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WEEK

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SUSTAINABILITY

2015 EVENT REPORT INCORPORATING

GET READY TO PUT IDEAS IN MOTION

SUSTAINABILITY PERFORMANCE

23-28 JUNE 2015 *Sustainbility Week is a brand owned by Alive2Green and operated in association with various industry stakeholders


HOST CITY

PARTNERS AND SPONSORS

CONTENTS 01 02 06 08 38 40 41 42 44 50

Foreword Acknowledgements About the Report About the Event and the Company CEO Message Governance and Management Economic Sustainability Social Sustainability Environmental Sustainability GRI index

SUSTAINABILITY

WEEK

GET READY TO PUT IDEAS IN MOTION

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AFFILIATED ORGANISATIONS


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

FOREWORD The City of Tshwane has proudly hosted its second Sustainability Week, which took place on 23-28 June 2015, an event that has created a vibrant platform for professionals from a myriad of disciplines to examine their respective subject areas from a sustainability perspective. It goes without saying that South Africa is replete with conferences and seminars yet this assembly distinguishes itself by bringing together a dozen thematic areas enhancing each one’s sustainability impact. Sustainability Week has further distinguished itself by becoming associated with the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, a forum initiated by the City of Tshwane to stimulate the concept of sustainability leadership among African Capital Cities. The inaugural forum was attended by 20 African Capital Cities and their Mayors. A major outcome was the signing of the Tshwane Declaration affirming their commitment to sustainability stewardship. While sustainability has different applications depending on the context in which it is applied, there is a basic set of best practices that are indisputably universal and it is my conviction that African Capital Cities have a responsibility to promote these, especially by virtue of commitments to ignite excellence and promote Agenda 2063. The overwhelming positive response to the event has reinforced our undertaking to deepen the notion and application of sustainability on the continent, for the sake of a higher standard of living for its citizens across the board. Sustainability Week 2015 has also been enriched with the hosting of the Green Home Fair at the Brooklyn Shopping Centre. The aim of the fair was to promote green goods and services, demonstrating that they are in easy reach of the ordinary resident of Tshwane, thereby connecting markets and buyers. As much as we must deliberate subject areas and content, it’s as important to be practical and demonstrate what we mean by sustainability. And this is how we will proceed with our approach to igniting excellence in sustainability—we will fastidiously show and tell ensuring that all the dots are properly connected. A continuation from last year was the Youth and Green Economy Dialogue. In 2015 it was hosted by the Tshwane University of Technology, for which we wish to thank the institution, noting the mutual benefits of the Memorandum of Understanding between ourselves and this esteemed institution. I trust that the report captures the true essence of Sustainability Week with its impressive array of speakers, fine curatorship and opportunity for creating and fostering sustainability as widely as possible. Yours sincerely, Councillor Kgosientso Ramokgopa Executive Mayor—City of Tshwane

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

SPECIAL THANKS TO... H.E. DOCTOR NKOSAZANA DLAMINI ZUMA H.E. Doctor Nkosazana Clarice Dlamini Zuma, exiled for her political activism, completed her medical studies at the University of Bristol in the UK in 1978. After the 1994 elections, Dr Dlamini Zuma was appointed Minister of Health in the cabinet of President Nelson Mandela. In 1999, President Thabo Mbeki appointed Dr Dlamini Zuma Minister of Foreign Affairs, and in 2009, was appointed Minister of Home Affairs. Having served South Africa with distinction Dr Dlamini Zuma became the first woman to be elected Chairperson of the African Union Commission

EXECUTIVE MAYOR KGOSIENTSO RAMOKGOPA Councillor Kgosientso Ramokgopa is the Executive Mayor of Tshwane and chairperson of the African National Congress (ANC) in the Tshwane Region. He served as Tshwane’s Ward 51 councillor between 2000 and 2005. He served in the leadership of the South African Students Congress (SASCO) and the African National Congress Youth League at the University of Durban-Westville. His qualifications include BSc Civil Engineering from the University of Durban-Westville, Master of Public Administration from the University of Pretoria, Master of Business Leadership from the University of South Africa, and a Certificate in Executive Leadership from the University of Stellenbosch. He is currently writing his PhD thesis on local government finance at the University of Pretoria. He has extensive experience in corporate governance and served as the CEO of the Metropolitan Trading Company (MTC), an entity of the City of Johannesburg, and of the Johannesburg Market which is the largest fresh produce market in the world by volume. He has been recognised for his sterling business leadership and was voted the 2008 MTN Boss of the Year and the 2009 CEO of the Year (adjudicated by the Institute of People Management). He is also the 2010 Black Business Quarterly title bearer: Young Business Achiever of the Year. Growing up in Atteridgeville, he attended Seaparankwe Lower Primary School, proceeding to Patogeng Higher Primary School and finished at Hofmeyr High School. A keen soccer player as a young man, he was given the nickname ‘Sputla’ for his skill and creative manoeuvring of a soccer ball. Still an avid sport enthusiast, he watches football, rugby, cricket and Formula 1 race driving and likes to attend live matches. Relaxation includes reading up on economics and politics, and doing community work. His life motto is: “Live truthfully and you shall prevail against all adversity.”

MORAKANE MOSUPYOE–LETSHOLO: SPEAKER OF COUNCIL Morakane Mosupyoe-Letsholo is the speaker of council for the City of Tshwane, the first female speaker of the city. Her political involvement includes being the Regional Ward Councillor, a member of African National Congress Regional Committee Tshwane and also the chairperson: Home Affairs Stakeholder Forum - City of Tshwane Qualification and Experience Summary: Senior Management Programme (SMP). She is a graduate of the University of Pretoria and holds a three-year diploma in Business Administration (BBA); certificate courses in HR, Labour Relations, Project Management, Mentoring and Client Relations; Advanced MMDP (University of Pretoria). She has over five years’ experience in administration work; experience in the tertiary education administration field and vast experience in managing holding companies including NGO involvement at Board Level (Treasurer) and a member of the team that developed and implemented policies for the NGO.

MEMBER OF THE MAYORAL COMMITTEE RT MASHEGO Rasello Terence Mashego was born in Mpumalanga, Graskop in 1953. His schooling began at Dukathole Primary School. He was an underground operative of the then banned African National Congress, arrested and sentenced in the Pietersburg Magistrate Court and served his prison sentence at the Pietersburg Prison. On his release he pursued his studies privately and later taught at Ithuteng Commercial High School from 1975 to 1982. He joined the UDF in 1986 and became Secretary of SANCO Mabopane branch in 1994. He served in the Branch Executive Committee of the African National Congress in Mabopane from 1995 to 1997. He became a member of the African National Congress-REC Eastern Region in 1998 and served as a member of the disciplinary committee. After completing his certificate in Provincial and Local Government Law he joined the Madibeng Local Municipality and later the Bojanala District Municipality where he emerged with distinctions from both municipalities in service delivery related matters and was appointed Chairperson of the Public Participation process for the District of Bojanala and Head of Protocol for the District of Bojanala and Convener of Bojanala Communications Forum. He joined the City of Tshwane in 2009 as the Chief whip of Council until 2011, in which year he was appointed a member of the Mayoral Committee: Community Safety and a Leader of Council Business, and Chairperson of the CAPEX Committee.

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT MR JASON NGOBENI: CITY MANAGER Mr Jason Nugobeni served as a corporate executive in the following institutions: Absa Bank, National Housing Finance Corporation, South African Airways, and North West Development Corporation where he specialised in development finance, housing, corporate and project finance. Subsequently he served as City Treasurer at the City of Joburg where he spearheaded the issuing of the first municipal bonds in SA. Furthermore he was appointed the Executive Director for Economic Development at the City of Joburg and gained extensive focus on various legislation for economic development, the Municipal Finance Management Act and the Municipal Systems Act. During his tenure, he led key developmental projects linked to transformation of the economy, for example, the Broadband Network, Inner City property Scheme, Lanseria Airport Development Initiative, Equity Fund Concept, Community Micro Finance Institution, Skills HUB, and the decking of the railway line—a spacial economic development project.

CITY OF TSHWANE DEPUTY CITY MANAGER: MS. LINDIWE KWELE Ms Lindiwe Kwele is charged with the responsibility of leading, directing and overseeing the Strategy Development and Implementation Cluster within the City of Tshwane. Ms Kwele’s educational background includes: Master of Business Administration (Wales University), Advance Business Programme (Natal Technikon) and Bachelor of Administration (University of Durban Westville) where she majored in economics and public administration. She spearheaded the establishment of a sector support programme which unlocked opportunities for established and emerging business within tourism, automotive, and the business process outsourcing sector, among others. One of her significant achievements was the establishment of the eThekwini Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA), the first SEDA office to be established in KwaZulu-Natal. Furthermore, Ms Kwele won Africa’s travel personality of the year 2009 from World Travel awards. While working as Chief Executive Officer at the Joburg Tourism Company, the company was voted a leading government departments and won the Africa’s Diamond arrow award for being the best Destination Marketing Organisation in South Africa in 2010 and 2011. She is currently a Governance Champion and Convener of the AG’s Management Letter Action Plan (MLAP) for the City which advises the Mayoral Committee, Governance Sub-Mayoral Committee and the City Manager on a number of governance related issues ranging from performance management, finance, risks and communication.

COUNCILLOR EULANDA THERESA MABUSELA Councillor Eulanda Theresa Mabusela is the current Member of the Mayoral Committee for Health and Social Development. Councillor Mabusela has completed her primary and secondary education in Attridgeville and Soshanguve respectively. Her tertiary education includes the completion of an Auxiliary Nursing Course in Blymoedig Kliniek and a BA Degree in Social Sciences (UNISA), majoring in Political Leadership. Mabusela was previously employed as a nurse on a full time basis for 17 years. In 1985 she joined the Young Christian Student and Soshanguve Student Congress. In 1987 she was detained at Pretoria Central prison under the State of Emergency laws and in1989 she worked with the late Elizabeth Matsemela, re-launching the Soshanguve Women’s League. From 2008 to 2009 she was the regional executive committee member of the African National Congress Tshwane Region. In 2011 she was deployed as Councillor in the CTMM as chairperson of the Civilian Oversight Committee.

COUNCILLOR JACOB MASANGO Councillor Masango equipped himself with a number of qualifications that enabled him to perform his duties and responsibilities diligently, for example, Chief Executive Certificate (University of Durban Westville); Municipal Management Programme (Technikon Pretoria); Executive Leadership Municipality Development Programme (University of Pretoria); Sports Administration (University of Pretoria); Skills Development Facility Unit Standards (Africa Competency Development); Integrated Development planning (DBSA Vulindlela Academy); Roles, Functions, Rights and Duties (Salga/DPLG); Change Management and Transformation (Marcuseuans); Traditional and Customary Leadership in Southern Africa (Excellent International); Leadership in a Councillor Context (Ikgodiseng Business Consulting); Councillor Development Capacity Building (Brain Africa Corporate Training); Leadership (IDASA); Traditional Leadership in Southern Africa (Excellent International). Currently he is studying for his LLB (Law Degree).

COUNCILLOR JOSHUA NGONYAMA Councillor Joshua Ngonyama is a member of the Mayoral Committee for Housing and Sustainable Human Settlement Development. Politically, he served as: Secretary of the Metalworkers Union from 1980 to 1986; a member of the African National Congress Executive Committee since 1992; an area board chairperson from 2004 to 2007; and a member of the Civilian Oversight Committee of the Metro Police from 2006 to 2011. His corporate governance background includes: Chief Executive Officer of the Kerk Street City Improvement District for 10 years; executive member of the Tshwane Chamber of Commerce and Industry for 12 years; and an administrative judge of the Gauteng Development Tribunal for 14 years.

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT COUNCILLOR MAUPE GEORGE MATJILA Councillor Maupe George Matjila was born in Stinkwater, Hammanskraal in 1974. He completed his secondary education at Bokamoso High School and then obtained a certificate in Women and Children’s Social Issues at UNISA. His background in corporate governance includes working closely with government departments in youth development projects, such as the building of sport and recreation centres in Tshwane. Politically Councillor Matjila served as a COSAS leader during his high school years; a member of SASCO from 1994 to 1998 at UNISA; a member of the Regional African National Congress Youth League from 2008 to 2010; and a member of the regional leadership of the African National Congress.

COUNCILLOR NOZIPHO TYOBEKA-MAKEKE A member of the Mayoral Committee: Sports Recreation Arts and Culture Councillor Tyobeka-Makeke completed her senior certification at Katlehong Adult School and obtained a tertiary qualification, a diploma in advanced Adult Basic education and training (UNISA 2001), Certification in Adult basic education and training (UNISA 1999), Development and democracy (Woman’s institute Leadership) and a combination of computer and Business Courses obtained at Campus College. Her corporate history includes serving as a sales manager at Old Mutual Life Assurance in Alberton; ABET Facilitator with the Examination board, a consultant at Liberty life in Sandton and a consultant at Sanlam in Alberton.

COUNCILLOR PETUNIA MASHABA A member of the Mayoral Committee: Agriculture and Environmental Management Councillor Mashaba is from Eersterus in the City of Tshwane and finished her high school years at Eersterust High School, later attending Rand-College where she qualified as a teacher. She then worked for the private sector before joining the City of Tshwane Council, were she became a councillor for the local community and was later was appointed as The Chief Whip. She has served the community in council for 20 years and is currently a member of Mayoral Committee, responsible for the Department of Environmental Management and Agriculture. She also serves as a Board Member at the University of Pretoria.

COUNCILLOR REBONE MOTHOALO HENRY MOKGOTHADI Councillor Mokgothadi is the Chairperson of the Section 79 Oversight Committee for Services Infrastructure Development. In 1994, he was part of the interim Council that prepared for the 1995 municipal elections. Between 1995 and 2012, he participated in several business formations (NAFCOC, NAFBI and the Tshwane business chamber) which witnessed the development of business transformation charters (BBBEE codes). In 2012, he was elected in a by-election as ward councillor for Ward 28 and later appointed as Chairperson of a Section 79 Oversight Committee responsible for advising Council on water, sanitation, energy and electricity matters.

COUNCILLOR SUBESH PILLAY In 1995, Councillor Pillay became part of the first group of democratically elected councillors in the Pretoria City Council and Greater Pretoria Metropolitan Council. Elected for a third term in 2006, Councillor Pillay was appointed by the Executive Mayor to serve as a member of the Mayoral Committee. In his current portfolio as the Member of the Mayoral Committee of City Planning and Economic Development, Councillor Pillay has been instrumental in various growth and development projects in Tshwane, including assisting Ford SA to launch its BEE Incubator, facilitating a R140 million investment by Nestlé SA in Babelegi, and facilitating a multi-billion-rand mixed-use development called Rainbow Junction just north of the city. He holds an NQF 6 (equivalent of a B degree) certificate in Executive Leadership and Management Development Programme from the University of Pretoria.

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT COUNCILLOR THEMBI MMOKO Councillor Thembi Mmoko is currently serving as the Member of the Mayoral Committee (Member of the Mayoral Committee) responsible for Corporate and Shared Services. During the 2000 local government elections she was elected to the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality as a PR Councillor and served as a Chairperson of Community Safety Portfolio as well as the Water and Sanitation Portfolio. Staying on with the City of Tshwane the following term she was elected to serve on the Sec 79 Committee of Rules and Appeals Portfolio. She was re-elected after the local government election in May 2011 to serve as the Member of the Mayoral Committee and to continue to be the political head of the Department: Corporate and Shared Service. One significant achievement is the rationalisation of all call centres in the City where the Municipality will have one system of addressing customer queries. In the year 2012, she was elected to serve on the South African Local Government Association (SALGA) HRM working group. In 2001 she awarded a Gauteng Premeir’s Imbokoto Award for her involvement in community development projects and in 2005 she was awarded the Gauteng Local Government Award in the category of Women and Service Delivery. She holds qualifications from various institutions in the country and abroad, to mention a few: a Local Government Administration Diploma from the University of Pretoria; Local Government Certificate from the erstwhile Technikon SA; a Certificate of Nation Building from Beit College in Israel and the Certificate of Nation Building from FET College in Sweden.


I REALLY ENJOYED THE FACTS ON SUSTAINABLE FOOD, WATER, AND ENERGY STAND. THE BLACKBOARD FOR WRITING YOUR OPINION AND CREATING A DISCUSSION AND READING OTHERS’ PERSPECTIVE WAS VERY INNOVATIVE AND A GREAT INTERACTIVE TOOL. Farnaz Farhang, Association for Water and Rural Development


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

ABOUT THE REPORT This report of Sustainability Week 2015, in addition to covering all seminars and workshops, aims to convey relevant information regarding sustainability performance of interest to all stakeholders and interested parties. Compiled with the assistance of GSA Campbell Consulting, this report is aligned with the principles of the GRI G4 Guidelines. Information regarding the specific indicators covered in the report can be found in the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Table on page 50. Sustainability Week is a multifaceted and integrated event that traverses sectors and emphasises opportunities for investors, policymakers, business people, and consumers to improve environmental and economic performance—be it through achieving efficiencies, introducing alternative approaches, and by unlocking value. Sustainability Week showcases innovation and seeks to inspire and educate attendees. Multiple platforms highlight the actions and interventions of leading thinkers, policymakers, practitioners and producers. Spurred on by global governmental mandate, investor sentiment, and ever growing market demand on the ground, these sector leaders are setting the benchmark in responding to global and national challenges.

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

that constitute Sustainability Week; extended to include certain relevant product and company information. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 July 2015 and incorporates the events and activities of Sustainability Week taking place in South Africa. This is the second annual report aligned with GRI standards, and Alive2Green plans to report annually on sustainability performance at Sustainability Week. The first report, Sustainability Week 2014: Event Report Incorporating Sustainability Performance, covered the 2014 event.

MATERIALIT Y This report is intended to provide insight into those issues identified as the most relevant or material to Alive2Green’s organisation and involvement in the Sustainability Week event. These material issues are determined by means of a workshop of executive stakeholders able to identify the issues that impact and influence stakeholder audiences. A materiality matrix is created to ensure that key areas are addressed. Further information regarding Alive2Green’s material issues and key stakeholder groups relating to the event can be found on pages 26 to 29 of the report.

SCOPE AND BOUNDARY

CONTACT INFORMATION

The report is intended to provide all stakeholders with relevant information regarding the economic, social and environmental impacts arising from the event. The boundary of this report is limited to the events, activities and products

Alive2Green 28 Main Rd, Rondebosch, Cape Town, South Africa Gordon Brown, Chief Executive Officer 021 447 4733 Gordon.brown@Alive2Green.com

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

ABOUT THE EVENT AND THE COMPANY Sustainability Week is organised through a strategic partnership with the City of Tshwane, as an amalgamation of Alive2Green’s green economy sector events, along with a number of independent events, such as the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, sharing a single platform and marketplace. It is the largest diversified green economy focused event in South Africa, and among the most long standing in the sector. Alive2Green is a specialist knowledge company that promotes and delivers content on sustainability, believing that once presented with the facts, decision-makers will make the right choices. The company works in partnership with leading research institutions, industry organisations and government departments to develop and produce forums, publications, events and educational courses that communicate the fundamental issues, thereby facilitating, in some small way, the knowledge transfer needed to advance towards a sustainable future. Founded in South Africa in 2006 by directors and founders: Gordon Brown, Lloyd Macfarlane and Andrew Fehrsen. The company has offices in Cape Town, South Africa and Bamboo, Mauritius.

• The Southern African Wood, Laminate and Flooring Association • The South African Institution of Civil Engineering • The Council for the Built Environment • Cape Institute for Architecture • The Power Institute for East and Southern Africa • SAEE • REEEP • The Southern African Alternative Energy Association • TAPPSA • The Sustainable Energy Society of Southern Africa • The National Recycling Forum • Packaging SA • eWASA • The RailRoad Association of South Africa • The Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa • South African Youth Travel Confederation • Toscana Media • The Brooklyn Mall

Alive2Green is a member of the Green Building Council of South Africa and is an organisational stakeholder of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI). The company is also a member of the Cape Chamber of Commerce and has affiliation agreements with various industry organisations such as: • The South African Institute of Architecture • The South African Renewable Energy Association • Channel Africa • The National Business Initiative • Bizcommunity • The Family Business Association of Southern Africa • Food and Trees for Africa • Global GreenTag South Africa Certification • The Architect Africa News Network • The Association of Cementitious Material Producers • The Chartered Institute of Building Southern Africa • The Institute for Landscape Architecture in South Africa • ClayBrick Association • The Pretoria Institute for Architecture • Gauteng Institute for Architecture

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Green Home Fair Brooklyn Mall 09:00-17:00

Transport & Mobility Seminar CSIR: Amethyst 09:00 - 17:00

Sustainable Water Seminar CSIR: Jade 09:00 - 17:00

Green Manufacturing Seminar CSIR: Jade 09:00 - 17:00

Responsible Tourism Dialogue CSIR: Crystal 09:00 - 17:00

Tshwane Mayors’ Lunch Amber/Deck 12:30 - 14:30

Green Business Seminar CSIR: Onyx 09:00 - 12:30

Exhibition CSIR: 08:00-17:00

Exhibition CSIR: 08:00-17:00

Exhibition CSIR: 08:00-17:00

African Mayors’ Function CSIR: Amber 17:00-20:00

Cocktail Function CSIR: Exhibition 17:00-20:00

Expo Breakdown Party CSIR: Deck 16:30-18:00

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MARKETS & PRODUCTS/DIVISIONS

DIGITAL The online division publishes multiple sector websites and social media platforms. While this division provides online services to other divisions, its primary function is online publishing, and to this end publishes a fortnightly eJournal providing the latest stories in circulation under the heading of sustainability with a focus on green building, sustainable tourism and youth issues. HANDBOOKS The Handbooks ivision publishes peer-reviewed handbooks on multiple sectors, working closely with industry experts and researchers, and industry representative bodies. The handbook series forms an invaluable resource of thought leadership and case study content for multiple industry sectors. MAGAZINES The Magazines division publishes Green Business Journal and Green Home Magazine in alternate months, aimed at green business stakeholders and households respectively, providing readers with the latest thinking, examples of action and leadership among business and domestic consumers and suppliers. EVENTS The Events division organises events for Alive2Green such as Sustainability Week, the Green Business Seminar Series, Youth & the Green Economy Series, but also organises events on behalf of strategically aligned organisations such as the City of Tshwane and the South African Institute of Architects.

ABOUT SUSTAINABILIT Y WEEK Sustainability Week takes place annually in the City of Tshwane and consists of various conferences, seminars, expos and side events that are aimed primarily at the vertical business sectors of sustainability. Green Home and the youth-focused events add a consumer element to the week’s activities. Sustainability Week seeks to advance the green economy through the sharing of knowledge across disciplines and sectors, and by actively seeking to accelerate the total number of projects undertaken under the heading of sustainability. Sustainability Week is where government officials, private sector investors, business operators, professionals, researchers, and NGOs converge to engage on this critically important, and most fundamental consideration—sustainability. In 2015, Sustainability Week, through its innovative construction, truly reflected the interconnectedness of the issues—the cause and effect of actions, and the need to balance interests in a bid to achieve the most appropriate approach in all cases. Sustainability is not a quick fix or a one-size-fits-all solution; it is about a process of reaching decisions, with due deference to the interests of all stakeholders, including those not in the room. For the first time, delegates were able to attend sessions of different seminars as these were segmented and offered in multiple programmes. The format allowed people from different sectors to encounter the opportunities and challenges from one another’s perspectives, a primary step towards reaching consensus. In 2015, Sustainability Week welcomed African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, an event led by the City of Tshwane, which saw high-level delegations from around the continent converge on the CSIR International Convention Centre, to deliberate on shared experiences and perspectives. This significant Pan African dialogue laid the foundation for expanded African cooperation at the city level, and on an urban scale. In addition to stellar line ups at the ninth annual Green Building Conference, and extended programmes for Energy and Water, three new seminars were introduced in 2015: Mining, Manufacturing and Infrastructure.


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

SEMINAR SUMMARIES AFRICAN CAPITAL CITIES SUSTAINABILIT Y FORUM

FACILITATOR ERIC NOIR WROTE THE FOLLOWING REPORT

Speaker:  Councillor Kgosientso Ramokgopa, City of Tshwane Topic:  Opening and Welcome Speaker:  Jean Pierre Elong Mbassi, UCLGA Topic: Enhanced Cooperation among African Cities Speaker: Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma: African Union Topic: Agenda 2063: Towards a sustainable urban future Speaker: Tlou Ramaru, Department of Environmental Affairs Topic: Sustainable development goals and post-2015 development agenda Speaker: Seana Nkahle, GBCSA Topic:  Advancing the green building movement in Africa Speaker:  Chris Wray, Gauteng City Region Observatory Topic:  The potential of an African urban observatory and mapping the way forward Speaker: Erky Wood, GAPP Architects and Urban Designers Topic:  Sustainable urbanism Speaker:  Peter Newman, Curtin University Perth Topic:  Climate change: The good news The high rate of urbanisation in Africa poses several challenges to cities’ development with rampant urban sprawl, infrastructure often unable to cope with development speed, while simultaneously posing numerous social challenges and environmental damages. At the same time, major cities provide substantial driving economic forces that keep countries competitive at the global level. Addressing the sustainability imperative at the city scale is a difficult concept to grasp, multifaceted, highly complex in its implications, spanning a broad range of expertise and role players. Seemingly impossible to implement thoroughly due to the broad diversity of stakeholders, the fragmented nature of ownership of the land, and the greatly diverging and often conflicting interests of the various objectives at the core of true sustainability,

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Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma: African Union

economic prosperity, social equity and environmental stewardship, the task is overwhelming and requires high levels of leadership, innovation and excellence to achieve. To this end the programme, which was extended over days two and three, offered delegates a series of technical sessions - see reports following on below. In some cases members of the Mayoral delegations accepted invitations to take the stage and/or share their experiences from the floor with technocrats and practitioners in the context of these more practical and case study oriented sessions, adding richness and diversity of perspective to the engagements. The African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, hosted in 2015 by the City of Tshwane, established commonalities and problems faced by major cities in Africa while showcasing and sharing successful

initiatives towards the emergence of truly African, original and appropriate answers in addressing the sustainability imperative at the urban scale. This inaugural event is the first of an initial series of three annual conferences, which explored the nature of the challenges, showcasing successful initiatives throughout Africa. OUTCOMES The major outcome of the first African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum was the dedicated gathering of about 15 African capital cities under one roof for a period of three days, allowing networking and sharing of ideas. The second major outcome is the signing of the 2015 Tshwane African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum Declaration, which confirmed by attending delegations the success, needs and

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT commitment to proceed with further annual events. Among a list of more than 20 commitments and resolutions, key commitments included: • Accepting the invitation to reconvene in Tshwane in 2016 for a second annual conference and map the way forward for future events • Committing to the creation of a pan-African urban observatory on matters of sustainability • Resolving to work with individual Green Building Councils in Africa • Understanding that, as an organised network of African capital cities, the possibility exists to make the urban Africa voice heard at various global negotiations and forums on climate change. • The enthusiasm and many encouraging comments received by individual mayors and their entourage, either during the conference or afterwards by email, were overwhelmingly positive and confirmed the value of this initiative and its relevance to the African continent. GUESTS AND AUDIENCE The audience was made up of professionals, civil society and NGOs, civil servants—all in all about 300 delegates. The guests of honour from the African capital cities comprised 12 mayors and 28 representatives from the 15 capital cities. THE FOLLOWING CAPITAL CITIES ATTENDED: • Banjul—Gambia • Bissau—Guinea-Bissau • Dodoma—Tanzania • Harare—Zimbabwe • Kinshasa—Democratic Republic of the Congo • Libreville—Gabon • Lilongwe—Malawi • Luanda—Angola • Lusaka—Zambia • Maseru—Lesotho • Mbabane—Swaziland • Moroni—Comoros • Port Louis—Mauritius • Porto Novo—Benin • Sao Tome—Sao Tome and Principe • Tshwane—South Africa • Windhoek—Namibia

SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SEMINAR

FACILITATOR GORDON BROWN WROTE THE FOLLOWING REPORT Day 1: Supply Side Session 1: Renewable Energy Generation potential vs the REIPPP Speaker:  Councillor Jacob Masango, City of Tshwane Topic: Opening and welcome

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Speaker: Dr Wolsey Barnard, DG: DoE Topic: The expansion and acceleration of the renewable energy independent power producer programme for South Africa Speaker: Frans Manganye, City of Tshwane Topic: Building a low carbon energy future and diversifying the energy mix Speaker: Sisa Njikelana, SAIPPA Topic: The expansion and acceleration of the renewable energy independent power producer programme for South Africa Speaker: Dr Karen Surridge-Talbot, SANEDI Topic: Potential of RE for South Africa by extension Councillor Jacob Masango opened the event and emphasised the importance of sustainable energy for the City of Tshwane both for the respect of potential renewable energy projects and in respect of the need to advance energy efficiency for businesses and households in the city. Dr Wolsey Barnard provided context for the REIPPP programme, set out programme successes and future objectives and targets of the programme. The key message from the DoE is the further acceleration and expansion of the REIPPPP as follows: • IPP Office issued a Request for Further Proposals for an expedited procurement process of 1 800MW from all technologies on 25 June 2015 • IPP Office redesigning the current RFP for the BW 5, planned for issue in second quarter of 2016 • Minister of Energy made a new determination for an additional 6 300MW for the REIPPPP submitted to NERSA. Mr Frans Manganye presented an analysis of the natural energy resources available to the City of Tshwane, emphasising the good solar radiation, and set out the advantages of renewable energy for the City. The presentation also set out the city’s energy efficiency policies, objectives and successes to date and concluded that policy development and realignment, together with partnerships, are key aspects to the City’s sustainable energy strategy. Mr Sisa Njikelana (SAIPPA) stated that government policy in the electricity supply industry should create an enabling environment for IPPs, should establish open access to the grid for IPP’s, facilitate competitiveness and enable the current policy of 30% of electricity generation from IPP’s. Dr Karen Surridge-Talbot presented on SANEDI and the potential of renewable energy in South Africa. She explained the role of SANEDI in the national energy framework, and discussed its focus areas: energy efficiency, green transport, clean fossil fuels, smart grids and renewables. The discussion also looked at the Wind Atlas for South Africa (WASA) and the REIPPP focal areas.

Session 2: Wheeling—could this approach pave the way for a far greater number of RE projects? Speaker: Peter Neilson, Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality Topic: The role of municipalities: Challenges and opportunities Speaker: Pieter Oosthuizen, Bio2Watt Topic: Bronkhorstspruit Biogas project Speaker: Seelan Pillay, Industrial Energy Specialist Topic: Clearing the way to wheel energy Mr Peter Neilson argued in his introduction that the legal framework mandating municipalities in respect of service delivery and governance, allows municipalities to restructure their business should this be required. Mr Neilson then used this premise to put forward a hypothetical business case: a municipality could change its business model in respect of electricity from a business that trades and transmits electricity to one which charges a simple fee per kWh delivered within the city. This new business model looks at outsourcing electricity generation and the electrical grid to the private sector, with the municipality charging a nominal fee of 28c per kWh delivered. According to this hypothetical business case end users, in the municipality, could pay as little as R1.07 per kWh—less than the current blended tariff. Mr Pieter Oosthuizen presented the Bronkhorstspruit Biogas Project and shared the challenges of IPPs and biogas IPPs in particular, and spoke to the business framework that enables his plant to be able to sell the electricity generated directly to an off-taker (in this case BMW), using the City of Tshwane grid. Mr Seelan Pillay explained the concept of wheeling, and its potential in South Africa. Mr Pillay shared the work being done by SAIPPA and other industry associations in advancing the practice of wheeling, making the case for wheeling, and setting out the requirements and benefits. He also shared a case study and set out the NERSA approach, as well as his views on alternative bold steps and recommendations on ‘where to next’. In discussion the question was posed: Can wheeling make a significant contribution to installed capacity in the national grid? Feedback from the panel was that yes: the regulatory framework, the municipal business case, and the availability of producers and buyers was such that an open wheeling policy would alleviate energy pressure and reduce the cost of electricity by stimulating competition. Session 3: Storage/Batteries Speaker: Tim Crombie, Mulilo Topic: Flow batteries for Africa Speaker: Etienne Gerber, Mitochondria Topic: The hydrogen economy—a move to a low carbon future

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT Mr Tim Crombie introduced the flow battery technology emphasising that different battery technologies were applicable for different energy objectives where flow batteries are best applied to provide grid support and load shifting. The advantages of flow batteries include: the ability for power and capacity to be scaled independently, a long lifecycle, quick response times, a tolerance to overcharge/ discharge and no self-discharge. Mr Crombie presented a number of projects emphasising the different kinds of flow batteries and indicating a general trend towards declining prices for these game-changing technologies. Mr Etienne Gerber gave a presentation outlining the advantages of hydrogen fuel cells as a store of energy, contextualising the role of hydrogen fuel cells as part of the process of converting gas to electricity as the end point in a number of processes that create gas. Mr Gerber provided a market overview and defined the different types of fuel cells and their applications and set out the benefits for South Africa in adopting this technology. In discussion the question was asked: Can the development of battery technology bridge the gap for renewable energy to become the ideal energy source? The sentiments expressed by the panel in response to this question, and others posed by delegates, was that presently battery technology is not economically feasible, but that this would change in the foreseeable future. These important

technologies will offer a game changing solution for renewables and should be brought into the midterm planning processes. Session 4: Alternative energy sources in SA Speaker: Dr Mkhulu Mathe, SAASTA Topic: Hydrogen fuel cells as an alternative energy source Dr Mkhulu Mathe presented the case for advancing alternative energy sources, presenting a global energy view. In support of his argument that fuel cells offer advantages as an alternative fuel source Dr Mathe presented the various types of fuel cells, cost break down and applications. He also emphasised the relationship between investment in research and development and the amount of electricity sourced from fuel cells across different countries, emphasising that Japan had fully embraced fuel cells as a key component of the energy mix. He argued that South Africa should pursue this opportunity by continuing to invest in R&D. In discussion with Dr Mathe, Mr Crombie, Mr Gerber and Mr Oosthuizen the question was put forward: Should South Africa pursue alternative energy sources? The panel, together with questions and statements from delegates, held the firm view that we must pursue alternatives to coal generation in South Africa, that alternative’s such as wind, solar and biomass generation are already feasible, and that

Dr Wolsey Barnard, DG: DoE

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storage solutions such as flow batteries and fuel cells will significantly improve the reliability of renewables into the future. Day 2: Demand Side Session 5: Greater energy independence through a combination of EE and RE Speaker: Dr Tobias Bischof-Niemz, CSIR Topic: Opportunities for Renewables in SA Speaker: Reshard Sayed, BMW Topic: Self generation and energy efficiency Speaker: Rosalind Dos Santos, PSEE Topic: Private Sector Energy Efficiency (PSEE) programme Dr Tobias Bischof-Niemz set out the global context for wind and PV generation indicating that renewables have been mainly driven by the US, Europe and China and citing Spain as having grown the share of renewables in gross electricity production from 15% in 2000 to 44% in 2015. Dr Bischof-Niemz advocated an alternative macro-economic electricity model for South Africa. He argued that a fully dispatchable mix of PV, wind and flexible gas generation could meet national demand in the same reliable manner as the coal mix. His argument is premised on the abundance of natural resources and the impending low cost of wind and solar technologies, which at scale can provide base load, supplemented with quick responding gas generation to manage peaks. In respect of the CSIR campus, which uses the equivalent energy of 7 500 German four-person households, the vision is to build a real world research platform for cost efficient future energy systems based on renewables: “Energy-Autonomous CSIR Campus” where the CSIR will study extreme 60/80/100% renewable scenarios for South Africa. Mr Reshard Sayed presented an overview of the BMW Group sustainability targets incorporating energy efficiency and self-generation. He provided insight into the process of setting targets in relation to energy demand and CO2 emissions reductions and energy security at the BMW Rosslyn plant. A key step was the identification of electricity demand from the various components of the plant, and understanding the unique energy profiles in each instance—this process enabled BMW to achieve significant savings. BMW conducted an analysis of the self-generation opportunities at the plant and found that there was potential for offsite biogas (see Bio2Watt project), and potential landfill gas availability from the City of Tshwane. Solar energy was identified as an opportunity predicted as feasible from 2016. Solar-water heating has been implemented and concentrated solar power (wheeling) potential is good due to 24hour operation. A co-generation opportunity exists in the paint shop where there is a high electrical process heat load, and an opportunity exists to use wind power. Mr Sayed provided an overview of the wheeling project with Bio2Watt and pointed to the ongoing efforts on the

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT part of BMW to seek out alternative sources of energy and to achieve greater energy efficiency. Ms Rosalind Dos Santos presented the objectives and process of the Private Sector Energy Efficiency (PSEE) programme making a strong argument for energy efficiency and setting out the national framework and PSEE structure. The PSEE has identified potential lifetime energy savings of 4762GWh across 360 sites with an average pay back period of 2.1 years and estimated saving in terms of grid capacity of 115MW. Ms Dos Santos pointed to the repository of information on energy efficiency available on the PSEE website—www.psee.org.za/. In discussion the question was posed: How feasible is it to achieve energy independence, does the certainty of supply justify the premium? The panel together with contributions from the delegation concluded that while energy efficiency could combine with onsite generation, it was not immediately feasible to obtain energy independence but that this was likely to change in the near future. The discussion stopped short of stating the reasons for this. Session 6: Industrial Energy Efficiency Speaker: Ajay Trikam, NCPC-SA Topic: Why some companies succeed in sustaining energy efficiency programmes while others fail Speaker: Hemant Grover, NCPC-SA Topic: Energy Management standards supporting energy management in South Africa Speaker: Jerusha Joseph, ACSA Topic: Sustainable approach to incorporate energy efficiency within a business Mr Ajay Trikam presented on best practices in relation to energy efficiency pointing to implementation challenges such as insufficient commitment from top management, resistance to behaviour change and a disconnect between assessment and implementation in the private sector—a total of a 66% allocation of staff plant time as a percentage of total implementation cost. Mr Trikam pointed to a winning culture of demonstrable and visible top management as the key to success. Mr Hemant Grover pointed to the need to adopt energy management standards in support of energy management. He demonstrated a variable consumption curve resulting in an ad-hoc approach vs. a structured approach, which illustrated a descending consumption curve. He advocated that companies that adopt energy standards SANS/ISO 50001:2011 as well as other related standards achieve greater medium to long-term results. Ms Jerusha Joseph presented on the process taken by ACSA to pursue ISO 50001 as a sustainable and best practice response to the South African energy crisis, emphasising the structured approach set out under the standard.

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The Sustainable Energy Seminar

In discussion the question was posed: Industrial EE remains a ‘low hanging fruit’, why aren’t more industrial plant owners and operators being more proactive in this regard? Panellists agreed that more industrial plant owners should be adopting energy efficiency as a fundamental business practice and emphasised the positive effects. Session 7: Tackling Energy Poverty in new and existing human settlements Speaker: Mothusi Guy, PEER Africa WC CC Topic: Alternative/renewable energy solutions for sustainable human settlements and small and medium municipalities Speaker: Pieter Malherbe, Teva Windows Topic: Energy efficient approaches for low-income households Mr Mothusi Guy challenged audience perception that alternative approaches to electrification of low-income households do not exist in South Africa. With the right leadership and planning along with a “bankability equation”, sustainable energy solutions can be implemented in low income households enabling these households to function at low or zero electrical cost into the future. Mr Guy presented ground breaking case studies of the Witsand iEEECO Village Phase 2 development, and the !KHEIS Local Municipality human settlement project to illustrate his argument. Mr Pieter Malherbe argued in favour of improving lives by greening low cost housing developments. He cited the Cato Manor Green Street Retrofit project as an example to demonstrate the range of socio-economic, health and environmental benefits, where passive-performing interventions had the effect of reducing costs in these households. In conventionally designed and constructed low cost

houses, households spend significant portions of their income on energy for ambient and water heating. Session 8: Sustainable Energy at the City Scale Speaker: Jaco Cronje, Katika Consulting Topic: Increasing a city’s attractiveness Speaker: Melusile Ndlovu, Sustainable Energy Africa Topic: Advancing sustainability in energy at the city scale Speaker: Dr Chris Haw, SOLA Topic: Solar energy for commercial energy users—case studies and discussions Mr Jaco Cronje presented factors affecting a city’s attractiveness, sharing insights from African cities and highlighting a commitment to sustainability as a key strategy. He argued that sustainability is economically viable, environmentally beneficial and improved quality of life. He pointed to a four-step implementation strategy: policy, leadership, aligning public and private sectors and drawing on financial support models. Mr Cronje presented the City of Tshwane as an example, listing the areas of focus and action. Mr Melusile Ndlovu presented the city energy overview listing municipal mandates as they affect energy and illustrating the metro energy picture, which reflected 40% electricity consumption by both residential and industrial users with demand from commerce growing in relative terms. Mr Ndlovu presented graphs on energy demand and the cumulative impact of efficiency per sector, highlighting the need for local government energy strategies and pointing to the role of Sustainable Energy Africa (SEA) as a source of information and intelligence. Dr Chris Haw highlighted the high levels of solar radiation and the abundance of space and emphasised that solar industry growth has produced steadily falling

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT prices. He demonstrated that a strong business case existed for solar in respect of commercial users due to their energy use profile as compared to residential users. He pointed out that, in spite of a much lower tariff for commercial users, a strong business case could be made for solar, advocating for a cost reflective tariff structure, net metering, and the necessity for municipalities to act. Dr Haw also emphasised the increasing price of coal generation against the decreasing price of solar generation, pointing to an “obvious solar future” for South Africa.

FOOD SECURIT Y SEMINAR

FACILITATOR MELISSA BAIRD WROTE THE FOLLOWING REPORT Speaker: Member of the Mayoral Committee: Health and Social Development Councillor. Eulanda Mabusela, City of Tshwane Topic: Opening and Welcome Speaker:  Dr Ntsikane Mayine, City of Tshwane Topic: Food security and agriculture in urban areas Speaker: Michael Mosifane, Gauteng Department of Agriculture and Rural development Topic: Provincial perspective on food security Speaker: Inge Kotze, WWF SA Topic: Farming facts and futures in a changing climate: Reconnecting our food systems with our ecosystems Speaker:  Dr Michael Scholtz, Subject working group on climate change and the red meat industry - ARC Topic: Climate change, mitigation and adaptation: Agri industry perspectives Speaker: Jan Coetzee, SAB & WWF—SA Topic: Case Study: Better barley, better beer

Speaker: Shelly Lizzio, Endangered Wildlife Trust Topic: Mainstreaming biodiversity into business Speaker: Claire Slabber and Tererai Dhliwayo, Talborne Organics Topic: Organic farming and food production Speaker: Constansia Musvoto, CSIR Topic: Converting subsistence farmers into successful commercial farmers Speaker: Dr Michael Aliber, University of Fort Hare and Agricultural and Rural Development Research Institute Topic: Food security and agriculture: Reappraising the challenges Speaker: Letsutla Moroaswi, City of Tshwane Topic: Tshwane Agriculture: Gearing up for climate change Speaker: Leonie Joubert, science writer, author and journalist Topic: The hungry season Speaker: Paul Barker, Permaculture and social transformation specialist, Here We Grow Topic: Regenerative agriculture—the case study in progress: Lentegeur Spring Project Food security in South Africa is integral to the development of a healthy nation capable of growing and thriving. Climate change and the impacts already being felt by small and large-scale farmers alike as more extreme weather patterns affect crop production, is making these farmers ever more economically vulnerable. Biodiversity and its preservation offer new conservation opportunities for large scale farms and the successful stewardship interventions of WWF-SA is a leading initiative. Being a key contributor has enabled South African Breweries for one, to showcase the success of their Better Barley Better Beer initiative, which offers an excellent example of how a partnership approach can positively impact crop

The Food Security Seminar

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production. The context driving the debates includes stark facts about population growth, large-scale food waste and urban malnutrition among low-income communities who can only afford cheaper and less nutritional foods. Intensive industrial agriculture requires more interventions in terms of chemical inputs , which in the long run destroy soil quality. This is of great concern and is why the organic methods of crop production offer so many wins, and why organics are being more widely investigated, and highly nutritious organic vegetable gardens at home (or in schools) are proving their results. Food is a community issue and growing nutritious vegetables in community settings can have tremendously positive impacts on the communities involved. Drawing deeper into the discussion, the foundation is having enough good quality soil and water to enable crop production. Agriculture, as a sector, is the biggest driver of climate change and the largest user of water, and managing this on risks versus opportunities basis requires more participation from the public and private sectors. A map of ecological infrastructure could enable us to understand the land impacts within the food, water and energy nexus. Wetland loss is startling and as we face water, quality and quantity issues, and how regenerative agricultural techniques can bring about healthier water systems? Agriculture also offers key opportunities for social transformation in terms of and how land is distributed and used. Collaboration becomes a key method to activate solutions and some harsh facts need to be accepted about water, soil and biodiversity as the foundation of a better future. The most food insecure communities can benefit from understanding the fact that food gardens make massive positive social and nutritional impacts. There are 26 priority townships identified by the Gauteng Department of Agriculture that require immediate help as the growing influx of people into the province adds another layer of complexity to urban food security problems. Multi layered issues about consumption and waste—both of water and energy emerge and with it industrial agricultural practises that impact long term soil health—need to be addressed through communication, research and collaboration. The City of Tshwane is investing in segmented mitigation strategies that include sustainable agricultural parks, improved crop varietals, precision technologies (to improve water use) and investing in emerging farmer’s education and training, agricultural processing plants and organic vegetable and essential oils. Taking stock of biodiversity loss is crucial in devising strategies for better land management. South Africa has fewer than three million households already involved in small-scale farming and the role of agriculture has a significant role to play in land transformation and rural economic development. Developing the supply chain packaging and processing capacity in relation to urban growing also offers new opportunities for employment. The transformation of land is tied up in the food security debate and

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT Tomohiko Amemiya, Unity Design

GREEN BUSINESS SEMINAR

FACILITATOR LLOYD MACFARLANE WROTE THE FOLLOWING REPORT

land reform—or lack of it—will impact food production much like climate change is, which is why the way forward needs to be collaborative and take agriculture in a more resource efficient and productive direction, but no longer at the expense of soil health. Food security as an endeavour and as a focus can ensure community development and the stimulation of a new food economy.

GREEN BUILDING CONFERENCE

FACILITATOR LLEWELLYN VAN WYK WROTE THE FOLLOWING REPORT Speaker:  Mr Jason Ngobeni, City Manager, City of Tshwane Topic: Welcome and introduction Speaker: Prof. Barbara Norman, University Of Canberra Topic: Building resilient and healthy cities for the 21st century: Making it happen! Speaker: Llewellyn Van Wyk, CSIR Topic: Designing water efficiency in buildings Speaker: Tomohiko Amemiya, Unity Design Topic: ‘After Fire Project’: Architectural practice in informal settlements Speaker: Mark Olweny, Martyrs University Topic: Ethics and architecture: Foundational values in the green building movement Speaker: Ken Stucke, ERA Architects Topic: Energy, water and waste efficiency: two case studies Speaker: Dr Rodney Milford, CIDB Topic: Energy certificates Speaker: Paul Marais, University of Cardiff Wales Topic: Case Study: An ecological approach to housing in South Africa

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Speaker: Chrisna du Plessis, University of Pretoria Topic: Video—The regenerates This year’s Green Building Conference followed the pattern developed over the past years of commencing the conference with a wide overview and digging down into that worldview through the course of the day. The opening speaker, Professor Barbara Norman of the University of Canberra from Australia focused on developing resilience at an urban-scale, reflecting on current practices and thinking in Australia. Her work focuses particularly on the impact of sea level rise and sea surge on coastal cities on the east coast of Australia. This was followed by a presentation by Llewellyn van Wyk on water usage in the built environment, which addressed the need to develop a new paradigm with regard to the water reticulation system in South Africa, using Cape Town as a case study. Afterward, Dr Rodney Milford from the CIDB spoke about the adoption of Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs) in South Africa. He provided an overview of how EPCs have been used in other countries, and how it is likely to be rolled out in South Africa. This was followed by a presentation by Mr Tomohiko Amemiya from Japan on work currently being done in a slum in Jakarta. The work has resulted in the design and construction of a new house, which was to be used as a prototype for future work in the area. Two further case studies were presented: the first was based on the building of a house in Monaghan Farm in Gauteng using compacted earth, while the second was based on a private house in Rosebank where a range of green infrastructure services had been used to supplement municipal services. The final presentation was the showing of a movie by Chrisna du Plessis from the University of Pretoria, which covered interviews with a range of green thinkers who are exploring the next generation of green building methodologies.

Speaker: Councillor Terence Mashego Topic: Opening and welcome Speaker: Alexander Haw, Massmart Topic: A strategic approach to sustainability in SA Speaker: Alistair Schorn, Sustainability Consulting Topic: Global and local instruments driving the green economy Speaker: Corli le Roux, Johannesburg Stock Exchange Topic: How the JSE is driving change in context of the sustainable development agenda Speaker: Ms Dolly Mafa, City of Tshwane Topic: Innovative partnerships in advancing the sustainability agenda Speaker: Kerri Savin, Nedbank Topic: Sustainability is a lever for growth Speaker: Dr Mao Amis, African Centre for a Green Economy Topic: Green business incubation and capacity-building Dr Haw’s presentation was a case study for the Massmart Group, which is a high volume, low cost distributor in South Africa. The case study dealt with the sustainability approach used by the group, which starts with an assessment of priorities driven by key questions around legislation, commercial benefits, and resonance with governance and civil society. Further assessment of any initiatives, based on their relevance for the Walmart Global sustainability commitments, is important and includes the benefits for the brand in Africa. Finally, Dr Haw assessed the practical influence and capabilities that Massmart is able to exert over sustainability in SA. The presentation included details on how the sustainability business case is optimal particularly where environmental regulations and technological innovations are concerned. Additional information was provided around the supply chain strategy for the group, which involved broadening the scope of accountability. Mr Schorn set the scene for the Green Business Seminar by providing a context for the green economy. In particular the presentation dealt with global and local instruments that were driving the green economy. He began by providing various definitions of the green economy and indicated what this term generally meant for South Africa in the current context. He also elaborated on why the green economy was needed. Various problems can be associated with old economy principles, which need to be revisited if there is to be any true sense

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT of sustainable development in Africa. Issues such as rising inequality, stagnating economies and the degradation of natural capital are but a few. The speaker focused on why these issues were being experienced from an economic point of view and touched on what is needed to develop a green, fair and inclusive economy. The presentation dealt with certain third party frameworks and economic systems, which are contributing to green economic development around the world, including the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Ms Corli le Roux opened by introducing the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) mandate where sustainability was concerned and described the responsibilities of the JSE in the South African context. The speaker described how the JSE is an essential player in the domestic economy and how the JSE was influencing exchanges in the developing markets around the world. A hybrid approach has been identified by the JSE and combines regulatory framework, investment tools, engagement and advocacy, which creates an enabling environment for sustainability. The Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) index has been running since 2004 and has achieved global recognition for its ability to encourage integrated risk management and facilitate responsible investment. The speaker also focused on the barriers to systemic change, particularly where perception is concerned. Ms Le Roux finished by discussing the enablers of change and the concept of value, which together are important for the JSE as it contemplates a new chapter in sustainable development. Ms Mafa began by providing the long-term vision for the City of Tshwane—Vision 2055. The speaker described the structure that will facilitate collaboration and which will also facilitate the sustainability financing strategy for the City and the building blocks required. The presentation looked at the strategy for partnerships as well as the baselines and sustainability interventions that were planned and also touched on the actions required in all sectors in order for successful implementation to take place. The vision for the city is that by 2055 there will be growth in development that is driven by an economy that supports a sustainable, vibrant and liveable city through integrated ecological, social, economic and special agendas. The speaker unpacked the various components of the strategy and focused on how mitigation, adaptation and financing played a major role in determining the action plans. The presentation concluded by providing information regarding green economy projects that were in the RFI process - these projects included renewable energy, waste minimisation and maximisation of resource utilisation. Ms Savin introduced the Nedbank sustainability philosophy and some of the accolades and achievements, credentials and achievements in the Nedbank journey so far. She explained the importance of a principle for Nedbank that has played an important part in the development of the sustainability agenda—that the business can be grown through actively shaping the

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Green Business Seminar, Speaker Panel Discussion

conditions for its future success (and not grown while actively shaping these conditions). This distinction is important. Savin went on to explain that the sustainability agenda is aligned with the internal campaign called FAIR SHARE 2030. The FAIR SHARE 2030 campaign seeks to drive prosperity while focusing on a sustainable future for all. Savin concluded by explaining that the Nedbank value proposition was inextricably linked to a broader sustainability agenda. If it is good for society and if it is good for clients, then it must be good for banks and therefore a priority for Nedbank. Dr Amis began by contextualising the green economy and the associated issues. He then continued to explain what is meant by green innovations, and in this regard he referred to activities that produce goods and services to measure, prevent, limit, minimise or correct environmental damage to water, air, soil, or which reduce waste, noise, and protect eco systems. This relatively broad definition becomes increasingly applicable in the business landscape as certain issues emerge, such as legislation, resource scarcity, etc. Quite simply, there are opportunities for the production and distribution of green products or services and there are opportunities to ‘green’ processes and existing businesses. In either instance, there exist various benefits for companies that are prepared to think out of the box and to challenge conventional systems. Dr Amis proceeded to explain the impact of green innovation and the targets that exist for technological and non-technological innovation, while listing the barriers and enablers that are at play in the green economy. He concluded by sharing some information on how green economies contribute to job creation and quality of work.

GREEN MANUFACTURING SEMINAR

FOLLOWING REPORT Speaker: Angus Ryan, GCX Africa Topic: Waste Case Study Speaker: Bongani Memela, CSIR Topic: Hosting role of CSIR and programme management principles Speaker: Eddie Vienings, Blue North Sustainability Topic: The fundamentals of supply-chain sustainability Speaker: Faith Mkhacwa, NCPC-SA Topic: EnMS implementation case study Speaker: Phillip Button, Belgotex Topic: Greener carpets Speaker: Ndvuho Raphula, NCPC-SA Topic: Green Economy SA Speaker: Sally-Anne Kasner, Jeffares & Green Topic: Green specifications Speaker: Sharlin Hemraj Topic: Reducing greenhouse gas emissions: Carbon tax policy Speaker: Thembi Kodisang-Sibanda , NCPC-SA Topic: Vamcosa RECP case study Angus Ryan opened by explaining the importance of viewing waste as a valuable esource and understanding its symbiotic relationship with other material factors that combine to create a profitable business such as energy, water, time and management intellect. When evaluating waste, the following key concepts must be addressed: • Creation of shared value • Commercial value of waste • Symbiosis • Circular systems • Theory of constraints • Regenerative business approach

FACILITATOR LLOYD MACFARLANE WROTE THE

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT Bongani Memela stated that the CSIR responds to national priorities in line with its mandate and in support of South Africa’s National Development Plan. To achieve this, the CSIR has identified research impact areas, implemented programmes that address challenges and introduced integrated responses to the national initiative. The CSIR plays a hosting role and in so doing is responsible for the operation of programmes, the integration of programme activities, and the facilitation of the collaboration between stakeholders, strategy and governance. This unique value proposition takes programmes from policy to strategy to implementation and this is undertaken with independence and an excellent track record. Eddie Vienings looked at the difference between a weak and a strong sustainability worldview and highlighted where in a weak example, the economic, environmental and social considerations were hardly overlapping, whereas in a strong example they were fully integrated. This is most often evidenced in a typical agricultural supply chain, which was explained in some detail. Whereas a market-driven response is the norm, in most cases a supply chain driven strategy, which acts from the source is far more integrated in its approach. The speaker continued by highlighting the importance of the development of a sustainability framework for the supply chain which deals with key pillars, goals and necessary conditions in the supply chain. Some key learnings were shared, particularly on how sustainability leverage can be achieved in a supply chain approach, rather than an entity approach. Supply chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Collaboration is essential and sustainability is not necessarily intuitive. Faith Mthacwa looked at how the energy management standard ISO 50001 is designed to enable organisations to establish systems and processes that are necessary to improve energy performance. This standard is applicable to all organisations but does not prescribe specific performance criteria where energy is concerned. The standard fits neatly with ISO 9001 and ISO 14001. The speaker demonstrated some case studies in which initial savings were achieved and then sustained over time through the implementation of ISO 50001 standards. The standard is focused on the integration of energy efficiency into industry corporate culture and daily manageme nt and practices. It combines behaviour change, use of data, low cost operations and maintenance, and sustained improvements through restructuring. The speaker continued by discussing case studies in which significant savings had been achieved and went into some detail about which areas were most responsible for these savings. Phillip Button presented a case study that focused on how sustainable flooring was produced from sustainable materials by a sustainable process that reduces demands on ecosystems during its life cycle. The case study focused on how Belgotex has implemented sustainability into its operations over the last 20 years. During this period, various standards and

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systems have all played a part in driving the organisation towards performance levels achieved today. Some of the areas of success have been: • Materials—recycled content has resulted in energy savings, savings on materials and lower carbon emissions • The molecular structure of nylon which has increased the efficiency of the product • Innovations where textured styling is concerned which have improved the lifespan of the carpets • Carbon management, which has reduced the footprint of the company significantly • Reduction of energy consumption through photovoltaic panels and energy efficiency interventions—this has reduced consumption by 12% WATER CONSERVATION. In addition, waste management has improved significantly and so too has the health and safety aspects of the products being produced (e.g. VOC emissions). The speaker continued to highlight the take-back or reclamation programme that the company has introduced and spoke in conclusion about how the reporting and communication of sustainability to customers has become increasingly important for the Belgotex value proposition. Ndvuho Raphula started by defining the green economy and by pointing out key conditions supporting the growth of the green economy in South Africa. In particular, carbon emissions, pollution abatement, energy efficiency, resource efficiency and biodiversity are fundamental to the concept of a green economy. The speaker continued to highlight the characteristics of a green economy and then to identify existing strategies in place, which are designed to move industry in South Africa towards these objectives. In South Africa, some of the drivers are the strengthening of the country’s legislative framework, energy challenges, water challenges, the DTI incentives schemes, industrial competitiveness (new markets), improved reporting and others. Some focus was given to the various green economy mechanisms that are at play in South Africa and more specific examples were provided, such as certain national programmes of government that are being implemented with great success—particularly the RECP initiatives through the NCPC–SA. The speaker concluded by providing statistics for certain IEE projects in South Africa from 2010—2014 among which were savings of R759 000 000 or 866 GWH in 80 industrial plants. Sally-Anne Kasner introduced the concept of green specifications and the need for guidelines around green procurement at the business-to-business level, and at the consumer level. The speaker demonstrated the importance of green specifications where the construction industry was concerned and elaborated on how this need in South Africa has triggered the development of the Eco Standard. This is a third party audited eco-label specifically designed for the South African market and its objectives are to eliminate green

washing and provide buyers with some assurance that a product has undergone a lifecycle performance assessment. Each product receives a score of up to five stars depending on this performance. The speaker drew attention to the differences between the types of eco-labels that can be found in South Africa and internationally, and why it is important to understand the benefits of a Type 1 Eco label. The process of securing an Eco-Standard assessment was discussed and a case-study example was provided. Sharlin Hemraj introduced the background to the carbon tax policy in South Africa and explained the relevance of this tax policy in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in South Africa. The policy context of carbon tax was discussed as was the economic rational for the proposed carbon tax system to be applied in June 2016. The speaker went into further detail about the design considerations and how revenue was to be treated where issues of competitiveness (in particular) were important to consider. Some attention was given to the potential benefits of carbon offsets in the form of carbon credits and how a strategic use of carbon offsets could have benefits for organisations that wish to save tax-spend and increase their CSI profile. Thembi Kodisang-Sibanda introduced the NCPC-SA as the key industrial sustainability programme of the DTI, which is hosted by the CSIR. She went on to discuss the objectives of the NCPC, particularly where certain sectors were concerned, and introduced the broader and international term for resource efficiency cleaner production (RECP). RECP assessments are aimed at the optimisation of energy, water, materials and waste in the manufacturing in various industrial sectors. A case study was discussed in which initial challenges and resulting processes were detailed for the project. In this project, assessments were undertaken to identify opportunities to increase resource use efficiency, environmental sustainability and overall profitability for the company. These assessments resulted in the documentation of opportunities and an action plan for these opportunities was developed in conjunction with the company. The speaker continued to describe the results of this project as well as to discuss the general approach that should be used in any resource efficiency programme. The speaker concluded by providing average costs savings opportunities that have been gathered over time.

SUSTAINABILIT Y IN MINING SEMINAR

FACILITATOR LLOYD MACFARLANE WROTE THE FOLLOWING REPORT Speaker: Xolani Mncedane, Frost and Sullivan Topic: Energy efficiency and security in the mining sector Speaker: Dr Richard Harris, DST/Mintek Topic: Nanotechnology in mining

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT Speaker: Reana Rossouw, Next Generation Topic: Stakeholder relations: An oxymoron in the mining industry? Speaker: Wilhelm Swart, Schneider Electric Topic: Embracing the new era of energy Speaker: Frans Rentel, Climate Neutral Group Topic: Emissions and carbon tax Speaker: Dr Lorren Haywood, CSIR Topic: Integrated reporting: A tool to facilitate resilience in the mining sector Xolani Mncedane: The landscape for smelters is changing and that this is as a result of growing environmental and energy concerns as well as the trend towards this investment of old economy or an efficient operation. The rising cost of electricity has also played a role in making the business case for smelters more tenuous, and yet these smelters play an important role in the larger economic landscape. There lies a very real opportunity for smelters to be incorporated into systems that allow co-generation. The incredibly high levels of heat energy emitted by smelters can be captured and used to create steam that can drive turbines in order to create energy into the grid. The incorporation of such systems can allow smelters to become much more energy efficient and as a result more globally competitive. As a result they are more attractive for investors and for governments that are under pressure to manage environmental and energy capacity issues. Smelters have the potential to generate between 1 000 and 1 500 megawatts of co-generation electricity which would drastically reduce vulnerability to electricity tariffs and would go a long way to contributing towards energy security. In order for this to be realised, governments must introduce new policies that allow for net metering, and strategic partnerships which will encourage co-generation projects into the manufacturing environment as quickly as possible. Dr Richard Harris. Nano-technology is the branch of technology that deals with dimensions and tolerances of less than 100 nanometres, especially the manipulation of individual atoms and molecules (at the Nano scale (10-9)). Nano-technology is playing a role where alloys can be manipulated to the extent that new and innovative materials and applications can be created in various sectors. The

Sustainability in Mining Seminar

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global nanotechnology market is expected to grow at a rate of 30-60% from 2015 - 2020 and again by 25% thereafter. The manipulation of minerals and alloys at the Nano scale is resulting in more efficient materials technology and processes as well as brand new applications and inventions. Some examples of these new applications are: • The development of C02 catalysts that are more cost effective, faster and more efficient in the conversion rates • Alloy coating processes • Medical interventions that involve Nano particles and which are able to isolate disease and reduce risk of treatment • Thin films and coatings, which have new or better qualities such as strength resilience or conductive capacity. South Africa has a vast mineral wealth, the largest proportion of which is exported for beneficiation overseas, only for these value added products and materials to be imported back into South Africa. The number of jobs created through the process of beneficiation increases exponentially from exploration through to product retail and sales and South Africa is not therefore enjoying the employment benefits that should be proportionate to the mineral wealth in the country. Nano-technology has the potential to make a difference in that it is a process being successfully researched and practiced in South Africa, and has the potential to be expanded as a value adding process in the local economy. Examples of nanotechnology are numerous, but there are significant and meaningful applications in the mining sector, which are changing conventional beneficiation opportunities. There are many opportunities that can be explored in the process of value added Nano technology particularly where minerals and alloys are concerned. Reana Rossouw: Evidence from research has suggested that stakeholder relations in the mining sector has declined or has been over reported, based on assessment of the most important issues emanating from the mining industry. Reported incidents have increased fivefold in the last 10 years. The mining industries have faced reputational challenges in recent years and there are additional perceived challenges that are linked to community

and environmental issues. Research would indicate that the persistent challenges in the sector are mostly due to failure by mining companies to adapt to stakeholder engagement in the operational context, or to choose the right engagement activities. This may be due to a lack of a strategic approach or due to the engagement process across the project lifecycle. It could also be due to a lack of capacity, knowledge or support for Effective engagement. In spite of there being an increasing number of human rights impacts that flow from inadequate stakeholder engagement processes, there seems a reluctance to take steps that will result in meaningful change. This may be because real engagement takes much longer and costs much more than is usually planned, and requires so many more resources than companies anticipate. There are certain basic rules about the engagement strategy that should be considered and is important to ensure that key components of the process are maintained, such as rules of engagement, the concept of shared value and the true meaning of responsive engagement. Wilhelm Swart. The advancement of communication technology is enabling smarter city grids around the world. This is being fuelled by collaboration and shared interests in innovation and technology. Renewable energy and renewable technology is now more affordable than ever and cost has reduced substantially in recent years, and will continue to do so. In parallel with these trends are some significant growth figures in terms of urbanisation in major cities around the world and this is presenting these cities with challenges that can really only be solved by real collaboration and new technologies. A failure to manage energy supply and demand in established and emerging economies may result in massive impacts that become difficult and in some cases impossible to deal with. The real solutions lie in a combination of cleaner generation, greater efficiency and a smarter grid, where economic growth is decoupled from rising energy consumption. Efficiency will be driven through industry and mining will reinvent itself in the direction of quality over quantity. The business landscape will change and energy management will be the common factor in the new economy. Schneider Electric is the provider of various solutions that are aimed at key areas in the new economy such as safety and security, operational efficiency and the maximising of value creation. Frans Rentel: The South African government has implemented a carbon tax to be initiated in June 2016. Carbon tax has come about as a result of various papers, which were created between 2010 and 2013 after which time draft legislation was released in June 2015 for public comment. Key design features of the carbon tax are that the price per ton of CO2 equivalent will be rated at a R120 rising at 10% a year thereafter. Due to various tax relief measures, the effective carbon rate will actually be between

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT Sustainable Infrastructure Seminar

R12 and R48 per ton of CO2, which is significantly lower than the statutory carbon tax rate. Initially the tax will cover all direct greenhouse gas emissions from sources that are owned or controlled by the relevant entities, but will not cover emissions from electricity purchased. There is an allowance between 5%and 10% for carbon offsets, which is an allowance for entities to reduce their carbon tax liabilities by purchasing carbon credits from non-carbon tax liable entities. The option is to purchase the carbon credits or pay the carbon tax. Generally speaking, the carbon credits will cost less than the carbon tax or will cost the business less and will allow the tax purchaser of the credits the secondary benefits that relates to the social and environmental projects link with these carbon credits. Purchasing carbon credits will reduce the carbon tax bill for companies between 5% and 20% per year and will boost corporate social investment profile of the organisation while allowing the organisation to directly support projects that are linked to the offsets. Dr Lorren Haywood: The unprecedented pace of global change is resulting in new emerging risks for which very little social, ecological and economic resources are available. This is threatening business and life, as we know it. There is a requirement for business to build and maintain systems that are resilient in order to drive the creation of sustainability in economies. Resilience for adaptive systems means the ability to withstand, recover from, and reorganise in response to crises. A combination of resilience and business strategy suggests that organisations are able to put sustainability into context in order to contemplate their role as a contributing member in a greater social and ecological system. To successfully adopt the principles of resilience, the organisation should transform the way it thinks— therefore the requirement for integrated thinking that is underpinned by the process of integrated reporting. The integrated reporting process seeks to communicate and explain how the organisation creates value over time. In so doing, the organisation reports on the

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Topic: Infrastructure for sustainable human settlements Speaker: Khaiko Makwela-Wali, Green Globe Architecture Ltd Topic: Integrated infrastructure development for sustainable communities.

six capitals, which must all be contemplated in order for the business to be thinking in an integrated fashion. Integrated reporting allows businesses to understand that value creation needs to be beyond their own organisation and applicable to the entire system in which they exist.

SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE SEMINAR

FACILITATOR LLEWELLYN VAN WYK WROTE THE FOLLOWING REPORT

Speaker: Councillor RHM Mkgothadi, City of Tshwane Topic: Opening and welcome Speaker: Lindiwe Kwele, Deputy City Manager, City of Tshwane Topic: Sustainability challenges and opportunities: the creation of people-centric African cities Speaker: Tshepo Kgobe, Gautrain Topic: Creating efficient mobility: intelligent transport systems and integration Speaker: Kerry Bobbins, Gauteng City Region Observatory Topic: Infrastructure to enable sustainable cities Speaker: Nishan Rathanlall, Gibb Topic: Infrastructure required to facilitate the transfer to urban-scale sustainable energy. Speaker: Jeremy Taylor, Water Rhapsody Topic: Infrastructure required to facilitate the transfer to urban-scale sustainable water infrastructure Speaker: Mashopha Moshoeshoe, NewGX Topic: Infrastructure required to facilitate the transfer to urban-scale sustainable waste Speaker: Paul Marais, Cardiff Metropolitan University

The seminar was opened by Councillor RHM Mkgothadi from the City of Tshwane, followed by Tshepo Kgobe who presented on the Gautrain and looked at how data capturing and sharing can optimise the efficiency of the high-speed rail system for both the operators and commuters. This was followed by a presentation by Kerry Bobbins from the Gauteng City Region Observatory, which is driving the green infrastructure strategy for the region. Her presentation addressed the valuation of green services in Gauteng and the provision of sustainable infrastructure through a green infrastructure planning approach. Lindiwe Kwele presented on what shapes the City of Tshwane’s agenda and making Tshwane Vision 2055 a reality, focusing on catalytic projects. Nishan Rathaniall from Gibb focused on grid connection challenges for renewable projects. Jeremy Taylor of Water Rhapsody then presented on infrastructure required to facilitate a transfer to urban-scale sustainable water infrastructure, highlighting the challenges South Africa faces with regard to water shortages and water quality. He was followed by Masopha Moshoeshoe who spoke about the waste disposal challenges facing the City of Tshwane and provided a strategy to move toward a sustainable waste disposal model for the future. Nishan Rathanlall provided an overview of what infrastructure measures must be put in place to facilitate grid connections for large renewable projects, smart metering, and net metering. Paul Marais, currently studying at Cardiff University, shared his experiences with regard to getting a house off grid. The seminar ended with a presentation by Khaiko Makwela-Wali from Uganda on Integrated Infrastructure Development for Sustainable Communities. The panel discussion looked at how to enable corporate and individual citizens to operate and live more sustainably, the infrastructure our cities require, and how we can ensure that infrastructure planning and investments achieve this outcome?

SUSTAINABLE WATER SEMINAR Facilitator Garth Barnes wrote the following report Speaker: Councillor Joshua Ngonyama, City of Tshwane Topic: Opening and Welcome Speaker: Hastings Chikoko, C40 Topic: Water security in the context of climate change for African cities Speaker: Alex McNamara, National Business Initiative

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT Topic:

 ater scarcity and business: Constraints W and opportunities Speaker: Dr Kevin Harding, University of the Witwatersrand Topic: Measuring water use as a means to increase efficiency Speaker: Francois Theron, Maskam Water Topic: Fusion sewer treatment plants Speaker: Margaret-Ann Diedricks, Water and Sanitation Department, City of Tshwane Topic: Urban water—the realities facing South African cities Speaker: Dr Jean-Marc Mwenge Kahinda, CSIR Topic: Extending water access through alternative means—rain water capture and efficiency Speaker: Dr Marco Lotz, Nedbank Topic: Alleviating water poverty through funding sustainable water projects Speaker: Etienne Terblanche, PJCarew Consulting Topic: Designing for water efficiency Speaker: Anton Swanepoel, Geberit Topic: Water efficiency in buildings Speaker: Patrick Rosslee, JoJo Tanks Topic: Water capture and usage After the opening Mr Hastings Chikoko provided a strategic view of water management (or the lack thereof) in urban Africa. Mr Chikoko highlighted issues of urban sprawl and climate change as key threats to water resources management for a burgeoning urban population. Thus water was introduced as a “wicked problem” for the day’s discussion. Alex McNamara, positioned business as a “solver of problems” despite the fact that water presents key strategic and operational risks to business. He presented three strategies that may enable business to navigate these risks: get its own house in order; support for innovation; and engage with collective action. Three focused technical presentations followed that took the audience into the realm of water foot printing (Dr Kevin Harding), water treatment on the urban edge (Gerhard Cronje) and using current municipal infrastructure to generate hydropower (Marco van Dijk). These innovative technical water management solutions provided a great juxtaposition for the next presentation given by the Department of Water and Sanitation on South Africa’s water issues. Dr Jean-Marc Mwenge Kahinda and Dr Marco Lotz presented in the third session after lunch with presentations on the use of rainwater harvesting to extend access and water poverty alleviation through funded projects. The next presentation after tea fuelled the debate on the importance of rainwater harvesting (Patrick Rosslee of JoJo Tanks). The theme of water use efficiency in buildings was given impetus by the presentations of Etienne Terblanche and Anton Swanepoel. Etienne challenged people

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Hastings Chikoko, C40

to think of “hybrid systems” and Anton shared some thoughts on certification programmes. In his presentation, Anton mentioned that water scarcity is both a natural and human phenomenon. This was a fitting conclusion to a complex theme.

RESPONSIBLE TOURISM DIALOGUE

FACILITATOR NIKI GLEN WROTE THE FOLLOWING REPORT

Speaker: The Member of the Mayoral Committee: Sports, Recreation, Arts, and Culture, Councillor Nozipho Tyobeka Makeke Topic: Opening and Welcome Speaker: Llewellan Vance, EVOLVE Topic: Resource efficiency programme outline Speaker: Franz Rentel, Climate Neutral Group Topic: Carbon offset through partnership Speaker: Rhian Berning, Eco Atlas Topic: Voting for responsible tourism Speaker: Nick Plewman, Architect Topic: Green leisure building Speaker: Samantha Annadale, Hotel Verde Topic: Hotel Verde case study Speaker: Amiene van der Merwe, Green Cabs Topic: Conservation as a driver of a sustainable travel future Speaker: Daphne Keyster, Metro Rail Topic: Rail tourism Speaker: Ian Cruickshank, South African Airways Topic: SAA biofuel programme Speaker: Caroline Ungersbock, Sustainable Tourism Partnership Programme Topic: Karoo Parliament conference The Member of the Mayoral Committee Sports, Recreation, Arts, and Culture Councillor Nozipho

Tyobeka Makeke, opened the morning, expressing the commitment of the City of Tshwane to sustainable tourism development. She further elaborated on her personal passions for local economic development, using tourism as the catalyst, and asserting that tourism is an excellent industry to bring to the fore issues such as human rights. Tourism is a means through which previously disadvantaged groups can gain access to decent and sustainable jobs. Niki Glen, introduced herself as the facilitator for the day, and referred to three news stories mentioned on the way to the conference on radio 702. There was commentary on the Eskom crisis, and how load shedding is affecting business negatively, a news story of violence erupting on Metro Rail trains and news about how tourism numbers have dropped, as a result of, what many people believe, the institution of the new visa regulations. As the day unfolded, different perspectives were provided, of good news stories that have the ability to turn bad news stories into opportunities for sustainable growth in the tourism sector. Niki then introduced the participants in the dialogue. Llewellan Vance reiterated that resource costs are the downfall of many tourism businesses in South Africa, and threatened their sustainability. This, coupled with the continued load shedding that negatively impacts businesses, there has never been a better time for tourism and hospitality businesses to convert to the innovative technologies that EVOLVE has on their platform. Not only does EVOLVE provide onsite assessments with the installation of technologies that can measure consumption at an appliance and device level, but they provide innovative finance solutions to assist businesses to take the step, which is a business investment with a well-articulated return. The Sustainable Tourism Partnership Programme’s Resource Efficiency Programme, which partners EVOLVE, is the first of its kind in Africa, and is set to change the face of competitiveness in the industry.

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

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are obvious environmental benefits, there are also saving benefits, which make the company more sustainable and competitive. Ms Daphne Kayster presented an innovative concept where out of peak hours are used in Cape Town to transport visitors on a ‘hop-on-hop off’ system. The Rail Tourism train is not for commuters, and Daphne explained that the concept works extremely well for visitors and families who may not necessarily have other forms of transport. The key, however, for both companies to succeed in making transport accessible and more environmentally friendly at the same time, is to find stakeholders to buy into the concept and to help create mechanisms through which barriers could be overcome. In the case of Green Cabs, Hyundai was mentioned and in the case of Metro Rail, strong collaboration with government was essential. Ian Cruickshank presented a gripping case study of how South African Airways, in partnership with Boeing, will be sourcing a significant amount of their aviation fuel over the next three to five years from bio-fuel sources. Bio-fuel is derived from the Solaris tobacco plant, which is a special hybrid developed by an Italian company to produce flowers and seeds with high oil content. The project is set to create a large number of jobs and contribute significantly to local economic growth in the areas where the crops and processing will be established. This case is an excellent example of how the tourism supply chain can be utilised to stimulate local economic development. The final presenter for the day was by Caroline Ungersbock, who provided an overview of the

GOOD OVERALL SET OF SPEAKERS, SPARKED GOOD INTEREST. LOTS OF TRENDING TOPICS.

Franz Rentel provided insight into an extremely easy and effective way for establishments to get access to Carbon Offset. The Climate Neutral Group has created GreenDreams, essentially a small levy that is payable per bed night by the tourist, which then translates into offset of a tourist’s carbon emission as a result of their travels. Mr Rentel highlighted a number of benefits that this brings for an establishment, including an opportunity to educate tourists on sustainable travel, gain B-BBEE points through participation, provide access to greater marketing opportunities through, for example, the Eco-Atlas Platform presented by the next speaker and part of solutions towards a greener economy. Mr Rentel reiterated that GreenDreams is a logical next step; especially once EVOLVE has done on-sight assessments. Rhian Berning spoke about her innovative online platform Eco-Atlas that provides businesses that have engaged in ethical, green and responsible business practices, including tourism and hospitality businesses, the opportunity to share information regarding these actions. The platform gives consumers access to this information, which allows them to not only make more informed choices, but also provides the geographic locations of these businesses, so that they can offer support. Eco-Atlas allows customers to interact and share their views on the various initiatives. Ms Berning confirmed that the role of Eco-Atlas is not to certify or verify, but rather to put the power in the hands of consumers to decide whether businesses are operating as they say they are. SA Tourism has adopted the Eco-Atlas system, and Eco-Atlas (Rhian) is a finalist in the Mail & Guardian Awards. Nick Plewman presented on the Sandibe Lodge Okavango Delta Case Study, which is a Lodge designed and built on sustainability principles. Ms Samantha Annadale presented the Case Study of Hotel Verde, voted the greenest hotel in Africa and the recipient of a number of other awards. The key messages for the tourism and hospitality businesses that came of these two important discussion are: that it is no longer an option to ignore sustainability aspects of designing, building and operating hotels and lodges; that building costs do not have to be higher than the costs of conventional building, but even if it marginally higher, there is a very good business case and a demonstrated return on investment as operating costs and impacts are significantly lower and; businesses that have still not bought into these principles will become less relevant and less competitive as consumers are increasingly aware and demand to do businesses with more sustainable providers. The speakers presented the critical role of more sustainable forms of transport in the supply chain of tourism. Green Cabs have used innovative technologies to reduce fuel consumption and carbon emissions of the vehicles they use to transport guests to large events and festivals. While there

-Nick Mannie

Karoo Parliament conference, which is scheduled for 11—13 November. This conference has been running for a number of years, and is owned by the Karoo Development Foundation. The format of the Karoo Parliament is structured meetings and workshops where specific topics pertaining to local economic development are discussed, action plans are put in place, and ownership executed by various stakeholders. The next year is then spent on implementing actions, with report back at the next Karoo Parliament. It has been extremely successful to date,

and the audience discussed plans to travel to the Karoo Parliament and participate! Niki Glen closed the day by thanking all the participants, and commented that the day presented a number of ‘firsts’ in South Africa. The day was really about setting the scene for other tourism businesses to re-think their own sustainability and to adopt some of the innovations that were presented.

VISION ZERO WASTE SEMINAR

FACILITATOR MELISSA BAIRD WROTE THE FOLLOWING REPORT Speaker: Dimitrios Delivasilis, HLM Architects Topic: Architectural design of buildings for zero waste Speaker: Bernd De Smedt, Van Dyk carpets Topic: Building materials designed for recovery and recyclability Speaker: Nick Mannie, Aurecon Topic: Waste management plan for construction/demolition of new developments Speaker: Stacey Davidson, REDISA Topic: The resource revolution Speaker: Dr Jaisheila Rajput, Tomorrow Matters NOW (TOMA) Topic: Driving the waste economy—feeding the recycle value chain Speaker: Henry Nuwarinda, NCPC- SA Topic: Industrial symbiosis—connecting industry and creating opportunity Speaker: Anben Pillay, Waste Policy and Information Management, Provincial Government Topic: Government policy and approach Speaker: Charles Muller, Independent packaging consultant specialist Topic: The Waste Management Acts pricing strategy government policy and approach and private sector concerns and response Speaker: Dr Linda Godfrey, CSIR Topic: Evaluating cooperatives as a development vehicle to support job creation and SME development in the waste sector Speaker: Bertie Lourens, Waste Plan Topic: Waste to energy—can recycling and waste to energy co-exist or is there inherent fatal competition for recyclables? Speaker: Reon Pienaar, AECOM SA (Pty) Ltd. Topic: Separation at source—best practise and case studies Speaker: Mthobeli Kolisa, City of Tshwane Topic: Scaling up waste reuse and recycling: Beyond pilot projects Many landfill sites across the country are reaching capacity, as illustrated right here in the City of Tshwane

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT where key landfill sites are being closed. This urges the fast tracking of solutions to shift the approach away from disposal to landfill and towards recycling on a broad based national scale. Eliminating waste in the building sector is a mammoth task and correct enforcement of legislation around the recycling of building waste could go a long way in ensuring better building practises at the outset, and less rubble in landfills. Vast tons of materials can also be recovered from packaging and as illustrated by REDISA In the tyre industry;, other sectors may be forced to extend producer responsibility to the ethical handling of their products post life. Technology and design offer many solutions to manage the measurement and re-use of waste. There are products that have grown out of the need to innovate and provide solutions more suitable to a changing, resource-constrained world. There is consensus that the right mix of creative design, recycling and separation at-source as well as large composting and green waste facilities could instigate a zero waste cycle. However, the solutions are slow to be taken up and there is a lack of education among consumers as to the value of waste streams and a lack of enforcement of waste legislation. The (as yet unclear) but imminent new pricing strategy the government plans to implement and the advent of new waste levies is cause for concern in the wake of the plastic bag levy debacle. New material recovery plants offer hope for job creation and as a way to clean up cities that are not managing their waste effectively enough. A city’s waste footprint is the sum of its residents’waste behaviours and radical behaviour change and education is needed to encourage consumers to separate at source.. Research presented by the CSIR indicates that the role of co-operatives as development vehicles to support job creation and skills development is not easily navigated and that more complex social issues are playing out in these groups, but which can be resolved with more intervention and incubation. Shifting towards a circular economy is a most positive proposition within the waste discussion as it offers opportunities to connect sectors wanting to minimise their waste and share highly valued, but not always well distributed, collateral. A new market for recycled products needs to be vigorously promoted in order to draw attention to the value of what is being thrown away on a daily basis. As waste-to-energy becomes more likely the competition for recyclables will become fierce and there is a great deal of consumer education that needs to be driven by the leaders in the sector. The City of Tshwane’s investment in a material recovery facility will give the city a chance to start reaping the benefits of having buy back centres and being able to provide materials that can be recycled. The connections between environmental damage and waste and how it links to resource protection are largely un-debated, and most fundamentally a zero waste future calls for waste prevention and minimisation ahead of waste to energy.

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Green Home Fair

There is an obvious opportunity for general education about the role of waste in the future and too few of the many wonderful zero waste stories are being receiving enough media attention to drive a shift in thinking among South African households firstly that their garbage is actually of value, and secondly that landfills have a high social impact. Many people derive an income from the detritus and this informal sector must be considered in all matters relating to waste management practises. 38 waste streams have currently been identified in South Africa under the new waste levy and this will cause many larger generators of waste to take stock and implement waste reduction innovations. All in all it represents a strategic imperative to be more resourceful and come to grips with waste and all its potentials. A vision for Zero Waste can emerge but it needs the correct economic incentives and for sectors and consumers to work together in reducing waste in general. Municipalities are encouraged to form partnerships with the private sector to resolve landfill pressures through the creation of buy back centres, and to stimulate a waste economy.

TRANSPORT & MOBILIT Y SEMINAR

FACILITATOR GARTH BARNES WROTE THE FOLLOWING REPORT Speaker: Member of the Mayoral Committee: Roads and Transport Clllr George Matjila, City of Tshwane Topic: Where are we now? Speaker: Pumza Letsoalo, City of Tshwane Topic: Addressing sustainability through Transit Orientated Planning Speaker: Gail Jennings, Cycle Map

Green Home Fair

Topic: What will get us out of our cars? Behaviour change, what is the tipping point? Speaker: Mike Krynauw, City of Tshwane Topic: City of Tshwane’s CITP—responding to climate change Speaker: Rory Williams, Carbonsmart Topic: Shifting to public transport Speaker: Bless Nenzhelele, Nissan Topic: Electric car production Speaker: Carel Snyman, Sanedi Topic: Sustainable city mobility Speaker: Liesl de Wet, Barloworld Logistics Topic: Efficient logistics Speaker: Sean Doherty, Mott MacDonald PDNA Topic: Modal shift—moving appropriate freight from road to rail Speaker: Andries Louw, CEO Milotek Topic: Radical problems require radical solutions Speaker: David Schmukler, Dash Couriers Topic: How to move goods inside the city especially in city centre/zero emissions in certain areas Speaker: Neil du Preez, MellowCab Topic: Labelling freight vehicles/distribution hub and then disseminated by solar powered tuk tuk ie. Park and Ride The Transport and Mobility Seminar was opened by Clllr George Matjila from the City of Tshwane. Ms Pumza Letsoalo of the City of Tshwane presented the concept of transit-orientated development or TODs, which speak to issues of scale, speed and scarce resources. Ms Letsoalo set the scene with her problem statement that South Africa’s urban form is broken. If it is broken because transport-user behaviour is broken, then Ms Gail Jennings would be keen to fix it. Ms Jennings spoke to the audience about tipping points in human

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

transport behaviour. The presentation was followed by Mr Mike Krynauw who challenged us to be‘practioners’ as he delved into the City of Tshwane’s Vision 2055. Session Two gave a peek into alternative propulsion as Mr Rory Williams explained a little of the psychological and sociological reasons for shifting (or not) to public transport use while Mr Bless Nenzhelele and Mr Carel Snyman spoke to us about Nissan’s electric car production and alternative means of transport that very quickly relegate private car use as having negative environmental, financial and mobility efficiency impacts. National logistics issues were the highlight of Session Three where Ms Liesl de Wet and Mr Sean Doherty presented. Most memorable was Ms de Wet’s reference to our “Goldilocks planet” which can be protected by more streamlined supply chain logistics and by working together. Mr Doherty played devil’s advocate by arguing for and against rail versus road logistics. The last session was a fitting conclusion to what was a very successful day of presenting and discussing mobility around our cities: Mr Andries Louw, Mr David Schmukler and Mr Neil du Preez all spoke of the latest innovations with regard to moving people and packages around cities. Much of that innovation, according to Andries Louw, can be mimicked from nature that often uses the smallest creatures to move the greatest bulk!

GREEN HOME FAIR

FACILITATOR MELISSA BAIRD WROTE THE FOLLOWING REPORT Brooklyn Mall is one of Tshwane’s most visited and glamorous shopping malls and this year it was the host venue for the Green Home Fair over the weekend of 27 to 28 June 2015. This fair marked the end of the Sustainability Week conference hosted at the

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

CSIR International Convention Centre that saw a number of delegates attend the various seminars and networking events. A key focus of the fair was to showcase solutions for energy efficiency and organic home gardening as well as products made out of recycled wood and plastic. Rand Water was there to discuss water purification and REDISA to enlighten the public on how waste tyres are being turned into products of value and creating jobs. Green Home Magazine was freely distributed to over 5 000 shoppers and there was a handy chart to take the reader through a step- by- step process on how to ‘green’ their homes and start saving money on electricity and water. Representatives from the City of Tshwane were also present and this offered shoppers an opportunity to directly engage with their municipal counterparts who could answer questions about water, energy and waste. There was a lively panel discussion when the editor of Green Home Magazine—Melissa Baird, SESSA chairman—James Green, Talborne Organics CEO—Jenny Slabbert and the City of Tshwane’s green campaign representative, Mercedes Mathebula, engaged the onlookers on various topics like how renewable energy can make a big difference to secure energy supply and why growing one’s own vegetables is a great way to save money and stay healthy. Backsberg Wines had their range of low carbon wines to taste and there were some great products that showed just how creative one can be with every day waste like PET plastic and wood. The Green Home Fair was the consumer face of the Sustainability Week conference whose core aim was to help “put ideas into motion”. The outcome of the Green Home Fair was evident in the conversations that were started at the podium and continued long after the show was over.

YOUTH AND THE GREEN ECONOMY DIALOGUE

FACILITATOR CALVIN MAKHUBELA WROTE THE FOLLOWING REPORT PARTICIPANTS: Theo Bhengu, Tshwane University of Technology Kgaugelo Chiloane, KEC Environmental Solutions Kgomotso Mohlala, City of Tshwane Vuyo Mjimba, University of South Africa Mbali Dlamini, Tshwane Univeristy of Technology Courtney Gehle, Greenline Society, University of Pretoria Bronwyn Grant, SANEDI Marcelle Johnson, Gauteng Department of Agriculture and Rural Development Sello Mphaga, City of Tshwane Glen Thompson, Bio2Watt

the Youth and Green Economy Dialogue at the Tshwane University of Technology on 27 June 2015. The theme of the dialogue was ‘Advancing Youth Interest in Green Economy and Sustainable Development’ in order to ensure that the youth play a central role in shaping and participating in the trajectory that will ensure sustainable livelihoods and a better environment for future generations. The goals of the dialogue were to sensitise and empower young minds about the opportunities within the green economy and sustainable development and focused on five topics: renewable energy, agriculture, climate change, waste management and water conservation. The Youth discussed who the stakeholders are in each of these sub sectors and what their subsequent roles might be in the future, in fields such as renewable energy highlighting themselves as stakeholders. The Dialogue attempted to provide an in-depth analysis of the current state of affairs and explore and engage with technological advances within the green economy to enable the Youth to understand potential solutions and Inspire them to think critically about current problems. Finally the group sought to identify the inherent opportunities for young people as well as for the broader society offered by the green economy; and highlighted the strategic partnerships and structural configurations necessary to ensure a coherent programme towards sustainable livelihoods. REPRESENTATION The Youth and Green Economy Dialogue brought together 224 youth delegates from both youth formations and the private sector. Among the delegates were students from three universities namely: University of Pretoria, UNISA and Tshwane University of Technology. The dialogue also hosted a group of high school learners from local schools in the City of Tshwane with the objective of influencing their career path to study towards careers in the green economy. In order for the dialogue to achieve its objective, key stakeholders were requested to participate and contribute to the content of the discussion. This enriched the level of engagement and empowered delegates to engage exhibitors, who shared information and opportunities within the green economy. Organisations wish to thank participating organisations who assisted by extended an invitation to members of the Youth within their networks to attend the Youth and Green Economy Dialogue. Below are organisations that took part in the Green Exhibition Expo at the Youth and Green Economy Dialogue. EXHIBITORS WHC-Water Hygiene Convenience Africa 350. Org Love Life JB Marks

The City of Tshwane, in partnership with Alive2Green and Tosaca Media Group took the initiative to host

23


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT

Because the success of Sustainability Week is dependent on efficient communication with all stakeholder groups, the company conducted a stakeholder identification process by means of a workshop. This ensured that the company was able to identify the most relevant key stakeholder groups with whom it engaged with the most. Using guidelines provided by GSA Campbell Consulting,

the committee created a stakeholder identification matrix which plots how the business is impacted by stakeholders on the one axis, against how the business influences key stakeholders on the other axis. A diagonal dotted line across the matrix provided a guide for the identification of the key stakeholders and also helped to illustrate the relative position of the stakeholders on the matrix. The table below contains the list of key stakeholder groups and

some information regarding engagement around Sustainability Week: Event Greening Guidelines were directed at key stakeholders of the event and were designed to facilitate engagement and responsiveness. The guidelines were developed by GSA Campbell and presented to stakeholder groups in an online form which requested their participation (including feedback) under each guideline.

STAKEHOLDER GROUP

MECHANISM FOR ENGAGEMENT AND FREQUENCY*

Delegates

The event team used email and media platforms to communi- Delegates were able to communicate with the cate with delegates and potential delegates. Relevant delegates event management team via the Sustainability Week page on the A2G website, and via email. were targeted, based on their industry and personal profile. Through these and other platforms delegates were able to submit questions/issues and the event team was able to respond to questions/issues raised.

Sponsors and exhibitors

The event sales team communicated with sponsors and exhibitors via phone, email and meetings. The event marketing team communicated with exhibitors and sponsors using email and advertising. See more detail in the media schedule section of this report.

Meetings are held so the sponsors can discuss issues they may have after the event. A2G responds to each item raised and will be following up with action points taken under each issue in an ongoing process. Exhibitors liaison process will involve salespeople contacting them to follow up on their comments, and where necessary to refer those comments to management for further action/ interaction.

Employees and associates

Employees and associates were communicated with using email and in a number of daily, weekly and monthly meetings.

The organisation held a post-event meeting in which all employee-related issues were raised and addressed.

Facilitators and speakers

The event team communicated with facilitators via email and We seek an ongoing relationship with our speakers telephone in the run-up to the event. and facilitators who by nature of their expertise are also potential contributors to our publications.

Suppliers and service providers

The event team emailed the suppliers and service providers We deal with suppliers on an issue-by-issue basis. as required. Suppliers and service providers were able to communicate with the event management team via scheduled meetings and phone calls in which responses to their queries and issues were provided.

Local and regional community

The growing relationship between A2G and the City of Tshwane is becoming increasingly more important. Green Home Fair and the youth project are related to this community (see CEO’s report). Because the City of Tshwane procured 200 seats, a fair number of regional businesses supported this event. They see Sustainability Week as a large and important event for the city. Editorially we will continue the relationship between Tshwane, and the issues raised in the editorial component of the event.

24

FEEDBACK AND RESPONSE

Local and regional communities were able to communicate with the event management team via the Sustainability Week page on the A2G website, and via email. Through these and other platforms community members were able to submit questions/ issues and the event team was able to respond to questions/issues raised.

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT Media

We were very successful in achieving high media return through earned media process. Social media was a big part of this. Social media gives us media value –- where articles or interviews are featured in the media. Our PR agent tracks that and apportions a value to that - it was valued at R10 000 000.00 (compared to R2 500 000.00 last year. Stories in the media (business-to-business media, e.g. engineering news) show that 25% of their content comes from statements made by key people at events and we had at least one story featured (Dlamini Zuma).

Industry associations, affiliates and institutions

The event management team attended industry forums and events to meet key role players from industry associations, affiliates and institutions. The event management team communicated with the industry associations, affiliates and institutions through emails and phone conversations. The event management team negotiated agreements with certain industry associations in order to market to their members.

Government departments

The event management team attended events to meet key role players from government departments and communicated with government departments through emails and phone conversations.

A2G = Alive2Green. *Communication frequency was daily, weekly, monthly as appropriate.

The process for defining report content was led by the event committee and consisted of committee meetings and certain engagements with stakeholders. In analysing the information to be included in the report, the team considered the questions: “Who is our reporting aimed at?” and “What decisions will they be able to make from our reporting?” In this context, it is the intention of Alive2Green that this report: • Informs and adds value for all stakeholders with a valid interest in the group and event; • Considers all issues that can impact on the group’s ability to create value for these stakeholders; • Reports as comprehensively as possible on the known and potential impacts of these issues for the group and its stakeholders. In identifying the issues and information to be included in this report, the team considered the relative importance of each matter in terms of its known or potential effects on Alive2Green’s ability to continue creating value for all stakeholders. These matters were then prioritised for relevance to the intended users of the report, so that non-pertinent information need not be included. Alive2Green feels

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

E

B C D A G H F I

NB FOR COMPANY

REPORT CONTENT

5

5 A) Right Speakers B) Correct audience attendance / delegate numbers C) Sponsor Engagement / management D) Perception Environmental Impacts

NB FOR STAKEHOLDERS

E) Energy usage F) Waste G) Water H) Procurement- food, stationary I) Marketing effectiveness

25


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT this is in line with the reporting principles for defining report content, as defined by the GRI. The event team made themselves available to address questions and issues as they arose during the planning for this event.

MATERIALIT Y Alive2Green undertook a process that was aimed at determining the material issues for the company and for key stakeholder groups. This process would serve to inform the content for engagement and would also provide the company with clarity around which issues should be managed. Materiality was determined by a process similar to that used to identify key stakeholders. The event committee used a workshop to determine issues of importance to the company and of importance to key stakeholder groups, including risks and opportunities relevant to the South African context. The major issues impacting and influencing the business and key stakeholder groups were plotted on the matrix in order to establish the relative importance of certain issues compared to others. THE RIGHT SPEAKERS The success of the event is clearly impacted by the presence of the most appropriate and effective speakers. Our policy is to create a network of strategic editorial advisors, including consultants and where appropriate partners and even sponsors. This network assists us to develop the speaker invite list. A dedicated team of staff members runs the process, ensuring that different views are incorporated and integrated. A challenge is the need for continual massaging of the timing of finalising the programme against the recruitment of new partners and sponsors. CORRECT AUDIENCE ATTENDANCE/DELEGATE NUMBERS Our marketing strategy is key for this issue, targeting predefined groups of people, media and representative organisations. As discussed in the CEO’s report, a challenge for future events will be to improve the delegate booking process to allow greater pre-event engagement. Post-event engagement has provided valuable input for next year’s event. SPONSOR ENGAGEMENT/MANAGEMENT Our aim is to ensure that we have delivered on our promises to sponsors, or exceeded expectations. Dedicated staff members are appointed to facilitate this process, and checks and balances are put in place. Potential improvements include more faceto-face meetings and possibly a pre-event group meeting of sponsors and exhibitors.

26

PERCEPTION There are no specific policies governing the material issue of perception because it is all-pervasive. All aspects of the event can create both positive and negative perception; managing this involves putting together the best possible event, and doing so in a manner that has the least negative impact. We also endeavour to demonstrate our efforts to our stakeholders through information boards, and through the post-event report. Potential growth in this area could be to clarify our stance on problematic issues (e.g. serving meals that are not sustainable choices) so that more effective communication reaches all service providers. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Energy use, waste and water are discussed in the Environmental Sustainability section of this report, and procurement issues are discussed in the Economic / Environmental sections of this report. MARKETING EFFECTIVENESS As indicated above, marketing of the event is carefully targeted to appropriate individuals, representative organisations and sector-focused media. Management takes place on a daily basis involving the CEO, and sales, event and marketing managers. Potential improvements include more direct meetings with the media and organisational partners.

EVENT GREENING

EVENT MANAGEMENT The organisers of Sustainability Week are committed to ensuring that the events and activities taking place before, during and after the week are as green as reasonably possible in terms of their impact on the environment. Event greening activities include correspondence and engagement with certain key suppliers such as venue, caterers, exhibitors and sponsors regarding ways in which they can reduce the impact of their involvement, and how they can assist to report on sustainability. Various other interventions that relate to specific environmental issues, such as energy, water and procurement have been discussed and actioned with key stakeholders. CARBON FOOTPRINT Events have the effect of increasing carbon emissions as they generate increased levels of activity and energy consumption. We travel to and from events and we make use of accommodation and other products and services when attending events. We can measure the impact of our event activities by calculating a carbon footprint. Alive2Green selected the Climate Neutral Group to conduct the

carbon footprint for the Sustainability Week and to offset the events and activities. CARBON OFFSETS In order to host a carbon neutral event Alive2Green implemented measures to reduce the carbon footprint of the event as much as possible and offset all remaining emissions, except emissions generated by the delegates travelling to the event. Offsetting was arranged by the Climate Neutral Group. A carbon offset is an equivalent amount of carbon that is either absorbed, or avoided being emitted elsewhere. This can be achieved by financing renewable energy or energy efficiency projects to replace the need for fossil fuels, or by conserving or planting forests, to absorb carbon

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

from the atmosphere. On the advice of the Climate Neutral Group, Alive2Green selected the Wonderbag Foundation project, based in KwaZulu-Natal, which reaches communities throughout Africa, providing an alternative cooking method to reduce open-fire and paraffin emissions, and benefitting vulnerable communities through education and health projects. VENUE GREENING The CSIR ICC has a number of initiatives in place to reduce negative environmental impact. Gauteng Green Events Guidelines is used by the venue to ensure greening is at the forefront of all activities and the Event Greening Guidelines from GSA Campbell were used by Alive2Green to liaise with venue stakeholders.

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

27


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS MARKETING OUTLET

AMOUNT/PERIOD

VALUE

SUMMARY

South African Institute of Architects CIOB SAWFLA PIA KNZIA GIFA CIFA ILASA Claybrick ACMP SAICE Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry of South Africa South African Alternative Energy Association FABASA NBI PIESA SESSA RETOSA SAYTC eWasa NRF PACSA

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00 R5 000.00

45% discount 45% discount 45% discount 45% discount 45% discount 45% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount 20% discount

TOTAL

46

R115 000.00

Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event Leading up to event 3 months 1 month 2 months

R2 500.00 R2 500.00 R2 500.00 R2 500.00 R2 500.00 R2 500.00 R2 500.00 R2 500.00 R2 500.00 R2 500.00 R2 500.00 R2 500.00 R2 500.00 R114 890.00 R2 500.00 R5 000.00

AFFILIATE SPECIFIC MARKETING MAILERS

WEBSITE ADVERTISING Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry of South Africa Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership South African Alternative Energy Association RailRoad Association of South Africa eWasa NRF NBI ILASA ACMP SAICE Claybrick SAIA Alive2Green Bizcommunity Architecture Africa African Utility Week TOTAL

Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Transprt & Mobility Seminar Vision Zero Waste Seminar Vision Zero Waste Seminar Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Green Building Conference banner Green Building Conference banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner Sustainability Week banner

R154 890.00

NEWSLETTERS Ecospcifier Newsletter Green Economy Online Bizcommunity Architecture Africa TOTAL

28

2 12 8 2

R5 000.00 R30 000.00 R20 000.00 R5 000.00

Green Building Conference Sustainability Week Sustainability Week 20% discount

R60 000.00

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT BROADCAST ADVERTISING Radio 702 Channel Africa

1 Week Campaign Weekly

TOTAL

R251 272.07 R698 950.00

Sustainability Week Sustainability Week

R698 950.00

PUBLICATION ADVERTISING Green Home Magazine Green Economy Journal Green Building Handbook The Star Newspaper

Issue 20 Issue 17, 18 Volume 8

TOTAL

R17 950.00 R35 900.00 R16 950.00 R180 000.00

Green Home Fair Sustainability Week Sustainability Week Sustainability Week

R250 800,00

ALIVE2GREEN SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING Twitter Facebook LinkedIn

Weekly Weekly Weekly

R0,00 R0,00 R0,00

TOTAL

R0,00

SUM TOTAL

R1 279 640,00

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

29


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT PRINT PR OUTPUT

CIRCULATION

VALUE

SUMMARY

Eastern Times (incl. Nothern Times) Mens Inc Mens Inc AD African Design Magazine Mechanical Technology South African Builder Green Economy Journal Earthworks Government Publications: My Capital City Sunday Sun Engineering News Women’s Choice South African Builder Steel Quarrying Chemical Technology Cape Times (Second Edition) RéSource Green Economy Journal Green Economy Journal South African Builder Star Pretoria News

30 000 3 248 3 248 9 500 3 714 5 000 5 801 9 566 14 002 163 016 9 636 1 654 5 000 2 521 3 700 31 930 3 640 5 801 5 801 5 000 91 735 14 968

R 2 391.87 R 5 834.34 R 42 802.55 R 953.20 R 2 072.73 R 896.40 R 1 485.83 R 2 643.60 R 26 410.82 R 733.25 R 5 599.92 R 42 090.62 R 896.40 R 2 420.74 R 31 701.67 R 16 317.00 R 1 985.90 R 8 008.03 R 33 626.64 R 990.40 R 38 243.75 R 25 446.54

Sustainability Week a highlight in the environmental calendar Editors note: Sustainability Week mention Sustainability Week - Green Building: the future of South Africa Get ready to put sustainable ideas in motion Sustainability Week Event listing - Sustainability Week Winning in green innovation Event listing - Sustainability Week Mayor meets African head of missions Vision of high quality life for residents Sustainability Week to take place in Pretoria in June Sustainability Week; Green Building Conference Event listing - Sustainability Week Environmental calendar highlight Putting sustainable ideas in motion Support Earth Day and reduce consumption Event listing - Sustainability Week Editors note: Sustainability Week mention SAASTA tackles the big issues at Sustainability Week 2015 Event listing Seminar to trash out SA’s sustainability options

South African Garden and Home Steel Construction Earthworks Indwe Essays of Africa Green Home The Centurion The Centurion Joburg East Express Pretoria News Star Pretoria News Cosmo City Chronicle Pretoria News Pretoria News South African Garden and Home Bedfordview & Edenvale News Mens Inc Women’s Choice Midrand Reporter Tembisan Construction World

56 368 2 500 9 894 15 000 40 000 9 038 20 000 20 000 17 650 14 968 91 735 14 968 15 900 14 968 14 968 59 100 46 575 3 248 1 654 28 159 9 250 4 698

R 4 296.44 R 11 263.46 R 3 017.00 R 31 198.55 R 9 643.45 R 10 418.82 R 2 219.72 R 649.00 R 5 543.36 R 17 605.01 R 78 465.63 R 15 644.63 R 3 236.40 R 19 526.96 R 1 691.31 R 8 168.23 R 11 511.25 R 22 563.18 R 22 523.11 R 6 788.24 R 10 100.13 R 12 312.29

CSIR International Convention Centre’s performance soars: Sustainability Week mention What’s on Sustainability Week overview Event listing - Sustainability Week Event listing - Sustainability Week; Green Home Fair Go Green: Sustainability Week and Green Home Fair A word from the Editor From the Editor Pen-A-Date: June/July 2015 Sustainability Week—Get ready to put sustainable ideas in motion Community Notice Board; Green Home Fair and Sustainability Week Save the date Advancing the Green Economy—REDISA insert Advancing the Green Economy—REDISA insert African Cities to address the sustainability question Sustainable cities tops summit agenda Outings: Green Home Fair | Sustainability Week What’s on Sustainability Week—Get ready to put ideas in motion Exec. mayor of the City of Tshwane addresses the sustainability question Exec. mayor of the City of Tshwane addresses the sustainability question Sustainability is the only way forward Sustainability Week—get ready to introduce new, green initiatives Key Partner—BASF

R 601 938.37

68%

PRINT MEDIA QUALITY VALUE

30

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT BROADCAST STATION

PROGRAMME

VALUE

SUMMARY

SAfm CCFm Talk Radio 702 / Cape Talk Simulcast Talk Radio 702 / Cape Talk Simulcast SABC News

Weekend AM Live 9 to 12 Show Talk @ 9 Redi Thlabi Newsroom

R 11 063.00 R 5 075.47 R 31 994.13 R 4 472.00 R 25 250.00

• • • • •

ANN7 SAfm SABC 3

Vuka Afrika Enviro-Show Expresso Show

R 184 800.00 R 5 962.00 R 165 333.33

• • •

SABC 3

Expresso Show

R 63 000.00

Classic FM Classic FM

Classic Business Show Classic Business Show

R 24 918.40 R 8 985.00

SAfm

The Talk Shop

R 7 824.00

• •

• SABC 3

Expresso Show

R 75 333.33 •

SABC 3

Expresso Show

R 5 666.67

SABC 3

Expresso Show

R 121 333.33

• •

SABC 3

Expresso Show

R 8 666.67

SABC 3

Expresso Show

R 72 666.67

• •

Classic FM

News @ 06:00

R 7 906.80

Classic FM

The Classic Drive

R 5 091.67

Classic FM Classic FM

Classic Business Show Classic Business Show

R 24 678.80 R 7 068.20

• •

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

• •

Inaugral African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum: Interview with Dorah Nteo Earth Day: Mention of Sustainability Week and the Green Home Fair Energy Frontiers: Interview with Dr Karen Surridge-Talbot Sustainability Week live read South Africa’s first publication to stimulate green innovation, GreenOvation is set to release during sustainability week at the end of June Green environmentalists to be awarded: Sustainability Week mention Inaugral African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum: Interview with Sello Mphaga Sustainability Week 2015 | Today marks the start of Sustainability Week 2015, which will be held in the City of Tshwane. The aim of the gathering is to educate people on various issues surrounding the environment and sustainability. An insert on boutique hotels, which will bring you closer to nature and will help you travel more eco-friendly. Sustainability Week 2015 - Continue | Today marks the start of Sustainability Week 2015, which will be held in the City of Tshwane. An insert on boutique hotels, which will bring you closer to nature and will help you travel more eco-friendly, featuring Kilindi Resort in Zanzibar. Show line-up: Sustainability Week mention The Sustainability Week Summit is being hosted at the CSIR kicks off tomorrow with an altitude of acclaimed speakers in the field of sustainability from food security to renewable power which has been a big topic in the country as of late. Mentions: Nedbank Tshwane will be hosting the Inaugural African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum which will begin tomorrow and will run until the 25th.(Int:) Dorah Nteo - Strategic Executive Director : City of Tshwane Mentions: Sustainability Week, Green Home Fair, Brooklyn Mall This week marks Sustainability Week. A group of South African teens are taking their education to new heights by creating Africa’s first private satellite. Micro Enterprise Development Organisation Co-Founder and Joint CEO Judi Sandrock and Editor in Chief, Carla de Klerk, discuss the initiative which involves high school learners launching a satellite into space. The project aims to teach learners about the importance of maths and science in an approach to furthering their education. Show Update | A look a what is coming up on the show. Mention: Gugu Zulu, Greenpop, Sustainability Week This week marks Sustainability Week, which is all about improving the state of our planet and finding a balance between our co-existence with the environment. Becoming sustainable is one of the biggest problems facing humans. Alive2Green CEO, Gordon Brown, chats to the presenter about the problems facing the environment, such as climate change, and how sustainability could be affected by them. The Green Home Fair will be hosted at the Brooklyn Hall on the 27 and 28 of June.(Int:) Gordon Brown - CEO: Alive2Green Show Update| A look a what is coming up on the show. Mention: Greenpop, Sustainability Week - Part2 The Alive2Green Sustainability Week takes place at the CSIR International Convention Centre in Pretoria today. Greenpop has embarked on its Peace Park Project, which involves greening a certain area of Cape Town, in an attempt to reconnect people. Greenpop Cape Town Urban Greening Coordinator, Leanne McKrill, and Planting & Sustainability Assistant, Pamela Mayaba, chat to the presenter about Greenpop’s initiative of planting trees. Nedbank Sustainability Week live read |Live read on Sustainability Week at the CSIR International Convention Centre. Mention: Alive2Green Nedbank Sustainability Week live read |Live read on Sustainability Week at the CSIR International Convention Centre. Mention: Alive2Green Show line-up | Coming up on the show tonight: Sustainability Week mention The Sustainability Week Summit is being hosted at the CSIR kicks off tomorrow with an altitude of acclaimed speakers in the field of sustainability from food security to renewable power which has been a big topic in the country as of late. Mentions: Engen, WWF, Nedbank

31


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT e.TV

Sunrise

R 6 666.67

e.TV

Sunrise

R 6 500.00

Classic FM

Classic Breakfast

R 5 630.00

SABC 3

Expresso Show

R 65 333.33

Classic FM

Classic Lifestyle

R 4 107.83

Classic FM

Classic Business Show

R 4 911.80

Classic FM

Classic Business Show

R 958.40

SABC 3

Expresso Show

R 75 666.67

e.TV

Sunrise

R 102 000.00

Classic FM

News @ 06:00

R 5 750.40

Classic FM

Classic Lifestyle

R 4 107.83

SABC 3 Classic FM

Expresso Show Classic Lifestyle

R 103 666.67 R 3 940.17

Classic FM

Classic Business Show

R 3 474.20

Classic FM

Classic Business Show

R 8 146.40

Classic FM

Classic Business Show

R 3 594.00

Channel Africa

Africa Midday

R 17 336.00

SAfm

Enviro-Show

R 6 446.00

Radio Pulpit

Spektrum

R 9 342.50

Channel Africa

Africa Rise & Shine

R 14 640.00

Channel Africa

Africa Rise & Shine

R 32 384.00

SABC News

Question Time

R 15 066.67

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• Under the theme ‘Get ready to put ideas to in motion’, the City of Tshwane hosts Sustainability Week. The purpose of this week is to share ideas which will improve environmental and economic performances. • Repeat: Under the theme ‘Get ready to put ideas to in motion’, the City of Tshwane hosts Sustainability Week. The purpose of this week is to share ideas which will improve environmental and economic performances. • Nedbank Sustainability Week live read |Live read on Sustainability Week at the CSIR International Convention Centre. Mention: Alive2Green • This week marks Sustainability Week. South Africa is believed to be the 30th driest country in the world yet the expert in studio says South Africans use too much water more than half of what they should be using. • Nedbank Sustainability Week live read |Live read on Sustainability Week at the CSIR International Convention Centre. Mention: Alive2Green • Nedbank Sustainability Week live read |Live read on Sustainability Week at the CSIR International Convention Centre. Mention: Alive2Green • Nedbank Sustainability Week live read |Live read on Sustainability Week at the CSIR International Convention Centre • Sustainability Week | A discussion about green transport alternatives and how to protect mother nature while travelling. Bike sharing is a transportation system which will be released in Cape Town in the near future. • Under the theme: Get ready and put ideas in motion, the City of Tshwane is hosting Sustainability Week. The purpose of this week is to share ideas which will improve environmental and economic performance.(Int:) Melissa Baird - Alive2Green mentions: Food Security Seminar, Green Home Magazine • Nedbank Sustainability Week live read |Live read on Sustainability Week at the CSIR International Convention Centre. Mention: Alive2Green • Nedbank Sustainability Week live read |Live read on Sustainability Week at the CSIR International Convention Centre. Mention: Alive2Green • The Bushman winter has come; Sustainability Week mention • Nedbank Sustainability Week live read |Live read on Sustainability Week at the CSIR International Convention Centre. Mention: Alive2Green • Nedbank Sustainability Week live read |Live read on Sustainability Week at the CSIR International Convention Centre. Mention: Alive2Green • Details on the CSIR Sustainability Week Summit that wrapped up yesterday at the convention centre.Mention: World Wildlife Fund • Nedbank Sustainability Week live read |Live read on Sustainability Week at the CSIR International Convention Centre. Mention: Alive2Green • As the Sustainability Week conference concludes today in Pretoria delegates say tourism is a point of convergence between the economy and the environment government and the tourism industry should be leaders within the area of sustainable business practices. • Sustainability Week is from the 23rd till the 28th of June at the Tshwane University of Technology and the CSIR International Convention Centre. Pieter Malherbe TEVA Windows MD will be speaking at Sustainability Week.(Int:) Pieter Malherbe - MD: TEVA Windows • Ella Bella shares some green tips as part of Sustainability Week. She talks about the spindle, a laundry dryer. (Int:) Ella Bella - Generation Earth • As the sustainability week conference concluded yesterday in the capital Pretoria, delegates say sustainability is not a quick fix or a one-size-fits-all solution. It is about a process of reaching decisions while considering the interest of all stakeholders. (Int:) Stacy Davidson - Executive Director: Recycling and Economic Development Initiative of South Africa • REPEAT - As the sustainability week conference concluded yesterday in the capital Pretoria, delegates say sustainability is not a quick fix or a one-size -its-all solution. It is about a process of reaching decisions while considering the interest of all stakeholders. (Int:)Stacy Davidson - Executive Director: REDISA • Green renewable energy can go a long way in mitigating load shedding and the effects of global warming. This came out at the City of Tshwane’s Green Home Fair and the Youth and green economy dialogue held in Pretoria today. (Int:) Melissa Baird

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT SABC News

Prime Time News

R 17 066.67

SABC 1

News @ 19:00 (Xhosa)

R 163 266.67

SABC 2

News @ 19:00 (Sotho)

R 62 100.00

SABC News

Newsroom

R 40 833.33

Power FM

Power Hour

R 38 016.00

Power FM

Power Hour

R 35 376.00

BROADCAST MEDIA QUALITY VALUE

R1 650 751.01

• Green renewable energy can go a long way in mitigating load shedding and the effects of global warming. This came out at the City of Tshwane’s Green Home Fair and the Youth and green economy dialogue held in Pretoria today. (Int:) Melissa Baird • Green renewable energy can go a long way in mitigating load shedding and the effects of global warming. This came out at the City of Tshwane’s Green Home Fair and the Youth and green economy dialogue held in Pretoria today. (Int:) Melissa Baird • Green renewable energy can go a long way in mitigating load shedding and the effects of global warming. This came out at the City of Tshwane’s Green Home Fair and the Youth and green economy dialogue held in Pretoria today. (Int:) Melissa Baird • It is estimated that 1.3 billion tons of urban waste is created across the globe every year, according to reports South Africa generates about 1.8 million tons of waste a year with 90% going to land filling. Last week th annual Sustainability Week took place at the CSIR where a number of organisations spoke on waste to make the economy greener. (Int:) Stacey Davidson - Director: REDISA • Discussion on sustainability and energy Gerswynn Mckuur, Global Cleantech Innovation Programme National Programme Manager is being interviewed. Mckuur is discussing some of the highlights of the Sustainability Week as well as renewable energy related issues. • Discussion on sustainability and energy - Continue Gerswynn Mckuur, GCIP National Programme Manager is being interviewed. Mckuuris discussing some of the highlights of the Sustainability Week as well as renewable energy related issues. 70%

WEBSITES WEBSITE

COST

SUMMARY

Link 2 Media Construction Review Online Alive2Green Media Update Bizcommunity Alive2Green Alive2Green Media Update Bizcommunity Link 2 Media Alive2Green Link2Media Engineering News Leading Architecture Alive2Green Alive2Green Bizcommunity Bizcommunity Alive2Green My Newsroom IOL / Cape Times All4Women Infrastructurene.ws Bloemfontein Courant

R 500 R 15 654 R 433 R 478 R 4 952 R 468.10 R 668.62 R 436.00 R 5 660.64 R 500.00 R 488.34 R 500.00 R 2 733.92 R 6 775.48 R 562.82 R 557.84 R 5 851.36 R 5 289.44 R 557.24 R 383.00 R 15 157.05 R 6 672.00 R 501.00 R 359.00

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Randfontein Herald Roodepoort Record

R 548.00 R 1 384.00

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

Get ready to put sustainable ideas in motion Stakeholders in sustainability building to convene at Sustainability Week Stakeholders in sustainability building to convene at Sustainability Week Sustainability Week 2015 aims to get ready and put ideas in motion Sustainability Week will accelerate number of projects Sustainability Week will accelerate number of projects Sustainability Week 2015 aims to get ready and put ideas in motion Councillor invites mayors of African capital cities to attend ACC Sustainability Forum African mayors invited to attend Sustainability Forum African Capital Cities to champion sustainability African mayors invited to attend Sustainability Forum Green Building - The future of South Africa Sustainability Week to take place in Pretoria in June Green Building Conference in June Conference to focus on sustainable built environment Green Building Conference in June Conference to focus on sustainable built environment GreenOvation a platform to showcase green innovation GreenOvation a platform to showcase green innovation Easy steps to make every day Earth Day Support Earth Day and reduce consumption Five Steps to making every day Earth Day. Every day can be Earth Day; Green Home Fair and Sustainability Week mention Did you know? Today the world celebrates Earth Day for the 45th time; Green Home Fair and Sustainability Week mention • Easy steps to make every day Earth Day; Green Home Fair and Sustainability Week mention • Easy steps to make every day Earth Day; Green Home Fair and Sustainability Week mention

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT Krugersdorp News Alive2Green Purely Local Spice4Life We Can Change My Newsroom Media Update Bloemfontein Courant Eco Diva Green Business Guide Alive2Green Show Me We Can Change Alive2Green Alive2Green My Newsroom Media Update Bizcommunity Alive2Green We Can Change Spice4Life Alive2Green Home Dzine Opportunity Online Leadership Online The Project Manager My Newsroom Nunnovation Media Update Green Business Guide Show Me My Newsroom Engineering News Babys and Beyond Polity Engineering News Show Me Bizcommunity My Press Portal Expressoshow.com We Can Change Bizcommunity Alive2Green Alive2Green Alive2Green Alive2Green Show Me Show Me Truck and Bus Joburg East Express Bedfordview & Edenvale News Automotive Business Review The Centurion The Centurion Media Update Bizcommunity

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R 1 039.00 R 524.00 R 419.00 R 748.00 R 469.00 R 449.00 R 515.00 R 359.00 R 344.78 R 439.00 R 554.63 R 2 928.40 R 457.45 R 434.80 R 578.12 R 486.76 R 508.11 R 5 617.76 R 563.18 R 433.60 R 734.00 R 524.44 R 473.40 R 459.00 R 516.00 R 488.00 R 434.00 R 458.51 R 477.00 R 447.00 R 1 078.78 R 439.00 R 2 240.48 R 206.68 R 945.76 R 2 325.00 R 1 947.00 R 4 902.00 R 511.00 R 6 716.92 R 433.00 R 4 300.17 R 441.98 R 450.36 R 450.06 R 436.10 R 1 043.00 R 1 585.70 R 899.52 R 672.34 R 724.88 R 777.00 R 312.00 R 304.00 R 479.00 R 5 470.56

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Easy steps to make every day Earth Day; Green Home Fair and Sustainability Week mention Easy steps to make every day Earth Day; Green Home Fair and Sustainability Week mention Easy steps to make every day Earth Day; Green Home Fair and Sustainability Week mention Easy steps to make every day Earth Day; Green Home Fair and Sustainability Week mention Easy steps to make every day Earth Day; Green Home Fair and Sustainability Week mention Sustainability Week - South Africa becoming a leader in renewable energy South Africa becoming a leader in renewable energy South Africa on its way to becoming a renewable energy leader Is SA a renewable energy leader? SA is becoming a leader in RE South Africa’s transition to renewable energy Green Home Fair South Africa’s transition to renewable energy Green Home Fair South Africa becoming a leader in renewable energy Africa in need of sustainable agriculture production Africa in need of sustainable agriculture production Agricultural production in spotlight at Food Security Seminar Agricultural production in spotlight at Food Security Seminar Africa in need of sustainable agriculture production Africa in need of sustainable agriculture production Africa in need of sustainable agriculture production Sustainability Week 2015 Sustainability Week - Green Building Conference Get ready to put sustainable ideas in motion Green Home Fair African cities to address the sustainability question GreenOvation - Celebrating and stimulating green innovation in South Africa African cities to address the sustainability question African cities to address the sustainability African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum: Building a continental perspective Executive Mayor of the City of Tshwane addresses the sustainability question BASF a key partner at Sustainability Week 2015 Van Dyck Newsletter - Sustainability Week mention S Africa solar energy roadmap to be unveiled by October S Africa solar energy roadmap to be unveiled by October City of Tshwane hosting mayors of African capitals Tshwane mayor addresses the sustainability in major cities African cities to address the sustainability question How to make transport more sustainable City of Tshwane Mayor addresses sustainability question Tshwane mayor addresses sustainability in major cities Tshwane mayor addresses sustainability in major cities How to make transport more sustainable African cities to address the sustainability question S Africa solar energy roadmap to be unveiled by October Green Home Fair Visit the Green Home Fair at Brooklyn Mall Get ready to put ideas in motion Sustainability Week—Get ready to put ideas in motion Sustainability Week—Get ready to put ideas in motion Sustainability Week—Get ready to put ideas in motion Sustainability Week offers seminars for all From the Editor; Sustainability Week mention Executive Mayor of the City of Tshwane addresses the sustainability question Working towards a green economy - change is afoot

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT My Newsroom Alive2Green Bizcommunity Alive2Green

R 412.00 R 5 494.72 R 449.00 R 460.64 R 5 526.24 R 454.30

• • • • • •

Sustainability Week—Get ready to put ideas in motion Sustainability: a lever for growth African Capital cities sign declaration of intent focused on sustainability African Capital cities sign declaration of intent focused on sustainability Mayors sign declaration of intent at Sustainability Week Mayors sign declaration of intent at Sustainability Week

ONLINE MEDIA QUALITY VALUE

R154 425.48

78%

TOTAL AVE*: R 2 479 196.03 TOTAL PR: R 9 916 784.12 Average Clip Quality 68% 72% Circulation figure*** 12 152 781 *AVE = Advertising Value Estimate, this is the amount that would have been paid had the space been booked for advertising purposes ** PRV = Public Relations Value, this is the amount estimated from the credibility gained from the exposure received *** CIRCULATION = This is the amount of people exposed to the specific media channel. Unfortunately not all online media channels are currently monitored.

Dorah Nteo, City of Tshwane, Dr Jaisheila Rajput, Tomorrow Matters NOW (TOMA),  Peter Newman, Curtin University interviewed by Channel Africa

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT AT TENDANCE

EVENT

2013 DELEGATES

2014 DELEGATES

2015 DELEGATES

African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum

310

Sustainability in Mining Seminar

80

Green Building Conference

528

286

272

Sustainable Energy Seminar

111

96

165

64

92

79

85

Food Security Seminar Sustainable Transport and Mobility Seminar

52

Green Manufacturing Seminar

60

Vision Zero Waste Seminar

33

110

90

Sustainable Water Resource Seminar

40

86

61

Sustainable Infrastructure Seminar

80

Responsible & Sustainable Tourism Seminar

95

85

42

Green Business Seminar

114

109

52

Youth & Green Economy

98

517

91

TOTAL DELEGATE ATTENDANCE

1071

1432

1480

OTHER EVENTS Climate Change Breakaway

92

UNIDO Breakaway

46

Official Opening and Launch of the Green Outreach Programme

100

Cleantech Incubation Seminar

50

Sustainable Cities & Communities Seminar

62

Green Building Council

46

Clean Business Seminar

135

OTHER STAKEHOLDERS Exhibitors

811

208

100

Staff and Volunteers

75

20

22

Green Home Fair Exhibitors

27

Facilitators

7

Media

21

36

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

CEO’S MESSAGE Sustainability is of fundamental importance to Alive2Green because we are a media company that focuses on issues that relate to sustainability. All our commercial opportunities, our business strategy and the choice of titles that we publish relate to sustainability, and in that sense we are different to other companies. Our strategy for the short term is to consolidate the media products and assets that we currently operate. Sustainability Week has the potential to double in size without requiring additional components. A goal for Sustainability Week is to reach beyond national boundaries to draw international audiences. This year we were delighted to see mayoral delegations from African capital cities at the show, and we are certainly looking to increase the level of attendance from other African stakeholders. As far as sustainability relates to our own operations, and as a small company we sometimes put delivery ahead of the big picture, and because we sublet premises we are not in a strong position to influence our immediate operational sustainability, but we are working on changing this. Alive2Green’s biggest impacts occur down the value chain through printing and distribution of publications, and in the running of events, and in respect of these aspects we try hard. In terms of environmental impact we need to work more closely with suppliers to minimise those environmental impacts that are significant at any event. This report gives details of the ways we are already addressing these issues in the Event Greening section. In respect of our magazines, we might increase the frequency of the Green Economy Journal as this seeks to compete with other more frequently published business journals. We are contemplating decreasing the frequency of Green Home Magazine but looking at improving the quality, with a perfect-bound coffee-table look. We are thinking of expanding into the mining publishing market. We will be putting a lot of effort into electronic publishing and we hope to grow that business. We will continue to reinvent ourselves and reinvent our publications and invest great amounts of effort in ensuring that we’re producing best content.

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We need to work more closely with our suppliers on environmental matters—pushing the boundaries of paper quality, looking at more efficient logistics for distribution, trying our best to advance our electronic business and increasing the market share. Another aspect we need to explore is assessing our events in relation to international standards, where appropriate. The bulk of standards in event industries relate to venues and suppliers. We use the top five suppliers in the country, so it is a matter of checking how they match up to international standards like King III and ISO. Social impact initiatives include exploring legacy projects with the City of Tshwane. The emediate impacts relate to the invitation to City of Tshwane stakeholders to attend the event, who through being inspired by speakers and exhibitors, might begin to reduce their impacts or to get involved in the green economy directly. The launch of the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum made a positive social impact in support of the Executive Mayor’s campaign against xenophobia. In relation to our youth outreach, we have formed a partnership with a local Tshwane company that is active in the same space. Through them and with our input, we are hoping to provide support to young entrepreneurs in the City of Tshwane. We also have a website that provides ongoing information to young people about bursaries, scholarships and a range of other inputs. A dedicated newsletter to our youth stakeholders also provides them with the latest information regarding advancing their education. We certainly see sustainability becoming a more and more important issue, driven by macroeconomic realities in South Africa. Energy continues to be constrained and is going to continue to increase in price. That is a driver for companies to look at obvious alternatives like renewable energy and energy efficiency. People are not necessarily turning to these solutions because they’re sustainable but because they offer genuine alternatives to the current energy crisis. Regionally, Southern Africa will continue to be a water-scarce region, and as industrialisation increases, ongoing pollution will continue to negatively impact that resource. In terms of water conservation and becoming more

efficient with water use, we need to advance best practice in this regard, upgrade infrastructure on the supply side, and upgrade infrastructure in relation to human settlements to improve access to water and sanitation and reduce wastage and effluent runoff. Likewise issues that relate to waste: landfill sites around the country are filling up while government is making it harder for municipalities to open new landfill sites. New landfill sites are being located further away from the cities, increasing the cost of transport. The real costs of our current disposal paradigm are increasing and its becoming harder to externalise these, and therefore the pursuit of alternatives is going to continue to grow through greater levels of waste recycling, materials recovery, and upstream beneficiation. Human health issues—we believe that there is a trend among people to be more conscious of their health and more aware of things like toxins found in paints and coatings and other manufactured goods. Issues such as the use of inorganic farming practices, fertilisers and how they affect nutrition and health are becoming increasingly topical. There is a growing awareness of these issues and we perceive that it’s going to continue to increase. There is a big push in nutrition to go for unprocessed, whole foods, etc. There is a greater reconnection being made between consumers and food production and farming, and that’s putting pressure on farmers to farm more sustainably. Environmental health—this is an area of concern both on a state level and regionally. The state is struggling to enforce rules and regulations that relate to environmental degradation. We don’t seem to be winning our war against poachers, both rhino and other poachers. We are not resourcing those areas well enough, and that’s where we see tourism and particularly sustainable tourism playing a key role; the more we invest in the protection of biodiversity and areas of natural beauty in the country, the greater the revenue streams and the economic growth that will flow from tourism. One of our key objectives is to connect the dots in the minds of policy makers in this regard. Our publications and our events offer the opportunity to speak about these issues: what will the effect be on tourism if all the rhinos are wiped

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

out and all the fynbos is destroyed? The connection between funding a rhino protection programme and the billions we earn from tourism is not strong enough, but we believe that is changing. We look forward to greater investments in the protection of biodiversity and natural areas, and therefore a growth in the industries and economy to support that. That is another key growth area in our perception. A highlight for 2015 was the advent of the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, launched this year by the City of Tshwane. We saw almost 20 mayoral delegations from a total potential of 54 invited countries in Africa. A declaration was signed by these parties to play their role as capital cities in Africa to advance sustainability. Other additions to Sustainability Week included a mining focus, manufacturing, and infrastructure. We achieved our goals in terms of attendance, and feedback so far has been extremely positive. A challenge for the future is to improve the bookings process for Sustainability Week. This year delays impacted negatively on the level of conversation that we had intended to initiate ahead of the event. This limited the amount of pre-event information and resulted in lost communication opportunities with delegates, but as communication is one of our priorities, we intend to continue these conversations post-event, and build early towards 2016. The outlook for Sustainability Week is very positive. In terms of strategic growth, one of the areas that we are looking to expand is the organisation of third-party and partnered events as distinct from our own events. Long-term strategy is to develop our products to be market leaders in each of their segments and for Sustainability Week to be regarded as one of the most important events on the calendar, regardless of sector.

Gordon Brown CEO Alive2Green Yours faithfully, Gordon Brown CEO—Alive2Green

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT Alive2Green’s highest authority is the chief executive officer (CEO), who is an executive director of the Board of Directors. Directors report to the CEO. The directors have functional portfolios and are responsible for the development and execution of company strategy. Shareholders use the board meeting platform to provide their input and to influence resolutions. The primary purpose is to implement the strategy of the shareholders in a way that is true to the values of the company. The Board manages and keeps abreast of financial performance and other key objectives of the business. Environmental, social and governance issues are key to the content of our discussions. Meetings are scheduled once a month to address necessary actions e.g. if a strategic action is yet to be implemented, or if an issue has been specifically flagged for reactive response. The agenda reflects the dynamics of required response rather than a list of standing items. Operational meetings are held on an ongoing regular basis to supervise various operational centres, provide review and feedback to middle-management staff, and ultimately achieve the operational objectives of the business.

VALUES, PRINCIPLES, CODES AND PROCEDURES Alive2Green has developed and implemented internal value statements and codes of conduct which are used as guidelines for management, and which relate to economic, environmental and social performance. Employees thus have forums and systems at their disposal to address the values, codes of conduct or standards with regard to non-compliance in any work-related situation or incident.

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY CLIMATE CHANGE Alive2Green is subject to general business risk associated with climate change. The financial impact of increased tariffs, carbon taxes and emissions regulations will reduce the organisations potential to operate as effectively without corresponding increases in funding. However, given that the activities of Alive2Green and the event are directed specifically at climate change mitigation and adaptation, an opportunity exists for Alive2Green to show results and to demonstrate leadership in this space, which may even serve to position the organisation as an essential solution to climate change mitigation, potentially increasing access to funding.

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

Examples of sustainability practices are detailed in other sections of this report.

SUPPLIERS (LOCAL) Alive2Green follows an active policy of attempting to procure the best environmental choice whether it is for food, paper or publishing, within certain price parameters. An effective management approach involves ongoing identification of suitable suppliers, building relationships with existing suppliers and ensuring that staff have up-to-date information at their disposal regarding developments in various procurement categories. There is room for improvement in that the staff can be more

proactive in educating suppliers and emphasising the importance of sustainable procurement to the company, thus prompting suppliers to make their own changes in product presentations and manufacturing processes where possible. An example is the relationship with our printer, a small BEE company. We are engaged in a process to get the company Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC)-certified. We view this attempt to encourage the company to achieve compliance as a more sustainable approach, rather than moving to a company who is already certified. Local in the understanding of Alive2Green is defined as being within South Africa.

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

SOCIAL SUSTAINABILITY

42

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za


FRIENDLY AND HELPFUL STAFF.

-Magriet Leaper, Lige Pty Limited

EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT HUMAN CAPITAL, DIVERSIT Y AND TRAINING; HEALTH AND SAFET Y

EMPLOYMENT VALUE SYSTEM Alive2Green subscribes to the principles of broad-based black economic empowerment and provides on-the-job training. Staff at Alive2Green are expected to uphold the company ethos in their dealings with customers and suppliers. Open, honest and respectful communication and freedom of expression is encouraged and the company ensures a safe and healthy work environment for all employees. Of a total workforce of 24 permanent and three contract staff, 17 are female with three in senior management and 10 in mid-management. The table below lists the workforce involved in Sustainability Week. EMPLOYMENT AND REMUNERATION As a small company, Alive2Green offers the best possible packages it can afford to administrative staff and offers competitive basic-plus-commission packages to sales staff. The company also boasts high levels of staff retention and long service. TRAINING AND EDUCATION Education and training are treated as very important at Alive2Green and this is particularly relevant in the context of Sustainability Week, which required staff to possess the requisite skills and experience in order to manage so many moving parts. Volunteers who worked at Sustainability Week were trained beforehand and a large number of these volunteers have worked at two or more Alive2Green events. Volunteer retention is excellent. Volunteers were mostly students in the architectural, engineering, technical or science faculties of tertiary institutions in the local community. Volunteers were paid a stipend which covered food and transport for the time that they were at the event. WORKFORCE FOR THE EVENT: • Elna Willemse • Muqmena Anyachor • Nabilah Hassen • Nicole Kenny • Dylan Oosthuizen • Edward MacDonald • Gordon Brown • Lloyd Macfarlane • Pitso Saul Maholela • John Elford • Melissa Baird • Louna Rae • Ann Mashiane • Ingrid Bame • Hiral Naik • Rebecca Oyerinde • Refilwe Kai • Faatimah Mansoor • Yusuf Mansoor

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer

• • • • • • • •

Taralyn Moodley Yakira Bahadur Makhanya Nomfundo Margaux Loubser Khanya Ngonyama Ashley Naude Lianelle JansenVan Vuuren Jasmine Jacob

Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer Volunteer

CORPORATE SOCIAL INVESTMENT

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT In 2014 Alive2Green established a new platform that focuses on youth and the role they can play in the green economy. The Youth and Green Economy Dialogue continued to be a successful platform in 2015. In terms of marketing, the platform was marketed as SWEEK in the programme and via mailers before the event, which went out to our larger youth database.

YOUTH AND THE GREEN ECONOMY Likes: 7 249 w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / p a g e s / Youth-and-the-Green-Economy/437554116287231 THE ACTUAL FACEBOOK EVENT 130 accepted the invitation to attend /www.facebook.com/events/1125627470796178/ Alive2Green elected to support the Wonderbag Foundation initiative by purchasing carbon credits that were aligned with the development of this project through the Carbon Neutral Group (see information in the Environmental section). Alive2Green also seeks to source only local products and services (procurement and hiring) which in turn contribute to the growth of the local economy and community. Left-over food at the event was donated to charity. The event was directly responsible for a meaningful economic contribution to the local region of Ekurhuleni. The publicity surrounding the event resulted in increased awareness of event activities and objectives in the Gauteng region and in South Africa. In addition, international speakers and guests of the event were also informed about the commercial profile of the region. This exposure was valuable for the region and for the event facility. Future tourism and trade opportunities are expected to flow as a result of the awareness and networking activities surrounding the event.

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY ENERGY AND EMISSIONS Large events such as Sustainability Week can be major sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The use of electricity, heating, air conditioning, transportation and paper all contributes to climate change in some way. Electricity and fuel consumption were regarded to be the most material impacts for Sustainability Week and it was important to measure and mitigate consumption wherever possible. This included creating awareness among key stakeholders. Roughly 90% of electricity generated in South Africa comes from coal-fired power stations which emit tons of carbon into the earth’s atmosphere. Events are also usually associated with the use of planes, cars, buses and trains which use carbon-emitting fuels to various degrees. A ‘carbon footprint’ is an effective measure of the emissions associated with the event. A carbon footprint can generally be defined as the total set of GHG emissions caused by an organisation, event, product or person. Alive2Green undertook a GHG reduction and offsetting initiative in an attempt to make the event ‘carbon neutral’. Part of the responsibility to reduce the carbon footprint for Sustainability Week rests with exhibitors and participants, and so all attendees were encouraged to select low-carbon options. The initiative to offset the carbon footprint for Sustainability Week 2015 consisted of establishing the event’s overall carbon footprint, implementing event greening measures and then offsetting the Scope 1 (direct) and Scope 2 (electricity) emissions with the Wonderbag Foundation initiative facilitated by the Climate Neutral Group in South Africa.

WONDERBAG PROJECT

BACKGROUND Over three billion women around the world still cook over an open fire each day and face the

44

dangers of smoke inhalation. Statistics show that over 4 million people die from this cause and 50% of these premature deaths are children under five. Often low-income households use firewood for fuel to cook food; this not only results in deforestation, but many hours spent by women looking for wood. These are hours that take girls out of school and mothers away from caring for their children. Many South Africans use paraffin stoves for cooking which also create environmental problems. The Wonderbag non-electric, portable, slow cooker reduces cooking time (and therefore carbon emissions) whether the meal is being prepared on an open fire in a rural KwaZulu-Natal hut or a stateof-the-art kitchen in Bishopscourt.

partner community relationships. Families are trained on how to use the bag and empowered to understand the health and environmental benefits of using the bag. The Foundation also monitors health results through local clinics.

THE PROJECT The story of Sarah Collins and her drive for sustainable impact is not only a proudly South African entrepreneurial success story, but one that truly shows the power of connecting hearts and homes around the world. Sarah’s original inspiration came from the memories of her grandmother’s economical cooking methods and her deep connection with African women. The project supplies employment for the women who manufacture the Wonderbag while providing much more than just an alternative cooking method to the communities who use the bags. The Wonderbag Foundation has built a model that focuses on empowering and educating communities through partnership organisations, monitoring and follow-up programmes. This ensures wide distribution, deep impact and real transformation. The Wonderbag Journey forms a community of hope around the globe, linked to online purchases from all over the world. For every Wonderbag purchased in the developed world, the Foundation donates a Wonderbag to a family in Africa. The Foundation distributes the bags through

PROUDLY SOUTH AFRICAN Despite its international footprint, Wonderbag still sources all their raw materials from South African companies - the product is thus 100% locally made. www.wonderbagworld.com; www.wonderbagfoundation.org

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS For every family in the developing world that uses a Wonderbag the positive impact can be quantified and measured. Every bag used: • Saves 1.7 trees, slowing deforestation rates • Saves 1 000 litres of water per year • Saves 1 248 hours spent collecting firewood per year • Reduces up to 1 ton of carbon emissions.

ENERGY EFFICIENCY

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES To the extent that it was regarded to be important to communicate the sustainability aspects of the event to attendees and participants, the GSA Campbell event greening guidelines were used to do this leading up to and following the event. This event sustainability report forms part of this stakeholder communication process. Alive2Green specifies uncoated paper and insists on paper products for its publications to be guaranteed to have come from sustainably grown forests. Alive2Green is in the process of negotiating with their printer of choice to get Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC) certification. The company made use of reusable and recyclable signage and marketing materials for the event,

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

and waste products from the event were separated and recycled. The event committee chose a venue with excellent energy, water and waste policies and practices. Alive2Green products play a role in spreading the message about sustainability by stimulating the green economy and by facilitating a knowledge transfer and providing a source of information for green business and entrepreneurship information. CUSTOMER HEALTH AND SAFETY The event met all Joint Operations Committee (JOC) requirements for customer health and safety. The JOC was established to ensure that all events held in Johannesburg are safe and that event organisers comply with all the by-laws and regulations of the City. The venue, used for many large events and exhibitions, was chosen as it already had multiple health and safety amenities in place. PACKAGING RESPONSIBLY Packaging materials were avoided and recycled where possible and the following materials were reclaimed for re-use: • Delegate badges (after the event) • Delegate bags not wanted. MATERIALS USED As a publisher and events company, Alive2Green produces a large quantity of printed materials, and takes the following into account when procuring such materials: • Source of paper products—the company ensures that these emanate from sustainably farmed forests. • Printing approach—the company chooses uncoated paper to ensure maximum recyclability. • The event programme was printed on Hi-Q paper—A4 size, print run of 2000. (80 pages, 90g matt art) • Reusability—the company prints generic signs where possible to ensure reusability and offers bins for used lanyards and plastic sleeves. • Recycling—the company ensures that materials used for publications are recycled or redistributed and that waste separation processes are put in place during the event.

WATER AND WASTE As mentioned above, the event management team is keenly aware of the necessity of water conservation and waste management and therefore the venue was specifically chosen for its good sustainability profile.

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

45


CARBON FOOTPRINT

OVERVIEW OF SUSTAINABILIT Y WEEK 2015 CARBON DIOXIDE EQUIVALENT (CO2 E) EMISSIONS

REPORTING PERIOD: 22—25 JUNE 2015 (3 DAY CONFERENCE & 1 DAY SET UP) CONDUCTED ON: CSIR INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE, PRETORIA

ALIVE2GREEN has offset 125 tonnes of CO2 equivalent for Sustainability Week 2015

with carbon credits from the WONDERBAG PROJECT (Verified Carbon Standard)

Climate Neutral Group invests in emission reduction projects which combine energy, environment and developmental solutions into sustainable business opportunities in developing countries. Our offset projects are carefully selected for their wider social and environmental benefits. These socially progressive projects simultaneously reduce carbon emissions and improve the quality of life of people who are threatened by the impacts of climate change. As such, they are a powerful tool for sustainable development.


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

BASIC INFORMATION Total SW delegates

1 480

Total SW exhibitors

100

Total SW Alive2Green crew

22

Total SW speakers

128

Total square metres of space reported

4 500

SCOPE 1 DIRECT EMISSIONS

METRIC TONNES OF CO2E

Equipment owned or controlled (generators)

0

Owned or leased vehicles

0

TOTAL SCOPE 1 EMISSIONS

0

SCOPE 2 INDIRECT EMISSIONS Electricity consumption (Total electricity consumption : 23 310kWh)

23.8

TOTAL SCOPE 1 & 2 EMISSIONS

23.8

SCOPE 3 INDIRECT EMISSIONS Travel by delegates

89.2

Travel by exhibitors

0.06

Travel by crew

13.0

Travel by speakers

35.0

Hotel accommodation by crew

4.6

Catering

36.5

Paper

0.4

TOTAL SCOPE 3 EMISSIONS

178.9

Contingency (5% of total emissions)

10.1

TOTAL SCOPE 1, 2 & 3 EMISSIONS

212.8

Total emissions per attendee (kgCO2e/attendee)

108

Total emissions per square metre of space (kgCO2e/m2)

45

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

47


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT 67%

Emissions by activity at Sustainability Week 2015

EMISSIONS BY ACTIVIT Y AT SUSTAINABILIT Y WEEK 2015

2% Electricity

Private car

Public transport

Catering

Paper

Hotels

Airtransport

12%

18%

67%

COMPARISON OF 2013-2015

Electricity

Private car

Public transport

2013 Catering

Paper2014

Hotels2015

No. of attendees

1071

1432

1480

Square metres utilized (m2)

3 426

5 000

5 000

Electricity emissions

12.43

24.39

23.8

Travel by delegates

80.66

165.18

89.2

Travel by exhibitors

41.61

165.18

0.06

Travel by crew (Alive2Green)

20.19

33.33

13.0

Travel by speakers

20.19

55.76

35.0

Hotel accommodation by crew

N/A

N/A

4.5

Catering

N/A

N/A

36.5

Food waste

0.0037

N/A

0

Recycled waste

N/A

0.056

0

Paper

0.80

0.77

0.4

Contingency (5% of total)

7.17

13.97

10.1

TOTAL EMISSIONS (TCO2E)

151.74

293.46

212.8

Carbon Offsets Purchased (tCO2e)

9.27

128.28

125

Emissions/attendee (tCO2e/attendee)

0.059

0.14

0.11

Emissions/total utilised space (tCO2/m2)

0.044

0.059

0.045

COMPARISON OF SW 2013 - 2015

Airtransport

BASIC INFORMATION

ACTIVITY (TCO2E)

48

5

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

GRI INDEX GENERAL STANDARD DISCLOSURE

RESPONSE/PAGE

COMPLIANCE

G4-1

38

G4-3

8 and 9

G4-4

9

G4-5

8

G4-6

8

G4-7

Sole owner of the Sustainability Week Events and properties.

G4-8

Sole owner of the Sustainability Week Events and properties.

G4-9

43

G4-10

43

G4-11

This indicator has not been reported in this annual report but the organisation endeavours to provide this information in the next report

G4-12 G4-13

There have been no significant changes during the reporting period regarding the organisation’s size, structure, ownership, or its supply chain, including:

G4-14

Alive2Green considers the need for applying the precautionary principle if there is a risk that a project may cause significant and irreversible damage to the environment. In such cases, measures should be taken by the company to avoid the risk and, if a feasible alternative is not available, to reduce it to an acceptable degree. The Company’s aim is to avoid, where possible, or at least minimise any negative environmental impacts of the projects with which it is involved.

G4-15

8

G4-16

8

G4-17

The Business Zone 1678CC (trading as Alive2Green is a closed corporation registered in the Republic of South Africa

G4-18

25

G4-19

26

G4-20 G4-21

50

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EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT G4-22

There have been no restatements of information provided in previous reports

G4-23

There have been no significant changes from previous reporting Periods in the Scope and Aspect Boundaries.

G4-24

24.25

G4-25

24.25

G4-26

24.25

G4-27

24.25

G4-28

7

G4-29

7

G4-30

7

G4-31

7

G4-32

7

G4-33

A2G has chosen to not have this report externally assured

G4-34

40

G4-55

40

SPECIFIC STANDARD DISCLOSURE

RESPONSE

G4-EC2

41

G4-EC6

100% of senior management is hired from the local community at significant locations of operation

G4-EC9

41

G4-EN1

45

G4-EN3

47

G4-EN15

47

G4-EN16

47

G4-EN17

47

G4-EN19

48

G4-EN22

45

G4-EN23

45.47

G4-EN27

26

G4-EN30

There is a relatively meaningful environmental impact resulting from the transportation of delegates, exhibitors and speakers to and from the events. The company has attempted to mitigate this impacts (Page 20 and 21)

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

COMPLIANCE

51


EVENT SUSTAINABILITY REPORT G4-LA2

No benefits provided to full-time employees that were not also provided to temporary or part-time employees,

G4-LA9

43

G4-LA10

There are currently no such programmes

G4-LA11

The performance of all employees is reviewed in the ordinary course, however career development reviews do not currently form part of this process

G4-LA12

40

G4-SO1

41, 44

G4-PR1

Health and safety impacts of the event are not currently assessed for improvement.

G4-PR5

Customer satisfaction surveys were carried out at the event and post-event, on-line

52

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WEEK

HOST CITY:

SUSTAINABILITY

GET READY TO PUT IDEAS IN MOTION Advancing the Green Economy through the sharing of knowledge and experience across disciplines, sectors, and markets - actively seeking to develop and accelerate sustainability oriented project pipelines. The convergence of government officials, private sector investors, business operators, professionals, researchers, and NGOs under one roof to re-engage on key challenges and solutions will once again prove to have a catalytic effect on the Green Economy. Through its innovative and interconnected event construction, delegates at Sustainability Week, are exposed to the need to balance interests in a bid to achieve the most appropriate approach to each decision. The day to day market realities are put to one side for three days as decision makers re evaluate their business context and the cause and effect of actions. In 2016 delegate access to sessions of all seminars will again be open, enabling each individual to structure a bespoke programme that suits their personal preferences. This unique approach enhances the delegate experience as people from different sectors and different places interact with each other, seeing similar challenges from different perspectives, and discovering new opportunities. Highlights for 2016 include: The 2nd annual African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, led by the City of Tshwane, and which welcomes high level delegations from cities around the African continent to deliberate on shared experiences and perspectives, and agree on matters of leadership in relation to sustainable cities. The 10th annual Green Building Conference, will focus on African approaches and leap-frog thinking to bring fresh thinking to what is fast becoming a mature market. See you at Sustainability Week 2016

- It starts here!

CSIR INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE

31 MAY-2 JUNE 2016 SPONSORS 2015

By becoming a leading ‘green economy’ South Africa can dramatically improve competitiveness! CONTACT US

www.sustainabilityweek.co.za

021 447 4733

sales@Alive2Green.com

Sweek report 2015  

Sustainability Week 2015 Report

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