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2008 HAWAII IRONMAN PREVIEW GEAR

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46 ATHLETES

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Race Scene

NO.295

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L i f est y le

NOVEMBER 2008

TO WATCH FOR IN KONA

SET A 70.3 PR IN 16 WEEKS

SIZE

DOES MATTER

SETTLING THE CRANK LENGTH DEBATE

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SAM McGLONE THE WORLD’S TOUGHEST UNDERDOG


Trevor Wurtele

Heather Wurtele 2008 Ford Ironman Coeur d’Alene Champion

14th 2008 Subaru Ironman Canada

3rd 2008 Subaru Ironman Canada

PHOTOS: DAVID MCCOLM

2nd 2008 Lifesport Victoria Half Ironman

AVIA.COM AVIA the Thunderbolt logo and Cantilever®, are trademarks or registered trademarks of American Sporting Goods Corporation. ©2008


TEAM WURTELE’S CHOICE FOR FINISHOLOGY

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PHOTOS: DAVID MCCOLM

The Canetilever® System—triathlete inspired since 1979.

ENDURANCE SPORTS TRAINING


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Athlete Tested. World Champion Approved. Profile Design aerobars and accessories have been used by the Ford Ironman World Championship men's winner so frequently, you could almost consider them standard equipment. Since the year 2000, seven times our athletes have stood at the pinnacle of triathlon competition. How do we stay on top? Experience, passion and a commitment to our athletes set us apart and keep them winning. “When you train as much as I do, you become almost intimate with your aerobars. So you better have gear that you can trust.” – Chris McCormack, Ford Ironman World Champion, 2007 World-class bicycle components since 1988. www.profile-design.com


CONTENTS No. 295 NOVEMBER 2008

154

COLUMNS

XTERRA Zone | 146 B y A l ex Wh i t e

48

DEPARTMENTS

TRAINING

First Wave | 16

Half-iron training | 113 By M att F i t z g er al d

“Very Organized Chaos”

Lane Lines | 118

B y Thier ry Deket e l a e re

B y B r ad C u l p

Starting Lines | 22

Big Ring | 122

B y Mitc h Throw e r

By M ar k D e t er l i n e

Editor’s Note | 24

UK Column | 148 B y A aro n K am n e tz

Triathlete’s Garage | 152 B y B r a d C u l p & J ay P r as u h n

Cutting Edge | 156 B y J ay P r as u h n

In English | 162 B y C l i ff E n g l i s h

Gear Bag | 164 By Brad Culp

Ticket Punch | 166

B y B r ad Culp

B y S am M c G l o n e

Mail Call | 26

Tinley Talks | 216 B y S c o tt T i n l ey

Checking In | 33 IndusTri; News Analysis; Training Tips; Selection; 70.3 series; Point-Counterpoint; Medically Speaking; Pro Bike; Reviewed; Endurance Conspiracy; Race for a Cause; Light Read

C over : S am an t h a M c G l o n e P h o t o b y T i m M an to an i

At the Races | 168

122

On the Run | 130 By J a s o n G o l db er g

Dear Coach | 132 By Pa u l H u ddl e & Ro c h F r ey

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Speed Lab | 140 By T im M i c k l e b o ro u g h

T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M


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CONTENTS No. 295

NOVEMBER 2008

FEATURES intO the Fire | 68 Sam McGlone is known for her fiery persona and how she throws herself full throttle into races. She and her coach, Cliff English, talk about training, her trademark pain tolerance and how they’ve developed one of the most formidable partnerships in triathlon. B y T.J. Mur phy

2008 haWaii irOnMan previeW | 78 speed: the priMary FaCtOr in Capturing the WOMen’s titLe | 79 B y TiMoThy M o o re

Men’s raCe prOMises FierCe COMpetitiOn aMOng tOp athLetes | 88 B y Jay pr as uh n

anything But aMateur | 92 B y B r aD c ulp

Meet the WOrLd’s Fastest FOrensiC pathOLOgist | 102 Twenty questions for outstanding age-grouper Kelly Lear-Kaul B y c our Tney J o h n so n

ON THE COVER saM MCgLOne | 68 46 athLetes tO WatCh FOr in kOna | 78 set a 70.3 pr | 113 size dOes Matter | 122

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FIRST WAVE

Very Organized Chaos Photo by Thierry Deketelaere The peloton of contenders makes their way into T2 at the men’s Olympic Triathlon in Beijing. Front and center is Germany’s Jan Frodeno, who jolted past Canadian Simon Whitfield in the final meters to take gold. Look for Triathlete’s complete Olympic wrap-up in the December issue. 1 6 T R I AT H L E T E

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E-114

Torbjørn Sindballe

Behind the calm demeanor lurks an iron will. His objective: to be among the foremost triathletes in the world. To achieve this, he has made the necessary sacrifices and has adopted a well-balanced, optimized way of life in the pursuit of uncompromised athletic excellence. Torbjorn has been a member of the Argon 18 family for three years and there he has found a community that fully understands his vision and his goals. The E-114 he rides exemplifies our shared commitment to optimal balance and the fuller integration of man and machine. Optimal balance. Always.

a

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E-112 Samantha McGlone When this name comes up, determination is what springs to mind. When Samantha starts a triathlon event, she’s there to win. Her life is framed by the need to set the bar higher at every race. This defines who she is and how she lives her life; in this challenge she finds her personal balance. For the past four years, Samantha has been a member of the Argon 18 family, a tightly-knit group that understands her needs and fully supports her in her quest. Sam’s E-112 is more than just the bike she happens to ride: it’s the embodiment of our ongoing search for optimal balance and greater unity between bike and rider. Optimal balance. Always. ARGON 18 Tel.: 514.271.2992 www.argon18bike.com


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Courtesy Mitch Thrower

STARTING LINES No.295 • November 2008

Publisher Associate Publisher VP, Sales & Marketing

John Duke Heather Gordon Sean Watkins

Editor Brad Culp, bculp@competitorgroup.com Managing Editor Somyr McLean Perry, sperry@competitorgroup.com Senior Editors Matt Fitzgerald, mfitzgerald@competitorgroup.com Jay Prasuhn, jprasuhn@competitorgroup.com Photo Editors John Segesta jsegesta@competitorgroup.com Don Karle dkarle@competitorgroup.com Brad Kaminski bkaminski@competitorgroup.com International Editor Shane Smith, ssmith@competitorgroup.com Graphic Designer Oliver Baker, obaker@competitorgroup.com Contributing Writers Roch Frey, Paul Huddle, Tim Mickleborough, Scott Tinley Contributing Photographers Delly Carr Robert Murphy Medical Advisory Board Jordan Metzl, M.D., Jeff Sankoff, M.D. VP, Production/Circulation Heather Gordon, hgordon@competitorgroup.com Customer Service Linda Marlowe

Push Past Your Training Plateau On Aug. 13 at University of California at San Diego Masters Swimming, I moved up a swim lane. Perhaps not permanently, but for today I took it up a notch. In the last decade I’ve swum in lanes two or three, for the most part, and sometimes after a long time away—lane four. Swimmers of all abilities attend Masters training sessions and the social community around Masters programs is very welcoming. Admittedly, one of the great things about moving from first position in one lane to last position in another, faster lane, is that you don’t have to track the clock so perfectly. But as I was swimming, looking left and right at the other swimmers in the lanes I had vacated, I noticed that I was swimming just a bit faster than people that used to beat me to the wall every set. I was in a faster lane, and the mere fact of being there inspired me to be more focused on my stroke, my breathing and body position. I really didn’t want to get lapped. Before I moved up a lane, my swim training had plateaued. Geologically speaking, a plateau is a high area that is relatively flat. All over the earth plateaus have been travelers’ reprise before climbing greater summits. And some along the way settled down on the plateau. The city of Bogotá, Colombia, is located on a high plateau, and the highest plateau on earth is the Tibetan Plateau—also known as the roof of the world. It covers more than 2.5 million kilometers at 5000 meters above sea level. Sometimes we plateau in our training and racing and stay there. We race the same races, train the same way at the same pace and swim in the same lane at the same pace. We run at the same speed and bike at the same cadence. It’s when you plateau that you really need to do a gut-check. Look inside yourself to decide whether you are on a flat, easy path—just pedaling or stroking through the motions—rather than building, expanding and progressing. In triathlon we have a clock, and most of you have Timex Ironman watches, so when you look at that clock, are you trying to get through the same old workout, or trying to improve? We can always get better, even if in small, progressive steps. There’s nothing wrong with finding a pattern of activity Train Smart, that you love with all your heart. But as you look around your tri-life, ask yourself if you are on a plateau in any area. If so, it could be time to chart updated goals for how and Mitch Thrower where you spend your time. mthrower@triathletemag.com 2 2 T R I AT H L E T E

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Senior Account Executive Sean Watkins, Cycling & Events swatkins@competitorgroup.com Senior Account Executive Lisa Bilotti, Nutrition, Apparel, Footwear & Auto lbilotti@competitorgroup.com Marketplace Sales Laura Agcaoili, lagcaoili@competitorgroup.com Accounting Vicky Trapp vtrapp@competitorgroup.com Triathlete Magazine Offices 10179 Huennekens Street, Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92121 Phone: (858) 768-6805; Fax: (858) 768-6806 www.triathletemag.com Attention Retailers: To carry Triathlete in your store, call Retail Vision: (800) 381-1288 SUBSCRIPTIONS: Your satisfaction is important to us. For questions regarding your subscription call (800) 441-1666 or (760) 291-1562. Or, write to: Triathlete, P.O. Box 469055, Escondido, CA 92046. Or, e-mail: subs@triathletemag.com. Back Issues available for $8 each. Send a check to Triathlete Magazine Back Issues, 10179 Huennekens Street, Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92121 and specify issues requested, or visit www.triathletemag.com. Publication Mail Agreement #40683563. Canadian mail distribution information: Express Messenger International, P.O. Box 25058, London BRC, Ontario, Canada N6C 6A8 Submission of material must carry the authors’/photographers’ guarantees that the material may be published without additional approval and that it does not infringe upon the rights of others. No responsibility is assumed for loss or damage to unsolicited manuscripts, art work or photographs. All editorial contributions should be accompanied by self-addressed, stamped envelopes. Printed in the USA.

Triathlete Magazine is a publication of the

David S. Moross, Chairman Peter Englehart, President & CEO Scott Dickey, COO & CMO John Duke, Sr. VP of Print Media


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"%)*).'/2"534 With everything on the line, Hunter Kemper came up HUGE

Hunter Kemper is not what you would call the most emotional guy on the planet. After all, he is 32 now and competed in his first Ironkids event when he was 10. For the past 12 years, he has raced professionally, been ranked number one in the world, raced on the first two U.S. Olympic Triathlon Teams in Sydney and Athens, represented his country in the Pan American Games and won events like the Life Time Fitness Triathlon where the prize purse was a cool $200,000. But when you look at the picture on this page, Kemper is not his usual poised and collected self. Nope. He is out-of-his-mind ecstatic because he knew, deep down, that he had just finished the most important race of his life. It was the bottom of the ninth, the bases were loaded, there were two outs and his team was down by three. And he jacked it out of the park. Five weeks before the final Olympic qualifier in Des Moines, Iowa, Kemper could barely train because of a hernia. A doctor in Denver recommended that he try a shot of cortisone to ease the discomfort. The day after the injection, Kemper felt like himself again. “80 percent of the pain went away right away,” he says. “I was finally able to run.” Come race day, Kemper built a lead during the 10K run over Andy Potts, his main competition for the last spot on the team. “When I hit the finish and had the American flag draped around me, I just lost it. That is a moment I will remember forever.” After taking seventh in Beijing, Kemper is going to be focusing on The Race To The Toyota Cup, a series featuring five major events around the country with a total purse of $1,440,000. It’s also a place where top amateurs and age groupers can take home a Toyota Cup of their very own after the final event of the series, The Toyota U.S. Open, on October 5. How good does it feel like to make your third Olympic team? Ask Hunter Kemper. Photo by Tim Carlson.

For series information, go to www.ltftriathlonseries.com. For information about Toyota’s Engines of Change Program & Elite Athletes Hunter Kemper, Andy Potts & Sarah Haskins go to www.toyota.com/endurance.

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Off to Kona To Check Out Some Ladies By Brad Culp

J

Just like every other overzealous, type-A, high-strung triathlete you know, I got into this sport with one goal in mind: To get to Kona. After seven years, six Ironmans, a couple of near misses and several shameful walks to the finish, I’ve finally achieved my goal. Granted, my original plan was to actually qualify for the Ironman World Championship, but covering the event for Triathlete isn’t a bad consolation prize. Honestly, the thought of spending October 11 shooting photos off the back of a motorcycle instead of battling the Big Island winds in my aerobars is quite appealing.

T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

8/26/08 11:32:18 AM

I definitely picked a good year for my first trip to Kona. While the pre-race chatter among the media and tri-geeks typically focuses on the men’s race, this year is a different. For the first time I can remember, the women’s contest is shaping up to be the marquee race. Read our women’s race preview on page 78. Many are ready to crown Chrissie Wellington as the third Queen of Kona (Paula Newby-Fraser and Natascha Badmann being the first two), but I think that’s a bit premature. Wellington is truly gifted and it’s hard to bet against her. The fact that she can win an Ironman by 20 minutes and still look fresher than I do after a massage is remarkable. But I wouldn’t be surprised if Wellington doesn’t even make it onto the podium—the women’s field is too deep. First, there’s Sam McGlone, who we profile on page 68. She seems the polar opposite of Wellington, at least when she’s racing. Wellington no doubt pushes incredibly hard, but she doesn’t show it. The Brit is all smiles even when the heat reaches triple digits. McGlone, on the other hand, competes like the former short-courser she is and has no problem racing at her redline for 140.6 miles. Then there’s the duo of Kona veterans: Natascha Badmann and Kate Major. Look for these ladies to sit back and watch the younger speedsters tear each other apart at the front. If they are healthy on race day, I expect at least one to be on the podium. Lastly, there’s a fresh onslaught of wildcards. We know these women are fast, but that is never enough to win in Kona. Yvonne van Vlerken, Sandra Wallenhorst and Erika Csomor have all finished 140.6 miles in less than 8:50 this year and they have the legs to out-run many of the top men. Will they do so in Kona? I don’t think so, but then again, I would’ve said the same thing about Wellington last year.

Robert Murphey/bluecreekphotography.com

EDITOR’S NOTE


MAIL CALL Family Matters

her fans to read her direct account of her present situation and source of strength. Most know Jamie as an incredible athlete, inspiring thousands with her lighting speed. What some may not know is that Jamie is an incredible person, who has left a wake of encouragement behind her. Jamie is truly a hero of the sport, challenging her fans to fight just as hard on the course as off the course. Please continue to provide opportunities for the triathlon family to give back some of the love and support she has given us.

old mommy and my girls are two, four and six. After my second daughter turned 1-year old, I took Total Immersion swimming lessons, borrowed a bike and completed my first triathlon. It wasn’t pretty, but I did it. I promptly conceived my second daughter and took a year off. When my third daughter was 6-months old, I volunteered to teach a spin class at our local recreation complex. I spin and swim three mornings every week while the playroom is open at the recreation complex. I run when I can. I am getting better at triathlon. In three days I am doing my first half-iron triathlon. For my spouse and I, this summer has been all about communication, compromise, doing what you can and getting on with it. It has been tough knowing that I want to do more but my family must come before my hobby. I was so happy to see that this feeling is normal and very successful athletes are making this philosophy work for them. I love this sport, I love being fit and I love my family. I am glad to know I can have it all. Thank you for printing those letters. On another note, I wanted to address the frustration some women are having with the June Swimsuit Issue and how it heightens the frustration they feel over the lack of respect women get in sports. In The Triathlete’s Training Bible, Joe Friel says that triathlon was the very first sport to have women doing the same race as men. No, we aren’t competing against men, but the distances are the same. Triathlon was the first sport to have women racing the same distance as men. Triathlon is ahead of the curve. We can’t control the attitudes and behavior of other people— we can only control our own. So to the ladies feeling frustrated about a lack of respect, I want to say this: “After I pass his ass I could not care less if he is looking at mine.” I truly enjoy your magazine. It is entertaining and informative.

Becka Creger Chico, Calif.

Karen North Platte, Neb.

Whitmore a Hero to the Sport

With eager expectation I have been waiting to see how you would address the issue of Jamie Whitmore’s cancer. I must applaud your approach of allowing

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Rich Cruse

I was so happy to see your feedback letters from families who have made triathlon work for them. I am a 38-year-


Feeling Intimidated

I’m a beginner triathlete and have been receiving your online magazine for two years. From what I understand, triathlon is one of the fastest growing sports in the country. I live in Denver where I just did my second Tri-for-the-Cure. This is a 3,000-person, women-only event, and each year half the women are newbies. That’s 1,500 new women triathletes each year in Denver—all from one race. We also host the Danskin Tri, which as I understand is also huge and full of newbies. A conservative estimate might determine that there are 4,000 new triathletes in the greater Denver area each year. In looking for an Olympic-distance tri in the Denver area, I can only find a couple offered each year. Given the fact that Denver has been ranked as one of the fittest cities in the country, we probably have a relatively high number of triathletes, and as far as I can tell, most of them do sprint triathlons. This all leads me to my question: Why is your magazine almost exclusively devoted to longer or more extreme races? Your biketraining articles talk about VO2 max—I don’t even know what that is. The photos show athletes in impeccable physical form on $4,000 bikes wearing $300 helmets. I completely understand this approach, because the people most likely to read your magazine are the people the most “into” triathlons. However, I think you are missing out on a huge demographic. What about a section devoted to new triathletes or more articles for sprinters? Some of your articles make sense to me, but the majority are way over my head. I love my new sport, but I have a life too, and doubt that I will ever devote the concentration, energy and time needed to become an elite athlete. This doesn’t mean I’m not excited or that I don’t want to learn (or that I’m not dropping tons of cash on my new sport). I get your magazine because I signed up through Active.com, which is probably how most race registrations occur. You have access to so many new athletes, but instead of getting people excited about their new sport, I think you intimidate them. Melissa Dickard Denver

Editor’s note: Thanks for taking the time to write. To keep you on the right path, we’ll send you a copy of T.J. Murphy’s Guide To Finishing Your First Triathlon.

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John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

MAIL CALL

Talking Back to Tinley

I imagine you punks sitting around with the buckets of letters that pour in, laughing and making fun of us. Clearly you all love

His bantering and sage insight has mostly entertained and has sometimes been ignored. But when the Dave Martin death took place I really looked forward to what Tinley had to say. I knew he would opine in an honest and non-media biased manner. His words were on the mark. He even divined Queequeg from the Melville classic Moby Dick, in the intro. Excellent perspective. Thanks Tinley.

the controversy of the Swimsuit Issue and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not going anywhere. So, I have some constructive feedback to make it more palatable. Next year, put a muscled-out, scantily clad couple on the front. That way you can avoid sexism and just hold true to your vision of one, sinfully delicious, body-ogling edition. Do you think us ladies only race for empowerment? No! We love the hotness too, so please include men. Show some women in action, doing something truly sporty, not Baywatchey. And put real triathletes on there, not models who have done the swim segment of a sprint relay. Real athletes. Real hotness. Same sexist

I wanted to express appreciation for the Tinley Talks section in the latest Triathlete.

Lance Manning Dallas

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MAIL CALL standards of just judging the book by its delicious cover! Dr. Elizabeth Esalen Playa del Rey, Calif.

you. Better yet, just stay home, save yourself the embarrassment of having to see anyone in spandex. Plus, that just makes one less person I have to beat on Sunday. Sean Lee Boston

Each month I wait and wait to receive my new issue of Triathlete in the mail. I usually read the entire magazine in a week and then I wait and wait until the next issue. One of the first things I read is the letters from other readers. I like to know what other triathletes think, how they feel and what insight they might have on a particular article. What has really gotten to me is the negative feedback you have received on the Swimsuit Issue. The comparison to the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue is not valid and is just ignorant. I could see readers getting upset if you used a topless model, wearing a g-string and riding in the aero position, but my issue was missing those pages. You did show functional and practical swimsuits, which could be used for training or race-day performance. Apparently that is just wrong. I was even compelled to look back at the issue before writing this and all I saw was 39 extra pages to help show off what is out there on the market. You still had the same great articles, training tips and race stories that you find in every issue. For those of you who oppose the Swimsuit Issue—relax a little. Not having a Swimsuit Issue would be like not having a bike issue, a wetsuit issue or a running issue. These are the products and the tools we use to train and compete. If you don’t like swimsuits sign up for a duathlon. But watch out, you might just see women wearing only sports bras and topless men competing right next to

REVIEW

TritonAd081308.qxp:TritonAd081308.qxp

8/14/08

Please stop publishing letters from whiny women. Every month we have to read complaints from some woman who’s ticked because Brad Culp is on too much ginseng, or some woman who’s wizzed because there’s a picture of a woman who might be considered sexy. Give me a break. I’ve been subjected to entire issues being devoted to whiny chick nonsense, with long articles dedicated to races the likes of the Peoria Mini Chick Microthlon featuring the famous group hug empowerment pink fest. I have suffered quietly, just rolling my eyes, as I’m sure every other male triathlete does when he sees this kind of sappy crap. Of course, I understand why you do it. It’s a Venus and Mars thing. Women need to feel special and loved—blah, blah, blah. Fine, we guys get that. Just stop giving more ink to those truly whiny chicks that think that you aren’t doing enough. Trust me, you are doing plenty. Any more and we’ll be seeing an Oprah or Dr. Phil column soon. Tom Donner Thibodaux, La.

Editor’s note: Tom, we assure you that you’ll never see a column from Oprah or Dr. Phil in this magazine. Aside from your letter, you’ll likely never even see a mention of them.

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Reprinted from the June issue with the permission of Triathlete Magazine

By Brad Culp (Triathlete Editor)

Triton Swim Trainer Yes, it may look like a torture device straight out of Braveheart, but we assure you that it isn’t quite as painful as having all of your joints pulled out of socket. While tools like stretch cords are great for developing swim-specific power and endurance, the Triton targets these key muscle groups and also helps you develop proper stroke form. The machine is designed to improve six key aspects of the freestyle stroke: entry, catch, high elbows, stroke range, relaxed recovery and kick, It’s the only swim bench on the market with a kicking mechanism, which also doubles as a leg curl to strengthen hamstrings and calves. 3 0 T R I AT H L E T E

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Aussie superstar Chris Legh is an avid Triton user and loves the convenience of swimming without actually driving to the pool. “I typically jump on (the Triton) three or four times a week for a quick swim workout,” Legh said. “I like the fact that it forces you to find the path of most resistance, instead of letting your stroke suffer and finding the easy way out.” About 20 minutes a day, three times a week, is all it takes to develop your swim-specific muscles and work out a few of those kinks in your stroke.

See it in action at tritonfitness.com


  

     





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INDUSTRI | NEWS ANALYSIS | TRAINING TIP | SELECTION | SECOND TAKE | 70.3 SERIES POINT-COUNTERPOINT | MEDICALLY SPEAKING | PRO BIKE | REVIEW | ENDURANCE CONSPIRACY | RACE FOR A CAUSE | LIGHT READ T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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INDUSTRI

Columbia Lagoon. Additionally, Cozumel has an international airport with multiple direct connections to the U.S. and Mexico City, plus a first-class hotel infrastructure. Visit www.ironmanmexico.com, www. ironmancozumel.com or www.active.com for registration information.

Aqua Sphere, Ironman Announce Partnership ALCiS Introduces New Size Of Pain-Relief Cream

ALCiS Health Inc. of San Jose, Calif., has introduced a new, on-the-go size of its daily relief pain cream. This new, 1.25-ounce size is ideal for a transition bag during a big race or even to carry in a waist pack during a run. The company says that through its patented technology, the cream quickly targets aches and pains, providing relief in as little as five minutes. It is also gentle to the skin with a clean fresh scent. There is no burning or cooling sensation or unpleasant odor. ALCiS Daily Relief is available in more than 13,000 retail stores nationwide, including Walgreens and Rite Aid. Visit www.alcis.com for a $2 coupon and to find a store near you.

Ironman Announces New Cozumel Race for 2009

Ironman recently announced that the inaugural Ironman Cozumel is scheduled for November 29, 2009. The event will offer 50 qualifying slots for the 2010 Ford Ironman World Championship. The professional prize purse is $50,000 to be distributed among the top five male and female finishers. The two-loop 2.4-mile swim begins at Chankanaab Park Beach. Athletes will see colorful fish and coral reefs as they go. The 112-mile bike course, also utilizing Chankanaab Park, takes athletes on roads that surround Cozumel. The 26.2-mile run encompasses Cozumel’s downtown center. With its beautiful beaches and exotic locale, Cozumel is an ideal destination where athletes and spectators can enjoy breathtaking sunsets, a variety of water sports and historical destinations such as Punta Sur Ecological Reserve and the 3 4 T R I AT H L E T E

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Aqua Sphere has partnered with Ironman to create a new line of openwater swimming wetsuits. The collaboration combines Aqua Sphere’s high technical standards and commitment to innovative design with Ironman’s experience and dedication to triathlon. It’s a partnership that will soon deliver a new line of wetsuits specially engineered to maximize an athlete’s performance. Aqua Sphere, known primarily in triathlon circles for its popular Seal and Vista swimming masks and Kaiman goggles, has sponsored Ironman championships since 2001. Additionally, it sponsored Christof Wandratsch, the former Ironman swim world record holder, and Faris Al Sultan, the 2005 Ford Ironman World Champion. The wetsuits will come in three classifications (Elite, Pro and Competitor) to cater to all levels of triathletes from beginner to world-class. The suits will be in stores by December.

PowerBar, Ironman Launch New Web Site

PowerBar of Berkeley, Calif., has partnered with Ironman to launch a unique online destination for triathletes. The site provides the latest nutrition information as well as interactive tools to help athletes train for events. As the official nutrition partner for Ironman, PowerBar supports the “fourth pillar” of Ironman— nutrition. “The program on IronmanPower.com keeps athletes on track not only with their

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training, but also with their nutritional needs while preparing for their Ironman challenge,” said Chris Ota, director of Marketing for PowerBar. “With nutrition articles, training points and plenty of motivation, IronmanPower .com is the ultimate online training partner for Ironman athletes regardless if it’s their first or their tenth.” PowerBar invites athletes to visit IronmanPower.com to use the 29-week Ironman training and nutrition guide. There is also a RouteFinder, which allows users to map training routes that match the elevation and challenge of their upcoming race courses. The site provides widgets so users can share their progress with others on socialnetworking sites such as iAmTri.com, MySpace and Facebook.

Blazeman Spin-A-Thon to Raise ALS Awareness

The Blazeman Foundation for ALS is calling upon endurance athletes all over the world to join the Blazeman Foundation and its “War on ALS.” Get a group of friends together on February 7 and spin to raise awareness and much needed funds for Lou Gehrig’s disease medical research. Participants spin as individuals or a team for a total of 16.5 hours (the finishing time of Jonathan “Blazeman” Blais in Kona), and can cover the 16.5 hours any way they want (collective spinning hours or total run time). People can participate anywhere but the foundation recommends high-traffic areas (indoors or outdoors), such as health clubs, shopping malls, sporting goods stores or parks. The Blazeman Foundation is seeking national health club and sporting store chains that can serve as hosting locations for the 2009 ALS Spin-A-Thon. Contact John Wolski at banjodoggy@comcast.net for more information. The Spin-A-Thon proceeds will help the Blazeman Foundation build awareness and advance the search for a cure for ALS. Participation is free and the foundation will help individuals and teams organize their own Spin-A-Thons for a great day of training with buddies, and ALS gets much needed awareness and funds to help promote medical research. To learn more about the Blazeman Foundation visit Waronals.com

Images courtesy the manufacturers

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NEWS ANALYSIS

Doping, Bribery Charges Levied Against Austrian ITU Pro By Jay Prasuhn

Ah, the Olympics—the last bastion of fair play in a world of overpaid, arrogant sports stars. Or maybe not. Prosecutors say the fair-play creedo may have been a rough guideline to Austrian Lisa Huetthaler. 3 6 T R I AT H L E T E

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Huetthaler was accused by defending Olympic gold medalist and countrywoman Kate Allen of deliberately crashing Allen in a race—with the intent of eliminating her from the Games. But a recent positive

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doping result and ensuing bribery charge eliminated Huetthaler from Olympic contention and further sullied her already tarnished name. The drama started in early April when Huetthaler and Allen, both competing for qualifying points and a spot on the Austrian team for the Beijing Olympics, toed the start at the ITU World Cup in New Plymouth, New Zealand. Allen, who won the gold medal at the Athens Olympics, was thrown head-first to the pavement losing three teeth, and suffering a bruised nose, torn tendons in her right thumb and sustaining 22 stitches from several deep facial lacerations. ITU video shows a bloody-faced Allen sitting on the pavement as race officials rush to her aid. Allen recovered quickly enough to finish eighth at the ITU World Championships in early June, thus securing the second and final spot on the Austrian team at the proverbial stroke of midnight. But while video reviews of the crash were deemed inconclusive, Allen was resolute on just how she ended up on the tarmac.“It wasn’t just an accident—let’s just leave it at that,” Allen said. The inference is that Huetthaler intentionally crashed into Allen in an attempt to neutralize her prime competition for a spot on the Beijing pontoon. Things got hotter for Huetthaler in May, when a drug test revealed that Huetthaler tested positive for EPO in her A-sample. Her lawyer maintained her innocence as she fought to keep her place in the running to represent Austria in the Beijing Olympics. But things went from bad to worse. In June, an article in the Austrian newspaper The Kurier reported that Huetthaler attempted to bribe a doping laboratory assistant with a $20,000 Euro payoff (about $31,000 USD) to doctor her B-sample, ensuring a negative return. The World Anti-Doping Agency confirmed the report to The Kurier as well as the Deutch Presse-Agency. The Kurier reported that a letter sent to the newspaper “confirmed the bribery attempt to us,” adding, “This appears to be a criminal act.” Austria’s triathlon governing body would not comment. “We are still in a current proceeding and we don’t have the right, according [to] the WADA and ITU Rules, to inform the public,” Triathlon Austria Secretary General Herwig Grabner told Triathlete. The legal proceedings against Huetthaler are expected to carry well beyond the Beijing Games.

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TRAINING TIP

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The Straight Dope On Salt By Matt F itzgerald

The average health-conscious American believes that salt is “bad for you” because it promotes high-blood pressure. This is a myth. The research-supported truth is that salt avoidance is beneficial only for the roughly 30 percent of already-hypertensive individuals who are “salt sensitive.” For the rest of us, salt intake does not have a significant effect on blood pressure. A recent review of 114 studies performed by researchers from the University of Copenhagen and published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that even an extreme reduction in salt intake would barely lower blood pressure to a measurable degree in those with normal blood pressure. Triathletes have a more favorable view of salt than the average person does. That’s because we know that we lose a lot of salt every day through exercise-induced sweating, and we’re used to consuming salt in sports drinks to compensate for those losses. Failure to do so, we’ve been taught, will cause internal fluid imbalances and muscle cramps. It turns out these notions are somewhat mythical, too. There is surprisingly little scientific evidence that salt consumption during exercise provides any benefit. However, the practice does no harm and is advisable whenever large volumes of sweat are lost and large volumes of fluid are 3 8 T R I AT H L E T E

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consumed during very prolonged exercise. The notion that sodium depletion during exercise causes muscle cramps is clearly false. A 2005 study found no difference in blood sodium levels between athletes who suffered muscle cramps and athletes who did not during an Ironman. The fact that some athletes are especially prone to muscle cramps while others are not also suggests that sodium depletion is not the cause. The latest theory is that exercise-induced muscle cramps represent a type of tendon fatigue that occurs during unaccustomed levels of exertion. However, there is evidence that consuming fluid and salt during prolonged exercise may at least delay cramping in those who are susceptible. In a study from the University of North Carolina, crampsusceptible athletes were able to exercise twice as long before experiencing cramps when they consumed a sports drink during activity than they when they did not drink. What about the idea that adding sodium to a sports drink improves hydration by increasing the rate at which fluid is absorbed into the bloodstream and by slowing the decline in blood volume? Most research supports neither of these claims. A study from the University of Iowa found that sports drinks with different levels of osmolality, both with and without salt, were absorbed at the same rate during exercise and none reduced blood volume decline more than another. Studies from the University of Cape Town, South Africa and the University of Auckland, New Zealand, found that sodium

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supplementation during an Ironman had no effect on blood sodium concentration or blood plasma volume. Interestingly, the studies showing the greatest beneficial impact of salt on exercise have involved sodium loading before exercise instead of sodium intake during exercise. Another group of New Zealand researchers found that when runners consumed a highly concentrated sodium beverage prior to running to exhaustion at 70 percent of VO2max in a hot environment, they maintained a higher blood volume, lower core body temperature and lower level of perceived exertion than when they consumed a low-sodium beverage before running. It’s tough to know what to make of this result, though, since no fluid was consumed during the runs. While there is little evidence that salt boosts endurance performance, there is no evidence that it has a detrimental effect on performance. What’s more, there are countless real athletes who swear that salt intake is beneficial to them in extreme endurance events. Based on these facts, I suggest that you consume salt in the normal amounts contained in sports drinks and energy gels during prolonged endurance exercise, but don’t knock yourself out to get more salt in the form of salt tablets or salty foods, except for reassurance. You don’t need to add salt to your diet either. But you might do it unconsciously anyway. A 1999 Israeli study found that exercise increased the preference for salty foods. So that’s why you crave potato chips after a long weekend endurance session.


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sELECTION

Socks Go High-Tech

2XU Compression Recovery Sock and Race Sock $49.99

By Cour tney Johnson

Australia-based 2XU has manufactured tights and socks since 2005. Their Recovery and Race Socks help reduce fatigue, improve circulation and heighten agility. Made with powerful yarn and a graduated fit, these practical socks increase circulation to help the body flush lactate and improve movement of oxygen in the blood. The black Recovery Sock is great for long periods of use, including travel and recovery. The lightweight sock offers added protection from deep vein thrombosis. The white Race Sock wicks moisture, channels air and stabilizes the muscles while minimizing damage and fatigue. 2xu.com

You don’t have to be a professional athlete or a fan of ’80s-era basketball to sport compression socks. After a hard workout, during a race or while traveling, compression socks can help any athlete fight fatigue and cramping and aid recovery. Socks come in a wide range of colors, sizes and features, and their manufacturers are leading the way in helping triathletes perform their best and recover faster.

Beaker Concepts VasoSocks $30 and up

Encinitas, Calif.-based Beaker Concepts Inc.’s VasoSocks have graced the roads of the Giro, Tour and Ironman runs since 2004. The 100 percent graduated-pressure application method compresses surface veins, arteries and muscles so circulating blood is forced through narrower channels. Arterial pressure is increased allowing more blood to return to the heart and less to pool at the feet. The VasoSock is tightest at the foot and ankles and becomes less constrictive towards the knees. Comprised of proprietary wicking materials that eliminate the need for mesh, the VasoSocks keep feet dry and legs feeling fresh. Mid-length VasoSocks are best used in training and competition while the taller versions are great for travel and recovery. Look for a no-show and a multi-sport height cuff version in both select cushion and no cushion to make their way into the 2009 line-up. Beakerconcepts.com

In collaboration with the medical industry, Zoot Sports in Vista, Calif., is the latest company to introduce a compression sock that allows athletes to train harder, go longer and recover faster. The company’s CRx “Graded Compression Technology” is based on medically prescribed levels of compression to increase blood flow and muscle stability while speeding up the blood filtering process. EC3D technology (engineered compression three-dimensional) applied at levels of 18 to 24 mmHg at the ankle cuff and a gradual reduction of compression up the calf offer a ZonedRX engineered level of support to major muscle groups. Padded foot beds, ventilation channels and added Achilles support make these socks all-around comfortable. Zootsports.com 4 0 T R I AT H L E T E

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Skins Sport Sox $39.99

From Australia-based Skins comes a unique product that allows athletes to experience compression while still wearing their lucky race-day socks. These socks lower lactate production, assist circulation and promote greater oxygen availability by using scientifically supported BioAcceleration technology to help increase circulation through the calf and lower leg. They are great during training and competition, are easy to pull on and maintain compression around the calf. By reducing chronic fatigue and increasing endurance, these socks are also known to help minimize the effects of arthritis and prevent deep vein thrombosis and varicose veins. Skins.net

Courtesy the manufacturers

Zoot Sports CompressRx Sock $60.00


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SELECTION

CEP O2 Max Running Socks $59.99

CEP Sports was one of the first companies to recognize that socks arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just for protecting the bottoms of your feet anymore. The O2 socks feature a patented pressure flow that provides a more even distribution of strain on muscles and tendons while increasing circulation. Their integrated power system with added compression thread provides muscles with much needed oxygen and energy. Padded foot soles and Achilles support give extra comfort to tired feet and irritated tendons. Ventilation channels and a 3-D fit ensure the socks fit the anatomy of any feet. A non-chemical additive thread called CellTex activates skin cells and regulates temperature for a more climatecontrolled environment. Cep-sports.com

The SLS3 all-American compression sock debuted in Hawaii in 2007. Developed, tested and manufactured in the U.S., it fefatures RC-COMP Technology designed to reduce muscle vibration leading to muscle soreness and less soft-tissue damage. The socks offer significant increase in blood flow to deliver needed oxygen to muscles to enhance performance. Improved circulation helps the body get rid of metabolic waste quicker. The SLS3 averages 24 to 26 mmHg in compression to provide firm support in minimizing swelling, fatigue and cramps. The SLS3 has also added quality support to the Achilles heel, tibia, calf and ankle muscles to help reduce common foot and ankle injuries. The special material helps keep your body temperature down when the socks get wet from sweat, weather or fluids. The 50+ SPF protection is an added bonus. Slstri.com

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Courtesy the manufacturers

SLS3 Compression Sox $57.90


sECOND TAKE

Rich Cruse

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An athlete at AVIA XTERRA Snow Valley in California braces for impact after losing control on the road. 4 4 T R I AT H L E T E

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70.3 SERIES

Daniel Oulmet

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Calgary and 70.3, Eh?

Alberta, Canada, is the newest addition to the ever-expanding 70.3 family.

By Brad Culp Give it another year and there will be more than 70.3 Ironman 70.3 events. With the recently announced addition of Ironman 70.3 Calgary, the World Triathlon Corporation (WTC) series that started with fewer than 20 events in 2005 now numbers, almost 40. The inaugural Ironman 70.3 Calgary is scheduled for August 2. Eastern Canada hosts a pair of 70.3 events in Newfoundland and Muskoka, and the new Calgary event now fills the void left in Western Canada. 4 6 T R I AT H L E T E

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Calgary is no stranger to staging major sporting events. The city hosted the 1988 Winter Olympics and is regarded as one of Canada’s sporting capitals. Need more motivation to take the trip up north? Forbes Magazine ranked Calgary the world’s cleanest city in a survey last year. Pretty impressive considering that the city’s population is more than 1 million. If you’re considering the Calgary race next August, spend some time training in the hills. Calgary sits in the foothills of the Canadian Rockies, and while you won’t be forced to summit any mountains, there are plenty of ups and downs to keep you honest. The event opens with a 1.2-mile swim in Ghost Lake and will definitely be wetsuitlegal because the water temperature is often below 65 degrees.

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After the first transition, athletes embark on a 56-mile point-to-point ride with plenty of rollers and scenic views of the surrounding mountains. T2 will take place in the heart of downtown Calgary, before racers are sent off on a relatively tame half-marathon around Glenmore Reservoir. Race-day temperatures should prove ideal for those who suffer in the heat. Calgary’s average early August high is 72 degrees and the average low is 50 degrees. Be sure to take some arm warmers. Registration for the inaugural event is in progress and will cap at 1,500 athletes. Ironman champions Lisa Bentley and Keiran Doe have already committed to race. Visit www.ironmancalgary.com for race details and registration information.


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POINT-COUNTERPOINT

At Issue: In Training, Does Quality or John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

Quantity Reign Supreme?

There’s No Substitute For Quality By Matt F itzgerald

Would you rather have 10 lame friends or one good friend? If you had to choose between driving a dozen beat-up cars and driving your dream car, which would you take? Would you rather watch 20 insufferably bad movies or a single great movie? If you’re Inside Triathlon Editorin-Chief T.J. Murphy, apparently you’d rather have 10 lame friends, drive a dozen crappy cars and watch 20 terrible movies. Mr. Murphy also seems to believe that logging infinite hours of slow, unfocused swim, bike and run training is better than following a lean, laser-straight training plan in which not a second is wasted. That’s 4 8 T R I AT H L E T E

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probably because he learned everything he knows about endurance training in the early 1980s when the likes of Scott Tinley were destroying their bodies with 35-hour training weeks. (Comic exaggeration, Scott. Please don’t hurt me.) Guess what, T.J.? It’s 2008 and the smartest triathletes of today’s generation, having learned from the mistakes of their predecessors, are emphasizing quality over quantity in their training. And by “quality” I mean swimming, cycling and running fast. Make every meter count. Get the job done and go home. Why spend two hours noodling around on the road or in the pool when you can crank up the intensity and build more fitness in half the time? Then smear on some deodorant, put your feet up and recover while your “more is better” rivals remain outside fine-tuning their overuse injuries?

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Science is squarely on my side in this debate. Study after study shows that if you can only train fast or train a lot, you’re better off training fast. I would cite one of these studies, but since this column is supposed to be entertaining, you’ll just have to take my word for it. Athletes don’t have to choose between quality and quantity. They can have some of both—but quality must come first. Only after you’ve reached the point where you are getting as much benefit as you can from training at race pace and faster should you add a little extra slow stuff. And if you’re doing as much quality work as you should, don’t expect to put in as much volume as you could if you cruised around in third gear all the time like Murphy. I say this in love, as one of T.J.’s 10 lame friends.


POINT-COUNTERPOINT

High-Mileage Over Crap Any Day B y T. J . M u r p h y

By all means listen to Triathlete Senior Editor Matt Fitzgerald and whatever argument he’s cooked up to suggest high intensity can supplant high mileage in a triathlete’s quest for greatness. Go ahead, waste your time. He’s not the only one—authors, coaches and pseudo coaches for years has been pitched by modern-era reincarnations of Clark Stanley and his snake oil liniment. Athletes buy into it, of course, because it’s the new-new thing, usually linked to “recent studies” and marketed as a breakthrough in the science of training. Old-school coach Brett Sutton, a high-mileage zealot and producer of more than 20 triathlon world champions, told me experts like Fitzgerald make it easy for him to win. “Keep it up!” he says. “I should pay you guys!” How many champions has Fitzgerald coached? Or winners of tri-forfuns? Any tri-for-fun podiums? Ask him about that. Sexed-up low-mileage training—Fitzgerald loves this stuff, especially when it comes attached to a Garmin unit. Allow me to quote Triathlete Magazine contributors Paul Huddle and Roch Frey, who opened one of their books with, “Swim a lot, bike a lot, run a lot.” No one says that high-intensity work won’t help you, but you have to do the bulk work so that you can go fast and keep going fast. Without bulk work a surge might as well be a leap off the Chrysler Building. When Sutton’s Chrissie Wellington makes a surge, Greg Welch recently told me, unlike most of her competitors, “She can hold it to the finish.” Why? Because her body is suped up with a broad base of high-mileage training. Let’s look at what scientific breakthroughs and all their surrounding hype did to American marathoning. Running a marathon, like doing triathlon, is an almost exclusively aerobic event when it comes to energy systems. In 1980, high-mileage was the way you trained. If you weren’t cranking out 140 miles a week, like Frank Shorter or Bill Rodgers, you weren’t training. Science hadn’t leapt into the fray, telling those relying on “the trial of miles” they were fools and should halve their mileage and rely on speed training. In the 1980s Olympic trials marathon, Tony Sandoval won in a trials record time of 2:10:19. The record still stands. More impressive was the fact that 56 American runners—no one using nutrition gimmicks, training gimmicks, heart-rate monitors or GPS units—posted sub 2:20 marathon times. There wasn’t even prize money. Fast-forward to the end of the millennium, after two decades of hype about scientific breakthroughs that have been paraded around by authors like Fitzgerald. How many men broke 2:20 in the 2000 Olympic trials marathon? Nine. As for triathlon, last year Paula Newby-Fraser was asked the question, “Why is it that the times in the Ironman haven’t plummeted in the last 10 to 15 years?” Newby-Fraser said that back when she started no one was telling them what not to do; that one of the problems with today’s coaching is that it likely restrains athletes from doing the raw work that you need to do to become great. She essentially said ignorance was bliss and the simplicity of “swimming a lot, biking a lot and running a lot” may not have been snazzy, but it worked then and it works now. Of course, high-mileage training beats you to hell, can be fantastically unhealthy, can drive your marriage into ruins and make it difficult to hold a job. In fact, you can do quite well using quality training, science and all the gizmos that make it fun. So as one of Fitzgerald’s lame (double meaning there) friends, you should probably listen to him and not me. 5 0 T R I AT H L E T E

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MEDICALLY SPEAKING a short list of causes: too much volume too soon, improper footwear and poor choice of running surface. For a small minority the cause is an anatomical variation.

Orthotics May Help Compensate For Anatomical Variations B y J e f f r e y S a n k o f f , M D, FA C E P A colleague of mine was recently concerned about foot pain he developed while running. The usual therapies weren’t doing much good, so he asked if custom 5 2 T R I AT H L E T E

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orthotics might be the answer. Injuries to the lower leg, including the feet, ankles, shins and knees, are common among triathletes. Most are attributed to

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In these individuals one leg may be shorter than the other, the arches of the feet may be too high or too flat or the angles formed by the bones across joints may be severe or shallow. In these instances, forces are transmitted to the joint surfaces or surrounding structures in a way that is potentially injurious. Orthotics might help provide athletes a means of compensating for anatomic irregularities. They provide support where needed, compensate for any leg-length discrepancies and even contribute to re-aligning joints. However, athletes without anatomic variationsdon’t typically benefit from orthotics—either in preventing injury or improving performance. Nonetheless, orthotics are big business and many triathletes may find themselves convinced to invest in a pair. It’s important for athletes to know that the money spent on custom orthotics when they are not anatomically needed doesn’t translate to lower injury rates. On the other hand, spending money on a run gait analysis and proper footwear matched to your individual running style can help lower injury rates and will likely cost significantly less than orthotics. After a period of recovery, my colleague had his gait analyzed and found that he was actually over-supinating when running. He picked up a pair of shoes designed to counter the supination and is running without pain. Train hard, train healthy.

John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

Spending money on a run gait analysis and proper footware … can help lower injury rates.


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PRO BIKE I

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H

B A

F

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Jay Prasuhn

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By Jay Prasuhn

As an engineer and a professional triathlete, Jordan Rapp brings an inquisitive nature to his selection of bike gear. For proof of this point look no further than Rapp’s Felt DA, which is a study in science for speed. From his position (an effective 79.5-degree seat angle) to the use of a custominstalled bottle cage between his aerobar extensions and latex tubes, the Scarsborough, N.Y., resident (who also spends time training in Canada) has done homework. He even made a point to let me know he uses a BPA-free Camelbak Podium water bottle. Results are what matters, of course, and Rapp’s obsession has yielded some of those. Rapp was 5 4 T R I AT H L E T E

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one of the final sprint battlers at Ironman Arizona this spring—finishing third, just a few seconds off first. Easily one of the most tech-savvy triathletes in the sport, Rapp may score an Ironman win sooner than later, thanks to his hair-splitting attention to his ride. A B

Frame: Felt DA, 56 cm Cockpit: Zipp VukaAero with Zipp

VukaShift SRAM-integrated extensions Groupset: SRAM Red D Drivetrain: Zipp VumaQuad, 175mm, 53/39 with Zipp ceramic BB; SRAM Red 11-23 cassette E Wheelset: Zipp 900 clincher disc with PowerTap, Zipp 1080 clincher front F Tires: Michelin ProRace3 with Michelin AirComp latex tubes G Pedals: Speedplay Zero Stainless Black H Hydration: Trek Batcage, custom modified I Saddle: Fi’zi:k Arione Tri2 Carbon with Ti rails J Computer: PowerTap 2.4 K Rear Brake: Oval Concepts A900 C

Jay Prasuhn

Jordan Rapp’s Felt DA


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REVIEW (especially against a headwind) than a conventional bottle, as demonstrated at the San Diego Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Invisciddesign.com

By Brad Culp

Inviscid Design Speedfill $100

If the Bontrager Speed Bottle and Profile Design Aero Drink had offspring, this is what it would look like. The new Speedfill is designed to combine the aerodynamics of a narrow downtube-mounted bottle with the convenience of a hands-free refillable hydration system. The bottle mounts securely on any downtube and the straw runs up between your aerobars. The straw is covered with a wire-guided “sleeve,” which means it will stay in place. The bottle holds 40 ounces of fluid, so with a few refills, you can make it through any distance—even Ironman— without a spare bottle. The refillable cap is made with two splash guards and can be filled even while you’re in the aerobars. OK, so there’s a lot going on with this bottle, but does it really all work? Hell, yes. I gave it a go at Ironman Vineman 70.3 and avoided all but one congested aid station. I also 5 6 T R I AT H L E T E

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enjoyed the bite valve at the end of the straw, which made sure I was only slurping water—not GI stress-inducing gulps of air. The only splash back I experienced was while bombing over some elevated railroad tracks at high speeds. I’d recommend it for everyone except for those who ride really, really tiny bikes— like 47 cm tiny. The bottle occupies quite a bit of a bike’s front triangle, and on a pintsized frame this could cause some handling issues in crosswinds. That said, the Speedfill is more aerodynamic

T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

Before I could try out the Speedfill at Vineman, I had to get two people, two bikes and a ton of gear from San Diego to Santa Rosa, Calif., (550 miles). I decided to help the environment (and my wallet) by rolling up to NorCal in the 27 mpg Toyota Highlander Hybrid. While it doesn’t get quite the mileage as a tinier hybrid (like the Prius) does, 27 mpg isn’t bad for a full-size SUV with a thirdrow seat. I made it through the first eight coffee stops before filling up the gas tank. The Highlander Hybrid operates on a 270-horsepower V6 engine coupled with a 123 kilowatt electric battery. The engine relies almost entirely on gasoline while accelerating, which is particularly beneficial when you’re merging onto the seemingly speed-limitless I-5 freeway. Once you level off the battery kicks in and provides a smooth, quiet ride. If you’re looking for a little more bling in your hybrid, the limited model offers plenty of bells and whistles. For a little more coin, Toyota will pimp your ride with navigation, rear entertainment and even Bluetooth compatibility through the sound system. Toyota.com

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Pete said he wanted to do the Wiggins ride. Heck, I lived in Boulder and I had not heard of Wiggins. I went and looked up where we were going. I shouldn’t have been surprised, but I was still a little intimidated. Wiggins was around 78 miles from our starting point, and it was a one-road ride—out and back on Highway 52. You really couldn’t find a more boring ride if you tried. We left early and planned to ease into the ride, hoping to make the second half a little faster than the first. We talked some but soon we traded off leading and stayed a good distance apart so we both worked hard without the benefit of drafting. The funny thing about out-and-back rides is that during the out part I often have the feeling that I should turn around early. Not because I’m too tired, but because it just seems so far out there, even a little silly. The further we got along the road, the more I wondered whether this town of Wiggins truly existed. We finally rolled over a little hill and saw a small gas station. We figured we would ask someone inside how much farther to our turning point. Apparently, Wiggins is not the most exciting town. The gas station was about it. I did have a greasy, but fulfilling, piece of pizza and was ready for the return trip.

Team of Rivals By Tim DeBoom

Can you imagine Chris McCormack and Normann Stadler training together and hanging out before they race in Kona? How about Lance Armstrong and Jan Ullrich back in the day? The big boys of triathlon—Mark Allen, Greg Welch, Mike Pigg and many others—used to train together all season and especially leading up to Kona. But I can’t think of many recent examples of athletes who train with their key rivals. Granted, when Peter Reid and I became friends and started training together, I wasn’t at his level, but I knew I could train with anybody. For the most part I liked to train by myself, or with my brother, Tony. Pete did the majority of his training alone until Wildflower in 1998. I finished third and Pete second that race. He ran me down on the steep hills of the course. Cam Widoff placed first. After the race, Pete and I had a chance to chat, and I realized he was a cool guy. He was pretty mellow, beyond talented and he loved 5 8 T R I AT H L E T E

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to train hard. We talked about training in Boulder over the summer. Maybe he was just looking for someone to show him around town, someone he could punish on the bike. I don’t think either of us knew that our conversation was a catalyst for our multiple Ironman wins.

Finding Compatibility Pete came to Boulder about 10 weeks before Ironman. During our first ride, there was a little apprehension on both sides. I don’t think either of us knew if it was going to be one of those rides where one person is constantly half-wheeling the other and you can’t find a compatible pace. We were pleasantly surprised to find a smooth synchronized rhythm, and we were instantly riding like old training partners. The next several weeks flew by and training was nothing short of spectacular. I showed him all the best rides through the mountains and we did some great runs up on the Switzerland Trail. I learned so much from Pete, and I think my altitude advantage helped push him to new levels in training as well. The most memorable day was when

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Pushing Each Other On the way back we stopped one more time then rolled back into Boulder for a total distance of just under 160 miles. I was surprised that I completed the ride and held my own, even pushing us along sometimes. It was a breakthrough ride for both of us. Pete left Boulder when the weather started to turn, and we didn’t get the chance to do a second ride to Wiggins. We stayed in touch during the weeks before the race in Kona, and once on the Island, we connected again for a couple rides and swims. In the 1998 Ironman, Pete had the race of a lifetime and won his first world title in grand fashion. We had become good friends and I found myself rooting for him even during the race, as he did for me. Afterwards, even though I was disappointed with my tenth place, I could not have been happier for Pete. He deserved to win and I felt a little pride helping him get there. I learned a great deal from training with him that summer and found strength in the knowledge that Wiggins would one day help me win a world title, too.

John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

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Race for a cause

The Active Network Raises $58K for San Diego School By Tina Wilmott

When Carrie James approached the finish line of her first triathlon she was not only cheered on by friends and spectators, but also by dozens of coworkers in matching triathlon uniforms yelling her name and shouting words of encouragement. “I must admit, there were a few tears of joy at the end,” James said. “What was most rewarding is that I felt like I had been crossing finish lines for the three months leading up to the race. I ran my first 10k, completed my first brick workout, raised funds for a cause and much more—all with my work colleagues there to support me.” The XTERRA Wetsuits Solana Beach Triathlon, held on July 27 in Solana Beach, Calif., sold out early this year, and it is no surprise considering San Diego-based The Active Network (whose parent company is Active.com) had nearly 90 employees registered. That represents about 20 percent

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SPECIAL EDITION


CHECKING IN

Race for a cause available and organized team workouts were scheduled. The company’s creative director, Arch Fuston, took on the role of head coach. Fuston is an Ironman athlete who already runs weekly “boot camp” workouts at Active’s office. Other employees stepped up to offer swim clinics, and Mike Reilly, the voice of Ironman and an Active employee, provided a motivational talk prior to race day. Additionally, local professional triathletes Katya Meyers and Jessi Stensland gave training advice and race day tips. By working with outside partners such as local bicycle and triathlon shop B&L Bike and Sports, Active was able to offer employees discounts on bike purchases, free bike fittings and repair tips. Additionally, those who hit certain fundraising goals received free registration, team uniforms and a group dinner with Active’s CEO Dave Alberga. “This was not only Active’s most successful fundraiser to date, it was also our most successful corporate-sponsored event since Active was founded ten years ago,” said Alberga. “The team training aspect brought our employees closer. And I believe the thrill of accomplishing a personal goal such as a triathlon will also result in our team setting bigger and better goals for themselves professionally.” The race was so successful that employees are now asking, “What’s next?” Let’s just say the Mission Bay Sprint Triathlon, also in San Diego, should expect to see a spike in registration.

of its corporate office. Of those 90 athletes, all but a handful were competing in their first triathlon. The motivation was a local charity, The Monarch School, which is a San Diego school dedicated to providing homeless and at-risk children with an accredited education while caring for their basic needs. When all was said and done, more than $58,000 were raised. “It would not have been possible to get such a large number of first-time triathletes to take up this challenge without tremendous support from the company and outside partners,” said Allison Reutter, corporate events manager for The Active Network. To help employees prepare for the event, online training programs were made 6 2 T R I AT H L E T E

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WTIIHJEREXMGWVINSMGI XLIMWLIVI MWLIVI 8LI MWXLIJEWXIWXRSRHMWG[LIIPMRXLIYRMZIVWI4IVMSH 8LIMWEWJEWXEWEXVEHMXMSREPHMWGMRQER][MRHGSRHMXMSRWXSS (IWMKRIHMRXLI[MRHXYRRIPEWEVIWYPXSJXLIPEVKIWX[LIIPXIWXMR LMWXSV]XLMWFEHFS]FSEWXWQQSJTEXIRXIHXSVSMHEPVMQERH %&0' HMQTPI XIGLRSPSK] -R SXLIV [SVHW MJ ]SY«VI XLI X]TI SJ VMHIV[LSPSSOWJSV[EVHXSTYRMWLMRKSXLIVWMRXLIFMOIPIKSV XMQIXVMEPWXLMWMW]SYV[IETSRSJGLSMGI*SVWSQIXLMRKWS VSYRHMXWYVIHSIWLEZIEPSXSJIHKI ; , ) ) 0 7  & % 6 7  7 8 ) 1 7  ' 6 % 2 / 7

^MTTGSQ 


CHECKING IN

Light Read

Have You Lost Your Damn Mind? In my pre-triathlon years, I was fortunate enough to spend a night with Hunter S. Thompson, enjoying his favorite indoor sports. As we were hanging out in Aspen watching “South Park” (the movie) and eating Domino’s pizza, I shared my writer’s angst with the good doctor (because that’s what you’re supposed to do). He asked me, “Have you ever interviewed yourself? You have no problem asking people tough questions, but how about yourself? Ask yourself this one question to start, ‘Have you lost your damn mind?’ See what you discover.” In honor of the good doc, I recently did just that.

Me: Have you lost your damn mind? Myself: Honestly?

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Courtesy Dave Wallach

B y D a v e Wa l l a c h


CHECKING IN Me: If we’re going to get through this you have to take it seriously and also stop hogging the tequila. Myself: At one time or another I think most of us have, but getting it back is what counts. Lime? Me: No thanks. Let’s stick with triathlon. What in the hell did you do? Myself: More specific please. Me: Why did you get involved in this sport? Myself: I won a bet, is the short story. My mother had passed away from cancer and then two weeks later my wife left me, took the kid, the car, the dog, and I lost my job. I became a country song. Me: Harsh! Have another swig. Myself: I lost my damn mind. I was alone, flat broke, 50 pounds heavier than I am now and mostly drunk. I wanted to be a better man for my daughter, my

Light Read

remaining family, myself. A friend of mine lost a drinking game and I got to pick the punishment. I said, “Tomorrow we start to train for a triathlon!”

Myself: The idea started during Memphis in May. The race director was yelling for everyone to wear lots of sunscreen. I was in line to start the swim and looked at the guy next to me and said, “I don’t have sunscreen on, but I am wearing a condom!” He looked at me like I’d lost my damn mind. It clicked: People get so crazy about this sport they forget it can be fun, even funny. It’s too easy to get caught up in the tragic “Why me?” scenario in life. Why did my mom die? Why did my wife leave? It can cripple you, but I never let it. The world is filled with people saying, “You can’t.” But you can. The night I became an Ironman I put my daughter to bed and told her the same thing I do every night, which is what I believe to the deepest part of my soul. “Daddy did it. If you believe in yourself, you can do anything. Anything.”

Me: Hmm. Not the most righteous path, but I get it. Myself: Don’t “hmm” me, pal. Triathlon saved my life. I lost weight, got in shape, sobered up (mostly) and started to train for the Ironman. My new mantra was “Peace, love and happiness. If you believe it, you can make it happen.” Me: What is it about this sport you like the most? Myself: The people. I enjoy hanging out at races, talking to people and training more than I do racing. My wife laughs at me, because when I travel I hang out at tri-shops instead of bars. Me: So you finished the Ironman and started to write?

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AVA I L A B L E E XC LU S I V E LY AT w w w.t riat hlont rainingseries.com

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M

M

Y

Y


into the fire Sam McGlone is known for her fiery persona and for throwing herself full-throttle into races. She and her coach, Cliff English, talk about training, her trademark pain tolerance and how theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve developed one of the most formidable partnerships in triathlon.

Tim Mantoani

I n t e r v i e w b y T. J . M u r p h y

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John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

into the fire

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t the Edmonton World Cup in July 2004, Sam McGlone displayed the inner mettle she had been slowly forging in her long-shot attempt to make the Olympics. The final spot on the Canadian women’s team was at stake, one that Sharon Donnelly, Natasha Filliol, Lauren Groves and McGlone were vying for. Thunderstorms and hail complicated the day further, but with one lap remaining in the 10k run, McGlone passed Donnelly in dramatic fashion, driving on to claim the spot and a ticket to the Athens Olympics. The following year, McGlone won Wildflower and Ironman California 70.3, and predictably the tri-world began to speculate on how she would fare in Hawaii. After winning the 2006 Ironman 70.3 World Championship in Clearwater, Fla., she accepted the slot she earned for the 2007 Ironman World Championship in Hawaii. In the race that was her first Ironman, she was second in Kona to another phenomenal (and cloaked) rookie, Great Britain’s Chrissie Wellington. This year, the women’s race is expected to be a classic, as McGlone and Wellington return with a field lit up by bright new stars. McGlone has been coached since 1999 by her fiancé, Cliff English. The wedding is set for November, with a guest list that looks more like the start list of a world championship. Triathlete talked to the couple as they launched into their final training phase for the 2008 Hawaii Ironman. 7 0 T R I AT H L E T E

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Q

This past year has seen an emergence of a new generation of fast women in the Ironman. What’s going on?

Cliff English: I think what we’re seeing is the talent pool migrating from ITU racing. Obviously, Chrissie Wellington hasn’t come over from the World Cup circuit; rather, she’s a one-in-a-million born with an ideal engine for the Ironman. But women like Sam and Mirinda Carfrae and Erika Csomor— there’s a lot of talent depth moving in from the other disciplines of multisport. To North Americans it seems like they’re coming out of nowhere, because here the World Cup scene exists on the fringe, but many of these are athletes that have been in the sport for some time. Not just the women, but in the men’s racing too. Michellie Jones did this, of course. For years it was ITU racing, Escape from Alcatraz and even XTERRA. Then she takes on the Ironman and wins in her second attempt.

Q

Sam, did you suspect you’d be good at Ironman?

Sam McGlone: I always figured my strength would be in the longer distances. When I started my goal was to make it to the Olympics. It was all that was on my mind. But I


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into the fire knew eventually I’d go longer and have a better chance for success. Draft-legal racing didn’t play to my strengths, and speed has always been a weakness. But I figured I would put in my time on the ITU circuit and then treat myself to the longer distances later. It was a good education for me. In World Cup racing you need transitions that are sharp and you have to swim flat-out. It helped me develop speed and mental toughness. If I hadn’t gone that route I wouldn’t be where I am today.

Q

Watching a World Cup race, you can see from the panic how critical transitions are. How is that different in Ironman?

Sam: You can win or lose a race by a second [in a World Cup]. Miss the pack after T1 and you’re out of it. Not being the strongest swimmer, I had to have one of the fastest transitions. I’ve settled down in long course, but I like to think I keep a sense of urgency in transition.

Q

There seems to be a number of couples in the tri world that double as coach-athlete relationships. How would you describe your relationship?

Cliff: Some athletes change coaches every three or four years, and that can be a good stimulus. Sam and I change locations. It keeps things fresh. We have tried a lot of new things. One nice thing about my coaching teams in the past is that Sam has been able to work with a variety of training partners. Before she made the Olympic team in Canada she trained with a group including Rena Hill, Annabel Luxford and Leanda Cave. They just beat up on each other every day. Sam recalls that as being some of the hardest training she’s ever done.

Q

You’ve recently moved from Colorado Springs, Colo., to Tucson, Ariz. Sam, you’ve said that you have a love-hate relationship with the mountains because of the altitude: You love the scenery but the altitude wrecked you. Sam: Every day. I struggle at altitude. We always assume it’s an enhancement, but I just got more and more tired and worn down during training. It’s almost a reverse effect. I’d come down to sea level in Canada for the summer and I would be able to work hard again. It’s something I have really struggled with the last couple years. It’s good to be

“She’s the toughest person I’ve ever seen. You don’t want to go toe-to-toe with her or you’ll end up in a body bag.” Sam: Growing up I was always really stubborn and I thought I knew everything and wanted to do my own thing. I’ve got better with that. With Cliff, I saw the success he was having with other athletes so I learned to relax, and even though I don’t always understand why I’m doing everything, it’s always worked out. I think he knows me better than I know myself. I have such complete trust in Cliff. I’ve seen what he’s done for me and other triathletes. He’s got a feel for it. It’s hard to describe. He knows athletes. He knows there’s an art to it. He doesn’t just slam an athlete with a ton of training and see how they come out on the other side. Cliff has a good handle on the craft.

back at sea level. At any race I dropped down to directly from altitude I just wanted to pull over to the side of the street and fall asleep.

Q

Q

How did you pick up this craft?

Cliff: It’s something you develop over time. You have to be humble. You learn about yourself and you learn from the people you work with. Everyone is different. Sam has been my guinea pig for nine years. While there’s lots of science out there to tap, I think the most important thing is how a coach communicates, both in what you say and how you say it. What I say to one person is different than what I say to another person. It’s taken me 15 years to learn about what makes an individual tick. There are so many things going on, sometimes it takes a while to figure out a new athlete.

Q

Why do you two experiment with different training locations such as Colorado, Arizona and Canada?

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Q

Do you two train together?

Cliff: In the beginning we did. I was training and racing at that time before I turned full-time to coaching. But she’s a world champion so I can’t really train with her. However, lately I’ve been getting fitter so I’m starting to do some trash talking. Sam, when you race you look like you’re in agony. Is it as bad as it looks?

Sam: (laughing) It’s always how I’ve raced. There are pictures of me when I was racing cross-country as a little kid and I looked the same way. Sometimes I don’t feel too bad during the race but the next day I’ll feel terrible. Cliff: All personal biases aside, Sam is the person with the highest pain threshold I’ve ever known. I had this discussion with Peter Reid about how much she suffers. In 2005 we had eight athletes in a training camp in Arizona for about three months. Group rides and runs we’d do all together, but Sam would want to go and do some extra work after. One of the athletes wanted to go with her. [Canadian pro] Kelly Guest was there and told him, “Hey, you don’t


  


into the fire want to do that. She’s the toughest person I’ve ever seen. You don’t want to go toe-to-toe with her or you’ll end up in a body bag.” In terms of getting everything out of themselves on race day, Sam is one of the best I’ve ever seen. There are athletes who can dig fairly deep when they’re going well—they can hurt themselves. But I think the thing about being a real champion is being able to go to that place on good days and bad days. It really is about the effort. Your body doesn’t know whether you’re winning or not; it just knows the pain.

There was one World Cup race in 2000 where I told Sam, “I don’t care if you’re 20th or 30th; just race like you’re winning it. Every time you go out like this at a World Cup you’re going to get a little better and get more out of yourself.” Sam took offense: “What? You don’t think I’m tough?” She just kept going at it. Starting in 2003 she was flying to World Cups around the world. She started coming back with skinned knees. She’d say, “Hey, I went from 11th to seventh by diving across the line head first!” It was interesting how it started clicking for her. She could always find another way to hurt herself and move up in the standings and make more prize money. She has explored pretty much every way to hurt herself.

Q

When you decided to make the jump to the Ironman did you seek advice from others?

Cliff: We’ll use resources. But we’re similar in that we’re headstrong. I wouldn’t be the coach I am today if I didn’t try my way of doing things. So we sought advice, but we had a good idea of what we wanted to do. We wanted to prepare in a way that played to her strengths. Last year we had rookie overconfidence. But we did our homework. We looked at the swim and made sure she’d do what was needed to be in the right place. We knew she would have to go out hard on the bike for the first 20 to 30 miles. She had to be ready for the heat and to run a three-hour marathon. We also looked at the competitors and how we were going to compete with them. 7 4 T R I AT H L E T E

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Jay Prasuhn

Sam: Cliff knows the Ironman. He’s trained others to do it and he’s raced the distance himself, which was great because he made all the mistakes so I didn’t have to. So we had a bit of experience coming in. Also, Peter Reid has been a great friend and has been great in helping us make the transition. And I’ve asked everyone who has raced Ironman, “What do you know about this?”


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into the fire

Q

Brett Sutton says that Sam reminds him of Loretta Harrop—an athlete with modest talent but a lot of heart. Sutton says that Harrop was so tough and had such a high pain threshold that if she mentioned she had the slightest irritation in her knee, he was ready to call an ambulance. Are you good at picking up signs in Sam that she might be nearing the edge?

Robert Murphy/bluecreekphotography.com

Cliff: It’s taken many years, but I have a good feel on

how Sam is recovering. It’s interesting. Sam is all business during training but when she’s done she’s done. She’d rather go hang out at a coffee shop. Our communication style is very quick. I can go on and on in analyzing things, but she just wants to know if it went OK and then she’s moving on. Sutto (Sutton) is definitely right about Sam. It’s an interesting and flattering comparison. Sam definitely grins and bears it and sucks it up and gets on with it. I’m more of the whiner in the family.

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Speed the Primary Factor In Capturing the Women’s Title By Timothy Moore A new era has dawned this season and there’s more than a fair chance that a course record will be required to claim first prize in the women’s race.. That’s what makes the women the ones to watch this year. Ever-smiling Chrissie Wellington from Great Britain remains undefeated as an Ironman after four races the past two seasons. She’s shown an ability to focus on her training despite the obligations that come with being the reigning world champ. But there’s no shortage of would-be champions with Canada’s Sam McGlone and Kate Major of Australia at the top of the list. The fastest challenger comes in the form of the flying blond Dutchwoman, Yvonne van Vlerken, who will make her Hawaii debut. Other speedsters include Hungary’s Erika Csomor, Sandra Wallenhorst of Germany and five other recent sub-nine-hour finishers. There’s also former Ironman world champ Michellie Jones who can never be counted out.. Here’s a look at Triathlete’s picks, the players and the potential outcome.

John Segesta/johnsgesta.com

The Favorite Chrissie Wellington (GBR) Her anonymity was a blessing a year ago as she bolted ahead late on the bike and held the lead the rest of the way. She’s already acknowledged there’s a target on her back and it will be more of a challenge to break away from the rest of the field. Her every move will be closely marked. Even so, she is clearly the front runner. ‘’Chrissie will be tough,’’ says LifeSport master coach Lance Watson. ‘’She has been strong all year. We’ll see how she handles the pressure. There will be lots of demands on her pre race. This will all be new to her. Athletes become champions and then they have to learn how to handle being a champion. That said, she has stood up well this year and put in some remarkable performances that place her as race favorite.’’ Wellington has shown she’s a fierce competitor and she’s not about to relinquish her title without a fight. She won Ironman events at Port Macquarie, Australia in April and Frankfurt, Germany in July. She was second overall— man or woman—at the Alpe d’Huez Long Course Triathlon in France this August and cruised to first place at Timberman 70.3 in New Hampshire later that month. She has a well of positive energy that her coach, Brett Sutton, seems determined to help keep filled to the brim. Wellington has spent a good part of the year training in the heat and humidity of the Philippines with Team TBB. “Chrissie definitely has the upper hand even with a target on her back,’’ said former Ironman world champ Tim DeBoom. ‘’She has won in Kona, has confidence, a good coach and is extremely talented. If she doesn’t over-race and come in tired, she’ll be hard to beat.’’

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The Contenders

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Sam McGlone (CAN) While the 70.3 specialist hasn’t had as dominating a season as in 2007, the 29-year-old retains one obvious advantage: Hawaii is the sole Ironman race on her schedule for a second consecutive year. Sometimes coming in fresh is the key to having a good race on the Big Island. That said, McGlone hasn’t been sitting still. She has several key wins this season including Wildflower and 70.3 events in Hawaii and Kansas. While she’s stayed busy, racing to win in October is her main focus. McGlone tops the list of contenders because she proved with her second-place finish in Hawaii last year that she can run with speed in the heat. ‘’Sam is, in my mind, the toughest athlete in the field,’’ Watson said. ‘’Sometimes after a successful debut, it is easy to fall into the trap of goal setting to blow away the last performance and the result is blowing up rather than blowing away. I will be interested to see how she goes.’’ McGlone, as a result of her 3:00:51 run-split a year ago, holds the third fastest run time in Hawaii. The fastest run-split is held by fellow Canadian Lori Bowden who clocked 2:59:16 when she won Hawaii for the first time in 1999. The second fastest run-split in Hawaiiis held by Wellington with her 2:59:57 effort last year.

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John Segesta/johnsgesta.com

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Kate Major (AUS) Not surprisingly, last year’s third-place finisher is expected to challenge for the title again. She too has shown an ability to run fast in Hawaii, posting a 3:02:19 split in 2005 and a 3:06:35 a year ago. Major Kate, as she calls herself, has three third-place finishes in Hawaii in the last four years, making her one of the most consistent athletes in the field. She’s had a solid season with a runner-up finish at Ironman Australia in March—where she kept Wellington very honest—and a win at the 70.3 race in Boise. She was also fourth among a very strong field at Vineman 70.3. For this former pro squash player, Hawaii is the race that drives everything she does season after season.

The Dark Horses

Erika Csomor (HUN) A training partner of Wellington, Csomor ran a 2:55:54 marathon in Roth this year and ranks as the second-fastest ever iron-woman on the planet. Like van Vlerken, Csomor is a former duathlon world champion, winning in 2001 and 2004. She also won ITU Long Course Worlds in 2007. This season the 34-year-old won Ironman Arizona, California 70.3 and was second in Roth. She’s been gaining confidence in her ability to compete with the elite of the elite and Hawaii offers an opportunity to confirm her recent accomplishments are no fluke. 8 2 T R I AT H L E T E

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John Segesta/johnsgesta.com

Yvonne van Vlerken (NED) This Dutch athlete, still relatively unknown outside of Europe, is set to make her mark in Hawaii. She has won the Quelle Challenge iron-distance race in Roth, Germany, the last two years, setting a new 140.6-mile world record of 8:45:48 in July. The great Paula Newby-Fraser held the previous record of 8:50:53, which she set in Roth in 1994. Van Vlerken secured her Hawaii spot at Ironman Malaysia in February and is looking for the win in Hawaii after changing coaches and revamping her training schedule and her diet during the past year. This 2006 duathlon world champion ran a 2:54:22 in Roth, which means Wellington, McGlone and Major will have to worry about her coming from behind on the marathon.


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There are four other athletes who have finished irondistance races in less than nine hours during the past two seasons who will be on the starting line in Hawaii, each one of them has the ability to influence how the race will unfold and perhaps even pull off an upset. Bella Comerford (GBR) Comerford, a Team TBB member, has been a race demon this season with six Ironman finishes as of mid-August: Florida, Western Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Lanzarote and Austria, plus UK 70.3. She won in South Africa and Lanzarote and was second in Austria.

Gina Ferguson (NZL) Ferguson, a math teacher turned violinist turned pro triathlete, may be a rookie in the sport but she’s wasting little time getting up to speed. In the last 12 months she won Ironman Wisconsin, came in second at Ironman Western Australia, won the Quelle Challenge iron-distance race in Wanaka, New Zealand, and was third at Quelle Challenge Roth.

Joanna Lawn (NZL) Lawn won her sixth consecutive Ironman New Zealand in March and set a course record in the process. A superb cyclist, she’s been making great strides with her run. She was fourth in Kona last year—one of her three topfive finishes on the Big Island.

John Segesta/johnsgesta.com

2 0 0 8 Hawaii Ironman Preview

Best of the Rest

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John Segesta/johnsgesta.com

2 0 0 8 Hawaii Ironman Preview

Belinda Granger (AUS) Granger is having a spectacular season to say the least. She has raced and won Ironmans in China and Malaysia, and finished fourth in Roth with a personal best time of 8:58:08. She also won Antwerp 70.3 in August. She’s a consistent top-10 finisher in Hawaii and is slowly and steadily becoming a better runner. Her strength is undoubtedly the bike.

The depth of this year’s field means race commentators and spectators may be scratching their heads for details on who is leading at any given time. DeBoom expects a fast race: “The women will definitely watch each other and play to their strengths. They will know how much time they can give up or need to get to be in the hunt off the bike.’’

Charlotte Paul (AUS) Paul took her cycling to a new level during 2007 and it helped her smash the course record at Ironman Western Australia in December. She is poised to break into the top-10 at Hawaii after several months of training in the Canadian Rockies.

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Desiree Ficker (USA) Ficker won South Africa 70.3 in January before shifting gears and attempting to earn a spot on the U.S. Olympic marathon team. While she ran 2:48 at the Olympic marathon trials, she failed to get a spot. She rebounded with a second place at Boise 70.3 and she will be looking to recoup from a lackluster performance in Hawaii last season. The American was second, behind Jones, at the 2006 Ford Ironman World Championship.


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By Jay Prasuhn The men’s race in Hawaii never fails to disappoint. The tactics, conditions and potential verbal interactions make it anyone’s game. Will the winds give the bikers an edge, and how much of a leash will the uber-bikers get? Brash Australian Chris McCormack comes in brimming with even more confidence (if that’s even possible) with the title of defending world champ and no doubt feeling sure he will win again on his terms. Others will come to the Big Island with their own tactics to grab the win on October 11. There’s the science of Denmark’s Torbjorn Sindballe; the power of Germany’s Normann Stadler; the near-perfect balance of Aussie Craig Alexander; and the unbreakable endurance of Kiwi Cam Brown. And don’t forget about a dozen wildcard athletes who don’t give a damn about anyone else’s tactics. Here’s a look at Triathlete’s picks, the players and the potential outcome.

The Favorite Chris McCormack (AUS) A master at mental manipulation, he makes his competitors doubt their own abilities. Now he has all the cards, and he can say he knows how to win in Hawaii. His preparation has been textbook, which is something few of his competitors can boast. He won at Wildflower and followed up with a victory at Ironman Germany. After his win in Frankfurt, he headed to Boulder, Colo., to squeeze in some altitude training and now he’s ready to come back down to sea level. All things equal, there’s not much that can get in the way of a guy who not only has the smarts, but also has the utmost faith in his ability. Save for a successful bike breakaway, he should have a race similar to last year and will look to force the pace on the run. A 2:40-something marathon is what’s needed to win and “Macca” is one of the few who can pull it off.

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John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

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Men’s Race Promises Fierce Competition Among Top Athletes


John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

The Contenders Craig Alexander (AUS) Alexander was screwed by NBC last year, to say the least. “Crowie” was the only man to put McCormack under serious duress in the process of claiming the runner-up spot in 2007—in his Kona debut—but somehow almost all the cameras missed him. Not that he cares. He has been his usual self this year, sewing up 70.3 race podiums, highlighted by wins at St. Croix and Newfoundland. One of Alexander’s big advantages is that he is one of the few who has the speed to respond to Macca’s torrid pace during the early miles of the marathon. While Macca called out Brown and Spaniard Eneko Llanos as his key threats, don’t think that Crowie isn’t on that shortlist. The two Aussies have been training in Boulder in advance of the race—but not together. With a year of race experience under his belt, expect Alexander to play a potentially more offensive role than the watch-and-learn approach of last year. Earlier this year, Dave Scott told Triathlete that Crowie is the only athlete in the field who can break 2:40 on the run. If Scott is right, Alexander will be almost impossible to beat.

Normann Stadler (GER) No triathlete better exemplifies the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat better than Stadler. He won in 2004 and then tossed his bike in the lava fields the following year after suffering a pair of flat tires. He won again in 2006 and followed up with a DNF to an upset stomach last year. By this logic, the German bike powerhouse should expect a third world title, right? Stadler is one of the race’s biggest question marks. His tactics are no surprise to anyone: drill the bike and hold off the field for the run. With a field of other strong bikers (namely Sindballe and Americans Chris Lieto and Steve Larsen), he will have a potential group that can feed off one another. Once off the bike, Stadler is the class runner among the potential breakaway athletes. The question remains: Will the gap off the bike be enough? Like McCormack has often said, the field doesn’t give Stadler the gap—he takes it. The downside for everyone else is that Stadler feeds off past misfortunes and lets his emotions drive him. With the Macca and Stadler fracas behind both athletes (they’re on friendly terms), expect a fit and motivated Stadler to prove for a third time that yes, he can win Hawaii on the bike.

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John Segesta/johnsegesta.com John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

Cameron Brown (NZL) Don’t think the quietest guy on the pro circuit isn’t plotting. The 400-time Ironman New Zealand winner (well, seven-time, but you get the idea) is one of the fastest runners in Ironman racing and he has the patience to make his move at the right time. Brown was dealt a band hand last year when his stomach went array and he was forced to drop out. Stomach woes aside, he took something valuable away—strategy. He watched McCormack race into T2 and set a hot early tempo along Ali’i Drive. You can count on one hand the men who can respond to that speed—or initiate it themselves. Brown is definitely one of them. We can only guess what his track workouts are like. He was fourth at a blazing-fast Ironman Germany and defended (again) his home-country Ironman at Taupo. Will he podium? Probably. Can he win? It’s possible. There’s a reason McCormack always keys off Brown—he’s a sure bet to go 2:50 or under for the marathon, making him a major threat to win the whole shebang.

The X-Factor Steve Larsen (USA) In a toss-up between Larsen, Potts and Belgian Marino Vanhoenacker, Larsen is the bigger X-Factor. With five kids, a full-time real estate gig and a coaching plan from Brett Sutton, there are plenty of question marks surrounding the un-retired American. Other athletes are certainly taking notice of Larsen’s potential. “I’ve never seen him so lean—he was awesome,” said Alexander after Larsen finished third among a stacked field at Vineman 70.3 this July. The Oregonian has won everything—NORBA cross country national titles, XTERRA races, road races alongside Lance Armstrong and Ironman Lake Placid. He definitely wants more than the ninth-place Kona finish he recorded in 2001. This guy doesn’t show up at any world championship to just participate. Even with Lieto, Sindballe and Stadler in the field, Larsen is the best bet to lead the race off the bike. If he can keep himself together on the marathon, things will be very interesting.

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Other Players Chris Lieto (USA) The perennial top American is no doubt anxious to finally make it onto the Kona podium. While Lieto is capable of leading the race at T2, he’s smart enough to hold back a bit and save his legs for the run.

John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

2 0 0 8 Hawaii Ironman Preview

Eneko Llanos (ESP) If anyone earned the respect of McCormack this year, it’s Llanos. It took a sprint finish for Macca to shake the Spaniard at Wildflower this spring. Then it took McCormack the last few miles of the marathon to shake Llanos at Ironman Germany. “Guys like Llanos, they’re dangerous,” McCormack said. “The Spanish are clever. He’s got a few Ironmans in his legs now and he’s 30—a good age. I’ve got a gut feeling he’s going to be good.” McCormack’s right. The former XTERRA world champion has a “clever” race strategy, similar to that of McCormack: swim well, be among the players on the bike and then drill the run. Llanos has always been among the top runners at Hawaii and closed with a 2:51, 26.2-mile stroll last year. If the other players falter, Llanos should be right there to make a move.


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Torbjorn Sindballe (DEN) “Thunderbear,” as his first name translates, recorded a brilliant third-place finish last year thanks to his torrid bike pace and a scientific heat-dispersing protocol of long sleeves and compression socks. Pulling it off again would be an impressive feat for the great Dane, and it will likely take some bad luck by a field of super-runners to keep his podium chances alive.

John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

Luke Bell (AUS) With four second-place Ironman finishes to his credit, Bell is on the threshold of achieving great things. His fifth-place finish in 2003 was remarkable, but since then he has had lackluster results coming to a crescendo last year when an injured knee force him to DNF. This year he’s way under the radar but he’s coming in fit and healthier than last year. Another topfive result is possible for the Aussie.

John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

Rutger Beke (BEL) A healthy Beke, should he exit Kailua Bay amid the players, is capable of making the podium with one of the finest run strides in the game.

Andy Potts (USA) No one is more of a wildcard than Potts, a former Olympian and reigning Ironman 70.3 world champ. He has more speed than anyone in the field at all three disciplines, but he’s never run a marathon let alone done one after over four hours in the saddle. One thing is for sure: he’ll win the swim—by a lot.

Faris Al Sultan (GER) The 2005 Kona champ is keen to return to Kona after falling sick just before the race start in 2007. He is perhaps the most balanced athlete in the field, as exemplified by his wire-to-wire win three years ago. If he can regain the form everyone knows he’s capable of, the media helicopter may be following this German all day long.

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John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

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Marino Vanhoenacker (BEL) Is the former duathlete supplanting Rutger Beke as the top Belgian in Kona? Vanhoenacker has posted some very consistent results during the past two seasons and he’ll look to improve on his fifth-place finish from 2007.


Anything but Twenty Amateur age-groupers to watch on the Big Island.

For many age-group triathletes just getting to Kona is as good as it gets. It’s the icing on the cake; the culmination of years of hard work; the exclamation point on a career. For a select few, however, just getting to the Big Island isn’t good enough. These almost-elite athletes come to Kona for one reason: to win. The battle among the age-groupers is often as fierce as the professional race, only with fewer helicopters and NBC cameramen keeping track. Many of the top amateurs could hold their own in the pro field but would rather take home a title in their respective age group. Others use a solid age-group finish to propel themselves into the pro ranks. Case in point: The top five finishers in the men’s 25-29 race last year all turned pro in 2008. Here’s a shortlist of amateur standouts poised to make a run for their respective world titles on October 11. Thanks to Jim Scott and Gaylia Osterlund for their help researching this piece.

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John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

By Brad Culp


Male 18-24

Male 25-29

Sebastian Loehnert (GER) Schmoll’s toughest competition will likely come from another German, Sebastian Loehnert. The last time Loehnert was in Kona he only managed a 9:36 finish, but has since turned in some impressive performances. He was the overall amateur champion at Ironman Florida last year (8:48) and he can really hammer on the bike.

Male 25-29

Daniel Schmoll (GER) Schmoll finished sixth in this age group last year and with all those finishing ahead of him accepting their pro cards, he’s the likely heir to this group’s throne. His 9:10:21 performance from last season was impressive, but he’ll have to drop a few minutes from his 5:08 bike-split if he wants to approach the nine-hour mark (which is what it took to win this age group in 2007).

Male 30-34

Rich Cruse

Tim Hola (USA) If Hola doesn’t loose too much time to Hume on the bike, he’ll be right in the mix at the end of the marathon. The American is one of the best runners in the amateur field, but he needs to hang tough on the bike if he wants to improve on his ninth-place finish.

Male 30-34

Sam Hume (AUS) Hume finished third in this age group but is the top returning athlete. Last year’s winner Tommy Nielsen has aged up and German uber-biker Marko Schlittchen has turned pro—all of which is good news for Hume. If the Aussie can repeat his 9:11 performance from a year ago he’ll have a solid chance of moving to the top of the 30-34 podium.

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Robbie Steegink (NED) 2008 will be Steegink’s first trip to Kona but that doesn’t mean that he lacks experience. The 24-year-old Dutchman has been competing in triathlons since he was 14 and is finally having his breakthrough season. Steegink was the overall amateur champion at Ironman South Africa this April with a time of 8:52:46. He has one of the fastest swim-bike combinations of any amateur and will no doubt look to lead his age group from start to finish.


Christoph Sonnack (GER) Sonnack has yet to post a top-10 age-group finish on the Big Island, but he certainly has the talent to improve. The German took the amateur title at Ironman Western Australia last winter, finishing in 8:40. Granted, Western Australia is one of the fastest courses on the circuit, but he did top Hume by just over a minute.

Male 35-39

Luis De La Torre (USA) No one knows the Queen K Highway better than De La Torre, who lives and trains year-round on the Big Island. The Hawaiian was fourth in the 35-39 race last year, but the reigning winner has turned pro and the rest of the podium will not be returning. De La Torre has shown good form this season and was the top amateur at Ironman Hawaii 70.3 in 4:19:53.

Male 35-39

Male 45-49

Gregory Fraine (NZL) Fraine is the defending champ in this division and won by more than seven minutes last year. The Kiwi is one of the only athletes older than 45 who can still run under 3:10 in the marathon. If he can repeat his 3:07 marathon from 2007, he’ll be very hard to catch.

Male 40-44

Shinichi Ide (JPN) In 2007, Canadian Marty Bulcock won this age group by more than 27 minutes, but he hasn’t declared if he’s racing this year—at least not yet. If Bulcock doesn’t show, the 40-44 race will be wide open and Japan’s Ide will be the one to watch. Ide closed with a blistering 3:02 marathon at Western Australia last year en route to an 8:48 finish. With Bulcock out of the mix, it should only take a time of around 9:30 to win this group and Ide is definitely capable of pulling it off.

Miku

Laurent Jalabert (FRA) It appears this Tour de France legend has finally figured out how to swim and that spells trouble for the rest of this age group. In 2007, “Jaja,” as he’s affectionately known, posted a 9:17 in Kona after spending 1:15 in the Pacific. He knocked nine minutes off of that swim time en route to winning his age group at Ironman France this June and that makes him a serious contender. If the winds really pick up, look for Jalabert to crush his competition on the Queen K.

Male 50-54

Jeff Cuddeback (USA) Unfortunately for Bonness, Cuddeback has aged up into the 50-54 division this year and he has the goods to win—by a lot. On an Kona-like day at Ironman Arizona this year, Cuddeback posted a 5:02 bike-split on his way to a 9:21 finish. If he does anything like that on October 11, Bonness, Taylor and Moats don’t have a chance.

Male 50-54

Joe Bonness (USA) Florida’s Bonness is always tough to beat, but he’ll have his hands full this season. Fellow Americans Gregory Taylor and Kevin Moats are both capable of out-running Bonness, but they’ll have to play catch-up. Bonness may be 53, but if the conditions are right, he’s capable of riding fewer than five hours.

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Don Karle

2 0 0 8 Hawaii Ironman Preview

Male 30-34


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Heather Jackson (USA) If anyone is going to give Swigart a race in Kona it will likely be her friend and teammate Heather Jackson. The former hockey player has shown tremendous improvement this season and is one of the fastest cyclists in the amateur field. At Ironman 70.3 Rhode Island this year, Jackson used a blazing 2:25 ride to finish as the top amateur and fourth overall.

Female 18-24

Lauren Swigart (USA) With defending champ Christine Waitz moving up to the pro ranks, 2007 runner-up Swigart will be the heavy favorite. Swigart crushed the rest of this division with a 3:13 marathon in 2007 and it looks like her opening two legs have improved this season. If she can improve on her 1:15 swim and 5:50 bike from last year, no one will come close.

Female 25-29

Larry Rosa

Kristen Molloy (AUS) Last year Molloy finished nearly an hour behind age-group winner Bree Wee. Fortunately for Molloy, Wee and the rest of the top-six women from 2007, have moved up to the pro ranks and that should leave the door open for the Aussie. Molloy can swim and run with the best of them, but she’ll need to improve on her 5:59 ride from a year ago if she wants to get to the top of the podium.

Female 30-34

Rachel Ross (USA) Ross has dominated this age group for two years and all indications are that she’ll make it three this year. Last year she won by almost 20 minutes and was one of the only amateur women to break ten hours (9:56:21). The rest of the women in her group can hang with her on the swim and bike, but she’s the only one who can consistently run under 3:20 for the marathon and that makes her almost impossible to beat.

Female 30-34

Rhae Shaw (USA) Shaw is always considered a contender is this division, and after a disappointing finish in Kona last year (11:02:46), she’ll be anxious to get back on the podium. Shaw is without a doubt the strongest biker in her group, and if she holds it together on the run, Ross might not catch her.

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Larry Rosa

2 0 0 8 Hawaii Ironman Preview

Female 18-24


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Kelly Lear-Kaul (USA) The race for the overall amateur crown may come down to Ross and countrywoman Lear-Kaul, who is the defending champion in the 35-39 division. Earlier this year, LearKaul ripped off a 9:52:40 finish at Ironman Brazil, which was good enough for second overallâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;pro or amateur. If all goes according to plan, she has the goods to win this group by a half-hour.

Female 40-44

Katherine Nichols (USA) Nichols finished third in this division last season, but it looks like sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be the top returning athlete. The Hawaiian dusted a couple of pros en route to a fifth-place overall finish (first amateur) at Ironman 70.3 Hawaii this May and appears to have even better form than she did last year.

Female 45-49

Female 40-44

Lynn Keane (USA) Keane competed at Kona in 2006, and finished sixth in this division. Keane lucked out and picked up a lottery spot this year and she may be one of the only lottery winners who can contend for an age-group title. The Californian spent most of last season cruising the 70.3 circuit and finished the year with a scorching 4:40 finish at Clearwater.

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Juliana Nievergelt (USA) Nievergelt has been one of the top amateur women at Kona for more than a decade and has a stronger swim-bike combo than most women half her age. In 2007, she was the only athlete in this division to swim under an hour (58:20) and then back it up with a 5:35 ride. There are plenty of women in the 45-49 group who can outrun her, but they will likely have some serious time to make up on the marathon.

Timothy Carlson

2 0 0 8 Hawaii Ironman Preview

Female 35-39


Meet the

World’s Fastest Forensic Pathologist

Twenty questions for outstanding age-grouper Kelly Lear-Kaul. By Cour tney Johnson

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T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M


Timothy Carlson

T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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NOVEMBER 2008

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T R I AT H L E T E 1 0 3


20 Questions

F

or the past three years Colorado’s Kelly Lear-Kaul has finished in the top 10 overall at an Ironman, the most notable beingher second place finish at Ironman Brazil on May 27 of this year. She grew up swimming and running, but it wasn’t untill she met Todd Deboom, brother of Tim DeBoom, in 2002 that she tried her first triathlon. She rode a mountain bike that year at Boulder Peak Triathlon and was hooked. Shortly after, Lear-Kaul bought her first tri-bike and has been a regular on the podiums ever since. She’ll race her eighth Ironman and her fourth in Kona this year to defend her 35-39 age-group title and she hopes to set a new personal record. Triathlete caught up with Lear-Kaul as she began her final prep for the big show.

What is a typical week like for you? I spend at least 40 hours a week working as a forensic pathologist for Arapahoe County in Colorado. I also spend 20 to 27 hours a week training. It is hard to fit it in. I wake up at 4:30 a.m. to swim masters. Thankfully my office has a weight room so I can lift or get in a run on the treadmill during lunch. I usually bike from my office after work or drive somewhere to ride. I always have my bike and gear in the car and never go straight home after work. I get my workouts in but my ability to recover really suffers. I don’t have time for a massage or to stretch. It’s a struggle to just get seven hours a sleep a night.

Some have called you the fastest amateur on the planet. What do you think about that title? If anything, it is about my consistency not my overall time. I don’t have the fastest Ironman time for an amateur. I don’t expect to be the fastest in Kona either. Women don’t tend to peak at 40-years old, so I don’t think I have enough time left to beat the fastest amateur time. What did your second-place finish in Brazil this year do for you and what does it say about your fitness? It did great things mentally for me. I was really happy with my place and time. For sure it has given me more motivation for training for Kona. If I am tired or not feeling up to training I draw from what I felt that day on the run and at the finish line. As far as my fitness I know I didn’t peak at Brazil because I was under-prepared especially on the bike because of the Colorado winter. Brazil let me know I was just where I wanted to be. What is your favorite part about the Ford Ironman World Championships? The atmosphere is definitely my favorite part. It is such a great time to be there. The community support is wonderful and the volunteers are incredible. There is this

Athletics have always been a part of my life and are important to me. I really enjoy competition and pushing myself to the limit to see what I can do. As far as Ironman, I love the distance even if people think it is crazy. What is it about Ironman that gets you out the door to train instead of going home and vegging out on the couch? Part of it is growing up in an athletic family. Athletics have always been a part of my life and are important to me. I really enjoy competition and pushing myself to the limit to see what I can do. As far as Ironman, I love the distance even if people think it is crazy. Competition is important to you. What kind of sports did you grow up participating in and when did triathlon enter your life? My dad was a swim coach so I swam before I even walked. When I was in middle school I would spend the afternoon swimming with the high-school boys with my dad because my mom was at work. In high school I didn’t swim because the season conflicted with cross-country. I also ran track. My passion for running continued through college. I ran through medical school but it wasn’t until 2002 that I did my first triathlon. 1 0 4 T R I AT H L E T E

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aura in the town with all the athletes and big name pros that the qualifying races just don’t have. It can be a circus sometimes but there is nothing like it. Now that you have won your age group, do you have a different mindset going into Kona? I don’t really have a new mindset. Last year I knew it was possible and I had the best chance of it happening. I knew my biggest competition wasn’t going to be there. This year I know it is possible again! What do you know now that you wish you would have known in the past? Really, it’s just having confidence in my training and myself. The first year in Kona it was all about enjoying it, finishing and taking it all in. The second year I knew I could be more competitive and I just built on that. This year in Brazil I learned to not let the rest of my race go when my swim time was longer than I wanted.


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20 Questions What do you think it is going to take to win your age group this year? I haven’t really looked at my competition. That is something I don’t usually do. There isn’t really anyone new in the age group to worry about. A few of the top

Timothy Carlson

What are your goals for Kona this year? I, of course, want to defend my age group title and have the best race I can. Bringing down my bike time is also a goal. Last year my swim, run and overall times improved but not my bike.

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Brightroom Photography

20 Questions

girls have gone pro so they are out of the mix. There really isn’t anything I can do about their race, only mine. I just hope to improve my time and get faster. Do you feel like you are as prepared as you need to be? I really hope so! My workouts have been going great. The recent heat wave in Colorado has been really good for me since I love training in the heat. Is there one specific workout you always do to know you are ready to race? I don’t have a specific workout for the swim, but on the bike I will do a six- to seven-hour ride. When my body can hold race pace it is a big mental boost. For the run I have two workouts—a Fartlek and a three-hour run, in which I do about 24 miles. When I can run the distance at my Ironman run pace I feel good about it. My favorite workout is the Fartlek. It’s really mental for me and I enjoy it. Being able to do speed intervals in the middle of a run is a confidence boost. Since you have won your age group now has your prep been any different this year? 1 0 8 T R I AT H L E T E

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It really hasn’t been that different. I did my usually big bike week with friends. We spend 4 days riding in the mountains in Colorado. This year, we rode more than 350 miles and did 30,000 feet of climbing. It really helps my bike fitness. That has been my main focus because it is my weakness. My pool yards and running miles are the same. I always know they will come along. What kind of taper do you do for Kona? I have a staggered taper. I begin my run taper five weeks out and my bike is four weeks out. The swim taper starts three weeks out. I will still have five-hour rides during my taper, longer runs and also swims. My taper isn’t too extreme. What is your typical week before Hawaii like? I usually arrive the Saturday or Sunday before an Ironman. I need to be careful since I train in altitude not to come down too early or too late. I start by setting up my bike to make sure it is working properly. I also go out and build a pyramid on the Queen K before all the crowds get there (referring to the Hawaiian tradition of stacking white coral rocks on the lava rock). It helps


to see it on the bike as it gives me mental energy. I usually do two rides around an hour-and-a-half each. I swim at the pier three times and go for two to three runs of 30 to 40 minutes each. The rest of the time my feet are up. The week is really strange for me since I don’t have ever have days off from training because of my work schedule. Any pre-race rituals you have? I always have Italian food the night before if it is possible. I also go to the Carbo Dinner at all my Ironman races. It is something I feel is important for me to do and participate in.

ahead of me last year and I passed them before the turn around on Ali’i. How long do you see yourself doing Kona?

In the next few years I see myself taking time to have a family. I’ll have to take a year off from Kona but after that I will be back. I just really enjoy it and usually love the training.

FRICTION. FREEDOM.

What is your pre-race meal like? I have a bagel with peanut butter in honey early race morning. I’m not a big pre-race eater so I don’t finish the bagel. I sip a sports drink throughout the morning. I also take in a GU about a half hour before the start. What nutrition do you use on the course? Anything interesting in your specialneeds bags? I bring three bottles of Mark Allen Fluid Energizer drink on the bike. When they are gone I use water and Gatorade from the aid stations. I carry a couple GU gels in case I need them. In my special-needs bag I have homemade chocolate and peanut butter cookies. On the run I take Gatorade and water from every other aid station. I also carry two gels and always take down at least one. I drink Coke only if necessary as late on the course as I can. Any specific strategies or tactics you will use to ensure a win? I really like the swim so I plan to just to enjoy it. I hope to feel better on the bike. I cramped up last year (in Kona) and in Brazil. I work on it in training and plan to take in salt to help. The better bike I have the better off I will be. On the run I plan to chase people down—it’s what I do best. There were two to three girls

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118

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TRAINING

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IN ENGLISH

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John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

TRAINING

A Shortcut to Going Longer By Matt F itzgerald

D

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be fooled by the numbers. An Ironman is much more than twice as long as a half Ironman, or Ironman 70.3, as the format is now called. Yes, the race distance is double, but the level of commitment required to prepare properly for an Ironman is exponentially greater than that which is required to prepare for a successful 70.3. You can get ready for a 70.3 without sacrificing morning sleep or allowing entire weekends to be swallowed up by training.

The key to making a minimalist approach to 70.3 training work is efficiency. Just how little training can you get away with doing in your ramp-up for an Ironman 70.3 without setting yourself up for misery on race day? The following training plan is the answer. The key to making a minimalist approach to 70.3 training work is efficiencyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that is, getting the most out of each and every workout. And to be efficient your training must be well-balanced, including regular efforts at a variety of intensities, very high intensities not excepted. You might not work long in following this plan, but you will work hard. T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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TRAINING

Week

1

2

Mon

Off

Off

Thu

John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

The plan is 16-weeks long and includes seven workouts per week. Each week presents two workouts in two disciplines and three in the other, with the sport of emphasis rotating on a three-week cycle. Saturday’s bike and run should be performed as separate workouts unless otherwise noted. Every fourth week is a reducedvolume recovery week (indicated by shading). The workouts are very simple. Most of the information you need to do them is in the calendar boxes. The exception is in the swim workouts. I’ve provided only a total yardage target and a main set. Distribute the yardage difference between the total and the main set among a warm-up, drills and a cool-down. Rest intervals are not indicated in the swim workouts. In each of them, rest just long enough so that you can perform the next interval at the same speed you performed the last one. In all workouts use a 1-10 scale to control intensity. “L1” equals barely moving, “L5” is a moderate comfortable pace and “L10” is a maximum effort relative to the interval distance. Tue

Wed

Swim

Bike

600y MS: 4 x 50 L10

10 miles Level 5-6 w/ 4 x 30-sec. spurts @ L10

4 miles L5-6 w/ 3 x 200m spurts @ L9

Swim

Bike

Run

Swim

700y MS: 4 x 50 L10

12 miles Level 5-6 w/ 6 x 30-sec spurts @ L10

4.5 miles L5-6 w/ 5 x 200m spurts @ L9

600y MS: 3 x 100 L7

10 min. warm-up L4 6 x 1 min. hill climbs L9 (coast back down to recover) 10 min. cool-down L4

Run

Swim

20 miles L 5-6

5 miles L5-6 w/ 8 x 200m spurts @ L8-9

800y MS: 4 x 100 L7

Bike

Run

10 miles L4

Bike

Run

10 min. warm-up L4 5 x 1 min. hill climbs L9 (coast back down to recover) 10 min. cool-down L4

1-mile. warm-up L4 4 x 400m uphill L9 (jog down for recovery) 1-mile cool-down L4

Bike

Run

10 min. warm-up L4 6 x 1 min. hill climbs L9 (coast back down to recover) 10 min. cool-down L4

1-mile. warm-up L4 4 x 400m uphill L9 (jog down for recovery) 1-mile cool-down L4

Run

Fri Swim 600y MS: 2 x 100 L7

Bike

3

4

5

6

7

8

Swim Off

800y MS: 4 x 50 L10

Swim Off

600y MS: 4 x 50 L10

Swim Off

900y MS: 4 x 100 L9

Off

Off

1 1 4 T R I AT H L E T E

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Run

Swim 1000y MS: 5 x 100 L9

10-min. warm-up L4 3 x (5 min. Level 9/3 min. L4) 10-min. cool-down Level 4

Swim

Bike

Swim 1,100y MS: 6 x 100 L9

10-min. warm-up Level 4 4 x (5 min. L9/3 min. L4) 10-min. cool-down Level 4

Swim

Bike

Run

10 min. warm-up L4 5 x 90-sec. hill climbs L9 (coast back down to recover) 10 min. cool-down L4

1-mile w/u L4 5 x 1K L8 w/ 400m jog recoveries L4 1-mile c/d

NOVEMBER 2008

Bike 15 miles L5-6

Swim

Run

600y L5-6

4 miles L5-6 Bike 18 miles L 5-6 Run 2 miles L5-6 off bike

Run 5 miles L5-6

5 miles L5-6

Bike

900y MS: 4 x 100 L9

Sun

Bike

Swim

Swim

Off

Sat

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T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

1-mile w/u L4 6 x 800m L8 w/ 400m jog recoveries L4 1-mile c/d L4 Run 7 miles L5-6

Swim 600y MS: 2 x 100 L7

Swim 700y MS: 2 x 100 L7 + 4 x 50 L10

Bike 15 miles L5-6

Swim

Run

800y L5-6

4 miles L5-6 Bike 25 miles L 5-6

Run

Run

6 miles L5-6

2 miles L7 off bike

Swim

Bike

1000y MS: 3 x 100 L7 + 5 x 50 L10

28 miles L5-6

Bike

Run

12 miles L4

Swim

Bike

1100y MS: 4 x 100 L7 + 5 x 50 L10 Swim 1000y MS: 3 x 100 L7 + 5 x 50 L10

6.5 miles L5-6 30 miles L5-6

Swim

Run

1200y L5-6

7 miles L5-6 Bike 22 miles L5-6

Run

Run

8 miles L5-6

2 miles L7 off bike


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John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

TRAINING

Week

9

10

Mon

Tue Swim

Off

1,200y MS: 3 x 200 L8

Swim Off

1400y MS: 4 x 200 L8

Wed

Thu

Bike 10-min. warm-up L4 5 x (5 min. L9/3 min. L4) 10-min. cool-down L4 Bike 10-min. warm-up L4 20 min. L8 10-min. cool-down L4 Bike

11

12

13

14

15

16

Swim Off

1600y MS: 3 x 300 L8

Swim Off

1200y MS: 3 x 200 L8

Swim Off

1800y MS: 4 x 300 L8

Swim Off

2000y MS: 3 x 400 L8

Swim Off

2,000y MS: 3 x 400 L8 Swim

Off

1 1 6 T R I AT H L E T E

1,600y MS: 3 x 300 L8

|

10-min. warm-up L4 2 x 12 min. L8 w/ 10-min. recovery @ L4 10-min. cool-down L4 Bike

Run 9 miles L5-6

Run 10 miles L5-6 Run 1-mile w/u L4 3 miles L7-8 1-mile c/d L4

10 min. warm-up L4 6 x 90-sec. hill climbs L9 (coast back down to recover) 10 min. cool-down L4 Bike

Run

10-min. warm-up L4 2 x 15 min. L8 w/ 10-min. recovery @ L4 10-min. cool-down L4 Bike

Run

10-min. warm-up L4 2 x 18 min. L8 w/ 10-min. recovery @ L4 10-min. cool-down L4 Bike 10-min. warm-up L4 2 x 20 min. L8 w/ 10-min. recovery @ L4 10-min. cool-down L4

8 miles L5-6

Bike

1200y MS: 4 x 100 L7 + 2 x 100 L9

35 miles L5-6

Bike

Run

15 miles L4

Swim

Bike

1200y MS: 4 x 100 L7 + 3 x 100 L9

40 miles L5-6

Swim

Run

1400y L5-6

Swim 1600y L5-6

7 miles L5-6

8 miles L5-6 Bike 45 miles L5-6 Run 2 miles L7 off bike

Run 11 miles L5-6

Swim

Bike

1200y MS: 4 x 100 L7 + 4 x 50 L10

30 miles L5-6

Bike

Run

20 miles L4

Swim

Bike

10 miles L5-6 Swim

Run

1800y L5-6

Run

Swim

Bike

1-mile w/u L4 4 miles L7-8 1-mile c/d L4

2000y MS: 9 x 100 L7 + 7 x 50L10

56 miles L5-6 Run

Run

Swim

Bike

1-mile w/u L4 4.5 miles L7-8 1-mile c/d L4

1800y MS: 4 x 100 L7 + 3 x 100 L9

45 miles L5-6

Bike

Run

15 miles L4

Swim

Bike

800y L4

5 miles L4

10-min. warm-up L4 20 min. L8 10-min. cool-down L4

1-mile w/u L4 2 miles L7-8 1-mile c/d L4

T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

Swim

Sun

50 miles L5-6

Run

|

Sat

1800y MS: 6 x 100 L7 + 4 x 100 L9

12 miles L5-6

Bike

NOVEMBER 2008

Fri

10 miles L5-6

3 miles L5-6 off bike

Run 13 miles L5-6

8 miles L5-6

IM 70.3


lane lines

Courtesy Janet Evans

TRAINING

Eat like an Olympic Swimming Champion What you (and your diet) can learn from legend Janet Evans.

By Brad Culp 1 1 8 T R I AT H L E T E

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I

In August 1989, American Janet Evans shattered the 800-meter freestyle world record with a time of 8:16.22. Almost two decades later that swim is the longest-standing world record in the sport. The next-oldest world record has only stood for eight years. Evans knows a thing or two about swimming really, really fast and staying healthy. Triathlete caught up with Evans to chat about sports nutrition and her favorite pasta recipe.


lane lines

Courtesy Janet Evans

TRAINING

Swimmers are able to eat pretty much whatever they want without worrying about weight gain. Michael Phelps is known to eat around 8,000 calories per day. Do you find yourself eating healthier now that you’re not competing? What major changes have you made to your diet since retiring? I definitely had to make some changes to my diet after I stopped competing. I don’t think I made any drastic changes, I just learned how to eat a more balanced diet. I cut my caloric intake big time, which took a little getting used to. When I was training full-time I ate as much protein as I could. I needed all that protein for both recovery and energy. I think that’s where I was able to cut out the most calories. Now I just eat like a normal healthy person. Triathletes tend to eat healthier than the rest of the public, but their diets certainly aren’t without flaws. What are some areas where you see athletes in general making dietary mistakes? I think a lot of athletes don’t get enough healthy fats. We hear a lot about eating a low-fat diet but you need to eat plenty of healthy fats, especially if you’re training. Fat helps you stay full, burn calories and absorb vitamins and minerals—you need it! I also think that athletes need to watch their protein intake. Athletes need protein both before and after training or racing. In 1994, we went to Rome for the [swimming] World Championships. I ate nothing but pasta for three weeks and I had no energy by the end of the competition. When I got home I went to see my doctor and he told me that my iron levels were way too low. I know a lot of athletes swear off red meat but I think they need it. 1 2 0 T R I AT H L E T E

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About 15 years ago, when you were breaking world records, how long were each of your training sessions and what did you eat immediately before and after workouts? We trained three hours in the morning and three hours in the evening almost every day. I was averaging about 18,000 meters of swimming each day. I tried to eat as many carbs as possible before I worked out, which usually came in the form of a bagel or something like that. After workouts I just grabbed whatever protein I could get my hands on—I really didn’t have a specific recovery food. I was never really into sports drinks, so I just stuck to water during workouts. Even the healthiest people have something that they splurge on occasionally. What do you reach for when you need a treat? Ice cream. We almost always have some in the house. There’s nothing quite like cookies n’ cream right out of the carton. Since you work as a motivational speaker, I take it you’re on the road quite a bit. Do you have any advice for eating healthy while you travel? Yes, I spend a ton of time on the road and it’s definitely hard to stay healthy, especially in airports. I’ve found that you have to be somewhat demanding with a waiter or waitress. Tell them to hold the mayo on a sandwich or put the salad dressing on the side. I try not to eat all my meals at restaurants when I travel, because you never really know what’s in their food. I make some meals for myself at the hotel. That way, I can make a healthy sandwich or something like that.


LANE LINES

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JANET’S ARRABIATA PENNE RECIPE

For my family, I like quick, easy and healthy meals. One of my favorites is pasta with a spicy tomato sauce. The key to a great sauce is layering flavors and it all starts with canola oil in a sizzling pan. With high-heat tolerance and a neutral taste, canola oil is the perfect first ingredient. Arrabiata means “angry style” in Italian and it refers to the heat of the peppers. This simple spicy sauce goes well with plain penne pasta. Adding fresh garden tomatoes to the sauce makes it hearty enough to go well with chicken or fish. If you like hot spice add more chili flakes! INGREDIENTS: • 3 tbsp. canola oil • 1 onion, diced • 1 garlic clove, minced • 1 tsp. red chili flakes • 8 cups Roma tomatoes, seeded and chopped • 1 tsp. salt • 1/4 tsp. granulated sugar • 3 tbsp. fresh oregano, chopped • 3 tbsp. fresh basil, chopped • Pepper to taste 1. Heat canola oil in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Sauté onions in canola oil until softened. Add garlic and red pepper flakes. Add tomatoes and simmer with lid on for 20 minutes. 2. Remove lid, stir and simmer for 15 minutes. Add salt, sugar, oregano and basil. Stir to combine. Season with pepper to taste and serve. Makes about four cups or eight servings. Tip: You can substitute fresh tomatoes with two 28-ounce cans of low-sodium diced tomatoes.

BASED ON A 1/2 CUP SERVING: Calories: 100 Total fat: 6 g Saturated fat: 0 g Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 300 mg Carbohydrate: 11 g Fiber: 3 g Protein: 2 g T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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A longer crank isn’t necessarily better, experts say. Shorter cranks can recruit muscles for a contraction rate that better mimics run cadence.

The Crank Length Debate Comes Full Circle By Mark Deterline // Photos by John Segesta While building up a new TT bike recently, I asked famed aerodynamics and biomechanics guru John Cobb which crank lengths to use and which corresponding gear ratios he would recommend. I’m just over 6’2” tall and have always used 180 mm cranks on my TT and mountain bikes. I was thinking I might even need to go longer to optimize my power output or achieve maximum efficiency. But what Cobb said challenged that thinking, and forced me to consider the topic more broadly. “I used to be a big believer in long crank arms, but now I’m going in a different direction,” Cobb says. “I’m convinced that crank length and pedal rate (i.e. cadence) should be more directly related to one’s natural running cadence and stride length than anything else. Every muscle has a natural contraction rate that will yield 1 2 2 T R I AT H L E T E

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maximum efficiency. The game is to keep the muscle in its most efficient extension range and at its most efficient rate of rotation.” John McDaniel holds a PhD in exercise physiology and is an elite amateur road racer and triathlete. He is also a research associate of Dr. Jim Martin, whose exercise physiology lab at the University of Utah is well respected. McDaniel adds some insight to Cobb’s observations. “Every muscle does two things for which an athlete should strive to determine optimal performance parameters: One is the contractionrelaxation rate (the rate at which the muscle will contract, perform work, then relax), and shortening velocity (the speed at which the muscle contracts, or shortens),” McDaniel says. “These two tasks determine maximum power and maximum efficiency.


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“By varying pedal rate and crank length we can adapt conditions to the muscular system so that it operates closer to its maximum efficiency or power. Our goal is to do both. It is interesting to note, however, that the parameters in which max power is produced are often not the same as those that produce max efficiency. This is obvious in cycling where max power is usually produced around 120 to 130 pedal rotations per minute, yet max efficiency is reached at around 60 to 70 rpm,” McDaniel says. When I brought up the issue of crank length with Ironman champ and “super-biker” Chris Lieto, he said that internationally renowned exercise physiologist and coach Max Testa suggested that he transition to shorter cranks to improve efficiency. But Lieto confided that he had been reluctant to make the switch since he was comfortable on 175s—what he has always used on his road bike—and hadn’t wanted to mess with what he felt was “dialed in.” Cobb explains what got him moving in the new direction in the first place. “My initial motivation for experimenting with shorter cranks was to get riders lower on their bikes by rotating them forward and down without their legs hitting their rib cage, and without restricting their breathing,” Cobb says. “But first, I had to determine that shorter cranks and the lower seat heights they afforded, because of improved upper-body clearance, would not adversely affect power output or efficiency. “That led me to Professor Jim Martin at the University of Utah. Martin conducted a study using 60 racers of all skill levels. He would vary crank length in 15 mm increments both longer and shorter. His findings showed that there was no power difference EPITri11-08 8/26/08 4:13 PM Page 1

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from one length to another but that oxygen uptake was always better with shorter cranks. “I’ve worked with a rider who is 6’5” and has worked down to 165 mm cranks over the last three months; he’s gained 65 watts of power,” Cobb says. “During one particular study, Martin and I recorded athletes’ oxygen consumption while cycling on a stationary bike in the lab,” McDaniel says. “We used crank lengths of 145, 170 and 195 mm, pedaling rates of 40, 60, 80 and 100 rpms, and intensity levels of 30 percent, 60 percent and 90 percent of lactate threshold. “We found that the power produced (i.e. force applied to move the pedals) during exertion accounted for 95 percent of oxygen consumption (V02). Changes in crank length and pedal rate had the capacity to alter oxygen consumption or efficiency by about 3 percent,” McDaniel says. “Furthermore, this study demonstrated that the body requires more oxygen as pedal speed (speed of the pedal along its axis of travel—not cadence) increases. So, for any given pedal rate (cadence), pedal speed will therefore be slower with shorter cranks, resulting in a decreased oxygen requirement.” McDaniel emphasizes, however, that they determined modest changes in oxygen consumption across the large variations in crank length (145 to 190 mm) they implemented. “So switching from 175 to 172.5 mm would likely have little measurable or even undetectable benefit,” he says. “The main point is that you would be safe switching to shorter cranks for aerodynamic reasons without the fear of decreasing efficiency. In fact, research implies your efficiency


TRAINING BIG

RING would increase somewhat.” Since I’m about 6’2” with a common proportional inseam for North Americans, Cobb suggested that to start I shouldn’t go longer than 170 mm and that I may want to try 165s. Then Cobb introduced what—at first—seemed a contradiction. “My own continued research and experience supported Martin and his associates’ findings,” Cobb says. “But there was a recurring theme I was noting in my work with athletes. In order for shorter cranks to feel right to my riders, they had to start turning bigger gears.” I’m predominantly a roadie who has been using a 53-tooth chainring with 175 to180 mm crank arms, so Cobb suggested I might want to mount a 54- or 55-tooth chainring if I moved to shorter cranks. This didn’t make sense to me—or McDaniel— initially, as it seemed to contradict the whole leverage discussion. A shorter crank implies a shorter lever, which would imply that a rider needed to exert more force to turn the same gear. However, Martin and his colleagues’ findings implied that longer cranks didn’t yield more power and that shorter cranks yielded more efficiency in the form of less oxygen uptake. This means that factoring in all aspects of biomechanics and physiology, with pedal speed perhaps being the most significant, the issue of leverage was no longer

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a primary consideration. That’s the change in paradigm. For example, let’s say a rider determines she is efficient (and has likely become comfortable) turning a certain gear size with 180 mm cranks at a given pedal rate, yielding a particular pedal speed. Now she switches to 165 mm cranks and settles back into her comfortable pedal rate. But after several rides she feels something is amiss. We know that her pedal speed has decreased, because she’s now turning shorter cranks at the same pedal rate as before, so we —like Cobb—make an educated guess that what feels different can likely be attributed to the fact that her oxygen uptake is reduced. In other words, there is now less metabolic cost (i.e. she is not working as hard) to turn the same gears. Applying these principles represents an additional advantage to time trialists and triathletes, according to Cobb. Not only can you become a more efficient human machine but shorter cranks will help improve your aerodynamics with a lower, more forward position. “Martin has determined that shorter cranks can allow a rider to decrease saddle height by 50 to 70 mm with a comparable lowering of the front end—lower overall rider position—since the more contained pedaling action was less inhibitive with regard to leg movement and breathing,” Cobb explains. He contnues, “Subsequently I conducted a wind-tunnel test with one triathlete in which the change to shorter cranks and a correspondingly more compact position yielded a 30 percent reduction in drag. That means a theoretical reduction in time of 25 minutes over the Ironman bike distance!” A final consideration is the “dead spot,” generally established to occur between the 10 and two o’clock positions in the complete rotation of a crank arm. Lieto points out that over the course of an Ironman bike segment (112 miles) it becomes increasingly difficult to stay smooth through the dead spot, and he says that it could be easier to maintain efficiency by using shorter cranks. Lieto also hints that an athlete might potentially head into the run segment (26.2 miles) less fatigued, because an athlete might be able to stay within more natural movements with shorter cranks, causing less stress and strain on muscles and joints. You’ve probably heard, “First learn to spin a small gear. Then get strong enough to turn a big gear. Then get fit enough to spin a big gear.” Cobb’s inference has similar performance implications, this time leveraging biomechanics: Use shorter cranks so that you can turn a bigger gear without working any harder.


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TRAINING ON

THE RUN

E

Efficiency equals strength, speed, power, endurance and most important, injury prevention. More triathletes today work harder to become faster, stronger and healthier. Triathletes frequently improve their fitness by increasing their endurance, speed, power, strength and flexibility. But many are inefficient in their fundamental movements. As a result, commitment to hard training fails to produce the results athletes want. For example, developing greater flexibility doesn’t necessarily make you a better athlete or prevent injuries. However, identifying your biomechanical strengths and weaknesses and then working to increase mobility and stability will make you a better athlete. Devoting just a little time each week to strengthening your biomechanical weak links can do wonders for your triathlon career. Your weak links are almost always inadequacies of mobility and stability in specific movements. To identify a weak link, analyze your basic movement patterns. This will enable you, your coach or a fitness professional to focus on areas that need improvement. If a weak link is not identified, your body will compensate, causing inefficient movements. It is this type of inefficiency that can cause a decrease in performance and an increase in injuries.

Mobility and stability are often misunderstood so I’ll define them more specifically. Mobility is the combination of muscle elasticity, joint range of motion and the body’s freedom of movement. Stability is the ability to maintain posture and control movements freely. Triathletes too often sacrifice quality of motion to maintain quantity of motion and in turn develop compensatory movement patterns to overcome functional insufficiencies. For example, runners will develop hip stiffness because of so many miles of training and repetitive motions. When the hips become stiff in the end ranges of flexion, extension and adduction, the lower back muscles have to sacrifice their stability to achieve greater mobility in compensation for the hips’ limitations. Specifically, excessive flexion, extension and rotation occur in the lower back in an attempt to compensate for a relatively decreased stride length during running caused by the stiffness in the hips. These imbalances decrease running efficiency and increase the chances of a hip or back injury.

Mobility, Stability and Efficiency in Movement By Jason Goldberg 1 3 0 T R I AT H L E T E

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Hurdle Step Test A hurdle step is a simple test to identify limiters in your movements. Place a broomstick on top of two buckets, creating a “hurdle” that is roughly 12 inches off the ground. The hurdle step test challenges your coordination and stability between the hips and torso during the stepping motion, as well as single leg stance stability. This test also

John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

Mobility Vs. Stability


ON THE RUN assesses functional mobility and stability of the hips, knees and ankles. With a trainer, coach or friend looking on, place a second broomstick across your shoulders and step over the hurdle. You want to maintain an upright posture, step over the hurdle without your foot touching the broomstick and place your heel onto the ground. Return back to a standing position. Ideally, when you step over the hurdle, your planted hip, knee and ankle will remain aligned in a vertical plane and the broomstick on your shoulders will stay parallel to the hurdle.

you will get more out of them by taking the time to improve how you move. Jason Goldberg is the director of operations for FIT Multisports, a professional sports

TRAINING

marketing, management and coaching company for endurance athletes. To receive a free report on how to increase your performance while decreasing injury risk send an email to info@fitmultisports.com

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Triathletes too often sacrifice quality of motion to maintain quantity of motion and in turn develop compensatory movement patterns to overcome functional insufficiencies. You also want minimal to no movement in your lower back. When performing this test, most people find that the broomstick and hurdle do not remain parallel. Alignment is lost between their hips, knees and ankles, and there is some movement in their lower back. The knee and lower leg on the step leg will often rotate in or out as it moves over the hurdle. Many are not aware of these problems, so that’s why an observer is required. C

M

Y

CM

MY

Finding Weaknesses

CY

The inefficient movements during this test are due to poor stability of the stance leg or poor mobility of the step leg. The relevance of the hurdle step is that it simulates what happens when you run and amplifies the stability and mobility issues that affect every stride. After you discover your biomechanical weaknesses, start doing corrective exercises in the gym. A simple corrective exercise such as a reverse walking lunge can do wonders to improve your hip mobility and stability and increase efficiency when running. Ask yourself the following questions the next time you head out to train: • Is my training program doing anything to improve my stability efficiently? • Will I be more prepared to accelerate away from the pack by doing miles and miles of running, or by doing a few traveling lunges with high-knee raises while focusing on driving through with my knee and planting my feet before the next stride? • Long runs are beneficial, of course, but CMY

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TRAINING Dear

Coach

Dear Coaches, After reading one of our sportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most recent publications, I started thinking about being lazy. I have always joked that I am lazy, but having done four Ironmans including Kona it is hard to believe that. I think I am just hard to motivate. My wife is tired of hearing my whining about Ironman. She says go do a half or a sprint but 1 3 2 T R I AT H L E T E

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I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get motivated for it. I am threatening another IM but my guilt about being a good father, husband and executive prevents me from doing it. There has to be a happy solution. Is there? Please say it is IM. Thanks, Steve B


TRAINING DEAR

COACH

Steve, OK, if we understand you correctly, you’re asking two questions: 1. Am I lazy or just difficult to motivate?; and 2. Is training for and executing another Ironman instead of being a good husband, father and boss the answer to my fitness and competitive goals? Since we’re in touch with the broad spectrum of personality traits of our readers, we want to provide the quickest bottom-line answer that the most neurotic of this group requires. These are the deadline-pushing, eating-while-driving, readingwhile-riding, crackberry-thumbing-while-in-a-meeting, ultra-multi-tasking, busier-than-you-and-me-no-matter-what-you’ve-got-going-on kind of people. For these self-esteemed VIP’s the answers are: 1. You’re lazy; 2. No, Ironman is not the answer. There. The VIP’s can move on to “Tinley Talks.” Have a nice day and see you next month. Now, for the rest of you … One hundred and five words of background aren’t a lot to go on. You’ve provided us with very little information, but that’s OK, we’re trained professionals. Answering questions like this all day long for the past 15 years has rendered us experts at deciphering the grammatical patterns and linguistic clues that triathletes provide in every spoken or written utterance. Who knew that a job as seemingly mundane as responding to questions about endurance sports would lead to FBI-level profiling skills? It’s a burden, no doubt, but it’s also a responsibility we take very seriously and whose rewards are without parallel. Just knowing that we might shed light on some small tri-related issue and the chain reaction of good that can come from it is enough for us. We’re going to answer your question so completely that even your children’s grandchildren will benefit. Hey, don’t mention it. That’s why we’re here. This time we’re going to let you behind the scenes to see how we work our magic. But isn’t that like revealing a trade secret? Maybe, but we look at it the same way the inventor of the seat belt or air bag might have—it’s too important to keep secret from the general public when that public might include co-workers, friends and family members who stand to benefit from a better understanding of the myopic world that triathletes occupy. We start by looking at and determining the true meaning in each sentence in your question based on our 50-plus years of collective triathlon training, racing and coaching. By determining the true underlying essence of each sentence we can more accurately arrive at an answer that not only responds to the obvious but also ferrets out any subliminal meaning. Your Sentence (YS): “After reading one of our sport’s most recent publications, I started thinking about being lazy.” Our Translation (OT): After reading last month’s Triathlete Magazine when I was supposed to be (watching the kids, doing chores around the house, analyzing the company’s latest P&L statement and increasing its EBITDA), I started calculating various average speeds and paces per mile needed to place in the top three in my age group and cross-referencing this data with the 20-something Ironman races worldwide over the past five years and suddenly found that the day had gone by and I got nothing accomplished. YS: “I have always joked that I am lazy but having done four Ironmans including Kona it is hard to believe that.” OT: Even though I know I’m lazy, I often rationalize it by pointing out to whoever is around to listen (or pretend to listen) that I’ve completed four Ironman events including the world championships in Kona, which really proves I’m not lazy. Really. I’m not. YS: “I think I am just hard to motivate.” OT: I’m sick of anything to do with the more inescapable and important aspects of life that most adults have to prioritize like watching the kids, doing chores around the house and working, but I seem to have endless amounts of motivation for anything and everything to do with swimming, cycling, running, training and racing—especially when it comes to the Ironman distance. YS: “My wife is tired of hearing my whining about Ironman.” OT: My wife is a saint and I’m so lucky that she’ll have anything to do with me because she’s still sticking with me even though I’m going through a midlife crisis. My crisis includes 1 3 4 T R I AT H L E T E

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TRAINING Dear

Coach

spending 20-plus hours per week flogging myself at various aerobic activities most often associated with childhood summers away from her, kids, chores around the house and our primary source of income. When I am around, all I seem to talk about is triathlon and plans for my next assault on the Ironman distance and how great it will be when the whole family gets to go to Panama City Beach for another “triathlon vacation.” YS: “She says go do a half or a sprint, but I can’t get motivated for it.” OT: As proof that she’s a saint, she’s actually willing to compromise and has suggested doing some shorter races that will not only allow me to shoulder my end of the household responsibilities and give her, our kids and my business their fair share of my time but will also give my Ironman performance a swift kick in the pants even though I hate shorter races because I get my ass handed to me at them. YS: “I am threatening another IM but my guilt about being a good father, husband and executive prevents me from doing it.” OT: Because I’m a myopic triathlete, I can’t help but want to do another Ironman. I also know with certainty that if I do this I’ll quickly become divorced, jobless—and though I fantasize about both of these outcomes—I know that this would leave me very, very unhappy. YS: “There has to be a happy solution.” OT: Please tell me that I should do another Ironman race. YS: “Is there?” OT: Please. YS: “Please say it is IM.” OT: Please tell me what I want to hear.

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Mark Sisson, 54 2:18 marathon, 4th Hawaii Ironman Author, coach, ITU anti-doping exec Master Formula designer

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Mark Sisson's Message Damage Control Master Formula is the ultimate expression of my passion for health, nutritional science and pushing the limits of human endurance as an elite athlete and coach for three decades. Perhaps the most profound discovery of my journey - a journey that has meandered through lava fields, laboratories, winner's circles, orthopedist's offices and ten years with the Olympic antidoping commission - is this:

Hard Training Can Be Hazardous To Your Health! Loads of recent studies confirm that optimal recovery goes beyond diet, beyond rest days and beyond sports nutrition bars, gels and drinks. The unrelenting stress of modern life coupled with ambitious endurance goals causes chronic depletion at the cellular level. My ten year process to research, create and provide Damage Control Master Formula to athletes across the planet (including numerous world champions) has been a mandate to solve this problem. The end result is a product that is simply the world's most potent and comprehensive supplement. At $129, it's not cheap (all told the component ingredients cost $370 to replicate in individual bottles) and it's not for everyone, but you owe it to yourself to take advantage of my risk free offer and enjoy the very best support you can get.

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TRAINING Dear

Coach

So that’s how it works. You present your question and we dig through all of the disguised facts and innuendo to reveal the underlying truth. Our response might be painful and humiliating, but in the long run it will save you untold amounts of pain and suffering that you’d almost certainly experience had you listened to the inevitable agreement with your side of things from some wellmeaning friend. Plus, it makes for good reading. What’s more entertaining than seeing one of your peers skewered in public? So, what would our response be? After going through the above process, it would probably sound something like this: Steve, it seems to us that you’re motivated to do well at the Ironman distance and not much else. Part of doing well is maintaining the highest possible average speed for a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike and a 26.2-mile run. If you’ve been training for and doing events of this distance, your basic endurance is probably just fine. If you want to get faster, however, you should consider spending a portion of your season focused on doing shorter races like sprint, Olympic and 70.3-(halfiron) distance events. You probably aren’t motivated for these shorter distances because the training and racing hurts, you might not be that good compared to the Ironman distance, and they don’t have that “lifetime challenge” feel to them, right? Get over it. The fact that your wife is suggesting that you pursue shorter-distance events isn’t the only alarm bell ringing. The fact that you mention guilt about being a better husband, father and executive is all we need to hear. You’ve become addicted

to Ironman. The best way to address this addiction is to give yourself the long-term goal of another Ironman event next year but, instead of succumbing to the shakes that come with withdrawal, turn your attention to going short and fast as a means to your Ironman end. Focus on improving your best possible 1000 to 1500-yard/ meter swim time, 20 to 40 km bike time, and 5 to 10km run time. When the time comes next year to “shoot up” with the sweet, sweet, slow mileage, you’ll not only be mentally and physically fresh for the challenge but you might just be a little faster too. That you’ll still be married and gainfully employed will be a bonus. Paul Huddle and Roch Frey are not winners of the Ironman World Championship in Hawaii, but they’ve trained with and coached many of them. They have lived the sport of triathlon on every level for the past 30 years and use this extensive background to assist others with their goals. Based in Encinitas, Calif., Paul and Roch are partners in Multisports.com, an endurance coaching service that includes camps, online coaching, and personal coaching. Never resting on their considerable laurels, both continue to explore strange new worlds (adventure racing), seek out new life (ultra-running) and new civilizations (paddleboarding and standup paddling) and to boldly go where no man has gone before (the underpants run). If you want to consider coaching that emphasizes experience, common sense and simplicity, go to www.multisports .com. If you have a question that begs for ridicule and sarcasm, please send it to: info@multisports.com

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LAB

Working Through Days and Nights By Tim Mickleborough, PhD Dear Speed Lab, I have a rather complex question regarding circadian rhythms. Can they influence training and racing performance? I guess my main question is, what is the best time to exercise? Erin Major Knoxville, Tenn.

Dear Erin, This is a very complex and little-understood area of physiology. The 24-hour rhythm of light and dark is a major influence upon the physiology, biochemistry and ecology of most plants and animals. By convention, most of us regulate our activities so that night is for sleep, the daytime for work and the evenings for leisure. We are, both by design and desire, rhythmic creatures. Rhythms having cyclic periods of about 24 hours are termed circadian rhythms. The recent developments of miniaturized portable data loggers and radioimmunoassay techniques for the detection of hormones and other substances in very small samples of body fluids have enabled us to determine circadian rhythms with comparative ease. 1 4 0 T R I AT H L E T E

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It has been shown that body temperature, blood pressure and urinary potassium loss are greater during the daytime (12 p.m.-6 p.m.) and lower during the night, with minimum values in the small hours. Exceptions to this pattern are peak values of plasma cortisol, testosterone and growth hormone during hours of nocturnal sleep. Changes in lifestyle, as after a time-zone transition or shift to a night work schedule, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t result in immediate changes in the rhythms of body temperature or plasma cortisol. For example, volunteers living in isolation chambers (where time cues from the outside, light and noise are excluded) have maintained their normal 24-hour temperature variations. This result indicates the presence of an endogenous component or timing mechanism that is metaphorically called a body clock. Circadian rhythms can affect the physiological determinants of exercise performance. Exercise or performance rhythms conform closely in phase with body temperature and the level of arousal. Circadian rhythms may be influenced by environmental factors such as temperature, light and dark. These rhythms therefore have implications for elite athletes and for people performing exercise for health purposes who are seeking optimal times of the day for training. They also have implications for sports medicine personnel who may want to consider the impact of the time of day on joint stiffness and pain perception. Most athletic records are set in the late afternoon or evening. This partly reflects the fact that record attempts are usually scheduled for evening meetings when the environmental temperature is more favorable. Nevertheless, athletes tend to prefer evening contests and consistently achieve their top performances at this time of day. Sports contests are not amenable to the types of manipulation demanded by experimental design. Therefore, researchers tend to concentrate on the effects of time of day on performance in time trials or simulated contests. In the first investigation into diurnal variation in performance, six runners, three weight throwers and three oarsmen performed better in the evening than in the morning.1 Swimmers have produced faster times over 100 m at 5 p.m. compared with 7 a.m. in three out of four strokes studied2 and the speed of running in a five-minute test varied closely with the circadian curve in body temperature.3 There is a time window close to the peak in core body temperature in which optimal performance in sports involving gross motor tasks can be attained. This window can extend for four to six hours provided that meals and rests are suitably fitted in during the daily routine. Sports that require fast explosive efforts tend to peak earlier and may be dependent on the sleep-wake clock rather than body temperature. Consequently, practices where skills have to be acquired should be conducted early in the day or around midday, but more severe training drills and â&#x20AC;&#x153;pressure trainingâ&#x20AC;? practices are best timed for later in the day. Many physiological parameters are known to show circadian rhythmicity. These include metabolic, cardiovascular and endocrine functions. The metabolic functions showing cyclical changes include oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and ventilation. A peak in heart rate occurs earlier in the day than the peak in core body temperature, but is close to the phase of the rhythm in circulating catecholamines, or hormones that govern wakefulness and physiological arousal. The peak-to-trough heart rate variation at rest is about 8 beats per minute; athletes and coaches should take this into account when resting pulse rate is used as an index of either training state or overtraining. The catecholamine rhythms are probably closely related to changes in arousal.

John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

TRAINING SPEED


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Physiological rhythms detected at rest may be obliterated or attenuated, or maintained or amplified, under exercise conditions. The most robust rhythm seems to be minute ventilation (liters of oxygen expired per minute), which is amplified at light and moderate exercise intensities. This may partly explain the mild dyspnea, or shortness of breath, sometimes associated with exercising in the early morning. Studies of the maximal heart rate during exercise have consistently shown an influence of the time of day. A circadian rhythm in recovery heart rate has been shown to occur soon after maximal exercise ceases. Therefore fitness indices, such as the Harvard test score, could contain an error as large as 5 percent because of the time of day the test is performed. This also means that self-monitoring of post-exercise pulse rates is subject to at least this degree of error. Exercise to voluntary exhaustion at intensity close to VO2max exhibits circadian variation. Subjects performing a high-intensity cycle ergometer test to exhaustion exercised for longer in the evening (10 p.m.) than in the morning (6:30 a.m.), with the mean values being 436 and 260 seconds, respectively. The subjects also tolerated higher blood-lactate levels in the evening as a result of the increase in total work performed at that time.4 However, it is possible that rhythms in vigorous exercise may also be due to a combination of motivation and psychological drive that is reflected in anaerobic power output. References 1. Conroy, R. T. W. L. and Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien, M. Diurnal variation in athletic performance.

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Journal of Physiology 1974; 236: 51P. 2. Rodahl, A, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien, M and Firth, P. G. R. Diurnal variation in performance of competitive swimmers. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1976; 16: 72-6. 3. Reilly, T. Human circadian rhythms and exercise. Critical reviews in Biomedical Engineering 1990; 18:165-80. 4. Reilly, T and Baxter, C. Influence of time of day on reactions to cycling at a fixed high intensity. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 1983; 17: 128-30.

Dear Speed Lab, What is the best way to cope with jet lag? I travel overseas because of work and therefore race and compete quite a bit overseas. It seems that I constantly have difficulty adjusting to a new time zone and this affects my training and racing. Any insight and advice on how to minimize the symptoms of jetlag would be great. Peter Snow Baltimore

Dear Peter, Jet lag, or desynchronization, refers to the disruption of circadian rhythms, which fall out of phase with each other. Physiological rhythms affected include core body temperature, the sleep-wake cycle, heart rate, ventilation, arterial pressure, diuresis and excretion of electrolytes. The disorientation of these rhythms can be caused by air travel across time zone and symptoms include fatigue and general tiredness, insomnia, loss of appetite and concentration, headaches and general malaise. Jet lag can impair the performances of athletes on busy competitive


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schedules that demand they race in many different countries in a short period of time. Westward travel tends to be easier to adjust to than travelling east. A variety of strategies have been suggested for offsetting the effects of jet lag. The first is to mentally tune in to the new local time as soon as possible. This can be done during the flight by altering your watch, missing meals if inappropriately timed and avoiding alcoholic and other diuretic drinks such as strong coffee. Also drink plenty of fruit juices to avoid the dehydrating effects of breathing dry airplane cabin air. Altering the time you go to bed a few days before departure and for a few days after arrival has been suggested as a means of lessening the disruptive effects of travelling across time zones. The time you go to bed is delayed for a few nights prior to travelling westward, with the opposite applying before flying eastward. Since only the behavior and sleep-wake cycles, and not environmental variables, are adjusted, the alterations in phase of the new biological rhythms occur at a slower rate than in timezone transition. Sleep is a stronger synchronizer of circadian rhythms than are mealtimes or social activities. Consequently, prolonged napping at the new location should be avoided as this operates against adaptation by anchoring the rhythm in its previous phase. Nonsportsmen who regularly cross time zones for short spells use this tactic of anchoring or maintaining circadian rhythms at the time phase of the country of departure. Its use by athletes would be feasible on flying in for single events but might be counteracted by the effects of so-called travel fatigue.

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Minor tranquillizers (benzodiazepines) are effective in inducing sleep but not necessarily good at keeping you asleep. Melatonin capsules taken in the evening (by local time zone in the new time zone) may reduce the symptoms of jet lag. Their use should be carefully timed according to whether the body clock should be delayed or advanced. The consequences of athletes using melatonin have not been extensively studied. It is important to use signals such as both natural daylight and bright artificial light to help resynchronize rhythms. These work to link the arousal and sleep-wake cycles to the new environment. Exercise stimulates adrenaline production, increases alertness and is an effective resynchronizer. It is recommended that moderate exercise be performed, even on the day of arrival, unless it is very late in the evening local time. It switches the athlete quickly into local time cues and is also a good antidote to travel fatigue. Perhaps the best plan is to ensure that you arrive in the country of destination in good time for physiological and performance rhythms to adapt and resynchronize. Empirical data on runners crossing the Atlantic Ocean support the wisdom of allowing one day for each time-zone shift to enable adaptation. The coping strategies outlined should help shorten this time. Dr. Mickleborough is an associate professor of exercise physiology at Indiana University. He is a former elite-level athlete who placed eighteenth overall (08:55:38) in the 1994 Hawaii Ironman World Championships with the second-fastest run (2:52:13).


Nils Nilsen

XTERRA ZONE

Brian Smith sneaks by Josiah Middaugh to win the inaugural XTERRA Winter Triathlon World Championship by one second.

XTERRA’s Fire and Ice Top off-roadies battle for summer and winter tri supremacy.

By Alex White

F NEW

1-877-TRI-BIKE

(874-2453)

CONGRATULATIONS! on top performances at

Subaru Iron Man Canada Valdora Triathletes Andriy Yastrebov (4 th overall) Matt Seeley (10 th overall)

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Flash back to March 8 when Brian Smith jolted past Josiah Middaugh less than 20 meters from the finish line to win the inaugural XTERRA Winter World Championship in dramatic fashion at Snowbasin Resort. After nearly two hours of grueling racing action that included mountain biking, snowshoeing, running and ski mountaineering in snow flurries at more than 6,000 feet elevation, Smith pulled off a jaw-dropping come-from-behind victory by a little more than one second in 1:58:29.92 (with Middaugh right behind in 1:58:31.21). Spectators at the finish line said that it was the most unbelievable 13 seconds of racing—in any sport—they had ever seen. “I had goose bumps, it was unreal,” said Mike Caldwell of Ogden, Utah. “That’s about as pure and epic a sporting

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moment as I’ve ever witnessed.” It started with two hundred yards of downhill skiing through eight gates, all of which could be seen from the main plaza at Snowbasin. Middaugh came into view of the spectators and fell rounding the first gate. All he needed to do was stay upright and the race was his. He picked himself up and slowly rounded the next two gates only to fall on his back, this time sliding down the hill. As Middaugh got up, Smith, who is fueled by years of alpine racing and a natural competitive fire, emerged from the tree line like a man possessed. Seconds later and with just two gates to go Smith zoomed past Middaugh on the inside and sped across the finish line, arms raised high. Smith not only won XTERRA’s Winter Worlds, but he captured the first-ever Fire and Ice award for having the fastest combined times at the 2007 XTERRA World Championship in Maui (where he was the top American and third overall) and XTERRA Winter Worlds in Utah. Several other XTERRA standouts, including a host of current and former national champions, made it clear that their athletic endeavors don’t end with the summer season. In the women’s adventure racing phenom Sari Anderson won the Winter


Rich Cruse

XTERRA ZONE

Smith leads a group of pro men up a hike-a-bike section at the XTERRA World Championship. World Championship. Former XTERRA amateur national champion and mother of two Lisa Isom, who was third at Winter Worlds, won the Fire and Ice duel. Isom edged Emma Garrard, the reigning XTERRA amateur national champ who was racing as a pro for the first time in the snow, by less than two minutes in the combined times event. In the amateur Fire and Ice battle Ross McMahan and Caroline Colonna, who each won their XTERRA age group national championships, posted the fastest

combined times. On October 26 the “fire” part of the 2008-2009 double will be contested on the south shore of Maui, and on March 8 the “Ice” returns to Utah. Put them together and you’ve got the hottest and coolest multisport event combination on the planet. Do you have fire and ice running through your veins? To see highlights from both races and watch the races unfold live tune in to XTERRA.tv.

2007/2008 Fire and Ice Results Name

Hometown

Division

Brian Smith

Gunnison, Colo.

MPro

Maui Time

Utah Time

Total

2:42:35

1:58:29

4:41:04

Nicolas Lebrun

Digne, France

MPro

2:45:19

1:58:40

4:43:59

Josiah Middaugh

Vail, Colo.

MPro

2:53:56

1:58:31

4:52:27

Michael Tobin

Boise, Idaho

MPro

2:57:58

2:01:26

4:59:24

Greg Krause

Denver

MPro

3:50:13

2:09:35

5:59:48

Ross McMahan

Incline Village, Nev.

MAmateur

3:15:09

2:51:30

6:06:39

Peter Hanson

Minneapolis

MAmateur

3:36:56

2:50:58

6:27:54

Lisa Isom

Vail, Colo.

FPro

3:46:04

2:45:19

6:31:23

Emma Garrard

Truckee, Calif.

FPro

3:35:02

2:58:15

6:33:17

Caroline Colonna

Taos, N.M.

FAmateur

3:48:47

2:52:56

6:41:43

Lisa Lieb

Durango, Colo.

FAmateur

3:39:09

3:05:17

6:44:26

Rachel Cieslewicz

Salt Lake City

FAmateur

3:49:55

3:39:56

7:29:51

Beverly Watson

Alberta, Canada

FAmateur

4:46:22

3:47:37

8:33:59

Mike Malloy

Birmingham, Mich.

MAmateur

6:08:59

6:02:05

12:11:04

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triathlon training weeks starting March 2009

Girasole

www.girasoleTRI.com

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Corus Action Images

UK JOURNAL

Inside the Corus Elite Triathlon Series The British Triathlon Federation rolls out the red carpet for athletes and spectators.

By Aaron Kamnetz In the U.S. there is a huge emphasis on the non-drafting race format. It is the format used at everything from Ironman to Age Group Nationals to your local sprint triathlon. 1 4 8 T R I AT H L E T E

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Yet, there is a much different form of racing out there. Yes, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m talking about draft-legal racing and more specifically, the all-new Corus Elite Triathlon Series in the Uniked Kingdom.


UK JOURNAL Corus, a British steel producer, saw the chance to make a difference in the life of young athletes and veterans through a generous sponsorship and communityoutreach program. This included the Corus Elite Triathlon Team (composed of British junior, U23 and Elite triathletes with longterm potential and proven results) and the Corus Elite Triathlon Series. While the Corus Elite Series may have Corus as the title sponsor, the British Triathlon Federation should also be recognized for the amount of time and commitment it has put into series. Add to that the support of Mazda at every race and athletes can’t help but feel like kings. I can make these claims because I was offered to race at one of the three Corus Elite races this July. The series is composed of three races (one in Scotland, one in Wales and one in England) and three distances (sprint, Olympic and super-sprint). I was invited to compete in the Wales race, which also happened to be the Olympic-distance British National Championships. The British Triathlon Federation gives athletes the royal treatment from the moment they arrive. Nirvana Europe, a travel agency partnered with the series, arranges every athlete’s travel plans and a representative from Mazda is on hand at the airport to pick up the competitors. But the race isn’t all about the athletes. Corus and the British Triathlon Federation have tried to make the series as spectatorfriendly as possible and the draft-legal format is essential to bringing in the fans. Parc Bryn Bach, Wales, is race central and is home to a small lake with two little islands in the middle. With the swim consisting of two loops, the whole swim is easily seen from a lawn chair along the lake’s bank. One quick turn in that same chair and you can see the transition area where athletes pass through another nine times during the course of the bike leg. If you walk roughly 100 yards, you will be at the base of a hill and you can see almost the entire bike portion of the race. Remember that lawn chair? Head back there, sit down and you’ll have a clear view of the run, which is five laps around the lake. Oh, and there’s no need to move to see the finish, as that happens just behind you in that transition zone you watched earlier. With constant race commentary and a helicopter overhead, you’d think you were at the ITU World Championships. The Wales event was the national championship and attracted the best of the best in Great Britain. The women’s race turned into a showdown between the

British Olympic Team members and young studs looking to show their worth. After a blistering swim, the ladies quickly got out to a fast-paced bike and rocketed through the technical course. Typical of a draft-legal event, the top women came into T2 together and the race was left to the fastest runner.

The women remained in a tight pack for the first four laps but British Olympian Hollie Avil pulled away over the final kilometer and won by 50 seconds. Avil, who just recently finished high school, made the start at the Olympic Triathlon in Beijing, but was forced to drop out because of an illness.

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on the men as the race progressedtopping out at 80 degrees. It felt unbearably hot for British athletes accustomed to much cooler summer temperatures. As the leaders began to fade, Don started to make up huge chunks of time during the final few kilometers. The veteran was able to pick off everyone except for Will Clarke, who won with a seven-second gap over Don to earn the title of â&#x20AC;&#x153;national champion.â&#x20AC;?

Corus Elite Series Tredegar Parc Bryn Bach, Wales, United Kingdom July 26, 2008 1.5-km swim, 40-km bike, 10-km run

In the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race, another young British Olympian, Alistair Brownlee, was the first to exit the water in 18:42. Like the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bike leg, the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ride was a tight affair, until a crash ripped apart the pack. The top men made it through safely and the race was left to the best runner of the day. Out of T2 a group of four men broke away from the pack, and surprisingly, prerace favorite Tim Don missed the break. The heat of the day began to take its toll ROCKET?SKIN?SEPPDF0-

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Women 1. Hollie Avil (GBR) 2. Liz Blatchford (GBR) 3. Andrea Whitcombe (GBR) 4. Jodie Swallow (GBR) 5. Kerry Lang (GBR)

1:58:19 1:59:02 1:59:19 2:00:11 2:00:25

Men 1. Will Clarke (GBR) 2. Tim Don (GBR) 3. Stuart Hayes (GBR) 4. Olly Freeman (GBR) 5. Joao Silva (POR)

1:48:28 1:48:35 1:48:51 1:49:27 1:49:49

Corus Action Images

UK JOURNAL


Photo & Design: Clarke Rodgers/sportzfoto.com

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TRIATHLETE’S GARAGE

Courtesy the Manufacturer

y e l d i R Dean

By Jay Prasuhn

B

Before the start of the Tour de France, the Silence-Lotto press conference in Brest, France, was an interesting place. A few things were ready to explode. One was the race favorite, Cadel Evans, who barely tolerated the press attention. The other was Ridley Bikes president Joachim Aerts, who presented his new TT/tri bike—the Dean—to the world media. OK, so the ultra-tightly-wound Evans cracked and didn’t live up to the massive expectations to win, recording only a “good” time trial at the Tour. But you could see the yoke of pressure sitting on his back through the ride. When you hire Lance Armstrong’s former bodyguard to steward you through the Tour things might go sideways. But don’t dare blame his bike. This year, the team’s sponsor, Belgium-based Ridley, came to market with a genuine, fast bike. They were so brazen as to create a website around it www. thefastestbikeintheworld.com. It was clearly a star at the press launch,. “Considering what we have developed in the wind tunnel and in our cooperation with Oval Concepts, we’ve developed a technology and a bike that really make a difference,” said Ridley General Manager Joachim Aerts. The room was split—half talking to Evans, the rest to Aerts and Morgan Nicol, head engineer of Oval Concepts, about this newest bike.

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Wait, what is Nicol’s stake? Well, I’ll explain—but first, let’s look at the bike. On it’s face, that whole “fastest bike” thing looks like a fair claim. The brakes are invisible, edges organic. Horizontal dropouts. Clean internal cable porting into the front of the top tube. Cut-to-fit seat mast. Check, check, check. The Aussie’s Evans and McEwen liked to use the word “slippy” in describing it. Apt, considering there was a lot of “slippy” stuff—oil—used in the development of this frame. Looks aside, the frame has several engaging engineering cues, even to a jaded journo like me. Picking up Cadel’s bike, I felt a bumpy strip—almost like clear skateboard grip tape, but not as coarse—along the leading edge lengths of the tubesets. Reason: to trip up the turbulent boundary layer before it settles onto the smoother trailing sections of frame. But the bike’s signature are the R-Flow fork and seatstay slots. Oval Concepts and Nicol earned repute with his Venturi-slotted aerobars and forks, which accelerate wind through the slots faster than air can travel around them. Nicol collaborated with the Ridley engineers to integrate these features on the Dean. The integration of the R-Flow effectively keeps the wind off the churning spokes thus dropping drag. The result is an integrated fork (with the leading edge extending forward from the headtube instead of back, as most frames do), and a front brake tucked behind it. In the back,


TRIATHLETE’S GARAGE On the road, it may have been faster than some others—perhaps the roughened paint strips and Venturi slots at work? It has a long cockpit reach making for predictable bike—perfect for straight-line race, like, say, the L.A. Triathlon or Kona. It carves sweeping turns with ease and holds a straight line without incident. A slightly long cockpit made it harder work to climb upon or navigate technical corners, but to be clear, this is not optimized to take on something like Alcatraz or Monaco. It’s more suited to Florida, Kona or Eagleman. And its ease to control in the aerobars makes it a great bike for windy days—we’ve all wasted precious energy fighting a twitchy bike and deep aero wheels in a crosswind for hours on end in a race. The Dean’s front end helps release that death grip on the aerobars and focus on racing. Instantly, Ridley finds itself in good company—with Specialized, Cervelo and Trek—as a ProTour bike with optimization for both road TT and triathlon, and it could never say that before. The Dean vaults Ridley from a company with a TT bike to one with a bike that should be seriously considered for racing in multisport. My guess is it won’t be long before some pros sort that out and get on board, realizing it has the geometry triathletes demand, and it’s fast as hell. Perhaps as their claims suggest, it’s the fastest bike in the world. And if it really comes down to seconds, if those little engineering marvels might be the difference between you going to Kona, well, there’s no sense in wondering “what if.” More on the Ridley Dean can be found at Ridley-bikes.com

Courtesy the Manufacturer

the stays sidle up as close as possible to the wheel. “This technology works best the closer you can get the stays to the spokes, to pull that air off,” Nicol said. While designing the frame in the tunnel, Ridley’s introduced a unique testing protocol: application of viscous oil to the frame. When the wind blew, the oil’s path over the frame helps determine areas for improvement before the final mold was set. The coup de grace that sets the Belgian brand apart from the Bianchis and Colangos, brands with entrenched road heritage? Ridley actually designed the Dean with triathletes in mind. The fact that Aerts thought enough to chat with me at length about fit for triathlon and athletes was a tip-off. (I doubt I’d get that kind of attention from one of the classic Italian brands.) Said Aerts, “When we developed this bike, we looked more to the tri market than road TT—that is going to be our real customer.” OK, the oil-this and slotted stays-that is all hair-splitting—does this all really matter? If you’re looking at a Kona slot, it might be important. It’s the fit that will be the forebearer to everything though. And being a classic Belgian road brand we expected slack and was pleasantly surprised to get steep. The Dean comes with two seat mast clamps, one with layback on the 76-degree seat angle cutto-fit seat mast. The other clamp is for triathletes. With zero offset, it has two fore-aft positions allowing the saddle (in fore position) to be on rail centers at 78.5 degrees. Slide it further forward and you can go to well over 80 degrees of seat angle. It required no work putting my saddle nose 1 cm behind bottom bracket as I prefer.

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TRIATHLETE’S GARAGE

Courtesy the Manufacturer

LOOK 996

By Brad Culp

I

I spent the 2008 XTERRA season ripping up the steep climbs on LOOK’s 21-pound 986 hardtail. There were more than a few downhill stretches where I thought, “Damn, a little rear travel would be nice right about now.” Apparently, a few engineers in France could read my mind--the boys at LOOK unveiled the fullsuspension 996 this fall. In my review of the 986 earlier this year, I said that it was the perfect hardtail for athletes who think they may want a full suspension. Similarly, the new 996 is the perfect fullsuspension rig for athletes who love hardtails. I gave the 996 a go on the sandy trails outside of Los Gatos, Calif., and was transformed from a hardtail addict to a member of the full-suspension

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mafia. Like its predecessor the 986, the 996 is smooth through a tight single track and nimble on punishing ascents. The most rewarding part of the ride was the way it handled rocky stretches and sandy washes—two of my least favorite aspects of XTERRA. The addition of the rear shock provides just enough give to boost your confidence and comfort over rocks but stays rigid as you mash the pedals through the sand. The 996 features a Rock Shox Monarch rear shock, which offers up to four inches of rear travel. Four inches may seem like a lot for an XTERRA athlete who digs a rigid hardtail, but LOOK’s Anti Squat Kinematics (A.S.K.) system helps isolate pedaling forces, preventing you from bobbing up and down like a buoy. Basically, it rides like a hardtail over gentle terrain (even without locking out the shock) but offers plenty of cushion when you really need it. As with LOOK’s road bikes, the 996’s frame is truly high end. LOOK uses the same high modulus carbon on their mountain bikes as they do for their road line, which keeps the weight way down. Depending on which build you choose, it’s possible for a medium frame to tip the scales at only 22.5 pounds. LOOK uses a 100 percent monocoque front triangle and aluminum-linked carbon tubes in the rear to insure maximum durability. The 996 is available in three sizes--small, medium and large--and is compatible with 80 to 100 mm forks. All things considered, I put the 996 right up there with the Specialized Epic, Scott Spark and Cannondale Scalpel as a truly lust-worthy XTERRA rig. Not bad for LOOK’s first jump into the world of dual suspension. It’s not cheap but it delivers what you’d expect after dropping five grand. Find out more at Lookcycle-usa.com

Courtesy the Manufacturer

LOOK’s first full-suspension ride is ready to destroy any XTERRA course and comes equipped with SRAM XO ($XXX ) or Shimano SLX ($XXX ).


__________________________________________________________________________________________

customers [Real of Tribuys] Chris Hill, 37 Age group triathlete. 4 years in the sport. Grew up swimming; played water polo in college. Works in planning and strategy for Mazda North America.

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Qualified for Hawaii at IM CdA 2007. Racing with the best in the world at the 2007 Ironman World Championships. No DNFs!

BEST DAY RUNNING

A long lunch run on the bike trial then taking the afternoon off.

WHAT I LOVE ABOUT THE SPORT The finish chute. For those 10 seconds everyone is a champion.

FAVORITE RACE

Hawaii IronMan. The Kailua-Kona Bay, Ali’i drive, Queen K, Hawi, there is just something magical about that place on that day.

FAVORITE INDULGENCES

Eating frozen yogurt with my daughters. Drinking a bottle of Tobin James wine with my wife.

HARDEST RACE EXPERIENCE

Finishing the run at IronMan Hawaii after throwing up all over the side of Ali’i drive.

CHRIS IS WEARING

TYR’s Wrinkle-free silicone cap, Technoflex Vision goggle; Orca’s Apex2 suit; and Polar’s RS800.

You can find Chris’ gear and other triathlon products at TRIBUYS.COM

Your one stop TRI shop


CUTTING EDGE

The Term ‘European Precision’ Is More Than a Catchphrase Growing German tire manufacturer Schwalbe and established Swiss hub and wheel builder DT Swiss prove it.

Stor y and Photos by Jay Prasuhn

I

It’s a lightly regarded part, the lowly wheel, consisting of nothing more than a rim, hub, spokes and wrapped with rubber, it’s the low man on the totem pole that is the bike. Sent on its way, it’s a whirring afterthought. Then why has DT Swiss earned a reputation as one of the finest hub and spoke manufacturers world over? Why are brands from Zipp to Lightweight calling on the small-wheel parts manufacturer to build in their hoops? And why would Schwalbe be experiencing

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a growth curve that is outclassing many of its contemporaries? Triathlete was invited to find out. German-based Schwalbe tires joined forces with DT Swiss in Biel, Switzerland—or Bienne— depending on whether you’re from the Deutch- or Francaisespeaking part of the city. Much of the allure for both brands starts in manufacturing where production is considered more of a craft. While the rest of the modern production world is sourcing out of Asia, DT Swiss does just about


CUTTING EDGE everything—and I mean everything—in its rim, spoke, hub and manufacturing and assembly factory in Biel. They even create the carbonfiber lowers for their new cross-country suspension fork in-house. For those that appreciate Swiss Precision, Biel is a global center. On our drive, we went past the Rolex factory, and production of Breitling, Rado, Tissot, Tag Heuer and the iconic Swatch happen in Biel too. If you’re looking for engineers, this is the town to find them. “The craftsmanship is here, so that is why we are here,” said DT Swiss Public Relations Manager Daniel Berger. And DT Swiss has its fair share of engineers. Schwalbe in Reicchshof is ground zero for testing. They undergo design and prototyping on-site, as well as roundness, impact and puncture resistance testing. And that puncture resistance has taken a massive step up. Product manager Carsten Zahn put Schwalbe’s

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newest tire, the Ultremo-R, through a unique test for the media: an end-weighted pendulum affixed with a sharp toothpick was dropped from the apex onto a waiting tire. The first was one of their older tires; it punctured. But special durometers and use of a puncture-resistant cloth layer produced by their partner Warwick Mills (makers of bulletproof vests), allowed the new Ultremo-R to not only hold up, it broke the toothpick. Aside from a bit of real-world testing, we were taken on a long day in the saddle, finishing with a three-mile ride across dirt roads. There were no punctures, and our post-ride examination revealed no cuts. Impressive. The factory tour at DT Swiss instills a new appreciation for just what goes into a wheel. From the assembly line of employees handinstalling rubber seals into axles to the hand-measuring of every


CUTTING EDGE i m /tr r wi an m fo e S Pl e g .co r F in it ch a in is oa V a c Tr im sw tri w. ww

DEFY

your own limitations, dial into your potential! The Complete Guide to Triathlon Swimming, The Essential Triathlon Swimming DVD and a Membership to Tri Swim Coach are tools aimed at giving you a whole new perspective on not only participating, but also competing in Triathlons. Discover the secrets of employing the proper methods, techniques, and swim workouts to swim much more ease, retain the energy for the other two legs of the race, and slash precious minutes off your race time.

CONSERVE ENERGY, HAVE MORE CONFIDENCE!

SWEEPSTAKES RULES 1. No purchase necessary. To enter without ordering, send an index card to: Triathlete Zipp Sweepstakes, 10179 Huennekens St., 100, San Diego, CA 92121, with your name address and phone number. 2. This sweepstakes is sponsored by Triathlete, 10179 Huennekens St., 100, San Diego, CA 92121. 3. All entries must be received by December 31st, 2008. Triathlete is not responsible for lost, late, misdirected, damaged, illegible or postage-due mail. 4. Prize winners will be selected no later than January 16th, 2009 from among all entries received. Winner selection will take place under the supervision of Triathlete, whose decisions are final. Each entrant consents to the transfer of all information contained in the completed entry form to other companies.

rim for roundness and diameter. The creation of a spoke, from its inception as a piece of wire in a massive spool to the finished product, is fascinating.

5. The odds of winning are determined by the total number of eligible entries received. Taxes, where applicable, are the sole responsibility of the winner.

Master Craftmanship

6. Potential winners will be notified by mail, telephone or e-mail. Potential winners must follow the directions contained in any correspondence and return all forms correctly completed within 7 days of the date of correspondence. Noncompliance will result in disqualification and the naming of an alternate winner. 7. All entrants will be eligible to win a Zipp Speed Weapons complete upgrade. There is no cash exchange for this prize. 8. Employees of Zipp and Triathlete or anyone affiliated are not eligible. Sweepstakes subject to all federal, state and local tax laws and void where prohibited by law. 9. For the name of the winner, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope and letter of request to: Triathlete Zipp Sweepstakes, 10179 Huennekens St., 100, San Diego, CA 92121.

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And in its creation, the concept of digital automation doesn’t exist. Pulled from the spool, the wire is sent through a series of dials to straighten the steel wire. The wire is cut to length, one end punched under high pressure to create a head, the head is bent and pressed with the famed “DT” logo on its end. Threads are cut at the opposite end of the spoke, and voila. Add 31 more spokes, a hub and rim and you have a structurally sound wheel. The process from spool to finished spoke takes about 10 seconds, with a spoke made every second from one of the several machines running. With the machine spitting out thousands per day, there is a woman pulling spokes, checking lengths and examining the j-bend for inconsistencies. Maintaining high tolerances is one of DT Swiss’ hallmarks.


shaken out (so you don’t hear an insanityinducing rattling from within with spinning wheel. The braking surface is cut. Eyelets installed. Nipples paired up. All done in-house by master craftsmen. From there, the industry calls— whether major manufacturers or momand-pop shops—to build up that dream custom wheelset for a customer. Freehub bodies. Nipples. Rims. Spokes. All at a shop’s beck and call.

inside:

lines

Put to the Test

And they have exacting standards for other varieties of spokes as well. The double-butted and bladed spokes are produced from blanks, which are coldforged such that no structural compromise is introduced by way of material being removed. The diameters and shapes change but the strength remains the same. The rim and nipple production and assembly facility is equally impressive. Like the spoke, a straight rim is sent through a die to bend it into a hoop. The ends are welded, with either an interior sleeve or intense pressure and heat, joining the ends. The leftover flash material of aluminum is then CNC cut off. The rim then undergoes a battery of activities. Rim holes are cut. The leftover aluminum that falls into the rim must be

But for the other brands optimizing their own rims, getting lesser play is DT Swiss’s own homegrown wheelsets, and undeservedly so. We got to play on the wheels and the setting couldn’t have been more gorgeous: a 43-mile ride with 6,000 feet up the area’s legendary climb, Mount Chasseral (inspiration for the name of their lightweight climbing wheelset, the Mon Chasseral). While they have their new mid-v RRC 1250 full-carbon clincher coming down the pike, my favorite is one we aim to test more: the new RR 1850. I’ve always been a big fan of the racertrainer, a wheel you can put your daily miles into, which has an aero alloy rim that will give the wheel potential double-duty service as a race-day wheel—a nice feature for those running a lean wallet in today’s economy. At $1,028, including slick RWS skewers, and weighing 1850 grams (hence the name), it’s a great value. With that deep rim and bladed spokes, they get rolling fast on the flats and were strong enough to take on that little three-mile off-road foray that finished our ride. Another nice feature? It’s available in plain ol’ black, or sexy white. Guess which ones I thought looked slickest on my Cervelo SLC-SL? And to be clear, DT Swiss does outsource building of their wheel line— at DT Swiss’ North American base in Fort Collins, Colo., or their own factory in Poland, each location with a dedicated full-time staff, builds them nipple-up. Oh, yes, the nipples, which are created from raw material in Biel in the “nippelraum.” Silver, black or anodized gold or red spokes are pressed and then CNC cut into their final shape. Hundreds of thousands are created every day. We left Switzerland impressed with the fact that indeed, the German and Swiss precision adage is a real thing. Schwalbe and DT Swiss proved they’re moving fastforward. And the wheel? There’s more to it than meets the eye-let.

Upgrade your home repair shop’s cable selection with Jagwire’s brake and derailleur cables. Prestretched and lubricated, they’ll put you on the inside line to peak performance. www.jagwireusa.com

3251 Triathlete.indd 1

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TRAINING

IN ENGLISH

you are supposed to do 10 x 50 freestyle, then either wait until it is open or do 10 x 30 to 40 strokes in the ocean or lake. • Study the course and transition area and train on the course. If it is an IM then you will definitely want to drive the course and only run and ride selected areas of the course. At Kona I recommend training early and late to stay out of the midday heat. Your heat acclimatization occurs at this time and most race-week training should be done in more favourable conditions. • Be ready to deal with distractions. Use the stopwatch if necessary because a simple swim on the race course can lead to an hour at the expo and then a few more hours catching up with old friends. Next thing you know you’re hungry, tired and dehydrated. • Come with all your plans set: nutrition plan, race strategy and race equipment. • Be prepared for the Super Bowl of triathlon at a world championship—crowds, mayhem and distractions. Keep a few nutritional items and some hand sanitizer handy.

Big Race Do’s and Don’ts By Cliff English

T

Two of our sport’s world championships are coming up: the Ford Ironman World Championship and the Foster Grant Ironman World Championship 70.3. Over the years at major races, world championships and Olympics, I witnessed experienced athletes falter and it wasn’t as much on race day as it was in the pre-race week. Here are some prerace rules and tips to help you on your way to racing success.

Do • Listen to good advice and take what makes sense. Remember that during race week at big races—with all the talks and clinics going on at the expo—it can be overwhelming. Be confident in your plan. • Stick to your pre-race taper plan but stay flexible. For example, if the pool is closed when 1 6 2 T R I AT H L E T E

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Do Not • Train too much or get lured into racing in training, which can be very tempting. Taper training should be light with some pick-ups and if you can’t keep the ego checked at the door then train alone during race week. If it feels easy keep it that way. Don’t force the effort. • Don’t change all your gear just because the expo had some great new tri-suit or run shoes you hadn’t seen before. Stick with your plan. You should have already used your gear in training or in previous races so you know what to expect. • Don’t try all new sport nutrition. Go with what you prepared and you can try something new for the next race. • Don’t over-think. Relax. Until next time, stick to the plan! Cliff English is a high-performance triathlon coach who has led many athletes, including Samantha McGlone, to top finishes at ITU World Championships, ITU World Cups, IM Kona, Clearwater 70.3, Chicago, Wildflower and many more. For more on coach Cliff or 2009 training camps check out www.cliffenglishcoaching.com.

Courtesy Cliff English

Be prepared for the Super Bowl of triathlon at a world championship—crowds, mayhem and distractions.


GEAR BAG Miracle Salt $12.95 (100 capsules) While most sports nutrition products have gone high-tech, Miracle Salt is kicking it old school. Instead of loading up their tabs with chemicals, each tablet contains only one ingredient: salt. It’s nothing but 100-percent Himalayan mineral salt. If you’re the type who only shops at Whole Foods and steers clear of GMOs, this is your salt tab. Miracle-salt.com/triathlete.php

Faster Tomorrow ARX $35 In the spirit of keeping things natural, Faster Tomorrow has introduced all-natural Athletic Recovery X-ccelerator (ARX). There’s no laundry list of synthetic ingredients—just a healthy blend of herbs and extracts to help you feel your best. These ingredients include reishi mushroom, cordyceps and ginseng—all stuff that most natural health professionals would recommend. Fastertomorrow.com

Easton EC90 Crank with Ceramic Bottom Bracket $899

Images courtesy the manufacturers

When it came time to design their newest road crank, Easton spared no expense. They set out to build a crank with the highest stiffnessto-weight ratio in the world and here it is. It’s one of the only cranks in the industry that comes close to matching the stiffness of the Dura-Ace crank but weighs only 558 grams (ceramic bottom bracket adds 100 grams). Just because it’s light doesn’t mean it’s weak. Easton backs the crank with a five-year warranty—so feel free to beat the crap out of it. You could save $120 and get a standard bottom bracket, but giving this baby anything less than ceramic is a crime. Eastonbike.com

Yamaha BODiBeat $300 When you download a song into the BODiBeat MP3 player, the unit automatically categorizes the song by beats per minute. When you work out the player selects songs to match your intensity using the included heart rate strap. The unit, which also computes distance, time and pace, can hold about 100 songs and runs for more than 10 hours on a single charge. Yamaha.com/bodibeat

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All3Sports.com/tv Your online resource to learn about all things triathlon.


TICKET PUNCH

8 Kona Tips From A (Somewhat) Seasoned Veteran By Samantha McGlone

After accumulating 10 years in the sport, hundreds of races and a zillion frequent flier miles, I figured I knew a thing or two about triathlon. But in October 2007 I went back to rookie status. I attempted my first Ironman in Kona, the granddaddy of all triathlons. Armed with blind optimism and plenty of unsolicited advice from veteran ironmen I managed to get through my first race relatively unscathed. Needless to say, I made my share of mistakes and I definitely learned lessons on and off the lava fields. Many lessons are just common sense (which begs the question of why I didn’t think of them in the first place) but a few are little things that may not cross your mind until you are out there doing them. So here are eight tips to make your day a little easier. 1. Never underestimate the importance of specificity of training. This applies to any race, but Kona has particular challenges to prepare for. Even if you have a limited amount of training time during the week (and who doesn’t?), get the most bang for your buck by doing a long combo weekend—a long bike with a short transition run on the first day, followed by a long run early the next morning. A six- to eight-hour day on Saturday with a two- to three-hour run at marathon pace the next day is the best simulation of an Ironman short of actually doing one. But by breaking the brick into two days you can reap the benefits without incurring the breakdown. Be sure to perform the long run at or close to IM race pace, since it’s the only way to train your body to maintain that pace in a fatigued state. 2. Acclimatization for the race is crucial since it is hot and humid in Kona in October, just when the rest of the country is cooling off for fall. If an extended training camp in a warm climate is out of the question, be creative with your acclimatization. Favored methods include deliberately overdressing on long runs, riding the trainer indoors and doing hot yoga a couple times per week. The oppressive heat of Ali’i Drive is a breeze after the masochism of Mr. Bikram. 3. Try to get out to Kona beforehand, ideally for the Hawaii 70.3 in June. Nothing helps prepare you for the challenges of Kona like racing there. Riding the IM course up to Hawi and back is a lesson in just how hard the race is. It also gives you a chance to check out the island and get sightseeing out of the way. 4. Ignore what everyone else is doing the week before the race. I can’t emphasize this enough. It’ll seem as if everyone else is training like crazy the days before the race. From 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. you will see someone sprinting down Ali’i Drive. Follow your prescribed taper program, then get inside, put your feet up and ignore everyone else. 5. Learn the course. Technically, the race course is a piece of cake, but the conditions are another matter. Ride at Hawi and practice descending in the crosswinds—for the uninitiated they can be a 1 6 6 T R I AT H L E T E

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Robert Murphey/bluecreekphotography.com

bit of a challenge. Visualize the course, your plan of attack and nutrition strategy a few times in the week before the race. And learn where the swim start is. Embarrassingly enough I didn’t, and found myself standing on the beach three minutes before the canon wondering where the other pros were. It turns out they were all treading water at the end of the pier … where the start line was. 6. Listen to your body the week before the race. All sorts of niggles and phantom injuries will pop up in taper week. Don’t go out and test them every day. Instead, use the extra time to rest, stretch and get massaged. Don’t worry about losing fitness in the final week— trust your training; it’s all in there.

7. Stick to your pace. This is one of those rules in the “duh” category but it’s probably the most commonly broken one, even by pros. Ironman is a long, hot, challenging day. No matter how great you feel in the first hour, don’t be tempted to go out faster than you have trained for; it will come back and bite you later. 8. Practice peeing on the bike. It’s harder than it looks. Enough said. No matter what happens, your first Ironman is always memorable. Nothing will totally prepare you for the experience but there’s no reason to make all your own mistakes when you can learn from someone else’s. T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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AT THE RACES

Europeans Outrun Defending Champs In Kentucky Longree and Kramer-Postma come from behind to win the second edition of Ironman Louisville.

Kramer-Postma had plenty of energy left at the finish even after closing with a 3:18 marathon.

As the blistering sun seared Kentucky on August 31, the competition at the second annual Ford Ironman Louisville was equally heated. Athletes persevered through the relentless 90-degree weather to find the course littered with unexpected victories as well as unpredictable shortfalls. After enduring hours of close competition, German Maximilian Longree and Dutchwoman Mariska Kramer-Postma ran their way to victory. Instead of the typical Ironman mass start, the 2,100 athletes steadily poured into the Ohio River time-trial style. This unique start was put in place to fit all the athletes in the narrow channel where they began the swim. One by one the pros entered the water first with the age groupers following suit. The swim course began in the protected waters behind Towhead Island and followed the riverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main channel downstream toward the finish.

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analysis of run technique and underwater swim video production. Join our leading mutisport instructors to learn essential skills of the coaching business. Communicate better with racers about swimming, biking and running. Join air-flow demonstrations in the wind-tunnel. Learn to digitally analyze power curves, along with run and swim images. Go beyond USAT and USAC licensing courses. Transform your coaching into a business, not just a hobby.

Designed for Coaches! Nov. 21 - 23, 2008 College Station, TX

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Rich Cruse

By Brooke McEwen


Rich Cruse

AT THE RACES

Super-swimmer Andrew Johns leads the pro men down the Ohio River.

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AT THE RACES

Craft base gauge//proCOOL//proZEROextreme//proZERO//proWARM www.craftsports.us

Optimize your body’s core climate with Craft base layers

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Aussie Andrew Johns led the elites out of the river in a tick over 51 minutes, followed closely by American Chris Hauth. In the women’s race, American Hillary Biscay was able to break away from the chase group of woman and emerged just behind the male leaders. Johns’ swift transition put him 1:22 ahead of Hauth through the first five miles of the bike course, but Australia’s Chris McDonald, defending last year’s title, T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

sped towards Johns and quickly closed the gap. Despite remaining behind the leader, McDonald narrowed in on second place just 20 miles into the 112-mile tour of Northern Kentucky. Meanwhile in the women’s competition, Biscay held the lead over Californian Eileen Swanson, Aussie Lizbeth Kristensen and reigning champ Heather Gollnick of the U.S. First-year pro Bree Wee of Hawaii was well back of the

Rich Cruse

proWARM˘

The run course takes athletes to the Indiana side of the Ohio River before finishing in downtown Louisville.


AT THE RACES

leaders during the early miles of the ride, but made up time—fast. McDonald overtook Johns roughly 70 miles into the race and by the 90-mile marker McDonald increased his lead to 2:51 over Johns. The defending champ’s lead grew through the final miles of the bike leg, while Germany’s Michael Goehner continued to chase Johns. Gollnick suffered a broken spoke 45 miles into the women’s bike leg and soon

after Wee flew passed Kristensen to take the lead. Biscay, now fourth and lying in wait, launched an attack of her own while Gollnick repaired her wheel. As the women wrapped up their ride, the men headed out onto the marathon and Longree, who came off the bike in fourth, quickly made his presence felt. Just eight miles into the run, Longree overtook Goehner for second and McDonald’s lead was evaporating with each passing mile. T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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A hungry Longree scarfs down a hamburger after crossing the finish line.

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Amidst Longree’s sudden comeback, Johns unexpectedly fell off the leader board. It was later learned that Johns pulled out of the race because of back problems. Longree caught McDonald near the halfway point of the marathon and it was clear that the German had the best legs of the pair. Eager to take the first Ironman victory of his career, Longree gapped McDonald by almost 90 seconds per mile over the final half of the run. The 27-year-old made his way down Fourth Street to the finish line, soaking up every second of his impressive run. As the crowd cheered him on, Longree doubled back to make merry with spectators and high-five those nearest to the finishing chute. He crossed the finish line in 8:33:58 and immediately celebrated by scoffing down an enormous hamburger. Clearly his stomach was feeling as good as his legs. “I pushed myself to catch [McDonald],” Longree said. “I didn’t know if my legs would work.” McDonald finished just over 20 minutes later, but was able to hang onto the runner-up position. Sergio Marques of Portugal took third. As for the women’s marathon, Mariska Kramer-Postma battled back from more than 17 minutes behind Wee at the end of the bike and steadily crept up the leader-board. Kristensen recovered the lead from Wee, while Gollnick made up for lost time on the bike course and moved into third just before the halfway point. The defending champ continued her assault on the leaders and took over the top position by the 20-mile mark. With only four miles to go, Gollnick was looking strong, but she couldn’t shake Kramer-Postma, who had moved all the way

Brooke McEwen

AT THE RACES


5(*,675$7,2123(16129$0 :::1<&75,&20


AT THE RACES up to second place. The Dutchwoman flew past the defending champ with only a few miles to go and Gollnick had no answer. Kramer Postma hit the line in 9:54:17, just two minutes in front of Gollnick. Kristensen held off Biscay to secure the final spot on the podium. Holding true to the Ironman mantra, KramerPostma simply said, “Anything is possible,” when asked about her incredible comeback.

Ford Ironman Louisville Louisville, Ky.

Aug. 31, 2008 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike, 26.2-mile run

Age-groupers ready themselves for the non-wetsuit swim in the warm waters of the Ohio River.

Women 1. Mariska Kramer Postma (NED). . . . . . . 9:54:17 2. Heather Gollnick (USA). . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:56:53 3. Lisbeth Kristensen (DEN) . . . . . . . . . . . 9:58:33 4. Hillary Biscay (USA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:59:31 5. Rebecca Preston (AUS). . . . . . . . . . . . 10:06:15

IT’S BACK!…BUT WITH A NEW NAME, AND NEW FUN! GO BACK. GIVE BACK.

HAWAII REVISITED – AUGUST 9, 2009 HONOLULU, HI

THE ORIGINAL HAWAII TRIATHLON ADVENTURE TO BENEFIT THE CHALLENGED ATHLETES FOUNDATION

The Legendary Course: to benefit: • 2.4 mile Waikiki Rough Water Swim • 112 mile Around Oahu Bike • 26.2 mile Honolulu Marathon *Participate as an individual or with your friends as a team! The New Fun! To celebrate its new name, Hawaii Revisited has some new racing divisions and incentives. For more information, please visit www.challengedathletes.org. It is a one of a kind experience in today’s world of triathlon, so don’t miss it in 2009! To register, please visit www.hawaiirevisited09.kintera.org or call (858) 526-6576. 1 7 4 T R I AT H L E T E

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8:33:58 8:54:52 8:59:15 9:04:24 9:13:24

Brooke McEwen

Men 1. Maximilian Longree (GER). . . . . . . . . . . 2. Chris McDonald (AUS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Sergio Marques (POR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. Michael Goehner (GER). . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. Chris Hauth (USA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Paul Phillips

AT THE RACES

Englishman Stuart Hayes felt comfortable in Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unusually mild weather. 1 7 6 T R I AT H L E T E

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AT THE RACES

Hayes, Lavelle Roll Through the Windy City 8,600 athletes and pristine conditions make the 26th annual Accenture Chicago Triathlon one for the ages.

By Brad Culp Chicago certainly doesn’t have a reputation for ideal weather, especially among triathletes. It’s too hot and muggy in the summer and too damn cold in the wintertime, which often runs through April. Spring and fall can forget to appear for years at a time. But Chicago does have its good days and luckily for the thousands of multisporters participating in this year’s Accenture Chicago Triathlon, August 24 was one of those days. First-timers, elite age-groupers, relay racers and professionals were all treated to clear skies, a high of 75 degrees, calm Lake Michigan waters and just a little breeze (this is Chicago, after all). Boasting 8,600 athletes, this year’s event was the largest single-day triathlon in the history of planet Earth. With so many start waves spread so far apart, many athletes were able to participate in both the sprint and Olympic-distance races. While it was hard to ignore the 50-wave age-group exodus of bodies plunging into Monroe Harbor, it was even harder to ignore the impressive pro start list, which was chock-full of shortcourse talent. Headlining the men’s race was returning champion Greg Bennett of Australia. Last year’s Lifetime Fitness Series champion was forced to sit out of the Olympics after Australia lost its third qualifying spot. Bennett’s legs may have been fresh from sitting out of the Games, but he was no doubt a little jetlagged, as he came straight to Chicago from Beijing, where he watched his wife, Laura, compete for the U.S. Luckily for Bennett, his greatest challenge appeared to be two men who were equally fatigued. American Matt Reed T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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AT THE RACES

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also came to the Windy City from Beijing, where he posted a 32ndplace finish. Countryman Andy Potts was only a week removed from an impressive 3:52 first-place finish at Timberman 70.3 and was admittedly not fully recovered. “Racing the week after doing a 70.3 is tough,” Potts said. “It’s hard to have that snap you need for an Olympic-distance race.” Looking to take advantage of that trio’s fatigue were Brit Stuart Hayes, Canadian Brent McMahon and Aussie Richie Cunningham. Super-swimmer Potts was unable to break away from the field during the 1.5-km swim and as a result, a large lead pack emerged from Lake Michigan after about 18 and a half minutes. Potts was in the mix, along with Hayes, McMahon, Aussie Paul Matthews and American Kevin Collington. Reed hit T1 only 15 seconds behind and Bennett exited the water another minute back. The defending champ was quick to erase most of his deficit on the flat-and-fast 40-km bike leg along Chicago’s Lakefront. Bennett posted the fastest bike split of the day (56:11), but he wasn’t able to catch up to Hayes and Reed, who rode only a few seconds slower. Reed was the first to hit T2, but Hayes, known for his run speed, was lurking only 15 seconds behind. Bennett made it to transition less than a minute later and all three men headed out at a blistering pace to start the 10-km run. A few miles into the run it was clear that Hayes and Bennett had the freshest legs. Bennett caught Reed by the two-mile mark, but he was having much more trouble reeling in the fleet-footed Brit. The reigning champ gained a little ground over the next two miles, but Hayes kicked with just over a mile to go and Bennett

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could not respond. Hayes’ 32:07 run put him at the line first in 1:48:09, with Bennett claiming the runner-up spot 90 seconds later. McMahon made up serious ground on the run to overtake Reed for the final podium spot. The start list on the women’s side was equally impressive with a mix of ITU standouts and Kona contenders. Leading the way was American Becky Lavelle, who has set her sights on capturing the inaugural Toyota Cup (by scoring the most points at the five Lifetime Fitness Triathlon Series events). Looking to prevent Lavelle from capturing a much-needed win was a pair of former Olympians-turned-Iron women: Sam McGlone of Canada and Joanna Zeiger of the U.S. Also in the mix were short-coursers Sarah Groff of the U.S. and Jodie Swallow and Liz Blatchford of Great Britain. The women’s swim resembled a World Cup event, with a huge pack of leaders making it out of Lake Michigan in just over 20 minutes. Groff led the way, but all the contenders were hot on her heels. Once on the bike it became clear that Lavelle wouldn’t settle for second. The American put almost two minutes into the rest of the field as she turned over a massive gear and posted an impressive 1:00:56 split. “I’ve been working a lot on my biking, which has been a bit of a weakness for me in the past,” Lavelle said afterward. “My

legs felt great today.” With McGlone dropping out after the bike, it was up to Groff to give chase, but Lavelle’s lead proved to be way too big for anyone to make the run a contest. The American broke the tape in 2:00:19, comfortably ahead of Groff, who finished second in 2:01:45. Zeiger was determined to make it an all-American podium, but she couldn’t catch Swallow, who finished third in 2:03:53. “I really needed this win to score some points in the [Toyota Cup] series,” Lavelle said. “I’ll be at L.A. and the [Dallas] U.S. Open and hopefully I’ll have enough to be in the running for the series title.”

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Aug. 24, 2008 1.5-km swim, 40-km bike, 10-km run

Men 1. Stuart Hayes (GBR). . . . . . . . . . . . 2. Greg Bennett (AUS). . . . . . . . . . . 3. Brent McMahon (CAN) . . . . . . . . . 4. Matt Reed (USA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. Andy Potts (USA) . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Women 1. Becky Lavelle (USA) . . . . . . . . . . . 2. Sarah Groff (USA). . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Jodie Swallow (GBR). . . . . . . . . . . 4. Joanna Zeiger (USA). . . . . . . . . . . 5. Liz Blatchford (GBR). . . . . . . . . . .

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AT THE RACES

Zeiger led start to finish to win by more than four minutes.

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The 5430 Long Course Triathlon brought a stellar professional field to Boulder, Colo., despite being held during the same week as the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The half-Ironman distance race featured standouts such as Australians Chris McDonald and Simon Thompson, and Americans Tim O’Donnell and Brian Fleischmann. The women’s lineup included five-time Ironman winner Heather Gollnick and former Olympian Joanna Zeiger. With many pros calling Boulder home in the summer, the third and final race in the Boulder Triathlon Series allowed many of these pros to race on the roads they train on every day. In a race that featured athletes with various distance specialties and experience levels, it is no surprise that the competition brought out a mix of race strategies. Thompson came on strong in the run to conquer his competitors in the men’s race after sitting in the middle of the pack through the swim and much of

Timothy Carlson

Thompson, Zeiger Overcome Tough Pro Field to Win Boulder Long Course


AT THE RACES the bike. After crashing 10 days before the race on a training ride, Zeiger was forced to take on a much different strategy because of sore ribs and pain with every breath. She came into the race hoping that she could build a lead great enough off the swim and the bike so that any trouble on the run would be less of a factor in her pursuit of victory. Thompson didn’t seem like an early contender to win as the 15th man out of the water. Fleischmann was first out of the Boulder Reservoir with a time of 25:54. He was followed by O’Donnell, age-grouper Eric Peterson and Australian Paul Matthews. With a three-minute gap between him and the leading pack, Thompson took to the bike and struggled to close the growing margin between him and race leader O’Donnell. O’Donnell entered T2 with a lead over Matthews, Australian Stephen Hackett and Fleischmann. Thompson came into the transition down nearly seven minutes to O’Donnell and took to the half-marathon with several pros already ahead of him. With less than 500 meters to go, Thompson ran fast enough to overcome every pro but O’Donnell. Thompson passed a struggling O’Donnell for the win and a final time of 3:50:43. O’Donnell held onto second place with a time of 3:51:16, and Fleischmann crossed the line at 3:52:02 for third place. With an all-out strategy for the first part of the race, Zeiger accomplished her goal on the first leg and came out of the water first with a swim time of 26:44. Her closest pursuers were agegroup athletes Brooke Davison and Amanda Durner. With top competitors Golnick and Fiona Docherty of New Zealand minutes off of Zeiger’s swim time, Zeiger continued to exert maximum

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effort on the bike in hopes of building an insurmountable lead going into the run. Zeiger entered the run with a sizeable advantage, allowing her to run a steady pace in route to victory and a total time of 4:18:07. Docherty’s half-marathon time of 1:22:19 propelled her into second place and a final time of 4:32:28. Davison was consistent in all three legs of the race and earned third place overall, beating numerous pros and winning her age group by a 20-minute margin.

5430 Long Course Triathlon Boulder, Colo.

August 10, 2008 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run

Men 1. Simon Thompson (AUS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:50:43 2. Tim O’Donnell (USA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:51:16 3, Brian Fleischmann (USA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:52:02 4. Paul Matthews (AUS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:53:48 5. Joe Gambles (USA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:56:12

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Women 1. Joanna Zeiger (USA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4:18:07 2. Fiona Docherty (NZL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:22:38 3. Brooke Davison (USA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:24:14* 4. Angela Naeth (USA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:27:03 5. Katherine Baker (USA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:28:46 * Age-group athlete

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Athletes cautiously wade in the frigid waters11:31 of Okanagan Lake1**acimabue�**Users:acimabue:Desktop: before BAD-10-07-10543.Triathlete 11/1/07 AM Page the start of Ironman Canada.

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AT THE RACES

In a race year that has boasted as many headlines about weather as it has triumphant athletic stories, race morning in Penticton, British Columbia, Canada, was a welcome sight to pros and age-groupers. The days leading up to the Subaru Ironman Canada gradually grew warmer, giving race day an anticipated high of 78 degrees Fahrenheit—a very warm temperature for the region. With the rising temperatures came relief in the water. Early in the week, pros took to the waters of Okanagan Lake and cautiously practiced their open water swims in frigid waters struggling to reach 60 degrees. By race morning the water temperature had dramatically increased, helping to set up the day for nearly perfect race conditions. While wind and rain did briefly find their way onto the course late in the race, athletes were unfazed and focused on the course. The competition included a strong pro field for both the men and the women. As one of the later races in the Ironman season, the event featured pros with varying levels of experience and broad ranges of goals. Canadian Jasper Blake came into the race looking for his second Ironman title. His only Ironman win came

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at Ironman Canada in 2006, and he entered this race as one of the fan favorites. Another favorite of the crowd was New Zealander Bryan Rhodes, who once lived and trained in Penticton, and has made Ironman Canada a staple on his race schedule. With four Ironman titles to his name, Rhodes entered the race looking for his first win on this familiar course. Australian Jason Shortis was seeking his second Ironman victory of the season, after winning Ironman Japan in May. Canadian Jonathan Caron entered looking for a flawless Ironman race, after spending nearly 20 minutes roadside with mechanical issues in Ironman Arizona. While Caron came back to finish sixth in Arizona, he would have to overcome a summer of health issues to fare well in this race. The womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s field included 11-time Ironman winner Lisa Bentley of Canada, who chose Ironman Canada as her first Ironman race of the year. The early favorite coming into the race was Australian Belinda Granger. Granger has enjoyed a successful 2008 season, and won at this race in 2006. She would be challenged by Coeur dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alone Ironman winner and Canadian Heather Wurtele, who burst onto the scene in Idaho in June and has since been considered a contender in any race she enters. 2006 World Championship runner-up Desiree Ficker of the U.S. had not yet qualified for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race in Kona, and used Ironman Canada as a last-chance effort to qualify. Considered one of the best swimmers in the sport, Germanyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jan Sibbersen led the men throughout the entire 2.4-mile swim, and came out of the water in a time of 45:57. He was followed out of the lake by Australian Matt Clark and American Mark

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Australiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Belinda Granger recaptured her glory in Canada.

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AT THE RACES Van Akkeren. The three men swam close throughout much of the first leg of the race, and came out of the water together with the trailing pack finishing the swim nearly three minutes behind the trio. Sibbersen used his T1 time of 1:20 to gain on Clark and Van Akkeren and entered the bike with a 35-second lead. Rhodes entered T1 in fourth position, followed closely by Caron and Hiroyuki Nishicuchi of Japan. Van Akkeren quickly caught up to Sibbersen on the bike, and the two shared the lead for the early part of the race, with Clark riding close behind. Van Akkeren powered ahead of Sibbersen in the 13th mile to take the solo lead. Sibbersen quickly fell off the lead pace, leaving Rhodes as the closest pursuer nearly three minutes behind at the halfway point of the bike. Van Akkeren was the first to finish the bike, and took a four-minute lead onto the run course. He was followed out of T2 by Rhodes and Canadian Scott Curry. As soon as Rhodes took to the run course it was clear he was determined to run down Van Akkeren. Less than four miles into the run, Rhodes closed the gap to two minutes. Less than two miles later, Rhodes passed the fading Van Akkeren to take the lead. Rhodes ran in front all alone with a fast-approaching Blake following. Blake closed the margin on the New Zealander through the next 15 miles, but slowed his pace in the final 10k, giving Rhodes his long-awaited first Ironman Canada victory a time of 8:30:12. In his first Ironman race, Austrian Bernhard Hiebl had the fastest marathon time of 2:53:16 and crossed the finish line in second place, with a final time of 8:34:34. Blake rounded out the podium with a time of 8:36:08. American Andrea Fisher led the women out of the swim with a time of 53:23, followed closely by Granger and American Bree

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Wee. Granger wasted no time in taking the lead on the bike and attempted to surge ahead of the pack, but was closely followed by fellow Australian Alison Fitch. Granger slowly grew a lead over Fitch, with the two charging ahead of the trailing pack. Through 50 miles, Granger had stretched her lead to 3:30 over Fitch, and 11:54 over the next closest rider, Wurtele. Granger carried her growing lead into T2 and onto the run course. With Granger entering the run with a lead of more than 10 minutes, and Fitch running with a sizeable lead over Wurtele, the race behind the pair became a battle for third position. Wurtele Subaru Ironman maintained a strong pace Canada and pulled away from her Penticton, B.C., Canada followers, leaving the top August 24, 2008 three women spread out 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike, 26.2-mile run with a trailing pack working Men to close the margin. Granger crossed the 1. Bryan Rhodes (NZL) . . . . . . . 8:30:12 finish line at 9:17:58 for the 2. Bernhard Hiebl (AUT) . . . . . 8:34:34 win, followed by Fitch with 3. Jasper Blake (CAN) . . . . . . . 8:36:08 a time of 9:26:15. Wurtele 4. Andriy Yastrebov (UKR) . . . . . 8:37:11 held onto third with a time 5. Justin Daerr (USA) . . . . . . . . 8:37:34 of 9:39:51. Women Sara Gross of Canada 1. Belinda Granger (AUS) . . . . . 9:17:58 posted a marathon time of 2. Alison Fitch (AUS) . . . . . . . . 9:26:15 3:16:25 to overcome Ficker 3. Heather Wurtele (CAN) . . . . . 9:39:51 and Bentley for fourth 4. Sara Gross (CAN) . . . . . . . . . 9:41:31 position. 5. Lisa Bentley (CAN) . . . . . . . . 9:42:37

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American Andy Potts had time to carry his 1-year-old son, Boston, across the finish line.

Potts Wins Big At Timberman Wellington tops all but five pro men.

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has failed to remain a secret. Every year, the Timberman 70.3 Ironman event attracts some of the biggest names in triathlon. The combination of the outdoor beauty and open arms of the community has led many pros to make the Timberman event a staple on their annual race schedule. This year’s starting lineup resembled that of the Ironman World Championships in Kona, Hawaii, or the 70.3 World Championships in Clearwater, Fla. Talent on the men’s side included New Zealand’s Terenzo Bozzone, Great Britain’s Fraser Cartmell and Americans Andy Potts, Simon Lessing and Michael Lovato. The women’s field was equally deep with Great Britain’s Chrissie Wellington, Australia’s Pip Taylor and Americans Dede Griesbauer, Amanda Stevens and Karen Smyers. With a power-packed pro field making up the start list the race was slated to be one of most competitive of the 70.3 season. Reigning 70.3 world champion Potts and Ironman world champion Wellington dominated the race, leaving competitors to vie for a second place finish. Potts was first out of the water with a swim time of 22:42, which was more than a minute faster than those of the next closest trailers Cartmel, Lessing and Bozzone. Potts used his time advantage on the swim and carried his momentum to the bike, leaving the trailing pack to attempt to close the margin. Behind Potts, Cartmell and Lovato came on strong, but were unable to make up time on the fastpedaling Potts. Potts came into T2 after a bike time of 2:13:19, which proved to be the fastest bike time of the field. Cartmell, Lovato, Bozzone and Lessing all posted bike times under 2:20, and headed into the run in hot pursuit of the world champ. At some point during the run, 70.3-specialist Bozzone withdrew himself from the race. Potts was unwilling to give in to his competitors and posted a final halfmarathon time of 1:14:14. The run time finalized Potts’ dominance in the race, giving him the fastest splits in all three disciplines and a final time of 3:52:32. Cartmell managed to take second position with a run time of 1:19:52, earning a final time of 4:02:24. Lessing came on strong on the run but was unable to catch Cartmell, rounding out the podium with a time of 4:03:10. After failing to qualify as a starter for the U.S. Olympic team, Potts proved he belongs among the world’s best by beating the next finisher by a margin of nearly 10 minutes. The women’s race played out similarly to the men’s, with Wellington dominating the race, leaving a close competition for second behind her. Taylor and Stevens were the first pair out of the

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AT THE RACES


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Women 1. Chrissie Wellington (GBR) . . . . . 4:11:46 2. Amanda Stevens (USA) . . . . . . . 4:30:03 3. Cynthia Wilson (CAN) . . . . . . . . . 4:31:26 4. Dede Griesbauer (USA) . . . . . . . 4:32:02 5. Annie Gervais (USA) . . . . . . . . . . 4:39:52

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Only a handful of pro men were able to finish in front of Wellington.

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with a swim time of 24:52 and Windmann and Rolf Lautenbacher followed Degasperi out of the water. Al-Sutan carried the momentum from the swim to the bike with the fastest overall bike time of 2:24:48. Enrico Knobloch, who was seventh out of the water, put together a strong bike race time of 2:25:24 came into T2 behind Al-Sutan. Widmann was third off the bike, followed by Degasperi. Al-Sutan’s lead off the bike was too much for any competitor to overcome. With a half-marathon time of 1:18:55, Al-Sutan took the title with a total time of 4:10:26. Degasperi was the fastest pursuer of Al-Sutan but came up short, earning second place for the second year in a row and a time of 4:11:17. Widmann came in third with a total time of 4:14:01. For the women, Brede was first out of the water at 26:40 and Berasategui followed closely with a time of 26:42. Berastegui quickly took the lead on the bike and never looked back, finishing the bike with a time of 2:49:49. Ina Reinders had the second-fastest bike time of the women and came into T2 in second position. Meike Krebs came into the run in third position. Berastegui

asiphoto.com

AT THE RACES

Spain’s Berasategui became a two-time winner in Wiesbaden.

The 2005 Kona champ, Faris Al-Sutan, claimed victory for the host nation.

Ironman Germany 70.3 is known as one of the toughest races of the series after only two years as an Ironman 70.3 event. Twelve thousand enthusiastic spectators watched the swim start in Schiersteiner Hafen where athletes attacked the water knowing what lay ahead on the difficult bike and run courses. The one-loop bike course includes three lengthy climbs, rapid descents and winding turns. Although the technical nature of the course may rival the difficulty of any other course in the world, the breathtaking views of the countryside of Rhenigau and Taunus also make this one of the most beautiful courses in Europe. After T2 the athletes took on a run course with long stretches of hills through to the finish in the City of Wiesbaden. As if a difficult course and beautiful scenery weren’t enough for the estimated 60,000 onlookers to cheer for, the pro field featured numerous Germans in both the men’s and women’s races. The depth of the German presence left Italy’s Alessandro Degasperi and Spain’s Virginia Berastegui as the only two non-German athletes in the pro field. German standouts present included Faris Al-Sutan, Michael Göhner and Nils Goerke for the men, and Wenke Kuajala and Andrea Brede for the women. In the men’s race, Al-Sutan led the men out of the water with a time of 24:18 for the 1.2-mile swim. Degasperi was not far behind 1 9 0 T R I AT H L E T E

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T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

asiphoto.com

Al-Sutan, Degasperi Win Ironman Germany 70.3 Ironman Germany 70.3 was untouchable on the run, running the halfmarathon more than three minutes faster than any other woman. Berastegui crossed the finish line with a time of 4:43:38 for her second win in a row at this race. After coming off the bike in fourth position, Brede ran her way into second place with a final time of 4:49:26. Krebs rounded out the podium with a time of 4:55:48.

Wiesbaden, Germany

August 10, 2008 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run

Men 1. Faris Al-Sultan (GER) . . . . . 4:10:26 2. Alessandro Degasperi (ITA) .4:11:17 3. Uwe Widmann (GER) . . . . . 4:14:01 4. Michael Göhner (GER) . . . . 4:17:01 5. Markus Forster (GER) . . . . . 4:19:27 Women 1. Virginia Berasategui (ESP) . 4:43:38 2. Andrea Brede (GER) . . . . . . 4:49:26 3. Meike Krebs (GER) . . . . . . . 4:55:48 4. Ina Reinders (GER) . . . . . . 4:57.58 5. Nadine Baks (GER) . . . . . . 5:02:41* * Age-grouper


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1 9 2 T R I AT H L E T E

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NOVEMBER 2008

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Don Karle

Canadian Melanie McQuaid continued to roll through to 2008 season in Ogden, Utah.

Stoltz, McQuaid Victorious at XTERRA Mountain Championship The XTERRA Mountain Championship held on the grounds of Snowbasin Resort near Ogden, Utah, features nearly 3,500 feet of climbing and proves to be a trying test of strength and agility for even the fittest triathlete. Offering no guarantee of a successful finish, the event is one of the most important of the season for elites competing for points in the XTERRA Pro Series. As a testament to the toughness of the course, this year’s favorite, three-time world champion Conrad “Caveman” Stoltz of South Africa, suffered flat tires in 2006 and 2007 and was unable to crack the leader board. While Stoltz navigated the course without any mechanical issues this year, he faced a field that proved exceptionally competitive. Stoltz and Canadian Mike Vine battled back and forth on the bike with several lead changes taking place over the steep terrain. Stoltz managed to forge a one-minute lead going into the run and held off the attacks of the strong-running Canadian for the win and a final time of 2:21:32. Vine came in second with a final time of 2:22:03, with American Brian Smith rounding out the top three in 2:22:12. After coming out of the water three minutes behind the fastest swimmer, Canadian Melanie McQuaid posted a strong

T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

bike time and headed into the run with the lead for the women. American Shonny Vanlandingham also posted a moderate swim time, but her lightning-fast bike time helped her make up enough ground to go into T2 only 1:30 behind McQuaid. McQuaid proved to be the stronger runner and won the race with a time of 2:40:17. Vanlandingham held on for second with a time of 2:41:55, with New Zealander Jenny Smith finishing third in 2:47:01.

2008 XTERRA Mountain Championship Snowbasin Resort, Utah

August 16, 2008 1-mile swim, 19-mile bike, 5-mile run

Men 1. Conrad Stoltz (RSA) . . . . . . . . . 2:21:32 2. Mike Vine (CAN). . . . . . . . . . . . 2:22:03 3. Brian Smith (USA). . . . . . . . . . . 2:22:12 4. Seth Wealing (USA). . . . . . . . . . 2:22:22 5. Josiah Middaugh (USA). . . . . . . 2:25:33 Women 1. Melanie McQuaid (CAN). . . . . . 2:40:17 2. Shonny Vanlandingham (USA). . 2:41:55 3. Jenny Smith (NZL). . . . . . . . . . . 2:47:01 4. Daneele Kabush (CAN). . . . . . . 2:50:49 5. Jenny Tobin (USA). . . . . . . . . . . 2:53:17


AT THE RACES

Legh, Kehr Win In Reformatted Steelhead Event Weather conditions force Steelhead 70.3 Ironman into a duathlon.

asiphoto.com

lead early in the first run and bike legs. Kehr dominated the women’s field by running 2.1 miles in 12:51, biking 56 miles in 2:20:42 and then running 13.1 miles in 1:28:35 for a final time of 4:04:04. Age-grouper Kimberly Von During was the second woman to cross the finish line more than eight minutes after Kehr with a time of 4:12:40. Renee Damstra, another age-grouper, rounded out the top three with a time of 4:16:00.

asiphoto.com

Veteren Gina Kehr led wire-to-wire to win in Michigan. With wind causing unusually choppy water in Lake Michigan, Whirlpool Steelhead Ironman 70.3 race organizers abandoned the 1.2-mile swim in favor of a 2.1-mile run to start the event. The halfIronman-distance turned into a lengthy duathlon and stronger runners had their chance to shine in Benton Harbor, Mich. Heavily favored pros Chris Legh of Australia and Gina Kehr of the U.S. were unfazed by the altered format. Legh took the men’s title and Kehr the women’s. Age-grouper Nick Waninger was the first athlete to come into T2 after the first run portion with a time of 10:34. Although Legh came out of the first run 30 seconds behind Waninger, he quickly took the lead on the bike, posting the fastest bike time of 2:03:48. Legh carried the momentum from the bike to the run, and also posted the fastest second-leg run time of 1:15:35. His dominating performance earned Legh the overall victory and a final time of 3:32:13. Age-groupers Justin Henkel and Tony White crossed the line second and third with times of 3:37:04 and 3:41:34, respectively. In the women’s event, Kehr earned a large

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Men 1. Chris Legh (AUS) . . . . . . . . . . . 3:32:13 2. Justin Henkel (USA)* . . . . . . . . 3:37:04 3. Tony White (USA)* . . . . . . . . . . 3:41:34 4. Nick Waninger (USA)* . . . . . . . 3:42:19 5. Ryan Rau (USA)* . . . . . . . . . . . 3:42:25

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Women 1. Gina Kehr (USA) . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:04:09 2. Kimberly Von During (USA)* . . . 4:12:40 3. Renee Damstra (USA)* . . . . . . 4:16:00 4. Alaina Neary (USA)* . . . . . . . . 4:18:08 5. Krissandra Berens (USA)* . . . . 4:18:55 *Age-grouper T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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T R I AT H L E T E 1 9 3


AT THE RACES

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Rain is a common theme among many of Ironman’s recent events, including the Ironman Antwerp 70.3 race on August 3. Fresh off his win at Ironman Austria in July, Belgian Marino Vanhoenacker battled the rain to lead the men’s professional field for his second win in a row at his home event. Australian Belinda Granger ran her way to a soggy victory in the woman’s event. Belgian Thierry Verbinnen led the athletes out of the water with a time of 22:29, and Great Britian’s Andrew Johns and Frances’ Renaud Cadiere closely followed. Vanhoenacker came out of the water seventh with a time of 22:47. The rain proved problematic for many athletes on the bike course, butu Vanhoenacker held steady and found his way to second place behind fellow Belgian Luc Van Lierde. In T2, Van Lierde chose to put on socks for the half marathon, while Vanhoecker did not, giving him a 15-second lead going into the run. Vanhoecker only increased his lead from there and won the race with a time of 3:45:32. Van Lierde held on for second place and a time of 3:46:32, and Finland’s Teemu Toivanen rounded out the podium with a time of 3:51:37. Great Britian’s Rhian Roxburgh led

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T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

the women in the swim with a time of 23:19. She was followed out of the water by Granger and Great Britain’s EmmaKate Lidbuury. Granger lost ground on the bike, but pulled out the win by running a 1:25:47 half marathon for a total time of 4:12:55. Great Britain’s Felicity Harty finished second with a time of 4:15:19, and Tina Deckers was the first Belgian across the line finishing third with a time of 4:16:54.

Ironman 70.3 Antwerp Antwerp, Belgium

August 3, 2008 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run

Men 1. Marino Vanhoenacker (BEL) . . . . 3:45:32 2. Luc Van Lierde (BEL) . . . . . . . . . 3:46:32 3. Teemu Toivanen (FIN) . . . . . . . . . 3:51:37 4. Bert Jammaer (BEL) . . . . . . . . . . 3:53:13 5. Stijn Demeulemeester (BEL) . . . . 3:55:05 Women 1. Belinda Granger (AUS) . . . . . . . . 4:12:56 2. Felicity Hart (GBR) . . . . . . . . . . . 4:15:19 3. Tine Deckers (BEL) . . . . . . . . . . . 4:16:54 4. Sofie Goos (BEL) . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:17:05 5. Heidi Jesberger (GER) . . . . . . . . 4:22:26


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NOVEMBER 2008

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T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

Where skiers typically gather to hit the slopes of Snow Valley Resort in Southern California during the winter months, this summer a group of athletes joined at the resort for something a little different: the Avia XTERRA Snow Valley triathlon. The 1,000yard swim took place at 7,400 feet elevation in the private lake at the resort. Athletes faced a rough and rocky 11-mile bike path coming out of the swim, followed by an extremely difficult four-mile run alongside the ski chairlifts. Although the pro field for the race was not deep, it did feature three-time world champion Conrad Stoltz for the men and

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AT THE RACES


AT THE RACES

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AVIA XTERRA SNOW VALLEY TRIATHLON Snow Valley Mountain Resort August 3, 2008 1000-yard swim, 11-mile bike, 4-mile run

1:21:15 1:26:04 1:30:09 1:30:34 1:31:11

Women 1. Shonny Vanlandingham (USA). . . . 2. Meiling Yee (USA). . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Tamara Tabeek (USA) . . . . . . . . . . 4. Simone Messerschmidt (USA). . . . 5. Linda Lindsby (USA). . . . . . . . . . .

1:30:07 1:57:32 1:59:07 1:59:32 2:01:20

Correction: XTERRA West Championship Julie Bruckman of Littleton, Colo., was the women’s amateur winner at the XTERRA West (Temecula) Championship, with a time of 3:22:15. In our July issue, we mistakenly named Cary Kinross-Wright as the winner.

T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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Men 1. Conrad Stoltz (RSA) . . . . . . . . . . . 2. James Walsh (USA). . . . . . . . . . . . 3. Art Custer (USA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4. Jon Clark (USA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. Chad Green (USA). . . . . . . . . . . . .

proWARM˘

Shonny Vanlandingham for the women. Amateur Darin Buschmann was the fastest man in the water with a time of 11:10, and Stoltz was not far behind with a swim time of 11:16. Stoltz quickly took the lead on the bike and navigated the bike course in less than 40 minutes, finishing with a time of 37:54. He then dominated the trail run with a time of 32:04 and a final time of 1:21:15. Amateur athlete James Walsh finished in second place with a time of 1:26:04, and fellow amateur Art Custer placed third with a time of 1:30:09. Although Vanlandigham was not the first woman out of the water, no one came close to her time of 41:27 on the bike course. Vanlandigham followed the bike with an equally strong run time of 34:06 for a final time of 1:30:07. Nearly a halfhour later, amateur Meiling Yee crossed the line in second place with a time of 1:57:32. Amateur Tamara Tabeek followed in third with a time of 1:59:07.

T R I AT H L E T E 1 9 7


WW-DVD Triathlete RV2 ad:Layout 1

8/11/08

9 17 PM

Page 1

CALENDAR

JOIN THE EVOLUTION!

Triathlete endeavors to present the most comprehensive calendar of tris and dus. However, because event dates are subject to change, please check with race directors to confirm event information before making plans. See Multi-Event Contacts for contact

information for promoters that have multiple listings. Listings printed in red indicate Triathletesponsored races. USA Triathlon-sanctioned races are designated with a #. Register at active.com for events designated with @.

XTERRA TV SCHEDULE (November 2008) City

Network

Date

Time

Show

Boise, Idaho

KTVB

10/12

11:00 a.m.

2008 Eco Adventures Show #2

Boise, Idaho

KTVB

10/18

1:00 p.m.

2008 Eco Adventures Show #3

Boise, Idaho

KTVB

10/18

12:00 p.m.

2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #7

Boise, Idaho

KTVB

10/19

11:00 a.m.

2008 Nevada Passage

Boise, Idaho

KTVB

10/25

12:00 p.m.

2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #8

Madison, Wis.

WMTV

10/18

2:00 p.m.

2008 Eco Adventures Show #1

Madison, Wis.

WMTV

10/18

1:30 p.m.

2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #1

Madison, Wis.

WMTV

10/19

12:00 p.m.

2008 Eco Adventures Show #2

Madison, Wis.

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12:30 p.m.

2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #2

Madison, Wis.

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2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #4

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ON TOUR NOW! COMING TO A CITY NEAR YOU.

Madison, Wis.

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2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #8

Minneapolis

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10/12

11:30 a.m.

2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #5

Minneapolis

KSTP

10/12

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2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #6

Minneapolis

KSTP

10/19

11:30 a.m.

2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #7

Minneapolis

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10/26

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Portland, Maine

WCSH

10/18

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Salt Lake City

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10/18

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2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #5

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2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #6

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2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #7

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10/25

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San Francisco

KNTV

10/12

10:30 a.m.

2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #5

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2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #6

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10/25

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2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #7

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10/26

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2008 XTERRA Adventures Show #8

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RACE DIRECTORS: For online race listings, please go to triathletemag. com and post your races under our Calendar link. Allow one week for your events to become live. For listing in our print calendar, e-mail your information to bculp@ competitorgroup.com.com or fax it to (858) 768-6806. Entries submitted before May 31 have been included in the August issue. All entries that were submitted after that date will be in the September issue. Please note that most XTERRA global tour events consist of approximately a 1.5K swim, 30K mountain bike and 10K trail run.

South Atlantic

10/5-Buford, Ga. Emerald Pointe Tri. 400-meter swim, 13-mile bike, 3.1mile run.

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CALENDAR

10/5-Myrtle Beach, S.C. 2-km swim, 60-km bike, 15-km run. 10/5-Miami, Fla. Escape from Miami Tri. 1.5km swim, 40-km bike, 10-km run. 10/25-Clermont, Fla. Florida Challenge Tri. 1.2mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run.

North Atlantic

09/27-Duxbury, Mass. Duxbury Beach Triathlon. 0.5mi S, 13mi B, 3.1mi R. 09/28-New York, N.Y. Riverbank State Park Youth Triathlon and Aquathlon. 200-meter swim, 4-mile bike, 1-mile run. 09/28-Dartmouth, Mass.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Buzzards Bay Triathlon. 0.3-mile swim, 14.7-mile bike, 3.1mile run. 09/28-Dartmouth, Mass. Buzzards Bay Tri. 0.3mile swim, 14.7-mile bike, 3.1-mile run 10/12-New Paltz, N.Y. American Zofingen. 5-mile run, 84-mile bike, 15-mile run. 10/19-Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. Riverport Duathlon. 5-km run, 28-km bike, 5-km run.

10/26-Wrentham, Mass. Halloween Wrentham Duathlon. 3-mile run, 11-mile bike, 2-mile run. 10/26-Lowell, Mass. Lowell Monster Dash Duathlon. 3-mile run, 14.5-mile bike, 3-mile run.

Mountain Pacific

09/28-San Luis Obispo, Calif. Cal Mutltisport. 8-km paddle, 8-km run, 17-km bike. 09/28-Las Vegas, Nev. Las Vegas Half Iron. 1.2mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run. 10/04-Lake Tahoe, Nev. XTERRA Nevada. 750meter swim, 32-km bike, 5-km run. 10/05-San Diego, Calif. Mission Bay Triathlon. 500-meter swim, 15-km bike, 5-km run. 10/04-La Jolla, Calif. Coastwise Mile Run. 1-mile run. 10/12-Santa Cruz, Calif. SuperKid Triathlon. Distances vary. 10/12-Napa, Calif. His Tri All Mens Napa Sprint Triathlon. 0.5-mile swim, 15-mile bike, 4-mile run. 10/12-Sacramento, Calif. Golden State Triathlon.

0.5-mile swim, 15-mile bike, 3-mile run. 10/18-Boulder City, Nev. USAT Club National Championship. 1.5-km swim, 40-km bike, 10km run. 11/08-Catalina Island, Calif. Catalina Island Triathlon. 0.5-mile swim, 15-mile bike, 3-mile run. 11/23-Tempe, Ariz. Ford Ironman Arizona. 2.4mile swim, 112-mile bike, 26.2-mile run . Reminder: If a raceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contact information is not listed with the event in the preceding section, refer to the Multi-Event Contacts listings below. There you will find a list of race organizers who put on either multiple races or series events. For more events and online race registration, be sure to check out triathletemag.com and active.com. Both sites offer up-to-date racing and training information, as well as the most recent news and coverage of triathlonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most popular events. To list your event in our online calendar, please go to triathletemag.com.

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Multi-Event Contacts 3 Discliplines Racing: www.3disciplines.com;866.820.6036 5430 Sports: Barry Siff, 1507 North St., Boulder, CO, barry@5430sports.com, www.5430sports.com; 303.442.0041. AA Sports: 503.644.6822; www.racecenter.com; events@racecenter.com. Blue Sky Sports, LLC: 678.237.0308; director@tribluesky.com; www.tribluesky.com. Bradventures LLC. Producer of Auburn International Triathlon. www.auburntriathlon. com; 530-888-9911; info@bradventures.com. By the Beach Productions: 5153 Soquel Dr., Soquel, CA, 831.465.6517; www.bythebeachproductions.com; info@bythebeachproductions.com. Capri Events: 773.404.2372; www.caprievents.com. CFT Sommer Sports: 838 W. DeSoto St., P.O. Box 121236, Clermont, FL 34712; 352.394.1320 (p); 352.394.1702 (f);

info@triflorida.com; http://greatfloridian.com. CGI Racing: 856-308-7522; www.cgiracing.com. Cutting Edge Events: 217.347.3739; www.cutingedgeevents.net, beccakoester@yahoo.com, www.signmeup.com. Danskin Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Triathlon Series: 800.452.9526, www.danskin.com, triathlon@danskin.com. Elite Endeavors: Jim & Joyce Donaldson, 8963 Stoneybrook Blvd., Sylvania, OH 43560; 419.829.2398, jdjp@sev.org. Emerald Coast Events Commission: 850.784.9542; www.emeraldcoasstevents.com; jlynch@knology.net. EndorFUN Sports: 603.293.8353, 512.535.5224; www.endorfunsports.com, keith@timbermantri.com. Envirosports: P.O. Box 1040, Stinson Beach, CA 94970, 415.868.1829 (p), 415.868.2611 (f), info@envirosports. com, www.envirosports.com. Event Power: 22 Jagger Ln., Southampton, NY 11968; 631.283.7400; eventpower@aol.com;

www.swimpower.com. Exclusive Sports Marketing & Nestle Sprintkids Series: 1060 Holland Dr., Ste. 3-L, Boca Raton, FL 33487; 561.241.3801; 888.ESMSPORTS (376-7767); tjcesarz@exclusivesports.com, www.familyfitnessweekend.com. Fat Rabbit Racing: Craig Thompson, 614.424.7990, 614.306.1996; craigthompson@fatrabbitracing.com; www.fatrabbitracing.com. Field House Athletic Club: 166 Athletic Drive, Shelburne, VT 05482. 802.985.4402; rayne@fieldhouseraceseries.com; www.fieldhouseraceseries.com. Finish Line Productions: 475 Tinkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Trail, Boulder Creek, CA. 831.419.0883; info@finishlineproduction.com; finishlineproduction.com. FIRM Racing: 66 Bruce Rd., Marlboro, MA 01732; P: 508.485.5855, F: 508.229.8394; bill@firm-racing.com, www.firm-racing.com. Firstwave Events: P.O. Box 321269, Los Gatos,

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CALENDAR

DIGITAL EDITION NOW AVAILABLE Our digital edition is an exact replica of the print edition of Triathlete magazine, delivered to your computer by e-mail. It looks just like the print edition and contains the identical training information, gear reviews, race reporting, news and nutrition tips as the mailed copy. But the digital edition offers several advantages that print doesn’t: • Links to all of the Web sites (URLs) and E-mail addresses

John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

• Download: Save a local version directly to your computer for off-line viewing • Tools that allow you to zoom, print or e-mail pages to a friend • Find anything in the magazine by typing a search phrase • View all available archived issues for this magazine • Environmental friendly: No trees are cut and no fuel is wasted to deliver this edition

PREVIEW OUR SAMPLE

DIGITAL EDITION

TODAY triathlete-digital.com 2 0 4 T R I AT H L E T E

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CA 95032; P: 408.356.0518; F: 408.356.0534; www.firstwave-events.com.. Georgia Multisport Productions: Jim Rainey, 4180 Liberty Trace, Marietta, GA 30066; 770.926.6993, 770. 928. 9292 (F); jim@gamultisports.com, www.gamultisports.com. Great Smokey Mountains Triathlon Club: www.gsmtc.com; tri2000@dnet.net. Greater Knoxville Triathlon Club: Kevin Mahan, 205 Cross Creek Private Ln., Lenoir City, TN 37771, 865.675.BIKE (2453) (p), 865.988.9250 (f), www.knoxtri.org; kevinmahan@chartertn.net. Green Brook Racing LLC: Joe Patanella, P.O. Box 825, Green Brook, NJ 08812-825, 732.841.2558; greenbrookracing@aol.com, www.greenbrookracing.com. HFP Racing: P.O. Box 375, Thornville, OH 43076; shannon@hfpracing.com, T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

740.743.2418; scott@hfpracing.com, 440.350.1708; www.hfpracing.com Ironhead Race Productions: Jack Weiss, P.O. Box 1113, Euless, TX 76039-1113; 817.355.1279; ironjack@ironheadrp.com; www.ironheadrp.com. HMA Promotions: 216.752.5151; www.hmapromotions.net Ironman North America: 4999 Pearl East Circle Suite 301, Boulder, CO, 80301; 518.523.2665; 518.523.7542; imanusa@capital.net. J&A Productions: www.japroductions.com; info@japroductions.com. JMS Racing Services: P.O. Box 582, Marion, IN 52302, 319.373.0741; www.pigmantri.com jmsracing.html; jim@pigmantri.com; john@pigmantri.com. KOZ Enterprises: San Diego Triathlon Series. P.O. Box 421052, San Diego, CA 92142;


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858.268.1250; www.kozenterprises.com; info@kozenterprises.com. Lake Geneva Extreme Sports: P.O. Box 1134, Lake Geneva, WI 53147, www.lakegenevasports.com; lgsports@lakegenevasports.com; 262.275.3577. Lakeshore Athletic Services: 847.673.4100, lakeshoreinfo@aol.com. Mattoon Multi-sport: mattoonbeachtri.com; ltgarrett@hughes.net. Maui Multi Sports Club: P.O. Box 1991, Kihei, Maui, HI 96753; trimaui.org. MESP, Inc. Racing Series: 29395 Agoura Rd., Ste. 102, Agoura Hills, CA 91301; 818.707.8867 (p); 818.707.8868 (f); www.mesp.com. Mountain Man Events: P.O. Box 255, Flagstaff, AZ 86002; www.mountainmanevents.com; admin@mountainmanevents.com. New York Triathlon: P.O. Box 50, Saugerties, NY 12477-0050; 845.247.0271; www.nytc.org. North Coast Multisports, Inc: P.O. Box 2512, Stow, Ohio 44224; 330-686-0993; NCMultisports@aol.com;

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www.NCMultisports.com. On Your Mark Events: 209.795.7832; info@onyourmarkevents.com; www.onyourmark events.com. Pacific Sports, LLC: 1500 S. Sunkist St., Ste. E, Anaheim, CA 92806; 714.978.1528 (p); 714.978.1505 (f); www.pacificsportsllc.com. Palmetto Race & Event Production: P.O. Box 1634, Bluffton, SC 29910; 843.815.5267 (p); 843.785.2734 (f); andy5267@ aol.com; www.palmettorace.com. Personal Best Performance: Michael Hays, 808 Saturn Ave., Idaho Falls, ID, 834022658. 208.521.2243; Michael@PB-Performance.com. PCH Sports: www.pchsports.com; 2079 Cambridge Ave., Cardiff by the Sea, CA 92007; 760.944.7261. Piranha Sports, LLC/ Greater Atlantic Multisport Series/Greater Atlantic Club Challenge/Escape from School Youth Triahtlon Series: Neil Semmel, P.O. Box 150, Kirkwood, DE 19708; nsemmel@piranha-sports.com; www.piranha-sports.com. PR Racing, Inc., P.O. Box 56-1081, Miami,

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FL, 33256; 305.278.8668. trimiami.com, trimiami@gmail.com. Premier Event Management: P.O. Box 8764, Metairie, La. 70011. 504.454.6561. www.pem-usa.com. Race Day Events: P.O. Box 31333, Knoxville, TN 37930; 865.250.5948; www.racedayevents.net; Kevin@racedayevents.net Score This!!!, Inc.: 15 Ranch Trail Ct., Orchard Park, NY 14127; 716.662.9379; www.score-this.com; info@score-this.com. Set-Up, Inc.: P.O. Box 15144, Wilmington, NC 28408; 910.458.0299; set-upinc.com; billscott@set-upinc. com. TBF Racing: Bill Driskell, 5209 Blaze Ct., Rocklin, CA 95677; 916.202.3006; bill@totalbodyfitness.com; tbfracing.com. Team Magic, Inc.: Therese Bynum, Faye Yates; 205.595.8633; www.team-magic.com; races@ team-magic.com. Team Unlimited: XTERRA Series; 877.751.8880; www.xterraplanet.com; info@xterraplanet.com. The Pumpkin Triathon Festival: Kat Donatello; 20 Doe Drive, Eliot, ME 03903; (207)-451-7437; pumpkinmantri@yahoo.com. www.xterraplanet.com; info@xterraplanet.com. Time Out! Productions: Rich Havens, P.O. Box 543, Forestdale, MA 02644; 508.477.6311 (p); 508.477.6334 (f); timeout@ capecod.net; www.timeoutproductions.com. TriAthlantic Association: 410.593.9662; www.triath.com. Triathlon Canada: 1185 Eglington Ave., East Suite 704, Toronto, Ontario M3C 3C6; www.triathloncanada.com; 416.426. 7430 Tri-California Events, Inc. Terry Davis, 1284 Adobe Ln., Pacific Grove, CA 93950; 831.373.0678, www.tricalifornia.com. Tuxedo Brothers Event Management: Don Carr, 317.733.3300; tuxbro@indy.rr.com; www.tuxbro.com. UltraFit/USA: P.O. Box 06358, Columbus OH 43206, 614.481.9077, www.ultrafit-usa.com. Updog Sports LLC. www.updogsports.com, info@updogsports.com. Vermont Sun Triathlon Series: 812 Exchange St., Middlebury, VT 05753; 802.388.6888; www.vermontsun.com/triathlon.html, vtsun@together.net. YellowJacket Racing: 6 Regent St., Rochester, NY 14607; 585.244.5181; www.yellowjacketracing.com, yellowjacketracing@hotmail.com. 2 0 8 T R I AT H L E T E

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State of Mind Sports Winter Triathlon/Duathlon Series Stop 1 Waldo, FL Sunday, January 11 Glinn and Giordano Rio Bravo Rumble Bakersfield, CA Saturday, January 17 Midwest Indoor Tri-Classic Series Various Locations, IL Sunday, January 25 Sunday, March 8 The Coastal Challenge 2009 Rain Forest Run Costa Rica Saturday, January 31 - Saturday, February 7

Anthem Adventure Race Anthem, AZ Saturday, February 7 Chanoko Bike/Run Events for Kids Granite Bay, CA Saturday, February 7 Chanoko Mountain Bike Duathlon Series #1 Granite Bay, CA Saturday, February 7

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Bear Family Distributors Tucson 520.325.8187 Performance Footwear Tempe 520.299.3465 Run AZ Gilbert 480.507.0002 Runner’s Den/Walking Room Phoenix 602.277.4333

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Eclipse Running Reno 775.827.2279

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VIRGINIA Footsteps of Reston Reston 703.476.1022 Gotta Run Running Shop Arlington 703.415.0277

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Landry’s Bicycles, Inc. Natick 508.655.1990

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NOVEMBER 2008

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T R I AT H L E T E 2 1 5


Speaking In Tongues

L

Listening to the steady drone of commentary waft from an unwatched TV in the next room, I bent an ear to catch up on the war news. The reporter noted that someone had thrown a bomb from the trenches; a Hail Mary from deep inside his own territory. There was carnage in the zone and the defensive strategist predicted a counter-blitz to gain field position if the guards failed to intercept. There was a report on another front, the frenetic voice listing failed air-attacks that should’ve been slam dunks or at least an assisted alleyoop. “This team needs to quit swinging for the fences and just hunker down for a prolonged ground attack,” the voice claimed. “It needs to take possession before scrambling out of left field.” I shook my head and realized the subject was not the U.S. military but the NFL; not the Middle East conflict but sports; a kind of war without bullets. The phrases used in reporting sports are now openly traded

with every segment of our society and used for their familiarity and comfort. Besides the self-evident “war games” connection, the world of commerce might pull an “end run” or simply “bowl them over.” Sacred religious texts become “playbooks” and when a relationship gets serious it’s time to “fish or cut bait.” The language of sport is the language of our society, each borrowing from the other when it’s convenient and establishes meaning. I got up to turn off the TV and wondered if endurance sports had contributed such lexicon to the morphing of popular English. “Hitting the wall” symbolized exactly what it sounded like, while to “bonk” denoted a real or perceived nutritional crash. Both could be avoided by “carbo-loading,” assuming that you didn’t “toss your cookies” or have the “wheels fall off.” The sport-specific terms from triathlon appear to stem mostly from products designed around the sport’s unique needs. Speed laces, Speedplay pedals and speed suits, whether generic or proprietary, indicate that triathletes are interested in going fast. The ubiquitous prefix—tri—stamped on a multitude of events, products and points of sale, has grown weary. For the tri-team, tribike, tri-juice, tri-bar, tri-bag, tri-travel or tri-doc … yes, we get the point, it’s tri-gear for the tri-market. The only purely indigenous term to triathlon that I can think of is “brick.” I’d imagine the origin stems from a bike/run workout (thus the BR) and that often your legs feel as heavy as a brick after doing one. But I’m not sure. The appropriation of the term “aero” might be a candidate for its pervasive use and purely descriptive qualities, but again the origins lie in the study and application of aeronautics, as in planes, trains and automobiles, not bicycles, helmets and body hair. Multisport has certainly latched on to the number-asdescriptive concept. “While racing in a 70.3, I used my 3-mm suit from Nineteen, listened to my MP3, rode my Hed3s with GP4000 tires attached to my T16 Multisport with the EC90 cranks before checking my HR on my RS800 G3 in T1 and my body composition on my BC-558 in T2.” And so it goes. Language is our subculture’s identity, its raison de trios, its reason for being. Without a code or a way of communicating there is little reason for being. Words are our lifeblood to something human, something very, very personal. Without language that connects us to other like-minded folks we are just like everybody else—disconnected and impersonal. Numbers mean a lot to tri-heads. But you know that. And so do the ad agencies. In fact, our fascination with numbers may just be the direction of our communicative legacy. Where “three strikes and you’re out” started in baseball before traveling to the judicial system and its “three-strikes law,” the number 112 might eventually be associated with the number of minutes for the Martian hour or the minimum MPG for cars built after 2012. We are one nation with two-car garages housing old three-onthe-trees and four-wheel drives. A hole in one earns a five-course meal and a six-pack will send you three sheets to the wind. Still, our two-wheelers are our modern six-shooters and this three-ring circus of swim, bike and run will either send us six-feet under or high-five us 20 ways to Sunday with two thumbs up … assuming we’re not on the juice. And so it goes. —Scott Tinley

Triathlete (ISSN08983410) is published monthly by The Competitor Group, 10179 Huennekens St, Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92121; (760) 634-4100. Subscription rates: U.S., one year (12 issues) $29.95 (12 issues); two years (24 issues) $49.95. Canada $51.95 per year; all other countries $61.95 per year, U.S. currency only. Periodi­cals postage paid at San Diego, CA, and additional mailing offices. Single copy price $3.99. Triathlete is copyright 2003 by The Competitor Group. All rights reserved. Post­master: Send address changes to Triathlete, P.O. Box 469055, Escon­dido, CA 92046-9513. Ride-along enclosed in all book region 2 copies. 2 1 6 T R I AT H L E T E

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NOVEMBER 2008

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T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

John Segesta/johnsegesta.com

Publication mail agreement NO. 40064408, return undeliverable Canadian addresses to, Express Messenger International, P.O. BOX 25058, London BRC, Ontario, Canada N6C 6A8

TINLEY TALKS


Orbea Ordu – Lighter, stiffer and seven percent more efficient. Choice of Kate Major, Hunter Kemper, Craig Alexander and Greg Bennett.

photo ©Segesta 2008

One result drives Kate Major, a win at Ironman Kona. With five top tens, Kate has her eyes on the prize for 2008.

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You have an infinite amount of things to work on in the sport. My training is an attempt to do as many of those better today than yesterday. Everyday is a chance to improve myself.

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9/2/08 4:52:03 PM

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