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TAKING TRIATHLON TO THE TRAILS GEAR >> TRAINING >> RACE SCENE >> LIFESTYLE

N O. 2 9 1

GNARLY OFF-ROAD

SHOES

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EXCLU SIVE R EPORT COMB

MUSCLAT E DAMA GE

DESTINATION

GUAM PLAN A TRAVEL RACE

CHECKING IN WITH

NICO LEBRUN OFF-ROAD

GEAR GUIDE 2007 XTERRA CHAMPION

triathletemag.com

$4.99

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CONRAD STOLTZ


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ENDURANCE SPORTS TRAINING


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They come for our air.

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CONTENTS No. 291

JULY 2008

TRAINING LAB RABBIT | 159 B Y M AT T F I T Z G E R A L D

LANE LINES | 164 BY BRAD CULP

THE BIG RING | 166

44

BY JIM RUTBERG

B Y M AT T F I T Z G E R A L D

DEPARTMENTS

COLUMNS

FIRST WAVE ”TWISTED TRIATHLON”

XTERRA ZONE | 182

| 18

B Y E M I LY M C I LVA I N E

BY ROBERT MURPHY

TRIATHLETE’S GARAGE | 184

STARTING LINES | 20

BY THE EDITORS

B Y M I T C H T H R OW E R

CUTTING EDGE | 188

EDITOR’S NOTE | 22

BY CAMERON ELFORD

B Y J AY P R A S U H N

GEAR BAG | 192

MAIL CALL | 24

BY BRAD CULP

RACE CALENDAR | 213

CHECKING IN | 27 News analysis; IndusTri; Medically speaking; Training tip; Reality check; 70.3 series; Review; Selection; Beijing countdown; Life Time Fitness Series; Pro bike; Gatorade athlete; Point-counterpoint; Cadence Kona Challenge; Club profile; NA Sports

TINLEY TALKS | 224 BY SCOTT TINLEY

170

AT THE RACES | 196

SPEED LAB | 170

BY TIM MICKLEBOROUGH

TECH SUPPORT | 172 BY CHRISTOPHER KAUTZ

NUTRITION | 174 B Y P I P TAY L O R

DEAR COACH | 176 B Y R O C H F R E Y & PA U L H U D D L E

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ON THE RUN | 168

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TRAINING FEATURE | 178 BY DAN SMITH

T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

COVER: CONRAD STOLTZ PHOTO BY RICH CRUSE


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CONTENTS No. 291

JULY 2008

FEATURES HAPPY TRAILS | 52

Triathlete’s annual off-road gear guide B Y B R A D C U L P A N D J AY P R A S U H N

BLAZING TRAIL | 74 Top trail running shoes to escort you over hill and dale BY TRACY PERKINS

HAFA ADAI | 76 “Welcome” to XTERRA Guam BY BRAD CULP

CHILL MODE | 88 Warm up and cool down in this season’s trendiest—and most functional—triathlon apparel P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y J O H N S E G E S TA S T Y L I N G B Y N ATA L I E B O H L I N

TRIATHLON’S RENAISSANCE MAN | 110 Catching up with XTERRA standout Nico Lebrun BY BRAD CULP

THE REST STOP | 114 North America’s finest long-ride hitchin’ posts B Y J AY P R A S U H N

FREE RADICALS AND ENDURANCE PERFORMANCE | 122 Combat muscle damage with antioxidants B Y M AT T F I T Z G E R A L D

SPRINT, RECOVER, REPEAT | 130 To race most effectively in XTERRA, train your body to recover from anaerobic efforts while still working at a high intensity level B Y M AT T F I T Z G E R A L D

ON THE COVER

TAKING TRIATHLON TO THE TRAILS | 52 7 GNARLY OFF-ROAD SHOES | 74 CHECKING IN WITH NICO LEBRUN | 110 DESTINATION GUAM: PLAN A TRAVEL RACE | 76 OFF-ROAD GEAR GUIDE | 52 EXCLUSIVE REPORT: COMBAT MUSCLE DAMAGE | 122 14

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©2008 Pearl Izumi

Proud sponsor of saverun.org.

Pearl Izumi® Women’s Peak XC performance trail shoe, with Seamless Race Upper & SKYDEX® forefoot cushioning and protection. 7.3 oz / 206 grams. RunLikeAnAnimal.com


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FIRST WAVE

Twisted triathlon By Robert Murphy/bluecreekphotography.com As athletes prepare to start the Nautica South Beach Triathlon in Miami Beach, Fla., a pair of water spouts form in the distance. The spouts are actually tiny tornadoes, which suck water up toward the sky. 18

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One of the greatest things about being a triathlete is that you can swim, bike, run and eat your way toward your own particular summit of absolute fitness. At some point on the journey to the peak of your personal athletic Everest, you will wake up in that special place you will call “the best shape of my life.” Your time there may be fleeting. Nudging externalities such as time, workload, family commitments, geography and health will sooner or later draw you away from this special place. But you’ll be back. I’d venture to guess that if you haven’t been there, you are on your way now. But we need to understand our lives consist of inevitable peaks and valleys. If we were to chart a graph of our progress in any aspect of our life, it would not be a straight, upward-sloping line, nor would it reach and park on a high plateau. The natural arc of our lives consists, rather, in rhythmic waves of advances and retreats, surges and ebbs. But at the core of our oftenfragile egos and self-images, we tend to view those brief, shining moments at our absolute peaks as the way we should always be, and to mumble apologies for our day-to-day struggles, or lesser selves, which we hold in embarrassed disdain. We have a tendency to justify why we’re not at our best, or why at that moment we are not on our way to becoming the best physical and mental specimen we can be. I had to smile when talking to my friend—and CEO of Veoh.com—Dmitry Shapiro. We were talking about working out on the flight to SXSW Interactive and he said something funny: “I don’t understand the folks that say your body is a temple to be worshiped. I tend to go the opposite direction and treat my body like an amusement park.” I laughed, but it made me think. There seems to be two ways of thinking about our bodies. Many of us think of our bodies in humble terms: as vessels to be safely preserved as long as possible against some sort of inevitable grim slide of aging, injury and disease. The other, warrior mentality was most strikingly defined by the great Powerman Zofingen champion duathlete Maddie Tormoen, who once explained why she kept competing after half a dozen operations to relieve and repair muscle sheath compartment syndrome this way:“I only have so many miles in me and I want to use every one of them before my time is up.” In the last decade I’ve met two similarly opposite types of triathletes. The first type loves to train and race and obviously enjoys being outside and breathing fresh air. The second group complains about everything. They talk about how hard they are training, how difficult the run or bike was and how much hard work was involved in getting fit. They also complain about other racers, an event’s shortcomings, such as less-than-fresh bagels at the finish line. I’ve seen these two categories of triathletes interact, but it’s a Mars-Venus matchup. They truly do not speak the same language—although the bodies carrying their very different minds rise admirably to the occasion when they are sprinting toward the line. Triathlon often can be a lesson in pain management, but it’s a sport that leads us to understand the brilliant complexity and adaptive capabilities of our human bodies in a very special way. After all, the pain of a tough brick workout is merely an electrical reaction within our nervous system informing us that our biological mass is being stressed for its own betterment. Many of you are able to focus on perfecting your diet and workout schedule to attain a high level of fitness. This can be both a blessing and a curse however. You are able to feel a level of awareness and connection with your body few will ever experience, but when you’re in a period of high life stress, that connection can evaporate at a rapid rate. Finding the way back to training after time off is perhaps the biggest challenge any athlete can face. It takes character and mental strength to revive that fitness momentum. It’s not that I’m missing direction or motivation when I start to train after time off. It’s more about the ever-widening distance between where I am right now and where I was when I was in the best shape of my life. The longer you are stuck in a rut, the greater the sense that you are standing on the far rim of the Grand Canyon from your formerly fit self. Smart training is a perfect balance between stress and rest and that builds momentum. Try not to simply rememTrain Smart, ber what it was like to be fit, but to take the action steps to recreate your body at its best. Don’t quit just because that place seems far away, but be thankful you know the way. Mitch Thrower Life is a perpetual journey back to the best shape of our life. mthrower@triathletemag.com 20

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Courtesy Mitch Thrower

The best shape of your life

Courtesy Mitch Thrower

STARTING LINES No.291 • July 2008 Publisher John Duke Associate Publisher Heather Gordon VP, Sales & Marketing Sean Watkins Editor-in-Chief T.J. Murphy, tmurphy@competitorgroup.com Managing Editor Rebecca Roozen, rroozen@competitorgroup.com Senior Editor Matt Fitzgerald, mfitzgerald@competitorgroup.com Associate & Interactive Editor Brad Culp, bculp@competitorgroup.com Photo Editor John Segesta, jsegesta@competitorgroup.com International Editor Shane Smith, ssmith@competitorgroup.com Graphic Designer Oliver Baker, obaker@competitorgroup.com Contributing Writers Roch Frey, Paul Huddle, Jay Prasuhn Tim Mickleborough, Scott Tinley Contributing Photographers Delly Carr Robert Murphy Medical Advisory Board Jordan Metzl, M.D., Krishna Polu, M.D., Jeff Sankoff, M.D. Production/Circulation Manager Heather Gordon, hgordon@competitorgroup.com Customer Service Linda Marlowe Senior Account Executive Sean Watkins, Cycling & Events swatkins@competitorgroup.com Senior Account Executive Lisa Bilotti, Nutrition, Apparel, Footwear & Auto lbilotti@competitorgroup.com Marketplace Sales Laura Agcaoili, lagcaoili@competitorgroup.com Office Assistant Shannon Frank, sfrank@competitorgroup.com Accounting Vicky Trapp vtrapp@competitorgroup.com A publication of the Competitor Group Chairman David Moross President & CEO Peter Englehart Triathlete Magazine Offices 328 Encinitas Blvd., Suite 100, Encinitas, CA 92024 Phone: (760) 634-4100; Fax: (760) 634-4110 www.triathletemag.com Attention Retailers: To carry Triathlete in your store, call Retail Vision: (800) 381-1288 SUBSCRIPTIONS: Your satisfaction is important to us. For questions regarding your subscription call (800) 441-1666 or (760) 291-1562. Or, write to: Triathlete, P.O. Box 469055, Escondido, CA 92046. Or, e-mail: subs@triathletemag.com. Back Issues available for $8 each. Send a check to Triathlete Magazine Back Issues, 328 Encinitas Blvd., Ste. 100, Encinitas, CA 92024 and specify issues requested, or visit www.triathletemag.com. Publication Mail Agreement #40683563. Canadian mail distribution information: Express Messenger International, P.O. Box 25058, London BRC, Ontario, Canada N6C 6A8 Submission of material must carry the authors’/ photographers’ guarantees that the material may be published without additional approval and that it does not infringe upon the rights of others. No responsibility is assumed for loss or damage to unsolicited manuscripts, art work or photographs. All editorial contributions should be accompanied by self-addressed, stamped envelopes. Printed in the USA.


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EDITOR’S NOTE

THE LEADER IN POWER

FOR TRIATHLON

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T

Triathlon has long been the embodiment of what a human is capable of. Painted as “grueling” by the mainstream press (an overplayed adjective you’ll seldom see in our pages), viewed as “crazy” by your coworkers, multisport is simply badass. I think we’re all in agreement here. Want your colleagues to really think you’re crazy? Show up to work with a four-inch gash across your forearm, bits of dark gravel buried under the skin in your knee and a story about sailing through the air for 20 feet before landing in a briar patch. Of course we’re talking XTERRA. Granted, the swim’s a swim. But once you set foot on land, it’s a different animal than any road tri. For starters, say goodbye to pavement. During a hard charge to the bikes, you can count on putting the full stride weight of your heel into a sharp rock. Feet rinse bucket? Forget that—dirt is the main course so a bit of grit in your shoe is the least of your concerns. A hard charge across a dusty field is followed by an anaerobic climb that has you tipping off the bike. No time to recover—you have a garden of boulders along a ridgeline to navigate on the descent. One slipup and they’ll be airlifting your broken 22

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carcass off the mountain. After you’ve finished, there’s evidence of an honest day’s work: the palm-sized scrape across your shoulder; the broken buckle on your bike shoe; the grit collecting in the pit of your eyes; and if you’re Conrad Stoltz two years ago, the broken arm. You want grueling? There you go. One more thing you’ll be wearing: a smile. While there’s satisfaction in most races, XTERRA is markedly different. The post-race chatter is entirely of another stripe. “Remember that offcamber turn? Wasn’t that gnarly?” “Man, I dropped a wheel into that rut and almost put out a yard sale!” It’s not a race so much as it is a thrill-seeker’s good time. Everyone’s grimy and bloody, but smiling nonetheless. One smiling face that will be missing for a bit is that of 2004 XTERRA world champ and last year’s U.S. champ, Jamie Whitmore. Few are tougher than Jamie (even Melanie McQuaid, her sworn enemy on the race course, admits it). Triathlete wishes Jamie a fast recovery from surgery in March, when a large cancerous tumor was removed from her leg. After a “grueling” day at XTERRA, we can only aspire to look as chipper, covered in mud and blood, as she does.

T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M


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MAIL CALL Happy birthday, Triathlete

Just received the May 2008 issue of Triathlete. Great memories! I can still remember my first triathlon in 1983. I swam laps in the outdoor pool, exited after about 500 yards, ran into the bathroom to put in my contact lenses and change clothes, threw on my sun visor, ran to my Schwinn Super Sport, kicked the kick stand and took off. The most memorable thing about the race was I had to stop for stoplights while traversing through town. I can’t remember how the heck I knew where the bike course was, but somehow I found my way home. Over 160 triathlons later, including two Ironman finishes, I’m still hooked. My swim times have improved; my bike times have slowed a bit; my run times are slower; but my transitions and passion for the sport are as strong as ever. The people I’ve met have been amazing. Doctors, bankers, mechanics, clerks, teachers, All-Americans, first-timers—we all have a goal to become better, find fulfillment, be challenged and enjoy.

Tri therapy

I picked up the 25th Anniversary issue of Triathlete yesterday and was highly impressed with the entire presentation. So much material, such great photos, great work! However, I was a bit embarrassed to see that my entire section on the Big Four and Mike Pigg was cut out—I’d hate for those guys (and the sport in general) to think I somehow didn’t think they were worthy of a mention in my article.

I would like to make a suggestion for your magazine. I have just come out of a two-year relationship with a triathlete. We had a relationship with a lot of potential but a lot of issues. The biggest and deal-breaking issue was his training for Ironman Canada 2008. The training has progressively consumed his life. I wanted to be supportive but became very resentful of this thing that took him away and left me with only scraps of his time. I joined in on some of the training but felt like I was holding him back. I have talked with other triathlon “widows” who feel the same way—unless you are a triathlete as well, you become displaced by the training requirements of these enormous races. The bitterness I felt toward the Ironman and the resentment he developed toward me as I tried to cut into his training have completely finished our relationship. However, I think your readers and their partners could benefit from an article that addresses both sides of this issue and offers suggestions to avoid the patterns and pitfalls we fell into. Thank you for your time. I believe triathlons are a positive thing, but my experience has made me shudder at the word.

Sincerely, Richard Graham

Millie Gerken Menlo Park, Calif.

Greg Retter Indianapolis, Ind.

–Ed. Graham authored the article, “A Long Look Back,” in our May 2008 issue. An excerpt from the deleted section follows. The big four, plus one In 1988, multiple Ironman champion and fierce competitor Mark Allen became an athletic endorser and box-cover boy for Kellogg’s Pro Grain Ironman Cereal, which contained 39 percent sugar, resembled mutant alphabets, and tasted about the same. When asked if he really ate it, Allen said, with the smallest hint of a grin, “Every morning.” The cereal disappeared from supermarket shelves in a very short time, and not because people were buying it. At the 1998 Music City Triathlon, Scott Tinley was asked if he ate Pro Grain. Tinley said, “I feed it to my dog.” Tinley, “ST,” always mugging for the camera, no matter how much a race had taken out of him, was always a great interview, handy with a quip and a quote, and never hesitant with an opinion. I’ve kept in touch with Scott over the years, and enjoyed sharing a travel diary with him that I wrote while traveling around the Pacific Northwest in 2004. I used a few lines from a Jackson Browne song to start off one day’s entry, and Scott told me he’d had a chance to jam with Browne on guitars. A long-time contributor to Triathlete with his Tinley Talks column, Scott wrote many absolutely hilarious articles. Scott Molina, “The Terminator,” was one of my favorite triathletes. His soft-stated manner belied a fierce inner fire, but he could laugh at himself with the best. He once told me a story about sitting next to a woman on an airplane flight. She woke him up and said, “Excuse me, sir, but you’re drooling on me.” In Lyttleton, New Zealand, Molina chomped down vitamins like candy. I said, “I can see how someone might think that you were guilty (of a performance-enhancing drug charge after Nice, which 24

was unethically leaked just before the 1988 Hawaii Ironman) if they saw you eating pills like that.” Erin Baker, Scott’s wife, said, “I’ve told him that, too.” Scott was always straight and upfront— he knew baloney when he heard it, and I never got a hint from his behavior that he’d cross that line. I’ll always be convinced that he was innocent of those charges.

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Ill-Suited

I am the wife of a committed Ironman. Our life in some ways revolves around my husband’s training: three bikes in the living room of our tiny Manhattan apartment; a chunk of our budget spent on supplements, bars and other special foods; our summer travel built around our trip to Lake Placid for the Ironman; our inability to meet friends for dinner on weekends which involve long training. The list goes on. I admire my husband’s commitment to the sport and am in awe of his strength and mental focus. However, his pursuit of his Kona goal also involves me, the woman who cooks him nutritious food, watches out for new health news and who is patient about all of the lifestyle adjustments participation in this sport requires. It is for this reason your swimsuit edition feels like a slap in the face. My husband often reads Triathlete magazine before bed. Why should he be looking at pictures of women who are largely models, wearing skimpy suits and in seductive poses? What benefit does this bring to his training? What knowledge does this add as he strives to be faster, stronger, better? None, as far as I can tell. I am disappointed in the existence of the swimsuit issue: It is disconnected from the overall gist of your magazine and as far as I can tell, serves no purpose beyond what Sports Illustrated’s swimsuit edition, Playboy or other similar magazines provide. As a wife who sacrifices to support her husband in this allencompassing endeavor, I feel you owe me something more than pages upon pages of almost naked women. Please consider making this year’s swimsuit edition your last and returning to your mission of supporting triathletes in their athletic pursuits. Sincerely, Elizabeth Carr Via e-mail


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SUB HEADING

CHECKING IN

John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

CHECKING IN

NEWS ANALYSIS | INDUSTRI | MEDICALLY SPEAKING | TRAINING TIP | REALITY CHECK 70.3 SERIES | CLUB PROFILE | REVIEW | SELECTION | BEIJING COUNTDOWN | LIFE TIME FITNESS SERIES | GATORADE ATHLETE | PRO BIKE | POINT-COUNTERPOINT CADENCE CYCLING | NA SPORTS T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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CHECKING IN

Fair-play fuel

How do we know our supplements are safe? Our look into the sportssupplement industry finds there are safe choices out there

By Jay Prasuhn

A few years ago, Boulderites Michael Lovato and Simon Lessing rolled into Jamba Juice for a post-training smoothie and were asked which free “boost” they wanted in their drink. Lessing waved it off, which raised Lovato’s eyebrows. “He said he never risks it,” Lovato recalls. “It was at that point I realized how much we really have to look out for ourselves, and I started doing the same. I mean, who knows what’s in those scoops?” The same can be said of many nutritional supplements. Who really knows 28

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NEWS ANALYSIS

what’s in them? While the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates the supplement industry (Good Manufacturing Practices dictates standards for packaging, labels, shelf-life stamping and the type font and size of the Supplement Facts box), it’s a very light touch. The FDA does not test supplements for purity—it only does this for true drugs you would find behind your pharmacy counter. Consequently, athletes have no guarantee the nutritional supplements they use do not contain off-label ingredients, including ingredients that may cause a positive drug-test result. In a current legal case, Australian pro triathlete Rebekah Keat, Xterra pro Mike Vine and pro cyclist Amber Neben are alleging that tainted Hammer Nutrition products caused them to fail drug tests. It’s an uphill battle for these athletes, because governing bodies like WADA and USADA have set a precedent of applying the principle of strict liability, which means they don’t care how a banned substance got into your body. If it’s in, you’re out. Keat’s suspension was two years. The uncertainty with supplements is manifold. Contamination could potentially come from the production of the raw materials, which may be sourced overseas, before your favorite supplement company ever puts them into a capsule, bottle, powder or tablet. Another possible source of contamination is an outsourced packing facility, over which the company that actually brands the product has only limited control. With proprietary mixes of nutrients, brands use manufacturers known as co-packers or “blenders” to create the end product that gets sealed into a bottle. If the production facility also blends and bottles banned substances, product that is intended to be clean can be cross-contaminated if the machines

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aren’t cleaned well. Many companies simply opt to operate with “clean” facilities, which don’t work with prohormones or other banned substances—but even that’s no guarantee. “I used one manufacturer that signed an agreement with me that they didn’t have prohormones or anything of the nature near the facility, then I went in and found them bottling prohormones,” says John Gamble, president of Dedicated Athlete, which promotes a staunchly antidoping platform, and whose products include a blood booster called EP-NO. “I pulled them fast. [Now] I make sure the paperwork is top-notch.” That paperwork is what consumers have to rely on. It’s up to each individual brand to pay for independent labs to test a product lot and itemize everything in it—and to assure consumers their product lots are clean. Some go further, not only itemizing the substances, but what the substances do chemically when interacting within the body. The test certification run by First Endurance is called Certificates of Analysis (or CoA). Chris Lieto’s new Base Performance Nutrition line runs an assay. Dedicated Athlete does HPLC, or liquid chromatography. Other big brands that can afford the $50,000 fee can get their product ultra-analyzed and stamped with a gold standard NSF (The Public Health and Safety Company) certification. In an era when the burden of responsibility falls squarely on the athlete, earning the trust of the athlete is serious business. “Steve Larsen turned me on to them as I was looking for a clean source for vitamins,” Lovato said of First Endurance. “The fact that they have a certifiable product was part of my decision to go with them. I was tested eight times last year—five times out of competition and in each Ironman. Each time, the testers asked what supplements I’d had in the last 48 hours. It’s never a doubt in my mind that it’s safe—I know their stuff is super-double-extra-checked.” Lieto, who launched his supplements company recently, is learning the work that goes into getting a product certified. “I’ve been tested about 40 times and I know nothing is perfect,” he said. “For the most part, I try to get away from enhancers and just stick with the roots of being healthy, taking a basic multivitamin, that kind of thing. Anytime I add something new to my nutrition, I do my due diligence. There’s too much at stake.”

John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

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INDUSTRI

Aflac IronGirl Lake Las Vegas to Air on NBC

USA Triathlon has announced the addition of FuelBelt, Inc., as an official supplier to USAT through a multi-year agreement. “Triathlon is one of the fastest-growing sports in the endurance channel and USA Triathlon has been instrumental to this process,” said Vinu Malik, president & founder of FuelBelt. “Aligning the FuelBelt brand and its broad range of products with USA Triathlon was a natural fit.”

Let freedom run

New Multisport Retailer TriBuys.com partners with Craig Alexander

Tom Knoll, an original Ironman from 1978 (now 75 years old), is out on the road right now with his son Warren, 45, running 30 miles per day for 112 days to reach the East Coast. The goal of this challenge, called the Freedom Run, is to raise $1 million for three charities. The run began at Spanish Landing Park in San Diego. On the first day, Tom took a bad spill at mile 20 in Torrey Pines Reserve (San Diego County) and ended up with 25 stitches to the head. He was up at 2 a.m. the following morning, making up the miles he missed. Things have gone better since. You can read the pair’s daily blog at usfreedomrun.com. For detailed route information please contact Hubie at info@usfreedomrun.com or usmultisport1@aol.com. 30

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Irvine, Calif.-based multisport retailer Tribuys.com welcomes Craig Alexander, 2007 Ironman Hawaii runner-up, 70.3 world champion and runner-up at 2008 Ford Ironman 70.3 California, to the Tribuys team. During last year’s Vineman 70.3 Triathlon, Cameron Collins met Alexander and was so impressed with him he invited Crowie to become Tribuys.com’s first sponsored athlete. “Alexander is an accomplished triathlete, who enriches our community with his wealth of knowledge and passion for the sport,” said Collins. “Our customers can look forward to personal appearances with Alexander, Web casts, interactive Q&As and more.” “The guys at TriBuys are great mates,” said Alexander. “They’re totally committed to working with their customers and providing a level of personalized service that’s hard to find with online stores. One of my friends back home needed some specific race equipment no one else could find, but Cameron and his team delivered within days to Australia.” Learn more at tribuys.com or call (888) 788-7382.

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NBC Networks will televise the inaugural Aflac Iron Girl Lake Las Vegas on July 26, 2008, from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. EST. The telecast will showcase a highly competitive pro field, as well as stories of inspiring agegroup females ranging in age and fitness level. Several well-known professional athletes participated in the race, held April 12, including 2006 and 2007 Ironman 70.3 World Champions Samantha McGlone and Mirinda Carfrae, shortcourse specialist Becky Lavelle and Ironman World Champion Karen Smyers. For more information on IronGirl, visit irongirl.com.

John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

FuelBelt named official supplier to USA Triathlon

Vineman and AVIA partner up Vineman Inc. and AVIA are pleased to announce a three-year partnership. AVIA will become the official running shoe of the 2008, 2009 and 2010 Vineman events, including the Vineman Ironman 70.3 and the Full Vineman Triathlon. Assistant race director Dave Latourette says, “Many newcomers to triathlon may not realize the history AVIA has with the sport, but I fondly remember a few of my idols wearing AVIA back in the early days. It’s great to see their return to endurance sports and especially triathlon.” Today’s top multisport athletes are also embracing the brand, including three-time XTERRA world champion Conrad Stoltz, collegiate national champion Amanda Felder, the Luna Pro Team and U-18 & U-23 World Champion Matthew Seymour. According to Southern Californiabased AVIA’s Julie Vieselmeyer, “AVIA has a history of not only promoting champions, but supporting enthusiasts who want to set a PR or complete their first tri.”

Courtesy Hubie and Warren

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2:13 PM

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Iliopsoas strain By Jeffrey Sankoff, MD

MEDICALLY SPEAKING

shoe. As trivial as this movement may seem it is a common inciting event for strains or tears of the iliopsoas muscle. The iliopsoas is comprised of two major muscles: the psoas and the iliacus. These muscles are rooted to the anterior spine and the pelvic girdle, respectively, and join to attach to the anterior thigh. Together they are powerful hip flexors,

TRAINING TIP

Low-back pain and hip pain are very common complaints among triathletes. Willy recently wrote to me explaining his experience of suddenly developing pain in his back when he lifted his leg to tie his

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Beat the heat with a hat By Troy Jacobson

Race day is hot and humid with the sun beating down on you during the run at high noon. Sweat stings your eyes as the effects of dehydration and heat stress

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begin to take their toll and your once steady running pace slows to a shuffle. Sound familiar? Fortunately, aside from proper preparation, smart pacing and having a performance nutrition plan in place, there’s another way to combat the sun and heat. Simply wear a hat. Now, you can’t wear just any hat. It

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which raise the knee towards the torso. Strains of the iliopsoas are common and may cause pain in the back, hip or thigh, which often radiates to the groin. Because the muscle lies deep within the body, direct massage may not prove very effective. Furthermore, resting the muscle is difficult, because it is critical for stabilizing the torso during sitting and walking, so relief may be a frustratingly slow process. To manage iliopsoas strains, reduce running, cycling and strength training, all of which stress the muscle, and stretch. Stretching of the iliopsoas can be accomplished by kneeling on one knee with the opposite foot positioned flat on the floor a step ahead of your body. With the hands on the hips, keep the knee stable on the floor and press your hips gently forward towards the outstretched leg. Making this stretch part of a regular warm-up routine may also help ensure that the injury does not recur. Other means to prevent recurrence, or prevent the injury from occurring in the first place, consist of strength exercises that target the low back and hip stabilizers and rotators. Fortunately, although painful and often frustrating, iliopsoas strains are self-limited and rarely cause any longterm effects.

must be one that is breathable and allows for evaporation to occur. Additionally, it must be lightweight, have a firm visor and be of a lighter color in order to reflect the sun’s rays. Experienced triathletes know basic sports hat can save their race on a hot day. The visor serves to help shield the eyes from the sun’s intense rays (especially when worn with a pair of high-performance sunglasses) and helps to eliminate facial tension and stress caused from squinting. This can help you focus on the task at hand: running as quickly as you can. In addition, the hat can be used to aid in cooling your head. A tried-and-true strategy during a hot race is to place ice in your hat (or at least wet it down with water) at each aid station and place it back on your head. Find yourself a comfortable sports hat and beat the heat! A coach since 1992 and a former pro triathlete, Troy Jacobson is the creator of the Spinervals Cycling program and can be reached at CoachTroy.com.

John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

5/13/08

John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

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5/13/08

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Train the transition

You’ve started training for a triathlon. You swim in the morning and then run or bike in the afternoon. While this strategy works effectively to build your fitness in each individual sport and is essential to your success in triathlon, there’s one important aspect to your training that is missing: the brick workout. As anyone who comes to triathlon from a single-sport background knows, the ability to move seamlessly from one sport to another is a learned and trainable skill. There are numerous accounts in triathlon lore of highly accomplished and decorated swimmers, cyclists and runners entering a triathlon without experience in transitioning from one sport to another, only to find themselves in the middle or at the back of the pack, or otherwise underperforming in their primary sport. To prevent this disaster from befalling you, do a brick (or “transition workout”) at least once a week. The structure of these workouts can vary widely from long bike rides of two hours or more followed immediately by short runs of 20 minutes to high-intensity indoor sessions where you go from the bike trainer to the treadmill and back again multiple times in short, hard efforts. Examples: Workout A: Bike 2-3 hours (aerobic pace, 80100 rpm); rest 2 minutes, then run 20-30 minutes aerobic with the first 5 minutes at race pace. Workout B: Advanced indoor workout. After a brief warm-up, perform 3 x (Bike 10 minutes at threshold, rest 1 minute, then run 1 mile on the treadmill at 10k race pace). Recover for 5 minutes with easy pedaling and repeat. Train your body to adapt to the bike-to-run transition and you’ll be amazed by the results you get on race day. A coach since 1992 and a former pro triathlete, Troy Jacobson is the creator of the Spinervals Cycling program and can be reached at CoachTroy.com. 34

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70.3 SERIES

In transition: A chat with Andy Potts

By Troy Jacobson

John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

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Jay Prasuhn

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While 2008 is an ITU-focused year for reigning Ironman 70.3 World Champ Andy Potts as he tries to qualify for the Beijing Olympic games, he still finds that stepping up to the half-Ironman distance benefits his training. In fact, Potts will step all the way up to the Ironman distance in Kona this year. Triathlete caught up with Potts before the Olympic Trials in Tuscaloosa, Ala.

Triathlete magazine: How does 70.3 racing, particularly your title defense at 70.3 Oceanside, complement your short-course training as you prepare for the Olympic trials this year?

Andy Potts: For me and my physiology, I feel I can go back and forth nicely without having to adjust anything. Change comes more from the mental approach. In 70.3, you’re grinding a bit more, staying a bit more in the “no-fun” zone. It’s, “I’m not going to fall over, but I’m not having a lot of fun either.” Conversely, in Olympic-distance races, I push into the “I don’t know how much more I’m going to be able to hold this” zone. I wanted to have one race before the Tuscaloosa trials, though, and Oceanside was perfect. The alternative was to fly to Australia and New Zealand and race a couple of World Cups. That was changing too many time zones; there wasn’t that much of a benefit to doing that.

Your 70.3 World Championship title last November in Clearwater afforded you a slot to the Hawaii Ironman—which you’ve taken. Are you excited to race the Big Dance for the first time, and what are your expectations? For me, it’s going to be a chance to get my feet wet in the grandfather of them all. At the same time, my expectations are going to be realistic. When I enter an Olympic-distance race, my best day is good enough to win any race. I’m not going to walk into Kona thinking, “If I have a great race, I can’t be beat.” I know Ironman is the next step in terms of my development, but right now in my career, it’s an afterthought until a few months before the race. This year will be to test the

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event and see what it’s all about. I know what a beast it is.

But the Olympic trials are your priority this year, right?

The fact that triathlon was in the Olympics is why I got into the sport. I remember 1988, that was what I wanted in my swim career was to go to the Olympics. Moving from swimming to triathlon was a natural transfer. The Olympics is still such a heavy thing for me, it really means a lot. When I qualified in 2004 and I crossed the finish line, I started crying. It was a long time coming for me—from 1988 when the seed was planted to 2004. It may be the same if I qualify this year.

Will there be a time when you step into 70.3 and Ironman full time and leave ITU racing behind?

I don’t have a timeline for that yet. For me, the best-case scenario would be to keep my foot in it, to get into the races and gauge the speed. In 2009 and 2010 I will keep doing it, but I will not be traveling as much. Going to all these international events is hard on my wife and child and they’re a big part of who I am. [Ironman races] have nice timing, as I’ll be able to race more in the States. I could go back to [ITU racing] for London (2012 Olympics) when that comes around. If America doesn’t put up a stellar crop, I’d be willing to try it again.


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Team Sport Beans/NTTC By Brad Culp

From 1986 to 1994, Team NTTC (National Triathlon Training Camp)

REVIEW

Shimano SH-TR50 Tri Shoe ($180) & Dura Ace PD-7810 Pedals ($260)

With all of the different shoes and pedals on the market, triathletes have a myriad of options when it comes to clipping into their bikes. Shimano believes mixing and matching shoes and pedals won’t do your power transfer justice. As a solution, they’ve developed a shoe, pedal and cleat system designed to maximize stiffness in the 36

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CLUB PROFILE

dominated the sport, with athletes including Mike Pigg, Jan Ripple, Harold Robinson, Garret McCarthy and Paula Johnson racking up more than 190 total wins. After an 11-year hiatus, the team returned in 2006 with Sport Beans® from the Jelly Belly Candy Company signing on as the title sponsor. This season, Team Sport Beans/NTTC is sponsoring eight elite triathletes: Lauren Jensen, Alexis Smith (formerly Waddel), Brad Seng, Erin Ford, Kathryn Bertine, Kirk Nelson, Jeff Piland and Kim Dunker. Each elite team member receives a quarterly stipend, bonus program, plenty of Sport Beans and apparel and equipment from the team’s other sponsors:

INVISTA, Coolmax®, Rudy Project, Champion System and TYR. It’s been a successful return to the sport for the team thus far. The team pros have won 30 races and recorded 59 top10 finishes since the start of 2006. In addition to the elite members, a group of more than 50 age groupers currently represent Team Sport Beans/NTTC. The NTTC was founded in 1982 by Mark Wendley and Tom Peters and held the world’s first triathlon camp in Malibu the following year. A few years later the group added the bi-level racing team, which excelled for almost a decade. The NTTC hopes that it’s on its way back to the pinnacle of the sport. For more on Sport Beans, visit sportbeans.com. To learn more about the NTTC, visit NTTCracing.com.

sole of the shoe and power transfer to the pedals. Let’s first take a look at the SH-TR50 Tri Shoe. At 574 grams per pair, the TR50 is by no means the lightest shoe on the market, but it’s toward the top of the list. While the scant weight is an attractive feature, Shimano’s first and foremost concern in designing the shoe was balancing comfort with power transfer. The interior of the shoe is lined with quick-drying mesh and is completely seamless, which provides comfort when riding barefoot and reduces hotspots. The entire outsole is made of hollow-channel carbon, which provides only a slight flex and helps you transfer maximum watts to the pedals. As for the pedals, the most readily noticeable features of the PD-7810 pedals are the extra-wide platform and the relatively short spindle length. The wide platform (similar to that of a LOOK pedal) is designed to reduce lateral rocking of the foot. Maintaining foot and knee alignment (in the lateral plane) is crucial for maximizing power transfer and minimizing knee discomfort. The short spindle length (relative to most other pedals on the market) reduces both the weight of the pedal (278 grams per pair) and the perceived Q-factor (distance from pedal to pedal) of the bike. Reducing Q-factor provides a slight decrease in drag and increased cornering ability, but these advantages are void if your shoes end up rubbing against the crank arms. If this is the case, simply insert a washer onto the pedal axle before threading the pedal onto your crank. Find out more at shimano.com

Finis SwiMP3 v2 $199

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CourtesyNTTC/JellyBelly

5/13/08

The newest version of the Finis SwiMP3 player is free of the original back control console and can be clipped onto any goggle without additional assembly. The entire unit weighs only two ounces (roughly the weight of your goggles) and has a 256 MB capacity—enough for about four hours of music. The reduced size and weight of the unit is no doubt an improvement, but what’s most remarkable is the sound quality. The player doesn’t actually transmit music directly to your ears but instead transfers sound vibrations to the cheekbone, which then sends them to the inner ear. It may seem complicated, but the bottom line is the music player delivers exceptional sound quality and can make long sets a lot less painful (at least mentally). The SwiMP3 player connects directly to your computer via a tiny USB port on the cord attaching to two earpieces. It is compatible with Windows 98 and above and with MAC OS 9 and 10. Find out more at finisinc.com.

Courtesy the manufacturers

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5/12/08

2:41 PM

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ALCiS Congratulates Team Members Nicholas Thompson & Lauren Swigart

2008 Wildflower Long Course Amateur Champions

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1st Overall Male Amateur – 2008 Wildflower Long Course (Amateur Course Record)

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Ranked #1 Overall Amateur Triathlete by USAT in 2007 1st Amateur - 2007 Wildflower Long Course 1st Overall - 2007 Big Kahuna Half Ironman Triathlon 1st Amateur - 2007 SOMA Half Ironman Triathlon

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5/13/08

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Serious kicks for serious trails

Top mountain bike shoes for 2008

By Brad Culp

Page 38

SELECTION

If you’re the type who just likes to kick around your local trails on your mountain bike, then you probably don’t think twice about the shoes on your feet. However, if you’ve ever tried grinding up the climbs at XTERRA Maui or Tahoe, then you know power transfer is paramount. Whether you’re new to XTERRA or you’re gunning for a slot to Maui, these kicks will help you power down the trail and burn up the steep pitches.

Shimano SH-M230 $250

Specialized S-Works MTB $280

This shoe is a step down from Shimano’s topof-the-line M300, but not a big step. Shimano uses a custom-fit insole and heel cup, which means your feet will be comfortable for the entire 30km. Other features include a carbonreinforced sole and micro-adjust buckle. shimano.com

Scott MTB Pro Carbon $200

Diadora Protrail Carbon

Scott’s unique three-component X-traction outsole maximizes your power output, and by blending other materials with the carbon, Scott is able to keep the price way down. We also enjoyed the mesh upper, which dries incredibly quickly, even after bombing through a creek. scottusa.com

$300

Diadora’s Protrail Carbon is best known as the shoe chosen by Tinker Juarez en route to a 24-hour mountain bike world title. The Protrail uses a full-carbon sole and even a carbon powder-treated outsole, which keeps the weight way down and means it’ll last forever. cannondale.com

Sidi Dragon 2 Carbon SRS $443

The price may be a little steep for many XTERRA athletes, but if you’ve got the coin, the Sidi Dragon 2 Carbon SRS is worth a second look. The Dragon 2 features a replaceable full-carbon sole for maximizing power transfer, along with an adjustable Heel Security System, which prevents power-robbing heel lift. The Lorica Microfiber upper will last as long as your bike, so you won’t need to replace your $443-dollar shoes very often. sidiusa.com

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Time MXE Carbon $175

If you want a lot of bang for not a lot of buck, consider the Time MXE Carbon. The shoes include a replaceable carbon insert in the outsole, as well as a thermoformed insole, delivering a balance of power and comfort. The MXE is also one of the lightest shoes on the market at only 710 grams per pair (size 39). timesportusa.com

If it’s good enough for XTERRA world champ Conrad Stoltz, the Specialized SWorks MTB shoe is good enough for anybody. Using Specialized’s one-of-a-kind Body Geometry technology, the S-Works reduces hotspots, limits swelling and keeps the foot aligned, with features such as a metatarsal button and longitudinal arch. specialized.com

Spiuk ZS1-MTB $150

Who says you need to spend top dollar to perform like an elite athlete? The ZS1 has powered Spain’s Eneko Llanos to podium finishes at XTERRA events worldwide. The shoes feature a double-injected heelpiece to stabilize your foot and each pair comes with two insoles—a lightweight pair for summer and a water-resistant pair for winter. dpmsports.com

Pearl Izumi Octane SL MTB $300 Louis Garneau Carbon T-Flex $200

The T-Flex is designed for tough conditions. The deep threads in the sole provide incredible traction and when the trail gets really nasty, you can screw in additional aluminum toe spikes. The T-Flex also features a rigid carbon outsole and mesh throughout the upper for moisture control. louisgarneau.com

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The guys at Pearl Izumi are obsessed with weight, and nowhere is it more clear than in the Octane SL MTB shoe. At 640 grams per pair (size 43), it’s lighter than many tri shoes on the market. The Octane also has a full-length, unidirectional carbon sole, providing remarkable power transfer. pearlizumi.com

Courtesy the manufacturers

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, Triathlon s dirty little secret Look

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BEIJING COUNTDOWN

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Catching up with Colucci

• Quick drying

Team TBB standout Reinaldo Colucci has spent years dipping his feet in all varieties of triathlon, from World Cups to 70.3, and has found success at races around the world. As the topranked Brazilian athlete in the ITU’s Olympic Standings, Colucci has one goal in 2008: bringing some metal home to Brazil. We caught up with Colucci shortly after he began an intense training camp in the Philippines, under the watchful eye of coach Brett Sutton.

Triathlete magazine: Last year you did quite a variety of events. You won ITU events, a 70.3 and even the Alpe d’Huez Triathlon. Do you plan to mix it up again in 2008, or will your focus be mostly on ITU races to get ready for Beijing?

Reinaldo Colucci: My main goal for 2008 is no doubt Beijing. Until then all my training or racing will be preparation for the Olympic Games. I will possibly race another long-distance race in June, but I haven’t decided yet. I feel distance racing helps put some strength into my legs and can give me a boost.

What’s you’re training been like this spring? Most of your Team TBB teammates seem focused on long-course racing. Does that mean you end up doing a lot of long sessions, or do you get in a fair amount of speed work as well?

For the most part, our team is made up of long-distance athletes, but we also have a smaller group of short-distance guys, including myself, Reto Hug, Nicola Spirig and Mariana Ohata. I have good training partners, which helps me get in the speed work I need.

As a Brazilian, what does it take to lock in a spot on the Olympic Team? Is the qualifying process similar to that in

• Breathable • Quicklace system • Rugged the U.S., or is it more of a selection by committee like the Aussies do?

Currently Brazil has just one spot for Beijing and a possible chance of one more if Juracy Moreira can score enough points in the last few World Cup races before Vancouver (ITU Worlds). Because I am the top Brazilian in the rankings, all I need to do is score some more points and hold my ranking and the spot will be mine.

The competition on the World Cup level is faster than ever. From a tactical standpoint, what do you plan on doing in Beijing to stay with guys like Javier Gomez, Brad Kahlefeldt and Bevan Docherty? I know I need to improve my running if I want to fight for a medal at the Games. I have worked very hard on my run and I’m close to where I need to be. I think the course in Beijing will make for a tough event. The pace on the bike should be very, very fast and I feel my experience in long-distance racing will help, since I’m used to running on tired legs.

After Beijing, will you shift your focus away from ITU racing and do more Ironman and 70.3 events, or do you think you’ll continue to do a variety of races?

• 20 vents • Detox retention • Visor & spoiler • Inset chin straps

• 100oz. capacity • 549cu. in. cargo space • 3-hours of hydration • Variety of colors

I will focus on the Ironman World Championship 70.3 at the end of this season and I have plans to start doing more non-drafting races in the U.S. next season. I’d also like to qualify for and have a solid race in Kona sometime soon. Your one stop TRI shop

>

Jay Prasuhn, triathlon.org

By Brad Culp

The versatile Brazilian has his eyes set on Beijing

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LIFE TIME FITNESS SERIES

One for all: Life Time Fitness Tri changes pro-race format Life Time gives up Battle of the Sexes in favor of the LTF Series, but big money is still on the line

By Jay Prasuhn

The Battle of the Sexes is gone, but the Life Time Fitness Triathlon will again prove a strong lure for the world’s best triathletes when it hits the streets of Minneapolis on July 12. The race, the brainchild of Life Time Fitness founder Bahram Akradi, was

made popular by the intrigue of a menversus-women format, with male pros sent off after a predetermined handicap and a massive prize for the overall winner at stake. But 2008 will see the format scrapped, returning to a standard format: pro men racing against pro men and pro

With her husband running his own business, consistency, time-management and discipline are the keys to creating a functional family.

GATORADE ATHLETE OF THE MONTH

Angela Bancroft PARIS, MAINE By Marni Rakes

Every mother wants the best for her family. With three little boys (ages eight, six and three), Angela is no exception. As a former speech pathologist, the 38-year-old is now a stay-at-home mom who makes every effort to raise her children in a healthy environment. Whether the family goes on ski trips, takes walks in the park or participates in a local running event, her life revolves around her family. 42

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women versus pro women. Why? It’s an issue of equality—not gender equality, but equality among the five events that now comprise the Life Time Fitness Triathlon Series. With stops in New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles and Dallas as well as in Minneapolis, the series cannot pour too many resources into any single event at the expense of the others. “The series is the biggest reason,” said Life Time Fitness public relations manager Kent Wipf. “Having the other races added to the mix, it was good to balance the prize purses.” Fortunately, the prize purse for the Minneapolis event remains one of the richest payouts in triathlon. The top male and female each take home $60,000; second place earns $25,000; and the final podium spot is worth $15,000. Even sixth place earns $4,000—more than winners get at many other races. The Life Time Fitness Triathlon still has an elite amateur category as well, a draw for many top age groupers. The course remains unchanged from previous years, presenting a unique route in an urban setting. Pro men will dash into Lake Nokomis at 7 a.m., with the women taking off three minutes later. The bike course skirts the Mississippi River to the east and circles Lake Harriet to the west. The flat and fast 10K run circumnavigates Lake Nokomis. For more info on the race, visit ltftriathlon.com.

After swimming competitively in college, Angela decided to participate in triathlons in the early ‘90s. After a quick summer of triathlon races, running became her sport of choice. In April of 2006, Angela decided to give triathlons another go. Unfortunately, with her wetsuit not coming off so easily and her chain dropping due to shifting problems, her return to triathlons created a humorous scene. After briefly entering panic mode, Angela switched into mother mode and told herself she couldn’t get upset and that giving up was not an option. With nine of her family members at the finish line, Angela finished 14th overall and couldn’t wait to sign up for her next race. Other mothers often wonder how she fits everything in one day. Angela admits that waking up early is the key to getting in quality workouts. “Triathlon gives me balance,” she says. “I feel healthy, strong, alert, happy and energetic when I am training for a race. I don’t feel lazy and therefore I can be a better mother.”

Robert Murphy/Bluecreekphotography.com

5/13/08

John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

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PRO BIKE D

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Courtesy Conrad Stoltz

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By Jay Prasuhn

In observance of our off-road issue, we deemed it fitting to analyze the reigning XTERRA world champ’s rig. That would be Conrad Stoltz, the first pro 44

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to switch to a big-wheeled 29er, which he debuted on his quest for the European, American and World XTERRA titles in 2008. “I’m very excited to prove all the ranting 29er critics out there wrong,” he says. “I’m passionate about how the bike rides and how I feel on it.” The king of prototyping, the Caveman has been one of best product testers for mountain-bike companies, having done everything from bash Specialized tires and frames to evaluate early RockShox Reba protos. While the existing 29er frame is shown and ridden stock in training, Stoltz’ new race-day chassis will be worth checking out. “Specialized is making me a special race frame, replacing the bottom bracket shell with one that will take the new Specialized crankset, which saves close to 200 grams,” he says. “They'll also make some small tweaks on the frame to get it lighter, like light paint.” While the industry still sits on the fence about how far to delve into 29ers, Stoltz is committed and hopes to see others experiencing the benefit of the bigger tires, which Conrad claims carry obstacles better. If they continue to build steam, Specialized might have a carbon fiber 29er for racing in the near future. We (and especially Stoltz) can only hope.

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A Frame Specialized Stumpjumper 29,

size XL B Fork prototype RockShox Reba 29er

Race 100mm C Headset Cane Creek Lanusse, 1 1/8” D Handlebar Titec Pluto flat bar, Titec

Pluto stem, Titec bar-ends E Groupset SRAM X.0 9-speed, 11-34

cassette, F Brakes Avid Juicy Ultimate 7 G Chainring TruVativ Noir, 175

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crankarms, 44-32-22, Bikinventions Squirt Dry Lube Wheels DT Swiss 470 sl with Specialized Stout front hub and oversize quick release (training wheels) Tires Specialized The Captain 2.00, 1 cup of Stans No Flat (will race most Xterras on Flat Trak LK 2.00) Pedals Time ATAC Ti carbon Seat Post Specialized 30.9mm Hydration Campagnolo Record bottle cages Saddle Serfas DD Pro Travel Case Cardboard box (the airlines lowered their luggage allowances again—25 kilograms in South Africa, Stoltz adds)

Courtesy Conrad Stoltz

Conrad Stoltz’ Specialized Stumpjumper 29


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POINT-COUNTERPOINT

At issue: Should we race triathlons purely for the rush of the competition and the satisfaction of being fit, or is it okay to sign up for an event just to check out a few scantily clad chicks in skin-tight Lycra? This is a question that associate editor Brad Culp is constantly battling with, so this month, he’s squaring off against himself.

It’s all about the bike (and the swim and run) By Brad Culp’s good side 46

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Bring on the women! By Brad Culp’s evil side

I love triathlon. I love the competition of race day. I love seeing my competition in pain. And I love to win. But I also love women. A lot. I especially love women with ultra-lean physiques wearing the clothes that show them off better than anything. To that end, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with “stacking up the competition” while I’m out on course. Every year when our swimsuit issue comes out we get an onslaught of reader feedback, which always reads something like, “Triathlon isn’t about sexy, threequarters-naked women, it’s about following your dreams and doing the impossible.” Ummm, no, triathlon is about whatever I want it to be about and sometimes I want it to be about staring at perfectly proportioned women wearing less than they do in the shower. Is that so wrong? I’m only human— and more specifically, male—and I relish the opportunity to stop and appreciate the female form in all its glory. We should consider ourselves lucky to participate in a sport in which fit female figures are a dime a dozen. Sure, there are perhaps a few sports with even better female bodies (have you seen the Olympic beach volleyball team?), but it could be worse—we could be shot putters. So the next time you’re out on course, take some time to soak it all in. This is especially important for all of you Ironman athletes. Ironman is a long race and sometimes just a glimpse of a gal with 2-percent body fat and 3 percent of her body covered is all you need to beat the bonk and keep hammering. Yes, all of this comes from the same guy who six months ago said in this same column that all performance-enhancing drugs should be legal. Go ahead and pen a note to my editor asking for my resignation. He’s the one who put me up to this, though I was only too happy to write it. Just like I’m happy to spend a few extra seconds out on course to check out that 25year-old age grouper and wonder how the hell she squeezed into that tri top.

John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

Shortly after our swimsuit issue is released each year, we receive droves of e-mails and letters, condemning our editorial staff and our publication for succumbing to the “sex sells” method of marketing. This year I even penned a few letters myself to express my disgust for an issue that has absolutely nothing to do with triathlon. Our sport was created by badass military men, whose goal was to create the toughest sport on the planet, not objectify women and distract themselves from their quest for the athletic Olympus. Don’t get me wrong: I love women and as far as I’m concerned, the less they’re wearing the better. But on race day, I don’t waste my time wondering whether that woman at the next transition rack is checking me out. I’m too busy thinking about how I’m going to beat everyone on my own rack. There’s a time and a place to gaze at near-naked women (that’s what the internet is for), but it’s definitely not during a triathlon, and for the sake of this argument, it’s not while reading a magazine dedicated to triathlon. That being said, I understand why we put out this disgraceful issue: sex really does sell. The swimsuit issue appeals to both triathletes and lonely men in search of a two-dimensional companion and the latter is a demographic we don’t often reach. However, if you picked up this magazine merely as a means to chase away your loneliness, you’ve come to the wrong place. There are plenty of better options on the newsstand—just reach a little higher. The magazines that are polybagged are usually a good bet. Not that I know anything about them; I’ve just heard things.


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C ? 9>; B B? ; @ED;I ¸ M ? D D ; H ( & & , < E H : ? H E D C 7 D M E H B : 9 > 7 C F ? E D I > ? F /0'.0)'

From the ITU World Championships, to Olympic silver, to breaking the tape at Kona, Michellie Jones trusts her vision to Barracuda. With Positive Pressure frames, a huge visual field and leak-proof performance, Barracuda goggles provide confidence to win in all types of water. Barracuda professional goggles. Visualize success. B A R R A C U D A P R E D AT O R

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barracudausa.com


5/13/08

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CHECKING IN

Crunch time

Only a few months left until our Cadence Kona Challenge athletes make it to the Big Island It’s hard to dispute the benefits of a sound training program, and our six Cadence Kona Challenge athletes are a testament to what can be accomplished with focused, disciplined and consistent hard work. Two of the six athletes will be selected to compete at Ironman Lake Placid, where they will have a chance to put their fitness to the test and qualify for the grandfather of them all—Ironman Hawaii. This month each of the six athletes checked in to let us know how their run training is progressing.

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CADENCE CYCLING

snappy and mix things up. Scott Sharpe: I have struggled with my run training due to injuries, which have forced me to scale back a couple of times on my volume and intensity. Jumping snow banks and sliding on ice all winter has made me think I'm more ready for XTERRA than Ironman! I seem to be back on track and am getting stronger and faster and looking forward to the start of the season. My bike and swim are progressing well, but I’m still struggling with nutrition. I can't seem to get away from chocolate! James Pearson: Many things have helped my running, including using drills (hill repeats, fast cadence, strides) and using proper footwear. Perhaps the single biggest change to my running has been

Coaching tip: Training for the long run By Mikael Hanson

The long run is the cornerstone to any runner’s (or triathlete’s) training program and is of even greater importance when we move up from the shorter distances to the half or full marathon. While no longer competing at the highest level of the sport, American running legend Alberto Salazar spends a great deal of time coaching young talent. Salazar’s own training philosophy has changed since his competitive days and he now preaches that one must train slow to run faster, admitting he is now taking a page out of training book of Lance Armstrong, who was famous for putting in long hours on the bike at low to moderate speeds. Running longer, but at a slower pace, improves the cardiovascular system and builds core endurance, but puts less stress on the muscles, joints, tendons and ligaments than faster running. The appropriate duration of the long run depends largely on what your target race is. It is very important that you do not increase the duration too quickly. Follow the 10-percent rule, which states your weekly running mileage should not increase by more than 10 percent from week to week. Also, your weekly long run should be increased by no more than 10 percent from one session to the next. As for pacing, your long run should be done slowly enough to allow for a normal conversation over the entire duration of the run, which equates to about 90 to 120 seconds per mile slower than your 10k race pace. For example, a six-minute miler should target a 7:30-8:00 per mile pace for his or her long run. The long run builds that all-important aerobic base and will prove to be the key piece in your training foundation. In this regard, the long run is a yearround staple, but holds even greater importance for the pre-season phase of training.

Elizabeth Wittmaack: Something I’ve learned through this whole process is that one of the greatest mistakes athletes make is running the same pace all the time. You will never get faster by doing this! As an endurance athlete, I’ve learned it’s important to extend the time you can hang out in the aerobic zone—burning fat for fuel. To do this, you need to train to strengthen your aerobic system. At first it may be frustrating and painful—painfully slow. However, training in this zone has allowed me to run longer and harder without crossing into the zone of distress. I spent the first few months of the year doing almost entirely long, slow runs. Now, I include one speed session per week to stay 48

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my transformation from being a heavy heel striker to a forefoot striker. I believe this is still the subject of some debate, but the fact that humans used to run on their toes until we took to wearing footwear adds a lot of weight. Although I sometimes get a bit of acid

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buildup in my calves after hard runs, I’ve remained injury-free. With my new stride, I am a much more efficient runner—leaning forward, not bouncing, not sticking my foot out in front and not wasting energy. Although I have a long way to go before I would consider myself fast, I can now run eight-minute miles with relative comfort and that was something I couldn’t have dreamed of a year ago. Randy Christofferson: I am now transitioning from my base period to a build phase (leading up to Eagleman 70.3 and Ironman Austria). Since my training is focused on long-course racing, my key run workout each week is my long run, which is usually about two hours. I try to include a little speed work each week, depending on my race schedule. A road race or triathlon takes the place of the tempo run. As I get closer to Ironman Austria, my long runs will increase to three hours. I’m now able to run five times per week, which brings my weekly mileage to 30-45 miles. Mary Lou Hoffman: Training for an Ironman certainly has its challenges. I’ll save ranting about my swim troubles for some other time. For now, there’s this little issue of the marathon. Attempting a marathon was never on my to-do list. It’s unreasonably far and I sensed a fair amount of pain and discomfort would be involved. After months of training in my endurance zone it’s obvious something happened to me this winter. It might’ve been on those chilly Sunday-morning runs, or while I was sweating away on the treadmill at my crowded gym in January. I’m not really sure when or how it happened and I don’t really care. All I know is, at this moment, I believe I’m capable of running 26.2 miles. I guess there’s a first time for everything! Kate Conklin: Running has always been the hardest part for me; although I appreciate it so much more because I was once told I would never run again. I am doing the Providence Marathon in May and I'm going to be on ESPN! I am so excited to bring awareness to my pain disorder and show what it is like to live and train with erythromelalgia (a skin disorder that causes intense, burning pain). Running in sandals is a challenge all in itself. It’s like offroad training, because your feet are always sliding around on uneven surfaces. I now have great ankle stability and strength, which is something most runners struggle to achieve. It took me four years to be able to run again and I may not be fast at it, but I enjoy it so much.

Courtesy James Pearson

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eastonbike.com

The Perfect Carbon Crank Sure, it’s a bold statement. But through Easton’s proprietary Carbon Nanotube Technology (CNT™) and state-of-the art construction techniques, the EC90 packs up to 14.7% greater stiffness-to-weight ratio than other carbon cranks currently available, and a staggering 470% higher fatigue strength. And that’s with standard 5-bolt chainrings. No shortcuts. Easton. Born from engineering. Built for performance.


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NA SPORTS

Courtesy NA Sports

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North America Sports launches new merchandise initiative North America Sports and nine partner companies are proud to announce the launch of a new merchandise initiative for the 2008 race season. The new concept store will be featured at the North America Sports Marketplace at all nine NA Sports events in 2008. It will feature a new store look and layout, as well as a focus on adding variety to the merchandise offerings. An announcement concerning a new North America Sports online store is also imminent. “We had a goal to improve the merchandise component of our events by adding more options for athletes to choose from when they come to the Ironman Marketplace,” said North America Sports CEO Graham Fraser. “We have partnered with a number of companies who not only will be selling their various lines at the events, but also will have technical reps on hand to help explain and talk about the products to athletes.” The nine merchandise partners in the venture are Zorrel, Sugoi, 2XU, Zoot Sports, Wigwam, Headsweats, TYR, Blue Seventy and Fuel Belt. The new merchandise concept store will feature logo race apparel as well as a full range of merchandise from the various partners. Former professional triathlete Marc Lees will oversee the new initiative for North America Sports. “All of the partner companies have been great to work with and have made a commitment to help us improve the athletes’ experience at the Ironman Marketplace,” said Lees. For more information on North America Sports events or the North America Sports Concept Store log onto nasports.com. North America Sports event dates • Ford Ironman 70.3 California: Saturday, March 29 • Ford Ironman Arizona: Sunday, April 13 • Ford Ironman 70.3 Florida: Sunday, May 18 • Ford Ironman Couer d’Alene: Sunday, June 22 • Ford Ironman USA Lake Placid: Sunday, July 20 • Subaru Ironman Canada: Sunday, Aug. 24 • Ford Ironman Wisconsin: Sunday, Sept. 7 • Ford Ironman Florida: Saturday, Nov. 1 • Ford Ironman Arizona: Sunday, Nov. 23 50

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Neuro 6.0â&#x201E;˘ 2.4GHz digital wireless speed, cadence and heart rate Virtually interference free performance Five fully programmable heart rate zones User friendly interval program Altitude and percent grade Real Time Memory Intuitive navigation Eliminates headwinds

Blackburn Neuro 6.0. Everything you could reasonably want from a cyclometer

www.blackburndesign.com


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Triathlete’s annual off-road gear guide By Brad Culp and Jay Prasuhn We know XTERRA can be a bit intimidating. From the quad-burning climbs in Maui to the gnarly descents in Tahoe, jumping into the off-road triathlon world is a good way to beat yourself up, but it’s also a great way to have a ton of fun. As with road racing, getting the right

BIKES

gear can make all the difference come race day. Having the right bike or pedal system can give you the confidence you need to burn up a steep pitch, while your competitors lower their heads and hike it. Here are some of our favorite trail-proven goods for the ’08 season.

Hardtail or full-suspension? There’s really no right answer. If you’re in it just to have a little fun, or you’re racing some seriously tricky courses, a full-suspension frame is the way to go. But, if you’re not too keen on towing an extra four pounds uphill, go with the hardtail.

Winner of the 2007 XTERRA World Championship (underneath Conrad Stoltz), this bike is proven fast. You get 100mm of travel up front and an instantaneous lockout for the rear suspension, which keeps you from bobbing uphill. The full-carbon frame also comes loaded with hydraulic disc brakes. specialized.com

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Images courtesy the manufacturers

Specialized S-Works Epic $6,900


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Scott Spark 30 $3,569

A lightweight full suspension is an oxymoron—except in the hands of Scott Spark owners. While you could go for the $8,700 Spark Limited, we liked the equally stunning Spark 30, with a lesser spec on the same frame design. scottusa.com

Orbea Occam Carbon $4,860

Thanks to Orbea’s “you can have it your way” approach to bike building, the Occam can be built with your dream spec (and a cost up to $5,500). Options aside, it’s the super-light carbon frame (with a stiff polygon downtube), a fully active rear suspension platform and a standard Shimano XTR spec that makes Occam a simple solution for going fast. orbea-usa.com

Images courtesy the manufacturers

Felt Virtue 1 $4,199

Felt’s mid-tier bike destroys many top-end rides, thanks to the ride provided by Felt’s Equilink linkage. It climbs like a hardtail and descends like a dual-suspension bike should, with 130mm of travel. Outfitted with Shimano XTR and a RockShox Revelation fork, the Virtue was a hit with us during testing at Interbike. feltracing.com

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Kuota Kup HT $1,500 (frame only)

For mountain goats that place nimble climbing at a premium, the Kup HT (the choice of French XTERRA-star Nico Lebrun) delivers a stiff, full-carbon hardtail, with massively oversized tubes, which provide exceptional torsional stiffness and get you up any ascent quickly. kuotanorthamerica.com

Trek 69er Hardtail $1,870

Trek has solved the conundrum of whether to buy a 26er or a 29er with the introduction of the hybrid 69er frame. According to Trek, it’s like an inverse mullet—a party up front and all business in the back. The 69er maneuvers incredibly well over tough terrain with a 29-inch wheel up front, while the traditional 26-inch wheel in the back increases traction and power uphill. Available in a fullsuspension model as well for $2,640. trekbikes.com

Ladies, the mountain bike industry hasn’t forgotten about you. The Dakota’s female-specific geometry is designed to fit a women’s body, while the short chainstays and carbon seatstays are designed to drive you forward. The complete bike comes loaded with a Shimano Deore group and Rock Shox Recon Race Air fork (100mm travel). jamisbikes.com

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Images courtesy the manufacturers

Jamis Dakota Comp Femme $1,350


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5/12/08

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RACING HAS CHANGED. HAS YOUR BOTTLE? The Podium TM Bottle doesn’t just set the new standard for bike bottles—it reinvents it. Say goodbye to difficult opening and closing, as well as sticky spillover on your frame. The Podium’s revolutionary self-sealing Jet Valve makes drinking truly a squeeze. And because the Podium is constructed from proprietary TruTaste TM material, your drink will taste like your drink, not plastic. It’s time your bottle caught up to the rest of racing technology.

STEP UP TO THE PODIUM Proud bottle sponsor

w w w. c a m e l b a k . c o m


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Cannondale Scalpel Team $6,500

This hungry machine devours the trail like free pizza. Cannondale’s patented flexing stays and 100mm of rear travel mean you can fly off a 15-foot cliff and not feel a thing when you touch down. The rest of the bike isn’t bad either, with a Lefty Speed Carbon SL fork and full SRAM XO group. cannondale.com

BMC FourStroke 01 $3,695 (frame only)

Behold the beauty of BMC’s Virtual Pivot System. The drive and braking power are completely independent from the rear suspension, eliminating pedal kickback. Threetime XTERRA World Champ Melanie McQuaid digs this full-carbon monster and we think you will too. bmc-racing.com

ACCESSORIES The Blackbox technology means you could throw this baby out of a plane and it would still be in one piece 30,000 feet later, but we recommend you stick to riding it. The threepound fork delivers 80mm of travel and includes a BBMC PushLoc. This new ’08 version is top secret, so keep it to yourself. sram.com

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Images courtesy the manufacturers

RockShox SID World Cup Fork $1,020


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WHIT E HO T.

White is the new black, and now you can find it in the Speedplay Zero pedal. When combined with the Zeroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unmatched cornering clearance, phenomenal light weight, dual-sided entry, ease of adjustment and the lowest stack height available, no other pedal comes close to the performance or striking looks of the Zero Pedal System. See for yourself at speedplay.com.

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Step up.


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FSA K-Force Light MTB Crank $700

As if we needed any more proof that FSA hates excess weight, the new K-Force Light Crank is made of hollow carbon, delivering an extremely stiff ride with minimal mass. The whole package, with bottom bracket and ceramic bearings, only weighs 750 grams. fullspeedahead.com

Blackburn AirFix $40

From the “why the hell didn’t I think of that?” category comes the AirFix—a CO2 inflator and multi-tool all in one. The pump holds a 16-gram threadless cartridge, while the tool makes sure you always have hex keys and a screwdriver around. blackburndesigns.com

Rotor RS4X MTB Steel $729 and Titanium $963

Rotor used its renowned dead spot-eliminating technology from its Q-Ring line to build one funky off-road crank. By angling one crank arm in front of the other, Rotor’s MTB cranks keep your feet moving forward at all times. You even get to customize the tooth count of all three chainrings. rotorusa.com

Specialized ArcTerra Optics $125-$155

Specialized sweats the small stuff. The proof is in the ArcTerra Optics, designed specifically for mountain biking. The vented lenses keep your face cool, while the snug frame keeps the glasses from shifting, even on the most wicked terrain. specialized.com

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Don’t get laughed at by fellow off-roadies by sporting a pair of Lycra shorts on the trails. Instead, go for a pair of Garneau’s Montana shorts. You’ll look like you know what you’re doing and you’ll have a pair of shorts that’s tough enough to deal with any thorn, stick or root. louisgarneau.com

Images courtesy the manufacturers

Louis Garneau Montana Shorts $80


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Fizik Gobi XM Saddle $140

If you spend enough time ripping through the trails, you know your rear is constantly changing positions on the saddle. While many saddles are designed to keep you in one place, the Gobi XM’s Wing-Flex technology allows free thigh movements no matter where you’re sitting. fizik.it

Bell Sweep XC Helmet $145

The Sweep XC picks up where its road racing brother (the Sweep R) left off, by adding Bell’s Variable Position Visor (VPV) to the mix, which provides 15 degrees of vertical adjustment on the fly. A total of 20 breezy vents keep you cool on fireroad climbs. bellbikehelmets.com

Giro Pneumo Helmet $145

The super-light Pneumo may not feel like much, but Giro’s Roll Cage technology ensures that your head will be safe, even on gnarly singletrack. The Pneumo also comes with an adjustable visor and 19 Wind Tunnel vents. giro.com

Tip for XTERRA newbies: don’t do your off-road rides in your pretty white road kit. It’ll get shredded, along with your body. Instead, wear Pearl Izumi’s P.R.O. line, including a durable baggy short with built-in chamois, the dirt-hiding jersey and gloves that will keep your fingers safe from the occasional over-the-bars digger. pearlizumi.com

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Pearl Izumi Versa Jersey $65, P.R.O. Versa Short $125 and Full Finger P.R.O Glove $40


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Your legs will thank you. The all-new FP60 wheels from Flash-Point cut your ride times with less effort, saving your legs for the run. The FP60s slice the air, reducing drag with the same aerodynamic shape found in much more expensive equipment and provide a ride like you’ve never experienced on conventional wheels. So push yourself through the ride, and still be ready to run like, well, like the wind. It’s about time.

I rode them at an Olympic distance triathlon that I didn’t feel ready for. All the same, I beat my personal record on the bike split by 4 minutes. I’m convinced the wheels were the determining factor. –Susanna Loewy, triathlete, musician, Flash-Point rider

www.Flash-PointRacing.com Customer Service: 1-800-230-2387


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Titec HellBent Carbon Bar $110

The HellBent is affordable, lightweight, tough and designed for all-around performance. What more could you want? We dig the extra width and low rise (1.5 inches), which keep things comfortable whether you’re bombing downhill or tearing up a climb. titec.com

Easton EA90 Stem $100

Easton’s EA90 is sturdy aluminum stem that rivals most of its carbon counterparts in terms of weight (125 grams). It’s now is available in sizes 90-130mm (in 10mm increments), with a rise of +10, 0, or -10 degrees. eastonbike.com

Bellwether Scout Gloves $22.50

These gloves are priced so you can afford a few pair, but durable enough so you’ll only need one. The full-finger design adds a little warmth on cool mornings, while the Clarino palm material makes blisters a thing of the past. bellwhetherclothing.com

Ritchey WCS SL Bar Ends $40

Giro Semi Optics $99

These shades are designed to be worn with a helmet, but stylish enough to rock on the street. The Semi features a half-entrapped design, which keeps the weight down and provides optimal peripheral vision. giro.com 62

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If you’re more comfortable climbing on a pair of bar ends, look no further than Ritchey’s WCS SL. They’ll only set you back 65 grams and the angled clamp slot reduces stress on your expensive bars. ritcheylogic.com


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PEDALS Time Atac XS Titan Carbon $400

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve used the ATAC for years, due to its ability to flick mud aside and its ease of entry, but the Titan Carbon trumps earlier incarnations by adding a light titanium spindle to the equation, bringing the weight down to 290 grams per pair. timesport.fr

Speedplay Frog $135

The closed pedal design on a stainless steel spindle makes the Frog one of the finest pedals at shedding mudâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a great feature when clipping back in after a hikea-bike section through tacky Play-Doh. speedplay.com

Crank Brothers Egg Beater Four Ti $425

At 167 grams per pair, the Egg Beater Four Ti is ridiculously light. In addition, its open body sheds mud like nothing else and has four different entry positions. crankbrothers.com

Images courtesy the manufacturers

LOOK Quartz Carbon Ti $400

The XL pressure area makes the Quartz a rarity among off-road pedals in that it delivers power transfer similar to that of a road pedal. The hollow area around the axis line also gets rig of mud quickly, so getting on and off the bike is a breeze. lookcycle.com

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WHEELS

Edge Composites Mountain XC Tubular $650 (per rim)

Based in Ogden, Utah, the boys at Edge Composites know a thing or two about mountain biking. They’ve designed this ultra-light rim (355 grams), which is capable of being built up to a sub-1,300-gram wheelset. The 32-milimeter deep, full-carbon rim delivers unprecedented stiffness and acceleration. edgecomposites.com

American Classic MTB 350 Disc Wheels $699 (per set)

American Classic designer Bill Shook put low weight at the top of his wish list with the MTB 350 and we think he delivered. The wheels center around a proprietary six-pawl freehub and stainless steel bearings, which yields a strong wheel that can take everything you throw at it. The 26-inch set only weighs 1,500 grams, with a 29er version available as well. amclassic.com

Roval Controle XC Race Disc $830 (per set)

FRICTION. FREEDOM.

Lightning-Fast Transitions Our patented new fittings eliminate lace friction and great things start to happen... shoes go on & off effortlessly... lace tension is equal throughout shoe for incredible comfort & support... shoes adjust perfectly in seconds... stop fumbling with laces & knots...visit SPEEDLACES.COM or call 800.880.3427

A D VA N C E D L A C I N G F O R AT H L E T E S

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At 1,425 grams per set, the Controles are designed to get you uphill fast. We’re also fans of the super-tough Controle XC front hub and Swiss-made rear hub, which can really take a beating. specialized.com

triathletemag.com •News •Training Tips •Race Events Triathlete Online will get you there faster. Redesigned for speed and ease of use.


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No need for scandal, ride like a true champion on Maxxis performance racing tires. Our unique 3C, ONE70 and puncture resistant technologies dial in optimal traction, smooth transitions and longer wear for one exceptional ride. Do your part and let us take care of the rest. Maxxis tires: enhancing performance the old fashioned way.

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(per set)

Keith Bontrager’s latest innovation is Tubeless Ready technology, which yields a secure bead-to-rim interface like standard tubeless tires, but cuts off about 100 grams of weight per pair. As with all of Bontrager’s goods, these wheels are race-ready and can take anything the trail throws at you. bontrager.com

As its name suggests, this is race-specific tire with the perfect balance of grip and low weight. Another bonus is Schwalbe’s Triple Compound technology, which keeps flats at a minimum. Available for 26-and 29-inch rims. schwalbetires.com

Ritchey Z-Max Classic $46

If you’re not one for changing tires for conditions and want an all-trail tread, the Z-Max Classic delivers a tire with traction in loose sand and speed on the flats. Available in 1.9 and 2.1 widths. ritcheylogic.com

Bontrager Mud X $43

When race day conditions go seriously awry, you need a tire with some serious gripping power, and nothing compares to the Mud X when it comes to traction. The super-deep, dualcompound tread helps you keep the rubber side down, whether you’re tearing through soggy single-track or climbing over slick rocks. bontrager.com

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TIRES

Continental Speed King Supersonic $53

The name says it all. These tires are made to bomb through single-track and up slippery fire roads. What really sets these babies apart is the inclusion of Conti’s Black Chili Compound, a blend of carbon black particles in the tire, which provide unrivaled puncture resistance. conti-online.com

Maxxis Monorail $42

The Monorail is one of the most affordable race-proven tires on the market. Its low rolling resistance is great, but what really makes this tire fun is the Cshaped side knobs that help you corner like a pro. maxxis.com Images courtesy the manufacturers

Schwalbe Racing Ralph $68


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GROUPSETS

Shimano XTR (price varies)

Tried and tested, Shimano’s top-shelf group delivers exactly wha you expect from it. With a quick flick of the thumb, the RapidFire shifters jump gears with incredible ease. The price is nice too. A group with RapidFire shifters, hydraulic brakes, XTR cranks, Shadow rear derailleur/XTR front, XTR cassette and DA chain will only set you back about two grand. shimano.com

SRAM X.0 Rear derailleur and Trigger $228 and Twister shifter $80

Sure, the gold accents add bling, but it’s the function of the 1:1 cable-pull ratio and smooth shift action that makes X.0 an upgrade that delivers. SRAM’s Blackbox technology also means you won’t have to worry about colliding with the occasional boulder. sram.com

Images courtesy the manufacturers

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— All The Performance Without All The Cost! —

INTRODUCING THE ALL NEW LINE OF

TRIATHLON WETSUITS

EZ Out Zipper Pull: All suits include a quick-exit EZ Out Zipper Pull, making speedy transitions a snap.

Velcro® Adjustable Collar: Our adjustable collar locks out water and provides a perfect personal fit for no unwanted scooping.

Mens 5/3 mm Sprint John MSRP: $139.99

Mid-Calf Leg Opening: Every suit provides mid-calf leg openings which reduce heel snag and speeds up suit removal.

To view our full trisuit line and find an authorized NeoSport® dealer visit:

www.neosportusa.com/tri

1.800.927.2840


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.COM


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USA CANADA

TEAMIRELAND CANADA

w w w. s h a d i re l a n d fo u n d at i o n . c a

IN MEMORY OF PEG SMYTHE


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BLAZING TRAIL Top trail running shoes to escort you over hill and dale By Tracy Perkins

If you want to perform your own experiment with Einsteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theory of relativity, do this: Take your next three long runs 1) on a treadmill, 2) on the roads and 3) on a meandering trail. Note how the time passes during each experiment. For most folks, the trail is where the stopwatch dissolves and time flows by like a pleasant river.

To help you fully enjoy your trail-running pursuits, shoe geek visionaries are happy to provide you with the proper tools. Here are several of the best and brightest of the 2008 generation of off-road models now hitting the shelves.

A B

C D

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A AVIA Avi-Trail $90 The midsole of the Avi-Trail is made of lightweight EVA and is bolstered by a medial post to add stability. You can’t help but like the top layer of the upper: a skeletal mesh that provides sleek integrity to the shoe. avia.com B

SAUCONY

Progrid Xodus $100 The Xodus represents an aggressive new trail design for Saucony. The upper is made of a durable rip-stop textile material, with a breathable sockliner and gusseted tongue. The EVA midsole is enhanced by materials that increase shock absorption in the fore and rearfoot, as well a layer of rock-buffering EBO. An exclusive Vibram 8 compound rounds out the shoe with a durable outsole. saucony.com C

PEARL IZUMI

SyncroSeek 2 GTX $125 A waterproof off-roader with seamless mesh construction, the current version of the Syncroseek (the gal’s model is pictured) features high-rebound forefoot foam and a stability lacing system. A forefoot protection plate aids pushoff and protects you from sharp debris. pearlizumi.com

F

D

NORTH FACE

Rucky Chucky $110 At 14.5 ounces, this abrasion-resistant, nubuckuppered shoe is braced by TPU welding reinforcements to withstand both lateral and medial forces. A midfoot shank and medially posted rearfoot help stabilize foot motion, and a Tenacious Grip outsole digs in for traction. northface.com E VASQUE VST $100 New this spring, the Vasque VST is a trail runner streamlined down from the Velocity. VST stands for Vasque Spine Technology, a heel-strike control system using a TPU top plate and integrated gel to center and cushion the landing. The last of the VST provides support for high arches, and the Mako II outsole is designed to handle loose rock and gravel. vasque.com

G

F INOV-8 Roclite 295 $95 Engineered to be breathable and protective, the Inov-8 Roclite 295 blends nylon mesh and synthetic reinforcements for trail running on hot days. And on wet days, the water repellant-treated upper keeps your foot dry. Arch support is provided by the Fascia-band, a technology element also meant to enhance push-off and overall heel-to-toe efficiency. inov-8.com G

TEVA

Pro Wraptor Stability $110 Thanks to the 360-degree support system—which works somewhat like the taping of football cleats—the upper and midsole are practically one. A two-density midsole and shock-absorbing insert in the rear foot provide cushioning. Despite all the hardware, the Wraptor still comes in at a relatively lightweight 12 ounces. teva.com T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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HAFA ADAI “Welcome” to XTERRA Guam By Brad Culp

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IT SEEMS ABSURD TO TRAVEL THROUGH HAWAII EN ROUTE TO ANOTHER VACATION DESTINATION, BUT IF YOU DON’T MIND A FEW MORE HOURS OF FLYING, GUAM IS WORTH THE TRIP—ESPECIALLY IF YOU TAKE A MOUNTAIN BIKE. The tiny island in the South Pacific is as far as you can get from the mainland U.S. while still technically being in the U.S., and it’s the only place you’ll hear locals greeting each other with the phrase, “hafa adai,” the Guamanian equivalent of the Hawaiian “aloha.” Although Guam is a territory of the United States, it feels anything but American. Tourism is the driving force behind the island’s somewhat-lackluster economy and 80 percent of those tourists make the three-hour flight from Japan. Most of the Japanese tourists come to take advantage of the cheap shopping (relative to Japan), but for the past three years Guam’s more rugged visitors have found a different reason to make the trip: XTERRA Guam. 78

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With a population of only 150,000 people and almost 100 active triathletes, the 210-square-mile island may have one of the highest concentrations of multisport athletes on the planet (Boulder and San Diego withstanding). While you may catch a rider or two buzzing down the streets on their tri bikes on a Saturday morning, for the most part on Guam, triathlon means XTERRA. The island’s wild interior features steep hills and rough terrain and is almost completely uninhabited, making it ideal for mountain biking. The XTERRA Guam course takes full advantage of the island’s menacing terrain and is breathtaking both in its beauty and difficulty. The race itself is a throwback to the early years of our sport, with a transition area marked off by caution tape strung around a few trees and a conch-shell horn blast as the official start signal. The race also affords an interesting perspective on the island’s dark history. Guam, along with neighboring islands including


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Iwo Jima and Saipan, was the site of bloody Japanese-American battles of World War II. Fewer than 70 years ago, on the same trails where Japanese and American athletes now race side-byside, the two countries’ soldiers killed hundreds of young men, as each nation pressed for an advantage in the Pacific. The image of American spectators cheering Japanese athletes to the finish is an indication of how far the two nations have come. This year only 80 athletes were at the start, a slight drop from the previous season and no doubt a reflection of the race no longer being an XTERRA championship event and thus lacking qualifying slots to XTERRA Maui. Two weeks prior to the race in Guam, local athletes had their opportunity to earn an invitation to Maui at the XTERRA Saipan Championship, only a 45minute island-hop from Guam. Those who came to compete, mostly from Guam, Saipan and Japan, didn’t seem to mind the intimate atmosphere and welcomed the reprieve from the usual crowded transitions and clustered swims.

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The event kicked off with a 1000-meter swim in the protected waters of Piti Bay, just south of Tumon, the island’s largest city and the tourism capital. Like everything else in Guam, the waters in the Bay were hot—almost 80 degrees. Wetsuits weren’t needed. As the only professional athlete in the race, Aussie Andrew Noble had no problems pulling away from the field of amateurs from the start, and after about 15 minutes in the warm waters, he was alone in T1 and ready to start the grueling bike leg. The real race proved to be between the top amateur women, as Saipan’s Mieko Carey and Guam’s Shannon Cutting headed out of the first transition in close contact, ready to battle in the hills, which jut out of the bay with little preamble. As inviting as the trails of Guam’s inland are for off-road enthusiasts, they are not easy to get to, and the first few miles of the bike course are proof. Almost immediately after exiting transition, riders were greeted with a grueling climb up to the trailhead on the often trail-like roads that cut across the island. Once athletes turned onto the trail at the top of Nimitz Hill, they were treated to 12 miles of ideal singletrack and no one made quicker work of the rolling trails than Noble, who stormed through the bike leg in 1:17. He made it back to T2 free from mechanical mishaps, the only thing that could have prevented him from winning his third race in three weeks (Noble also won XTERRA Saipan and the Tagaman Sprint Triathlon on Saipan). In the women’s race, Cutting and Carey remained in close contact throughout the bike leg, with Cutting maintaining a small gap as the pair headed toward T2. Carey finished third at XTERRA Saipan and second at Tagaman and was looking to complete her podium sweep by running down Cutting in Guam. As Carey quickly learned, running down anyone on the 10-km course in Guam is far from easy. According to race director Eric Tydingco and just about every competitor, the run course is the gem of the event, providing a six-mile tour of Guam’s vast jungle that includes a hairy descent down a waterfall as well as a handful of creek crossings. Noble had no trouble expanding his advantage through the jungle and crossed the finish line almost 18 minutes ahead of his closest competition. “It was a good way to end my trip out here,” said Noble, who spent two weeks training in Guam. “The run was amazing; I’ve never done anything like it.” Behind Noble was age-grouper Eli Torgeson, from Saipan. “It’s a challenging course, but it’s certainly doable,” Torgeson said. “I’ve only done one other XTERRA event and I still had fun out there.” In the women’s race, Carey was able to overtake Cutting, as the pair plodded through the jungle, to secure her first win of the season. “I love the run course,” Carey exclaimed afterward. “It was hot out there, but every time I started to get too hot, I got to jump in the water.” Carey’s nonchalant mention of the heat was

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an understatement to say the least. Guam and the neighboring Micronesian Islands have the most equable temperature on the planet. This is great if you like consistency, but only if you like consistent heat. At just about any time of year, you can expect Guam to have highs in the upper 80s and nighttime lows in the upper 70s. As with most other Pacific islands, the humidity in Guam is truly oppressive. XTERRA Guam is held just after the wet season, a time that offers a bit of reprieve from 100-percent humidity afternoons.

Getting there

from the U.S. mainland, but Continental will get you from L.A., Houston, Cleveland or Newark to Honolulu, where you can catch a seven-hour flight to Guam. Be sure to book your flight early. There’s only one to and from Honolulu each day and booking late may mean you’re forced to go through Tokyo, making the trip unnecessarily long.

Where to stay The Hyatt Regency Guam is race central and is one of the finest hotels in Tumon. The oceanfront resort offers a trio of enormous pools and plenty of water sports to keep you and your family busy. The Hyatt is located in the center of Tumon’s shopping district and is a short walk from the area’s best restaurants. Learn more at hyattregencyguam.com. Brad Culp

Guam definitely isn’t easy to get to, but thanks to Continental Airlines setting up a mini-hub on the island, the journey is becoming less of a hassle. There are no direct flights

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Where to eat The majority of restaurants in Tumon and in the rest Guam are Japanese, to cater to the tourists, but if you’re craving something more American, there’s a TGI Fridays and a Hard Rock Café within walking distance of the Hyatt. The Hyatt itself has four upscale eateries, but if you’re looking to save a few bucks, walk north on the beach for about a quarter-mile to Nana’s Café. For $10-$15 per plate you get portions of Japanese and Korean dishes and an unlimited soup and salad bar.

RX TRI CARBON Fast and easy

ULTEAM RS CARBON $304.95*

ULTEAM CARBON $259.95*

RXL CARBON $199.95*

IVm^ 7gdjhhZ • TIME RCS B 339 730 996 - *MSRP

Designed specifically for triathletes, RX Tri Carbon shoes feature an oversize Velcro® strap to facilitate very fast foot entry, as well as a forefoot strap for adjustment. A maximized surface area of breathable mesh with front and side vents provides superior ventilation. Add to this a 7mm carbon sole and the RX Tri Carbon is a piece of equipment that will enable you to transfer all of your power to the pedal. 100% compatible 7mm carbon sole for 65 grams $199.95*

time-sport.com

A rental car isn’t needed if you’re just going for the race. The Hyatt’s shuttle will pick you up from the airport and 15 minutes later you’ll be in your room. All of the shops and restaurants in Tumon are a short walk away from the hotel, and, plenty of taxis and buses are available to take you farther. The race start is about five miles south of the Hyatt and is easily accessible by bike on race morning. If you want to take in a little more of Guam, renting a car for just a day is the way to go. Driving around the entire island takes less than two hours and the southern end of Guam is majestic. The crowded streets of Tumon give way to lush jungles, miniature mountain ranges and relative solitude. Just be careful when you’re driving on the crowded city streets, as the native Chomorrons treat traffic lights as more of suggestion than the law.

RXE CARBON $199.95*

RXC $134.95*

YOU WON’T RECOGNIZE YOUR PERFORMANCE

Rich Cruse

Getting around


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ANOTHER STEP. CONGRATULATIONS KATE MAJOR ON BEING ATOP ANOTHER PODIUM STEP — THIS TIME AT IRONMAN AUSTRALIA.

Kate again used our Carbon Base Bar and clip-ons, Flow saddle and our specially-designed carbon tubular wheels. Like Kate, we just keep getting FASTER.

visit BLACKWELLRESEARCH.COM or call us at

877-228-8804


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AVI-Bolt

Rich Cruse

AVI-Trail

If you go…

AVI-Lite II

San Francisco’s Complete Source for the AVIA Wildflower Training Collection DANVILLE 432 Hartz Avenue Danville, CA 94526 925.820.9966 WALNUT CREEK 1352 Locust Street Walnut Creek, CA 94526 925.979.9966

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Load up on electrolytes. The mix of heat and humidity will make you sweat more than you ever thought possible. Grab a few bottles of coconut water—it provides more potassium than an entire bunch of bananas—from the local markets. Stay awhile. If you can, take a few weeks off work, take your family along and embark on a three-week triathlon odyssey. Start off with XTERRA Saipan, hang around for the Tagaman Triathlon the following week and then cap the trip with XTERRA Guam. If you’re a true masochist, the Guam Marathon usually falls somewhere in that three-week span as well. You may lose your job, but you’ll be super fit. Do more than swim, bike and run. According to Taydenko, “Guam is a place for people who like the outdoors.” There are endless activities for outdoor enthusiasts and while mountain biking may be the cream of the crop, there’s plenty of other ways to wear yourself out. A handful of shops in Tumon will rent you a surfboard and then all you need to do is drive south to Umatac. On the shores of this quaint village (where Magellan first landed on Guam), you’ll find the best surf on the island and you may even get an entire cove to yourself. You can also enjoy epic snorkeling 86

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right off the beach of the Hyatt; just grab a mask from the hotel. The hotel also offers ocean kayaks and paddleboats for exploring the bay. If you’d like to get a little closer to the marine life, ask the concierge to set you up on a dive excursion and enjoy diving among mammoth WWII battleships. To learn more about the event, or to register for next year’s event, log on to xterraguam.com

XTERRA Guam Piti, Guam, USA March 29, 2008 1km swim, 27km bike, 10km run Men 1. Andrew Noble (AUS) 2. Eli Torgeson (SAI) 3. Hideto Sato (JPN) 4. Troy Roberts (USA) 5. Arthur Guerrero (USA)

2:13:57 2:31:21 2:32:19 2:47:18 2:49:02

Women 1. Mieko Carey (SAI) 2. Shannon Cutting (USA) 3. Susan Seay (USA) 4. Haldre Rogers (USA) 5. Jenifer Roberts (USA)

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Warm up and cool down in this season’s trendiest—and most functional—pre- and post-race apparel Photos by John Segesta Styling by Natalie Bohlin On location at La Costa Resort and Spa in Carlsbad, Calif.

AVIA True Red Skirt, $32 Optic White Top, $32

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2XU Men’s Long Sleeve Run Top, $69 Men’s Long Run Short, $44

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SUGOI Mood Jacket, $85 Mood Capri, $60

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TYR Bombora Trunk, $44

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ZOOT SPORTS Swimfit Recovery Dress, $50

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“The helix TST is the closest thing to swimming in your own skin – only faster.”

the water is open Photo by: Larry Rosa

Andy Potts – current Ironman 70.3 World Champion leading out of the water at Ironman 70.3 California. blueseventy.com


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OAKLEY Waterman Boardshort, $38

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DE SOTO Carrera Run top, $56 Carrera Capri Pants, $56

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pure: ride

Ride clean, cool and light with white brake pads, housings and cable adjusters from Jagwire. From subtle accents to bold statements, our complete line of brake system accessories gives your bike a look thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s purely you. www.jagwireusa.com

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Triathlon’s

RENAISSANCE MAN Catching up with XTERRA standout Nico Lebrun By Brad Culp // Photos by Rich Cruse

There’s not much for a young boy to do in Peira Cava, France—a village tucked away in the hills above Nice, in the picturesque region where the Alps meet the Mediterranean Sea. With the population hovering around 100 people and only a few buildings “downtown,” it’s seemingly impossible for an adolescent male to find a worthy outlet for his desire to make mischief, or at least dull the doldrums of growing up in a really, really small town. While spending one’s formative years in such a quaint village may be a recipe for serious boredom for many, it couldn’t have been more fitting for Nicolas Lebrun. Instead of frittering away his childhood confined to a cramped schoolhouse desk, Lebrun filled his youthful days with cross-country skiing, hiking and exploring a sliver of the world few ever get to see. Passing so much time outdoors wasn’t without consequences, as Nico wasn’t able to spell his own name until he reached the sixth grade. As a result, Lebrun was rejected by almost every institution of higher education in France, but eventually made it into a boarding school in Nice. Boarding school only served to further his athletic ambitions as Lebrun quickly joined just about every competitive sports team his school had to offer. Shortly after receiving his diploma, Lebrun became a professional triathlete and duathlete and has since found success at a wider range of events than almost any other multisport athlete on the planet. His achievements include multiple podium finishes at the ITU Duathlon World Championship, a pair of ITU Winter Triathlon World Championships titles and a bronze medal at the inaugural XTERRA Winter World Championships this past March, but his crowning achievement came in 2005, when he earned the title of XTERRA World Champion. Now, at the age of 35, Lebrun has his sights set on another title in Maui, but he’s not about to forgo his other athletic endeavors to do so. In fact, after qualifying at Ironman 70.3 Monaco last year, Lebrun will compete in his first ever Ironman World Championship this October, just two weeks before he takes a shot at his second XTERRA world title. We caught up with Nico shortly before the 2008 season got underway to chat about his fascinating past and his ambitious future plans. T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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Tell us a little about your upbringing. How did you get involved in so many different sports? My first experience of actually competing was doing cross-country races at boarding school, but I grew up doing a lot of winter sports. I never had to travel far to go skiing and so I spent a lot of time on my skis—both cross-country and downhill. I picked up triathlons shortly after I went to Nice for school. We did regular triathlons in the summer and then as soon as the winter came back, we did winter triathlon.

You’ve won world championships in both winter triathlon and XTERRA. What do you think is your greatest accomplishment to date and what is your ultimate goal in this sport? The biggest moment for me was at the 2005 race in Maui [XTERRA Worlds]. It’s absolutely the biggest event I’ve ever won. I think it really meant a lot to me because I know I’m not a very good swimmer and it was important to win a big race with a swim, instead of a duathlon or winter triathlon. Duathlons and winter triathlons have always come easy to me, because

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there is no swim. It gives me a big advantage. Mountain biking, running, skiing—those are my sports. I’m not much of a swimmer.

Since you brought it up, your swim is definitely your biggest limiter. Have you been spending some extra time in the water recently, or are you content with losing a few minutes during the swim, since you know you can make them up later in the race? I know my swim will never be very strong. I just tell myself, “OK, you can get through this.” I just do enough to get by in the water. I like to train in the sports I enjoy doing. I spend much more time biking and running, because I enjoy doing those sports. I don’t want to spend too much time in the pool, as it would take away from the other sports.

You compete on a very high level in XTERRA, triathlon, duathlon and winter triathlon. Does this require you to train hard year-round, or are you able to give yourself a break each year? I typically take a big break right after returning


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from Maui each October. I’ll take five or six weeks off from hard training and then start back up again in December, focusing on winter triathlon. When I won Winter Worlds in 1999 and 2000, I was spending considerably more time training for the winter sports. Now, my focus is on Maui each year, so I’m not able to spend as much time doing winter training. I know I’m not as strong in winter triathlons as I used to be, but I’d rather feel strong in the summer.

Where’s your favorite place to train these days? Where do you spend most of your time during the summer and winter seasons? I do almost all of my training at home, in Digne-les-Bains, France. It’s about a 90-minute drive from Nice. I can spend all day training in the mountains and I only need to drive a few minutes to find a good place to ski. There’s also a great pool there and I have plenty of friends I can train with if I don’t feel like training on my own. Sometimes I’ll travel to other places to train, but for the most part, I like to stay home.

When you’re not swimming, biking, running, mountain biking or skiing downhill or cross-country, what do you do? What do you like to do with your free time? I spend most of my free time sleeping—a lot. Although for the last few years I’ve spent some time organizing a few local races, including the French Winter Triathlon Championship. I’m also helping to organize a local triathlon team. Other than all of that, I sleep.

What made you decide to race in Kona this year? Will you alter your training much as you prepare for your first Ironman? After I qualified in Monaco, I decided I had to race Kona at least once, so I accepted my slot. I really don’t know what I’m capable of in that race, since I’ve never done anything so long. I’m really just doing it to have fun and to say I did it. I’ll change my training a little this summer, but not too much. I’ve always enjoyed doing long sessions on the bike, so I don’t think I’ll have a problem building endurance there. However, instead of spending all of my time in the mountains and

on the trails, I’ll spend a little extra time in the flats, on my time-trial bike. I really can’t change too much, though, because the focus of this season will still be XTERRA.

What are your biggest goals for this season? Is it just to win in

Maui, or would you like to do more? One of my dreams has always been to finish in the top three at three different world championships in one year. I already placed second at Winter Worlds, so now I have to get on the podium at Duathlon Worlds and in Maui.

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P O T S T S E THE R

EST N I F ’S A C I ER TS NORTH AM S O P ’ N I H C HIT LONG-RIDE ASUHN BY JAY PR

Tim Carlson

It’s the beacon in the night, an oasis in the wasteland. It calls like the Vegas skyline in the distance of a dark desert, all glitter and promise, a respite from the desolate, parched earth, the cracked throat, the tired body. The hitchin’ post. 114

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The weekend long ride requires a jersey chock full of bars, arm warmers, a set of house keys and a phone. But whether it’s a three-hour excursion or a seven-hour adventure, these items are often not enough. You need a stop, a place to refuel, gather your thoughts and stave off a bonk. When the body is pedaling on fumes, just roll up and walk in. It could be a modern convenience mart, a little mom-‘n’-pop general store, it doesn’t matter. Cleats clacking on the linoleum floor, you’re drawn by the promise of a bottle of cold water, a fountain drink on ice, a bag of pretzels, a handful of Red Vines from the big plastic jar at the counter. After a bath in caloric glory, you’re rested, invigorated—and off again to tackle the second half of your ride. We queried you, the reader—and a few pro athletes—about some of your favorite rides, and the legendary local stops that help make each ride special.

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eling before the hilly section of the course begins,” Caron adds. After the Richter ascent and a few miles of rollers cyclists enter a different valley and new scenery: high mountains, vast grape vineyards and long rolling hills. It’s here, on the out-andback section of the Ironman course, at about the 75-mile mark in the town of Keremeos, that one comes upon a popular fruit stand called Bear’s. “It’s another mandatory official stop,” Caron says. “It’s a relief in the hot summer. You simply want to get there when the pace is fast and hard, because you know for the 10 or 15 minutes you will be there, you will have some kind of relief.” Knowing the grinding ascent of Yellow Lake lies ahead, riders tarry a little longer than necessary. “There’s not much stress at that stop,” Caron says. “The break sometimes ends up

JONATHAN CARON, PRO TRIATHLETE, PENTICITON, B.C.

stretched out a bit!” Typically, cyclists take shade under a massive awning at a picnic table, next to which sits a classic old water pump. “I’ve had dreams so many times about this old pump,” Caron says. “It gives us the coldest water in the region—it’s always freezing cold even on the hottest day of the summer. You can put your head under it to come back to life or drink as much as you want.” Bear’s also sells fresh fruits and vegetables. “But as a triathlete, I always go for a few sport drinks and most importantly, the brownies and cookies!” Caron says. For those looking to lengthen the ride by heading up to the Apex Mountain at the end of the Ironman course, “The Bear” is the last stop, so they must load up for the next 3.5 hours. But for most headed up Yellow Lake for Penticton, Bear’s “gives you a nice break before tackling the last 60k of the ride, on one of the nicest parts of the course,” says Caron.

Courtesy Jonathan Caron

The most popular long ride in Penticton is, of course, the Ironman Canada course. It’s among the few single-loop courses and one of the most beautiful. On any Saturday or Sunday from May to August, this ride is taken by hundreds of triathletes training for Ironman. Caron, runner-up at last year’s race in Penticton and a favorite son as a local, does this ride twice a week with his training partner Tom Evans. The ride starts from Lake Okanagan in Penticton and heads south into the valley. “It’s a very fast section of rolling and twisty roads along the grape vineyards,” Caron says. Just shy of the 40mile mark comes the first official stop: Husky gas station in rural Osoyoos. “That stop is very simple and not very scenic,” he says. Caron says its location, at the foot of the infamous Richter Pass ascent, makes it a big draw. “On a weekend, you can be assured you’ll meet tons of cyclists at the Husky sitting on the curb, refu-

Courtesy Bears

HUSKY GAS STATION, OSOYOOS, B.C. AND BEAR’S, KEREMEOS, B.C.

KEVIN HAMILTON, EVERGREEN, COLO.

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Courtesy Kevin Hamilton

“You can’t pass it up—I still miss it after moving away from Kansas City,” says Kevin Hamilton. The ride, departing from the greater Kansas City area, takes riders south to start an 80- to 120-mile loop around northeastern Kansas. “Start at 7 a.m. and you’ll hit the Cider Mill as it opens,” Hamilton says. And the fuel? It’s like the ambiance: unmatched. “They have the best apple donuts and fresh cider,” says Hamilton, “and they’re always willing to fill your water bottles. The pumpkin patch is amazing in the fall, and the staff has always

Courtesy Jonathan Caron

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been more than just a little friendly.”

MICHAEL LOVATO, BOULDER, COLO.

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will stumble in there unprepared. It’s a pretty shabby general store, very classic.” On another loop, Lovato relies on another welcoming mom ‘n’ pop stop in Glenhaven, near Devils Gulch, about 15 miles into one of Lovato’s long rides. “They always have water in big gallon jugs outside for cyclists, and the store is loaded with all kinds of wonderful processed, manufactured treats,” he says.

MARK WISE, NEWARK, DEL.

GENERAL STORES IN RAYMOND AND GLEN HAVEN, COLO.

Michael Lovato says the nameless little hole-in-the-wall places on his long rides around Boulder. Colo., have been his savior. “I’ve been caught in the middle of freezing afternoon thunderstorms, so I’ll just dive into these stores to refuel and wait it out,” he says. One is the store in Raymond, midway up a 17-mile ascent into the Rockies. “That’s about all it’s called—the store in Raymond,” Lovato says. “It’s halfway into a 100- or 150-mile ride. The guy is known to give away free drinks because people

A stop at Northbook Orchards is requisite midway through the Donut Ride in Pennsylvania, especially in the fall. “At that time of the year we have what we call Amnesty Rides, says Mike Wise, a member of First State Velo Sport: “moderate pace and no attacks, so people who haven’t been training as much or who have had a long season can come out and have amnesty from getting drilled.” According to Wise, while the Donut Ride stop has an old general-store ambience, with hayrides around Halloween and ice cream in the summer, the donuts at North Brook Orchards are the draw for triathletes midway through a long fall ride. “The apple cider donuts are made on site and are rolled in sugar right in front of you,” Wise says, who offers a piece of advice. “It’s cheaper to buy six at a time; eat three and stuff the rest in your jersey pocket for later.” It’s worth coming back after your ride to load up on fresh fruits and vegetables, fresh baked pies, donuts, breads and their famed fresh apple cider.

Courtesy The Country Store

NORTHBROOK ORCHARDS, WEST CHESTER, PA.


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MICHAEL LOVATO, BOULDER, COLO.

GAS STATION ALLEYS, AUSTIN, TEXAS

While Boulder is Lovato’s home, he spent his formative years growing up and training in Austin, a land of Western charm and style. “It’s where you have some classic stores in the country that are really old-west looking,” he says. “They always have a ratty old wooden bench and you can see cyclists on these benches, hanging the whole tired weight of their bodies on them.” And it’s here where most of his “incident” rides have occurred—that is, where he entered the danger zone and teetered on the brink of disaster. “There, you’re factoring in 100-degree heat in Texas farmland,” he says, adding that just 15 minutes from your front door, “your bottles are like hot tea.” Rescue comes in the form of a string of gas stations strung along the farm roads. “You get to know them to where you’re counting on them,” he says. “If you go for a six-hour ride, you figure out every store you can run in and fill up with water and Coke and ice in the bottle, as much as you can, then go again.”

MIKE PLUMB, OCEANSIDE, CALIF. DUDLEY’S SANTA YSABEL, CALIF.

This San Diego ride is an icon. Some come to the tiny town of Santa Ysabel from the north, having attacked the famed Mount Palomar ascent. Others come at it from the east through Ramona. Either way, it’s a long day in the saddle. On any given weekend you’ll see pros perched there. Coming direct from San Diego through Ramona, it’s easy to get reeled into the AM/PM market on the corner. Don’t. You’ll

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want to build a proper appetite for what awaits. Mike Plumb, a well-known San Diego-area triathlon coach, has canvassed the San Diego County on his bike and says, “There’s one rest stop that seems to evoke memories of epic rides, big blunders and miraculous saves—Dudley’s.” Anyone who’s ridden in San Diego has no doubt heard of and probably made a stop at Dudley’s Bakery in San Ysabel. It’s just west of Julian, which is a major apple-growing area in San Diego. So it is no surprise Dudley’s is known for its apple pies among other things. Known for her sweet tooth, Lori Bowden reportedly counted it among her favorites. Plumb fondly remembers many eventful stops at Dudley’s, including one in 2002. “I sometimes do a ride with a group on Wednesdays that is led by RAAM record holder Pete Penseyres,” he says. The group goes long and goes high, with a typical Wednesday ride ranging from 70 to 100 miles with anywhere from 8,000 to 10,000 feet of climbing. Plumb continues, “This particular Wednesday was my first introduction to the Henshaw loop, a 115-mile loop through northeast San Diego County that encompasses many of North County’s best climbs and open roads. Dudley’s is perfectly situated at the halfway point,” he says. “On this late spring day the temperature was starting to push into the 90s and Dudley’s represented a great place to break for a quick lunch and bottle refilling stop. Ves Mandaric, one of the original frame builders at Quintana Roo, was on the ride as well. While everyone was filling bottles and getting quick calories in, Ves slipped around the corner to the general store right next to Dudley’s and after refilling his bottles,

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Courtesy Mike Plumb

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Courtesy Mike Plumb

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beer. It didn’t seem to faze him and we went on to finish the ride with Ves riding strong the whole way.” Dudley’s is also known for its fruit bars. These bars have raisins, apple chunks

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and other fruit pieces baked into a cookie-like bar and are sold by the bag. Dudley’s regulars commonly buy a whole bag, eat what they can, and carry away the rest.

MT. LEMMON CAFE MOUNT LEMMON, ARIZ.

A long climbing effort, from the saguaros and 80-degree temperatures on the desert floor in Tucson, Ariz., through four eco zones to whistling pines, with temps in the low 40s and snow on the road banks in the spring, makes Mount Lemmon a southern Arizona classic. Mount Lemmon owns the honor of having the closest ski resort to the equator in the Northern Hemisphere. It’s also a legendary ascent, home to an annual nine-mile uphill time trial (leave your tri bike at home for this one). Countless pro triathletes and cyclists use the sweeping turns of Catalina Highway to hone their climbing speed and ascending skills. But it’s often the reward of a slice of blueberry, peach or strawberry rhubarb pie at an elevation of 9,150 feet that drags tired bodies to the ski valley. Plop into the wrought-iron chairs, suck in the thin air and enjoy a slice. And remember, that slice helps rebuild a community still staggered by wildfires that decimated much of the mountain just a few years ago. J U LY 2 0 0 8

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FREE RADICALS ENDURANCE PERFORMANCE Combat muscle damage with antioxidants By Matt F itzgerald

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John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

and


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Most triathletes know their muscles generate free radicals—particularly those known as reactive oxygen species (ROS)—during exercise. Many triathletes also know these free radicals contribute to the muscle damage that normally occurs during exercise and to the muscle soreness and weakness that follow particularly tough workouts. You may also know that supplementation with particular types of antioxidants is scientifically proven to reduce free-radical damage during endurance exercise and thereby accelerate post-exercise muscle recovery. For example, in one study, the addition of cherry juice (which is rich in antioxidants called anthocyanins) to the diet of competitive rowers significantly reduced the amount of strength loss and muscle soreness they experienced after a strength test designed to cause muscle damage compared to a group of fellow rowers who received a placebo instead. What few triathletes know is that ROS also contribute to acute muscle fatigue during exercise and that adding antioxidants to the diet may increase endurance in hard workouts and races in addition to accelerating recovery afterward. Research in this area is still in its early stages, but scientists know enough to recommend that endurance athletes pack their daily nutrition regimen with the most antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables, not just for the sake of their overall health, but also to improve their triathlon performance. Also, there is a small and growing number of antioxidant supplements with apparent performance-enhancing benefits.

FATIGUE UNDER THE MICROSCOPE During non-prolonged, moderate-intensity exercise, ROS produced by working muscles actually assist muscle work by facilitating glucose transport into muscle cells. But when ROS are produced at high levels

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during prolonged exercise they begin to inhibit muscle work. In a new review published in Free Radical Biology and Medicine, researchers from the University of Kentucky summarized the current state of scientific knowledge in this area. ROS appear to cause fatigue by reducing calcium sensitivity in muscle cell proteins. Calcium ions play a key role in transmitting motor nerve impulses within muscle cells. When the muscle cell proteins become less calcium sensitive, the muscle fiber is no longer able to contract as forcefully and performance declines. The primary antioxidant in muscle cells is glutathione, which neutralizes ROS and thereby mitigates their negative effects on muscle work. Through this process, however, glutathione eventually becomes depleted, at which point the muscles’ antioxidant system is unable to delay fatigue any longer. This reality raises an obvious question: Can antioxidant-rich foods or supplements be used to enhance glutathione stores and thereby increase endurance? Scientists have indeed looked at the effects of infusion and ingestion of various compounds that regenerate glutathione in hopes that they would further delay ROS-induced muscle fatigue. At the same time, scientists are also actively studying the possible performance-enhancing effects of antioxidants that may work by other mechanisms.

N-ACETYL CYSTEINE Thus far, n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) stands out as the most effective glutathione-replenishing antioxidant. NAC is a derivative of cysteine, a frequently occurring amino acid that promotes glutathione regeneration. According to the University of Kentucky review cited above, “NAC has been shown to inhibit fatigue in healthy adults during electrical muscle activation, inspiratory resistive loading, handgrip exercise and intense cycling.” The cycling study mentioned here was performed by researchers at Australia’s Victoria Institute of Technology. Eight men received NAC or placebo before and during a 45-minute cycling workout performed at 71 percent of peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak) and then to fatigue at 92 percent VO2 peak. NAC was intravenously infused directly into the blood throughout exercise. Time to fatigue at 92 percent of VO2 peak was enhanced by 26.3 percent with NAC. Blood levels of cysteine and glutathione were higher in the NAC trial.

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QUERCETIN

Like this study, most of the other studies on the effects of NAC on exercise performance have involved intravenous administration of the compound, but a couple of studies showing benefits have involved oral administration. The dosage that proved effective in one study was 150 mg/kg of body weight. Several sports supplements contain NAC.

COENZYME Q10 In addition to NAC, there are also some more familiar antioxidants that have shown promise as supplemental means of delaying ROS-induced muscle fatigue, although they appear to do so through alternative mechanisms. For example, a new study conducted by researchers from Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Soiken Incorporation, Kansai University of Welfare Sciences, and Osaka University of Foreign Study and published in the journal Nutrition investigated the effects of eight days of CoQ10 supplementation at two levels—100 mg per day and 300 mg per day—on exercise performance and perception of fatigue in 17 volunteers. 124

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Another antioxidant that may enhance endurance performance is quercetin. Researchers at Pepperdine University recently studied the effects of six weeks of quercetin supplementation on time-trial performance among 11 competitive cyclists. Quercetin supplementation resulted in an average 3.1 percent faster finishing time over 30 km. The authors of this study speculated that quercetin boosted performance in part by increasing the availability of the hormones epinephrine and norepinephrine, which contribute to muscle work in a number of ways. So far, this study stands alone as the only science demonstrating an ergogenic effect of chronic quercetin supplementation, and a company that sells a quercetin supplement funded it. The results of this study will therefore need to be validated by additional, independent research before quercetin supplementation can be unequivocally recommended for performance enhancement.

PHYTOESTROGENS Quercetin belongs to the class of antioxidants known as catechins. There is cause to believe another class of antioxidants, phytoestrogens, has ergogenic potential as well when consumed supplementally. Phytoestrogens are found in greatest abundance in nuts, seeds and soy products. In a recent scientific paper, researchers at the University of Valencia, Spain, proposed that phytoestrogens might up-regulate the genes that govern the body’s antioxidant defenses, just as exercise itself does.

John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

All subjects rode stationary bikes to exhaustion at a fixed intensity on three occasions separated by washout periods. One trial was preceded by eight days of CoQ10 supplementation at 100 mg/day. A second trial was preceded by eight days of CoQ10 supplementation at a level of 300 mg/day. And a third trial was preceded by an eight-day placebo treatment. Time to exhaustion was found to be significantly greater in the 300 mg trial than in both the 100 mg and placebo trials. There was no significant difference in performance between the 100 mg and placebo trials. Perceptions of fatigue were also reduced by 300 mg of CoQ10 supplementation. The authors of the study speculated that, at adequate doses, CoQ10 might delay exercise fatigue through its role in aerobic energy metabolism as well as its function as an antioxidant. Other studies on the possible ergogenic effects of CoQ10 supplementation have produced less favorable results. In a new study published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, researchers investigated the effects of acute and chronic CoQ10 supplementation on exercise performance in untrained and trained individuals. All of the subjects completed an isokinetic knee extension endurance test, a 30-second Wingate anaerobic capacity test and a maximal cardiopulmonary graded exercise test interspersed with 30 minutes of recovery after one day of supplementation with either CoQ10 or placebo and again following 13 additional days of supplementation. In both the acute and the chronic treatments, CoQ10 levels were associated with performance in time to exhaustion in the exercise tests, but neither acute nor chronic supplementation resulted in a statistically significant improvement in exercise performance. Further research is required to conclusively determine whether CoQ10 enhances endurance performance, and if so, at what dosage, for whom (e.g. untrained individuals, trained athletes, or both) and in what circumstances.


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Mark Sisson, 54 2:18 marathon, 4th Hawaii Ironman Author, coach, ITU anti-doping exec Master Formula designer

How's Your Damage Control? Successful training and competition is dependent upon quick and complete recovery from the destructive stress of endurance exercise. Optimal recovery is a complex challenge involving three critical components: 1. Training Balance: Focus on Breakthrough Workouts with total recovery and optimize stress/rest cycles by always aligning workload with energy levels. (Download Mark Sisson's lauded endurance training book FREE at masterformula.com) 2. Nutritious Diet: Eat healthy, whole foods (fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, nuts, animal flesh) and avoid excess sugar, refined carbs and processed fats. (Discover extensive details about eating healthier at marksdailyapple.com) 3. Supplementation: Deliver complete protection, immune boosting and ergogenic support with Damage Control Master Formula. Recognize your unique challenge of balancing a busy life with hard training and utilize the absolute finest total body nutrient support.

Mark Sisson's Message Damage Control Master Formula is the ultimate expression of my passion for health, nutritional science and pushing the limits of human endurance as an elite athlete and coach for three decades. Perhaps the most profound discovery of my journey - a journey that has meandered through lava fields, laboratories, winner's circles, orthopedist's offices and ten years with the Olympic antidoping commission - is this:

Hard Training Can Be Hazardous To Your Health! Loads of recent studies confirm that optimal recovery goes beyond diet, beyond rest days and beyond sports nutrition bars, gels and drinks. The unrelenting stress of modern life coupled with ambitious endurance goals causes chronic depletion at the cellular level. My ten year process to research, create and provide Damage Control Master Formula to athletes across the planet (including numerous world champions) has been a mandate to solve this problem. The end result is a product that is simply the world's most potent and comprehensive supplement. At $129, it's not cheap (all told the component ingredients cost $370 to replicate in individual bottles) and it's not for everyone, but you owe it to yourself to take advantage of my risk free offer and enjoy the very best support you can get.

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The difference between antioxidants that directly neutralize ROS in the body and those like phytoestrogens that build up the body’s innate capacity to produce antioxidants could be an important one. Here’s why: One major benefit of ROS production by the working muscles during exercise is that it stimulates physiological adaptations that up-regulate the body’s antioxidant defenses. In other words, the free radical damage that occurs during exercise has a training effect that results in stronger antioxidant defenses, much as glycogen depletion during exercise stimulates a greater capacity for glycogen storage and fat burning. The Spanish research team mentioned above has pointed out that antioxidants that interfere with ROS production during exercise inhibit these beneficial adaptations. That is, they act as a sort of crutch. So it’s possible certain antioxidant supplements might do more harm than good. Again, we will have to wait for science to take a few steps forward before we can sort out which specific types of antioxidant supplementation may be counterproductive.

GREEN TEA CATECHINS If you’re a mouse, you might want to consider drinking green tea, or adding a green tea extract supplement to your diet. Green tea contains a high concentration of antioxidants that, like quercetin, belong to the catechins class. A couple of Japanese studies have shown that green tea extract supplementation increases endurance in mice. It appears green tea catechins increase fat oxidation by reducing the activity of ROS that inhibit fat metabolism.

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As yet, there have been no studies showing an ergogenic effect of green tea extract supplementation in humans. However, in a recent human study from the University of Birmingham, England, acute supplementation with green tea extract increased fat burning during moderate-intensity exercise by 17 percent. These results suggest a strong possibility that green tea extract could delay fatigue during prolonged moderate-intensity efforts.

DON’T FORGET ABOUT FOOD To my knowledge, nobody has studied the performance effects of simply increasing the amount of antioxidant-rich foods in the diet of endurance athletes. Real-food studies such as this proposed experiment are seldom performed in exercise science because they are more difficult to execute and fund. It’s far easier to get funding from a nutritional supplements company that stands to profit from a study demonstrating benefits associated with taking a particular supplement the company sells. This reality may lead to a skewed sense that—in this case—taking a bunch of individual antioxidant supplements is the only way to gain a performance edge from antioxidant nutrients, when it’s possible that eating large amounts and a wide variety of whole fruits and vegetables (and perhaps also drinking natural green tea) provides performance benefits that supplementation cannot further enhance. Sometimes supplementation does trump real food, however. For example, creatine supplementation increases strength and muscle size gains resulting from resistance training more than


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RACE WITH THE

PROS

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simply eating a diet containing plenty of creatine-rich foods such as beef. And a recent animal study found that supplementation with anthocyanins from berries reduced weight gain by enhancing fat metabolism more effectively than eating whole berries did. At this point we simply donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know whether supplementation is necessary to realize the full performance-enhancing potential of antioxidants. But one thing is certain: Regardless of whether you choose to take antioxidant supplements or not, you should consistently eat a wide variety of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables, which, in addition to helping you become a better triathlete, also confer health benefits ranging from slower aging to reduced cancer risk. A scoring system known as the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity is used to rate the antioxidant capacity of foods. The following table lists the ORAC scores of a number of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables. These foods should be mainstays in your diet. ORAC VALUE

FRUITS

Learn how you can qualify at

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VEGETABLES

ORAC VALUE

Prunes

5,770

Kale

1,770

Raisins

2,830

Spinach, raw

1,260

Blueberries

2,400

Brussels sprouts

980

Blackberries

2,036

Alfalfa sprouts

930

Cranberries

1,750

Spinach, steamed

909

Strawberries

1,540

Broccoli florets

890

Pomegranates

1,245

Beets

841

Raspberries

1,220

Red bell pepper

713

Plums

949

Onion

450

Oranges

750

Corn

400

Grapes, red

739

Eggplant

390

Cherries

670

Cauliflower

377

Kiwifruit

602

Peas, frozen

364

Grapes, white

446

White potatoes

313

Cantaloupe

252

Sweet potatoes

301

Banana

221

Carrots

207

Apple

218

String beans

201

Apricots

164

Tomato

189

Peach

158

Zucchini

176

Pear

134

Yellow Squash

150

Source: Agriculture Research, 1999

ACTION STEPS

The championship event of:

Š2008 LIFE TIME FITNESS, INC. All rights reserved.

Clearly, we have a lot left to learn about the role of antioxidants as ergogenic supplements. For now, the best thing you can do is simply to understand that free radicals are a major cause of exercise fatigue and that antioxidant compounds can increase endurance by neutralizing free radicals. Training properly and eating a varied diet containing lots of fruits and vegetables will take you a long way toward minimizing the effects of free radicals on your performance. For an extra edge, consider trying antioxidants supplements such as n-acetyl cysteine, quercetin, CoQ10, phytoestrogens and green tea or green tea extract. 128

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To race most effectively in XTERRA, train your body to recover from anaerobic efforts while still working at a high intensity level

By Matt F itzgerald // Photos by John Segesta

The differences between a traditional triathlon and an XTERRA go beyond the fact that in an XTERRA you ride a mountain bike and run on dirt. Another key difference is that the physiological intensity of XTERRA racing tends to be more variable than that of traditional triathlon racing. Most XTERRA bike and run courses are hilly and technical. Consequently, it’s impossible to find a steady groove at a high but sustainable effort level as you try to do on a road course. The intensity level spikes as you grind up steep ascents and through sandy sections and then comes down—a little— as you bomb downhill or pick your way through technical sections. Different types of racing require different types of preparation. To prepare yourself optimally for an XTERRA, it’s not enough that you put in some time off-road. You must also perform workouts that simulate the variable-intensity challenge of XTERRA. These workouts need not represent a radical departure from familiar workout formats such as hill repetitions, fartlek rides and runs and speed intervals. All you have to do is give these familiar workouts a special twist that makes them more XTERRA-specific in their physiological demands. Before I present these workouts, let me first spell out the precise nature of their physiological objective.

MIDAIR REFUELING In a typical XTERRA, the bike leg is approximately 30km (18.3 miles) and the run leg is approximately 10km (6.2 miles). In a road triathlon featuring these distances, you would bike and run at or near lactate threshold intensity—that is, at or near an effort level you could sustain for about an hour in a steady-state time trial on the bike and on the run individually. This intensity level is the base intensity level in an XTERRA, as well. On those rare, flat, smooth sections of the bike and run courses, you will find yourself moving at a speed that corresponds to your lactate threshold speed, give or take a few percent. But on those frequent occasions when you encounter a short, steep hill or a muddy patch, your physiological intensity level will increase as you struggle to maintain a high speed against greater resistance. T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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Fatigue generally results from different causes at intensity levels below and above the lactate threshold. It also occurs much faster at intensity levels that are significantly above the lactate threshold. Thus, when you attack those sharp climbs and muddy patches in an XTERRA your body undergoes acute physiological changes that push it quickly toward the brink of exhaustion. That’s okay, as long as your subconscious calculations of the degree to which you can increase your effort level in these short stretches without blowing up are accurate. However, once you crest the hill or make it back onto dry, packed dirt, your body must be able to undo those physiological changes that were pushing it quickly toward the brink of exhaustion without reducing the intensity of cycling or running below the base level for the event. Racing well in an XTERRA requires the ability to recover from supra-threshold efforts while riding and running at or near threshold intensity. It’s sort of like a military airplane’s midair refueling maneuver. You have to take on gas while you’re still burning it.

FATIGUE ABOVE THE LACTATE THRESHOLD If this article had been written 10 years ago, it might have told you that the reason fatigue occurs rapidly at exercise intensities exceeding the lactate threshold is a sudden switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, which results in rapid accumulation of lactate, a byproduct of anaerobic metabolism that causes fatigue. Fortunately, this article is current and we now know the explanation suggested in the previous sentence is completely false. First of all, there is no precipitous decline in time to exhaustion when an athlete crosses from slightly below lactate threshold intensity to slightly above it. If you can maintain your lactate threshold cycling power for precisely one hour, then you could probably sustain 105 percent of your lactate threshold cycling

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power for 50 minutes. That said, in XTERRA racing your intensity may skyrocket to 120 to 130 percent of lactate threshold at some moments, and time to exhaustion at these intensities is very short, especially when you’re pre-fatigued from the racing you’ve already completed. Second, there is no sudden switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism when the lactate threshold is crossed. When running at 95 percent of your lactate threshold pace, for example, your muscles are releasing energy roughly 90 percent aerobically and 10 percent aerobically. When running at 105 percent of your lactate threshold intensity, the balance will shift only slightly, to roughly 85 percent aerobic and 15 percent anaerobic. Finally, the lactate that is produced by the muscles as an intermediate product of anaerobic metabolism does not cause fatigue. To the contrary, it is used as fuel for aerobic metabolism, and it also helps to prevent fatigue caused by muscle cell depolarization (see below). So what does cause fatigue to occur at intensities exceeding the lactate threshold? The short answer is your brain. At all exercise intensities, the brain causes fatigue to occur by reducing motor output to the muscles in response to feedback from the muscles and other parts of the body indicating the potential for serious physiological harm if exercise continues at the present intensity. The difference between fatigue occurring below the lactate threshold and fatigue occurring above the lactate threshold lies in the nature of the feedback signals that cause the brain to curtail muscle tissue activation. During prolonged efforts at lower intensities, the warning signals take the form of declining muscle glycogen levels, increasing core body temperature, accumulating muscle damage and so forth. At higher intensities, fatigue results indirectly from muscular acidosis, cerebral energy or oxygen depletion, muscle depolarization and oxidative stress.

MUSCULAR ACIDOSIS The muscles become more acidic during exercise. That’s a good thing, because it enables them to function more efficiently. But only to a point. During sustained efforts at very high exercise intensities, the muscle acidity level rises (that is, the muscle pH level falls) to a level that may indirectly trigger fatigue. However, contrary to conventional wisdom, the muscles never reach a level of acidity that would directly cause dysfunction (fatigue) of the muscle fibers. The body’s normal pH at rest is approximately 7.4. During intense exercise, as the muscles become more acidic, pH may drop as low as 7.0 at the point of exhaustion. However, when muscle cells are electrically stimulated outside the body, mechanical failure only occurs when the pH drops all the way down to 6.8. This observation suggests that fatigue always occurs before a catastrophic loss of acid-base homeostasis in the muscles takes place. It certainly stands to reason that the brain would inhibit the muscles from working to the point of catastrophic acidity. Acidbase (or pH) balance is one of the most important types of homeostasis in the body. If organ tissues become either too acidic 132

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changes are also predictably correlated with the onset of fatigue. Initially, the level of oxygen uptake by the brain increases to meet the energy demands of the brain’s intensely active motor centers. But when very intense efforts are sustained, oxygen uptake by the brain decreases, and when this happens, fatigue occurs, likely because the brain’s motor centers reduce their output to avoid becoming too oxygen-depleted. The brain’s primary energy substrate is glucose. However, the brain can also metabolize lactate, and it does so increasingly during prolonged, intense exercise. The balance of energy substrates used by the brain is expressed as the metabolic ratio. At rest, the metabolic ratio is approximately 6. During prolonged, intense exercise this ratio decreases. Fatigue occurs when the metabolic ratio drops to 3, again probably because inadequate energy supply forces the brain’s motor centers to reduce their output. When the intensity of exercise is reduced from levels that cause cerebral deoxygenation and declining metabolic ratio, the brain begins to take up more oxygen and glucose and less lactate. As a result, fatigue diminishes. The more the exercise intensity is reduced, the faster this recovery process proceeds.

MUSCLE CELL DEPOLARIZATION

(too positively charged) or too alkaline (too negatively charged), irreparable damage ensues. Lactic acid acts on acid-sensing nerves in muscle tissue that connect to pain centers in the brain. It is believed this effect accounts for the burning sensation in the working muscles that is commonly felt by athletes engaging in high-intensity exercise. The feeling of pain may trigger a reduction in motor output from the brain to the muscles. The body contains various buffering systems that neutralize excess hydrogen ions produced in a one-to-one ratio with lactate and are the direct cause of pH decline. One of these buffers is sodium bicarbonate—that’s right: baking soda. When sodium bicarbonate buffers lactic acid, carbonic acid is formed. When carbonic acid reaches the lungs, it breaks into carbon dioxide and water. Carbon dioxide is a potent breathing stimulator. Thus, rapid lactic acid production causes a dramatic increase in breathing stress that may hasten fatigue, also through discomfort. When the exercise intensity is reduced from the levels that cause muscular acidosis, the various acid buffers are able to once again match pace with the acids themselves. The pH level rises, the breathing rate slows, muscle pain diminishes and fatigue dissipates. The more the exercise intensity is reduced, the faster this recovery process proceeds.

CEREBRAL DEOXYGENATION AND ENERGY DEPLETION During exercise, predictable changes occur in the rate at which the brain takes up oxygen and energy substrates. These 134

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Another potential contributor to fatigue during very highintensity cycling and running is muscle depolarization. Muscle cells work somewhat like batteries. Their potential to release energy and perform mechanical work depends on a difference in atomic charges between the inside of the muscle cell and the outside. When the positive charge inside the muscle cell is much greater than the positive charge outside it—as is normally the case at rest—the muscle cell membrane is said to be highly excitable, meaning it is very easy for electrical impulses to enter the muscle cell. The difference in electrical charges between the inside of the cell and the outside of the cell is referred to as an ion concentration gradient. When the concentration gradient is high, the cell membrane is very excitable and nerve impulses pass through very efficiently. When the concentration gradient is low, the cell membrane is less excitable and nerve impulses lose effectiveness. During very high-intensity exercise, there is a steady decline in the concentration gradient in muscles and in muscle cell membrane excitability that is strongly correlated to fatigue. When the intensity of exercise is reduced from the levels that cause muscle depolarization to occur, the muscle cells’ sodiumpotassium pumps, which are responsible for regulating the concentration gradient, are able to play catch-up and restore a higher concentration gradient that allows the muscles to contract more efficiently. As a result, fatigue dissipates. The more the exercise intensity is reduced, the faster this recovery process proceeds.

OXIDATIVE STRESS Aerobic muscle metabolism produces free radicals, primarily of the reactive oxygen species (ROS). During exercise, the rate of ROS production increases sharply. Up to a certain point this phenomenon is beneficial, because ROS facilitate glucose transport into muscle cells. But as ROS accumulation becomes excessive, this benefit is outweighed by a negative. Specifically, ROS act on muscle contractile proteins in a manner that reduces their calcium sensitivity. Calcium ions must bind to these contractile proteins for a muscle contraction to occur. As these proteins become less calcium sensitive, any given level of electrical input to the muscle cell from the nervous system results in less forceful muscle contractions.


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When the intensity of exercise is reduced, not only does the rate of ROS production decrease, but also the muscle cells are able to regenerate glutathione, the most important muscular antioxidant, enabling the muscle cells to neutralize ROS at a higher rate. As a result, fatigue dissipates. The more the exercise intensity is reduced, the faster this recovery process proceeds.

FATIGUE IS FATIGUE IS FATIGUE In the final analysis, it matters very little what causes fatigue at supra-threshold intensities. What matters is preventing it and, to the degree that it does occur, reversing it. The best way to push back the wall of fatigue in an XTERRA, or in any other race, for that matter, is not to figure out the precise physiological origins of the fatigue you experience therein but is instead to perform workouts that challenge your capacity to resist fatigue in ways that are similar to the race itself. Again, in the case of XTERRA, this means you need to include in your training regimen some workouts in which you challenge yourself to recover from a brief, supra-threshold effort while cycling or running at roughly threshold intensity. Performing such workouts will stimulate physiological adaptations that enable your muscles to restore their optimal pH balance, increase muscle cell polarity and so forth more quickly and at a higher exercise intensity than would be possible otherwise. Here are three such workouts.

HILL/FLAT INTERVALS In conventional hill intervals, whether done on the bike or on foot, each interval is performed at a steady intensity and

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entirely on an upward slope. Hill/flat intervals are a little different. You do the first half at supra-threshold intensity on an incline and the last half at threshold intensity on level terrain after cresting the hill. You must recover from the first half while completing the second. The particulars may vary. I suggest you start with shorter climbing segments and slightly increase their duration each time you repeat the workout while maintaining a steady duration in the flat segments. This will challenge your body to recover from increasing levels of fatigue in equal time. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a sample threeweek progression that works for the bike and the run (warm-up and cool-down are not included): Week

8 x 30 seconds uphill @ 120% threshold effort/30 seconds flat @ threshold speed, spin/jog back to starting point for recovery

Week

8 x 45 seconds uphill @ 120% threshold effort/30 seconds flat @ threshold speed, spin/jog back to starting point for recovery

Week

8 x 60 seconds uphill @ 120% threshold effort/30 seconds flat @ threshold speed, spin/jog back to starting point for recovery

1 2 3

The tricky part of this workout is finding just the right starting point on the hill so you crest it at 120 percent of threshold effort after the planned amount of time (30, 45 or 60 seconds) has elapsed. Recall that threshold intensity is defined as the max-

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imum intensity that you can sustain for one hour. (“Threshold effort” is used as the guideline for the uphill segment of hill/flat intervals instead of “threshold speed” because gravity reduces the speed you can achieve at any given effort level. If you have a power meter on your bike, however, you can simply do the climbs at 120 percent of threshold power.)

DIMINISHING RECOVERY INTERVALS The use of interval workout progressions with diminishing recoveries is fairly common in swimming but less common in cycling and running. If you’re training for an XTERRA, it’s a good idea to do them in all three disciplines. In a diminishing recovery interval workout progression you perform the same number of intervals of the same distance and at the same speed each time you repeat the workout, but you gradually reduce your recovery time to train your body to recover faster from supra-threshold efforts. Here’s a sample three-week progression that works on the bike and the run (warm-up and cool-down are not included): Week

1

Week

2

Week

3

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5 x 800 meters at 120% threshold speed/power w/ 90second active recoveries @ 70% threshold speed/power 5 x 800 meters at 120% threshold speed/power w/ 60second active recoveries @ 70% threshold speed/power 5 x 800 meters at 120% threshold speed/power w/ 30second active recoveries @ 70% threshold speed/power

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TEMPO FARTLEK A standard fartlek workout consists of a moderate-duration ride or run at a moderate intensity with several high-intensity bursts—usually lasting 30 to 60 seconds—sprinkled throughout it. A more XTERRA-specific type of fartlek workout consists of an extended effort at threshold intensity with faster fartlek intervals sprinkled throughout it. Here’s a three-week tempo fartlek progression that works for the bike and the run (warm-up and cool-down not included): Week

20 minutes @ 95-100% threshold speed/power with 6 x 30-second intervals @ 120% threshold speed/power sprinkled throughout

Week

25 minutes @ 95-100% threshold speed/power with 8 x 30-second intervals @ 120% threshold speed/power sprinkled throughout

Week

30 minutes @ 95-100% threshold speed/power with 10 x 30-second intervals @ 120% threshold speed/power sprinkled throughout

1 2 3

Of these three suggested workouts, hill/flat intervals should be emphasized earliest in the training cycle—between 12 and eight weeks before an XTERRA. Diminishing recovery intervals should come next, between 10 and four weeks before race day. Concentrate on tempo fartlek workouts in the last six weeks to develop peak specific fitness for your XTERRA event.


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RACING AROUND THE GLOBE

International editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s note International editor, Shane Smith, talks about the reality of the Ironman family. | 142

News and racing Down Under Catch up on the latest happenings from Australia and New Zealand as the Olympics draw nearer. | 144

Delly Carr Sportshoot Photography

Letter from Australia Pantherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ironman Australia remains one of the most enjoyable events in the sport | 146

Off the back In this issue we catch up with Australian Olympian Brad Kahlefeldt to chat about the upcoming Beijing Olympics. | 154 T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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We are family By Shane Smith

The term Ironman Family is often used at Ironman events around the world. No Ironman presentation ceremony is complete without mention of the Ironman Family. This sentiment is reinforced every year in Hawaii at the culmination of all the worldwide Ironman events. We are led to believe we are members of the Ironman Family, as it’s cultivated as a culture by WTC. The term is used often, but the sentiment was put to the test in the past 12 months, and the outcome proved to the Ironman world that it’s more than just a warm and fuzzy notion. The Ironman Family is alive and well and stretching its arms around those who need it most. Twelve months ago tragedy struck in Port Macquarie when Ironman Australia Legend Ian Green was pulled unconscious from the swim and died later in the hospital. His wife, Pam, who had been a supporter at dozens of triathlons, suffered terribly with grief after the sudden death of her fit husband. It was during this time the much-hyped Ironman Family stepped up to the plate and became a reality. Pam’s ties in the triathlon community helped her through the past year in many ways. From small gestures such as hugs and waves from other athletes, through to the fund-raising efforts of a triathlon chat room, Pam has certainly been helped 142

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through her grieving process. A Web site called Transitions, where Ian had been a chat-room member, helped Pam know she wasn’t alone. The “trannies” as they call themselves, made donations and organized auctions to raise funds for Pam, but more importantly, they became her support group in her time of need. They encouraged Pam as she trained for and completed her first triathlon, which she did in honour of her husband. As a tribute to Ian, Pam returned to Ironman Australia this year as a volunteer. The day before the race, a ceremony was held at the swim start. Pam laid her husband’s ashes to rest in a moving ceremony in the waters of Hastings River. It was an amazing show of strength from Pam to not only return to the site where her husband had passed away but to celebrate his life in a place he loved. It’s a tribute to Pam she hasn’t allowed her tragedy to dampen her enthusiasm for the sport, and an affirmation that the Ironman Family does indeed take care of its own when it is needed most. In a sport that requires so much inner focus, almost to the point of selfishness, it is comforting to know that in times of tragedy, real Ironmen stand up. The family is flourishing and as long as our sport’s athletes continue to look out for each other in the way they did for Pam, we can only get stronger. Well done Pam, and well done Ironman Family. Train hard, Shane


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Gomez wins opening triathlon world cup Spain’s Javier Gomez opened his 2008 season with a satisfying victory in Mooloolaba, finishing well ahead of last year’s winner Brad Kahlefeldt. The 2006 world champion Tim Don made it back to the World Cup podium, edging out Kiwi Bevan Docherty for the bronze. After a frenzied swim, the 40km bike leg kept most of the field together until the final stages, where four riders gained a slight gap. The four breakaways were quickly caught as the run specialists showed their hand early with Gomez and Kahlefeldt running shoulder to shoulder at the front. Kahlefeldt couldn’t stay with the punishing Gomez pace and dropped back to second. Remarkably, it was the 14th consecutive world cup in which Gomez has stood on the podium. 144

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Eyes Wide Open

Triathlon veteran Andrew Johns outclassed a hot young field of international athletes to win the 2008 Aria Open Elite Mooloolaba Triathlon. Unable to get a start in the ITU World Cup race, Johns made a statement in claiming an impressive victory. This race was introduced to cater to athletes travelling with national squads who were unable to make the ITU start line. Breaking back into the winners’ circle after a disappointing race at the Gold Coast Oceania Cup earlier this month, the Sunshine Coast local clocked a time 1:48:38 over the 1.5km swim, 40km cycle and 10km run, finishing just three seconds ahead of Queenslander Samuel Betten. David Matthews followed 37 seconds behind. “It’s great to have a race at home and today is just spectacular and perfect conditions,” said the 34-year-old Johns. “I worked myself into the race and guess my experience got me there in the end. There are a lot of great juniors coming through so I’m not sure how long I can hold them off.” The women’s event produced a truly international podium with Ashley Finaughty from Zimbabwe finishWomen ing just over one 1. Ashley Finaughty (ZIM) 2:05:00 minute ahead of 2. Sarah Crowley (AUS) 2:06:10 Australia’s Sarah 3. Bree Wee (USA) 2:06:40 Crowley, who dug deep 4. Carmel Hanly (NZL) 2:06:50 to stay ahead of fast5. Rina Hill (AUS) 2:08:10 finishing American Men Bree Wee in third place. 1. Andrew Johns (GBR) 1:48:38 “This is just fantastic, 2. Samuel Betten (AUS) 1:48:41 the course was tough 3. David Matthews (AUS) 1:49:18 but to my advantage as 4. Dylan McNeice (NZL) 1:49:36 hills are my strength,” 5. Josh Maeder (AUS) 1:49:38 said Finaughty.

Eyes Wide Open

Veteran too good for young guns

Kahlefeldt was able to hang on for the silver. Don rounded out the podium with the bronze, his first world cup medal since a bronze in Salford in 2005. “It was so special to win here in Australia,” said Gomez. “It is the country of triathlon. I always wanted to win a race here.” With a fantastic final lap, Greg Bennett came in fifth place; a result he hopes was enough to impress Aussie Olympic selectors. Also in the top 10 for the home team was Brendan Sexton, the Under-23 world championships silver medallist, and 2004 Olympian Simon Thompson. In the anticipated fight for the final Kiwi Olympic spot, former two-time junior world champion Terenzo Bozzone finished 14th, approximately 50 seconds ahead of Shane Reed, who finished 25th. Both will have to wait and see what the New Zealand Olympic selectors decide. Bennett moved one step closer to filling the third spot on Australia’s Results Olympic team. “I’m 1. Javier Gomez (SPA) 1:49:50 really fit and have done 2. Brad Kahlefeldt (AUS) 1:50:14 a lot of conditioning 3. Tim Don (GBR) 1:50:24 work,” said Bennett. “I’d 4. Bevan Docherty (NZL) 1:50:27 be grateful if the selec5. Greg Bennett (AUS) 1:50:29 tors pick me. I’m not going to race every world cup. At my age I have to pick my poison.”

Snowsill takes gold in Mooloolaba Three-time world and Commonwealth Games champion Emma Snowsill of Australia laid down a challenge to the rest of the triathlon world with a controlled and dominant display in winning the 2008 Mooloolaba BG Triathlon World Cup ahead of archrival Vanessa Fernandes of Portugal. It was the first head-to-head battle between the two who are expected to clash for gold at the Beijing Olympics. Fernandes was aiming for a record-breaking 20th world-cup title but settled for silver,


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approximately 39 seconds behind Snowsill, with Sweden’s Lisa Norden posting an incredible run to take the bronze, becoming the first Swede to ever podium at a world cup in ITU history. Recently retired Craig Walton was a very nervous coach today watching his partner Snowsill race. “The key to Emma’s race in Beijing is the swim,” he said “She has been working hard on that aspect with long-time swim coach Dennis Cotterill.” After the opening 1,500-meter ocean swim, a group of nine athletes formed early on the bike, including Australians Snowsill, Annabel Luxford, Alee Sharp and Emma Moffatt, American Laura Bennett, UK’s Liz Blatchford and New Zealand’s Andrew Hewitt. Moffatt led the group out of transition and onto the run. It didn’t take long for Fernandes and Snowsill to run her down. The pair stayed hip to hip until the end of second lap when Snowsill finally opened up a gap. “It’s good to get that first race out of the way,” said Snowsill. “It’s not the same as training and I’m happy with that performance. I finally found my legs with 5km to go and started to relax, especially once I’d heard Craig’s voice. “It was a nice change to be out in the front pack of the swim for a change and not experience a mouthful of feet. I’ve worked hard over the last five months on my swim and it’s paying off,” said Snowsill. Fernandes said, “I had a good race today and amhappy about where I’m at, it was not my goal to get the 20th win but about building on this for Beijing.” Current U23 World Champion Norden had a sensational day to grab the third spot. Bennett finished fourth while Brit Andrea Whitcombe rounded out the top five. After

a promising start leading out the run, Moffatt finished ninth and Abram 12th.

Eyes Wide Open

Results 1. Emma Snowsill (AUS) 2. Vanessa Fernandes (PRT) 3. Lisa Norden (SWE) 4. Laura Bennett (USA) 5. Andrea Whitcombe (GBR) T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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Ironman Oz competitors on the Williams Street bridge in Port Mac.

Letter from Australia Fun and games, folks: A tough race as always, the Panther’s Ironman Australia remains one of the most enjoyable events in the sport

By T.J. Murphy

On April 4, while in Port Macquarie, two days out from the 2008 Panthers Ironman Australia, I took a walk around town. This was my third visit to Australia but my first to Port Mac. Consistent with my previous visits, the people of Oz were exceedingly warm and friendly. Port Macquarians, I noticed, appear remarkably content, relaxed and smart enough not to take life too seriously. By all appearances, they manage quite well without the DEFCON 4 level of stress we Americans have successfully infused into our most mundane of days. 146

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I figure one reason why Americans and Australians get along so well is we all started out as British rejects. When Britain lost the American colonies, it first turned to Botany Bay, near Sydney, as a place to dispense with prison overflow. London was a terribly overcrowded place and it didn’t take much rabble rousing to get ordered on board for a trip to Down Under. One of the penal colonies that would eventually take hold was in Port Macquarie, established in 1821. Free settlers began pouring in 20 years later as the penal colony fizzled out. It would eventually becomes a splendid little resort town, lavished with white sand beaches and waterways, located 260 miles north of Sydney. Three years ago it became the new home of Ironman Australia. From the town center, I walked up a short hill where I passed school kids playing cricket (I think it was cricket), climbing to a quick peak where you can get a view of beaches and the South Pacific. Here you might find yourself concluding, “Uh, this works.” I then cut past a park and came upon one of the several


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intact landmarks that detail Port Mac’s early history. On Munster Street I stood in front of a well, constructed out of bricks by convicts in 1840. The plaque told me about how the female convicts labored at a factory that produced nails. I read the following quote recorded onto the plaque, written by William Delaforce in his diary describing his experience as a convict: “It was not an unusual thing to see one or more of the female convicts sitting in the stocks about the streets of the settlement, suffering a recovery from drink. Most of the women were quite equal to their liquor, like the men, when they could get it.” At the Ironman Australia carbo party, drink you could get, and since the stocks were long gone, I was happy to partake of the cold beer. I’ve been to a lot of carbo parties and Ironman Australia has one of the best. In a welcome contrast to most, the party doesn’t sway into the boredom zone when it comes to acknowledging sponsors or talking up other race events. Rather, the spirit is festive, relaxed and blessed with a sense of humor. There was an attractive vocalist who had a kind of Marilyn Monroe thing going on, delighting the crowd with a rendering of Happy Birthday for popular race announcer (and Oz regular) Mike Reilly. Ben Darwin, a 228-pound former rugby player who was doing the race, gave the best speech. Darwin told an old training story about working out with a fellow rugby player. “We rugby players aren’t that bright,” Darwin said with a glint in his eye, prefacing the tale. After the intense workout, next to a beach along the ocean, the two were gasping away, hands on their knees. Darwin’s mate breathlessly began talking about how the high-altitude workout they just did was bloody hard. “Mate,” Darwin said, looking up at the water. “We’re at sea level.” To which his training partner replied curiously, “What altitude is that?” The most poignant moment of the night came when Aussie Ironman pro Kate Major took the microphone after an introduction of several of the elites. Major’s eyes welled with tears as she talked about Emma, her twin sister, and her long recovery from a car accident and recent return to triathlon. Both sisters would be lining up on the starting line (unfortunately, after a strong start, Emma suffered a broken seat post and she wasn’t able to finish). Perhaps the best thing about Ironman Australia’s move from Forster, the previous host town, to Port Mac, is the size difference of the two towns. Despite having the same small-town charm Forster offered, Port Mac has more of the basic infrastructure needed to absorb the needs and desires of 1,800-plus triathletes and their throngs of spirited friends and family; more restaurants, hotels and fun things to do. Forster often seemed on the edge of being overrun. One quick suggestion to triathletes who go to Ironman Australia next year: For an excellent dining experience in a place you might not expect it, visit the El Paso Motor Inn Waterfront Restaurant. My conception of a motor inn comes from driving around the United States, and my image of an accompanying restaurant is that of a truck stop. But on the night before the race, I decided to go to the back of the hotel and give the Waterfront a try. It’s no truck stop; rather, it’s a truly pleasant place to have a fine dinner. A seafood and steak establishment with good service and atmosphere, it also offers a special menu for triathletes once a year. Since the back of the hotel does face the sea, the Waterfront is true to its name. I was astonished at how good the food was and how I couldn’t spot another triathlete. My waitress said visiting triathletes don’t seem to know the

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place is there. They await your reservations. While I was enjoying my time at the Waterfront, a light rain began to fall. The waitress suggested the race would likely be spared.“I think it will dump on us tonight and get it over with,” she remarked brightly. I woke up at about 4 a.m. race morning because the sky was purging itself, as prophesized by my waitress. On the top floor of the El Paso Motor Inn I could study the size and intensity of the drops by the way they slammed into the rooftop. You couldn’t help but imagine a day soaked to the bone. While I sipped on a cup of coffee, listening to the pounding rain, on the other side of town, in her hotel room, Chrissie Wellington, triathlon’s megaprodigy, the reigning women’s Ironman World Champion, was enjoying English Breakfast tea and muffins with jam. This would be the third Ironman for the 30-year-old in an eight-month period, starting with last year’s Ironman Korea. In Kona, where she stunned the world in her second Ironman, she had played the stealth card about as well as one could play it. Says her coach, Brett Sutton, “It was a tactic. I think if Sam McGlone had known who Chrissie was, the race may have turned out differently.”

Chrissie Wellington en route to winning her third Ironman. T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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“I feel like: You ain’t seen nothing yet,” she told me. “I don’t expect to win every race I enter. I know I will lose some. But I love this. I love what I do. I’m just trying to keep my feet on the ground.” What were her expectations in Oz? “I’ll be honest. I don’t expect to win, but if I don’t get a podium finish, I will be disappointed.” Seeing her train in Australia was illuminating. Looking fitter than she did in Kona, Wellington helped dispel the rumors about Sutton’s coaching – rumors portraying him as a madman running a survival camp where the athlete who doesn’t shatter goes on to win world championships. Wellington and the other athletes in Subic who I talked to said, yes, the training is hard, but the group is so severely dedicated that most of what goes on is Sutton trying to prevent them from doing too much, too hard. Anyone suspecting that TeamTBB uses drugs should visit the camp itself. There are no team doctors, nutritionists or other such amenities, let alone a lab. They live deep within a third-world country, train hard three times a day, eat basic foods, sleep and do what Sutton tells them. That’s about it. The team has an anti-drug manifesto that members are sworn to uphold, and Sutton says that one of the reasons his athletes do so much volume is “to beat the cheats out there.” Sutton says that there’s not one athlete Australia’s Kate Major looked strong as she pushed the women’s competition early. now on his team who is reluctant to give their all in training. He says Wellington is a Wellington arrived in Australia directly from a heat camp good case in point. He’s afraid she’ll overtrain when not in conducted by Sutton in the Subic area of the Philippines for camp. “I tell Chrissie that she doesn’t need to ride six-hour bike TeamTBB. In Subic Bay, a former U.S. Naval base, Wellington’s rides,” Sutton said. “The longest ride she needs is four hours. If training partners included a wide mix of international talent, she’s not in camp she’ll say, ‘Sure boss,’ and go out and ride six. including Belinda Granger (AUS), Mariana Ohata (BZL), Erika I want her in camp because otherwise she’ll overtrain.” Csomor (HUN), and Bella Comerford (GBR), and that’s just the “I’ve heard the story about how Brett ‘throws eggs against women. I paid a visit to Subic Bay two weeks out from Ironman the wall: some will crack and others won’t,’” Wellington adds. Australia. Heat camp was right. The thick tropical air was cook- “But he’s the one holding me back. I have a tendency to try and ing, as was a lean, ambitious Wellington. During one bike ride, I go harder and harder and harder. So he’s the one who’s reining sat in the van that followed her while she rode solo. Sutton was me in. Left to my own devices, I’m the one who would be driving. Wellington was pushing a big gear with a Jan Ulrich-like Humpty Dumpty smashing myself up. So I don’t see that as an cadence. “Do you see that?” Sutton asked me, pointing at the aspect of him.” van’s speedometer. “Forty-nine kilometers-per hour, here on the In Port Macquarie, Wellington’s competition was Major. The flats. That’s what I was seeing last year. And people thought I was men’s race included returning champion Patrick Vernay from mad to send her to Hawaii.” Her 49-kph pace (translating to 30.4 New Caledonia and from Australia, Dr. Mitch Anderson, Luke mph) was an indication of the diesel engine Wellington has McKenzie and Luke Bell. Switzerland’s Mathias Hecht was also a under the hood, the one that powered her pre-triathlon days of contender. It can be safely assumed that all of those treading mountain biking trips through Nepal, where in the cold, thin air water before the deep-water start said varying prayers of thanks of high altitude she dropped any and every guy who tried to when the rain stopped before the race and a rainbow sizzled stick with her. across the sky. While it would sprinkle here and there throughIn between workouts in Subic Bay, Wellington took a few out the day, the athletes were spared any serious downpour and minutes to talk about the upcoming race in Port Macquarie. She had excellent conditions for racing. acknowledged how this would be a new experience for her, as One must hand it to the Australians when it comes to makshe would no longer have the luxury to race while cloaked in ing for a dramatic race start. When the cannon fired it was like anonymity. She said she was thrilled to be racing again, anxious they were testing an atomic bomb. I was wedged into a crowd of to counter any doubts that she was the real thing. onlookers all popping their digital cameras. When the shock 148

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After the two-loop swim was over, I watched the athletes exit the water. The race began to take shape. The bike course at Port Macquarie is a three-lap affair, providing many opportunities for your ever-loyal loved ones to get pictures of you. After they do this and the race is a fond memory, be sure to study the timelapse effects captured by the photos and how a specific piece of the course effectively works people over. The challenge occurs on Mathew Flinders Drive and it’s a doozy. Here’s how the race Web site describes it: Here the course becomes undulating to Lighthouse Road where athletes turn left and then turn right at Davis Crescent and down and around and then left onto Matthew Flinders Drive, where athletes then travel along the coastline to the Ocean Drive roundabout. As Bill Bryson writes in his wonderful book about Australia, In a Sunburned Country, Australians are masters of understatement. Bryson relates how, upon his arrival in Sydney, Australian friends took him to the beach to try out the water and he notes how little concern is drummed up by things that generally terrify Americans. While wading out in the water, one of Bryson’s friends calls out to him. “Look out! There’s a bluey.” Glenn took on an immediate expression of alarm. “Where? What’s a bluey?” I asked, appalled to discover there was some additional danger I hadn’t been told about.? “A bluebottle,” she explained, and pointed to a small jellyfish of the type (as I later learned from browsing through a fat book titled, if I recall, Things That Will Kill You Horridly in Australia, volume 19) known elsewhere as a Portuguese Man-of-War. The sting of a Portuguese Man-of-War – even Iowans know this – is agony. My point is that climbing Flinders has a bit more zap than the word “undulating” suggests. To get to the road, the media car pulled up to an adjacent neighborhood and we Luke McKenzie (left) and Mathias Hecht made sure the men’s bike was fast. crossed through, no kidding, a tropical forest preserve. American neighborhoods have parks with swing sets; Australians have tropical forests. Upon completing the journey between neighborhoods, I laid eyes on the racers going past into the first vaulting ascent, a short, weirdly steep hill buffeted by a throng of spectators eager to see pain. They were led by a young man armed with a portable speaker and microphone, performing emcee duties at what he called the Heart-Rate Monitor Challenge. At the peak of the climb athletes turn right and then dive downward for a quick break before a shorter, steeper climb. The apex of the second climb does not have the respite of another downhill, rather casting the athletes further upward along the Sea Acres natural preserve. It’s good stuff, provoking heroics and merriment. One triathlete on the first hill had the gumption to pop a wheelie in front of the crowd. His new fan base erupted with screams and cheers. In the elite races, Hecht and McKenzie, training partners, sparred at the front. In the women’s race, Major was the dominant athlete through the first loop, building a two-minute lead by the 40-mile mark, but Wellington, pushing a monster gear, eventually heated up. As she put it later, during the third lap of the bike she was “storming.”

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wave from the cannon nearly knocked us all on our butts, we collectively burst out laughing. You had to wonder whether a cannon ball was about to smash through a building somewhere. I imagined two Australians in charge of stuffing the cannon with gunpowder, both worrying whether they had enough in there and topping it off with a few extra shovels’ worth just to be sure. During an Ironman is a good time for spectators to go and get a cup of coffee. Over the years I haven’t been a big fan of coffee in Australia. I’ve never been able to find brewed coffee, and the “flat whites” I order at the counter, made from an espresso machine, don’t pack the wallop I’ve come to know and love from the overpriced coffee we Americans are enslaved to. What I’ve needed is for the guys who handled the cannon to make my coffee. But Port Macquarie now has a Starbucks, and I’ll happily trade all the Burger Kings in the world for one Starbucks. The only problem was that the Port Macquarie Starbucks doesn’t open up until 8 a.m. on weekends. Note to Starbucks Global Operations: What the hell? Here in the States the poor blearyeyed blokes who work at Starbucks are accustomed to ridiculously early opening times. I know. I used to be one of those blokes. Hence, this is my unfiltered travel advice: Go to Port Macquarie, dine in the spectacular seafood restaurants, get a Hidgy Didge pie, enjoy the wonderful weather and endless opportunities for water recreation (fishing, dinner cruises, sunset cruises, drink cruises, beach time, you name it), see the local sights, go to the pub, but when it comes time for a coffee, go to Starbucks. Or, as my good friend and former pro triathlete Shane Smith has dubbed it with an Aussie tweak, “Starby’s.” You’ll find Starby’s on Clarence Street, smack in the middle of the town center.


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Patrick Vernay successfully defended his championship by unleashing a sub-2:52 marathon.

When the athletes turned in their bikes for running shoes, Wellington had a 1:20 lead over Major. The returning men’s champion, Vernay, was comfortable letting the bike dogs tear each other to pieces, and waited until the run to launch a proper attack. On the three-loop bike course that passed through the town center and traced along nearby beaches, Vernay and Wellington gradually took over the race. Kate Major and Dr. Mitch Anderson refused to give up, knowing full well that nothing in an Ironman is over until the tape is snapped. Wellington, in fact, said later that this was her most difficult Ironman yet, that certain leg muscles were on the verge of collapse and her mental faculties were put to a supreme test by the resolute Major. Anderson raced so hard he went through the finish line and directly into the medical tent. But Patrick Vernay and Chrissie Wellington, the new Panthers Ironman Australia champions, captured the day in times of 8:31:33 and 9:03:33 respectively. At the awards banquet both champi152

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ons spoke. Wellington started off by promising to make it short and sweet — her speech at the Hawaii Ironman was notably epic — and she did. It was also articulate and gracious. Vernay is the most humble of champions, and the native French speaker said he hoped everyone would consider him now an Australian, such is his love for the race. After the awards everyone limped over to Panther’s, the entertainment club that sponsors the race. At an Australian club like Panther’s, visitors can become temporary members and enjoy dining, gambling and, of course, a good party. Peter Murray, an Australian race announcer who co-hosted the weekend with Reilly, took to the stage and led the post-awards party through a gamut of dancing—including the magical Chicken Dance—and party games, including a best bum contest among the women and a T-shirtless competition among the men. The fun had lasted through the weekend, and the reputation of Ironman Australia was set to live on.

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Man on a mission: Brad Kahlefeldt By firstoffthebike.com

Brad Kahlefeldt is a man on a mission. At the end of 2007 Kahlefeldt was in a hospital watching his Olympic dream fade rapidly. Ten weeks later he ended up on the podium at an ITU race in Mooloolaba and is now approaching the best form of his life. In the leadup to Beijing, Brad Kahlefeldt should be considered a real medal prospect.

First Off The Bike: You’ve had some great victories recently, including the Commonwealth Games (2006) in front of 100,000 people. How did your life change after that?

Brad Kahlefeldt: I guess you could say it changed a bit. Triathlon got quite a lot of coverage from that one race and obviously with Emma Snowsill winning as well, getting the double was fantastic for Australia and it boosted the profile of the sport in this country. It was very special and it was great to do it in your home country with all the fans and family watching as well. It was a great experience.

Do you find the big wins attract the sponsors?

Yeah, they tend to. But I have tried to stick with the same sponsors all the way through. I have had a few and they are big supporters of mine. It just takes the pressure off me and I can just focus on racing without trying to make all my money out of prize money. It is nice to start the season with a little bit of money in the bank.

With that sponsorship pressure taken off you is there such a thing as a good loss?

I had a good loss on the weekend (at the ITU race in Mooloolaba Brad was second) and I think it just motivates you for later on. You want to beat all the guys and you want to perform well. But you win some and lose some; that’s the way it is in sport. I obviously would like to win more than I lose, but with some of the big losses I’ve had it has motivated me even more.

Are you a fan of cycling?

I keep a close eye on swimming, cycling and running. If I had to pick one it would have to be running. I grew up doing cross-country and little athletics. But you have to love cycling once you base yourself in France. You tend to follow the Tour for a number of hours every day, just watching it on television. Cycling is a great sport and I would love to be a part of it, as well.

There are some people who say the Olympic-distance format with its drafting is not pure triathlon. Tell those knockers, how hard is it to win a World Cup race?

The funny thing is that in Australia it (ITU triathlon) is regarded as a 154

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soft sport. But most of the guys who say that don’t race it. You know the bike is on, the swim is on from the start and it is very, very fast. And most of the courses these days, especially the Olympic Games, are very hard and very hilly. There are always guys looking to get up the road and you have to be a very strong rider in order to get of the bike fresh. That is the key, to be able to get off and have some legs for the run. Because all the runs these days are fast, some below 30 minutes. And to run that off the bike is a very hard thing to do. If you have fresh legs (off the bike) then you can win but if you don’t you’re out the back pretty fast.

Does it annoy you when you hear people saying that about your sport?

It does hurt a bit when they say you can’t ride a bike. You know some of those guys have come and done a criterium on the Gold Coast and we drop them halfway through the race and they shut up after that. But that’s part of sport. Some days a race will come together and it is pedestrian and you sit up just waiting for the run. But that’s just racing.

Last summer you got quite sick and had to be hospitalised. Was there a moment of panic that your Beijing program would not only be disrupted but derailed?

At the start. The doctor came in and said, “You’ve got pneumonia on the left side and it’s all infected through the lung. It may take a couple of months to repair itself.” At that point you are very nervous as to whether you will get back to 100 percent because if it does scar the lung then you have permanent damage there. It was quite nerve-wracking in the hospital waiting for the full results to come in. And when they did the doctor said it may only take six weeks for me to get back to 100 percent, and that’s what happened. At the moment I am just starting to feel on top of it and feeling great. All my training times have come down to better than last year so I have actually improved a bit.

After your good day at the Oceania Championships you said this win would show those who knocked you. Do you think you have many detractors in the sport?

You always have them. There are those guys who say you can’t do stuff., and that you’re only in teams because of certain people. With my coach Bill Davoren’s position in Triathlon Australia (head coach and Olympic selector) there’s certainly those guys who are out there who don’t agree with him on some points, and that is disappointing in some regard. But the easiest way to get into an Australian team is to just go out there and perform. I knew I had to do that to get into the team to Beijing. I knew I had to go out there on the world circuit and do the best I could and race to win most races and that’s what I did. I had a good couple of years and thankfully I’m on the team.

World Champion or Gold Medal?

To win in Beijing would be unbelievable but I have worked hard to be World Champion. (Laughing) Can I say both?

EPIX

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cycle faster run faster increase VO2 max reduce risk of injury rehab if injured

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“It’s lack of faith that makes people afraid of meeting challenges, and I believed in myself.”

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time is everyone's most precious training resource All athletes, even the pros, have a limited amount of time to train. Triathletes have to divide that limited time between three disciplines. Then, you have to decide between working on technique, aerobic conditioning, or power. Is it possible to work on both cycling and running technique and conditioning at the same time? YES!!! If you do your cycling training with PowerCranks. About 80% of PowerCranks new users set some sort of running PR within 3 months of starting cycling training with PowerCranks, usually despite very limited running. This is what we mean by improving training efficiency. Train with PowerCranks and:

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John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

The stealth training tool of: both professional and age-group


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The virtually coached triathlete: Part 2 By Matt F itzgerald // Photos by John Segesta

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In the first part of this three-part series on self-coaching with digital tools, we met Steve Turner, a 52-year-old age-grouper undertaking a “virtual coaching” experiment with the aid of a Polar CS600, which monitors power and heart rate on the bike; a Polar RS800, which monitors speed and heart rate on the run; and a software application from Training Peaks called WKO+, which allows him to analyze all of his workout data. Steve was then four weeks into following an online version of a 12-week, Level 4 Sprint Triathlon Training Plan from my book, Triathlete Magazine’s Essential Week-by-Week Training Guide. Unfortunately, Steve has since developed a minor knee injury resulting from choosing the wrong running shoes and has backed out of the program. What’s more, his computer broke,

stealing his ability to download and analyze workouts. But the show must go on. So let’s talk about some of the virtual coaching benefits Steve might be enjoying if he had not encountered these problems. One of the most important qualities of effective triathlon training is balance. Your training must be balanced in two ways. First, there must be a balance between stress (or work) and recovery. Second, there must be a balance of training intensities. Digital tools including speed and distance devices, power meters and performance management software can help you maintain both types of balance. The present article discusses the balance of stress and recovery; in the next and final installment of this series we will focus on the balance of training intensities. T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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The concept of training stress balance (TSB) that is integrated into WKO+ software is particularly useful in balancing stress and recovery. Training stress balance is simply the difference between your chronic training load (how hard you’ve been training over the past several weeks) and your acute training load (how hard you’ve been training within the past week). It works like this: The power and/or heart rate data from your rides and the speed and distance and/or heart rate data from your runs is automatically used to generate a “training stress score (or TSS)” when you download it into WKO+ software. (TSS scores for swims must be created manually.) Your chronic training load (CTL) for each discipline is calculated as a rolling average of your workout-by-workout TSS over the past 42 days with a “decay constant” that gives your most recent training greater weight than less recent training. The acute training load (ATL) is calculated as a rolling average of your TSS over the past seven days with a much steeper decay constant, the result of which is that your ATL tends to increase and decrease much faster than your CTL with fluctuations in your training. This is easily seen on the application’s Performance Management graph (see example below), where the line representing your ATL moves up and down relatively sharply and the line representing the CTL has a shallower slope and changes direction less often. (Note that your ATL, CTL and TSB can be tracked independently for each discipline, but for triathletes it’s best to look at combined data for cycling and running. Tracking your swim training in this manner should be considered optional, as it has little impact on running and cycling fitness or fatigue.) When your recent training workload is greater than your

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average training workload (that is, your ATL is greater than your CTL), your training stress balance will be negative. On the graph, the line representing your current TSB will dip below 0 and the line representing your ATL will be above the line representing your CTL. A negative training stress balance indicates you are probably less than fully recovered from your most recent training. In other words, you are fatigued. Therefore you will tend not to have your best performances when your TSB is negative, although there can be exceptions to this pattern, especially when your TSB is only slightly negative. On the other hand, when your recent training workload is less than your average training workload over the past several weeks (that is, your ATL is less than your CTL), your TSB will be positive. On the TSB graph, the line representing your current TSB will be above 0 and the line representing your ATL will be below the line representing your CTL. A slightly positive TSB indicates your body is well recovered from recent training. In other words, you are fresh. When your TSB is slightly positive, you will tend to have some of your better running performances, although, again, this rule is not absolute. However, a large positive TSB indicates you are losing fitness, because it results from a marked and/or extended reduction in training. When your TSB is strongly positive (10+), you will not feel fatigued but you will tend to perform poorly because you have lost fitness due to reduced training. The two best predictors of performance are a slightly positive TSB (between 1 and 10) and a very high CTL. In plain English, this means your very best workout and race performances will result when you first build your chronic training load


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to the highest level you can handle and then reduce your acute training load until your body is fresh, but still fit. But the training stress balance in each discipline must be managed carefully as you build your training workload avoid overtraining. Increasing your ATL too rapidly—by more than five average TSS points per workout per week—tends to result in overtraining, as does maintaining a TSB that is too negative (-20 or lower for more than three consecutive weeks). These are general patterns. Tracking your training stress balance becomes most useful when you plot your performance in workouts and races against your ATL, CTL and TSB numbers and thereby discover the conditions in which you, as an individual athlete, tend to perform best and those in which you tend to perform worst. Then you can adjust and plan your future training accordingly. Quantifying stress and recovery in this way always results in some surprises, even for the most experienced athletes. We all have a few false notions about what works best for us that are exposed under the bright light of this type of sophisticated analysis. Using these tools can be somewhat intimidating at first, but it’s well worth the effort. You can download a free trial of WKO+ software at trainingpeaks.com.

THE PLAN: WEEKS 5-8 Below are weeks 5-8 of the 12-week sprint triathlon training plan that “virtually coached” age-grouper Steve Turner was following until his injury.

WEEKS 1-4 OF YOUR SPRINT-DISTANCE TRAINING PLAN Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Swim WU: 250y DS: 6 x 25y MS: 8 x 100 moderate KS: 6 x 25 CD: 250y

Bike 1 hour moderate w/ 7 x 1-min. hill climbs @ VO2max

Run 30 min. moderate w/ 6 x 30 sec. @ VO2max

Swim WU: 250y DS: 6 x 25y MS: 5 x 200 @ threshold, 45-sec. rest KS: 6 x 25 CD: 250y

Bike 1 hour 15 min. moderate

Run 35 min. moderate

Rest

Swim WU: 250y DS: 6 x 25y MS: 9 x 100 moderate KS: 6 x 25 CD: 250y

Bike 1 hour 5 min. moderate w/ 8 x 1-min. hill climbs @ VO2max + 10min. transition run

Run 35 min. moderate w/ 6 x 30 sec. @ VO2max

Swim WU: 250y DS: 6 x 25y MS: 5 x 200 @ threshold, 30-sec. rest KS: 6 x 25 CD: 250y

Bike 1 hour 30 min. moderate + 10-min. transition run

Run 40 min. moderate

Rest

Swim WU: 250y DS: 6 x 25y MS: 10 x 100 moderate KS: 6 x 25 CD: 250y

Bike 1 hour 10 min. moderate w/ 9 x 1-min. hill climbs @ VO2max + 10min. transition run

Run 35 min. moderate w/ 8 x 30 sec. @ VO2max

Swim WU: 250y DS: 6 x 25y MS: 5 x 200 @ threshold, 20-sec. rest KS: 6 x 25 CD: 250y

Bike 1 hour 30 min. moderate

Run 45 min. moderate

Rest

Swim WU: 250y DS: 6 x 25y MS: 8 x 100 moderate KS: 6 x 25 CD: 250y

Bike 1 hour moderate w/ 2 x 12 min. @ threshold

Run 10-min. w/u 16 min. @ threshold 10-min. cooldown

Swim WU: 250y DS: 6 x 25y MS: 7 x 75 @ VO2max, 45-sec. rest KS: 6 x 25 CD: 250y

Brick Bike 45 min. moderate/ Run 10 min. moderate

Run 40 min. moderate

Week

1

Week

2

Week

3

Week

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LANE LINES

STANDING LAT PULL-DOWN

KNEELING CABLE PULL-DOWN

ROTATOR CUFF CABLE PULL

SHORT-RANGE, ONE-ARM TRICEP EXTENSION

Get out of the pool!

OVERHEAD MEDICINE-BALL TOSS

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ROTATOR CUFF CABLE PULL. Stand with one side of your body facing a cable pulley station with the handle positioned at hip height. Lock your elbow into your side Five dry-land exercises to build strength and endurance in the water and rotate your upper arm toward the weight stack to grasp the handle. Pull the handle toward your opposite By Brad Culp hip, using a slow and controlled motion. Next, turn 180 degrees and pull the handle in the opposite direction (like If you’re the typical Type-A triathlete and you got an early start to the 2008 season, you may be ready for a mid-season you’re swatting a fly with your backhand). Keeping your elbow break by now. We don’t recommend a complete training vaca- locked into your side is critical; otherwise your shoulder will be tion, but a little variety may be exactly what you need to feel out of alignment and you risk injury. Keep the weight very low to avoid inflaming the rotator cuff. This exercise targets the refreshed and push through the second half of the year. To get a reprieve from the monotony of swim training, try muscles of the shoulder rotator cuff, which are critical to mainreplacing one of your weekly swim sessions with this five-exer- taining shoulder stability during swimming. Do 2 sets of 20 reps cise dry-land workout. The whole routine should take about 45 in each direction with both arms. SHORT-RANGE, ONE-ARM TRICEP EXTENSION. Stand in the minutes to complete and after a month, you should notice same position as in the rotator cuff cable pull, and with the pulincreased power and muscular endurance in the water. STANDING LAT PULL-DOWN. This exercise represents one of ley in the same place. Grab the handle in an identical fashion, the best ways to target the muscles of your upper back, which are only this time rotate your forearm so that your palm is facing the the primary power producers in swimming. Stand over the seat of floor and push the handle downward until it touches your thigh. a lat pull-down machine and grab the overhead bar with your This is an excellent endurance builder, as the triceps are among hands just wider than shoulder width. Stand an arm’s length away the first muscles to become fatigued while swimming. Do 2 sets from the machine and pull the bar straight down toward your of 20 reps with each arm. OVERHEAD MEDICINE-BALL TOSS. This movement is probathighs, keeping your arms as straight as possible. Keep tension in your lats to slow the movement of the bar back to the original bly the most fun of all the dry-land exercises. Stand about 8-10 position. This movement is a pure strength developer, so don’t feet from a training partner and hold a 10-pound medicine ball skimp on the weight. Use enough resistance to do 3 sets of 8 reps. behind your head (with elbows fully flexed). Throw the ball in a KNEELING CABLE PULL-DOWN. This exercise is similar to the straight line, aiming for a spot about six inches above your partstanding lat pull-down, but it targets each side individually. Kneel ner’s head (unless you don’t like your training partner, and then facing a cable crossover machine and reach up with one arm to you can aim lower). Keep your upper arms locked in place when grab a handle. Pull the handle straight down toward the floor you throw. Propel the ball only with a powerful extension of with your arm almost completely straight (a small elbow bend is your triceps. If the ball is arcing in the air, you’re swinging your okay). Using too much weight can strain your shoulder, so use upper arms too much. Do 5 sets of 1 minute of back-and-forth just enough to do 3 sets of 12-15 reps with each arm. For an extra throws, with 45 seconds of rest after each set. This is another great endurance builder for the triceps. challenge, do the exercise while kneeling on a BOSU ball.

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BIG RING had done a great job increasing her sustainable power but nothing to improve her ability to cope with changes in pace. You’re never going to be able to sit at a completely steady power output during the bike leg, and it is important to realize that repeated efforts above your lactate threshold lead to fatigue faster than maintaining a more consistent output. At the same time, recent research confirms what’s known anecdotally for some time: Working harder when the going gets tough and recovering when conditions are easier leads to faster times. (J Sports Sci., 2007 Jul;25(9):1001-9. ) In other words, it’s a good idea to train for the eventuality that during a race you’ll want to or need to increase your effort above your sustainable output. The key to gassing it over small climbs, accelerating out of corners and surging to get around competitors—without sapping your long-term strength—is developing the agility to go above your lactate threshold for short periods and then recover without slowing dramatically below your normal race pace. You can do this with a slight variation to a typical threshold interval workout.

TYPICAL WORKOUT 3 x 8 minutes at or just below maximum sustainable power output, 6 minutes easy spinning recovery between intervals.

3 x 8 minutes, but instead of staying at or just below maximum sustainable power output, increase intensity by 10-15 percent (250 watts goes to 275-288 watts) for 1 minute every 3 minutes during the interval. Each interval looks like this: • 3 minutes maximum sustainable power (MSP) • 1 minute MSP plus 10-15 percent • 3 minutes MSP • 1 minute MSP plus 10-15 percent • Total: 8 minutes

Training for realworld conditions By Jim Rutberg

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There’s more to a fast bike split than a high sustainable power output and optimized aero position. You’re not riding in a wind tunnel, on an indoor trainer or down a dead-flat road by yourself. On race day you’ll be out there on undulating and technical courses with hundreds or thousands of other competitors, and your cycling fitness has to be up to the challenges of those environments. A story about an athlete I recently started working with is the perfect confirmation. After training consistently on her own and improving her sustainable power output on the bike, Abby struggled to find rhythm in the bike leg of a half-Ironman. It was an early-season race and most of her cycling training had been lactate-threshold intervals on an indoor trainer. She was excited to race because her power numbers were higher than ever. But she was disappointed because between the rolling hills, corners and efforts to pass other riders, she ran out of steam 12 miles before T2. When we started working together a few weeks later, I asked to see power files from the event and the training beforehand. These files revealed that Abby 166

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If you find the harder portions of the intervals are too intense for your current fitness, reduce them to 30 seconds. Stronger riders can include more frequent fluctuations in the intervals, like alternating between 1 and 2 minutes at maximum sustainable power and 30 seconds to a minute at the higher intensity. One of the things you’ll notice during these intervals—and during races—is that you’re often better off handling short periods of higher intensity by increasing your cadence rather than shifting to a higher gear. Pushing against more resistance in a bigger gear feels like you’re generating more power, but often it just means you’re over-geared and producing less power than before. This is part of the reason I like athletes to think about coping with changes in pace as a matter of agility instead of brute strength. When it’s time to accelerate, think of revving your cadence first, then shift to a bigger gear once you can do it without bogging down. For many short efforts, like making a pass, revving the gear you’re in often allows for a more seamless return to your sustainable rhythm and power output. Abby raced another half-Ironman on a similar course a few months after we started working together and though her power file showed spikes similar to those in her earlier race, she had the agility to handle the surges and took eight minutes off her PR for the bike leg (and 12 minutes off her PR for that distance). Jim Rutberg is a Pro Coach for Carmichael Training Systems, Inc. and co-author of five books with Chris Carmichael, including the NYT bestseller, Chris Carmichael’s Food for Fitness: Eat Right to Train Right and The Ultimate Ride.

John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

VARIATION


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ON THE RUN

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Know your heart rate-pace relationships Heart-rate monitoring is useless by itself. Heart-rate monitoring combined with pace monitoring is very useful.

By Matt F itzgerald

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The relationship between your pace and your heart rate changes as you gain (or lose) fitness. Tracking these changes is an excellent way to assess the effectiveness of your training. As you train toward peak-race fitness, your heart rate decreases at any given pace, and at any given heart rate, your running pace increases. You should also find you can sustain any given heart rate for a longer period of time before fatiguing. Finally, your threshold heart rate—the heart rate associated with your threshold pace—increases as your threshold pace itself increases. This means you are able to sustain a higher work rate over a given period of time. Note that all of these changes are relatively small and gradual. You can formalize the process of tracking changes in your heart rate-pace relationships by performing periodic specific endurance tests. A specific endurance test is a workout that tests the effects of your recent training on your efficiency at your race pace for an upcoming event. Suppose you’re currently training for an Ironman 70.3, which, of course, concludes with a half-marathon run. Step one is to come up with a ballpark estimate of your current half-marathon race pace in the context of doing your normal workouts involving efforts at this pace. Wear a heart-rate monitor during these workouts and note the heart rate that is associated with your current half-marathon race pace. This is your half-marathon heart rate, which will not change much between now and your goal race. What will change is the pace you can sustain at this heart rate. 168

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You’ll have achieved peak-race fitness if and when your halfmarathon heart rate and your goal half-marathon pace match up. For the specific endurance test, go to a track, warm up and then run for 20 to 30 minutes at your half-marathon heart rate. Stop after the designated test duration has elapsed and note how far you’ve run. Use the time and distance data to calculate your pace. Repeat this test once every five or six weeks. You should move closer to your goal half-marathon pace each time. If you train with a speed and distance device with heart-rate monitoring capabilities, every stride of every run can be used to measure changes in performance through analysis of heart ratepace relationships. When analyzing the workout data, choose a segment of a very recent run in which you maintained a fairly steady pace and note the corresponding average heart rate. Now go back a few weeks and find a segment of a run in which you averaged the same pace over the same distance. If the corresponding average heart rate is higher in this earlier workout, you have pretty good evidence you’ve gained efficiency at that particular pace. You can make this type of comparison for any pace: a very fast-pace run in short intervals, your goal pace for an upcoming marathon, your standard aerobic pace or any other pace you run with regularity. Failure to gain efficiency at a particular intensity level over time indicates you need to increase your focus on training at that intensity level. Polar’s RS800 speed and distance device has a feature called Running Index that quantifies your immediate fitness level


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through a complex analysis of the relationship between your pace and heart rate during the run. Essentially, the feature calculates the physiological stress of running at any pace (including variable pace), a value determined by your aerobic fitness and your running economy, both of which factors slowly improve with training but may be slightly compromised from day to day by fatigue. When you have a lousy run because you are carrying excessive fatigue from recent training, this fatigue will manifest itself in the form of reduced aerobic power and running economy, which will in turn reveal themselves through changes in the way your heart rate responds to the challenge of running at any pace (even if the pace is not very challenging). The Running Index is sensitive enough to measure these changes in a meaningful way. What itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really doing is generating a rough estimate of your VO2max, which takes a long time to change substantially (increasing through progressive training, decreasing with reduced training), but changes subtly from run to run. By tracking your Running Index daily and plotting it against your training load, you can spot cause-effect relationships that will enable you to adjust your training to make it more effective. You may also use heart rate-pace relationships to track changes in your endurance. During prolonged running at any steady pace, your heart rate will remain consistent for a while and then begin to slowly increase due to decreasing mechanical efficiency. This phenomenon is known as decoupling. As your endurance increases, you will be able to go longer at a given pace before your heart rate and pace become decoupled, and the degree of decoupling will decrease. Make a habit of measuring decoupling in each of your long runs exceeding one hour. Triathlon coach Joe Friel suggests the following protocol. Hit the split button on your speed and distance device when you reach the halfway point of a long run. Determine your average speed and average heart rate for each half. Divide the first half speed by the first half heart rate to determine your speed-heart-rate ratio for that half of the run and then do the same thing for the second half. Subtract the second half ratio from the first and divide the remainder by the first half ratio. This yields a decoupling ratio for the workout. An example: 1.First-half speed (8.1 mph)/first-half heart rate (140 bpm) = first-half speed/heart rate ratio (0.058) 2.Second-half speed (8.0 mph)/secondhalf heart rate (145 bpm) = second-half speed/heart rate ratio (0.055)

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3.First-half speed/heart rate ratio (0.58) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; second-half speed-heart rate ratio (0.55)/first-half ratio (0.58) = 0.052 or 5.2%. According to Friel, well-trained endurance athletes are typically able to keep their decoupling ratio below 5 percent. If yours is above 5 percent, as in this example, put greater emphasis

on endurance training until it falls below the 5-percent threshold. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no value in monitoring your heart rate in isolation. However, monitoring your heart rate-pace relationships in your run training is a great way to track your progress toward peak fitness and help you make smart adjustments when necessary.

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SPEED LAB

Caffeine

The pros and cons to caffeine-infused training and racing

By Tim Mickleborough

DEAR SPEED LAB, What’s the deal with caffeine? Does it truly improve race times and help with training? If it does improve performance can we dose up on caffeine and not have any worries about getting caught? Is it a banned substance? Are there any major side effects with taking large amounts of caffeine? Thanks, Dan Mahler Denver, Colo.

DEAR DAN,

Caffeine has proven ergogenic effects, and its use in competition is legal as long as concentrations in the urine do not exceed a predetermined limit. Caffeine should not be considered synony170

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mous with coffee. Caffeine is only one of more than 100 chemicals found in coffee, which is only 2 percent caffeine. Caffeine is found in many beverages, such as soft drinks (e.g., Surge, Mountain Dew) and “energy” drinks (e.g. Red Bull, Pirhana). Other sources of caffeine include teas and over-the-counter headache and antidrowsiness remedies. Despite decades of research, exercise scientists and sports medicine professionals are still uncertain of some of caffeine’s effects. We still lack good dose-response data for caffeine, and there has been a failure to distinguish between acute effects (caffeine’s effects in those who do not normally use it) from chronic effects. Caffeine’s effect on heart rate may depend on when it is ingested. Generally, caffeine increases resting heart rate in caffeine non-users. One study has found that neither resting nor exercise heart rates were affected by a large (10 mg/kg), single dose of caffeine in caffeine-naïve recreational cyclists who cycled to exhaustion (1). However, other studies have found increases in heart rates during exercise following caffeine ingestion. It appears the timing of measurements and the type of subject may influence how investigators interpret caffeine’s effect on heart rate. Caffeine is known to exert a moderate diuresis (i.e. dehydrating effect). However, research suggests that while ingesting caffeine at rest does induce a diuretic response, ingesting caffeine during exercise does not (2). Acutely, caffeine can increase the basal metabolic rate and enhance fat oxidation during exercise. It has been shown that plasma levels of free fatty acids increase 50-100 percent following caffeine ingestion. Thus, the increased availability of free fatty acids may lead to a glycogen-sparing effect and thereby delay fatigue. Since both caffeine and theophylline are xanthines, it is not surprising that caffeine exerts some actions similar to those of theophylline. For example, both xanthines exert protective effects in exercise-induced asthma (3). Caffeine has been found to increase vigilance and decrease motor reaction time in response to both auditory and visual stimuli. However, caffeine may be detrimental in tasks requiring fine-motor coordination. The general consensus of research findings is that caffeine improves continuous exercise time to exhaustion. This effect appears to increase as the duration of the event exceeds 30 minutes, but caffeine has also been shown to enhance performance during incremental exercise protocols lasting eight to 22 minutes and sprints lasting less than 90 seconds (4). Athletes may experience unpleasant side effects while taking caffeine, such as nausea and abdominal discomfort, particularly when ingesting 400-500 mg caffeine or more. Another drawback to routinely using caffeine is that a withdrawal syndrome can

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occur after cessation of regular use.

PROS AND CONS TO USING CAFFEINE DURING TRAINING AND RACING PROS

CONS

Increases aerobic endurance secondary to glycogen-sparing effect

Causes tremors and decreases hand steadiness

Improves voluntary reaction time

May cause tolerance and withdrawal symptoms

Enhances alertness

Intake cannot exceed acceptable urinary levels in NCAA- and USOCsanctioned competition

May prevent exerciseinduced asthma

Has a diuretic effect if consumed several hours prior to exercise

According to the NCAA and USOC, caffeine is officially classified as a restricted substance and not a banned substance. Single doses of caffeine at 9 mg/kg or greater produce urine concentrations that exceed the USOC/IOCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and NCAAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s acceptable limits, which are 12 mgc/ml (60mmol/l) and 15 mgc/ml respectively. It is important to note doses of 3-6 mg/kg, which do not produce urine concentrations that would result in disqualification, have been found to be ergogenic (5). To put these dosages into some perspective, consider the following: one cup of regular coffee contains 100 mg of caffeine and a can of Red Bull contains 115 mg of caffeine, while the equivalence in urine within two to three hours is 1.50 mgc/mL and 1.73 mgc/mL respectively. If you choose to use caffeine as an ergogenic aid, avoid routine use. Individuals build a tolerance to many of the effects of caffeine within days. In addition, caffeine has diuretic actions and has detrimental effects on hand steadiness and possibly reaction time. As to the ethics of using caffeine to enhance performance, the IOC stipulates that taking any physiologic substance in abnormal quantity with the intention of artificially and unfairly increasing performance should be construed as doping. Have a question for Speed Lab? If so, please e-mail it to speedlab@juno.com. References: 1. Flinn S, Gregory, J, McNaughton L R, Tristram, S. and Davies, P. (1990). Caffeine ingestion prior to incremental cycling to exhaustion in recreational cyclists.

International Journal of Sports Medicine, 11: 188-193. 2. Wemple R D, Lamb D R. and Mckeever, K H. (1997). Caffeine vs. caffeine-free sports drinks: Effects on urine production at rest during prolonged exercise. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 18: 40-146. 3. Kivity S, Ben Aharon Y, Man A. and Topilsky M. (1990). The effect of caffeine on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Chest, 97: 1083-1085.

4. Armstrong L E, Casa D J, Maresh C M. and Ganio M S. (2007). Caffeine, fluid-electrolyte balance, temperature regulation, and exercise-heat tolerance. Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, 35: 135-140. 5. Pasman W J, van Baak M A, Jeukendrup A E. and de Haan A. (1995). The effect of different dosages of caffeine on endurance performance time. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 16: 225-230.

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TECH SUPPORT

Fat tire savvy

With some basic knowledge you can greatly increase your chances of choosing the perfect mountain bike for your off-road adventures

By Christopher Kautz

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Triathlon is a lifestyle that encourages pushing oneself to take on new challenges and set new goals. XTERRA is becoming a more popular way for multisport athletes to expand their horizons and try something different. However, with the challenge of taking on a new form of triathlon comes a whole new set of skills to learn and hurdles to overcome. While most triathletes have run trails at some point in their lives, the vast majority have little to no experience with mountain biking, and even fewer have any knowledge of how to choose the right mountain bike. Selecting the most appropriate road bike for their needs is difficult enough for a lot of triathletes. Choosing the right mountain bike is potentially even more difficult given the wide variety of types of mountain bikes available. However, acquiring some 172

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basic knowledge makes this process much easier. Getting a good understanding of the various types of bikes from which to choose, and what each type is best suited for, will help you select the right bike with which to enjoy your XTERRA racing. At the most basic level, there are two main types of mountain bikes: hardtail, sometimes called rigid, and full suspension. However, within each of these categories are various subtypes, some of which are very specific in what they are designed to do, making them of limited usefulness. Let’s take a look at the various types of bikes, focusing on those that are most applicable to the types of riding you’ll encounter in XTERRA, and then look at how to choose the one most suitable for you. Hardtail mountain bikes are the most mechanically simple of the bikes on the market today since they do not have a rear suspension system. You can find hardtails in configurations such as single speeds, so named because they only have one gear; fully rigid, meaning no suspension front or rear; and the most common type, which has a front suspension system and multiple gears. Single speeds are growing in popularity, and often have their own category at mountain-bike races. However, most single-speed mountain-bike owners use them as a second bike, because they are much less efficient than multiple-gear bikes, and for the same reason they are not particularly useful for offroad riding. Fully rigid bikes are normally entry-level bikes not really designed for off-road riding. While there are exceptions to this rule, such as very lightweight specialty bikes, for XTERRA riding you want to look at bikes with a front-suspension system. Since the frame on a hardtail mountain bike doesn’t have any moving parts, it is mechanically quite reliable, being no more complicated than a road bike other than its front-suspension parts. Compared to full-suspension mountain bikes, they have fewer parts that can fail, they require less maintenance and the bike can be built quite a bit lighter than a full-suspension bike. It is not unusual for elitelevel racers to still ride hardtails because of their lighter weight. They are normally very nimble bikes designed to carve twisty trails and to climb without the energy losses that occur through the rear suspension system of bikes that have one. Riding a hardtail fast, particularly downhill or on rough terrain, is more challenging, however, as proper line selection is essential. Since the back of the bike is not suspended you will need to steer the bike around bumps and obstacles, or use your legs as suspension to keep the back wheel on the ground. Some people feel that in the long run this can make you a better mountain biker as you will learn some fundamental bike-handling skills, but in the short run you won’t be able to ride as fast on challenging terrain until you’ve mastered the basics. Full-suspension bikes come in a number of varieties: crosscountry, trail, all-mountain and free-ride/downhill. Freeride/downhill bikes are not really suited to XTERRA riding, as they are generally quite heavy and not really designed for normal trail use. They have an emphasis on lots of suspension travel for bombing down runs and over large obstacles, not on pedaling efficiency. All-mountain bikes are less specific in their use than freeride/downhill bikes, but still emphasize long-suspension travel (normally about six inches), are slower-steering and generally weigh more than is ideal for an XTERRA bike. For XTERRA you will most likely choose between a cross-country bike and a trail bike. Cross-country bikes have the least suspension travel of any full-suspension bike on the market, with between three and four inches of travel both front and rear. The handling of this type of

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TECH SUPPORT bike is normally very quick. They also climb quite well and are typically highly maneuverable on twisty trails. While the suspension on this type of bike will smooth out the trails to some extent, its true purpose is to help get the rider from point A to point B as quickly as possible. Trail bikes normally add another inch of travel to cross-country bikes, with five inches or so being standard. They also have more relaxed geometry, often with a taller front end and slower steering. While they will still climb relatively well, they often weigh a few pounds more than a cross-country bike, and the geometry is not quite as well suited to fast climbing. However, with more suspension travel and a more relaxed geometry they will generally be more forgiving on bumpy trails and easier to descend on than cross-country bikes, and on rougher trails they can actually be faster than pure cross-country bikes. A full-suspension bike can allow you to confidently navigate terrain that might be more intimidating on a hardtail, knowing the suspension will allow the bike to roll over obstacles that might bounce you right off a hardtail. On especially rough or bumpy climbs, some full-suspension bikes can climb better than some hardtails. Most cross-country bikes now have rear shocks with settings that can be adjusted on the fly for climbing to eliminate the power-robbing pedal bob they have been known for, leaving the suspension just active enough to provide traction on climbs. A full-suspension bike can also leave you fresher for the run since the bike will do the job of absorbing bumps instead of your body. So, how do you choose the right bike for your needs? Start by

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deciding whether you want a hardtail or a full-suspension bike. In addition to the ride differences between them, consider your budget. You can get a good hardtail for considerably less money than a comparable full-suspension bike. If you’re on a limited budget, a hardtail makes more sense, as you’ll get a higher-quality bike for the money. When budget is not a limiting factor, allow what you intend to do with the bike to drive the decision. A hardtail is a great choice if you will ride primarily on smoother trails or fire roads but will prove more challenging to ride on rough terrain. Hardtails are also the way to go if your long-term objective is to become the best off-road rider you can be; with a hardtail you won’t have a rear-suspension system acting as a crutch that allows you to choose less-than-optimal lines. A full-suspension bike works better on rougher terrain and allows you to ride through sections you might not have the skill for on a hardtail, most likely allowing you to stay on the bike through a greater portion of the course in races. In selecting a full-suspension bike it is important to decide whether you want a bike dedicated to high-speed riding or one with a more forgiving nature, sacrificing some race-day performance for overall usability. If race-day performance is your priority, a cross-country bike is your best bet, but if you’re looking for a bike you can do some more relaxed riding on, go with a trail bike. Christopher Kautz is the founder of PK Cycling, a company focusing on fitting services and building custom bicycles. He is also an XTERRA racer, an Ironman finisher and a retired expert-class mountain biker. You can find him on the Web at pkcycling.com.


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NUTRITION

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Eat like a pro

he competes in. The food and training diary below was recorded one month before his first major race of the year, Ironman Arizona. For more info on Tollakson, go to tollakson.com.

Gain insight on nutrition that works for triathlon’s elites (and may work for you)

By Pip Taylor

S

PIP TAYLOR Having come from an ITU background and with a number of World Cup podium finishes and many years on the Australian National elite team, I had my first full non-drafting USA season last year. I came away with seven podiums from 11 starts. Among my goals for 2008 is to go one better and win Alcatraz. I also want to consistently podium at all the Life Time Fitness series races (and

So what exactly do the pros eat? If you want a single, specific answer to this question then you are sure to be disappointed. Food and eating habits in the pro ranks vary widely and are influenced by individual health and performance goals and also personal taste, culture, family situaT.J. TOLLAKSON’S tions, travel, climate, season, budget, availability of produce, food intolerances and health considera- FOOD DIARY tions, as well as psychological factors (such as • Instant oats 1.5 cups with 2 tbsp “lucky foods”). There are, of course, some general peanut butter and half-cup guidelines for nutrition for health and optimal raisins. sporting performance that most athletes follow. • Powerbar and EAS Muscle Armor But these guidelines are flexible and certainly do • 8 slices whole-wheat bread with peanut butter and jelly (8 tbsp PB not apply to all individuals in the same way. and 8 tbsp 100-percent fruit Following the lead of someone else simply because spread) he or she is a pro is definitely not recommended. If you want to know how you should eat, then seek • Powerbar • 6oz pork loin with tomato and cotout a qualified professional to help you. tage cheese So the following sample pair of professional • EAS Muscle Armor triathlete food and training diaries is not a mud map of how and what to eat. Nor is it a scientific analysis • 1.5 cups instant oatmeal with 1 tbsp peanut butter and quarterof nutrition data. There are no comments on quanticup raisins ties, caloric values, macro- and micronutrients and timing of intake; the training data is very general. • EAS Muscle Armor • Powerbar Neither the food diary nor the training diary of either • 8 slices of pumpkin bread, can of athlete is intended to be copied. Think of them as soda and EAS Muscle Armor brief glimpses of how two professional triathletes ate, • 6 oz pork loin with cottage drank, swam, biked and ran for three days of one cheese, 2 tomatoes and half an week during one season of their career—three days avocado that will probably never be exactly repeated. Kind of • 2 slices whole wheat with 2 tbsp peanut butter and 2 tbsp 100like reality TV—something to be observed with percent fruit spread interest and a touch of voyeurism as well.

T.J. TOLLAKSON T.J. Tollakson captured his first major title in 2007 with a win and course record at Eagleman 70.3. His resume also includes a number of podium finishes and record bike splits. For 2008 his major season goals are a top-10 finish at the Hawaii Ironman World Championships; a top-five placing at Clearwater 70.3 World Champs; a victory in one 70.3 series race; and a podium placing at every other race 174

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• 1.5 cups instant oatmeal with 1 tbsp peanut butter and quartercup raisins • 2 Powerbars • 2 slices whole wheat with 2 tbsp peanut butter and 2 tbsp 100percent fruit spread and EAS Muscle Armor • 2 Powerbar recovery bars • Mahi mahi fillet with mixed salad and black beans

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FOOD AND TRAINING DIARY TRAINING DIARY

NOTES

• Run 4 miles • Swim 6900 yards

T.J. is trying to shave down a couple of pounds to get to his ideal race weight. This means he has to be sure to balance his training and nutrition to meet performance and weightloss goals. Cycling between days when he is in caloric balance and others of deficit allows him to get a good compromise. T.J. measures the serving sizes of what he consumes to track his caloric intakes versus expenditures.

• Bike 80 miles, including ride up Mt. Lemmon • Swim 7100 yards

T.J. eats just about everything and there is no food type he needs to or wants to avoid. However, he stays away from alcohol except for relaxing with a glass of wine the night before a race. He also stays away from carbs at night during the race season and tries not to eat after 8 p.m. (this might not for everyone). He admits he could never be a vegetarian and craves red meat especially when in heavy training.

• Run 8 miles • Ride 22 miles

You will note the common theme of peanut butter that runs through the food diary. T.J. supports the peanut farmers of the USA—almost singlehandedly.


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NUTRITION maybe win one!) and come out and surprise people at 70.3 world championships. My season started in March with a runner-up finish at the Miami International Triathlon. My food and nutrition diary was completed two weeks before this event. For more information, go to piptaylor.com.

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If you are interested in recording and tracking what you eat, consider relying on the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Library, which has a fantastic online resource with the nutritional data for many commonly consumed foods and drinks. http://fnic.nal.usda.gov

PIP TAYLOR’S FOOD AND TRAINING DIARY FOOD DIARY

TRAINING DIARY

NOTES

• Half-cup raw oats soaked in half-cup plain, low-fat yogurt overnight and then mixed with chopped apple, 1 cup mixed berries, half mango, handful macadamia nuts • Sourdough sandwich with salad, tuna and cream cheese. 2 plums. Small tub yogurt. 50g chocolate. • Salmon fillet and big salad with greens, roasted sweet potatoes, garlic, tomatoes, goat cheese. Apple with 3 slices cheese.

• Run 1 hour, with intervals of moderate-tohard race pace. 24 minutes total solid. • Bike 1.5 hours ergo/wind trainer set consisting of mixed intervals focusing on cadence rather than intensity • Swim 5km moderate mixed strength and aerobic set

There is nothing I won’t or cannot eat. I aim to eat fresh and minimally processed foods, because that is what I like as much as anything else. However, I too am trying to get down to “fighting weight” and am always watchful of how much I am eating. I tend to have the same breakfast every day, although I vary the fruit and nuts that I add depending on what is in season. Having the same breakfast also makes me feel ready for the day.

• During ride: 1 ClifBar, 1 packet Clif Shot Bloks • Same breakfast • Toasted sandwich with cheese, tomato, spinach, olive tapenade. 2 mangos. Clif Shot Recovery Hot Chocolate. • Roasted chicken with mixed steamed greens, roasted sweet potato. 50g chocolate

• Bike 3.5 hours including high-intensity TT intervals with total 50 minutes very hard • Lighter gym day, core and balance work • Swim 5km including lots of short sprints

I prefer not to eat in the morning before my first training session. If I run first then I eat straight afterward. If I am riding then I eat on the bike about an hour and a half into the ride. This works for some but not for others. You will see chocolate quite frequently on my food diaries; the Clif Recovery Hot Chocolates have been a new and exciting discovery for me.

• Same breakfast • During bike: Clif Mojo bar • Leftover roasted chicken with salad greens. Orange. Clif Shot Recovery Hot Chocolate • Lamb racks, couscous salad. Fruit salad and yogurt

• Run 1 hour, including 6 x 90-second hill repeats • Bike 2 hours aerobic • Swim 5km moderate strength and kick set

I try to do all my food shopping at our local farmers market, where I can get the freshest organic produce. Market shopping, searching for recipes and then cooking up a feast is one of my favorite pleasures. When traveling I struggle to find something to eat in strip malls. I also cook a lot less and definitely take advantage of healthy shortcuts such as frozen veggies.


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DEAR COACH

Taking the high road Check your ego to keep your training on track

By Paul Huddle and Roch Frey DEAR COACHES,

How does one deal with one’s ego when, spinning along in the small chain ring as prescribed, someone flies past tempting a response? Is it possible to quiet the mind? Klaus Graf

KLAUS,

Wow. You’ve hit upon one of the toughest questions in sport and, perhaps, life—not just cycling or triathlon. No, we’re not psychologists but, in order to more effectively respond to your question, we did watch Oprah and Dr. Phil yesterday. So, how does one (especially a male “one”) stick to his/her own goals for a given workout and not get drawn, i.e. goaded, into a harder workout, i.e. race, than prescribed because he/she was just passed, i.e. taunted, by another athlete? OK, we’ll stop with the “he/she, his/her” stuff because, let’s face it, this is a male issue. When was the last time you rode by a woman and she locked on to your wheel or went right by you without a word of greeting or acknowledgment? So, how do you keep your ego in check on an easy day? Consider the following proven strategies: Stay at home and ride your trainer. This is self-explanatory. By training in the controlled environment of your own four walls, you won’t subject yourself to the chance encounters of the road. Ride with a friend who is much slower than you and/or who isn’t competitive with you and/or who you don’t need to impress. This way, if/when you’re passed by another athlete, you’ll be 176

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much more likely to hold back because you have an unwritten obligation to ride with your friend—at least that’s the theory. Ride at off-peak hours or on quieter routes. Don’t look the part. Consider wearing unconventional clothing and/or equipment. Wear a T-shirt instead of a cycling jersey. Wear a backpack and board shorts. Ride your beach cruiser with baskets. This not only takes the target off your back, but it will go a long way toward making you feel more relaxed about your easy workout and less likely to go after every wheel that goes by. Practice getting dropped. Go out the door with the intention of practicing letting people go when you’re passed. This might sound ridiculous, but if you’ve ever done an Ironman race you realize the value in this suggestion, having experienced the frenzy of the first 20 to 50 miles on the bike when 50 percent of the field is on pace to crack five hours for their bike split. Being able to let people go and stick to your own realistic effort/pace is crucial to racing success. Now, for as to how you handle an ego encounter, consider the three possible reactions: Pass the offending athlete back and hammer away from him, showing the world you’re a superior being. Maybe even look at him as you go by and yell,“You want some of this?” and speed off. (Remember, if you choose this option, you can’t slow down. You have to keep the new pace going or you’ll soon be passed back, and that’s no good if you’re truly a superior being.) Who cares if this trashes you and leaves you flat for the rest of the week and possibly starts you on an overtraining death spiral? You’re not going to let anyone pass you at any time without paying a price. Give a greeting (“Hi” or “Good morning” or “Nice day” etc.) and continue at your pre-determined easy heart rate, letting the other person ride by. This might sting a little—particularly if the person who passes you is perceived by you to be a lesser being and/or if he’s riding a beach cruiser wearing jeans, a plaid flannel shirt and lightweight hiking boots while carrying a fishing pole and a tackle box. Nevertheless, you’ll be better off for letting the person ride away because you’ll actually be rested tomorrow and better able to tackle the harder and/or longer workout you have planned. You can say hi, or not, and immediately get on the wheel of the person who’s had the nerve to pass you. Then, without asking, simply sit on their wheel drafting along at your prescribed heart rate. You picked No. 2 as the correct answer, right? Right. If you practice leaving your ego at the front door as you head out for your easy workouts, you’ll be that much better off come race day, when you’ll inevitably be passed, which can greatly affect your energy and momentum. Ultimately, however, it’s not so much practicing letting people go as it is focusing on your own goals for each workout and, hence, your race. Train on, Paul and Roch

John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

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By Dan Smith

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from these efforts, but you’re better off using the assistance of gravity to gain time on your rivals. Gaining those extra seconds going downhill on a mountain bike is something that does not cost you a lot of additional energy. You can increase your downhill speed by taking advantage of your bike setup and by improving your skills, technique and confidence. Have faith in your bike. Today’s fullsuspension bikes and hardtail bikes have very sophisticated shocks to smooth the trail and improve handling and control. Before you hit the dirt, dial in the suspension. This will involve following the bike’s set-up guide to adjust the air preload (the amount of spring in your shock) and rebound damping (how fast

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the shock returns to its neutral state). More advanced shocks have compression adjustments (which regulate how fast the shock moves and how much force is required to activate it). Setting up the suspension properly allows the bike to handle as the manufacturer meant by smoothing the trail so it doesn’t buck you around and by keeping the tires in contact with the ground as much as possible. This allows you to descend with confidence. It also means the bike does the work of shock absorption instead of your legs. Once the bike is set up, there are basic and advanced skills you must master. First, to ride faster downhill you must stay off the brakes as much as possible. The more you apply the brakes to slow the bike down, the more time you lose and the more effort you must use to re-accelerate. Brake in a straight line before the corner, not in the corner. Work on holding as much speed as possible through the turn. Unless you’re on a fire road, you don’t have much chance of starting wide and hitting the apex of the turn.

Another important downhill riding skill is body positioning. Think of the bike as an extension of yourself, not a machine that you just sit on and pedal. One of the keys to going fast is to be able to react quickly to changes in the trail. If you are not pedaling, your butt should be just off the saddle and your weight should be rearward-biased with the crank arms parallel to the ground. Your elbows should be relaxed with a confident grip on the bars, and you should only keep one finger on the brakes. Avoid the death grip at all costs, as it will increase tension in your upper body. Momentum is your friend. To ride over roots and rocks, shift your weight back, relax your arms and let the bike suspension do the work. It can help to be in a slightly larger gear when pedaling over small obstacles. This also aids in keeping the chain on the chainring. Choosing efficient lines of travel is the third key to faster downhill riding. Look where you want to go, not at what you want to avoid. If you are staring intently at that rock or root, you are bound to hit it. That’s one of the laws of nature. The faster you go, the farther ahead you have to look. Ignore what is close to you, because by the time it has registered with your brain, it’s too late to change your direction in response to it. The fastest line is not necessarily the smoothest. Oftentimes the trail will be created and routed to avoid obstacles like roots, ledges or rocks. Pre-ride the course and check alternate lines. If you are confident in your technical abilities, try going straight through a rough segment. Check to see whether going over roots is faster than slowing down, turning and getting back on track. Is there a straight section after a technical area? If so, carrying more speed will allow you to clean that portion of the trail. In a multilap race the trail quality changes, ruts develop and new lines open up. Be prepared to alter your line if a new option arises. In those hair-raising moments when you lose traction, remember if the front wheel is pointed in the right direction, you’ll probably be okay. Stay the course, don’t panic and chances are you will continue in your intended direction. It’s an amazing feeling to recover after having both wheels slide while you’re whizzing down a fast, technical descent. And after you’ve done it once, it becomes much easier to do it again and again. When you’re practicing, find the limits of the traction of the tires while turning. When you’re confronted with puddles and mud, your movements should be more subtle and delicate and less aggressive. Stay relaxed when the wheels start to slide. Again, as long as the bike is going in the right direction, things are still good. Learn to bunny hop the bike, even if it is only a few inches. This ability can mean the difference between slowing the bike down considerably when approaching a rock or branch in the trail and not even touching the brakes. To lift the bike off the ground, your butt must be off the seat and the pedal cranks horizontal. Use your body as a spring and push your weight into the shock (or shocks) of the bike just before you reach the obstacle. At the last moment spring upwards with your legs and arms. Try to keep the effort even so the front and rear wheels come up at the same time. Approach the obstacle at 90 degrees; don’t try to cross it at an angle. The same rule applies to anything out of the ordinary you encounter on the trail, as a head-on approach allows you to use your momentum to save yourself as opposed to having the front wheel wash out. As with all new skills, start your bunny hopping practice with small obstacles and build in increments as your confidence increases. Finally, take advantage of features of the trail and use your upper body to gain free speed. Once you are comfortable movT R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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ing around on the bike it is time to use your weight to add momentum. On trails that have small up-and-down rollers, whoop-de-doos or tight, bermed corners, you need to be able to use the art of pumping. If you have ever watched BMX races, you will see the riders push the bike over the top of the bumps and into the corners. This is free speed. As you crest the bump, push down on the bars to drive the front wheel into the dip. By constantly moving your weight forward and back you can propel the bike forward without ever turning a pedal. Spending time mastering your descending skills on a moun180

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tain bike pays off for both off- and on-road bikes. It builds your confidence and can add speed with no increase in amount of energy you expend. LifeSport coach Dan Smith has been involved with multisport for more than 15 years. He got his first mountain bike in 1984. Beginner and experienced triathletes looking to start or improve their performances are invited to work with Dan and join the LifeSport team. Visit them on the Web at LifeSport.ca or e-mail LifeSport Coaching (coach@LifeSport.ca).


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On the XTERRA trail By Emily McIlvaine

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At the heart of XTERRA is the fundamental idea of putting on great races in epic places with friendly faces. Pretty simple, but it’s a formula that has proven successful over the years, and that same philosophy is being used to grow the XTERRA Trail Run Series. Now in its fourth year as a stand-alone set of races outside the off-road triathlon circuit, the XTERRA Trail Run Series boasts 50 runs in 16 states and eight countries. New in 2008 is the focus on the off-road half-marathon distance, which XTERRA calls an Xduro. When asked about the paradigm shift (XTERRA Trail Runs used to be mostly 5k and 10k runs), XTERRA CEO Tom Kiely explained, “After 12 years of producing trail runs alongside our XTERRA off-road triathlons we’ve learned our audience wanted a bigger challenge than a 10k. What the market told us was to create a series of half-marathons that have a physical challenge parallel to that of a road marathon, but with Mother Nature along for the ride.” Two new big-time races set in truly stunning adventure destinations have been added to this year’s lineup with the XTERRA Trail Running National Championship in Bend, Ore. on September 27 and the first-ever XTERRA Trail Running World Championship on the Hawaiian Island of Oahu on December 7. Not long ago Bend was named “America’s Best Trail Running Town” by Outside, and with its wide variety of terrain, mild fall 182

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climate, endless miles of pristine trails and a local community full of enthusiasm and support for the race, runners can expect a one-ofa-kind experience at nationals. “The U.S. Trail Run Series is the fastest-growing segment of XTERRA and the national championship race is turning into a really big deal,” said Kiely. “We think Bend is an amazing place to visit and explore and an ideal venue for the last race in the series.” There are 10 regional series in the U.S.—in Oregon, Utah, Georgia, New York, New England, Chicago, Tennessee, Philadelphia, Southern California and the Chesapeake Area—and each hosts between three and seven races through the course of the year. The winner of each age group in each series earns free entry into the XTERRA Trail Running National Championship race. In Bend, the championship event is an Xduro (21k/13.1 mile), but the daylong event will also feature 10k and 5k races, a festival/expo center for participants and spectators and live entertainment. While the race field will include competitors who have qualified for nationals at other events, participation is still open to the general public. Held the weekend prior to the Honolulu Marathon, the XTERRA Trail Running World Championship will kick off an exciting week of running. Ten thousand dollars in prize money will be awarded to the top male and female finishers and racers from Xduro events in Brazil, New Zealand, Italy, France, Austria and Japan are expected to come join in the adventure. The site at Kualoa Ranch on the northeastern side of Oahu is magical. The 4,000-acre working cattle ranch has been the setting for major filming productions such as Jurassic Park, Godzilla and LOST. From the steep mountain cliffs to the sparkling sea, the terrain varies from dense rainforest to broad open valleys and from beautiful white sand beaches to verdant cliff faces. This inaugural gathering of international trail runners is highlighted by the 21k Xduro but is accompanied by numerous events ranging from shorter trail runs and kids’ races to a walka-thon for charity. “XTERRA is thrilled with the growth of its Trail Running Series,” said Janet Clark, President of TEAM Unlimited/XTERRA. “XTERRA Trail Runs give runners an opportunity to explore some wildly natural environments and challenge Mother Nature’s diverse and unique offerings from roots to rocks, to stream crossings and unexpected scenic vistas.” With the addition of the national and world championships, athletes looking for a true adventure should look no further than XTERRA. For more details on how the series works and the complete schedule of races visit xterratrailrun.com.

Rich Cruse

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With Look’s featherweight 986 VTT frame you now have the ability to build a sub-20 pound hardtail.

By Brad Culp

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I’m a hardtail addict. I don’t like bobbing up and down on steep pitches and I don’t like carrying five extra pounds of rear suspension when I have a 10k run to worry about. That said, when I’m trying to inch through some boulder-ridden canyon, I wouldn’t mind a few inches of rear-wheel travel to help eat up the trail. Lucky for me, and the rest of the XTERRA-addicts out there, LOOK created the 986 VTT—the most forgiving hardtail frame on the market. When we first took the 986 out of the box we were afraid to take it to the trails. The thought of a serrated hunk of limestone putting a hole in the gorgeous frame was just too much to bear. But once we found out there was a five-year warranty on structural damage (and one year on paint and finish), we were ready to do some damage. As with all of LOOK’s top-flight ships, fitting the 986 is a precise science. The seat post must be cut to fit a specific rider, although spacers are included with the E-Post, which allows for a few centimeters of rise once the tube has been cut. By selling the 986 with the frame, headset and E-Post only, LOOK allows you to spec the bike however you deem fit, but outfitting such a fine ride with anything less than top-shelf components is a serious injustice. Our bike came stocked with a complete SRAM XO group, a Rock Shox RE3A fork (85mm of travel), and an FSA K-Force crank and handlebar. Needless to say, the specs did the bike justice. 184

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The first thing we noticed upon hitting the trails was the surreal weight of the complete bike. The 986 tipped our scale at exactly 21 pounds (size small with LOOK quartz carbon ti pedals), making it by far the lightest off-road rig we’ve ever tested. The reduced weight makes the bike nimble on flat single-track and sweeping descents, but the feathery frame really pays off on steep, uphill rises. Making climbing even easier on the 986 is the frame’s geometry, which puts your weight squarely over the rear wheel and provides remarkable traction on ascents. Another impressive feature of the 986 is the way it dissipates shock and vibration from the rear wheel—something most hardtails aren’t able to do at all. LOOK flattened the stays, which improves flexibility in the vertical plane (absorbing shock) and increases stiffness in the lateral plane (improving power transfer). To top it off, LOOK includes an elastomer block on the EPost, which allows for a slight, backward inflection of the post, absorbing small impacts and vibrations. It all adds up to an incredibly smooth, confidence-inspiring ride, even when the terrain gets a bit gnarly. The 986 is ideal for XTERRA events that don’t require a rear suspension and if you can afford one, it’ll get you back to T2 faster than you ever thought possible. The 986 VTT is available in three sizes (S, M, L) and is sold as a frameset, headset and seatpost for $2,499. Our complete bike, as tested, retails for $5,499 (without pedals). For more information on the 986 VTT, or to find a dealer near you, visit lookcycle.com.

Courtesy the manufacturer

LOOK 986 VTT


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Guru

no Kautz Croop her

Inspired by the Vodafone McLaren Mercedes-Benz MP4-23 F1 race car, the highly limited edition PK prices at $11,000.

By Jay Prasuhn

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Team McLaren Formula I driver Lewis Hamilton's Mercedes Benz MP4-23.

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Courtesy Crash PA

paintjob that made it impossible to miss careening around tracks from Monaco to Suzuka. Guru nodded its approval. The process: Every customer will receive a personal premanufacture fitting from Kautz himself, (provided they come to his Bay Area fitting studio), so the bike can be truly customized. For Guru, this perk was a critical component of the buy. “It is a reflection of what a perfect bike should be, and a bike that fits you perfectly is part of that,” Rossi says. “Chris leads that market, so it was a natural fit for us to work together.” To be clear, it’s not just a tape measure and hex wrench. Kautz spends an inordinate amount of time not only taking measurements, but also asking about physical limitations, race goals, course preferences and so forth. Kautz then calls in the measurements to Guru for a six-week build in their Montreal factory. “Because it’s custom, these bikes are perfect fits, and that’s an important part of performance for us,” Rossi says.

When we’re spending anywhere from $2,000 and up on tri bikes composed of space-age materials, I guess you can say with little fear of contradiction that our bikes, well, they’re special. Some take what is deemed special even further. Hence the union of Montreal-based Guru Bicycles and PK Cycling master bike fitter Christopher Kautz. The result? We haven’t seen too many bikes that would look as good on a wall in a study as they would in the transition rack, but the limited edition Guru/PK Racing Limited Edition Crono is one of them. “The genesis of the idea was to borrow from other industries, making a special edition for customers on the cutting edge,” says Guru marketing manager Robert Rossi. “We talked to retailers and know the interest is there and in talking to Chris, it was something he had in mind as well. The limited edition Crono bike can squarely be put in the dream-bike category, because for some it will be just that: a dream. A run of 25 numbered bikes, spec’d with SRAM Red, Zipp 808s and a Zipp Vuka aerobar, is going for $11,000 apiece. Each bike will come with a Guru head-badge keychain, with the bike serial number etched to the backside. Triathlete magazine’s test prototype, while accurate down to lay-up and paint, is not part of the number run. The inspiration: Guru asked Kautz, a Formula I fan, whether there was a motor-powered racing machine he might like to use as a model for his Crono design. Without hesitation, Kautz said there was the Mercedes Benz MP4-23, used by the Vodafone McLaren Mercedes Team. It’s a vehicle with a striking The limited-run Guru Crono PK Racing Edition finds its inspiration derived from look and a unique silver, black and blaze-orange 186

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Christ Limited Edition


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TRIATHLETE’S GARAGE The frame: Guru wanted the limited edition of its flagship tri bike to be more than a Crono with a facelift, and again, Kautz was instrumental in making it so. His request: the stiffness of the Clydesdale lay-up, at the weight of a standard lay-up. The result is a bike with the vertical and torsional stiffness of the 1,600gram Clydesdale frame—a 15 percent gain—at 1,200 grams. “Because we’re only making 25, we can walk them through by hand to deliver what we’re promising,” Rossi says. And when they say, “walk them through,” they mean it. The Crono is designed, built and painted in-house, a remarkable anomaly in an industry of cheap overseas outsourcing. Limited-edition moniker aside, the Crono is one of the most aesthetically pleasing frames on the market, with an organic look, as tubes flow and stretch into one another. Guru says every nuance of the form follows function. Tubes morph in latitude and longitude, thickness, diameter and shape to achieve a desired ride effect: stiffness through the drivetrain, compliance through the vertical plane and aerodynamic efficiency all around. The coup de grace is, of course, the paint. The clash of gloss black against a shining silver and a brilliant vermillion orange captures and owns the eye. Applied to such an organic creature, the PK Crono is special indeed. “Our president and VP of sales and Robert Pinazza and Tony Giannascoli paint quite a few bikes themselves and are not easily impressed,” Rossi says. Taking the bike into natural sunlight makes the colors really pop. But making it happen was no easy task. “It was complicated and took quite a bit of time,” Rossi says. “The silver was very finicky. It’s a first for us, but I think we nailed it.

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The ride: Rossi put it best: “When this bike hits the road, it’s like a great wine versus a boxed wine you get at the grocery store. Both are grapes; one can be fantastic and one can be terrible. The same holds true with carbon fiber and on this one, we’ve maxed its utility to the highest level.” I’d tested Guru’s Geneo road bike a year ago and had difficulty returning it; it delivered one of the finest road rides I’d ever experienced. It was a great all-around ride from so many standpoints. The Crono, built to my specs, squared that experience. The fit was remarkable: a 77.5-degree seat angle with the saddle set squarely in the middle of the rails. Reach and drop all perfect. Kautz did his job as expected. The blend of characteristics was also as promised. The bike doesn’t fully master any one thing, but it has wickedly maximized control of all of them. From cornering to climbing, aerodynamics to geometry, weight to look, the Crono Limited touches them all. The frame stiffness was greater than I experienced in the Geneo, which made it a great climber. The 72-degree head angle was stable but not sloppy in the front. Really, the Crono can do whatever you want, on any course—a true jack-of-all-trades. So is it for you? If you’re a major company president (or Robin Williams) and you want the ultimate, this may be your definition. But you’d better hurry; they won’t last long. “We aren’t trying to be the biggest, because with our staff, we truly are limited by the amount of bikes we can make, especially for this one,” Rossi says. “We are very proud of this bike. For a company of perfectionists, that’s saying something.” For more on this model, visit gurubikes.com and pkcycling.com.

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An appetite for speed Indiana-based Zipp has set the carbon bar in the bike industry

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Organizations can compete on a number of different metrics: cost, speed of service, flexibility of product or service offerings and quality. Which of these metrics an organization chooses to emphasize and deemphasize will help determine the segment of the market to which a particular product or service will appeal. For example, McDonald’s has chosen to compete on speed and cost—feeding people quickly and cheaply—while minimizing the flexibility, or range, of products offered and, perhaps for some, also overlooking quality. In contrast, the fancy boutique restaurant in the recently regentrified warehouse district is likely to provide a far wider range of top-quality menu items but at a much higher cost—and you likely won’t be in and out the door in five minutes. Nonetheless, both establishments cater to distinct market segments that base their decision making on the above four metrics. In a similar fashion, Speedway, Indiana-based Zipp, located less than a mile from the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, has risen to become a market leader by targeting those consumers seeking the lightest, fastest, most innovative carbon-fiber products from wheels to bars and stems to cranks. And no, Zipp isn’t out to capture the cycling equivalent of the McDonald’s crowd, which contains few triathletes, who (unlike many retro roadies, for whom the high-tech revolution has unfolded much more slowly) recognize the value of smart, consistent training paired with well engineered products. Indeed, Zipp’s savvy client base itself has become one of its most effective marketing tools, as nothing speaks as authoritatively as dropping several minutes from your 40km bike split thanks to a pair of aero carbon wheels. Although today its focus is on high-performance bicycle wheels and accessories, perhaps not surprisingly Zipp got its start in Indy in 1982 working with composite materials and manufacturing aero products for the motor-racing industry, particularly the Formula 1 circuit. Then, in 1988, company founder Leigh Sargeant, although not a cyclist, recognized he could realize significant economies of scope by repurposing the equipment designed to manufacture Formula 1 cockpits to produce disc wheels for


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CUTTING EDGE cycling. Sargeant contacted a local company familiar with the cycling industry and matched their technical expertise with his manufacturing capability and knowledge of aerodynamics, ultimately spinning Zipp off as a separate company from his motor-racing division. In 1991, when Andy Ording, now Zipp’s president, came to the company from Allsop, the corporate parent of Softride, Zipp had a single core product: its disc wheel. After serving as a partner, Ording bought out Sargeant in 1998 and, over the next decade, firmly established Zipp as the premiere manufacturer of carbon-fiber wheel sets— an enviable position that, in 2007, attracted the attention of Chicago-based SRAM and led to SRAM’s acquisition of Zipp in December 2007. Today, Zipp continues to focus on high-end carbon wheels as its core product but, just as Sargeant did two and a half decades ago, the company has also introduced complementary products, such as aerobars and cranks, all designed and produced in Zipp’s Speedway manufacturing facility, where workers meticulously manage every step of the process, from cutting and shaping the carbon fiber to lacing the wheels and applying the decals, or customizing products in Zipp’s ZEDTECH line according to individual consumer preferences. “We have done our homework with industrial design and in the wind tunnel,” says Ording, whose company’s Web site, zipp.com, provides wheel-selection guidelines for consumers based on course conditions and athlete prefer-

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CUTTING EDGE technology throughout his career,” says Ording. “I think coaching and the dissemination of training information is hugely important. Everyone is driven to do well, [yet] they often have limited time to train—and Mark is the master of maximizing his workouts.” “We’re the best at what we do, they’re the best at what they do,” echoes Allen. Additionally, both Zipp and markallenonline.com target a similar market segment and share a common strategy of achieving market leadership through continual improvement, creating a natural synergy between the organizations to cross-promote and share training and racing data—a move that should ultimately benefit their consumers.

John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

ences. “We make two to three trips each year to the wind tunnel,” he says. “We model each [new] wheel in CAAD then shape the prototypes in the tunnel to minimize drag, then tweak the design based on our tunnel results for a product that is both aero and strong.” Additionally, Zipp works with its team of sponsored athletes in both the triathlon and road racing to supplement the quantitative process with qualitative, real-world observations and feedback, ensuring Zipp products perform as well on the roads as they do in the tunnel. Plus, early this year, Zipp announced a strategic partnership with markallenonline.com, the topshelf coaching Web site designed by six-time Hawaii Ironman champion Mark Allen. “Mark was open to

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GEAR BAG

Feeling slow? Buy some speed

Seven goodies to get you over the mid-season hump

Maybe your season is going perfectly according to plan, or maybe you’ve been sidelined with injuries and work commitments and you’re just hoping to squeeze in one or two races this year. Whatever your situation, chances are you wouldn’t mind shaving a few precious seconds or minutes off your next race. Here are seven new products to help you squeeze out a little more speed and finish the season strong.

By Brad Culp

PT Paddles

$35

If you’re like most triathletes, swimming is already pretty hard— so why would you want to make it harder? PT Paddles make it extremely difficult to swim fast, but it’s all in the name of making you faster. The paddles essentially round out your palms and force you to manipulate your technique to pull water with your forearms. The result? A more efficient and coordinated stroke. ptpaddles.com

Selle San Marco Zoncolan TriathGel

$199

At first glance the Zoncolan may look like your typical triathlon saddle, but when you squeeze the seat, you’ll feel the difference. San Marco places uber-plush gel on the tip of the nose, which is where you put the bulk of your weight in the aero position. With it you’ll be able to hammer longer in your most efficient position. sellesanmarco.com

Kona Endurance CitraBeta Shot $34

Under Armour Proto Speed Trainer

$90

These aren’t your typical running shoes. They’re designed for short training sessions only, such as sprint repeats at the track. The Proto Trainers use directional cushioning, which propels your foot forward in the most efficient manner possible. They’re ideal for athletes who spend a lot of time on the track. underarmour.com

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Images courtesy the manufacturers

Each four-capsule serving contains a potent blend of beta-alanine and citrulline malate, both of which have been shown to increase workload capacity when taken before exercise. In testing, many athletes noticed results after a week. konaendurance.com


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GEAR BAG

Flash Point FP60 Front & Rear

$1,300

One of the most affordable ways to get 60mm deep, this wheel uses the same molds as Zipp, but without the dimples or tubular rims. The result is a wheelset that will perform at an elite level without the elite price tag. flash-pointracing.com

Energy First Greenenergy

$35

A super food in every sense of the word, Greenergy provides five servings’ worth of antioxidant-rich vegetables per scoop. It’s a perfect way to supplement your diet and is especially beneficial for those who spend too much time in fastfood lines. We recommend mixing one scoop into a fruit smoothie or a vegetable juice. energyfirst.com

Rocket Science Sports Dimpled Water Bottle $10

If you were to rank all of the so-called aero products on the market in terms of biggest gain per penny spent, this bottle would be at the top of the list. It’s only a few dollars more than a conventional bottle, but every square inch of Rocket Science’s bottle is covered with tiny dimples, eliminating enough drag to save you a few seconds in a 40K TT. rocketsciencesports.com

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Images courtesy the manufacturers

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AT THE RACES

Sam McGlone had a picture-perfect race at the 2008 Avia Wildflower.

Breaking Ground

McCormack and McGlone dig into the 2008 season with victories at Wildflower

By T.J. Murphy // Photos by Jay Prasuhn

The Wildflower Triathlon Festival has long been billed as the Woodstock of triathlon. The analogy suffers from the fact that the actual Woodstock Music and Art fair has been an intermittent happening since the famed 1969 version. Woodstock rolled again in 1979, 1989, 1994 and 1999. Wildflower started in 1983 and has relentlessly served for 26 consecutive years as triathlon’s spawning ground. Lake San Antonio resides west in California’s San Joaquin Valley. Steinbeck country. The lake is 17 miles long with 65 miles of shoreline. As a spawning ground, the festival features a halfiron event, a mountain bike triathlon and an Olympic distance tri, attracting everyone from the wide-eyed beginner to college teams to the stars of the sport. The 2008 AVIA Wildflower drew a strong field for the longcourse event, held on May 3. The men’s field included Chris 196

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McCormack, Chris Lieto, Eneko Llanos, Chris Legh, Terenzo Bozzone and defending champ Bjorn Andersson. The women’s field featured Sam McGlone, Leanda Cave and Pip Taylor. Although the temperature dropped down on the campers into the 40s at night, and the water measured 65 degrees, the athletes would eventually face the dry heat of midday during the bike and the run, and the course is unforgiving. “It’s the first big race of the season. Some of the best in the sport are here, and this is a true half-iron,” Lieto said. “The hills make it honest; there’s no drafting. It makes for pure, one-on-one racing.” Lieto exited the water a minute behind the lead pack as they sprinted into T1, with Andersson, the human motorcycle, flooring it early. But Lieto was anything but reserved in his racing strategy, pouring it on as well as he went on to snag the fastest bike split of the day, 2:14 flat, to Anderson’s 2:14:27. While Llanos and Legh managed to crack 2:20 splits, most of the top guys didn’t. “The race at Wildflower begins on the bike at the 40-mile mark,” McCormack said. This was the point where the reigning Hawaii Ironman champion took out the hammer, flying past the likes of Bozzone and Llanos and within a 90-second range of Lieto and Andersson. With the transition to the gritty 13.1-mile run, the men’s race quickly evolved into a trail running contest between McCormack and Llanos. The combination of hills and


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AT THE RACES

McCormack launched his major attack with 15 miles left in the bike.

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the loose dirt and rock on the trail are especially draining on unprepared legs. The athlete who has adapted to this terrain through specific training can enjoy a decisive edge, and it didn’t slip past Macca’s thoughts that Llanos is a former XTERRA world champion. “He is such a tough runner,” McCormack remarked later. And so is McCormack, who would run faster than Llanos by a minute with a 1:14:33 split. He would need every second of this net gain to catch up with the Spaniard at mile five. He also collected a precious 15 seconds on Llanos using quicker transitions. After that, Llanos dogged the Australian to the end, pushing McCormack to a 4:00:33 win. Llanos finished 19 seconds later and Lieto took third in 4:03:34. Sam McGlone echoes Lieto’s assessment of Wildflower. She says, “This is an honest, honest, honest race,” and it was this honesty that woke the tri world up to long distance talents of McGlone three years ago when the 2004 Olympian from Canada decided to spice up her life with a bit of non-drafting triathlon. She won, and her career switched gears. This past October, in her Ironman debut, McGlone finished second at the Hawaii Ironman. Despite her growing experience, McGlone’s start in 2008 left her feeling alarmed at her sluggishness in races, notably Ironman California 70.3 and St. Anthony’s, where she finished fifth and fourth respectively. “I forget it’s like this every year for me. I need a few races to blow the cobwebs out.”


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AT THE RACES most all of the top men and women joined hundreds of their age-group comrades to drink in the sun, the live music and the beer truck ale. The great tradition continues.

2008 AVIA WILDFLOWER LONG COURSE TRIATHLON Lake San Antonio, Calif.

May 3, 2008 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run

Men 1. Chris McCormack (AUS) . . . 4:00:33 2. Eneko Llanos (SPA) . . . . . . . 4:00:52 3. Chris Lieto (USA). . . . . . . . . 4:03:34 4. Chris Legh (AUS). . . . . . . . . 4:04:07 5. Fraser Cartmell (USA) . . . . . 4:04:51

American Linda Gallo and Australian Pip Taylor led the women out of the lake in 23 minutes, with Great Britain’s Leanda Cave and McGlone emerging about 90 seconds later. On the bike it was Cave and McGlone who took over the chase for first, with the latter assuming the lead at 15 miles. When it came time for the run, McGlone, resplendent in her new Wonder Woman racing uniform, impersonated not so much a speeding bullet but a runaway train, leaving Cave—a first-timer at Wildflower—to drop from sight. “It was fun,” said a beaming McGlone after bursting across the finish line in 4:31:38. Cave finished second in 4:36:35 and Taylor was third in 4:39:25. The opening race of the season made way for the opening post-race party, and

Women 1. Samantha McGlone (CAN). . 4:31:38 2. Leanda Cave (GBR). . . . . . . 4:36:45 3. Pip Taylor (AUS). . . . . . . . . . 4:39:25 4. Kelly Couch (USA). . . . . . . . 4:45:30 5. Heather Wurtele (CAN) . . . . 4:45:59 Amateur men 1. Nicolas Thompson (USA) . . . 4:15:34 Amateur women 1. Lauren Swigart (USA) . . . . . 4:50:30

Field Tested By Greg Bennett

1st New York 1st Los Angeles 1st Chicago 1st Minneapolis 1st Dallas

Triathlon Triathlon Triathlon Triathlon Triathlon

First Endurance triathlete Greg Bennett rewrote the record books several times in 2007 by winning an unprecedented five Olympic Distance races in a single year. Greg understands what it takes to win in the most challenging triathlon events in the world. That’s why he relies on the First Endurance system to help him train harder and recover faster than ever before. Shouldn’t you?

firstendurance.com • 866.347.7811

“First Endurance allows me to be at my best on race day.” – Greg Bennett

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tal clear and the waters were calm. The Ironman field brought together 437 age-groupers and 34 professionals while 318 athletes chose the 70.3 event. During the pre-race meeting veteran race director Murphy Reinschreiber explained the rationale behind his racecourse design. “I could have kept you on the highways during the bike and you never would have known you were in China,” he said. “By swinging the course up through the villages you might go a little slower, but I guarantee you’ll know just where you are.” Judging from the thunderous applause that followed, those in attendance were eagerly awaiting the new challenge before them. And what a day of challenges it would turn out to be, starting right away with the swim leg. When the typhoon passed over the island it took with it not only the fears of the weaker swimmers but also a number of swim buoys that had been marking the course, and on race morning just four small markers sat at the corners. That, combined with a handful of Chinese boats that moved around the swim course, made sighting incredibly difficult, especially for the age-groupers. Significantly slower-than-normal swim times were the result. Matt O’Halloran of Canada led out of the water in 48:02, followed closely by Matthew Clark of Australia and USA’s Timothy Marr. Sabatschus was the sixth pro male to exit in 54:40. Germany’s Ute Mueckel was first out of the water for the women, also in 54:30, and was followed by Maki Nishiuchi of Japan and Canada’s Donna Phelan, with Belinda Granger and Jo King coming out fourth and fifth, respectively. Out on the two-loop bike course the athletes quickly discovered that the lack of cloud cover and the scorching heat would be huge factors in the race. The temperature soared into the 90s as the first athletes made their way out onto the main highways, where shifting winds added to the difficulties of the day. O’Halloran held onto his lead in Belinda Granger’s win in China made her two for two in 2008 Ironmans. the early stages of the bike but by the halfway point Clark and Marr had hammered past him and Sabatschus was just 90 seconds back. On the women’s side, at the 50-kim mark Mueckel led into the first village with Granger close behind and Nishiuchi and King rounding out the top four. The main roads were smooth and free from traffic, with locals and government workers alike lining By Tom Holland the countryside, smiling, waving and cheering enthusiastically. “Ji-yo! Ji yo!” was the constant refrain from The sport of triathlon saw two firsts on April 20: the first the sidelines, the Chinese equivalent of “Go! Go!” At 53 km the Ironman event in China and the first staging of Ironman 70.3 turn towards the villages took racers off the main highways and and full Ironman races on the same course on the same day. transported them back into old China as if they had traveled Germany’s Olaf Sabatschus and Australia’s Belinda Granger won through a time warp. The small winding road was bordered by the full-distance race in convincing fashion, in what Granger vast rice paddies, ancient farms and grazing water buffalos, with described as “the hardest Ironman I have ever done.” farmers in the fields staring quizzically as the bikers zipped past. The inaugural Ironman China was a long time in the makThe first village, Dao Tang, was truly a sight to behold. The ing. The event was cancelled in both 2006 and 2007, and, as narrow concrete road was lined by dozens of tiny old stone typhoon Neoguri stormed through the China Sea just days storefronts and homes whose doors literally opened out into the before the 2008 race, it looked as if a third postponement was a streets. Hundreds of locals, both young and old, were packed in distinct possibility. But the storm hit the race venue of Hainan front of the ancient edifices, screaming encouragement and givIsland on Saturday, and by Sunday morning the skies were crys- ing the thumbs-up to the wide-eyed bikers passing through. Dao

Sabatschus and Granger win Ironman China

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Nick Cox, Asia Runner

AT THE RACES


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Tang was followed by a short quiet section and then Shin Shan, the second village, brought the same magical ancient charm and throngs of enthusiastic crowds. While the highways were fairly flat, the villages subjected the riders to some challenging climbs. The hills provided a welcome excuse to slow down and take in the amazing sights and sounds. Once through Shin Shan riders encountered one steep final climb followed by a long fast downhill and a short highway stretch back to the start for loop number two. Marr was first off the bike for the men with Sabatschus two minutes behind. Clark was five minutes down while O’Halloran and Australia’s Chris McDonald were over ten minutes off the leader. Granger led into T2 for the women almost ten minutes ahead of Mueckel and with twenty minutes on Phelan and Bayley. The original plans called for the run course and aid stations to follow the main roads, with athletes having the option to run along the sparsely shaded path that ran parallel to it. The heat and humidity proved to be so extreme that the path immediately became the main thoroughfare and the aid stations were moved to accommodate the runners seeking the shelter of the occasional palm tree. Sabatschaus transcended his lack of heat acclimitization.

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AT THE RACES Despite his training through the cold German winter, fellow countryman Renee Tanya Lane was the first female across Sabatschus was somehow able to take the lead on the run and the line in 5:02. Having participated in Ironman races all over the world quickly began to put some time into the field. Byung Hoon Park of Korea also ran down Marr and, despite a valiant final surge by including this inaugural Ironman China, I can wholeheartedly Marr to try and preserve a second-place finish, Park was simply attest to the extraordinary atmosphere surrounding this new too strong for him. Sabatschus won comfortably in 8:52, event. The possibility of a fast course was sacrificed for unique embracing his father at the finish line and adding a challenges and a truly memorable culthird Ironman win to his resume of two priors at tural experience. The result was a new IRONMAN CHINA Ironman Brazil. Ironman that is sure to please those Haikou, Hainan Island, China Unlike Sabatschus, Granger spent the month up for a remarkable journey. April 20, 2008 before the race training in the Philippines and the 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike, 26.2-mile run heat acclimatization paid dividends. She crossed CLSA IRONMAN Men the line almost 30 minutes ahead of Phelan, yet 70.3 CHINA 1. Olaf Sabatschus (GER) . . . . . 8:52:14 her 10:08 winning time was a testament to the Haikou, Hainan Island, China 2. Byung Hoon Park (KOR) . . . . . 9:13:15 severity of the conditions. April 20, 2008 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run 3. Timothy K. Marr (USA) . . . . . . 9:14:17 Similar to the bike course, the marathon pre4. Chris Mcdonald (AUS) . . . . . . 9:24:17 sented a little of everything for the runners. The Men 5. Justin Hurd (USA) . . . . . . . . . 9:26:35 path wound down along the South China Sea and 1. Steven Waite (AUS) . . . . . . . . 4:29:06 through the new sections of the city, included a Women 2. Fredrik Nils Croneborg (SWE) . 4:30:18 trying yet spectacular out-and-back over the New 1. Belinda Jane Granger (AUS). 10:08:37 3. Colin Curtis Hill (GBR) . . . . . . 4:40:38 Century Bridge at 35 kilometers, then snaked 2. Donna Phelan (CAN) . . . . . . 10:37:11 4. Young Hwan Oh (KOR) . . . . . . 4:44:05 back through old historic China to a remarkable 3. Abigail Bayley (GBR) . . . . . . 10:43:11 5. Martin Malleier (AUT) . . . . . . . 4:44:38 finish in East West Lake Park. 4. Belinda Jane Harrison (AUS) 10:48:24 Women The 70.3 race started two hours after the 5. Nicole Toepfer (GER) . . . . . . 11:08:22 1. Renee Tanya Lane (AUS) . . . . 5:02:24 Ironman start and flowed seamlessly along the Amatuer men 2. Hiromi Toda (JPN) . . . . . . . . . 5:15:50 same course, ending at a finish line adjacent to 1. Mark Rossetto (AUS) . . . . . . . 9:56:47 3. Claire Murray (GRB) . . . . . . . . 5:24:07 that of the full-distance race. No professionals 4. Mika Kume (JPN). . . . . . . . . . 5:41:19 Amateur women raced the inaugural half; Steven Waite of Australia 5. Kirsten Kempe (USA) . . . . . . . 5:41:56 1. Brigitte Niederberger (SUI) . . 11:07:41 took first place honors for the men in 4:29 while

Reed (right) launched his attack on the final lap of the bike.

Reed, Ertel punch tickets to Beijing 2008 Olympic Trials recap

Story and Photos by Timothy Carlson Matt Reed, a recent U.S. citizen, whipped heavy favorites Andy Potts and Hunter Kemper to take the second U.S. men’s 202

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Olympic Triathlon team trials event in Tuscaloosa, Ala. on April 19. In a race that went a little closer to form, Julie Swail Ertel used a lightning-quick bike to run transition to surge ahead of Sarah Haskins, then sealed her win with a personal best 35:19 10km—23 seconds faster than Haskin’s run—to cross the line in 2:02:21 for a 29-second margin of victory. The win gave the 2000 Olympic water polo silver medalist a rare Olympic qualification in a second sport. Potts, who was disappointed with his performance in the first U.S. Olympic Trials qualifier in Beijing, didn’t want to play a waiting game this time around. ”I’ve been swimming well and I wanted to take the race from the start,” said Potts at a post-race press conference. “That was my best play, knowing my strengths and knowing the course layout.” Reed hung back with Brian Fleischmann and Kemper while they wore down Potts during the early miles of the bike, but he wasn’t satisfied with the teamwork. “No, I don’t think we worked all that well together,” Reed said, which was probably more a sign of Reed’s strength on the day than any lack of cooperation. Reed made a savvy risk-reward calculation on the eighth and final lap of the bike. “I could see that Andy had made his play and was waiting for the run—and Hunter didn’t want anything to do with another surge on the bike,” said Reed, who took off on the last of eight bike laps on a hilly course along the Black Warrior River. It worked—Reed gained a 25-second advantage over Potts, Kemper and Brian Fleischmann. “It was a last lap decision,” explained Reed. “I win most of my races from the front, and I didn’t want to run with them, so I attacked on the bike.” While Kemper let Reed have his last lap bike surge, confident that he could overtake his tall, New Zealand-born friend on the


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Ertel followed a blazing transition with the best run of her career.

run, Reed answered with a race-best 31:03 10km run, which outpaced both Andy Potts (31:07) and Kemper (31:07) to cross the finish in 1:52:15, to join Jarrod Shoemaker on the men’s Olympic squad. For the women, Sara McLarty broke out with a 19:09 swim, followed closely by Sarah Haskins (19:21), Sarah Groff (19:21) and Ertel (19:23). The quartet of women worked hard to surge to a one-minute break over Joanna Zeiger, Mary Beth Ellis, Jasmine Oeinck, Amanda Stevens and Becky Lavelle. At the end of the bike, Ertel’s lightning change from bike to run gave her an eight-second advantage over Haskins and Groff. “She had a gunfire transition,” said Haskins. “When Julie came out of transition so fast, it takes a lot to make up those eight seconds. Yes, it’s a little discouraging.” Ertel, however, was locked and loaded for the best run of her six-year triathlon career en route to a 29-second margin of victory. “As soon as I got off the bike, I felt good,” said Ertel. “I focused on my run the last weeks of training and did three running races in three weeks.” “I took a pretty sizable taper to prepare for this race,” said Ertel. “I decided to put all my eggs in one basket, because if I qualified now I could go back and train hard to peak in August.”

Elite Triathlete Kim Dunker wearing Envy™ Metallic Baby Blue

Slip Carbon with High Speed Red Fototec in cloudy conditions

after 3 secs…

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2008 U.S. OLYMPIC TRIATHLON TRIALS

9 secs…

Tuscaloosa, Ala.

April 19, 2008 1.5-km run, 40-km bike, 10-km run

Men 1. Matt Reed (Boulder, CO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:52:15 2. Andy Potts (Colorado Springs, CO). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:52:35 3. Hunter Kemper (Colorado Springs, CO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:52:39 4. Brian Fleischmann (Colorado Springs, CO). . . . . . . . . . . 1:55:22 5. Doug Friman (Tucson, AZ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:56:25 Women 1. Julie Swail Ertel (Irvine, CA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:02:21 2. Sarah Haskins (Colorado Springs, CO). . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:02:50 3. Sarah Groff (Boulder, CO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:02:59 4. Joanna Zeiger (Boulder, CO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:05:15 5. Jasmine Oeinck (Colorado Springs, CO). . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:06:09 T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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12 secs.

Slip Carbon with High Speed Red Fototec in sunny conditions

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AT THE RACES Jay Prasuhn

Aussies run to victory in St. Croix Alexander, Carfrae too fast on foot for competition Aussies Craig Alexander and Mirinda Carfrae both came from behind on the run to win at the St. Croix Ironman 70.3 on May 4. “Crowie” hunted down Italy’s Marino Vanhoenacker with an absurd 1:15:58 half marathon, while Carfrae overcame early women’s leader Felicity Hart of Great Britain by posting a 1:19:55 run split, faster than all but Winners Alexander (left) and Carfrae. two of the pro men. The men were led out of the water by Kiwi super-swimmer Bryan Rhodes and 70.3-veteran Simon Lessing, as the pair exited the warm Caribbean waters in just under 26 minutes. Once the top men made their way onto their bikes, it was all about Vanhoenacker and rising Aussie star Paul Ambrose. Both athletes tore through the challenging bike leg, including a climb of the infamous “Beast,” in under 2:20, which put Ambrose into T2 first, one minute ahead of the Vanhoenacker. Alexander came into T2 another two minutes later, in fourth position, ready to go after the trio of men ahead of him. In typical fashion, Alexander made the half-marathon look easy, quickly catching and pulling away from Vanhoenacker, Ambrose and countryman Richie Cunningham. Crowie’s run was four minutes faster than the rest of the men’s field, putting him at the finish in 4:05:34, just over three minutes ahead of runner-up Vanhoenacker. Cunningham ran his way to third, just seconds ahead of former Ironman World Champ Faris Al-Sultan. One of the most impressive performances came from Italian Massimo Cigana. The former pro cyclist made up for a lackluster swim with the second-best run of the day, moving all the way up to sixth overall. In the women’s race, Germany’s Nina Kraft and ST. CROIX American Bree Wee surged to the IRONMAN 70.3 front of the swim, followed close- St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands ly by Great Britain’s Felicity Hart. May 4, 2008 The Brit pulled away from Kraft 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run and Wee as the women made their way through the hills of St. Men Croix, with Carfrae also making 1. Craig Alexander (AUS) . . . . . 4:05:34 up time and pulling into T2 2. Marino Vanhoenacker (BEL). 4:08:41 3. Richie Cunningham (AUS) . . 4:10:02 about two minutes behind Hart. Much like her countryman 4. Faris Al-Sultan (GER) . . . . . . 4:10:15 Alexander, Carfrae destroyed the 5. Paul Ambrose (AUS) . . . . . . 4:12:02 rest of the field on the run, by Women running about 50 seconds faster 1. Mirinda Carfrae (AUS) . . . . . 4:26:56 per mile than her closest compe- 2. Nina Kraft (GER) . . . . . . . . . 4:36:33 tition. Carfrae also pulled away 3. Bree Wee (USA) . . . . . . . . . 4:36:45 from most of the men’s field, 4. Tyler Stewart (USA) . . . . . . . 4:46:31 with only Alexander and Cigana 5. Felicity Hart (GBR). . . . . . . . 4:47:13 posting faster run splits. Carfrae Amateur men finished in 4:26:56, almost ten 1. Thierry Verbinnen (BEL) . . . . 4:20:07 minutes ahead of Kraft, who out- Amateur women sprinted Wee for second. 1. Stacey Richardson (USA). . . 5:03:07 204

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Jozsef Major weathered the heat for the men’s win.

Hungarian double in Tempe Csomor, Major battle through the heat at Ironman Arizona

By Jay Prasuhn

The 2008 running of Ironman Arizona was one for the record books. The heat, the wind, the close finishes and ultimately the victories by two athletes hailing from the same small town in Hungary, made for a memorable day in Tempe. Former race winner Michellie Jones said it best and said it flatly: “That was brutal out there. Anyone who finishes this race today is a champion.” Ultimately it would be a pair of Hungarians—Erica Csomor and Jozsef Major, who would prevail on a day that saw temperatures eerily close to 100 degrees (96, to be exact). In the men’s race, Major came from FORD IRONMAN behind with a 2:50 ARIZONA marathon to catch Tempe, Ariz. and pass Americans April 13, 2008 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike, 26.2T.J. Tollakson, Jordan mile run Rapp and James Bonney in the final Men mile. The top four fin1. Jozsef Major (HUN) . . . . 8:34:19 ishers were separated 2. T.J. Tollakson (USA) . . . . 8:34:36 by only 73 seconds. 3. Jordan Rapp (USA) . . . . 8:35:04 The women’s race 4. James Bonney (USA). . . 8:35:32 was also won on the 5. Rene Goehler (GER) . . . 8:42:36 run, with Csomor Women passing early leader 1. Erika Csomor (HUN) . . . 9:14:49 Michellie Jones of 2. Michellie Jones (AUS) . . 9:25:52 Australia shortly after 3. Heather Gollnick (USA) . 9:32:07 T2. The Hungarian’s 4. Tamara Kozulina (UKR) . 9:34:18 lead grew with each 5. Linsey Corbin (USA) . . . 9:34:38 passing mile of the Amateur men marathon, en route to 1. David Kahn (USA) . . . . . 9:06:09 a 9:14:49 finish and a gap of almost 10 minAmateur women utes over Jones. 1. Rachel Ross (USA) . . . 10:03:48

Barry Siff

By Brad Culp


Harald Neu

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Despite a flat, the gritty Comerford came back to win by 5 seconds.

Engaged couple takes titles at Ironman South Africa

Comerford wins by five seconds; fiancé Bayliss cruises to win Brits Bella Comerford and Stephen Bayliss have big plans for 2008. Aside from getting married later this year, the fleet-footed couple has a race schedule that would drive most relationships into the ground. While their wedding will no doubt be the couple’s most cherished moment of 2008, a pair of wins at Ironman South Africa is some pretty thick icing on the wedding cake. Bayliss had his work cut out for him after the bike, as South African Raynard Tissink and France’s Francois Chabaud made it to T2 with a comfortable gap on the field. Bayliss paced himself well for the first half of the marathon and then dropped his pace to below six minutes per mile to quickly catch and pass the lead pair. The Brit’s blistering run pace was too much for Tissink and Chabaud to handle and Bayliss crossed the line with a cushion of almost five minutes, in 8:18:23. Local-hero Tissink held on for second and Austrian Peter Schoissengeier passed Chabaud for third. In the women’s race, Commerford spent most of the bike leg trailing Czech Lucie Zelenkova, before suffering a flat tire and spending nearly 12 minutes on the side of SPEC-SAVERS the road. By the time IRONMAN SOUTH Commerford came out AFRICA of T2, she was well Port Elizabeth, South Africa behind the leaders, but April 5, 2008 appeared determined to 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike, 26.2-mile run make up the lost time. Women The Brit caught Italy’s 1. Bella Comerford (GBR) . . . . 9:27:48 Edith Niederfriniger 2. Edith Niederfriniger (ITA) . . . 9:27:53 shortly after the halfway 3. Lucie Zelenkova (CZE) . . . . . 9:34:09 point and the pair began 4. Cordula Moller (NAM) . . . . . 9:59:34 to chip away at 5. Kathryn Cronje (RSA) . . . . 10:00:13 Zelenkova’s advantage. Niederfriniger and Men Commerford passed 1. Stephen Bayliss (GBR) . . . . 8:18:23 Zelenkova with just over 2. Raynard Tissink (RSA) . . . . . 8:23:09 six miles to go and the 3. Peter Schoissengeier (AUT) . 8:33:24 pair ran neck-and-neck 4. Francois Chabaud (FRA) . . . 8:33:53 to the finish, with 5. Steffen Liebetrau (GER). . . . 8:34:00 Commerford edging out Amateur Women the Italian by a mere five 1. Amber Monforte (USA) . . . 10:12:07 seconds in a dramatic Amateur Men sprint. 1. Rob Steegink (NED) . . . . . . 8:52:46 T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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Reed defends title at St. Anthony’s Haskins tops stellar women’s field

By Brad Culp

April was a big month for American Matt Reed. While qualifying for the U.S. Olympic team was no doubt the highlight for the New Zealand native, taking home $10,000 at the 25th annual St. Anthony’s Triathlon was some pretty thick icing. In the women’s race, U.S. Olympichopeful Sarah Haskins out-dueled New York’s Reed’s run was too much for Potts. Rebeccah Wassner to net 10 grand for herself. In what is becoming typical form for any race featuring both Reed and countryman Andy Potts, Reed was forced to spend most of the bike leg reeling in Potts, who is considered by many to be the best swimmer in the sport. The pair of Americans entered T2 separated by only six seconds, and as with the Olympic Trials one week earlier, the race was left to the fastest

runner. Reed put on a big surge in the middle of the run, dropping his pace to 5:02 per mile, which was enough to open a small gap and finish 18 seconds ahead of Potts. Aussie Greg Bennett finished third, 51 seconds behind Bennett. “I’m on a roll,” Reed said after the race. “I’m really happy with how I’m going, but it’s even better that I still see ST. ANTHONY’S room to improve.” TRIATHLON The women’s race St. Petersburg, Fla. proved to be a one-woman April 27, 2008 show, with Haskins open- 1.5-km swim, 40-km bike, 10-km run ing up a one-minute lead on Wassner after the swim Men and maintaining her lead 1. Matt Reed (USA) . . . . . . . 1:46:34 throughout the bike and 2. Andy Potts (USA) . . . . . . . 1:46:52 run. Haskins only managed 3. Greg Bennett (AUS) . . . . . 1:47:43 the fifth-best bike split of 4. Craig Alexander (AUS) . . . 1:49:41 the day and the chase group 5. Richie Cunningham (AUS) 1:50:39 of Wassner, American Women Becky Lavelle and Britain’s 1. Sarah Haskins (USA) . . . . 1:59:24 Julie Dibens began to make 2. Rebeccah Wassner (USA). 2:00:34 up some ground, but 3. Mirinda Carfrae (AUS) . . . 2:01:52 Haskins sealed the deal 4. Sam McGlone (CAN) . . . . 2:02:35 with the day’s best run. 5. Becky Lavelle (USA). . . . . 2:02:54 Wassner finished comfort- Amateur men ably in second, almost two 1. Adam Webber (USA) . . . . 1:55:36 minutes ahead of Aussie Amateur women Mirinda Carfrae. 1. Brooke Davison (USA) . . . 2:04:56

Robert Murphy/bluecreekphotography.com

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XTERRA returns to Australia and Chris Legh takes the victory.

Legh out-muscles Griffin at XTERRA Australia By Melaina Juntti

After a six-year hiatus, XTERRA Australia was re-born April 5, with Aussie iron-stud Chris Legh rocking a speedy bike and run to edge Leon Griffin for top honors. The women’s race saw a mix of elites and age groupers score medals, with Susie Wood besting all ladies in 2:53:58. As a 1,000-meter swim got the party started, Griffin finished sixth in 13:20, while Legh’s 14:16 put him in 11th place. Onto the 30km mountain bike, Legh showed his off-road mastery, finishing the course in a day’s-best 1:20:13, while Aussie Jarad Kohlar pressured Legh with his 1:21:04 ride. Griffin also lurked close, wheeling into T2 in 1:22:20 to climb into XTERRA AUSTRALIA fourth place. But Legh Daylesford, Victoria, proved his prowess with a Australia 44:39 trail run that put April 5, 2008 him at the line in 2:19:10, 1-km swim, 30-km bike, 11-km run 1:44 ahead of Griffin and Men 6:40 up on Kohlar. While the men’s con- 1. Chris Legh (AUS). . . . . . . . . 2:19:10 test was all Oz, New 2. Leon Griffin (AUS) . . . . . . . . 2:21:26 Zealand’s Wood stole the 3. Jarad Kohlar (AUS) . . . . . . . 2:25:50 women’s race, making up 4. Sam Hume (AUS) . . . . . . . . 2:26:34 for a three-minute deficit 5. Matthew McDonough (AUS). 2:26:37 on the swim to kill the Women bike in 1:35:54. Although 1. Susie Wood (NZL) . . . . . . . . 2:53:58 age grouper Nicola Leary 2. Meg Russell (AUS) . . . . . . . 2:57:41 posted a strong 57:20 run, 3. Amanda Richards (AUS) . . . 3:12:09 Wood’s 59:57 was good 4. Raeleigh Rogers (AUS) . . . . 3:24:06 enough for gold. The 5. Jodie Tester (AUS) . . . . . . . . 3:33:55 awesome amateur strode Amateur men in 2:03 later for the silver, 1. Andrew Steel (AUS) . . . . . . . 2:32:59 and pro Meg Russell took Amateur women third in 2:57:41. 1. Nicola Leary (NZL). . . . . . . . 2:56:02 208

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Champions taken down at XTERRA South Africa Hugo, Erdelyi pick up upset wins

By Melaina Juntti

Upsets abounded at Grabouw Country Club on April 19, as young South African pro Dan Hugo stole the DUESOUTH XTERRA South Africa crown from reigning XTERRA world champion Conrad Stoltz and Hungary’s Eszter Erdelyi trumped 2007 race winner Michelle Lombardi for the women’s title. Hugo came out firing, exiting the 1.5km swim with a day’sfastest 19:20 split, with Dave Morison, Felix Schumann and Stoltz hot on his heels. Hugo and Stoltz then broke from road-bike specialist Schumann on the 25km mountain bike, but Stoltz punctured a tire, which let the 23-year-old wheel into T2 unchallenged. Although Stoltz made up serious time on the run, he couldn’t overcome the wily DUESOUTH XTERRA Hugo, who crossed the line SOUTH AFRICAN one minute, 12 seconds up FINALS South Africa on runner-up Schumann Grabouw, April 19, 3008 in 2:05:54. German Nico 1.5-km swim, 25-km bike, 10-km run Pfitzenhammer took the bronze in 2:10:32, while Men the mighty Stoltz settled 1. Dan Hugo (RSA) . . . . . . . . . 2:05:54 2. Felix Schumann (GER). . . . . 2:07:06 for sixth. In the women’s race, 3. Nico Pfitzenmaier (GER) . . . 2:10:32 Erdelyi led wire to wire, 4. Dave Morison (RSA) . . . . . . 2:12:50 knocking out an overall 5. Iain Don-Wauchope (RSA) . . 2:12:41 time of 2:28:23, which Women was 12th fastest among 1. Eszter Erdelyi (HUN) . . . . . . 2:28:23 all full-race competitors. 2. Jeannie Bomford (RSA) . . . . 2:32:32 Lombardi never let up in 3. Michelle Lombardi (RSA). . . 2:35:01 her chase for a repeat 4. Carla Germishuys (RSA) . . . 2:39:04 title, but Jeannie 5. Su Erskine (RSA). . . . . . . . . 2:47:06 Bomford managed to Amateur men upstage the South Marc Price (RSA). . . . . . . . . . . 2:24:09 African for the second Amatuer women place in 2:32:32. 1. Alexia Loizou (RSA) . . . . . . . 3:01:09

Courtesy XTERRAPlanet.com

Hugo upset Stoltz and claimed victory for South Africa.


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Jason Tuffs 6x Ironman Finisher 6th place overall 2007 Bizz Johnson Trail Marathon

PHOTO: CHRISTINA GANDOLFO

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Jason Trusts Multisports.com One reason. Experience. With over 2 decades of racing experience, and over 40 ironman victories including 11 ironman world championships (Paula Newby-Fraser, Greg Welch, Heather Fuhr and Michellie Jones) he knows he’ll be prepared to go the distance. From beginners to seasoned athletes, we can help you sort through the details on how to have your perfect race.

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XTERRA New Zealand champs Sonia Foote and Terrenzo Bozzone.

Bozzone, Foote rock in Rotorua XTERRA New Zealand recap

By Melaina Juntti

Although Terenzo Bozzone just missed making the Kiwi Olympic squad, he tore up the trails on April 12, winning XTERRA New Zealand in 2:07:09, as 2004 and 2005 women’s champ Sonia Foote bagged her third victory in the picturesque town of Rotorua. While Bozzone still prefers road triathlon, the Aucklander wasted no time making his stop at the world’s largest XTERRA

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festival worthwhile, busting out a day’s-fastest swim, and keeping pace with defending champ Tim Wilding’s over the 26km mountain bike. Bozzone overtook the Wilding on the second lap of the 11km run around Blue Lake, his stallion-like 42:44 split putting him at the line just 20 seconds up on Mark Leishman, who nabbed the silver in 2:07:29. Kiwi Scott Thorne XTERRA nipped Wilding for third. NEW ZEALAND Despite logging one of Rotorua, New Zealand the slowest pro female swims, April 12, 2008 Foote drew on experience to 1-km swim, 26-km bike, 11-km run regain the XTERRA New Zealand crown she lost to Men Gina Ferguson in 2007. Foote 1. Terenzo Bozzone (NZL) . 2:07:09 put on a clinic on the bike 2. Mark Leishman (NZL). . 2:07:29 course, wheeling a stellar 3. Scott Thorne (NZL). . . . 2:08:48 1:17:27 split, then used her 4. Tim Wilding (NZL) . . . . 2:11:03 new-and-improved running 5. Klayten Smith (AUS) . . 2:12:11 style to wax everyone but Women Ferguson on the run. Still, the 1. Sonia Foote (NZL) . . . . 2:28:18 gal from Rotorua had enough 2. Susie Wood (NZL) . . . . 2:31:34 of a lead to stave off her 3. Nic Leary (NZL) . . . . . . 2:34:06 chasers, busting the tape 4. Gina Ferguson (NZL) . . 2:34:28 three minutes ahead of 5. Fiona Docherty (NZL). . 2:34:55 XTERRA Australia winner Amateur men Susie Wood in 2:22:18. Up- 1. Patrick Harvey (NZL) . . 2:14:54 and-comer Nic Leary edged Amateur women Ferguson for bronze. 1. Monique Avery (NZL) . . 2:34:51

Courtesy XTERRAPlanet.com

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Big names, big fun in the Lone Star state

Lovato, Lessing win respective races at Lone Star Tri Festival

By Brad Culp

The Lone Star festival offered three race distances.

The Lone Star Triathlon Festival in Galveston, Texas truly has something for everyone. The two-day event plays host to a sprint, halfiron and even a unique quarter-iron triathlon. As always, a huge number of athletes (2,600 to be exact) showed up to kick off the 2008 season and test their legs at their chosen distance. LONE STAR HALF The weekend kicked off with IRON TRIATHLON the sprint triathlon on Saturday, Galveston, Texas won by Michael Lovato on the March 30, 2008 men’s side and Austin-native 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, 13.1-mile run Andrea Fisher in the women’s Women race. In Sunday’s quarter-iron 1. Kelly Lear-Kaul (USA) . . . . . 4:35:07 triathlon Simon Lessing dusted 2. Missy Ruthven (USA). . . . . . 4:51:02 the men’s field, while local-pro 3. Dana Chance (USA) . . . . . . 4:57:50 Michelle Leblanc held off 4. Karen Burks (USA) . . . . . . . 4:58:33 Amanda Lovato for the 5. Barbara Kuhlemeier (USA). . 5:00:13 women’s title. In the marquee event, the half-iron, Maryland’s Men Philippe Kozub won a tight 1. Philippe Kozub (USA) . . . . . 4:10:38 men’s race and Colorado’s Kelly 2. John Robertson (USA) . . . . . 4:12:34 Lear-Kaul dominated the 3. Tommy Rushing (USA) . . . . . 4:13:35 women’s event, winning by 4. Austin Jackson (USA) . . . . . 4:14:49 more than 15 minutes. 5. Liam O’Connell (USA) . . . . . 4:21:59

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WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR? Entry Fee Increases On June 1, 2008


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John Segesta/wahoomedia.com

INTERNATIONAL TRIATHLON & DUATHLON RACE CALENDAR

Triathlete endeavors to present the most comprehensive calendar of tris and dus. However, because event dates are subject to change, please check with race directors to confirm event information before making plans. See Multi-Event Contacts for contact information for promoters that have multiple listings. Listings printed in red indicate Triathlete-sponsored races. USA Triathlon-sanctioned races are designated with a #. Register at active.com for events designated with @. RACE DIRECTORS: For online race listings,please go to triathletemag.com and post your races under our Calendar link. Allow one week for your events to become live. For listing in our print calendar, e-mail your information to rebecca@triathletemag.com or fax it to (760) 634-4110. Entries submitted before April 30 have been included in the July issue. All entries that were submitted after that date will be in the August issue. Please note that most XTERRA global tour events consist of approximately a 1.5K swim, 30K mountain bike and 10K trail run.

SOUTH ATLANTIC

07/13- Chattanooga, TN—Chattanooga Waterfront Triathlon. Team Magic, Inc. 1.5K S, 42K B, 10K R. 07/26- Lebanon, TN—Cedars of Lebanon Triathlon. Team Magic, Inc. 300y S, 16.5mi B, 3mi R. 08/09- Guntersville, AL—Mountain Lakes Triathlon. Team Magic, Inc. 600y S, 16.2mi B, 3mi R. 09/06- Hendersonville, TN—Old Hickory Lake Triathlon. Team Magic, Inc. 400y S, 1.5mi R, 12.5mi B, 1.5mi R. 09/14- Nashville, TN—Music City Triathlon. Team Magic, Inc. 1.5K S, 37K B, 10K R.

NORTH ATLANTIC

07/06- Philadelphia, PA—Philadelphia Women’s Triathlon. CGI Racing. 750m S, 17-mile B, 3.1-mile R. #07/06- Buffalo, NY—Clark Companies A Tri in the Buff. Score This!!! 1.5K S, 40K B, 10K R; 750m S, 20K B, 5K R; 5K R, 20K B, 5K R; 200m S, 10K B, 2K R. 07/13- Salisbury, VT—Vermont Sun Triathlon. Vermont Sun Triathlon Series. 600y S, 14mi B, 3.1mi R. 07/26- Johnstown, PA—Johnstown YMCA Triathlon. 400m S, 20.8mi B, 3.1mi R. 07/27- West Windsor, NJ—New Jersey State Triathlon. CGI Racing. 1.5K S, 40K B, 10K R; 500m S, 13.5-mile B, 5K R. 07/27- Webster, MA—Danskin Women’s Triathlon New England. .75K S, 20K B, 5K R. 08/02- Salisbury, VT—Lake Dunmore Triathlon. Vermont Sun Triathlon Series. .9mi S, 28mi B, 6.2mi R. #08/09- Grand Island, NY—Riverside Federal Credit Union Summer Sizzle. Score This!!! 400m S, 17K B, 4.4K R, 400m S, 17K B, 4.4K R; 400m S, 17K B, 4.4K R; 4.4K R, 17K B, 4.4K R. 08/17- North East, MD—North East Maryland

Triathlon. CGI Racing. 1.5K S, 23.2-mile B, 10K R; 750m S, 15.5-mile B, 3.5-mile R. 08/23- Salisbury, VT—Half Vermont Journey. Vermont Sun Triathlon Series. 1.2mi S, 56mi B, 13.1mi R. 09/14- Sandy Hook, NJ—Danskin Women’s Triathlon NY Metro. .75K S, 20K B, 5K R. #09/21- Canandaigua, NY—Finger Lakes Triathlon. Score This!!! 1.5K S, 40K B, 10K R; 750m S, 21K B, 5K R.

NORTH CENTRAL 07/13- Pleasant Prairie, WI—Danskin Women’s Triathlon Chicagoland. .75K S, 20K B, 5K R. 07/13- Grand Haven, MI—Grand Haven Triathlon/Duathlon. 1.5K S, 40K B, 10K R; .5K S, 20K B, 5K R; 5K R, 20K B, 5K R. 08/03- Neoga, IL—MattoonMan. MattoonMulti Sport. .9mi S, 24.8mi B, 6.2mi R; 3.1mi R, 24.8mi B, 6.2mi R.

MOUNTAIN PACIFIC 07/12- Idaho Falls, ID—Blacktail Triathlon. PERSONAL BEST Performance. Olympic and sprint. 07/20- Oxnard, CA—Strawberry Fields Triathlon. Olympic, sprint and duathlon distances. 08/09- Emmett, ID—Emmett’s Most Excellent Triathlon. Olympic, sprint and kids’ splash and dash. #08/10- Santa Cruz, CA—Santa Cruz Sprint Triathlon. Finish Line Productions. .25mi S, 12mi B, 5K R. 08/17- Seattle, WA—Danskin Women’s Triathlon Seattle. .75K S, 20K B, 5K R.

#10/12- Santa Cruz, CA—SuperKid Triathlon. Finish Line Productions. Distances vary. Reminder: If a race’s contact information is not listed with the event in the preceding section, refer to the Multi-Event Contacts listings below. There, you will find a list of race organizers who put on either multiple races or series events. For more events and online race registration, be sure to check out triathletemag.com and active.com. Both sites offer up-to-date racing and training information,as well as the most recent news and coverage of triathlon’s most popular events. To list your event in our online calendar,please go to triathletemag.com.

XTERRA TV A brand new set of eight half-hour XTERRA Adventure Shows with coverage of the XTERRA Mountain Championship and XTERRA Winter World Championships from Snowbasin Resort in Utah, along with a series of segments from Nevada will begin airing in May 2008. Each show will be broadcast in more than 80 markets across the U.S. Check your local listings to see when the shows are on in your area or visit xterraplanet.com for an updated broadcast schedule for all the award-winning TEAM Unlimited TV productions.

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CALENDAR

MULTI-EVENT CONTACTS 3 Discliplines Racing: www.3disciplines.com;866.820.6036 5430 Sports: Barry Siff, 1507 North St., Boulder, CO, barry@5430sports.com, www.5430sports.com; 303.442.0041. AA Sports: 503.644.6822; www.racecenter.com; events@ racecenter.com. Blue Sky Sports,LLC: 678.237.0308; director@ tribluesky.com; www.tribluesky.com. Bradventures LLC.Producer ofAuburn InternationalTriathlon.www.auburntriathlon.com; 530-888-9911; info@bradventures.com. By the Beach Productions: 5153 Soquel Dr., Soquel, CA, 831.465.6517; www.bythebeachproductions.com; info@ bythebeachproductions.com. Capri Events: 773.404.2372; www.caprievents. com. CFT Sommer Sports: 838 W. DeSoto St., P.O. Box 121236, Clermont, FL 34712; 352.394.1320 (p); 352.394.1702 (f); info@triflorida.com; http://greatfloridian.com. CGI Racing: 856-308-7522; www.cgiracing.com. Cutting Edge Events: 217.347.3739; www.cutingedgeevents.net, beccakoester@yahoo.com, www.sign meup.com. Danskin Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Triathlon Series: 800.452.9526, www.danskin.com, triathlon@ danskin.com. Elite Endeavors: Jim & Joyce Donaldson, 8963 Stoneybrook Blvd., Sylvania, OH 43560; 419.829.2398, jdjp@sev.org. Emerald Coast Events Commission: 850.784.9542; www.emeraldcoasstevents.com; jlynch@knology.net. EndorFUN Sports: 603.293.8353, 512.535.5224; www.endorfunsports.com, keith@timbermantri.com. Envirosports: P.O. Box 1040, Stinson Beach, CA 94970, 415.868.1829 (p), 415.868.2611 (f), info@envirosports. com, www.envirosports.com. Event Power: 22 Jagger Ln., Southampton, NY 11968; 631.283.7400; eventpower@aol.com; www.swimpower. com. Exclusive Sports Marketing & Nestle Sprintkids Series: 1060 Holland Dr., Ste. 3-L, Boca Raton, FL 33487; 561.241.3801; 888.ESMSPORTS (376-7767); tjcesarz@ exclusivesports. com; www.familyfitnessweekend.com. Fat Rabbit Racing: Craig Thompson, 614.424.7990, 614.306.1996; craigthompson@fatrabbitracing.com; www.fatrabbitracing.com. Field House Athletic Club: 166 Athletic Drive, Shelburne,VT 05482. 802.985.4402; rayne@fieldhouseraceseries.com; www.fieldhouseraceseries.com. Finish Line Productions: 475 Tinkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Trail, Boulder Creek, CA. 831.419.0883; info@finishlineproduction.com; finishlineproduction.com. FIRM Racing: 66 Bruce Rd., Marlboro, MA 01732; P: 508.485.5855, F: 508.229.8394; bill@firm-racing.com, www.firm-racing.com. Firstwave Events: P.O. Box 321269, Los Gatos, CA 95032; P: 408.356.0518; F: 408.356.0534; www.firstwave-events.com.. Georgia Multisport Productions: Jim Rainey, 4180 LibertyTrace,Marietta,GA 30066; 770.926.6993,770.928.9292 (F); jim@gamultisports.com,www.gamultisports.com. Great Smokey Mountains Triathlon Club: www.gsmtc.com; tri2000@dnet.net. Greater KnoxvilleTriathlon Club: Kevin Mahan,205 Cross Creek Private Ln.,Lenoir City, TN 37771, 865.675.BIKE (2453) (p), 865.988.9250 (f), www.knoxtri.org; kevinmahan@char tertn.net. Green Brook Racing LLC: Joe Patanella, P.O. Box 825, Green Brook, NJ 08812-825, 732.841.2558; greenbrookracing@aol.com, www.greenbrookracing.com. HFP Racing: P.O. Box 375, Thornville, OH 43076; shannon@hfpracing.com, 740.743.2418; scott@ hfpracing.com, 440.350.1708; www.hfpracing.com Ironhead Race Productions: Jack Weiss, P.O. Box 1113, Euless, TX 76039-1113; 817.355.1279; ironjack@ironheadrp.com; www.ironheadrp.com. HMA Promotions: 216.752.5151; www.hmapromotions.net Ironman North America: 4999 Pearl East Circle Suite 301, Boulder, CO, 80301; 518.523.2665; 518.523.7542; imanusa@capital. net. J&A Productions: www.japroductions.com; info@japroduc tions.com. JMS Racing Services: P.O. Box 582, Marion, IN 52302, 319.373.0741; www.pigmantri.com/ jmsracing.html; jim@ pigmantri.com; john@pig mantri.com. KOZ Enterprises: San DiegoTriathlon Series.P.O.Box 421052,San Diego,CA 92142; 858.268.1250; www.kozenter prises.com; info@ kozenterprises.com. Lake Geneva Extreme Sports: P.O. Box 1134, Lake Geneva, WI 53147, www.lakegenevasports.com; lgsports@lake genevasports.com; 262.275.3577. Lakeshore Athletic Services: 847.673.4100, lakeshoreinfo@aol.com. T R I AT H L E T E M A G . C O M

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Mattoon Multi-sport: mattoonbeachtri.com; ltgarrett@hughes.net. Maui Multi Sports Club: P.O. Box 1991, Kihei, Maui, HI 96753; trimaui.org. MESP, Inc. Racing Series: 29395 Agoura Rd., Ste. 102, Agoura Hills, CA 91301; 818.707.8867 (p); 818.707.8868 (f); www. mesp.com. Mountain Man Events: P.O. Box 255, Flagstaff, AZ 86002; www.mountainmanevents.com; admin@mountainmanevents.com. New York Triathlon: P.O. Box 50, Saugerties, NY 124770050; 845.247.0271; www.nytc.org. North Coast Multisports, Inc: P.O. Box 2512, Stow, Ohio 44224; 330-686-0993; NCMultisports@aol.com; www.NCMultisports.com. On Your Mark Events: 209.795.7832; info@onyourmarkevents.com; www.onyourmark events.com. Pacific Sports,LLC: 1500 S.Sunkist St.,Ste.E,Anaheim, CA 92806; 714.978.1528 (p); 714.978.1505 (f); www.pacificsportsllc.com. Palmetto Race & Event Production: P.O. Box 1634, Bluffton, SC 29910; 843.815.5267 (p); 843.785.2734 (f); andy5267@ aol.com; www.palmettorace.com. Personal Best Performance: Michael Hays, 808 Saturn

Ave., Idaho Falls, ID, 83402-2658. 208.521.2243; Michael@PB-Performance.com. PCH Sports: www.pchsports.com; 2079 CambridgeAve., Cardiff by the Sea, CA 92007; 760.944.7261. Piranha Sports, LLC/ Greater Atlantic Multisport Series/Greater Atlantic Club Challenge/Escape from SchoolYouthTriahtlon Series: Neil Semmel,P.O.Box 150, Kirkwood, DE 19708; nsemmel@piranha-sports.com; www.piranha-sports.com. PR Racing, Inc., P.O. Box 56-1081, Miami, FL, 33256; 305.278.8668. trimiami.com, trimiami@gmail.com. Premier Event Management: P.O. Box 8764, Metairie, La. 70011. 504.454.6561. www.pem-usa.com. Race Day Events: P.O.Box 31333,Knoxville,TN 37930; 865.250.5948; www.racedayevents.net; Kevin@racedayevents.net Score This!!!, Inc.: 15 Ranch Trail Ct., Orchard Park, NY 14127; 716.662.9379; www.score-this.com; i nfo@score-this.com. Set-Up, Inc.: P.O. Box 15144, Wilmington, NC 28408; 910.458.0299; set-upinc.com; billscott@set-upinc.com. TBF Racing: Bill Driskell, 5209 Blaze Ct., Rocklin, CA 95677; 916.202.3006; bill@totalbodyfitness.com; tbfracing.com. Team Magic, Inc.: Therese Bynum, Faye Yates; 205.595.8633; www.team-magic.com;

SWEEPSTAKES RULES 1. No purchase necessary. To enter without ordering, send an index card to: Triathlete Felt Sweepstakes, 328 Encinitas Blvd., Suite 100, Encinitas, CA 92024, with your name address and phone number. 2. This sweepstakes is sponsored by Triathlete, 328 Encinitas Blvd., Suite 100, Encinitas, CA 92024. 3. All entries must be received by August 31st, 2008. Triathlete is not responsible for lost, late, misdirected, damaged, illegible or postage-due mail. 4. Prize winners will be selected no later than September 15th, 2008 from among all entries received. Winner selection will take place under the supervision of Triathlete, whose decisions are final. Each entrant consents to the transfer of all information contained in the completed entry form to other companies. 5. The odds of winning are determined by the total number of eligible entries received. Taxes, where applicable, are the sole responsibility of the winner. 6. Potential winners will be notified by mail, telephone or e-mail. Potential winners must follow the directions contained in any correspondence and return all forms correctly completed within 7 days of the date of correspondence. Non-compliance will result in disqualification and the naming of an alternate winner. 7. All entrants will be eligible to win a Felt B12. If the Felt B12 is unavailable at the time of the sweepstakes drawing, a bike of equal value will be presented. There is no cash exchange for this prize. 8. Employees of Felt and Triathlete or anyone affiliated are not eligible. Sweepstakes subject to all federal, state and local tax laws and void where prohibited by law. 9. For the name of the winner, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope and letter of request to: Triathlete Felt Sweepstakes, 328 Encinitas Blvd., Suite 100, Encinitas, CA 92024.

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races@ team-magic.com. Team Unlimited: XTERRA Series; 877.751.8880; www.xterraplanet.com; info@xterraplanet.com. Time Out! Productions: Rich Havens,P.O.Box 543,Forestdale, MA 02644; 508.477.6311 (p); 508.477.6334 (f); timeout@ capecod.net; www.timeoutproductions.com. TriAthlanticAssociation: 410.593.9662; www.triath.com. Triathlon Canada: 1185 Eglington Ave., East Suite 704, Toronto, Ontario M3C 3C6; www.triathloncanada.com; 416.426. 7430 Tri-California Events, Inc. Terry Davis, 1284 Adobe Ln., Pacific Grove, CA 93950; 831.373.0678, www.tricalifornia.com. Tuxedo Brothers Event Management: Don Carr, 317.733.3300; tuxbro@indy.rr.com; www.tuxbro.com. UltraFit/USA: P.O. Box 06358, Columbus OH 43206, 614.481.9077, www.ultrafit-usa.com. Updog Sports LLC. www.updogsports.com, info@updogsports.com. Vermont SunTriathlon Series: 812 Exchange St.,Middlebury, VT 05753; 802.388.6888; www.vermontsun.com/triathlon.html,vtsun@together.net. YellowJacket Racing: 6 Regent St.,Rochester,NY 14607; 585.244.5181; www.yellowjacketracing.com, yellowjacketracing@hotmail.com.


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A step in time By Scott Tinley

L

Larry was tired of triathlon. Swim, sleep, eat, bike, run, stretch. Another day, another interval. New racing flats and a 2009 calendar with Wendy Ingraham on the cover did nothing for him. He didn’t need to consume anything else; the sport had all but eaten him alive. “Tinley,” he said, “I’ve spent 10 years gripping those handlebars, controlling the bike and my life. Lately, I feel like it’s the just the opposite.” We sat on the sand after a cold, short ocean swim. I was digging my toes in the sand, hearing it again for the first time. It was Larry’s turn for a crisis of belief. All the things that had propped him up in relation to the earth were up for negotiation. This sport wasn’t doing for him what he needed it to. As a mentor, mistress or midwife, multisport had left him wanting. “What else sparks your passion?” I asked him. “What other activities extend your senses if not your sensibilities?” Silence. I watched a pod of dolphins move through the surf—playing for no other reason than to play, which has no specific purpose at all. His long exhale sounded like that of a beached whale. “I don’t know,” he mused. “Something . . . physical but artsy, quiet but with rhythm, easy on the eyes but demanding of the soft tissue, something that most people don’t understand and carries a caché if you can own it.” And he added, “I’d like to do something extreme but be home by dinner time.” He looked at me as though I were Yoda; as though I could utter a cliché and his entire neurosis of athletic angst would be resolved. Go west; be true to thy known self; fish or cut bait; when in doubt, punt; immature athletes imitate, mature athletes steal; when you come to a fork in the road—take it; your debutante knows what you need, but I know what you want.

“Man, Larry,” I said, “there aren’t too many things that can replicate what you’ve found in this sport, not too many forms that can thrill, challenge, create, flow, make you laugh, cry, curse and praise God in the same breath.” He was still sitting in the sands while I wobbled away, rinsed my feet off and hunted down a grande latte. I felt bad for him; he had that hangdog look like his wife had left him or he’d dropped out of the Ironman. Or his wife had left him because he’d dropped out of the Ironman. He didn’t look good. I told him something would come along, blew my nose on our best bathroom towel and listened to the music straining out of a boom box in the parking lot. It was a jazzfusion thing with a heavy backbeat and a percussion track that took hold of my cold feet and moved them across the dry sand. Something was happening and the mood lifted like fog. I turned and saw Larry’s head bob in time to the distant thump. The arc of his crescent lips reversed and there were teeth in his moon. “That’s it,” I mumbled to myself and then turned the volume up. “Larry, that’s your next thing. Learn how to dance.” He was doing something with his eyes but I couldn’t see past the squint into his head. “I knew a dancer once,” he confessed. “Had better cardio than me. Learned how to swim well in two months. Had awareness about her body and her relationship to the world, to the room, to the moment. She used to suggest my space was fixed and linear. I told her I could ride a bike downhill like a Stradivarius. She said she could hear the bow caress the strings as Antonio Stradivari coached her into a high leap.” The music got louder as the kids carried it toward the beach and the water fell from our ear canals. Larry moved his arms and towel in a muted sync with the 4/4 time and the thought of the possibility. He looked stiff, the frozen Tinman striving. But something was shifting inside him like tectonic plates and he stood up as if he were testifying in court. “Look, Tinley, I don’t want to seem ungrateful for my past, I just don’t want to be disappointed in my future,” he said. And then he sat on a bench to get dressed and added, “And I won’t wear pink.” “Larry,” I quipped, “When neon was hot back in the late ‘80s all the top triathletes wore pink.” “Really?” His voice was kind of cottony like he was mostly there but would fit in a smaller space if you squeezed him. “I swear. I have pictures.” “Of you dancing? Larry was already planted down the road. “C’mon, Baryshnikov-in-brown. I’m playing bridge at five.” We walked across the parking lot and Larry turned but didn’t look. “Maybe this sport ain’t so bad. It’s really too late for me to twirl.” —Scott Tinley

Triathlete (ISSN08983410) is published monthly by Triathlon Group North America LLC, 328 Encinitas Blvd., Encinitas, CA 92024; (760) 634-4100. Subscription rates: U.S., one year (12 issues) $29.95 (12 issues); two years (24 issues) $49.95. Canada $51.95 per year; all other countries $61.95 per year, U.S. currency only. Periodicals postage paid at Encinitas, CA, and additional mailing offices. Single copy price $3.99. Triathlete is copyright 2003 by Triathlon Group North America, LLC. All rights reserved. Postmaster: Send address changes to Triathlete, P.O. Box 469055, Escondido, CA 92046-9513. Ride-along enclosed in all book region 2 copies. 224

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Courtesy Scott Tinley

Publication Mail Agreement #40683563: Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to Triathlete Magazine, 328 Encinitas Blvd Suite 100, Encinitas, CA 92024

TINLEY TALKS


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