested to by the history that will unfold in the coming decades. Mr Andries Nel, Deputy Minister, Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs Address by the Deputy Minister Mr Nel expressed his thanks to all present by reciting key lines from the African Union Anthem, and emphasising the importance of cities as roots that feed the “African Tree of Life”. He stressed how this serves as a reminder of what Nelson Mandela had said in terms of how the architectural remains of the African city

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of Carthage speak of Africa’s contribution to the formation of the condition of civilisation. He referenced United Nations research that indicated that in 1950, a total of 30% of the world’s population lived in urban areas, today the figure is 54%, and is set to rise to 66% by 2050. He added that a further two-and-a-half billion people will be added to the world’s urban population by 2050, with 90% of this increase taking place in Asia and Africa. In fact, Africa is expected to be the fastest urbanising region between 2020 and 2050. In light of this anticipated population growth, it is essential to note that Africa currently only has only three megacities (cities with a population of more than 10 million), namely Cairo, Kinshasa and Lagos. It is projected that three more megacities will be added by 2030, namely Johannesburg, Luanda, and Dar es Salaam. Most of the fastest-growing cities with a population of less than 1 million people are also located in Asia and Africa. He stressed how the growth and management of urban areas must be guided in ways that unleash the potential of our cities and towns, adding that, in South Africa, there remains a need to reverse the legacy of apartheid-created spatial injustice. Ensuring that these most rapidly developing cities in the world develop sustainably is of vital importance, not only for the African continent, but also for the planet as a whole. To facilitate mobility and efficiency in the integration and densification process, land policies, infrastructure investments, and market-based energies require coherent policy frameworks with a primary focus on generating inclusivity and social cohesion through such endeavours. Consequently, there is a need for well-developed policies that promote integrated and sustainable urban development, failing which the continent will continue to face the downsides of urbanisation. This African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum brings together the ingenuity, the experience, the expertise and the commitment to find African solutions to African challenges, although there are also global challenges. The forum provides all stakeholders and role-players with a valuable opportunity to share and learn from one another, allowing for the exchange of ideas and experiences in terms of appropriate policies, design ingenuity, innovation, technical proficiency, robust implementation mechanisms and adequate infrastructural investments. He highlighted that, in doing so, effect is given to the injunction of the AU Agenda 2063 that must develop “an African approach to development and transformation, learning from the diverse, unique and shared experiences and best practices of various countries and regions as a basis of forging an African approach to transformation”. The Forum took place at an opportune time for this discussion internationally, continentally and nationally. The United

Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) recognise the importance of urban areas. Goal Eleven of the 17 SDG’s is “making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable”. AU Agenda 2063 recognises that “cities and other settlements are hubs of cultural and economic activities, with modernised infrastructure, and people have access to affordable and decent housing including housing finance together with all the basic necessities of life such as water, sanitation, energy, public transport and ICT”. One of Agenda 2063’s key objectives is to “provide opportunities for all Africans to have decent and affordable housing in clean, secure and well planned environments”. It proposes that this objective should be achieved through the following four measures: 1. Providing access to affordable and decent housing to all in sustainable human settlements; 2. Ensuring effective and territorial planning and land tenure, use and management systems; 3. Ensuring balanced development of all human settlements while embracing a rural urban continuum; 4. Improving the livelihoods of the great percentage of people working and living in slums and informal settlements. Implementing these objectives will require, in the words of South Africa’s National Development Plan, for a country to do three things: - Clarify and relentlessly pursue a national vision for spatial development; - Sharpen the instruments for achieving this vision; - Build the required capabilities in the state and among citizens. Mr Nel set out the National Government Framework emphasising that “we must say what we mean, and we must mean what we say, and most importantly we must do what we say we will do. Theory without action is empty, action without theory is blind”. Mr Nel listed the undertakings made at the first ACCSF last year and challenged participants to act on these undertakings. He then finally expressed his best wishes for the deliberations ahead. TECHNICAL PRESENTATIONS Kobie Brand, Director of ICEI Africa Role of African cities in supporting international climate agreements Kobie Brand emphasised the fact that urban centres are good locations for innovation and incubation, adding that it was essential to build the urban fabric over the next 40 years so that it can occupy at least twice the size of what we have now. Cities need mandates and frameworks but these are not always clear. That said, she stressed that www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


POST EVENT REPORT cities also need to stand up for themselves in order to both pioneer initiatives as well as to join others and to connect and lobby for the role of local government. People are also realising the importance of cities when it comes to climate discussions, although cities need to demonstrate where and how they can make a difference. The new SDC’s must include cities and should allocate resources to local government. She added that ICLEI will continue to engage with leading cities to assist them with measurements according to indicators, in addition to finding innovative finance solutions, and she called on all mayors to join this movement. She encouraged cities as a group to come on board as these activities and goals form part of a continuous loop, and from these types of forums, action follows and real projects flow. Jordi Farrando, Former General Secretary, International Union of Architects Case study: a new mobility plan for the city of Barcelona With his perspective of life on a different continent in the City of Barcelona, but having experienced many of the same problems, he stressed the importance of not focussing on the details but rather on the necessary ideas to find common ground. As an architect and urban designer, he believes in spacial planning as the basis for solving many urban challenges and cited the fact that, even though Barcelona is not a massive city (1.7 million inhabitants), it is a compact city and forms part of a larger metropolitan area that is home to 3.5 million people. The city sought to address two challenges: traffic congestion and insufficient public space. Traffic congestion has caused enormous problems for human and environmental health in terms of GHG emissions and

air pollution respectively, and the intensive use of streets by private vehicles has resulted in a major problem for the authorities in Barcelona. A key consequence of this is poor air quality (smog) which can often be seen hanging over the city, as is the case with many cities around the world. This has resulted in Barcelona failing to meet both EU and WHO targets for air quality. Some 3 500 deaths can be attributed to these factors annually, and these (in addition to many other health-related issues) might have been avoided. Public spaces in Barcelona are very compact, which is a good thing as the city does not have much public space. There are very few green spaces in Barcelona, in fact far below WHO standards in this respect. Sustainability is a key objective of their plan, which calls for a modal shift to small, sustainable modes of transportation to reduce air and noise pollution and a switch towards renewable energy sources. Following the hierarchy of Pedestrian–Bicycle–Public Transport–Goods and Services–Private cars, the goal is to reduce private vehicle mobility by 21%; to increase the number of public transport journeys by 3%; bicycle journeys by 75%; and pedestrian journeys by 10%. In order to ensure that the road infrastructure serves the city and its citizens, several actions/ interventions were planned: • Public transport: The historic transport network is complicated and intertwined (colloquially referred to as a “spaghetti network”) which is neither logical for transport users nor sustainable. The proposed plan involves switching to an Octagonal System – with route choices determined by direction, in other words, north, east, south or west. Commuters would be able to travel anywhere with, at most, one interchange. This rational system would be easy to follow, resulting

in shorter routes and a reduction in total mileage covered across the system, which would result in a reduction in pollution. • Bicycles: The introduction of bicycle lanes are a key component of the project and are intended to reach 65% of the population. • Super blocks: These are an amalgamation of about nine central city blocks, each of which is cordoned off and freed up internally through a park and walk/ride approach. All streets may still be used for all modes of transport but only during the specific time slot allocated for a particular mode. Apart from decongesting these areas, moving to the super blocks model could free up space at the corners of the super blocks and these could become interesting public spaces. It is envisaged that approximately 120 intersections could become available and could be dedicated as public space for pedestrians. Super blocks thus have the potential to increases the current allocation of 75 hectares of public space in Barcelona by 10 hectares and would make walking in the city easier and safer. Mr Farrando concluded by reaffirming his belief that the design and shape of cities is an important consideration in establishing a better quality of life for inhabitants. Celia Njenga, Head, Sub-Regional Office and Regional Programme Coordinator, Southern Africa United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Perspectives on urban sustainability in the African context Africa is increasingly being seen as a continent in transition, in part because of its high levels of urbanisation and a population with a

Ambassador Bene M’Poko & Hastings Chikoko

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POST EVENT REPORT high proportion of young people. The World Bank has stated that the fastest growing economies are in Africa and this growth is being led by cities. Africa can leapfrog to best practices and technologies and avoid following the high-impact path of the developed world. Politically, more local government authorities appear to be influencing decisions and strategies. A lot of progress has been made since 1992, with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted by world leaders officially coming in to force in early 2016. Ms Njenga highlighted some images and messages from the UN Environment Assembly in respect of related priority objectives: Poverty; Education; Health; and Environment – and the SDGs offer an integrated approach to follow in tackling these challenges. It is necessary to look at the current state of the environment. The key message in this regard is that there is enormous unfinished business in respect of resource efficiency, and it is imperative that local government shows the leadership required to ensure living standards are raised. A paradigm change is needed in order to move to more sustainable and safer environments. The importance of linkages should be considered with more compact and more connected cities enabling multiple modes of transport. A more integrated

approach is required and different stakeholders should engage each other to break administrative silos within cities. A key question people ask is, “what are the characteristics I must address for my city to be more sustainable?” It starts with a strategy, which plans key infrastructure, taking into account environmental factors and the economy and offering local opportunities for the private sector especially SMMEs. Cities should enable micro businesses. In society, people are key and they are moving to the cities in search of a higher standard of living. This raises the issue of resilience as informal settlements are highly vulnerable. Resource efficiency is also a key aspect of sustainable cities. Another focus should be business dialogue – how do city leaders enable businesses in a city? How can corporate players achieve the profits they need and how does being good corporate citizens help their bottom line? Local government, however, still lacks the skills to access finance and policies should be created to enable this. It is important that local government leaders remain informed and are networking in order to learn from each other. Christophe Nuttall, Executive Director, R20 Regions of Climate Action R20’s vision and role in assisting local government to develop and

communicate low-carbon and climate-resilient economic development projects for African Capital Cities R20 was established to support the implementation of green infrastructure and is part of an alliance of cities and regions, companies and the finance sector. It has been determined that sub-national authorities need bankable projects promising a return on investment in order to access green infrastructure funding. R20 runs an accompanying programme advancing projects within the following three categories: • LED street lights • Waste management • Renewable energy.

R20’s goal is to challenge role players to implement innovative projects. It wants citizens to have better living standards, access to electricity, access to water, etc, and believes that the policies and technology exist. There is, furthermore, financing available and willing investors. A hurdle is it can be difficult for the private sector to work together with government and R20 seeks to trigger the “magic” required to stimulate a broad roll-out of projects by connecting the dots between public policy, technology and finance. R20 has worked to achieve this alignment, and this is starting to pay dividends as it has just signed an $80m, 50MW PPA in Mali and this will be followed by a similar project in Senegal. R20 triggered the implementation of LED-street-light

The Green Mile Tour

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POST EVENT REPORT

Attending Mayors

projects in Brazil by covering the initial costs such as feasibility studies. It showed that the projects could have a seven-year return on investment through lower energy consumption and lower maintenance costs (than for conventional lighting). R20 is also keen to work with South African cities, and will be working with ICLEI to roll out the 100 Projects initiative, which seeks to pursue low-hanging fruits in key sectors. Funders have committed to cover feasibility studies and to launch 100 projects by COP 22. In terms of local government, the intention is to raise $100-billion and in order to access this money, bankable projects are required. This means ensuring a return on investment, and a 10-20% equity investment. SUMMARY OF MAYOR’S SUSTAINABILITY LEADERSHIP SHARES AND PROJECTS (Extract from the Executive Mayor’s Close Out Speech) Rabat, Morocco is demonstrating leadership and innovation in the implementation of renewable energy programmes and has set a tangible target of 52% of clean energy by 2030. Dakar, Senegal is responding to climate change challenges through a number of resilience and adaptation programmes. www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

Of importance is a micro-gardening project, which has multiple sustainability benefits that include food security, water conservation and community development while acting as carbon sinks. This project is well linked to the Tshwane project on the establishment of Agropolitan centres, therefore providing an excellent platform for shared learning. Monrovia, Liberia has a special focus on community-based enterprises to address the dual challenge of waste management and high unemployment and is actively seeking to lower the transmission rates of communicable diseases. Bamako, Mali has an innovative public engagement programme termed “the environmental protection brigade” aimed at ensuring that communities are jointly involved in pertinent environmental development projects like canalisation, sustainable water management programmes and drainage systems. Juba, South Sudan as the newest city in the world has managed to identify development challenges and prioritised the development of green infrastructure. This presents an excellent platform for the city to leap-frog and implement innovative construction solutions that

will ensure resilience and long-term sustainability. Bujumbura, Burundi as a relatively small city with just over one million inhabitants, is implementing a successful tree planting programme aimed at reducing river overflow and to support climate adaptation and mitigation by providing a much-needed carbon sink. Lome, Togo is tackling the issue of climate change adaptation through the use of marine sand to build catchment areas for coastal protection and flood prevention. To ensure reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, the city is reducing the number of private vehicles in urban centres by introducing and promoting the use of public transportation. Porto-Novo, Benin is rolling out a solar-powered-streetlighting programme and a semi-mechanised integrated waste management project. Sao Tome, Sao Tome and Principe is focusing on an intensive outreach programme on integrated solid waste management that incorporates recycling as a main intervention, targeting students and community members. Libreville, Gabon has a Green City Project that includes carbon

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POST EVENT REPORT sequestration and beautification through tree planting as well as the creation of a network of small and medium-sized enterprises in the green economy. Bangui, Central African Republic is focusing on ‘Light for All’, a project initiated by the city to address urban security in sensitive neighbourhoods and which includes provision for an additional 500 streetlights that are solar powered. Windhoek, Namibia has a policy intended to formalise informal settlements with location planning and connection plans for services. In dealing with severe drought the City has implemented new technologies and best practices. Lusaka, Zambia is focusing on an urban renewal programme and upgrading of slums to address rapid population growth in urban areas. Lilongwe, Malawi is strengthening its response to inclusive urban governance and management. This will be done through partnerships and stakeholder engagement to ensure buy-in in terms of sustainable infrastructure development. Maseru, Lesotho is addressing environmental sustainability by building a green city through a multi-billion rand solar project in partnership with private investors. Some of the projects developed by the city include a solid-waste-management project, retrofitting of street lights from conventional to solar, community gardens, and cleaning of the city by technical staff and councillors.

Harare, Zimbabwe plans to transition to a world-class city by 2025 through the development and implementation of green projects in partnership with the private sector. 14 000 Solar street lights will be installed on the major roads and airports by 2017 to improve security. Renewable energy for cooking and lighting will be generated via a biogas plant. Mbabane, Swaziland in response to challenges of unemployment, poverty and HIV/Aids, is stimulating economic growth through greening initiatives that support market-led businesses and improved understanding of environmental sustainability. Community members will be empowered to take advantage of economic and market opportunities. Compost from waste material is being produced by communities and has created a sizeable market in the city. Gaborone, Botswana is planning to build green by diverting funds earmarked for coal purchases for electricity to building sustainable green houses. The project will be implemented through partnerships with the private sector. This will also assist in driving sustainability initiatives throughout the city. DAY 2 ACTIVITIES Summary of the Business Briefing on SABC2 Morning Live During the second day of Sustainability Week, the TNA Media Business Briefing was broadcast live for two hours to over three million viewers tuned into South Africa Broadcasting Corporation’s (SABC’s)

Morning Live programme. SABC presenter, Peter Ndoro, conducted a panel discussion on sustainability in African Capital Cities with the following representatives: • Cllr Kgosientso Ramokgopa, Executive Mayor of City of Tshwane in South Africa, • Cllr Stephen Wani Michael Kaya, Mayor of Juba City in South Sudan • Ms Clara Doe Mvogo, Mayor of the City of Monrovia in Liberia and Chair of the Monrovia City Council • Mr Muesee Kazapua, Mayor of the City of Windhoek in Namibia • Mr Benito Jones, Mayor of Mbabane in Swaziland • Ms Kobie Brand, CEO of ICLEI Africa The guests shared ideas on how to develop more sustainable cities as well as empower and educate those living in those cities. The Green Mile Following the Business Briefing the mayors were escorted by electric vehicle from the CSIR campus to the Union Buildings. The event, billed as The Green Mile, involved 20 electric vehicles driving in procession through the streets of the City as a symbolic acknowledgement of the City of Tshwane’s commitment to low-carbon mobility. Having calculated the carbon footprint for the City of Tshwane for the past three years, the City has come to appreciate the fact that, after coal powered electricity, the transport sector is the second-biggest source of carbon emissions. It is thus incumbent on the City to institute multi-pronged climate mitigation interventions, in a view of reducing these transport-related emissions. The Green Mile

Mayor of Windhoek, Muesee Kazapua, Cllr Kgosientso Ramokgopa & Peter Ndoro at the TNA Business Briefing on SABC2 Morning Live

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www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


POST EVENT REPORT was highlighted part of this solution may be a shift to electric vehicles. The Exhibition Tour After the Green Mile, mayors were escorted on a tour of exhibition highlights. DAY 3: TECHNICAL TOURS The mayors were taken on a tour of the City of Tshwane’s sustainable projects: 1. Tshwane Food and Energy Centre in Bronkhorstspruit contributes to the city’s food security through livestock production and to its energy security by using photovoltaic solar power.

2. Bio2Watt Biogas Plant uses organic waste from livestock and other sources of bio waste within the city to produce bio gas, from which electricity is generated. This electricity from renewable sources is then fed into the City of Tshwane grid and used by BMW’s manufacturing facility, elsewhere on the grid. 3. Kwaggasrand Material Recovery Facility is a multi-purpose recycling facility being developed by New GX Enviro Solutions and Logistics, a waste, environmental management and bulk logistics service provider

currently providing waste management services to the City of Tshwane. The Kwaggasrand facility is made up of three components: a material recovery facility with recyclables processed from a free-bag system distributed by the city to residents; a composting facility where green waste will be shredded and turned into organic compost; and a building-rubble recycling facility where building rubble will be turned into aggregate. These three waste streams make up approximately 65% of the waste that is disposed at landfills.

Tshwane Food and Energy Centre

Tshwane Food and Energy Centre

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

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POST EVENT REPORT

SEMINARS AND SIDE EVENTS

GREEN BUILDING CONFERENCE

Speaker: Lindiwe Kwele, Deputy City Manager: Strategy development and implementation, City of Tshwane Topic: Welcome & Introduction Speaker: Llewellyn van Wyk, CSIR Topic: Setting the Scene Speaker: Jordi Farrando, Jordi Farrando Arquite (Spain) Topic: Green(er) green spaces Speaker: Bob van Bebber, Boogertman & Partners Topic: The BMW building Speaker: Dave Muller, Dave Muller Architects Topic: Green roofs and harvesting rainwater Speaker: Braam De Villiers, Earthworld Arch Topic: ….in the making of things … and in the thinking about things Speaker: Ken Stucke, ERA Architects Topic: House Jones Speaker: Buhle Mathole, Kabu Design Architects Topic: What is the dilemma of emerging architects? Speaker: Nela de Zoysa, Nela De Zoysa Design Corporation (Sri Lanka) Topic: Historic transformation of the Sri Lankan house from 1500 to present, in respect of Green architecture Speaker: Llewellyn van Wyk, CSIR Topic: Summary & Closing: Sustainable human settlements – smart infrastructure Speaker : Lindiwe Kwele, Deputy City Manager: Strategy development and implementation, City of Tshwane The conference was opened by Lindiwe Kwele, who welcomed the delegates to the conference. She noted the City of Tshwane’s commitment to sustainability and highlighted that the new municipal offices would be a greenrated building. Speaker: Jordi Farrando, Jordi Farrando Arquite (Spain) The keynote address was presented by Jordi Farrando. His presentation addressed achieving sustainability on the public scale and referenced

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three completed projec ts. The first project was in the North East of Spain, close to the French border, where the government purchased a holiday resort and demolished the facilities in order to restore the site to its original condition. The second project was in Riyadh in Saudi Arabia where a contaminated wetland was restored to serve as a public space while restoring its ecological value. The last project was also in Spain and involved the closing and rehabilitation of a municipal dump into a public facility. Speaker: Bob van Bebber, Boogertman & Partners After morning tea Bob van Bebber from B ooger tman presented the refurbishment of the BMW Head Office in Midrand.

This presentation was followed by a panel discussion where Dave Muller, Braam de Villiers and Ken Stucke spoke about their projects. The focus was on reducing energy and water use. Speaker: Buhle Mathole, Kabu Design Architects After lunch Buhle Mathole spoke about the difficulties experienced by emerging architects entering the mainstream profession. Speaker: Nela de Zoysa, Nela De Zoysa Design Corporation (Sri Lanka) This presentation was followed by the second keynote address given by Nela de Zoysa from Sri Lanka. She provided an historical overview of the development of the Sri Lanka house, noting that after independence the local architects adopted the tenets of the modern movement and ignored local tradition and the vernacular response to climate. She then presented two projects where she built on the vernacular to design two homes. The conference was concluded by the conference chair Llewellyn van Wyk who noted the need for environmental designers to treat their sites with the same care and

value that a restoration architect deals with heritage projects. CONCLUSION The conference chair closed the conference by sharing some work the CSIR has started around Smart Cities. He noted that while most definitions of smart cities aim at the extensive use of ICT, the preferred definition includes triple bottom line approaches with a focus on the wise management of natural resources. He shared a diagram in which the city is divided into three primary spheres namely the natural environment, society, and artefacts. He also noted the parallel references in the South African Bill of Rights to these three components. Identifying the existential risks facing our planet as a result of anthropological actions, he stressed that environmental designers have to construct an alternative narrative about what the future may look like. This narrative, he argued, will be dependent on the values adopted: in this regard, he suggested a similar approach to engaging with the natural environment to that which architectural restorers adopt in restoration of historical buildings where, in some cases, the best option may be to not intervene. In summarising he noted that the three spheres can be associated with leading protagonists from the 1960s, namely Rachel Carson with regard to the natural environment; Kingsley Davis with regard to human society; and more recently William McDonough with regard to artefacts. The intersection of the three spheres is where and when green architecture is realised. With a final slide depicting Joni Mitchell and the words from her song Woodstock “got to get ourselves back to the garden”, he thanked the delegates and the speakers for the participation and closed the conference. Summary provided by facilitator LLewellyn van Wyk

SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SEMINAR

Speaker: Dorah Nteo, Chief Sustainability Specialist, City of Tshwane www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


POST EVENT REPORT Topic: Opening and welcome Speaker: Oliver Johnston, Sola Future Topic: Current and potential challenges being faced by IPPs – grid access, land access, etc. How are leading projects overcoming these challenges? Speaker: S akkie Leimecke, Head of Energy, Nedbank Corporate Investment Banking Topic:  Access to funding for REIPPPP projects now and into the future, the effect of the devaluation of the Rand, and the downgrading of SA Sovereign debt, and other factors. Speaker: Sisa Njikelana, Chairman, SAIPPA Topic: IPP projects in Africa – risks and opportunities? Speaker: Greg Austin, Juwi Renewable Energies Topic: Large-scale industrial IPP projects – defining the scope of this key opportunity Speaker: Megan Euston-Brown, SEA Topic: Municipal-scale renewable energy projects – large projects for ‘own use’ by municipalities, and the facilitation of ‘wheeling’ transactions Speaker: Marco Van Dijk, University of Pretoria Topic: The potential of conduit hydro power as a source of renewable energy for cities Speaker: Johan Thyse, Sasol Topic: Expanding on the gas economy opportunity in South Africa Speaker: Shepherd Shonhiwa, MD, Egoli Gas Topic: case study – the MTN Head Office project, and defining the opportunity for large energy users to switch away from grid electricity? Speaker: Thabiso Mageza, Director, CNG Holdings Topic: Gas infrastructure as a key trigger for the gas economy in South Africa and what can be achieved regionally? Speaker: Dr Henrietta Langmi from CSIR’s HySA Infrastructure Centre of Competence Topic: Hydrogen: alternative energy source for the future? Session 1: REIPPPP update and opportunities Speaker: Oliver Johnston, Sola Future Johnston provided an update on the REIPPPP and identified the key challenges facing IPPs, which included the lengthy and expensive bidding process and the lack of clarity in respect of dates for Round 5, and assurances from the IPP office on Round 6 and beyond. In the bidding process the Subdivision of Agriculture Land Act, the Water Use Licence application www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

Sustainable Energy Seminar Day 1

processes, and non splitting of EIAs is causing costs, delays and thus risk. On the technical side grid connection is looming as a key constraint with significant potential cost for projects having to perform bespoke upgrades. On the social side land claims, and community unrest can affect projects. Speaker: Sakkie Leimecke, Nedbank Corporate Investment Banking With limited bond funding and long term ZAR funding requirements limiting international banks and development financial institutions, the majority of senior debt lending has come from SA commercial banks and DFIs, but funding limits are being reached which, along with Basel III requirements, makes syndication strategies very important for future rounds. While funding constraints are unlikely, future REIPPPP rounds may begin to compete for funding capacity. Equity participation from IPPs, especially internationally, has been strong although BEE funding is becoming constrained. Investor returns are under pressure however from lower tariffs coupled with higher costs triggered by the devaluation of the Rand. If SA’s sovereign debt rating was downgraded investors would expect greater returns, pushing up bidding prices. Panel discussion: Question: What are the current and potential challenges to the successful ongoing roll out of the REIPPPP, and how can these be overcome? In answering

the question speakers cautioned that the ongoing success of the REIPPPP could not be taken for granted. Technical challenges such as grid connection and financial challenges triggered by a devaluing of the Rand and the threat of a fiscal downgrade, were real issues that government needed to address. Session 2: Other key opportunities for IPPs Speaker: Sisa Njikelana, SAIPPA Independent power production/private sector participation in Africa dates back to 1994 and to take advantage of this key market opportunity IPP projects must assess risks by looking at a country’s policies, laws, regulations and programmes; economic situation and investment climate, the regional dynamics and the local and global investment appetite, skills profile, technological capacity, but most importantly political will. Speaker: Fezeka Stuurman, juwi Renewable Energies Stuurman briefly outlined the status quo, explored the costs of renewables, and presented the business case for PV in economic hubs. She went on to assess the viability of industrial PV, the market mechanisms and off-takers for renewables and the technology solutions, arguing that renewables are cost-effective and reliable, and that we have excellent renewable resources in South Africa. The business case for industry to

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POST EVENT REPORT Sustainable Energy Seminar Day 2 Panel Discussion

make use of RE is improving but will require time, effort and commitment from a myriad stakeholders, and different mechanisms for deployment, but evidence shows that the market is moving. Speaker: Megan Euston-Brown, SEA Euston-Brown summarised the policy framework affecting the relationship between municipalities and renewable energy, and proceeded to evaluate the role/opportunity for municipalities in generating RE from technologies such as landfill gas, waste water/biogas, and municipal rooftop PV, all of which have unique case studies illustrating challenges and opportunities. Another key opportunity is for municipalities to facilitate 3rd party RE projects by allowing energy to be wheeled across their grids. Speaker: Marco Van Dijk, University of Pretoria Van Dijk introduced the technology, setting its applications and low cost. In conclusion he said it is believed that there are numerous hydro power opportunities in South Africa in urban areas, and that these represent feasible and sustainable solutions that are cost effective in utilizing existing water infrastructure. Van Dijk presented as case studies two City of Tshwane pilot projects. Q&A: Speakers were unanimous that significant options for private PPAs were still underdeveloped. Session 3: Advancing the gas economy in South Africa Speaker: Johan Thyse, Sasol The successful development of the gas industry in South Africa was achieved

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through collaboration and a master plan. Gas from Mozambique was facilitated by Sasol being an anchor off taker. The collaboration between Sasol and its partners resulted in an infrastructure investment of R21bn by the end of 2014 and the gas industry has tripled in growth since the introduction of natural gas. From manufacturing to power generation, a wide group of gas users has developed and the sector has shown a 200% increase in volume from 2004 to 2015. Advantages of a meaningful gas economy in SA include diversification in our energy mix, that is low-capital intensive, expeditious and has a lower environmental footprint in terms of water, air quality and C02 emissions, and there are significant regional gas reserves. The benefits and the foundations for significant growth in the gas economy are thus firmly set.

gas distribution networks, industries and power generation systems, to customers who are not on the existing gas network. It specialises in the provision of gas filling stations for both private and public transport.

Speaker: Shepherd Shonhiwa, Egoli Gas The Tri-Generation systems being rolled out by Egoli Gas operate with natural gas by fuelling a reciprocating or turbine-driven generator. The benefits of using natural gas include price, abundance, and through the tri-generation engines, massive efficiencies. Natural gas power plants can also be used for balancing the grid and pre-empting future electricity shortages.

Q&A: Panellists agreed that the foundations existed for significant growth in the Gas economy, and that this development would enable South Africa to make a stepped decrease in C02 emissions.

Speaker: Thabiso Mageza, CNG Holdings Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is natural gas compressed into a high-pressure container for transportation or storage. CNG has become a vehicle fuel alternative to oil-based petrol and diesel and is one of the safest transport fuels available. The Group supplies compressed natural gas via a Virtual Pipeline® (via road). It is with this innovative modular road transport system that it can safely and economically transport natural gas to CNG refuelling stations,

Speaker: Dr Henrietta Langmi, CSIR’s HySA Infrastructure Centre of Competence Hydrogen-Fuel-cell technology has the potential to deliver clean energy to the South Africa energy mix, contributing to a low carbon future. South Africa enjoys a competitive advantage having nearly 80% of the world’s platinum group metals required in this technology. To develop the technology in SA, the Department of Science and Technology with Hydrogen South Africa (HySA) initiated the National Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technologies Research, Development and Innovation Strategy, a 15-year programme initiated in 2008.

CONCLUSION Delegates attending the 1st day of the Sustainable Energy Seminar were exposed to a wide variety of perspectives relating to the supply side of the South African alternative energy market, with key opportunities and some caution highlighted in respect of large scale renewable energy and gas projects. DAY 2 Speaker: Chilula Lombe, Solid Green Consulting Topic: Passive design for energy efficiency buildings Speaker: J eanne Parker-Weekes, IES www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


POST EVENT REPORT Topic: Building information modelling as an instrument to closing the performance gap Speaker: Grace Stead, ICLEI Topic: Lessons learned from Urban LEDS project Speaker: Faith Mkhacwa, Project Manager, NCPC-SA Topic: The power of a systematic approach – SANS 50 001 as a mechanism to unlock clean development and lock in savings Speaker: Albert Williams, Energy Cybernetics Topic: Case study: Review of recent energy efficiency projects Speaker: Christie Van Vuuren, Head of Energy Intelligence, Energy Partners Topic: Impact of plant monitoring and management on sustainable savings Speaker: Dr. Tobias Bischof-Niemz, CSIR Topic: What is the potential for SSEG interventions such as rooftop solar as a means to reduce demand for grid electricity, and meet target C02 emissions in SA? Speaker: Aurelie Ferry, Renewable Energy Technical Advisor, SALGA Topic: SSEG – Feed-in tariffs or net metering? What is the most advantageous for all stakeholders? Session 1: Energy efficient buildings Speaker: Chilula Lombe, Solid Green Consulting Lombe started off the morning session by outlining why companies should consider green building, and suggesting ways to encourage architects to employ more environmentally friendly designs, which show long term savings on energy bills. He went on to discuss the legislation around energy efficiency, with the feeling that it is not strict enough to force companies to make the most of the energy savings. Speaker: Jeanne Parker-Weekes, IES Parker-Weekes outlined what the building of the future might look like – with the ever advancing pace of virtual design, the sky is the

Food Security Seminar www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

limit. She went on to describe how companies can make the most of the energy performance potential of optimal operations. She also highlighted how to bridge the performance gap between promised energy efficiency when building green, compared to actual returns. Often buildings are not used in the manner they were designed for, thus reducing effectiveness. Speaker: Grace Stead, ICLEI Stead rounded out the first session’s speeches by looking at the some of the successes of the Urban LEDS project that has been successfully rolled out in some of the poorest areas of South Africa. The project seeks to bring renewable energy principles and technology closer to the man in the street. Stead outlined some of the success stories; with schools in rural areas enjoying the benefits of being about to satisfy their energy needs in the face of blackouts. Panel discussion: The panel discussion centred on the rollout of green building principles and technology in South Africa. The experts agreed that the uptake is slower than needed, with only progressively minded companies unlocking the benefits of true energy efficient construction practices. It was agreed that greater legislation/attention is needed to force architects to employ more greening methodology, while it is also vitally important to make efficiency principles and technology more accessible to the man in the street. Session 2: Energy efficient plant and industrial processes Speaker: Faith Mkhacwa, NCPC-SA Mkhacwa titled her speech, ‘changing operational behaviours’ which is very fitting in 2016. You can have the best technology in the world, but if you can’t change staff behaviour, you will never unlock the full potential of energy efficiency principles. She stated that companies that are serious about efficiency see the results on their balance sheet. Objective reporting was another key point to

come out, together with the need to address the skills gap within the EE industry. Speaker: Albert Williams, Energy Cybernetics Williams’ focus for his speech was compressed air, and how wasteful some companies are in this regard. Many companies rely on compressed air in their daily operations, and you’d be surprised the extent of wastage and misuse of the compressed air-equipment, which uses a lot of energy. An example was raised of how the employers of one company use the compressed air as an ‘air-conditioner’ during lunch break, which is very wasteful. Again, more skills development and technological interventions are needed. Speaker: Christie Van Vuuren, Energy Partners Van Vuuren outlined the many projects that Energy Partners is involved in in South Africa, from large supermarket chains through to logistics companies. His main focus was refrigeration. Like the previous speakers he pointed to a lack of awareness from workers as being the biggest factor in poor energy efficiency levels, with people leaving large freezer doors open all day long for example. He also touched on the some of the technological advancements in EE. Panel discussion: The discussion centred around the promotion of energy efficient principles within the workplace, as well as how to breakdown previous misconceptions, how to fully embrace technology and get the maximum amount of savings therein. There was an agreement that more legislation would be beneficial to encourage companies to comply. Skills development is vital going forward, whilst it is important for workers who have picked up skills to use them at home too, to further spread the energy efficiency message. Session 3: Small-scale embedded solar generation in South Africa Speaker: Dr. Tobias Bischof-Niemz, CSIR World-renowned Dr Bischof-Niemz outlined some of the key challenges and opportunities facing smallscale embedded solar generation in Southern Africa, from logistical problems to changing attitudes towards solar. He posed the question of how best to encourage embedded generation for business, with only the Western and Eastern Cape offering incentives to the public to feed back into the grid. It is clear that a lot more can be done to promote smallscale generation. Speaker: Aurelie Ferry, SALGA Ferry, talked about the hot topic of net metering vs. feed-in-tariffs. With only Cape Town and Port Elizabeth (in more recent times) offering incentives for small scale embedded solar generation, South Africa is really missing

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POST EVENT REPORT a golden opportunity to become less reliant on fossil fuels. She insisted that South Africa needs to find the best solution that can work for all stakeholders –- for government and business’ needs to always align. Panel discussion: Both speakers are experts in the field of solar, and the audience was treated to a high-level debate around the pros and cons of small-scale solar generation. It was agreed that legislation on a national level needs to facilitate this process. Dr Niemz also cautioned about not going overboard and making the same mistake as Germany and over-investing in solar, which has had a negative effect on their energy mix. It is essential to have a balanced mix of energy options. CONCLUSION Overall, the seminar raised some important points as we take energy efficiency to the next level. Being energy efficient is undoubtedly the first fuel, with 10-20% savings on offer for companies that employ both behavioural and technological remedies to high usage. It is essential that everybody is on board, from the cleaner to the managing director; everybody has a part to play. And for small-scale solar to really take off, feed-in-tariffs are essential countrywide to promote it. Summary provided by facilitators Gordon Brown and Greg Simpson

FOOD SECURITY SEMINAR

Speaker: Frans Boshielo, Deputy City Manager Topic: Opening and Welcome Speaker: Tatiana von Bornmann, WWF Topic: Food security: current challenges and education for the future Speaker: Dr Jonathan Crush, Balsillie School of International Affairs, Canada Topic: Assessing the Sustainable Development Goals – what happened to urban food security? Speaker: Chris Wild, Executive Director of Food & Trees for Africa Topic: Socio political and legislative trendsaffecting regional food security and potential opportunities from an NGO perspective Speaker: Kibi Komen Project Manager, City of Tshwane Agropolitan Village Topic: Case-study: City of Tshwane’s Agropolitan Village, Food and Energy Centre, Rethabiseng Speaker: Prof Raymond Auerbach, Director, Rainman Landcare Foundation Topic: Environmentally intelligent strategies to improving long

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term productivity – benefits and competitive advantages of organic farming? Or intelligent organic farming in times of climate change and vulnerability Speaker: Ernst Zeeman, Enviro Manager, DGB (Douglas Green Bellingham) Inc Boschendal Topic: Creating competitive advantage through leadership in efficient and sustainable operations in the agri-sector Speaker: Prof Raymond Auerbach, NMMU & CoE Food Security Topic: The right to healthy food: Industrial agriculture, obesity and declining food quality - what is wrong with our food system? Speaker: Dr Mercy Chikoko, Food and Agriculture Organisation Topic: Staple foods, health and human productivity: Food security issue? Frans Boshielo, Deputy City Manager Opening and Welcome As Tshwane braces for the effects of climate change the City Sustainability Unit recognises th challenge of availability of nutritious food at affordable prices. The city has two exemplary projects in the food-energy nexus, showing that urban sustainability planning must incorporate agricultural development for food security and to transition to a lowcarbon, resource efficient and climate-resilient city. Session 1, State of regional agriculture to ensure food ecurity. Speaker: Tatiana von Bornmann, WWF The food system is subject to socio-economic and political influencers and the interplay of the

food, energy and water. A growing population, a decline in agricultural and related infrastructure development and the subsequent pressures on critical natural resources led to current food insecurity. 60 to 100% of food produced in sub-Saharan Africa is from smallholder agriculture. One third of production is wasted. Regional dialogue and more collaboration are essential as we share resources and are impacted by climate change. Speaker: Dr Jonathan Crush, Balsillie School of International Affairs, Canada His studies have looked at upstream areas of food networks, particularly where it arrives in urban networks working through www.afsun. org and Hungry Cities partnership. Global exponential urbanisation is unstoppable yet food security interventions focus on rural populations and the SDGs omit urban food security altogether. Both SDG 11 and 2 replicate long-held and problematic assumptions in the international development agenda. He referenced Carolyn Steel’s Hungry City: How Food Shapes Our Lives. Speaker: Chris Wild, Food & Trees for Africa Corporates have become more discerning about investment, with education and skills being attractive. Government is implementing stricter controls. Use it or lose it land reform is positive. B-BBEE is the biggest pool of funding and can drive more young people into food production and processing. There are some exemplary projects in Transkei. Panel discussion: A shared vision for developing a more resilient regional agricultural sector. Thulile Dlamini, the guest panellist expected from DAFF, did not attend The discussion was on: the food, water, energy nexus and points raised include:

COT, Agropolitan Village

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


POST EVENT REPORT • • • • • • • • •

It is unnatural to separate environment and society Support for small-scale farmers and fisheries Easier access to markets C o n f l i c t s p u r re d b y fo o d insecurity Severe challenge of water Prices as big driver N e e d fo r t r a n s b o u n d a r y agreements and response mechanisms to address crises El Nino might be ending but full impacts still to come Big learning curve to get subsistence farmer to supply markets and export.

Session 2: Operational strategies to improve long term productivity Speaker: Kibi Komen, City of Tshwane Agropolitan Village A Green economy project to deliver sustainable development goals, provide food and mitigate income inequality, which is providing many lessons and employs 186 people.It comprises:: Integrated food and energy • production • Subsistence and commercial • Direct market access Value chain control with export • potential Biogas plant to power all buildings, • water pumps and cooling units Borehole and rain harvested water Innovative financing – municipal, grants, equity and revenue.

Speaker: Prof Raymond Auerbach, Rainman Landcare Foundation Organic small-scale farmers have been blocked from getting organic standards into government. Current agricultural practices are not sustainable, don’t feed the world and lose billions of tons of soil carbon annually, thereby exacerbating climate change. Organics, landcare and agro-ecology can feed Africa, use water efficiently and improve food quality. The Green revolution was based on an excessive use of external inputs and consumed non-renewable energy – not green. Innovation and farmer support, especially marketing, is needed. Speaker 3: Ernst Zeeman, DGB (Douglas Green Bellingham) Inc Boschendal The company representing a huge range of brands installed a solar system at an organic plant in Stellenbosch in efforts to reduce and offset their impacts, saving 30% of total energy bill. Lightweight packaging has saved more than 3 million glass kg. Water recycling reduced consumption by 18%, waste management and stringent recycling led www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

to efficiencies. Their offset is a community bamboo project where over 3 000 tons CO2 will be sequestrated. Panel discussion: Key operational actions farmers can take to improve their climate resilience and advance their competitiveness This panel answered participant questions rather than focusing on the panel question Organics are feasible in urban areas Tshwane’s outgrower facilitation is a nursery to advance commercialization and to create a template for small-scale farmer facilitation on zoning, EIAs and other legislative requirements Government and private sector should work more closely together to address poverty, environmental and food issues DGB hopes to sell energy back into the grid as in one of two municipalities are allowing this though energy feedback and water harvesting require elaborate certified systems Operational strategies are needed to improve long-term productivity. Session 3: The right to healthy food - is food security more complex than just abundance – i.e. does it extend to healthy, safe and ecologically farmed food? Speaker: Prof Raymond Auerbach, NMMU & CoE Food Security Food insecurity is a wicked and very complex problem. Current systems are contributing to health and environmental problems. Yields have trebled, calories have increased but protein, vitamins and minerals have not. Organic foods today compare in quality to food produced a hundred years ago. Food sovereignty is essential - right of people to healthy and culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods, and their right to define their own food and agriculture systems. Speaker: Dr Mercy Chikoko, Food and Agriculture Organisation Obesity and malnutrition lead to severe ill health at great cost to lives and economy. Implementation of South Africa Food-Based Dietary guidelines is needed. Strengthening inclusive local food value chains for small scale farmers will ensure access to nutritious affordable food. Taxation and food regulation, healthy messaging and encouraging regular physical exercise, creating an environ­m ent in which rich and poor are empowered to make healthy choices for healthy diets throughout the life are required. Panel discussion: Topic: Converging national health and agri-policies

A few African countries are attempting to align these policies but in most it is conflicted. Vested interest ensures insufficient political will to address real health and agricultural interests. Health budgets are spent on diseases resulting from poor nutrition and agricultural budgets often on modified seed, fertilizer and pesticides. Cultural issues sway food choices and unhealthy foods are more accessible. Food stamps and taxation (e.g. sugar tax) could work but enforcement is vital. Government and business must focus on public awareness and education, including agricultural education for girls. CONCLUSION Feeding 9-10 billion people by 2050 whilst dealing with runaway climate change are two of the greatest challenges facing humanity. In the face of drought, political uncertainty, intensive farming, diminishing agricultural returns, food insecurity, obesity and associated health challenges in our communities we are going to need to reconsider current systems, innovate and cooperate regionally and internationally. Summary provided by Dr Jeunesse Park

SUSTAINABLE WATER SEMINAR

Speaker: Stephen Notoane, Official, City of Tshwane Topic: Water leaks Speaker: Kobie Brand – ICLEI Topic: Building resilience is doing in Africa Speaker: Dr. Richard Meissner, CSIR Topic: Water security at local government level: What do people think? Speaker: Ronnie McKenzie, WRP Topic: Small-scale PPP as a means of reducing water losses in municipal water supply systems Speaker: Graham Young, University of Pretoria Topic: Intelligent landscape architecture as a strategy to improve urban resilience to water-related risks Speaker: Kevin Cilliers, Regional Manager, NCPC-SA Topic: Water risk, a CDP/WEF perspective, water footprinting Speaker: Dr Marco Lotz, Sustainability Carbon Specialist, Nedbank Topic: Development of a water basin relative risk screen to influence credit criteria Speaker: Dr Coleen Vogel, Professor, University of Johannesburg Topic: Living with climate risks – challenges and opportunities Speaker: Sipho Maagabula – Inkomati-Usuthu Catchment Management Agency

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POST EVENT REPORT Topic:

Drought in the Inkomati-Usuthu catchment area

Speaker: Stephen Notoane, City of Tshwane This year’s seminar attempted to explore the issue of water risk. The World Economic Forum’s Global Risk Report 2016, which is a report that features perspectives from nearly 750 experts on the perceived impact and likelihood of 29 prevalent global risks over a 10-year timeframe, identifies a water crisis as the 8th largest risk in terms of likelihood. Then, in terms of impact, a water crisis is the 3rd-highest in the top 10. The day’s deliberations began with the City of Tshwane’s Strategic Executive Director, Steven Notoane opening speech, which painted a picture of risk that involves the extent of municipal water leaks and the impact that wastewater is having on our water quality. He did, however, clearly describe how the City is addressing the waste water issue and improving water efficiency through innovation. Session 1: Local government perspectives Speaker: Kobie Brand – ICLEI The Regional Director of ICLEI Africa, Ms Kobie Brand, gave the audience a macro understanding of risk at a systems level where climate change and resilience are all playing a role at a local scale. She explained the importance of the development of a local action plan, the cost-benefit analysis and the financing thereof in the development of greater resilience to the threat of climate change, particularly on water accessibility. Speaker: Dr. Richard Meissner, CSIR After a snapshot view of risk at both the local and macro scales, Richard Meissner of the CSIR invited us into a view of water risk that encapsulates the concept of governance. The major thrust of his talk was how water security is about the individual, which is a “part of their lived experience.” Speaker: Ronnie McKenzie, WRP Ronnie McKenzie of WRP picked up on the theme the Mr Notoane opened with, which was municipal water losses. He reiterated that approximately 30% of water loss comes from municipalities. His very interesting perspective on this was that South Africa has one of the highest pressurised water systems in the world. For example, Asia works with 5m3 of pressure whereas South Africa currently supplies water at anywhere between 100250m3 of water. As a result of his case study based approach, he also highlighted that very real importance of stakeholder engagement and community buy-in to projects that are based in that local grassroots context.

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Speaker: Graham Young, University of Pretoria The landscape is the building block of sustainable water design. This was one of the major tenets of Graham Young’s presentation. Young, who is a senior lecturer of landscape architecture at the University of Pretoria, maintained that the best approach in water management is to have a holistic view by looking at water sources and then to use the built environment to help manage and protect these ecosystem services. Session 2: National perspectives Speaker: Kevin Cilliers, NCPC-SA Kevin Cilliers of the National Cleaner Production Centre of South Africa helped his audience understand risk from a measurement (or lack thereof ) perspective. He challenged his audience to understand, through the mechanism of water footprinting, how well we – or business supply chains – know their water footprint. Kevin introduced us to different types of footprinting methodologies, virtual water and the life-cycle-analysis approach. However, a question that seemed to go unanswered was, how does this methodology help inform policy? Also, what standards inform the use of various footprinting tools? Speaker: Dr Marco Lotz, Nedbank Nedbank ’s Sustainability Carbon Specialist, Marco Lotz explored the role of shadow pricing in terms of managing water in a basin that is showing signs of water scarcity. As he explained, Nedbank’s representation of a water shadow pricing table is similar to the representation of a currency table reflecting exchange rates – depending on which basin you are in, the price of water will differ and internal trading will have to be justified on the basis of the basin you operate in. Session 3: A regional perspective Speaker: Dr Coleen Vogel, University of Johannesburg Coleen Vogel demonstrated that despite the region being at climate and thus water risk, it’s not enough just to look at climate modelling but that vulnerability assessments are rapidly growing in importance. But vulnerability assessments are difficult to do. Why? This is because there are now multiple risks like drought, fire, flood and added to this, climate. Many of these risks are developmentally driven and so cannot just be attributed to climate change. Speaker: Sipho Maagabula – InkomatiUsuthu Catchment Management Agency

In conclusion, Mr Sipho Maagabula of the Inkomati-Usuthu Catchment Management Agency spoke to us of the work that the CMA is doing in the eastern region of the country to help allocate water fairly and efficiently to stakeholders. He did share, however, how precarious the situation is as water is becoming scarcer and demand from emerging sugar cane farmers and international neighbours is growing rapidly. The risk to both international treaties and agricultural production was flagged. Summary provided by Garth Barnes

VISION ZERO WASTE SEMINAR

Speaker: Mthobeli Kolisa, SED: Environmental Management Services, City of Tshwane Topic: Opening and welcome Speaker: David Baggs, EcoSpecifier/GreenTag (Australia) Topic: Visualising the circular economy using life cycle analysis Speaker: Philip Button, Senior Sales Manager, Belgotex Topic: Design of products to maximise recyclability and reusability of materials – a Green Tag case study Speaker: Henry Nuwarindo, NCPC Topic: Finding off-take partners for waste streams – the Industrial Symbiosis Project Speaker: Reon Pienaar, AECOM Topic: Waste beneficiation – What is preventing us from maximising recycling and minimising disposal? Speaker: Masopha Moshoeshoe, NewGX Topic: Case study – leading clean materials recovery facility in City of Tshwane Speaker: Andrew Venter, CEO, Wildlands Conservation Trust Topic: Innovating grass roots recycling Speaker: Farai Tererai, Eco Furniture Programme Topic: Case study of beneficiation of waste materials in action Speaker: Dr Chris Crozier, REDISA Topic: Case study – tire waste beneficiation in South Speaker: Sean Thomas, Bio2Watt Topic: Waste to energy case study – the Bio2Watt plant in Bronkhorstspruit Session 1: Design for waste minimisation and recycling Speaker: David Baggs, EcoSpecifier/ GreenTag (Australia) David Baggs led the opening presentation stressing the dire need for fundamental changes in production, setting out the increasingly harmful impacts of production www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


POST EVENT REPORT and materials flows on human and environmental health. Baggs highlighted multiple mass animal deaths impacting those species around the world, and also set out the realities as far as climate change is concerned. This set the context for motivation to effect change, with the opportunity to go beyond limiting harm to bringing about restorative actions and systems. What is required is a circular system underpinned by a series of metrics that not only measure life cycle impacts but also life cycle benefits, for the whole story to be told which goes beyond measuring what needs to be done or is being done, but extends to restoring systems and resources. The Green Tag Certification system, enables producers to achieve fundamentally necessary and desirable c h a n g e s w i t h i n t h e i r p ro d u c t i o n processes and achieve real life ideal outcomes. Speaker: Philip Button, Belgotex Button discussed the Belgotex experience of going through and achieving Green Tag Certification within the South African context. He star ted with the Belgotex philosophy and set of stewardship actions, which provided the foundation from which the company undertook the Green Tag process. He concluded that the good news is that while once it may have been challenging to source green flooring products locally, the range of options is growing without sacrificing durability, quality or aesthetics.

facilitate the development of business relationships between these parties resulting in mutual economic, social and environmental benefits. To date 10 businesses have been assisted resulting in cost savings of R1.4m, carbon savings of 3 121 tons, industrial H20 saved 45 628 (M 3), 6 new contract jobs created, a reduction of 220 tonnes of virgin resources used, 440 tonnes of waste diverted from landfill. Speaker: Reon Pienaar, AECOM The key benefits of recycling include job creation, that products made from recycled material have a considerably lower carbon footprint, recycling recovers scarce resources that would otherwise be landfilled, thus extending the life of landfills for waste that cannot be recycled. Households in Gauteng generate about 10kg to 20kg of recyclable waste per month consisting of glass, plastic, paper, metals, and cardboard. Currently SA generates 42 million m3 solid waste per year and 90% is landfilled. So, what is preventing us from maximising recycling? We must be more waste-aware, improve understanding of the value of waste, focus on separation at source, scale up, provide incentives for people to separate at source, impose stricter enforcement of legislation, but more than any other factor what is preventing us from maximising recycling and minimising disposal is US! Speaker: Masopha Moshoeshoe, NewGX In recent years, the City of Tshwane has been forced to close three of its eight largest landfill sites as they were full. Waste was diverted to other sites at great cost in terms of transport.

A new approach was required. NewGX is working with the City to meet the National Waste Management Strategy targets: 25% of recyclables to be diverted, 95% of urban households to have access to waste services; 69 000 new jobs created in the waste sector, 2 600 additional SMEs to be established and a minimum of 80% of the municipalities to run awareness campaigns. All municipalities develop and implement costs reflective of tariffs; 50% increase in the number of successful compliance enforcement actions, and 800 EMIs appointed in the three spheres of government to enforce the Waste Act. The intention is to implement a circular economy in respect of dry waste. Speaker: Andrew Venter, Wildlands Conservation Trust The NPO key is partnerships and SA government is the biggest partner, with 20% of income from corporates. First project–Trees for Life concept, which culminated in R2m being invested in 166 small business concepts. In 2010 they were looking at what else to do and recognised that recycling was an opportunity. They started with a bakkie and a trailer donated by Unilever, and now collect hundreds of thousands of tons a month. The model has exploded and last month 50 000 tons of recycling was collected by 2 000 individuals equating to 27 000 person-days of employment. The model is expensive and not replicable without government subsidy. Demand is there but some materials streams are problematic and these were summarised. The current

Panel discussion – Question: Can the vision for zero waste begin to inform design? The panel agreed that emphasising the role of product design and specification at the outset was a powerful driver of the circular model, as its at this point that recyclability of products can be most effectively influenced. Belgotex set out the active changes they made in respect of product design and the specification of input materials to enable recycling, and indicated that in many cases their reclaimed products are washed and donated for reuse post life rather than being recycled. Session 2: Materials recovery Speaker: Henry Nuwarindo, National Cleaner Production Centre The Industrial Symbiosis Project, funded by the dti and implemented by the NCPC, pursues recourse efficiency by seeking out companies with waste streams currently being landfilled and matching them with companies and entrepreneurs who may see value in these materials as inputs for existing or new products. ISP then seeks to www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

Vision Zero Waste Seminar

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POST EVENT REPORT

Q&A: A number of excellent questions were posed and discussed by the panel. Session 3: Waste materials beneficiation Speaker: Farai Tererai, Eco Furniture Programme The programme was set up by the DEA to beneficiate the wood stock being generated from the clearing of alien plant species under the Working for Water programme, converting the felled trees into furniture for schools and wood pulp for fire-retarding walling systems. This waste stream would otherwise have been burned and so the beneficiating of the wood not only creates furniture but avoids the release of associated C02 emissions. Speaker: Dr Chris Crozier, REDISA Materials recovery and subsequent reuse through beneficiation in a circular economy is not optional as the quantities of certain resources from which base elements are extracted are diminishing and will simply run out globally in the foreseeable future. In respect of tyres which pose a particular set of challenges and impacts, we must choose between negative value achieved from incineration and the positive value achieved through recycling and beneficiation, which has the potential to create 10 000 jobs through various stages of recycling and through the establishment of secondary industries such as rubber crumb and related products – however this remains a future reality at this stage. Speaker: Sean Thomas, Bio2Watt Bio2Watt is a waste-to-energy project development company that owns and operates waste to energy projects. The Bronkhorstspruit Biogas Project (Pty) Ltd is Bio2Watt’s first operational project, and the first industrial scale waste to energy plant in SA and maybe Africa. The feedstock to the Plant consists of fruit and vegetable waste from the nearby Fresh Produce Market, brewery effluent waste, agricultural waste such as livestock manure, abattoir waste, fat trap/clarifier waste from the food industry and from restaurants, other food industry waste, and paper sludge. Electricity generated by the plant is being sold privately to BMW’s

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Rosslyn Plant via a wheeling agreement with the City of Tshwane in terms of which the City’s grid is used to transfer the electricity. The total project costs were around R150m: R36m equity, R16m dti (SA goverment) grant, and a R98m loan from the Industrial Development Corporation. Through the plant multiple waste streams are beneficiated into e l e c t r i c i t y, d i v e r t i n g t h e s e w a s t e streams from landfill and producing electricity that would other wise come from coal, thereby creating a significant combined reduction in C02 emissions.

WELL DONE TO THE ORGANISERS OF THE EVENT AND CONGRATULATIONS TO ALIVE2GREEN FOR DELIVERING A WELL PLANNED AND SUCCESSFUL EVENT. COCKTAIL PARTIES WERE AMAZING, JUST A GOOD IDEA TO UNWIND, MINGLE, NETWORK AND GETTING READY FOR THE NEXT DAY. I SALUTE ALIVE2GREEN, LOOKING FORWARD TO 2017 FOR EVEN BETTER DELIVERY.

focus is schools recycling, which is hard to make viable, materials are good quality, but volumes are low. Nedbank has come on board and are pushing hard and more visionary investment is needed. There is a current project with the KZN Department of Education.

- Bongiwe Zikalala, Department of Environmental Affairs

Panel discussion – Question: Closing the materials loop can only happen through the broad-based specification of recycled content, which underpins a healthy market for recyclables – what are the key strategies needed to bed down these practices? Stakeholders demonstrated the vast potential of waste beneficiation from multiple perspectives but stressed that, in many cases, markets are undeveloped resulting in a weak b u s i n e s s c a s e fo r i n v e s t o r s . T h e oppor tunit y thus exists for public and pr ivate sec tor polic ymak ers to change this realit y through mar k et instruments. CONCLUSION All presenters from a wide variety of p e r s p e c t i ve s, i n c l u d i n g a n i n te r n ational perspec tive were unanimous: a sustainable future call for a circular economy where materials, once pro duced remain in circulation: process, use, retr ieval, re -process and reuse, repeat. Real world case studies pre sented show ver y clearly that the vision of a zero-waste system is firmly beyond the design table but remains t h e te r r i to r y o f p i o n e e r s a n d e a r l y

adaptors, with the broader economy lagging. Sentiment from presenters was unanimous however that we need to redouble effor ts to convince all producers to manufacture recyclable produc ts and pack aging and for ever yone to separate at source and municipalities must act to make it easy for businesses and households to re c ycle, and to help bridge the gap for recovery, sorting, and beneficiation businesses to be profitable. Summary provided by Gordon Brown Joint Facilitators: Jacques Lightfoot & Gordon Brown

SUSTAINABLE MANUFACTURING SEMINAR

Speaker: Solly Mogaladi, CEO, Tshwane Economic Development Agency Speaker: Julie Wells. NCPC Topic: Opening and welcome Speaker: Faith Mkhacwa, Project Manager, NCPC-SA Topic: Energy management systems – ISO 50001: Providing a sharper focus on energy efficiency Speaker: Kevin Cilliers, Regional Manager, NCPC-SA Topic: You can’t manage what you don’t measure – water footprinting for manufacturers Speaker: Gerhard Fourie, Chief Director: Green Industries at the dti Topic: Review of the dti’s objectives in promoting sustainable manufacturing and an update on policies and incentives Speaker: Roy Patterson, SolarCap Topic: Case study of a new clean-tech manufacturer Speaker: Dr Manfred Scriba, NRF/SAASTA Topic: Nanostructured materials scale-up based on natural South African clay minerals - a DST-CSIR Initiative Speaker: Lara Kotzé-Jacobs, NRF/SAASTA Topic: Green manufacturing technologies emerging in biotechnology Speaker: Victor Manavhela, Regional Manager, NCPC-SA Topic: The Industrial Symbiosis Project – can one manufacturer’s waste stream be another manufacturer’s input material? Speaker: Alistair Schorn, on behalf of PETCO Topic: Recycled content in action: case study examples and success stories Speaker: David Baggs, EcoSpecifier/ GreenTag (Australia) Topic: Sustainability metrics and life cycle analysis: the business benefits www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


POST EVENT REPORT The sustainable manufacturing seminar was partnered by the National Cleaner Production Centre in South Africa and introduced by Solly Mogaladi, Tshwane Economic Development Agency (TEDA). Session 1: Competitive advantage for manufacturers through adoption of more sustainable approaches Speaker: Faith Mkhacwa, NCPC-SA Mkhacwa’s topic was energy management systems and in particular ISO 50001. Mkhacwa’s presentation looked at how the ISO 50001 standard was providing businesses with a much sharper focus on energy efficiency, and how the evaluation of energy management systems was enabling organisations to significantly improve energy performance and margins. Practical examples were used. Speaker: Kevin Cilliers, NCPC-SA Cilliers, presented on water footprinting for manufacturers. Cilliers explained that in water stressed regions like South Africa, it is increasingly important to measure and manage a business’ water footprint. A water footprint is the volume of fresh water used to produce a product at the place where it is produced. Cilliers went on to explain how the creation of a policy environment and standards will help to build local capacity and develop relevant skills where industrial-water-use efficiency is concerned. Speaker: Gerhard Fourie, the dti Gerhard Fourie, Chief Director: Green Industries at the dti, discussed the importance of integration between various stream of policy development in government across the economic, social and environmental spheres. Some of the examples raised referred to fiscal policies such as carbon taxes and renewable energy support measures. He concluded that if appropriately designed and effectively integrated, public policies could be mutually supportive in enhancing government’s developmental objectives in all spheres. Panel discussion: The panel discussion for session one of the programme focused initially on the extent to which manufacturers could achieve cost savings through energy solutions. Panellists agreed that through a life c ycle approach businesses are able to properly measure and manage impact and costs. Panellists were asked specific questions about how, in their own experience, businesses have meaningfully created an www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

Sustainable Manufacturing Seminar advantage through the incorporation of energy solutions. Session 2: Emerging opportunities for manufacturers Speaker: Roy Patterson, SolarCap Roy Patterson from Solar Cap was next to present on a clean tech manufacturing case study. Patterson explained how in order to reduce the negative environmental impacts of modern manufacturing; existing and new businesses need to redefine their methods. Solar Cap is an innovative solar water heating system that is not just highly efficient but also aligned with key manufacturing processes and materials. Speaker: Dr Manfred Scriba, NRF/SAASTA Dr Manfred Scriba, representing the CSIR was next to present on the “Nano Structured Materials Scale Up, Based on Natural South African Clay Minerals”. Scriba introduced the DST-CSIR industry innovation partnership and the Nano Material Industrial Development Facility Project, and explained how the objectives are to establish infrastructure, stimulate the growth of the polymer industry, and create a nano structure production industry whilst transferring skills. Scriba discussed the structure of the project and some of the progress that was being made, particularly where the creation of a product for industrial testing was concerned. Speaker: Lara Kotzé-Jacobs, NRF/SAASTA The next speaker was Lara Kotze-Jacobs from NRF/SAASTA, whose topic was the CSIR Bio- Manufacturing Industry Development

Centre. Kotze-Jacobs proceeded to introduce the Centre and to explain its objectives, which are to stimulate the growth of a bio-manufacturing based economy and to create sustainable jobs in a new industry value chain. Further objectives of the Centre were to strengthen bio process product development competencies, provide support for entrepreneurs, and to support the development of skills and training. Overviews of the Centre’s activities were provided. Panel discussion: The panel discussion that followed session two was principally focused on the extent to which a green economy in South Africa is a potential opportunity for manufacturing. There was some discussion on what constituted a green economy, and whether the advances in technology were potentially problematic for the South African sustainability agenda, which incorporates job creation as a fundamental tenet. The view was however that new and previously non-existent manufacturing sectors and sub sectors are coming online and these should have a net positive effect on employment. Session 3: Sustainable approaches to materials Speaker: Victor Manavhela, NCPC-SA The afternoon session of the programme was dedicated to materials, and the first speaker was Victor Manavhela from the NCPC. Manavhela’s topic was the Industrial Symbiosis Project and more specifically, can one manufacturer’s waste be another manufacturer ’s input material? The presentation focused intentionally on the concept of industrial symbiosis and how,

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POST EVENT REPORT in essence, it is a match-making exercise – matching needs with supplies. Many businesses have unwanted resources and this project was managing ways to divert waste, reduce impact and create a stream of new raw materials. Speaker: Alistair Schorn, on behalf of PETCO The next speaker was Alistair Schorn who represented PETCO, and whose topic was Recycled Content in Action – Case Study Examples and Success Stories. Schorn began by explaining the structure of PETCO and how it was an extended producer responsibility organisation for the PET beverage bottle sector in South Africa. Schorn explain how producers through this organisation were able to accept significant responsibility for the treatment or disposal of post-consumer products. The organisation facilitates the development of plastic raw materials that are now meaningfully eroding the supply of virgin raw materials in certain markets. Schorn provided case study examples. Speak er : David Baggs, EcoSpecifier/ GreenTag (Australia) The final speaker in this session was David Baggs from Eco-Specifier and Global GreenTag Australia. Baggs’s topic was the role of eco labels in greening the supply chain. This popular presentation focused on the inherent benefits of independent, third party eco labelling as a mechanism for product sustainability and sustainable procurement. Baggs explained generally how eco-label certifications are issued based on what class of eco label they are. He also provided a caution to those buyers and consumers that do not fully understand the integrity of the various eco labels that are not aligned with best-practice standards. Panel discussion: The panel discussion for the final session focused on the advantages and opportunities that are possible through efficient production and life cycle analysis. Panellists provided examples. S u m m a r y p rov i d e d by L Loyd Macfarlane Joint Facilitators: Alistair Schorn & Lloyd Macfarlane

SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE SEMINAR

Speaker: Cllr Rebone Mokgothadi, Chairperson of Section 79 Oversight Committee: Services Infrastructure, City of Tshwane

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David Baggs, EcoSpecifier/GreenTag (Australia)

Topic: Opening and welcome Speaker: P rof Bob Scholes, University of Witwatersrand Topic: Infrastructure in response to climate change Speaker: P rof Pravesh Debba, CSIR Topic: Smart infrastructure road maps Speaker: Dr Tobias Bischof-Niemz, CSIR Topic: Smart is low-carbon-energy supply and reduced demand through efficiency Speaker: S teve Molteno, ICLEI Topic: City Innovation Platform (a recent initiative focusing on bringing together experts, the private sector and city leadership to prototype solutions to major infrastructure and resilience challenges) Speaker: J ames Devine – CIO, Project Isizwe Topic: City-provided broadband – connected cities for a smart connected population Speaker: Craig Pedersen, GM, The Computer Guyz Topic: Community safety and security – interacting with citizens through current and adaptive technology Speaker: Cllr Rebone Mokgothadi, Section 79 Oversight Committee: Services Infrastructure, City of Tshwane, welcomed the delegates to the session. Session 1: Infrastructure for smart cities

Speaker: Prof Bob Scholes, University of Witwatersrand The first keynote was presented by Prof. Bob Scholes from Wits University. He addressed the likely environmental impacts of climate change on South Africa, noting especially the expected temperature increase. He stressed the need to adapt the design approach to infrastructure in recognition of climate impacts. Speaker: Prof Pravesh Debba, CSIR This presentation was followed by the second keynote presented by Pravesh Debba of the CSIR, who shared a research project adopted by the CSIR Built Environment Unit on the theme of Smart Cities. Session 2: Infrastructure for smart service delivery Speaker: Dr Tobias Bischof-Niemz, CSIR After morning tea Dr Tobias BischofNiemz from the Energy Unit of the CSIR presented the findings of a research project they had done investigating the base load cost difference between renewable energy and non-renewable energy. Speaker: Steve Molteno, ICLEI This was followed by a presentation by Steve Molteno from ICLEI who shared an initiative they have launched to bring together exper ts, the private sector and city leadership to prototype solutions to major infrastructure and building resilience. www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


POST EVENT REPORT recognise carbon tax as a risk for their businesses; however this assessment of these risks is company-specific depending on the nature of business. McNamara concluded by advising that businesses focus on target setting and performance in order to explore the opportunities associated with a carbon strategy.

Sustainable Infrastructure seminar

Session 3: Infrastructure for connected cities Speaker: James Devine, Project Isizwe After lunch James Devine from CIO shared their experiences of establishing and rolling-out free broadband as part of the City of Tshwane’s initiative of building a connected city. Speaker: Craig Pedersen, The Computer Guyz This presentation was followed by Craig Pedersen from the Computer Group who shared their work in supporting local safety and security companies through adaptive technology. The session was closed by the chairperson Llewellyn van Wyk. Summary provided by Llewellyn Van Wyk

GREEN BUSINESS SEMINAR

Speaker: Umar Banda, Chief Financial Officer, City of Tshwane Topic: Opening and welcome Speaker: Alex McNamara, Programme Manager: Climate Change & Water, NBI Topic: The two primary drivers of a carbon strategy for business in South Africa;A carbon strategy can be an effective tool for large and small companies to establish a position of advantage Speaker: Franz Rentel, Country Director, Climate Neutral Group SA) Topic: The proposed SA carbon tax and offset scheme: the essentials Speaker: Andrew Gilder, Senior Associate,Environmental, ENSafrica Topic: Implications of the South African carbon tax for high carbon emitting companies www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

Speaker: Pieter Conradie, Programme Director: Integrated Reporting,Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership Topic: The relevance of organisational culture to sustainable value creation Speaker: Catherine Wijnberg, Founder and Director, FETOLA Topic: Green enterprise development in South Africa: Gaps and opportunities Speaker: David Baggs, EcoSpecifier/Global Green Tag (Australia) Topic: The role of ecolabels in greening the supply chain Speaker: Derik Coetzer, Finance Desk Manager, Green Cape Topic: Overview of available channels of finance, including ease of access and cost Speaker: Tiaan De Jager, CEO, GreenFin Topic: Green finance solutions for house holds and small businesses Speaker: Dolly Mafa, Tshwane Economic Development Agency (TEDA), opened the sessions. Session 1: Carbon tax Speaker: Alex McNamara, NBI The first of three sessions was on carbon tax and this session consisted of three presentations and a panel discussion. The first presentation was from Alex McNamara, representing the National Business Initiative, and he focused on the two primary drivers of a carbon strategy for businesses in South Africa. McNamara highlighted the risks and opportunities associated with carbon and provided some statistics about the business community’s perceptions in this regard. Ninety three percent of South African companies

Speaker: Franz Rentel, Climate Neutral Group SA The next speaker was Franz Rentel from the Climate Neutral Group. Rentel’s presentation was about the proposed South Africa carbon tax and offsets scheme. Rentel highlighted the key features of the scheme including details about the proposed emissions factors, which will be different from the GHG Protocol emissions factors. The presentation included a case study example and dealt with the management of carbon tax and offsetting, including some advice around how best to mitigate and benefit from the integration of the carbon offsetting scheme. Speaker: Andrew Gilder, Environmental, ENSafrica Andrew Gilder concluded the carbon tax session and presented on the implications of the South African carbon tax scheme for high carbon emitting companies. Gilder proceeded to describe the profile of the top 20 emitters in South Africa and proposed that a more detailed fashion of thinking is now required by business in order to best navigate the complexities of the scheme. Gilder went on to say that companies should not simply extrapolate carbon emissions by using the carbon price of R120, but rather look at the various thresholds and exceptions when trying to calculate carbon tax. The real rate of tax is generally significantly lower. Panel discussion: The carbon tax panel discussion stimulated participation by the audience who were interested particularly in the case example presented by Rentel. The audience was also interested in some of the more technical aspects of the proposed scheme. Session 2: Responsible business and investment Speaker: Pieter Conradie, Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership Presentations in the second session related to responsible business and investment, and the first speaker was Peter Conradie from the Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership at the University of Pretoria. Conradie examined the purpose of integrated reporting and drew attention to the stated objective of the IIRC in this regard, which is the reporting of value creation. Conradie made the point that we can’t sufficiently

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POST EVENT REPORT interpret integrated reports at the moment because we are not yet able to define the concept of value. Conradie further examined the meaning of sustainability and suggested that by understanding our own values we are more likely to be able to define value for the organisation (within the context of integrated reporting). Speaker: Catherine Wijnberg, FETOLA Catherine Wijnberg delivered the second presentation in this session. Wijnberg represented FE TOLA, an organisation that is involved in enter pr ise, supplier and sk ills development at the grassroots level in South Africa. Wijnberg discussed issues of sustainability as they relate to small and medium enterprises in South Africa, using examples of FETOLA’s work to illustrate these points. A central theme was that as a developing countr y, South Africa must not be influenced by a Eurocentric, altruistic ideal of sustainability, but rather one that looks to address the basic needs of citizens in a developing country, such as water, education and employment. Speaker David Baggs, EcoSpecifier/Global Green Tag (Australia) The final speaker in this session was David Baggs from Eco-Specifier and Global GreenTag Australia. Baggs’s topic was the role of eco labels in greening the supply chain. This popular presentation focused on the inherent benefits of independent, third par ty eco labelling as a mechanism for product sustainability and sustainable procurement. Baggs explained generally how eco-label certifications are issued based on what class of eco label they are. He also provided a caution to those buyers and consumers that do not fully understand the integrity of the various eco labels that are not aligned with best practice standards. Panel discussion: The discussion was initially focused on the challenges that companies face in implementing a responsible approach. The panel were in agreement that these challenges were not insurmountable, and are in fact not as relevant as they perhaps used to be. A focus on the opportunities and a corresponding measurement of success with responsible business is now far easier to contemplate. Session 3: Access to finance for Green businesses and projects Speaker: Derik Coetzer, Green Cape

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The theme of the final session was access to finance for green business and projects. Derik Coetzee from GreenCape was the first to deliver a presentation that was an overview of the available channels of Green finance, including ease of access and cost. Coetzee proceeded to profile and discuss the various channels of finance typically available to South Africans, including the three main types of finance which are debt, equity and subsidies or grants. Coetzee provided details of the recently developed tool which GreenCape and SANEDI have developed to assist with the navigation of financial options. Speaker: Tiaan De Jager, GreenFin The second speaker in this final session was Tian De Jager, CEO of GreenFin. De Jager ’s topic was Green Finance Solutions for Households and Small Businesses. The presentation focused specifically on the problems experienced where green financing is concerned, these being par tially the lack of histor y, and the lack of understanding by financiers. De Jager explained that there are many standards emerging that will assist financiers of green products and services. He also provided information on GreenFin’s finance mechanisms, which are generally available for products up to R200 000 in value if unsecured lending is required. De Jager added that a rental option was now also available through GreenFin for certain products that have been recognised by the company. Panel discussion: The panel discussion for the final session saw much engagement from an audience looking to find out more about what could be financed and how. Coetzee and De Jager were able to provide insights and to speculate about how the finance landscape may change in the near future. Summary Provided by Lloyd MacFarlane

RESPONSIBLE TOURISM DIALOGUE

Speaker: Peter Strasheim, expert in labour law and universal access Topic: Universal access and human rights Speaker: Kenneth van Sweeden, Auto & General Topic: Universal leadership Speaker: Niki Glen, Co-founder of Sustainable Tourism Partnership Programme (Standing in for Jason Fiddler),

KZN Gay and Lesbian Tourism Association Topic: Universal access tourism opportunities Speaker: Darryl Erasmus, CEO, Tourism Grading Council of South Africa Topic: Sustainability criteria for grading Speaker: Llewellan Vance, CEO, Evolve Today Topic: STPP Resource Efficiency Programme - Tladi Lodge Resource Efficiency Case Study Speaker: Prof Kevin Mearns, Full Professor, Department of Environmental Management UNISA Topic: – Community-based tourism trends, challenges and future Speaker: OJ Tshamboko, Deputy Chairperson, N12 Treasure Route (N2 TRA) Topic: - Storytelling and youth empowerment Speaker: Sue Snyman, Group Community Development and Culture Manager, Wilderness Safaris Topic: - Inclusive tourism: making a sustainable difference Responsible Tourism refers to everybody’s responsibility to make the tourism industry more sustainable. Delegates should be looking at this from a business, community and industry perspective. Tourism businesses need to become sustainable in order to help grow the South African economy. As part of one of the fastest-growing industries, tourism businesses enjoy massive opportunities as both domestic and international demand for travel increase. But tourism businesses – now more than ever before – need to take action to stay ahead of the game. For many tourism businesses, however, the “how-to” still remains elusive. The Responsible Tourism dialogue provides tourism businesses with a platform to gain insights on the latest developments in tourism. Every year, tourism experts take to the stage to share information on successes and lessons learnt. Participants in the dialogue always go home with new tools to immediately implement in their businesses. This year, the dialogue had three focus areas: 1) Universal accessibility: creating an understanding of what it is, why it is important and how to move forward 2) Sustainable operations: what are the next steps and where does the industry find itself and 3) Community-based tourism: the opportunities and best practices www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


POST EVENT REPORT and how to engage communities in our tourism value chain. The findings, submissions, and proposals from this seminar will be published in various media and distributed to key people in the sector to contribute to the body of thought on these important topics.

Responsible Tourism

Session 1: Universal access in tourism Speaker: Peter Strasheim, Universal Access Strasheim outlined that the South African Constitution overrides other legislation in the South African law. Every person has the right to equal access, regardless of age, race, religion, orientation or any other factor that makes someone “different”. Through illustrations, Strasheim pointed out the difference between equality (sameness) and equity (fairness). His key message was that “Sometimes people need to be treated differently to be treated equally” and that this is a basic human right captured in the constitution. Tourism needs to absorb this principle in all its planning and implementation initiatives. Speaker: Kenneth van Sweeden, Auto & General The leadership team is a company’s most important asset, but it can also be it’s worst liability. Companies achieve success for different reasons, but companies that fail, do so for the same reason – weak/dysfunctional leadership. It does not matter what leaders say, their behaviour determines the message that is received. Key traits of universal leaders include: Achievement orientation, Adaptability, Energy, Intelligence, Innovation, Persistence, Responsibility, Self-confidence, Sociability, Communication skills: Key message: In tourism, as in all other industries, we need universal leadership to drive successful change towards sustainability. Speaker: Niki Glen, KZN Gay and Lesbian Tourism Association A recent survey conducted by the STPP shows that there is a lack of understanding amongst accommodation establishments of what Universal Access is and the business opportunities it presents. Welcoming all tourists regardless of their sexual orientation (and other aspects captured in the definition of UA Tourism) presents an opportunity to tap into the worldwide LGBT market of more than $65-billion. LGBT requires mind-set change and small tweaks to one’s offering, rather than capital intensive investment. Considering that only 55% of accommodation establishments surveyed by the STPP show a profit, LGBT offers an www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

opportunity to increase market share for those businesses that are not making profits and run at low occupancies. Session 2: Operations of sustainable tourism businesses Speaker: Darryl Erasmus, Tourism Grading Council of SA The TGCSA’s mandate is to establishment of one or more schemes in terms of which “tourism services, facilities and products are graded and classified” as outlined in the Tourism Act 3 of 2014. Currently the TGCSA focuses on accommodation and event and conference facilities, but in future will also include transportation, restaurants and tourist attractions. The grading criteria currently includes bonus points for initiatives that are aligned to water, waste and energy criteria included in the responsible tourism standards (SANS 1162:2011), but the TGCSA is working towards greater alignment with SANS 1162:2011, as the definition of a quality offering must include the impacts that businesses have on the triple bottom line. Speaker: Llewellan Vance, Evolve Today The Evolve audit focuse d o n management concerns and needs, a thorough walk through of the entire premises and capturing of data as well as utility bill analysis. Management

concerns included escalating operational and resource costs, on-site resource consumption, reliance on utility bills for insight, business continuity for improved resource management, load shedding and the desire to go off the grid with Solar PV to reduce business continuity risk. Initial interventions from Evolve focused on assisting the establishment to avoid monthly penalties when peak consumption rates are exceeded. Key Evolve inter ventions included Main DB meter installation, organic waste management, k itchen and laundr y retrofit, sub DB meter installations and geyser management, time and temperature controls. Savings to Tladi Lodge from these small interventions is estimated to be around R60,000 per annum already. Session 3: Community-based tourism Speaker: Prof Kevin Mearns, Department of Environmental Management UNISA The number of community-based tourism initiatives significantly increased in South Africa between 2001 and 2006. The study needs to be repeated shortly. Different types of CBT initiatives include: Operations wholly owned and managed by communities

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POST EVENT REPORT Operations owned and managed by entrepreneurs from communities Operations run through informal agreements between private sector operators and communities Operations run through formal agreements between private sector operators and communities Operational partnerships between government, private sector operators and communities Operations run by national trusts and societies • Operational challenges include: • • • • • • •

Lack of CBT policy Unrealistic donor funding time lines Venture ownership Heterogeneous composition, trust, expectations and size of communities Attracting and keeping qualified staff Management structure Venture site and location

In order to achieve success in CBT initiatives, priority should be given to: • Partnership and collaboration • Quality of the product • Access to resources • Access to information • Reservation system • Accessibility • Visitor expectations Speaker: OJ Tshamboko, N12 Treasure Route Association (N12TRA) Storytelling provides an effective format to assimilate the cultural, historical and natural beauty of the five provinces as it cuts through and builds new perspectives that unify the provinces in the eyes of the traveller, whether local or international. Captivating stories that appeal to the new age traveller will create new opportunities for the N12 TR, building on current strengths that the route already possesses. Stories include stories of the past, captivating the imagination of the traveller and stimulating the need to discover more and stories of the present, which include the traveller and positive impacts of tourism on local societies and nature. Youth will be given the opportunity to develop their own businesses. The competition is used as a tool to empower, inspire young people to take further steps and discover new things about themselves. Speaker: Sue Snyman, Wilderness Safaris Community-based tourism (CBT ) confirmsthe correlation between business success and community goodwill and support. Some of the negative impacts of tourism can be observed in the humanwildlife conflict, where day-to-day survival of the community members is threatened by the wildlife that attract tourists.

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However, if managed correctly, CBT can bring myriad benefits to communities. CBT areas of inclusion are e.g. activities, construction, maintenance and services, crafts, transportation, food and beverages and conservation. Social improvements brought about by CBT initiatives can include e.g. greater access for local people to infrastructure and ser vices, capacity building and education, enhanced pride and self-confidence within the community ,technical support, greater access for marginalised groups to opportunities and skills and promote respect and tolerance amongst people. It is critical to note the numbers of local people impacted by tourism, and the measurements of the multiplier effect is critical in understanding the benefits that successful tourism ventures bring. It is therefore critical that CBT initiatives understand their stakeholders and how to aid in appropriate capacity building. CONCLUSION Sustainable tourism implementation remains an ongoing challenge in South Africa. In line with the UNWTO definition of Sustainable Tourism, i.e. “tourism that takes full account of its current and future economic, social and environmental impacts, addressing the needs of visitors, the industry, the environment and host communities”, tourism stakeholders need to adopt tools that have already been used rather than invent new ones. The tools provided today focused on understanding the improved market access oppor tunities that universal access tourism bring, while universal leadership approaches help to reduce business risks. The TGCSA offers an existing mechanism to ensure that after tourists arrive, their needs and requirements are met through a robust quality assurance system. The grading criteria itself is adapting to new ways of thinking about quality through the incorporation of responsible tourism principles. Any business still in doubt about whether there is a return on investment in becoming more resource efficient, need only to look at current case studies that consistently prove that businesses no longer have a choice, especially in view of the fact that so many of them do not make a profit. Lessons learnt from community based tourism initiatives and innovative approaches to engaging community members provide tools to ensure we avoid the pitfalls of the past and we measure and monitor the right impacts. We need to fast track sustainable tourism implementation by retaining models that have been proven to work.

Summary provided by Niki Glen

TRANSPORT & MOBILITY SEMINAR

Speaker: Nava Pillay, Acting Strategic Executive Director: Roads and Transport, City of Tshwane Topic: Opening and welcome Speaker: Imelda Matlawe, Acting Executive Project Manager: IRPTN Specialised Unit, City of Tshwane Topic: Design strategies to enhance transport efficiency on city roads and transport links Speaker: Madeleen Engelbrecht, ARUP Topic: Master planning case study – Zendai City, Modderfontein Speaker: Pieter Smits, CEO, Globaltrack World Logistics Topic: National road infrastructure vision to facilitate efficient logistics in Gauteng Speaker: Vusi Kunene, CNG Holdings Topic: Benefits and current use of CNG Speaker: Dr Cordellia Sita, HySA Systems Topic: Fuel cell powered vehicles – prototype hydrogen fuel cell powered forklift Speaker: Carel Snyman, Senior Manager – Green Transport, SANEDI Topic: Alternative energy solutions for mobility Speaker: Dr Gary Kendall, Sustainability & Strategy Specialist, Nedbank Topic: Transport electrification: a view from the finance sector Speaker: Hiten Parmar, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University Topic: eMobility as a sustainable solution Speaker: Louise Naude, WWF Topic: The last kilometre – trains to integrate with busses and taxis on either side of the journey Speaker: Thabelo Ratshilumela, City of Johannesburg Topic: Infrastructure for safe and convenient NMT – bicycle lanes and racks on busses; pedestrian thoroughfares and pedestrian-only zones Speaker: Yolisa Mashilwane, Head of Public Policy, Uber Africa Topic: Strategies to convert ‘drivers’ to ‘riders’ – boosting the appeal of public transport Session 1: Efficient logistics Information circulated by both SANEDI and WWF’s Low Carbon Frameworks notes, rank South Africa as among the highest emitters of carbon dioxide in the world (SA is ranked 12th in the world in terms of top emitters per capita). More than 75% www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


POST EVENT REPORT of the primary energy requirement is from fossil fuels. The Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT ) provides one of the more recent estimates, using data collated primarily from the International Energy Agency in the case of South Africa’s data. The latest data, for 2007, suggests that energy used in transpor tation contributed 46.3 Mt CO2e, or 13.1% of South Africa’s greenhouse gas emissions. For transport emissions, these are estimated using a top-down approach, on the basis of fuel sales data, rather than using actual measured data from the vehicle fleet. These figures only include emissions from diesel and petrol consumption for road transport, diesel for rail transport, and an estimate of emissions from domestic aviation. They exclude emissions from electricity generated to run electric trains and fuel transpor t pipelines, from combustion of fuels supplied in South Africa for international aviation and marine transport (so called “bunker fuels”) and those emissions from the manufacture of fuels. Therefore, it is evident that to constantly move to a low carbon economy, it is vital that we can begin modal shifts in transport, one of the highest contributors to GHG. The session was opened by Nava Pillay, Acting Strategic Executive Director: Roads and Transport, City of Tshwane, who welcomed the delegates to the session. Speaker: Imelda Matlawe, IRPTN Specialised Unit, City of Tshwane Imelda Matlawe, Acting Executive Project Manager: IRPTN Specialised Unit, City of Tshwane, opened her presentation with a bold mission from the City of Tshwane: “To develop a transport system that positions the capital city to meet the economic and social needs of its citizens”. And for the third-largest municipality in the world, this mission will need to be supported by robust, innovative objectives and plans. Matlawe described the city’s key objectives but focussed on two that supported their vision of “a transport system developed to support a sustainable city.” Matlawe explained how transport needs to connect people to economic and social places in an efficient manner, especially as employment patterns predicted for the city will change over time. She also reiterated that the city must meet the needs of residents in the most affordable way but not at the expense of the environment. www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

Speaker: Madeleen Engelbrecht, ARUP She provided fantastic context to her description of Transit Orientated Development ( TOD). This context was presented in a case study of Modderfontein – a rapidly developing area east of Johannesburg. What is a TOD? In Engelbrecht’s words, a “ TOD implies high quality, thoughtful planning and design of land use and built forms to support, facilitate and prioritize not only the use of transit, but the most basic modes of transport, walking and cycling.” With that definition and an illustration of the principles of TOD, she described how TODs should ideally form part of a network of TODs consisting of nodes and corridors. She likened this to “beads on a string”. Engelbrecht went on to show how these TODs or “beads on a string” should be applied to the Modderfontein Transport Plan, which should incorporate the Ekurhuleni and City of Joburg’s BRT systems, the Corridors of Freedom and the development’s population densities. Speaker:Pieter Smits, Globaltrack World Logistics He presented innovative ideas for savings and/or efficiency in the logistics sector. He gave the audience a brief history of Globaltrack before focussing on the branding strategy of the company, which provided the basis for the innovation behind efficiencies in the logistics sector. Essentially Globaltrack enable transporters to operate at lower cost and more efficiently and to reach their market effectively. They do this by providing the following innovative

interventions: a fuel-tracking system that promotes holistic fuel management; cross-border and web tracking that provide an accurate mapped placement of the vehicle anywhere, anytime; and a growth consultancy that offers training and system integration. Session 2: Alternative propulsion Speaker: Vusi Kunene, CNG Holdings Vusi Kunene of CNG Holdings gave the audience an informative presentation of the benefits and current use of CNG – Compressed Natural Gas. CNG is made by compressing natural gas to less than 1% of its volume at standard atmospheric pressure. According to Kunene, some of the benefits of CNG are: • CNG is cleaner-burning, with reduced emissions (less CO, NOx, HC, and PM) • CNG’s quality/energy content remains consistent • CNG’s storage method eliminates theft of fuel at source It seems that CNG usage is growing rapidly with the spearheading of this initiative by CNG Holdings through its “Mother Station” at Langlaagte, which has a compression capacity of 6 500m3 per hour, and a couple of smaller satellite stations. It was illustrated that CNG has a diversity of functionality from inner-city buses to refuse removal companies, and from taxi owners to cars in general. Kunene then explained how to convert from fuel to gas, and what the holistic benefits are to this conversion, i.e. a rapid pay-back period,

Transport & Mobility Seminar

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POST EVENT REPORT emission reduction, job creation – direct and downstream, skills development and training. Speaker: Dr Cordellia Sita, HySA Systems The Department of Science and Technology of South Africa developed the National Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technologies (HFCT) Research, Development and Innovation (RDI) Strategy. The National Strategy was branded Hydrogen South Africa (HySA). The overall goal of HySA is to develop and guide innovation along the value chain of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in South Africa. This is how Cordellia Sita of HySA Systems framed the presentation that described the use of hydrogen fuel cells in forklift usage. In fact, Sita detailed the articulation of this project by saying that the project, which is co-funded by the Department of Science and Technology and Impala Platinum Ltd, South Africa, is to integrate metal hydride (MH) technologies for on-board hydrogen storage and related applications in utility vehicles. The audience learnt about the system concept, the h ydrogen storage tank and the tests that were performed. The successful application of the concept to operations at Impala Platinum was then shown. Speaker: Carel Snyman, SANEDI Snyman began his presentation with the vision of SANEDI, which is, “To serve as a catalyst for sustainable energy innovation, transformation and technology diffusion in support of South Africa’s sustainable development that benefits our nation”. He proceeded to share great innovation and technology diffusion that seems to be gaining traction throughout the world. The greatest thrust of his presentation, though, was that we are not making the best of clean, efficient fuels because our economy remains addicted to fossil fuels. For example, he posed the following question to the audience: “How far can I go on only solar PV energy as compared to fossil-fuel-based energy?” The answer: “As far as you want to!” Carel used his presentation to show how technology and its innovative application is making solar a very viable alternative in driving our transport habits. Speaker: Dr Gary Kendall, Nedbank A deeply contrasting picture to that of Carel Snyman was painted by Dr Gary Kendall, Sustainability & Strategy Specialist, Nedbank. The picture described how the world would look if its current economic paradigm remained fixated on its demand for oil. Essentially, Kendall, described the real constraints to continuing this pattern of economic development under five key headings: 1. Geography

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2. Geology 3. GHGs 4. Growth (in demand) 5. Gridlock His conclusion was that avoiding severe economic impact requires prioritizing of demand-side options and far-reaching changes in global transport systems. Although climate-friendly solutions are available, they will not be easy, they will not be quick and they appear unlikely to allow the majority of the world’s population to achieve the levels of mobility currently enjoyed in the West. Kendall suggested lower mobility levels imply a very different trajectory for future economic development. Speaker: Hiten Parmar, uYilo eMobility Programme Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University Parmar shared an interesting presentation entitled “Electric Mobility as a sustainable mobility solution”. Parmar began the presentation with a definition of emobility: electric mobility (eMobility) refers to the use of electric propulsion for the fulfilment of different individual mobility needs. After touching on some of the trends of eMobility, Parmar focussed on the infrastructure – from the landscape required to support electric to the battery life required to sustain electric – and then shared stats that proved their viability and accessibility: In 2011, global plug-in electric vehicles (PEV ) were just 50 000 units whereas in 2015 sales increased by about 80% to 565 668 units. Session 3: Integrated public and nonmotorised transport Speaker: Louise Naude, WWF Naude introduced us to economic geography and eco-economy where she described the top externality costs borne to South African society. Second

to accidents are CO2 emissions at R6.5billion (in 2010). Then, a statistic from research done in 2000 was shared that reiterated the fact that South Africa’s transport sector is responsible for 12.1% of SA’s ±450Mt CO2e. This sobering statistic was used to lead the audience into the concept of eco-equity, which is really about transport disadvantage caused by the legacy of apartheid planning and new post-apartheid housing development patterns. Eco- equity was expanded upon and used as the context for, and in making a case for the mini-bus taxi. Speaker: Thabelo Ratshilumela, City of Johannesburg The City of Joburg has a NonMotorised Transpor t Framework and Street Guidelines that confirm the city’s commitment to NMT. This is according to Thabelo Ratshilumela from the City of Johannesburg. Ratshilumela described the CBD’s cycle network which includes a University of Johannesburg and Wits cycle lane. Out south, Soweto, Orlando and Diepsloot have cycle lanes and north of the CBD, Rosebank and Sandton also have c ycle lanes. Ratshilumela also presented the cycle promotions that the city has done to encourage cycle use, their research to better understand user behaviour and how that research is informing cycling network planning. Much of this planning needs to take cyclist-traffic conflict management into consideration. Speak e r : Yo l i s a M a s h i l w a n e , Head of Public Polic y, Uber Afr ica, shared her passion for Uber as one of the 21st centur y ’s most disruptive t e c h n o l o g i e s. A p a r t f ro m s h a r i n g how quick ly Uber is growing globally, Mashilwane shared that South Africa is one of the fastest growing markets

Sustainability in Mining Seminar

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POST EVENT REPORT fo r U b e r, p a r t i c u l a r l y m a r k e t s i n Johannesburg and Cape Town. One of the major reasons for Uber ’s success in this countr y is that it meets many needs for commuters – convenience, cost and frequenc y to name a few. Mashilwane then unveiled plans to pilot Uber GREEN which means giving riders the option of ordering a fully electric vehicle. She reiterated that Uber sees Green as the future of sustainable mobilit y – they do not want to charge riders a premium for a more sustainable option. Summar y provided by Gar th Barnes Joint facilitators: Carel Snyman & Peter Ndoro

S U S TA I NA B I LIT Y IN M INING S E M I NA R

Speaker: Jacques Botha, Chief Economist, Afriforesight Topic: Summarising the positive contribution of mining Speaker: Karin Ireton, Consultant Topic: Mining for a sustainable future: Managing the costs, maximising the opportunities. Speaker: Mansoor Parker, ENSafrica Topic: Carbon tax mitigation and management for mining companies Speaker: Crystal Rowe, Digby Wells Topic: How wetlands affect mining plans and the use of passive water treatment systems Speaker: Dr. Henk Coetzee, Council for Geosciences Topic: Latest approaches to treating acid mine drainage Speaker: Nicholas Veltman, Hogan Lovells Topic: Compliance in the mining sector Session 1: Leadership in compliance as a strategic opportunity for the mining sector Speaker: Jacques Botha, Afriforesight Botha started off the mining seminar by outlining some of the positive impacts of mining on economic sustainability. He went on to pose the question of what environmental impact the production of renewable energy equipment has on the environment, since most wind and solar products have elements that come from mining. In essence, the economy of needs vs. the needs of the environment. Speaker: Karin Ireton, Consultant Ireton star ted off her speech by questioning some of the points in Botha’s speech, with the no-nonsense Ireton painting a rather different picture for the mining industr y, which is a www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

major polluter the world over. She went on to question the viability of mining long term, with a trust deficit forming between mining companies and the public. She also questioned leadership in South African mining, as they had not taken a strong enough stance on sustainability. Speaker: Mansoor Parker, ENSafrica Parker rounded off the first session by unpacking some of the finer details behind the new carbon tax law. What should companies look out for, how one can make the legislation work for your company, not just to add red tape, but to actually reduce the carbon footprint of the company? The knock-on effects of adhering to the new carbon tax, which comes into effect in 2017, will ultimately save companies money if they invest in energy/environmental efficient principles and mechanisms. Panel discussion: The panel discussion was a lively debate around the role of mining in a sustainable economy. The speakers discussed the effectiveness of sustainability reporting, with some large companies paying more lip service than real time interventions for the key environmental concerns that face the mining industry. Key social development questions were also raised with the many socio-economic issues that surround mining in South Africa causing concern. Session 2: Operational sustainability Speaker: Crystal Rowe, Digby Wells Rowe started off the operational sustainability in mining segment by looking at some of the passive measures that mining companies are using to clear pollution from their precious water sources. She went on to outline some of the challenges that the coal mining industry faces in terms of water management and the effect on biodiversity, with many mines situated near wetlands, which posed an opportunity to use the wetland as a passive cleanser. However, if the wetland is not used properly, the negative effects are compounded downstream. Speaker: Dr. Henk Coetzee, Council for Geosciences Charismatic Dr Coetzee started off his segment by painting a dark picture of water quality around some of the mines in South Africa. He showed brutal examples of acid mine drainage (AMD), which is a massive problem that affects much more than just the mines. He went on to

outline some of the measures that are being used to combat AMD and some of the pitfalls he highlighted related expertise needed to operate the equipment in a long-term sustainable manner. Speaker: Nicholas Veltman, Hogan Lovells Respected lawyer Veltman rounded out the morning session by looking at some of the key compliance issues that face the mining industry. South Africa has strict environmental compliance regulation to safeguard the industry. Are companies actually following the regulations? He went on to outline some of the key aspects of compliance that companies should adhere to avoid penalties. The awarding of water-use licences in mining can make or break mining companies, thus companies looking for long-term sustainability need to be mindful to stay within the law. Panel discussion: The panellists engaged in a lively debate at the end of the morning session, unpacking what really needs to be done to avoid an environmental catastrophe in South Africa. It was agreed that mining companies need to employ both active and passive measures to combat the servere impacts on mining on the environment. There is no doubt that mining is here to stay, and the key thought to come out was: If you don’t solve the water problems of today, you will have twice the problem in the future. CONCLUSION All in all, the mining sustainability seminar was well attended, with a high level of interaction between the delegates and speakers. For the long term ,sustainability of mining it is essential that greater care is given to the environment by all stakeholders. Water security is going to be a telling factor in the longevity of the industr y, with pressure being placed on eco-systems at an ever-increasing rate. The time for change is now, before it’s too late. Summary provided by Greg Simpson

YOUTH & THE GREEN ECONOMY SEMINAR

Speaker: Cllr Subesh Pillay, MMC: Economic Development, City of Tshwane Topic: Opening and welcome Speaker: Taahir Chagan, 350Africa.org Topic: An NGO perspective Speaker: N icholas Funda, SAN Parks Honorary Rangers

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POST EVENT REPORT In essence Chagan called on the youth to become activists for the environment, just like students had done for #FeesMustFall. That in the current political landscape governed by self-interest, the only way to bring about change was to force change through activism.

Courtney Gehle, Greenline Topic: The value of biodiversity and the commitment to conservation: focus on combatting rhino p oaching! Speaker: Courtney Gehle, Greenline Topic: A youth perspective Speaker: Innovation Hub Topic: Entrepreneurial perspective Speaker: Dr. R. L. Bhatia, Founder World CSR Day (India) Topic: An international perspective Speaker: Dr. R. L. Bhatia, Founder World CSR Day (India) Dr Bhatia gave an inspirational talk suppor ted by video footage and quotes from a diverse range of thought leaders. His message to the youth was essentially that there was nothing they could not do, that no problem was insurmountable, but most importantly to accept responsibility for taking action. If you want something to change then change it! Speak er : Nicholas Funda, SAN Parks Honorary Rangers Funda set out the value of biodiversity and the importance of the conservation thereof through a network of national parks in South Africa. While many career opportunities exist, conservation of biodiversity is a calling not just a career. Counter-poaching is a global challenge with key programmes on anti-rhino and elephant poaching in Kruger National Park.

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These species command a high monetary value, attracting poachers. There are diverse societal values about conservation of biodiversity and the culture of volunteerism in conservation is important. Poaching can be viewed as either an ecological, economic, or a social problem, and governments should be prioritizing conservation efforts through education and community outreach. The long term goal is to mobilise society to participate in conservation of biodiversity. Speaker: Courtney Gehle, Greenline Gehle highlighted the key role that the Youth have to create the sustainable future they wish to see for the world. Young people should not fixate on the negative impacts of environmental challenges and not become despondent and lament how massive the problems are. Instead young people should focus on the solutions, and find inspiration in the often significant positive impacts being achieved through innovation and by businesses that are leading the way in transitioning to a green movement. Essentially, the role of the youth is to forge a new path, and not accept the ‘business-asusual’ path set by the establishment. Speaker: Taahir Chagan, 350Africa.org Chagan highlighted key challenges facing the environment, stressing the dire impact these challenges are likely to have on the lives of young people. Consequences, which if properly understood by young people would compel them to take an active stance.

Speaker: Dr Keoagile Modisakeng, Innovation Hub One of the major problems facing South Africa is youth unemployment. According to Stats SA (2015): 44.5% of young South Africans are actively looking for jobs. At the same time we face key environmental challenges and worldwide, governments and investors have earmarked funds for actions to address these challenges across all sectors. In a report on green jobs in South Africa, 46 000 employment opportunities were highlighted (ASSAF, 2014). Green technologies and innovation have been recognised as key to effecting change, and the Climate Innovation Centre was established in 2011 to catalyse clean technology innovation as part of a global network through the establishment of a technology and business incubator, to support start-ups and small businesses accessing key elements inputs such as business advisory, and finance. It has developed a pipeline of 51 businesses. The youth were encouraged to bring through their ideas and proposals. CONCLUSION In excess of 150 youth participated in this engagement, seeking to learn more about the state of the environment and how addressing environmental challenges is creating career and entrepreneurial opportunities. The speaker lineup included representatives from the youth, from conservation, NGOs, the private sector and from partner organisation Innovation Hub, as well as inspirational Indian human resources expert Dr Raju Bahtia. The event was structured to include extended interaction enabling the youth to engage the panel of speakers at length. They made full use of this opportunity to gain sector insights and information, and this engagement continues on an ongoing basis through Alive2green’s Youth & the Green Economy webpage and newsletters. Summary provided by Gordon Brown

GREEN HOME FAIR

“Excellent marketing opportunity”, “Great event and an amazing response”, were just some of the statements made by exhibitors to describe this year’s Green Home Fair held at the Woodlands Boulevard Mall in Pretoria on the 4th and the 5th of June 2016. Over 20 exhibitors offered environmentally friendly products to interested shoppers, such as energy-efficient appliances like gas appliances and innovative cookers, www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


POST EVENT REPORT aquaponics gardens, energy-efficient air-conditioning solutions and insulation, energy-efficient LED lighting, Solar PV, and others. A highlight was the City of Tshwane stand that attracted many interested visitors eager to find out more about what the city was communicating. Woodlands Boulevard Mall statistics indicate there were approximately 45 000 mall visitors over the two days of the event, possibly boosted by advertising in event partner Pretoria News. Visitors to the mall who engaged with exhibitors left the mall more educated and informed about green homes, with greater awareness and in many cases with great purchases from exhibitors. Exhibitors were unanimous in saying they would attend next year’s event with many saying the event had an incredible opportunity to expand and grow in the future. “Informative, fantastic green products and filling a huge gap in the market” was how one mall visitor described the event. Summary provided by Gordon Brown

SIDE EVENTS WWF DEBATE: WHAT NEXT FOR ENVIRONMENTALISM

Saliem Fakir, Head of WWF’s Policy & Futures Unit, spoke of the importance of modernising the environmental movement if it is to remain relevant and effective. Fakir asserted that environmentalists need to look beyond a fatalistic world view and embrace the Anthropocene as an age which has the potential to see humans using technology to the advantage of both nature and society. Jaclyn Cock, Professor Emerita in the Department of Sociology at the University of the Witwatersrand, countered that environmentalism remains a white, middle class concern that largely fails to address social issues. Both globally and locally, society is divided and fragmented. In the SA context, more than 53% of the population is classified as hungry. In such a context, environmentalism can never successfully be addressed in isolation. Issues of land reform coupled with the priority of job creation complicate matters. Environmental degradation must peak and decline, but this can only happen equitably in a manner which addresses prevalent social issues.

NATIONAL PAGE FORUM

Over 50 participants convened at the National PAGE Forum, a side event held at Sustainability Week which has, since 2012, gathered sustainability professionals in an innovative knowledge sharing event. Under the theme Advancing the Green Economy through the

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

sharing of knowledge and experience across disciplines, sectors, and markets, Sustainability Week brought together key stakeholders to engage on key challenges and solutions to advance South Africa’s green economy transition. In addition to holding its inaugural national forum, PAGE was among the sponsors of Sustainability Week in 2016 and also participated in the exhibition space held during the week. The National PAGE Forum sought to raise awareness of the PAGE programme in South Africa and to initiate discussions on strategies to improve coordination and collaboration on green economy policy formulation and implementation. The PAGE Forum, which was opened by senior policy advisor of the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA), Ms Devina Naidoo and PAGE Management Board member, Mr Kees van der Ree, of the International Labour Organization (ILO), assembled key stakeholders from the public, private and civil society sectors with the intent of introducing the PAGE programme to key national stakeholders. The high-level panel, composed of Tanya Abrahamse (SANBI), Dorah Nteo (City of Tshwane), Alex McNamara (NBI), Rethabile Melamu (Gauteng Provincial Government) and Julie Wells (National Cleaner Production Centre), shared valuable insights from the various green economy initiatives they are involved in and generated a robust discussion on South Africa’s green economy trajectory.

Union Building. Having calculated the carbon footprint for the City of Tshwane for past three consecutive years, the City has come to appreciate the fact that, after coal-powered electricity, the transport sector is the second-biggest source of carbon emissions. It is thus incumbent on the City to institute multi-pronged in climate mitigation interventions, with a view to reducing these transport-related emissions. The Green Mile was a symbolic acknowledgement of the efforts and commitment by the City of Tshwane to low carbon mobility.

TNA BREAKFAST BRIEFING

This facility was next on the agenda so that the visiting mayors could see the progress that the City of Tshwane was making. The material recovery facility is a multi-purpose recycling facility at the Kwaggasrand Landfill site and marks the transition to a green economy in line with the Tshwane Vision 2055 outcomes. The recycling facility will be developed in partnership with New GX Enviro Solutions and Logistics, a waste, environmental management and bulk logistics service provider currently providing waste management services to the City of Tshwane. The Kwaggasrand facility is made up of three components: a material recovery facility (MRF) with recyclables processed from a free bag system distributed by the city to residents; a composting facility where green waste will be shredded and turned into organic compost; and a building rubble recycling facility where building rubble will be turned into aggregate. These three waste streams make up approximately 65% of the waste that is disposed at landfills.

On the second day of Sustainability Week TNA Media Business Briefing was broadcast live for two hours from the CSIR to over three million viewers tuned into South Africa Broadcasting Corporation’s (SABC) Morning Live programme. SABC Presenter, Peter Ndoro, conducted a panel discussion on sustainability in African Capital Cities with Cllr Kgosiento Ramokgopa, Executive Mayor of City of Tshwane in South Africa, Cllr Stephen Wani Michael Kaya, Mayor of Juba City in South Sudan, Clara Doe Mvogo, Mayor of the City of Monrovia in Liberia and Chair of the Monrovia City Council, Muesee Kazapua, City of Windhoek in Namibia Benito Jones, Mayor of Mbabane in Swaziland, and Kobie Brand, CEO of ICLEI Africa. Mayors were featured on live television as they shared ideas on how to develop more sustainable cities as well as empower and educate those living in the cities.

SUMMARY OF TOURS THE GREEN MILE

Immediately after the TNA Business Briefing on SABC2, the mayors then joined a convoy of electric vehicles called The Green Mile. The procession of vehicles took the visiting mayors from a hotel in Lynnwood Drive to the

Tshwane Food and Energy Centre in Bronkhorspruit The mayors were taken on a tour of the City of Tshwane’s sustainable projects. Tshwane Food and Energy Centre in Bronkhorstspruit is said to contribute to the city’s food security through livestock production and energy security by using photovoltaic solar power plant and reusing livestock organic waste for production of renewable energy-biogas. Biogas (a biofuel) is a form of renewable energy, and as we are all aware South Africa is finding ways to generate energy and move away from being solely dependent on Eskom’s supply of electricity using coal (a non-renewable energy that is slowly depleting).

K WAG G A S R A N D MAT E R I A L RECOVERY FACILITY

Summaries provided by Gaole Bogatsu

33


POST EVENT REPORT

34

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


POST EVENT REPORT

ATTENDANCE

REGISTRATION SUMMARY REGISTRATIONS BREAKDOWN Day 1

774

Day 2

361

Day 3

230

Estimated non registered delegates

100

DELEGATE BREAKDOWN EVENT

2016 DELEGATES

African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum

450

Sustainability in Mining Seminar

24

Green Building Conference

173

Sustainable Energy Seminar

106

Food Security Seminar

69

Sustainable Transport and Mobility Seminar

33

Green Manufacturing Seminar

43

Vision Zero Waste Seminar

88

Sustainable Water Resource Seminar

51

Sustainable Infrastructure Seminar

44

Responsible & Sustainable Tourism Seminar

60

Green Business Seminar

52

Youth & Green Economy

140

OTHER EVENTS

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

UNIDO Breakaway

72

Sustainable Cities & Communities Seminar

40

PAGE National Forum

60

TNA Breakfast meeting

60

Other Stakeholders

233

SUM OF DAILY ATTENDANCE

1963

35


POST EVENT REPORT

CARBON Events have the effect of increasing carbon emissions as they generate increased levels of activity and energy consumption. People travel to and from events and we generally make use of accommodation and other products and services when attending events. We can measure the impact of our event activities by calculating our carbon footprint. Alive2green made use of the recently launched ReportFast online reporting and data management system to conduct the event carbon footprint. ReportFast.net is an easy to use online reporting system that is aligned with international best-practice standards and processes, such as the GHG Protocol. Once the carbon footprint had been established, carbon offsets for the Sustainability Week activities were purchased from The Climate Neutral Group.

CARBON OFFSETS

In order to host a carbon neutral event, Alive2green implemented measures to reduce the carbon footprint of the event as much as possible and offset all remaining emissions, except emissions generated by the delegates travelling to the event. ReportFast allowed the team to calculate the emissions totals for the event and carbon offsetting was then arranged by the Climate Neutral Group. A carbon offset is an equivalent amount of carbon that is either absorbed, or avoided being emitted elsewhere. This can be achieved by financing renewable energy or energy efficiency projects to replace the need for fossil fuels, or by conserving or planting forests, to absorb carbon from the atmosphere. On the advice of the Climate Neutral Group, Alive2green selected the Joburg Waste to Energy Project , which strives to keep the lights on while cleaning up the municipal sites around Johannesburg. The Project uses the methane gas produced at landfills to generate energy.Venue greening The CSIR ICC has a number of initiatives in place to reduce negative environmental impact. The Gauteng Green Events Guidelines are used by the venue to ensure greening is at the forefront of all activities and the GSA Campbell Event Greening Guidelines were used by Alive2green to liaise with venue stakeholders.

ALIVE2GREEN has offset 157.4 tonnes of CO2 equivalent for Sustainability Week 2016

with carbon credits from the

Joburg Waste to Energy Project (Clean Development Mechanism) Climate Neutral Group invests in emission reduction projects which combine energy, environment and developmental solutions into sustainable business opportunities in developing countries. Our offset projects are carefully selected for their wider social and environmental benefits. These socially progressive projects simultaneously reduce carbon emissions and improve the quality of life of people who are threatened by the impacts of climate change. As such, they are a powerful tool for sustainable development.

36

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


FOOTPRINT

POST EVENT REPORT

Sustainability Week

Conducted on:

CSIR International Convention Centre

Reporting Period:

30 May - 5 June 2016

Carbon Dioxide Equivalent Emissions (CO2e) Scope 1 0

Other 0

Scope 2 51443.35

Total tCo2e

Scope 3 105966.9

157.41

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS The Joburg Waste to Energy Project As South Africa grapples with an electricity crisis, this Joburg Waste to Energy Project strives to keep the lights on while cleaning up the municipal sites around Johannesburg. The Challenge Municipal landfill sites are not only an eyesore on our landscapes, they also pose serious environmental and health hazards by generating huge quantities of methane gas. Methane gas is produced through decomposition, which happens when organic waste is broken down by bacteria that is naturally present in the waste as well as in the soil used to cover the landfill. Organic waste includes food, garden waste, street sweepings, textiles, wood and paper products. Methane is a very potent greenhouse gas, 21 times more harmful to the environment than carbon dioxide. Methane gas can also migrate underground in the right conditions and become highly explosive. However, if managed correctly, the methane gas can be captured and destroyed by flaring it. The Joburg Energy to Waste project goes further, by using methane gas to generate electricity, solving two serious issues that South Africa currently face. The Project Five municipal landfill sites around Johannesburg have been developed using the latest technology by the energy management company Ener-G Systems.

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

The solution involves retrieving the methane gas and converting it into electricity. This is done by installing pipes into various places in the landfill. The gas is pumped through the pipes into a chimney where it is combusted into harmless emissions, as is currently happening at the five landfill sites across Johannesburg. The next phase of this project will be to install generators through which the gas will be channeled as fuel for electricity generation. The renewable electricity will be “exported” by connecting the generators to the municipal distribution grid, owned by either Eskom or City Power. By 2016, it is anticipated that 19 megawatts of electricity will be produced from these five landfill sites – enough to power 16 500 medium-sized houses. When completed, this will be the biggest landfill gas-to-energy project in South Africa. The Benefits The project contributes towards solving South Africa’s electricity crisis by eventually providing power for up to 16,000 homes. Five major landfill sites around Joburg are covered making them cleaner, safer and reducing the risk of methane explosions. Increase in employment opportunities as local contractors and labourers were required for construction, as well as long-term staff contracted to operate and maintain the system.

37


POST EVENT REPORT

MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS MARKETING OUTLET

AMOUNT/PERIOD

VALUE

SUMMARY

South African Institute of Architects SAWFLA PIA KNZIA GIFA Claybrick ACMP South African Alternative Energy Association FABASA NBI SAYTC NRF ASEA SAIL AAMSA/TIASA Food & Trees for Africa PACSA

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00

50% discount 50% discount 50% discount 50% discount 50% discount 50% discount 50% discount 50% discount 50% discount 50% discount 50% discount 50% discount 50% discount 50% discount 50% discount 50% discount 50% discount

TOTAL

34

R85 000,00

2-4months 2-4months 2-4months Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event 4 months 3 months

R5 890,00 R5 890,00 R5 890,00 R2 500,00 R2 500,00 R2 500,00 R2 500,00 R2 500,00 R2 500,00 R2 500,00 R2 500,00 R2 500,00 R2 500,00 R15 000,00 R1 400,00 R22 500,00

AFFILIATE SPECIFIC MARKETING MAILERS

WEBSITE ADVERTISING

ReSource IMIESA Water&Sanitation Africa World CSR Day & World Sustainability Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership South African Alternative Energy Association Kitchen Specialists Association Decorex NRF NBI ACMP Claybrick SAIA Alive2green Bizcommunity Architecture Africa

TOTAL

38

Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner

R81 570,00

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


et et FM 90.5 FM 90.5 m 98.3fm

unrise

POST EVENT REPORT NEWSLETTERS

3S Media World CSR Day & World Sustainability Ecospcifier Newsletter Green Economy Online Bizcommunity Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Architecture Africa

3 3 2 12 8 2 2

R11 400,00 R15 000,00 R5 000,00 R30 000,00 R32 000,00 R5 000,00 R5 000,00

TOTAL

Sustainability Week Sustainability Week Green Building Conference Sustainability Week Sustainability Week 50% discount 50% discount

R103 400,00

BROADCAST ADVERTISING

Power FM

At the event

TOTAL

R0,00

Sustainability Week

R0,00

PUBLICATION ADVERTISING

Inside Mining ReSource IMIESA Water&Sanitation Africa Green Home Magazine Green Economy Journal Green Building Handbook Pretoria News

Volume 9 No.3 Voume 18 No.2 Volume 41 No.4 Volume 11 No.2 Issue 20 Issue 17, 18 Volume 8 Main Body

TOTAL

R11 650,00 R11 200,00 R13 050,00 R12 750,00 R17 950,00 R35 900,00 R16 950,00 R15 000,00

Sustainability in Mining Seminar Vision Zero Waste Seminar Green Building Conference Sustainable Water Seminar Green Home Fair Sustainability Week Sustainability Week Green Home Fair

R134 450,00

ALIVE2GREEN SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING

Engineering News - Sponsored Tweets 1 Week Twitter Weekly Facebook Weekly LinkedIn WeeklyREPORT SUSTAINABILITY WEEK 2016 PUBLICITY

R5 000,00 R0,00 R0,00 R0,00

TOTAL

R5 000,00

FEBRUARY - JUNE 2016

City of Tshwane ---Continue SUM TOTAL City of Tshwane Discussion with Pieter de Necker Show line up Earth Day - Sustainability Week Discussing the role of the youth in the green economy

30-May-16 30-May-16 30-May-16 30-May-16 21-Apr-16

R32,500.00 R41,900.00 R30,268.00 R9,945.20 R 6,425.00

R97,500.00 R125,700.00 R90,804.00 R29,835.60 R 19,275.00

R 156,750.00 R 3,488,814.10

R 470,250.00 R 10,466,442.30

R 409 420,00

PR OUTPUTSUMMARY 26-Apr-16

TOTAL

AVE VALUE

PR VALUE

PRINT

R 925,693.17

R 2,777,079.51

ONLINE

R 2,777,862.03

R 8,333,586.09

BROADCAST

R 3,488,814.10

R 10,466,442.30

TOTAL:

R 7,192,369.30

R 21,577,107.90

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

PREPARED FOR ALIVE2GREEN BY TSA AFORIKA MEDIA

39


SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

SUSTAINABILITY REPORT the benchmark for how to respond to global and national challenges, spurred by demand for more sustainable solutions.

SCOPE AND BOUNDARY

The report is intended to provide all stakeholders with relevant information regarding the economic, social and environmental impacts arising from the event. The boundary of this report is limited to the events, activities and products linked to Sustainability Week; however, we have also included certain product and company information that is deemed relevant for stakeholder groups. This report covers the period from Januar y through June 2016 and incorporates the previously mentioned events and activities of Sustainability Week taking place in South Africa. This is the third annual report that is aligned with GRI Reporting Guidelines, and Alive2green repor ts annually on sustainability per formance at Sustainability Week.

MATERIALIT Y

This report is intended to provide insight into those issues identified as the most relevant or material to Alive2green’s organisation of and involvement in the Sustainability Week event, for the company, and for its key stakeholder groups.

SUSTAINABILITY

WEEK

These material issues are determined annually by means of a workshop of Alive2green executives and associates, who are representing the view of key stakeholder groups, and who are able to identify the issues that are of concern, that impact and that influence the company and its stakeholders. The results of the process are captured in a materiality matrix which, along with further information about materiality and key stakeholder groups can be viewed on page 37 of this report.

ASSURANCE

Alive2green has employed the services of independent consultants GSA Campbell to ensure that best practices and principles are applied to the greatest degree possible in the development of this report. The company has not elected to assure any report content in this reporting cycle.

CONTAC T INFORMATION

Alive2green 28 Main Rd, Rondebosch, Cape Town Gordon Brown Chief Executive Officer 021 447 4733; 083 259 8948 gordon.brown@alive2green.com

HOST CITY:

ABOUT THE REPORT

This report of Sustainability Week 2016 incorporates all seminars, workshops, events, exhibitions and activities that are included, or associated with the Sustainability Week brand, and which took place between the 31 May and 2 June 2016. The report aims to convey relevant information regarding sustainability per formance to all interested stakeholders. Compiled with the assistance of GSA Campbell Consulting, the report is aligned to the GRI G4 Reporting Standard of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI). Information regarding the specific indicators covered in the Report can be found in the GRI Index Table on page 43. Sustainability Week is a multifaceted and integrated event that traverses sectors and emphasises opportunities for investors, policymakers, business people, and consumers to improve environmental and economic performance – be it through achieving efficiencies, introducing alternative approaches, and by unlocking value. Sustainabilit y Week showcases innovation and seeks to inspire and educate attendees. Multiple platforms highlight the actions and interventions of leading thinkers, policymakers, practitioners and producers as they set

2015 EVENT REPORT INCORPORATING

GET READY TO PUT IDEAS IN MOTION

SUSTAINABILITY PERFORMANCE

SUSTAINABILITY WEEK 2014

Advancing the green economy in South Africa and the region

EVENT REPORT INCORPORATING SUSTAINABILITY PERFORMANCE Sustainability Week is a brand owned by Alive2green and operated in association with various industry stakeholders.

SUSTAINABILITY

WEEK

GET READY TO PUT IDEAS IN MOTION

23-28 JUNE 2015 *Sustainbility Week is a brand owned by Alive2Green and operated in association with various industry stakeholders

40

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

CEO’S MESSAGE

trust by operating at consistently high standards, and where possible for this to be verified through third party certifications and awards. We will begin to look at this area more closely.

How is sustainability relevant to the organisation? The singular focus of our media channels is to share knowledge and best practice in respect of sustainability, making sustainability central to our reason for existing. Sometimes however we get so bogged down in meeting this primary objective that we forget how important it is for us to also use our best endeavours to operate sustainably, and we have to guard against being the proverbial mechanic with the broken down car in the back yard. What is the overall vision and strategy for the short-term, medium-term (e.g. 3-5 years), and long-term? Our vision is to be regarded as the most important source of sustainability related content in South Africa on each of the sectors we cover. Our immediate strategy is to continue to hone our skills and to improve the delivery of media platforms, both qualitatively in respect of content and delivery mechanism, and quantitatively in respect of the number of people engaged. We will strive to do this organically but also through partnerships with expertise providers and by expanding the number of co-located events on the Sustainability Week Calendar. In the medium-term we will seek to expand geographically into African markets. We will do this with caution, starting with neighbouring countries, and with opportunities that open up through to relationships. Our long-term vision is for our channels to become regarded as the most important source of sustainability related content in Africa. In order to achieve these objectives we www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

will need to be financially successful but will not achieve this at the expense of people or the environment. What are some of the strategic priorities and key topics for the short/ medium-term with regard to sustainability? Strategically it’s fundamental that we constantly remain at the forefront of the issues and deliver the latest thinking. A key risk in our business is that the mainstream media takes over the discourse and that dedicated channels such as ours become marginalised. This is also a risk to the sustainability discourse as a whole because mainstream media are news and trend driven and thus intrinsically fickle, and they will only cover green economy while it’s deemed to be ‘newsworthy’. Our editorial strategy is thus to delve deeper into the detail behind the main stories, to share the nuances, and the insights, and to make the arguments, and in so doing continue to create reader/ delegate value. What international standards does the organisation subscribe to or incorporate? As we are not manufacturers or constructors so we do not have to meet any specific standards, but where there are voluntary standards that affect us we will adopt these, and examples are having our publications ABC Certified (Audit Bureau of Circulation) and by following the GRI standards for this report. How do these standards relate to longterm organisational strategy and success? Expansion locally, and more importantly regionally, requires trust, and companies earn

What are the broader trends (e.g macroeconomic or political) affecting the organisation and influencing sustainability priorities? Like all sectors and businesses, the green economy and indeed our business is affected by the waxing and waning of the economy, and by macroeconomic shocks. Some, like Eskom’s rolling blackouts actually benefited our business, but the recent devaluing of the Rand increased the cost of many clean technologies, negatively affecting green economy businesses such as our own. A slow growing economy also has a negative impact on the sector as in many cases the green economy interventions require capital and thus access to finance, and in a slow economy businesses and lenders become risk averse. At the same time many green economy interventions cut costs, and during tough times businesses are more likely to invest in cutting costs, so there are swings and roundabouts. What were the key events, achievements, and failures during the reporting period? Sustainability Week is a key event for us and has kept the flag flying high, and this due in no small measure to strong partnerships. Our publishing business has been difficult and we have been unable to move our Green Economy Journal to monthly, which was a key goal for 2016. What is the outlook on the organization’s main challenges and targets for the next year? The outlook for the organisation is extremely bright due to new event opportunities opening up, and due to an improved profitability outlook within the publishing business due to rationalisation of titles. What are the goals for year? Our goal for 2017 is to expand Sustainability Week to reach more people and include more elements, and in respect of other aspects of the business, to do less, better. Gordon Brown CEO Alive2Green

41


SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

ABOUT THE EVENT AND THE COMPANY OVERVIEW

Sustainability Week has for the past two years been organised through a strategic partnership with the City of Tshwane. It as an amalgamation of Alive2green’s green economy sector events, along with a number of independent events, such as the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, sharing a single platform and marketplace. It is the largest diversified green-economy-focused event in South Africa, and in Africa, and among the most long standing in the sector. Alive2green is a specialist knowledge company that promotes and delivers content on sustainability, believing that once presented with the facts, decisionmakers will make the right choices. The company works in partnership with leading research institutions, industry organisations and government departments to develop and produce forums, publications, events and educational courses that communicate the fundamental issues, thereby facilitating, in some small way, the knowledge transfer needed to advance towards a sustainable future.

Founded in South Africa in 2006 by directors and founders: Gordon Brown, Lloyd Macfarlane and Andrew Fehrsen, the company has offices in Cape Town, South Africa and Bamboo, Mauritius.

• ClayBrick Association • The Pretoria Institute for Architecture • Gauteng Institute for Architecture • The Southern African Wood, Laminate and Flooring Association • REEEP • The Southern African Alternative Energy Association • The Sustainable Energy Society of Southern Africa • The National Recycling Forum • Packaging SA • African Sustainable Energy Association • TIASA/AAMSA • World CSR Day & World Sustainability • African Institute of the Interior Design Professions • Decorex • Kitchen Specialists Association • South African Institute of Lighting • KZNIA • The Sustainable Tourism Partnership Programme • South African Youth Travel Confederation

ABOUT THE COMPANY

The Business Zone 1678CC trading as Alive2green is a closed corporation registered in the Republic of South Africa and is the sole owner of the Sustainability Week events and properties. Alive2green is a member of the Green Building Council of South Africa and is an organisational stakeholder of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI). The company is also a member of the Cape Chamber of Commerce and has affiliation agreements with various industry organisations such as: • The South African Institute of Architecture • Bizcommunity • The Family Business Association of Southern Africa • Food and Trees for Africa • Global GreenTag South Africa • The Architect Africa Network • The Association of Cementitious Material Producers

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The 1st phase completed (Inception Phase) was between CBD and Hatfield. This phase comprises of approximately 7km of TRT trunk route, 7 median Stations and Feeder routes going via Hatfield, Groenkloof, CBD and Steve Biko Hospital. The inception phase has been well received by the commuters. The average number of passengers per day has been consistent since February 2015 ranging between 3,000 and 4,000 passengers per day; increasing to 4495 passengers daily in October 2015.

alive2green alive2green

www.sustainabletourism.co.za

9

Ramokgopa further mentioned that “the City seeks to reaffirm its position as a leader on Green technology and other green interventions. The introduction of the CNG buses further indicates that the City wants to achieve a low carbon growth city; reduce emissions and benefit from a first mover advantage in this regard”.

South Africa Volume 2 The Essential Guide

Volume 4

CNG is a safe and renewable alternative source of energy that is sourced from various gas fields; natural Gas is the only abundant, eco-friendly and economically viable fuel.

The City of Tshwane has chosen CNG because natural gas burns cleaner than diesel, reduces fuel costs by up to 40%; cuts carbon dioxide by 25%; and lower carbon monoxide by 20%; does not produce particulates (ash); cuts nitrogen oxide by up to 90%; it is colourless, odourless and non-toxic; and it is a renewable source of energy.

www.alive2green.com

The roll-out of CNG powered buses is part of the City of Tshwane’s commitment of providing efficient transport service and transforming the existing system into a more sustainable form of transport. CNG has many benefits, it releases much lower gaseous emissions, it is environmentally friendly, with much lower noise levels, it has low maintenance costs than other hydrocarbon fuel-powered buses and further it will cost the City 40% less to operate a CNG bus.

Church Square in the CBD. During the launch the Executive Mayor of Tshwane Cllr Kgosientso Ramokgopa said” Tshwane is a trailblazer and trendsetter in this regard as we are the 1st in the Sub-Saharan Africa to operate a full CNG propelled bus”.

Sustainable Infrastructure Handbook

South Africa

40 of the 84 new buses expected for delivery for the second phase of A Re Yeng operations, comprises of the 37 x 12 m rigid diesel buses, 7 x 18 m articulated buses equipped with clean-burning diesel-powered Euro V engines and 40 X 12 m rigid buses running on compressed natural gas. 37 of these buses are expected to start coming off the production line from the end of November 2015 and the balance until January 2016.

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Creating a greener future for the people of Tshwane does not seem like a distant vision anymore. The procurement of 40 A Re Yeng buses running on Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) has cemented the City of Tshwane’s position towards being a liveable City in 2055.

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A Re Yeng launches a CNG bus, a first in Sub-Saharan Africa

The CNG bus was launched on the 24th November during a high profile event at the new A Re Yeng Molefe Makinta station,

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Southern & East Africa Volume 4 The Essential Guide

The City of Tshwane’s A Re Yeng is the first in Sub-Saharan Africa to run on full CNG.

www.alive2green.co.za

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www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

MARKETS AND PRODUCTS / DIVISIONS

DIGITAL The online division publishes multiple sector websites and social media platforms. While this division provides online services to other divisions, its primary function is online publishing, and to this end it publishes a fortnightly eJournal.The eJournal provides the latest stories in circulation under the heading of sustainability, with a focus on green building, sustainable tourism and youth issues. HANDBOOKS The Handbooks division publishes peer-reviewed handbooks on multiple sectors, working closely with industry experts and researchers, and industry representative bodies. The handbook series forms an invaluable resource of thought leadership and case study content for multiple industry sectors. MAGAZINES The Magazines division publishes Green Economy Journal and Green Home tin alternate months, aimed at green business stakeholders and households respectively, providing readers with the latest thinking, examples of action and leadership among business and domestic consumers and suppliers. EVENTS The Events division organises events for Alive2green such as Sustainability Week, the Green Business Seminar Series, Youth & the Green Economy Series, but also organises events on behalf of strategically aligned organisations such as the City of Tshwane and the South African Institute of Architects.

ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY WEEK

Sustainability Week takes place annually in the City of Tshwane and consists of various conferences, seminars, expos and side events that are aimed primarily at the vertical business sectors of sustainability. Green Home and the youth-focused events add a consumer element to the week’s activities. Sustainability Week seeks to advance the green economy through the sharing of knowledge across disciplines and sectors, and by actively seeking to accelerate the total number of projects undertaken under the heading of sustainability. Sustainability Week is where government officials, private sector investors, business operators, professionals, researchers, and NGOs converge to engage on this critically important, and most fundamental consideration – sustainability. Through an innovative format change in 2015, Sustainability Week has truly reflected the interconnectedness of the issues the cause and effect of actions, and the need to balance interests in a bid to achieve the most appropriate approach in all cases. Sustainability is not a quick fix or a one-size-fits-all solution; it is about a process of reaching decisions, with due deference to the interests of all stakeholders, including those not in the room. Once again, delegates were able to attend sessions of different seminars as these were segmented and offered in parallel, and in multiple programmes. This format allows people from different sectors to encounter the opportunities and challenges from one another’s perspectives, a primary step towards reaching consensus. Once again in 2016 ,Sustainability Week hosted The African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, an event led by the City of Tshwane. It saw an even larger contingent of high-level delegations from around the continent converge on the CSIR International Convention Centre, to deliberate on shared experiences and perspectives. This significant Pan African dialogue has for the past two years laid the foundation for expanded African cooperation at the city level, and on an urban scale. In addition to stellar lineups at the ninth annual Green Building Conference, and extended programmes for Energy and Water, three new seminars were introduced in 2015: Mining, Manufacturing and Infrastructure. www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

43


SUSTAINABILITY REPORT REPORT CONTENT

The process for defining report content was led by the event committee and consisted of committee meetings and certain engagements with stakeholders. In analysing the information to be included in the report, the team considered the questions: “Who is our reporting aimed at?” and “What decisions will they be able to make from our reporting?” In this context, it is the intention of Alive2green that this report: • Informs and adds value for all stakeholders with a valid interest in the group and event; • Considers all issues that can impact on the group’s ability to create value for these stakeholders; • Reports as comprehensively as possible on the known and potential impacts of these issues for the group and its stakeholders. In identifying the issues and information to be included in this report, the team considered the relative importance of each matter in terms of its known or potential effects on Alive2green’s ability to continue creating value for all stakeholders. These matters were then prioritised for relevance to the intended users of the report, so that nonpertinent information need not be included. Alive2green is of the view that this process is well aligned with the ‘reporting principles for defining report content’, as defined by the GRI. The event team made themselves available to address questions and issues as they arose during the planning for this event.

MATERIALITY

Alive2green undertook a process that was aimed at determining the material issues for the company and for key stakeholder groups. This process would serve to inform the content for engagement and would also provide the company with clarity around which issues should be managed. Materiality was determined by a process similar to that used to identify key stakeholders. The event committee used a workshop to determine issues of importance to the company and of importance to key stakeholder groups, including risks and opportunities relevant to the South African context. The major issues impacting and influencing the business and key stakeholder groups were plotted on the matrix in order to establish the relative importance of certain issues compared to others.

MATERIAL ISSUES

The best possible speakers The success of the event is clearly impacted by the presence of the most appropriate and

44

effective speakers. Our policy is to create a network of strategic editorial advisors, including consultants and where appropriate partners and even sponsors. This network assists us to develop the speaker invite list. A dedicated team of staff members runs the process, ensuring that different views are incorporated and integrated. A challenge is the need for continual massaging of the timing of finalising the programme against the recruitment of new partners and sponsors. Correct audience attendance/Delegate numbers Our marketing strategy is key for this issue, targeting predefined groups of people, media and representative organisations. As discussed in the CEO’s report, a challenge for future events will be to improve the delegate booking process to allow greater pre-event engagement. Post-event engagement has provided valuable input for next year’s event. Sponsor engagement/Management Our aim is to ensure that we have delivered on our promises to sponsors, or exceeded expectations. Dedicated staff members are appointed to facilitate this process, and checks and balances are put in place. Potential improvements include more face-to-face meetings and possibly a pre-event group meeting of sponsors and exhibitors. Perception There are no specific policies governing the material issue of perception because it is all-pervasive. All aspects of the event can create both positive and negative perception; managing this involves putting together the best possible event, and doing so in a manner that has the least negative impact. We also endeavour to demonstrate our efforts to our stakeholders through information boards, and through the post-event report. Potential growth in this area could be to clarify our stance on problematic issues (e.g. serving meals that are not sustainable choices) so that more effective communication reaches all service providers. Environmental impacts Energy use, waste and water are discussed in the Environmental Sustainability section of this report, and procurement issues are discussed in the Economic / Environmental sections of this report.

MARKETING EFFECTIVENESS

As indicated above, marketing of the event is carefully targeted to appropriate individuals,

representative organisations and sector-focused media. Management takes place on a daily basis involving the CEO, and sales, event and marketing managers. Potential improvements include more direct meetings with the media and organisational partners.

EVENT SUSTAINABILITY

Event management The organisers of Sustainability Week are increasingly committed to ensuring that the events and activities taking place before, during and after the week are as sustainable as reasonably possible in terms of their impact on the environment. The team are aware of the typical impacts and material issues that are associated with Sustainability Week, however every year brings a few new challenges, even if they are in the form of dealing with (and even training) new supplier representatives, for example. ‘Event greening’ activities included correspondence and engagement with certain key suppliers such as venue, caterers, exhibitors and sponsors regarding ways in which they could reduce the impact of their involvement, and how they could assist us to report on sustainability. Various other interventions that relate to specific environmental issues, such as energy, water and procurement were been discussed and actioned with key role players

STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT

Because the success of Sustainability Week is dependent on effective engagement with all stakeholder groups, the company conducted a stakeholder identification process by means of a workshop. This ensured that we were clear about who to engage with, how to engage and what to engage about. Using guidelines provided by GSA Campbell Consulting, the committee conducted a stakeholder identification process that examined how the events impact or influence stakeholders, and how the events, and the business impact or influence stakeholders. This data was plotted on a matrix that allowed the team to establish the relative importance of each key stakeholder group.The team engaged with stakeholders proactively about key issues, including the GSA Campbell Event Greening Guidelines, which seek to create awareness and understanding of sustainability impacts and the avoidance thereof. Links to the Guidelines were included in email correspondences with stakeholders leading up to the events.The table overleaf contains the list of key stakeholder groups and some information regarding engagement around Sustainability Week.

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


SUSTAINABILITY REPORT STAKEHOLDER GROUP

MECHANISM FOR ENGAGEMENT AND FREQUENCY*

FEEDBACK AND RESPONSE

Delegates

The event team used email and media platforms to communicate with delegates and potential delegates. Relevant delegates were targeted, based on their industry and personal profile.

Delegates were able to communicate with the event management team via the Sustainability Week page on the A2G website, and via email. Through these and other platforms delegates were able to submit questions/issues and the event team was able to respond to questions/issues raised.

Sponsors and exhibitors

The event sales team communicated with sponsors and exhibitors via phone, email and meetings. The event marketing team communicated with exhibitors and sponsors using email and advertising. See more detail in the media schedule section of this report.

Meetings are held so the sponsors can discuss issues they may have after the event. A2G responds to each item raised and will be following up with action points taken under each issue in an ongoing process. Exhibitor’s liaison process will involve salespeople contacting them to follow up on their comments, and where necessary to refer those comments to management for further action/interaction.

Employees and associates

Employees and associates were communicated with using email and in a number of daily, weekly and monthly meetings.

The organisation held a post-event meeting in which all employee-related issues were raised and addressed.

Facilitators and speakers

The event team communicated with facilitators via email and telephone in the run-up to the event.

We seek an ongoing relationship with our speakers and facilitators who by nature of their expertise are also potential contributors to our publications.

Suppliers and service providers

The event team emailed the suppliers and service providers as required. Suppliers and service providers were able to communicate with the event management team via scheduled meetings and phone calls in which responses to their queries and issues were provided.

We deal with suppliers on an issue-by-issue basis.

Local and regional community

The growing relationship between A2G and the City of Tshwane is becoming increasingly important. Green Home Fair and the youth project are related to this community (see CEO’s report). Because the City of Tshwane procured 200 seats per day, a fair number of regional businesses supported this event. They see Sustainability Week as a large and important event for the city. Editorially we will continue the relationship between Tshwane, and the issues raised in the editorial component of the event.

Local and regional communities were able to communicate with the event management team via the Sustainability Week page on the A2G website, and via email. Through these and other platforms community members were able to submit questions/issues and the event team was able to respond to questions/ issues raised.

Media

We were very successful in achieving high media return through earned media process (editorial). Social media was a big part of this. Social media gives us media value –- where articles or interviews are featured in the media. Our PR agent tracks that and apportions a value to that - it was valued at R2 500 000.00 (compared to R 21,577,107.90 last year. Stories in the media (business-to-business media, e.g. engineering news) show that 25% of their content comes from statements made by key people at events and we had at least one story featured (Dlamini Zuma).

Industry associations, affiliates and institutions

The event management team attended industry forums and events to meet key role players from industry associations, affiliates and institutions. The event management team communicated with the industry associations, affiliates and institutions through emails and phone conversations. The event management team negotiated agreements with certain industry associations in order to market to their members.

Government departments

The event management team attended events to meet key role players from government departments and communicated with government departments through emails and phone conversations.

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

45


SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

46

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT

Alive2green’s highest authority is the chief executive officer (CEO), who is an executive director of the Board of Directors. Directors report to the CEO. The directors have functional portfolios and are responsible for the development and execution of company strategy. Shareholders use the board meeting platform to provide their input and to influence resolutions. The primary purpose of the Board is to implement the strategy in a way that is true to the values of the company. The Board manages and keeps abreast of financial

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

performance and other key objectives of the business. Environmental, social and governance issues are key to the content of our discussions. Meetings are scheduled once a month to address necessary actions e.g. if a strategic action is yet to be implemented, or if an issue has been specifically flagged for reactive response. The agenda reflects the dynamics of required response rather than a list of standing items. Operational meetings are held on an ongoing regular basis to supervise various operational centres, provide review and feedback to middlemanagementstaff, and ultimately achieve the operational objectives of the business.

VALUES, PRINCIPLES, CODES AND PROCEDURES

Alive2green has developed and implemented internal value statements and codes of conduct, which are used as guidelines for management, and which relate to economic, environmental and social performance. Employees thus have forums and systems at their disposal to address the values, codes of conduct or standards with regard to non-compliance in any work-related situation or incident.

47


SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY CLIMATE CHANGE

Alive2green is subject to general business risk associated with climate change. The financial impact of increased tariffs, carbon taxes and emissions regulations will reduce the organisations’ potential to operate as effectively without corresponding increases in funding. However, given that the activities of Alive2green and the event are directed specifically at climate change mitigation and adaptation, an opportunity exists for Alive2green to show results and to demonstrate leadership in this space, which may even serve to position the organisation as an essential solution to climate change mitigation, potentially increasing access to funding. Examples

48

of sustainability practices are detailed in other sections of this report.

SUPPLIERS

Alive2green follows an active policy of attempting to procure the best environmental choice locally, whether it is for food, paper or publishing, within certain price parameters. In this context ‘local’ means based in South Africa. An effective management approach involves ongoing identification of suitable suppliers, building relationships with existing suppliers and ensuring that staff have up-to-date information at their disposal regarding developments in various procurement categories. There is room for improvement in that we could be more proactive in educating suppliers and emphasising the importance

of sustainable procurement, which would encourage and influence suppliers to make their own changes in product presentations and manufacturing processes where possible. For example, we have been engaging our printing supplier – a relatively small BEE company – for the last two years about becoming FSC (Forestry Stewardship Council) certified. This is, in our view, an important supplier requirement and yet it seems more important to influence our existing suppliers than to abandon the relationships in order to seek out an already-certified supplier. We remain committed to suppliers that are willing to engage around these issues – suppliers that understand our journey and the role that they play.

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

SOCIAL SUSTAINABILITY HUMAN CAPITAL, DIVERSITY AND TRAINING; HEALTH AND SAFETY

Employment value system Alive2green subscribes to the principles of broad-based black economic empowerment and provides on-the-job training. Staff at Alive2green are expected to uphold the company ethos in their dealings with customers and suppliers. Open, honest and respectful communication and freedom of expression is encouraged and the company ensures a safe and healthy work environment for all employees. Of a total workforce of 25,9 are permanent, 3 are contract staff and 13 are volunteers. 11 are female with 2 in senior management and 3 in mid-management. Below lists the workforce that have been involved in Sustainability Week. Employment and remuneration As a relatively small business, Alive2green offers the best possible packages it can afford to administrative staff and offers competitive basic-plus-commission packages to sales staff. The company boasts high levels of staff

retention and long service, however attracting good employees remains an ongoing objective for management. Training and education Education and training are treated as very important at Alive2green and this is particularly relevant in the context of Sustainability Week, which required staff to possess the skills and experience required to manage so many moving parts. An additional requirement was that staff understood certain basic tenets of corporate sustainability. This was important given that employees were required to engage with key stakeholder groups that needed to understand the value proposition of the events. Volunteers who worked at Sustainability Week were trained beforehand and a large number of these volunteers have worked at a number of Alive2green events in the past. Volunteer retention is excellent. Volunteers were mostly students in the architectural, engineering, technical or science faculties of tertiary institutions in the local community. Volunteers were paid a stipend that covered food and transport for the time that they were at the event and most of the volunteers view the week as an opportunity to engage with prospective future employers or influencers. Workforce at the event: John Elford Staff Beverley Stone Staff Nabilah Hassen Staff Gordon Brown Staff Lloyd MacFarlane Staff Pitso Saul Maholela Staff Annie Pieters Staff Loic Nguema Staff Tulingui Bignoumba Staff Nobelusi Kenyana Staff Tracy Mills Staff Edward MacDonald Staff Courtney Gehle Volunteer Kathleen Godfrey Volunteer Brian Ethan Volunteer King Dlamini Volunteer Lisa Mbwia Volunteer Sam Chamberlain Volunteer Miracle Chawane Volunteer Thiasha Vythilingam Volunteer Tshepho Mamashela Volunteer

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

Khanya Ngonyama Shoneez Parsons Micke van Niekerk Craig Dube

Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer

Corporate social investment Community development In 2014 Alive2green established a new platform that focuses on youth and the role they can play in the green economy. The ‘Youth and Green Economy’ dialogue continued to be successful on social media platforms and at the Event. Website traffic from this group initially grew very quickly, and has increased steadily over the last two and half years. It is our belief that those ‘members’ of this community are not only emerging as a key stakeholder group, but are developing in their careers, and in their ability to influence the organisations that they will represent in the future. This, in our view could be equated to a ‘downstream strategy of influence and growth’ – a sustainable approach in itself. Youth and the green economy Likes: 7 186

www.facebook.com/pages/ Y o u t h - a n d - t h e - G r e e n Economy/437554116287231 Other social impacts Alive2green elected to support the Joburg Landfill Gas to Energy Project by purchasing carbon credits that were generated by this project through Climate Neutral Group (see information in the Environmental section). Energy and emission section The initiative to offset the carbon footprint for Sustainability Week 2016 consisted of implementing event greening measures, establishing the event’s overall carbon footprint, and then offsetting the Scope 1 (direct) and Scope 2 (electricity) and all scope 3 emissions except delegates’ flights with the Joburg Waste to Energy Project facilitated by Climate Neutral Group in South Africa.

49


SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ENERGY AND EMISSIONS

Large events such as Sustainability Week can be major sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The use of electricity, heating, air conditioning, transportation and paper all contribute to climate change in some way. Electricity and fuel consumption were regarded to be the most material impacts for Sustainability Week and it was important to measure and mitigate consumption wherever possible. This included creating awareness among key stakeholders. Roughly 90% of electricity generated in South Africa comes from coal-fired power stations, which emit tons of CO2 (Carbon-dioxide) into the earth’s atmosphere. Events are also usually associated with the use of planes, cars, buses and trains that use carbon-emitting fuels to various degrees. A carbon footprint is an effective measure of the emissions associated with the event. A carbon footprint can generally be defined as the total set of GHG (Greenhouse Gas) emissions caused by an organisation, event, product or person. For the third year in succession Alive2green undertook a GHG reduction and offsetting initiative in an attempt to make the event ‘carbon neutral’. Part of the responsibility to reduce the carbon footprint for Sustainability Week rests with exhibitors and participants, and so all attendees were encouraged to select low-carbon options. The initiative to offset the carbon footprint for Sustainability Week 2016 consisted of implementing event greening measures, establishing the event’s overall carbon footprint, and then offsetting the Scope 1 (direct) and Scope 2 (electricity) emissions with the Joburg Waste to Energy Project facilitated by the Climate Neutral Group in South Africa.

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

To the extent that it was regarded to be important to communicate the sustainability aspects of the event to attendees and participants, the GSA Campbell Event Greening Guidelines were used to do this leading up to and following the event. This event

50

sustainability report forms part of this stakeholder communication process. Alive2green specifies uncoated paper and insists on paper products for its publications that have come from sustainably grown forests. Alive2green is in the process of negotiating with our printer of choice to obtain Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC) certification. The company made use of reusable and recyclable signage and marketing materials for the event, and waste products from the event were separated and recycled. The event committee chose the CSIR International Convention Centre - a venue with excellent energy, water and waste policies and practices. Alive2green products play a role in spreading the message about sustainability, by stimulating the green economy and by facilitating knowledge transfer and providing a source of information for green business and entrepreneurship.

CUSTOMER HEALTH AND SAFET Y

The event met all Joint Operations Committee (JOC) requirements for customer health and safety. The JOC was established to ensure that all events held in Gauteng are safe and that event organisers comply with all the by-laws and regulations for the region. The venue, used for many large events and exhibitions, was chosen as it already had multiple health and safety amenities in place.

PACKAGING RESPONSIBILITY

Packaging materials were avoided or recycled where possible, and the following materials were reclaimed for re-use: • Delegate badges (after the event) • Delegate bags not wanted.

MATERIALS

As a publisher and events company, Alive2green produces a large quantity of printed materials, and takes the following

into account when procuring such materials: • Source of paper products – the company is increasingly ensuring that these emanate from sustainably managed forests. • Printing approach – the company chooses uncoated paper to ensure maximum recyclability. • The event programme was printed on Hi-Q paper - A4 size, print run of 2000 (80 pages, 90g matt art). • Reusability – the company prints generic signs where possible to ensure reusability and offers bins for used lanyards and plastic sleeves. • Recycling – the company ensures that materials used for publications are recycled or redistributed and that waste separation processes are put in place during the event.

WATER AND WASTE

As mentioned above, the event management team is keenly aware of the necessity of water conservation and waste management and therefore the venue was specifically chosen for its good sustainability practices in this regard.

EXTREMELY IMPORTANT EVENT ON THE CALENDAR AND WE WILL CONTINUE OUR SUPPORT IN FUTURE.

– Reon Pienaar, AECOM

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


GRI INDEX

SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

Indicator

Page/Response

G4-1

41

G4-2

36, 41, 45, 48, 49, 50

G4-3

3, 40, 42

G4-4

42, 43

G4-5

42

G4-6

40, 42, 43

G4-7

42

G4-8

43

G4-9

42, 43, 49

G4-10

49

G4-11

No employees are covered by collective bargaining agreements

G4-12

48

G4-13

No significant changes

G4-14

The Alive2green values reflect the organisation's commitment to avoiding environmental and social harm and the precautionary approach or principle is informally applied at all levels in the organisation.

G4-15

36, 37, 38

G4-16

42

G4-17

No additional entities to report on

G4-18

40

G4-19

40, 44

G4-20

40, 44-50

G4-21

40, 44-50

G4-22

No restatements

G4-23

No significant changes

G4-24

45

G4-25

44

G4-26

45

G4-27

45

G4-28

This report covers the period 31 May through 2 June 2016.

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

51


SUSTAINABILITY REPORT G4-29

The most recent prior report was for Sustainability Week 2015, at roughly the same time of year.

G4-30

Annual, or as frequently as the event takes place

G4-31

Back page and 33

G4-32

Alive2green believes that our reporting process is aligned with, but not yet in accordance with the GRI G4 Reporting Standard - Core. No external assurance of any content in this report has been sought.

G4-33

Alive2green believes that external assurance of certain content in this report is not necessary at this time. The involvement of an external consulting firm has assisted the company and we will continue to consider the inclusion of an external assurance process in each new reporting cycle.

G4-34

38

Text with grey background indicates Reponses which do not fully satisfy the conditions of compliance with GRI G4 Indicators

Material Aspects

Indicators

Applicable/DMA/Indicator Response

Attendance, management, speakers, sponsorship, perceptions, legacy

G4-1; G4-PR7

Recruitment policies are important to ensure good management and performance where these material issues are concerned. Employee performance regarding sales of delegates tickets and sponsorships, and attendance by suitable speakers, is key to the economic sustainability of the event and also the value proposition that stakeholders experience. Marketing strategies are also crucial and the company is extremely concerned with how the events and activities of Sustainability Week are presented. No marketing industry fines, penalties, complaints or issues have been recorded.

G4-1; G4-EC2, G4EN3, G4-EN5, G4-EN7, G4-EN8, G4-EN15, G4-EN16, G4-EN17, G4-EN19, G4-EN27, G4-EN32

The perceptions of all stakeholders are important. Sustainability Week has made every effort to ensure that through all of its activities and communications it is promoting responsible event management. The environmental impacts of the event are closely managed, and mitigated where possible. Further information on the indicators applicable can be found in the report on pages 26, 28, 29, 33, 40, 41 and 42.

Environmental impacts, perception

52

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

53


APPENDIX

APPENDIX PR OUTPUTS

PRINT

MEDIA HOUSE

HEADLINE

DATE

AVE VALUE

PR VALUE

New Age, The

Africa’s mayors talk

2-Jun-16

R170,478.00

R511,434.00

Gauteng Guardian

Capital leads commitment to sustainability

2-Jun-16

R9,747.00

R29,241.00

Pretoria News

‘Hunger to destabilise Africa’

2-Jun-16

R7,265.00

R21,795.00

Leadership

Leadership Sustaining sustainability

1-Jun-16

R105,116.33

R315,348.99

Leadership

The case for green

1-Jun-16

R14,134.16

R42,402.48

Daily News (Deadline Edition)

Sustainability Week

1-Jun-16

R17,327.55

R51,982.65

Star

CITIES BATTLING TO HOUSE ALL COMERS

1-Jun-16

R25,477.86

R76,433.58

Times, The (KZN Edition)

CAPITAL OCCASION

1-Jun-16

R18,946.80

R56,840.40

Times, The (Cape Edition)

FLYING THE FLAG

1-Jun-16

R18,946.80

R56,840.40

Times, The (Second Edition)

Tshwane greenest city on the continent

1-Jun-16

R28,420.20

R85,260.60

Get It (Pretoria)

Out & About

1-Jun-16

R21,607.02

R64,821.06

Business Day (Late Final)

Rapid migration ‘is the issue’

1-Jun-16

R1,473.61

R4,420.83

Citizen (KZN)

CAPITOL JOB

1-Jun-16

R9,708.38

R29,125.14

Pretoria News

Urban drift to go on, mayors told

1-Jun-16

R10,090.27

R30,270.81

Pretoria News (Saturday)

Fair for ‘green’ enthusiasts to showcase their wares

21-May-16

R1,983.61

R5,950.83

Grocott`s Mail

Invest in African sustainability now

20-May-16

R3,156.48

R9,469.44

Centurion, The

Pen- A - bate: May/June 2016

1-May-16

R4,489.06

R13,467.18

Property Professional

WHAT’S ON

1-May-16

R23,474.74

R70,424.22

The Star, Workplace

Eco-thinking is the way

21-Apr-16

R 175,634.12

R 526,902.36

The Star, Workplace

Eco-thinking is the way

22-Apr-16

R 171,130.68

R 513,392.04

54

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


APPENDIX Daily Sun (Tshwane)

African Cities to unite in Tshwane

10-Mar-16

R 17,224.36

R 51,673.08

The New Age

Climate change on agenda

1-Mar-16

R 33,768.00

R 101,304.00

To Build

Green Building Conference

1-Mar-16

R 6,705.42

R 20,116.26

Leading Architecture & Design

The City of Tshwane will be the site of national and international knowledge sharing

1-Feb-16

R 4,284.56

R 4,284.56

South African Builder

Sustainability Week

1-Feb-16

R 21,224.61

R 63,673.83

TOTAL

R 925,693.17

R 2,777,079.51

ONLINE MEDIA HOUSE

HEADLINE

DATE

AVE VALUE

PR VALUE

Juggelingactoflife.blogspot. co.za- Juggling Act Of Life

Five for Friday edition 10

3-Jun-16

R5,185.00

R15,555.00

Enterprise-africa.net - Enterprise Africa

New horizons for SA’s urban spaces

3-Jun-16

R12,669.80

R38,009.40

Iol.co.za/business - Iol Business Report

Green push for young people in business

3-Jun-16

R42,305.94

R126,917.82

Iol.co.za/capetimes - Cape Times

Youth urged to tap into green economy

2-Jun-16

R36,426.72

R109,280.16

Knowledgebylanes.co.za South Africa News Gazette

NEW HORIZONS FOR SOUTH AFRICA’S URBAN SPACES

1-Jun-16

R12,226.80

R36,680.40

Engineeringnews.co.za - Engineering News

Inventory of South Africa’s green economy initiatives to be completed by end-June

1-Jun-16

R23,517.60

R70,552.80

Sapropertyinsider.co.za - SA Property Insider

Tshwane greenest city in Africa

1-Jun-16

R14,774.40

R44,323.20

Bizcommunity.com - Biz Community

New horizons for SA’’s urban spaces

1-Jun-16

R118,208.16

R354,624.48

Greenbusinessguide.co.za Green Business Guide

Jacaranda City wins green award for second year running

1-Jun-16

R16,535.40

R49,606.20

Timeslive.co.za - Times Live

Tshwane greenest city on the continent

1-Jun-16

R27,182.06

R81,546.18

Allafrica.com - All Africa

South Africa: New Horizons for SA’s Urban Spaces

31-May-16

R12,824.85

R38,474.55

Allafrica.com - All Africa

South Africa: Tshwane Hosts African Mayors

31-May-16

R5,448.90

R16,346.70

Sacommercialpropnews.co.za - SA Commercial Prop News

SA’s urban development framework set to create vibrant spaces

31-May-16

R27,069.39

R81,208.17

Architectafrica.com - Architect Africa Online

New Horizons for South Africa’s Urban Spaces

31-May-16

R31,296.80

R93,890.40

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

55


APPENDIX

Timeslive.co.za - Times Live

‘’African cities cannot cope with the rate of urbanisation’’ Tshwane mayor Ramokgopa

31-May-16

R31,942.37

R95,827.11

Engineeringnews.co.za - Engineering News

Urbanisation, spatial injustice remains a challenge in Africa

31-May-16

R28,029.92

R84,089.76

Sanews.gov.za - South African Government News Agency

New horizons for SA’s urban spaces

31-May-16

R12,669.80

R38,009.40

Engineeringnews.co.za - Engineering News

Tshwane wins Earth Hour Capital competition for the second year in a row

31-May-16

R15,678.40

R47,035.20

Polity.org.za - Polity

African mayors meet to discuss how African cities are coping with urbanisation

31-May-16

R27,907.20

R83,721.60

Agriorbit.com- Agriorbit.com

Sustainability Week

31-May-16

R418.00

R1,254.00

Timeslive.co.za - Times Live

‘’African cities cannot cope with the rate of urbansiation’’ Tshwane mayor Ramokgopa

31-May-16

R31,942.37

R95,827.11

Timeslive.co.za - Times Live

Jacaranda City wins green award for second year running

31-May-16

R20,490.03

R61,470.09

Gautengguardian.co.za – Gauteng Guardian

Tshwane hosts African mayors

31-May-16

R7,065.85

R21,197.55

Metrosanews.co.za – Metro SA News

Tshwane hosts African mayors

31-May-16

R5,670.40

R17,011.20

Cajnewsafrica.com – CAJ News Africa

Tshwane hosts African mayors

31-May-16

R5,471.05

R16,413.15

Infrastructurene.ws – Infrastructure News and Service Delivery

Sustainability Week 2016

31-May-16

R10,338.52

R31,015.56

Gov.za – Sa Government Online

Deputy Minister Andries Nel addresses African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, 31 May

30-May-16

R11,222.75

R33,668.25

Elledecoration.co.za – Elle Decoration South Africa

Green Living With The Green Home Fair

30-May-16

R49,489.20

R148,467.60

WWF.org.za – WWF

Tshwane named SA’s Earth Hour Capital

30-May-16

R31,630.62

R94,891.86

Businesseventsafrica.com – Business Events Africa

Africa’s Capital Cities unite in search of truly African answers to sustainability imperative at the urban scale

26-May-16

R43,029.22

R129,087.66

Windowart.co.za/blog – Window Art

Embrace eco-friendly habits for sustainability week

25-May-16

R23,208.12

R69,624.36

Africanindy.com – African Independent

African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum

24-May-16

R55,242.10

R165,726.30

Sabusinessintegrator. co.za – South African Business Integrator

Africa’s Capital Cities unite in search of truly African answers to sustainability imperative at the urban scale

19-May-16

R53,560.26

R160,680.78

Getitonline.co.za – Get It

Green Home Fair 2016

19-May-16

R2,678.12

R8,034.36

Bizcommunity.com – Biz Community

Go green at the Green Home Fair 2016

17-May-16

R52,536.96

R157,610.88

Bizcommunity.com – Biz Community

Food Security Seminar 2016 - changing the face of African agriculture

16-May-16

R97,151.68

R291,455.04

Bizconnect.standardbank. co.za – Standard Bank Bizconnect

Green building and energy efficient building convention

14-May-16

R30,226.56

R90,679.68

Sun.ac.za - Stellenbosch University

SRC chairperson gives overview of the past term

13-May-16

R27,175.36

R81,526.08

56

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


APPENDIX Bizconnect.standardbank. co.za – Standard Bank Bizconnect

Green building and energy efficient building convention

14-May-16

R30,226.56

R90,679.68

Sun.ac.za - Stellenbosch University

SRC chairperson gives overview of the past term

13-May-16

R27,175.36

R81,526.08

Mynewsroom.co.za – My Newsroom

Food Security Seminar 2016 – changing the face of African agriculture

11-May-16

R27,867.98

R83,603.94

Businesseventsafrica.com – Business Events Africa

Food Security Seminar 2016 – changing the face of African agriculture

9-May-16

R20,885.02

R62,655.06

Architectafrica.com – Architect Africa Online

Sustainability Week 2016

9-May-16

R15,270.68

R45,812.04

Ngopulse.org – SA NGO Pulse

South African Youth Call on All South Africans to Take a Stand for Sustainability this Earth Day - Sustainability Week 2016

28-Apr-16

R10,818.36

R32,455.08

Greenbusinessguide.co.za

Sustainable Energy Seminar 2016 to examine the energy supply and demand imperative

15-Apr-16

R 22,936.20

R 68,808.60

Spice4life.co.za

Sustainable Energy Seminar 2016 to examine the energy supply and demand imperative

18-Apr-16

R 20,734.56

R 62,203.68

Bizcommunity.com

Sustainable Energy Seminar 2016 to examine the energy supply and demand imperative

18-Apr-16

R 87,353.12

R 262,059.36

Wecanchange.co.za

Re-imagining Africa’s Capital cities for sustainability

21-Apr-16

R 18,428.80

R 55,286.40

Mynewsroom.co.za

South African youth call on all South Africans to take a stand for sustainability

21-Apr-16

R 43,733.21

R 131,199.63

infrastructurene.ws

Sustainable Energy Seminar 2016 to examine the energy supply and demand imperative

22-Apr-16

R 12,035.30

R 36,105.90

Fourwaysreview.co.za

7 Tips for Earth Day

22-Apr-16

R 9,089.60

R 27,268.80

Citybuzz.co.za

7 Tips for Earth Day

22-Apr-16

R 8,229.22

R 24,687.66

Northeasterntribune.co.za

7 Tips for Earth Day

22-Apr-16

R 9,069.84

R 27,209.52

Themarketingsite.com

South Africans called to take a stand for sustainability this Earth Day

22-Apr-16

R 119,465.60

R 358,396.80

Rosebankkillarneygazette. co.za

7 Tips for Earth Day

22-Apr-16

R 9,069.84

R 27,209.52

Sandtonchronicle.co.za

7 Tips for Earth Day

22-Apr-16

R 9,069.84

R 27,209.52

Midrandreporter.co.za

7 Tips for Earth Day

22-Apr-16

R 9,069.84

R 27,209.52

Newsroom.co.za

Great minds set to gather at the 10th annual Green Building Conference in Tshwane

28-Jan-16

R 50,566.42

R 151,699.26

Businesseventsafrica.com

Great minds set to gather at the 10th annual Green Building Conference in Tshwane

1-Feb-16

R 36,950.42

R 110,851.26

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

57


APPENDIX Bizcommunity.com

Imagining and constructing healthier buildings

3-Feb-16

R 111,953.76

R 335,861.28

exsa.co.za

Great minds set to gather at the 10th annual Green Building Conference in Tshwane

3-Feb-16

R 36,342.54

R 109,027.62

Transformsa.co.za

Green economy can speed up basic services

4-Feb-16

R 6,489.91

R 19,469.73

Constructionreviewonline. com

10th annual Green Building Conference in Tshwane

4-Feb-16

R 32,909.64

R 98,728.92

Meetconfex.co.za

Great minds set to gather at the 10th annual Green Building Conference in Tshwane

4-Feb-16

R 11,804.76

R 35,414.28

Leadingarchitecture.co.za

Great minds set to gather at the 10th annual Green Building Conference in Tshwane

4-Feb-16

R 45,218.48

R 135,655.44

Propertywheel.co.za

Green Building Conference 2016

10-Feb-16

R 33,164.64

R 99,493.92

Africagreenmedia.co.za

Great minds set to gather at the 10th annual Green Building Conference in Tshwane

16-Feb-16

R 38,724.84

R 116,174.52

Greenbusinessguide.co.za

Green Building Conference in Tshwane

17-Feb-16

R 61,821.06

R 185,463.18

Spice4life.co.za

Africa’s population to reach 2.4 billion by 2050

22-Feb-16

R 52,649.52

R 157,948.56

Infrastructurene.ws

Building Sustainable African cities

24-Feb-16

R 17,086.18

R 51,258.54

Bizcommunity.com

Africa’s population growth poses greatest climate change threat

1-Mar-16

R 71,717.12

R 215,151.36

Infrastructurene.ws

Great minds set to discuss green building

2-Mar-16

R 23,360.32

R 70,080.96

Propertywheel.co.za

Sustainability Week 2016

3-Mar-16

R 11,080.80

R 33,242.40

Bizcommunity.com

Re-imaging Africas capital cities for the prosperity of its people

4-Mar-16

R 187,006.56

R 561,019.68

Bizcommunity.com

Africa’’s population to reach 2.4 billion by 2050 - the time to invest in the sustainable development of African cities is now

7-Mar-16

R 229,328.00

R 687,984.00

Greenbusinessguide.co.za

Re-imagining Africa’s Capital cities for sustainability

10-Mar-16

R 46,992.54

R 140,977.62

Tobuild.co.za

Great Building Conference

14-Mar-16

R 9,194.18

R 27,582.54

Businesseventsafrica.co.za

Re-imagining Africa’s Capital cities for sustainability

17-Mar-16

R 26,355.94

R 79,067.82

Sagoodnews.co.za

Re-imagining Africa’s Capital cities for sustainability

22-Mar-16

R 19,492.00

R 58,476.00

showme.co.za

Re-imagining Africa’s capital cities

23-Mar-16

R 52,061.68

R 156,185.04

Sabusinessintegrator.co.za

Re-imaging Africa’s capital cities for the prosperity of its people

17-Mar-16

R 42,947.19

R 128,841.57

TOTAL

R 2,777,862.03

R 8,333,586.09

58

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


APPENDIX BROADCAST MEDIA HOUSE

TOPIC

DATE

AVE VALUE

PR VALUE

Kyknet

City of Tshwane ---Repeat

7-Jun-16

R11,733.33

R35,199.99

Kyknet

City of Tshwane ---Repeat

6-Jun-16

R25,800.00

R77,400.00

Kyknet

Discussion with Pieter de Necker---Repeat

6-Jun-16

R11,733.33

R35,199.99

Channel Africa

This week African city mayors are meeting in Tshwane to discuss matters of Sustainability as they relate to local government

4-Jun-16

R88,704.00

R266,112.00

Channel Africa

Sustainability Week hosted by City of Tshwane

3-Jun-16

R40,760.00

R122,280.00

SAFM

Focus on the SANParks Volunteer Ranger Programme

2-Jun-16

R9,373.00

R28,119.00

SAFM

Sustainability Week hosted by City of Tshwane

2-Jun-16

R7,527.00

R22,581.00

SAFM

Show Line Up

2-Jun-16

R1,924.00

R5,772.00

Classic FM

Focus on the Sustainability Week event

2-Jun-16

R51,034.80

R153,104.40

Classic FM

Show Line Up

2-Jun-16

R36,419.20

R109,257.60

ANN7

African cities’ mayors meets in PTA---Repeat

1-Jun-16

R99,200.00

R297,600.00

ANN7

African cities’ mayors meets in PTA---Repeat

1-Jun-16

R150,600.00

R451,800.00

ANN7

African cities’ mayors meets in PTA---Continue

1-Jun-16

R148,800.00

R446,400.00

ANN7

African cities’ mayors meets in PTA

1-Jun-16

R98,400.00

R295,200.00

Radio 2000

Focus on Sustainability Week

1-Jun-16

R24,424.00

R73,272.00

ANN7

African cities’ mayors meets in PTA

1-Jun-16

R76,200.00

R228,600.00

Radio 2000

Show Line Up

1-Jun-16

R8,591.00

R25,773.00

SAFM

Focus on building African cities

1-Jun-16

R98,217.00

R294,651.00

Channel Africa

Influx of people to urban areas is not only an African problem but a global challenge---Repeat

1-Jun-16

R29,656.00

R88,968.00

Power FM

Live Broadcast from the City of Tshwane---Continue

1-Jun-16

R142,174.00

R426,522.00

Power FM

Live Broadcast from the City of Tshwane---Continue

1-Jun-16

R75,174.00

R225,522.00

Power FM

Live Broadcast from the City of Tshwane---Continue

1-Jun-16

R87,234.00

R261,702.00

Power FM

Live Broadcast from the City of Tshwane---Continue

1-Jun-16

R86,698.00

R260,094.00

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

59


APPENDIX Channel Africa

Influx of people to urban areas is not only an African problem but a global challenge---Repeat

1-Jun-16

R4,920.00

R14,760.00

Power FM

Live Broadcast from the City of Tshwane---Continue

1-Jun-16

R82,946.00

R248,838.00

Power FM

Live Broadcast from the City of Tshwane---Continue

1-Jun-16

R172,056.00

R516,168.00

Power FM

Live Broadcast from the City of Tshwane---Continue

1-Jun-16

R150,482.00

R451,446.00

Power FM

Live Broadcast from the City of Tshwane

1-Jun-16

R118,054.00

R354,162.00

Ukhozi FM

African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum---Repeat

1-Jun-16

R40,103.00

R120,309.00

Ikwekwezi FM

African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum---Repeat

1-Jun-16

R10,575.00

R31,725.00

SABC 2

Live crossing to the SABC and New Age Business Briefing--Simulcast---Continue

1-Jun-16

R217,333.33

R651,999.99

SABC News

Live crossing to the SABC and New Age Business Briefing--Simulcast---Continue

1-Jun-16

R108,833.33

R326,499.99

Ikwekwezi FM

African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum

1-Jun-16

R10,650.00

R31,950.00

Channel Africa

Influx of people to urban areas is not only an African problem but a global challenge

1-Jun-16

R7,744.00

R23,232.00

SABC News

Live crossing to the SABC and New Age Business Briefing

1-Jun-16

R29,500.00

R88,500.00

SABC 2

Live crossing to the SABC and New Age Business Briefing---Simulcast

1-Jun-16

R57,666.66

R172,999.98

SAFM

African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum

1-Jun-16

R21,417.00

R64,251.00

Radio 2000

Influx Of People To Urban Areas Not Only An African Problem

1-Jun-16

R7,350.00

R22,050.00

5FM

Influx of people to urban areas is not only an African problem but a global challenge

1-Jun-16

R41,400.00

R124,200.00

Motsweding FM

African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum

1-Jun-16

R29,625.00

R88,875.00

Metro FM

African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum

1-Jun-16

R67,228.00

R201,684.00

Motsweding FM

Tshwane greenest city on the continent

31-May-16

R12,285.00

R36,855.00

Power FM

Live broadcast from CSIR--Continue

31-May-16

R140,140.00

R420,420.00

Power FM

Live broadcast from CSIR--Continue

31-May-16

R127,204.00

R381,612.00

Power FM

Live broadcast from CSIR--Continue

31-May-16

R65,912.00

R197,736.00

Power FM

Live broadcast from CSIR

31-May-16

R81,620.00

R244,860.00

60

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


APPENDIX Phalaphala FM

New Urban Agenda necessary

31-May-16

R3,822.00

R11,466.00

Lotus FM

New Urban Agenda necessary

31-May-16

R5,555.00

R16,665.00

Kyknet

Focus on Sustainability Week ---Continue

31-May-16

R30,000.00

R90,000.00

Kyknet

Focus on Sustainability Week

31-May-16

R35,800.00

R107,400.00

Groot FM 90.5

Youth & the Green Economy Sustainability Week

31-May-16

R25,439.53

R76,318.59

Groot FM 90.5

Show line up

31-May-16

R7,494.93

R22,484.79

Power FM

Power Business and Power Talk Live Read

30-May-16

R32,340.00

R97,020.00

Power FM

African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum Live Read

30-May-16

R12,772.00

R38,316.00

Kyknet

Discussion with Pieter de Necker - New

30-May-16

R23,500.00

R70,500.00

Groot FM 90.5

Discussion with Pieter de Necker---Continue

30-May-16

R18,881.46

R56,644.38

Kyknet

City of Tshwane -- Continue

30-May-16

R32,500.00

R97,500.00

Kyknet

City of Tshwane

30-May-16

R41,900.00

R125,700.00

Groot FM 90.5

Discussion with Pieter de Necker

30-May-16

R30,268.00

R90,804.00

Groot FM 90.5

Show line up

30-May-16

R 6,425.00

R 19,275.00

E.tv Sunrise

Discussing the role of the youth in the green economy

26-Apr-16

R 156,750.00

R 470,250.00

TOTAL

R 3,488,814.10

R 10,466,442.30

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

61


SUSTAINABILITY

WEEK

GET READY TO PUT IDEAS IN MOTION The objective of Sustainability Week is to advance the Green Economy by sharing knowledge, thought leadership, and experience across sectors, stakeholders and Africans. The goal of galvanising African countries to work together to drive sustainable development will not benefit Africa only, but offers a global solution to Climate Change. As such expertise and funds are being made readily available for related project investments across the continent, presenting a massive opportunity for green economy experts and solution providers. Sustainability Week features the 3rd Annual African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, which invites mayors of African capital cities to the City of Tshwane to share and to learn from each other. The goal of transitioning to a low carbon economy must be driven from all perspectives, but with development as a primary outcome. The argument that developing clean is a ‘nice-to-have’ and that conventional approaches such as coal fired power generation offer the shortest route to development is quite simply false – going green represents change and change represents opportunity. Creating good jobs is the key to success for South Africa and Africa, and leap-frogging to sophisticated (not necessarily high-tech) approaches is the key. Education, training, entrepreneurship and skills development are critical, and green economy careers present a real and present opportunity for young people. Connecting industry with services sectors such as local government, energy, water, waste and transport is another key objective, with the outcome being to drive best practice and sustainable approaches to achieve both savings and competitive advantage. Going green requires innovation across all areas of endeavour – research, policy, standards, business models, technology, and methods, and therefore innovation transcends all engagements at Sustainability Week. Get to SW17 and experience the change. It starts here!

Boogertman & Partners

In partnership

13-15 JUNE 2017 CONTACT US

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

087 023 0853

sales@Alive2Green.com

Sustainability Week Report 2016  
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