Page 1

TIME TO STEP IN

An intervention program tackles opioid addiction MAY '20

VILLAGE EDITION

FEATURING

The

FACE of the crisis

Health-care professionals risk lives, save lives on COVID-19 frontlines AL SO

PAGEANT ROYALTY

Meet Miss Florida Michaela McLean

THIRST FOR KNOWLEDGE The Sunny Pint knows craft beer

A GOOD IMPRESSION

Artist Jennifer Harper creates unique prints


T H E E R C A R E YO U N E E D F R O M A H O S P I TA L YO U T R U S T.

U F H e a l t h T h e Vi l l a g e s ÂŽ H o s p i t a l Freestanding ER. Now Open. L O C AT E D A C R O S S F R O M B R O W N W O O D S Q U A R E The first full-service emergency department in the Wildwood area is now open. The freestanding ER offers quality care from seasoned health care experts, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Learn more at thevillagesregionalhospital.org/er


C O M M E R C I A L

R E S I D E N T I A L

DON’T GET CAUGHT IN

THE DARK

0C% ING 1I0 NAN BLE F ILA AVA

HOME & BUSINESS BACKUP GENERATORS

PUT POWER IN YOUR OWN HANDS Power outages happen. They plunge your home into darkness, leave your food spoiling in the refrigerator and have homeowners enduring unbearable heat. With a generator, you have the power to avoid these inconveniences. Act now before it’s too late.

8010 US Highway 441, Leesburg 352.460.0810 electricalworksflorida.com LICENSE EC13005476


YOUR AV FISTULA & GRAFTS

David C. Lew

Jose R. Rosado

Director, Board Certified in Cardiology and Vascular Interventions

Board Certified in Cardiovascular Disease

MD, FACC, FSCAI

MD, FACC


ARE YOUR LIFELINES THIS IS ESPECIALLY TRUE FOR DIALYSIS PATIENTS. PROTECTING

DIALYSIS ACCESS FROM THE CONSTANT USAGE OF REGULAR DIALYSIS TREATMENTS IS CRITICAL TO PRESERVING THEIR VIABILITY FOR AS LONG AS POSSIBLE. THE VASCULAR ACCESS CENTER WAS CREATED SPECIFICALLY FOR YOUR VEINS AND ARTERIES—AND FOR YOU.

VA SCU LAR ACCE SS CE NTE R LEESBURG 511 Medical Plaza Drive, Suite 101 Leesburg FL 34748 THE VILLAGES 1560 Santa Barbara Blvd. The Villages FL 32159

352-350-5616 fhvhealth.com FORMERLY KNOWN AS FLORIDA HEART & VASCULAR MULTI-SPECIALTY GROUP

SE RVICES • Vein Mapping • AV Fistula/Graft Surveillance and Interventions • Angioplasty/Stenting • Thrombectomy/Declotting • Banding Procedure for Ischemic Hand • Advanced PAD Interventions • Tunneled Catheter Placement • Surgical Creation of AV Fistula and Grafts

John R. Hurt

David L. Sustarsic

Prakrut H. Patel

Michael Ruisi

Kevin P. Williams

Board Certified in Interventional Cardiology

Director of Vascular Surgery Board Certified in Surgery

Board Certified in Interventional Cardiology

Board Certified in Interventional Cardiology

Board Certified in Interventional Cardiology

MD, FACC

MD, FACS

MD

MD

MD, FACC


GET HIP!

LIVE LIFE PAIN FREE, AGAIN. At Advanced Orthopedics Institute we specialize in hips, knees, shoulders, ankles, wrists...and golfers. If you are experiencing hip pain, playing a round of golf, climbing stairs, walking through the grocery store, even driving can be a challenge. Our experience has expanded the boundaries of possibility in joint replacement, providing you with the most effective solutions for your unique needs, so you can get back to doing what you love most. Get moving. Call 352.751.2862.

G E T A-O K W I T H AO I


John T. Williams, Jr., MD

1400 N US Hwy 441, Suite 552 | The Villages, FL 32159 phone 352.751.2862 | fax 352.751.5541 | goaoi.com

Alfred J. Cook, Jr., MD


MAY'20 V.16

≈ N.07

CONTENTS 1 of 2

FEATURES

036

Facing a crisis Nurses and other health-care workers tell their stories about being on the frontlines of the coronavirus pandemic. STORY: THERESA CAMPBELL

046

Time to step in Opioid addicts are getting help through an intervention program run by LifeStream Behavioral Center and AdventHealth Waterman. STORY: CHRIS GERBASI

010 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0


We Listen. We Care. We Educate.

352.350.1161

TBFinancialGroup.com 3261 U.S. Highway 441/27, Suite F-2 Fruitland Park, FL 34731

May 6th | 9 a.m. May 19th | 9 a.m. The Waterfront Inn. Lake Sumter Landing, The Villages

Annuities 101 Workshops for May Seating is very limited and by RSVP only

May 21th | 9 a.m. Mission Inn, Howey-in-the-Hills

TB Financial Group Inc. is a licensed insurance agency for life, health, and annuities. We are not securities licensed.We are not tax advisors. Our seminars are very general in nature and not meant to replace the advice of your CPA, Tax Preparer, Investment Advisor or Attorney. We will not provide tax or legal advice. Please consult your tax or legal professional for these matters.

Liz Cornell, CASÂŽ

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


MAY‘20 V.16

≈ N.07

CONTENTS 2 of 2

DEPARTMENTS

first

021

agenda

THE HIT LIST 022 PERSON OF INTEREST 024 OUTSTANDING STUDENT 026 MY FIRST TIME 028 IN THE VILLAGES 030 THIS 'N' THAT 032

059

THE TO-DO LIST 060 LOCAL TALENT 062 HI, SOCIETY! 064

menu

075

columns

IN THE KITCHEN 076 SPIRITS 080 DINING GUIDE 082

FROM THE PUBLISHER 014 AT YOUR SERVICE 015 FINAL THOUGHT 096

076 022

032

096

080

E ON TH R C OV E

TIME TO STEP IN

An intervention program tackles opioid addiction MAY '20

L AKE & SUMTER

face crisis FE ATURIN G

The

024

030

062

of the

Health-care professionals risk lives, save lives on COVID-19 frontlines

AL SO

PAGEANT ROYALTY

Meet Miss Florida Michaela McLean

THIRST FOR KNOWLEDGE The Sunny Pint knows craft beer

A GOOD IMPRESSION

Artist Jennifer Harper creates unique prints

Lake and Sumter Style

TIME TO STEP IN

An intervention program tackles opioid addiction MAY '20

VILLAGE EDITION

FEATURING

The

064 012 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

083

FACE of the crisis

Health-care professionals risk lives, save lives on COVID-19 frontlines AL SO

PAGEANT ROYALTY

Meet Miss Florida Michaela McLean

THIRST FOR KNOWLEDGE The Sunny Pint knows craft beer

A GOOD IMPRESSION

Artist Jennifer Harper creates unique prints

Village Edition


Sharon Bassett, Owner/Broker HSE, SRES, MRP

4880 NE 122ND AVE, OXFORD, FL 34484 Beautiful 3/3 “Holly” model is nestled in The “Family Friendly” Villages of Parkwood, A Deed Restricted Neighborhood near the heart of the Villages. Granite, Tile and Room for Pool!!! $259,000 | MLS# G5013168

1203 W. MAIN STREET, LEESBURG, FL 34748 MIXED USE COMMERCIAL! Investment Opportunity! Multi-Unit Retail on Main St. Downtown Leesburg, 2.32 Acres, Warehouse, Pole barn and room to build. $550,000 | MLS# G5015726 2 Parcels - may divide

(LOT 32) BARRINGTON DR, EUSTIS, FL 32736 GORGEOUS 1.42 acre Lakefront property in the prestigious Estates at Black Bear Reserve. This Deed Restricted golf community offers serene Country Club Living. Build to your specifications. If you’re an avid fisherman or enjoy the outdoors this is the right place for you! $104,900 | MLS# G5018145

4972 NE 73RD DRIVE, WILDWOOD, FL 34785 STUNNING LAKE VIEW! BEAUTIFUL 3/2 Custom WATERFRONT Southern Plantation with 1/1 Guest Home privately nestled amongst (7) beautiful acres on LAKE DEATON. Includes; Barn and covered RV parking. $559,999 | MLS# G4815599

14329 SE 170TH ST., WEIRSDALE, FL, 32195 LOCATION! LOCATION! (10) Gorgeous Acres of vacant land. Build your dream home and bring your animals. Surrounded by citrus trees and farms. Just minutes to Lake Weir, The Villages, Grand Oaks Resort Carriage Museum and Orange Blossom Opry. $183,500 | MLS# G4852009

13945 SE 66TH CT, SUMMERFIELD, FL 34491 Adorable 3/2 Mobile Home in the lovely subdivision of High Hope Mobile Home Community. Large backyard, large enclosed screened in porch with a BEAUTIFUL view and no neighbors behind. $53,000 | MLS# G5023451

7936 NE 42ND TER, WILDWOOD, FL 34785 Charming 3/1.5 block lovely home nestled on ONE ACRE and sold AS-IS. Beautiful flowering bushes, double car port, enclosed side porch, 3 storage sheds (1 has electric), towering oak trees, 2017 Roof and yard completely fenced in. $110,000 | MLS# G5026500

12403 NE 52ND LOOP, OXFORD, FL 34484 FAMILY FRIENDLY! Villages of Parkwood. LOVELY 4/2.5 “Evergreen” Model on a fenced private Homesite, Front covered and rear Screened Covered Lanai, Newer AC, Quartz countertops and ceramic tile floors. $229,900 | MLS# G5020539 Available for Rent $1,800!

463 MEDFORD PLACE, THE VILLAGES Absolutely Adorable 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath “Laredo” Ranch Home nestled on an elevated Homesite in the sought after Village of Amelia. “Turnkey Furnished” $220,000 | MLS# G5028111

13225 SE 94TH AVE, SUMMERFIELD DEL WEBB GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Dynamite 2/2 “Madeira” model POOL Home with an open and spacious layout. “Turnkey Furnished.” Nestled on an over-sized home-site in a Cul-De-Sac that backs up to beautiful trees, providing rear privacy. $217,900 | MLS# G5026419

1-352-307-2925

BassettPremierRealty.com

1104 BECKER AVE, THE VILLAGES, FL 32163 FABULOUS 3/2 “Avondale” Bungalow Courtyard Villa. Block and Stucco home with 2 car garage on corner homesite! Turnkey Furnished! $349,000 | MLS# G5027614

If you are thinking about selling your home, contact us today! 1-352-307-2925

Spruce Creek Professional Plaza | 10935 SE 177th Place, Suite 201, Summerfield, FL 34491


FROM THE PUBLISHER

This is us In crisis, our community bands together. uring the past month or more of isolation due to COVID-19, you have been hungry for news and we have been proud to do our part to meet your needs by providing daily updates and useful information at lakeandsumterstyle.com. We also have been supporting restaurants with a “Style-toGo” promotion for carryout customers, and telling the stories of business owners, teachers, residents and others. Of course, Akers Media has not been immune to the economic hit or the new reality of working at home while trying to publish a magazine. For logistical reasons, we rearranged our story lineups for the upcoming months, and this gave us an opportunity to profile today’s heroes. In an emotion-filled feature, nurses and other frontline health-care workers speak honestly and thoughtfully about what it’s like to go to work every day facing a contagious disease

and to come home each night wondering whether it’s safe to be around their families. We salute them for their lifesaving work. In another health feature, representatives of LifeStream Behavioral Center and AdventHealth Waterman explain how an intervention program also is saving lives—those of people addicted to opioids. The leading ladies of Business Women of Style, our largest issue that traditionally runs in May, will now take over the June publication. The women will be followed by Business Men of Style in July and another annual blockbuster, the Hot! issue, in August. We have an exciting lineup for the next several months. We hope that we not only keep you informed but also give you a little diversion from the pressures of the day. I would like to personally thank all of you for your loyalty and dedication to Style magazine for the past 15 years. We are all in this together and will get through this together. Stay well!

Have a story to tell? We’re always looking for stories about people who live and work in our area. Send suggestions to chris@akersmediagroup.com.

014 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0


Kendra Akers Doug Akers

OWNER/PUBLISHER kendra@akersmediagroup.com

DESIGN

/

AT YOUR SERVICE

PRESIDENT doug@akersmediagroup.com

PHOTOGRAPHY

/

EDITORIAL

Steven J. Codraro Chris Gerbasi

CREATIVE DIRECTOR steve@akersmediagroup.com

MANAGING EDITOR chris@akersmediagroup.com

Michael Gaulin James Combs

SENIOR DESIGNER michael@akersmediagroup.com

STAFF WRITER james@akersmediagroup.com

Volkan Ulgen Theresa Campbell

ART DIRECTOR volkan@akersmediagroup.com

TIME TO STEP IN

TIME TO STEP IN

An intervention program tackles opioid addiction

An intervention program tackles opioid addiction SPONSORED BY

MAY '20

MAY '20

VILLAGE EDITION

L AKE & SUMTER

STAFF WRITER theresa@akersmediagroup.com

TO LAKE COUN T Y

face crisis FE ATURIN G

Douglas Tyler Victoria Schlabig

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY douglas@akersmediagroup.com

STAFF WRITER victoria@akersmediagroup.com

Megan Mericle

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER nicole@akersmediagroup.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNER megan@akersmediagroup.com

M A RK ETIN G

Tim McRae

VICE PRESIDENT, SALES tim@akersmediagroup.com

Melanie Melvin Dillon True

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING melanie@akersmediagroup.com

ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE dillon@akersmediagroup.com

Shaena Long

SALES ASSISTANT shaena@akersmediagroup.com

ADMI N IS TRATION Deb Matlock Aubrey Akers Simmons

DIRECTOR OF CLIENT SERVICES deb@akersmediagroup.com

Local beer that’s truly local. Fresh hops, fruit and other ingredients grown in Lake County.

The

FACE

+

of the crisis

Health-care professionals risk lives, save lives on COVID-19 frontlines

FRESH TODAY!

WHERE THE LOCALS GO

BIRDWATCHERS UNITE

Enjoy food picked fresh at a farm café, pick your own fruit, or take a hayride to relish agritourism.

Find the best places for outdoor fun, downtown adventure, and lazy life on the water.

Lake County is home to hundreds of bird species, including the native scrub-jay.

AL SO

AL SO

PAGEANT ROYALTY

Meet Miss Florida Michaela McLean

THIRST FOR KNOWLEDGE The Sunny Pint knows craft beer

A GOOD IMPRESSION

Artist Jennifer Harper creates unique prints

PAGEANT ROYALTY

Meet Miss Florida Michaela McLean

THIRST FOR KNOWLEDGE The Sunny Pint knows craft beer

A GOOD IMPRESSION

Artist Jennifer Harper creates unique prints

Hot off the press! The latest editions of Lake & Sumter Style, Village Edition Style, and Welcome to Lake County.

Get yours Subscriptions: Order a subscription of your favorite magazine to be delivered directly

to your home for just $84. Each subscription includes 12 consecutive issues of Lake & Sumter Style and Village Edition Style. Choose 2 or more magazines for $108 per year. To order, call 352.787.4112 or mail us at: Subscriptions at Akers Media, P.O. Box 490088, Leesburg, FL 34749. Change of Address: If you are a seasonal resident or have moved, send your address change request to general@akersmediagroup.com or mail us at: Subscriptions at Akers Media, P.O. Box 490088, Leesburg, FL 34749. Back Issues: Order a single issue by mail for $7, or 2 or more single issues for $9. To pick up a back issue from our office, please call 24 hours in advance.

OFFICE MANAGER aubrey@akersmediagroup.com

DI S TRIBUTION Scott Hegg

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER scott.hegg@akersmediagroup.com

Akers Media is a proud member of

Winner of 200+ Awards for Excellence

Health-care professionals risk lives, save lives on COVID-19 frontlines

Nicole Hamel

CON TRIBUTIN G Anthony Rao WRITER S Joe Angione

/

LAKE COUNTY IS HOPPIN’ FEATURING

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER anthony@akersmediagroup.com

SALES

The

of the

Lake & Sumter Style. Published monthly by Akers Media, 108 South Fifth Street, Leesburg, FL 34748. All editorial contents copyright 2020 by Akers Media. All rights reserved. Lake & Sumter Style is a registered trademark of Akers Media. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. For back issues or billing information, call 352.787.4112. Return postage must accompany all unsolicited manuscripts and artwork if they are to be returned. Manuscripts are welcomed, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. “Paid Promotional Feature” denotes a paid advertising feature. Publisher is not responsible for claims or contents of advertisements. The ideas and opinions contained in this publication do not necessarily reflect the thoughts or opinions of Akers Media.

Digitize your life Visit the Apple or Android app store today and download the Lake & Sumter Style online magazine app for your mobile device.

Find us on social media

FULL-SERVICE ADVERTISING AGENCY • VIDEO PRODUCTION • CUSTOM PUBLISHING AKERSMEDIAGROUP.COM • 352.787.4112

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 015


OPTIONS? DO YOU KNOW YOUR BEST

FACELIFT, TEMPORARY FILLERS, OR PERMANENT FACIAL FILLERS

Liz had ImageLift, Laser, and filler treatments. Results are typical and do vary.

Kathy had a Laser ImageLift. Results are typical and do vary.


YOU’RE INVITED TO FIND OUT! Double Board-Certified Facial Plastic Surgeon

STAY UPTO-DATE

MAIN LANDING PAGE imagelift.com/covid19-update

SHOP THE ONLINE STORE shop.imagelift.com

ATTEND VIRTUAL SEMINARS! imagelift.com/webinar

MEET THE TEAM!

WSJ

Bestseller!

FREE IMAGELIFT BOOK for first

DR. RICH CASTELLANO

20 callers! Limited quantities (Retail $14.95)

is a Double Board Certified Facial Plastic Surgeon as seen on:

*Patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hrs of responding to ad for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination, or treatment.

8630 East CR 466, The Villages 877.346.2435 // www.IMAGELIFT.com


RBOI thanks our healthcare community working on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic.

Patient-centered radiation oncology close to home The Villages 352.259.2200 Ocala 352.732.0277 Timber Ridge 352.861.2400 Inverness 352.726.3400 Lecanto 352.527.0106 RBOI.com

Like us on Facebook


AMERICAN FAMILY HOMES CUSTOM CHANGES BENEFIT YOU

CHANGE IS GOOD

At American Family Homes we believe you deserve your new home, your way. This includes custom changes that make your home personal and special to you. That’s always been part of the American Family Homes experience. Bring us your ideas. Let’s collaborate on style, color and design features to create an energy efficient custom home, within budget, just the way you want it.

KNOW YOUR BUILDER

“Designing and building a custom home is a long process. A thousand decisions need to be made, one just as important as the next. The first decision you need to make is to hire the right builder with the right experience. Don’t underestimate the importance of the relationship with your builder. American Family Homes is Committed to Quality and 100% Satisfaction. We invite your inquiry today.” - Mike Neace CUSTOM HOMES “ON YOUR LOT” FROM THE $200s OFFICE/DESIGN STUDIO 312 South Bay St., Eustis FL 32726

HOME BUILDERS ASSOCIATION OF LAKE-SUMTER

BUILDER OF THE YEAR Let’s get started. Call me today.

Mike Neace: 352-589-6004 Award Winning Home Designer, Builder, Licensed Contractor

“Committed to Quality & Satisfaction” AmericanFamilyHomesInc.com State License Number - CBC058306


021

p.

first

BE IN THE KNOW ABOUT LAKE AND SUMTER COUNTIES | PEOPLE. COMMENTARY. NEWS.

022 THE HIT LIST 10 tidbits to keep you informed.

024

026

028

030

032

PERSON OF INTEREST Florida’s crown jewel: Michaela McLean.

OUTSTANDING STUDENT Hadley Fales likes to read — a lot.

MY FIRST TIME Don’t ask Holly Dickerson to skydive.

IN THE VILLAGES Meet Villager Bob Oburn.

THIS ’N’ THAT The toll of driving in Florida.


THE HIT LIST

A HEARTFELT CONTRIBUTION: Orlando Health South Lake Hospital sponsored the purchase of 130 heart rate monitors for students at Cecil E. Gray Middle School in Groveland. Physical education instructors will track the heart health of nearly 500 students, which will increase their ability to make healthy choices, according to a press release. The hospital’s recent health needs assessment indicated that diabetes and obesity continue to rise among Lake County middle school students.

SOUTHERN BELLE: The Orange Blossom Belle recently held its grand opening at 752 W. Montrose St. in Clermont. The boutique, owned by Bryttany Phillips, offers women’s fashions, jewelry and other accessories, plus custom monogram and embroidery services, according to its Facebook page. 352.267.5735

ARTIST HONORS VETERANS: Artist Cary diValentin’s work is worth seeing at American Legion Post 35, 920 Highland St., Mount Dora, where she has painted a variety of vignettes of military veterans defending and serving their country. “This is something that has been in my heart,” the Mount Dora artist says.

FIESTA TIME: Who doesn’t love a good burrito or taco? Cinco de Mayo, May 5, presents the perfect excuse to enjoy Mexican cuisine and music. The Cinco de Mayo celebration commemorates the victory of the Mexican Army over French forces in the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862. To the victors go the tacos. Check out Main Street Cantina in Leesburg and other restaurants offering curbside pickup or delivery at lakeandsumterstyle.com/style-to-go2/.

022 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

BULLY FOR THEM: Bully Brewing opened recently at 2204 Griffin Road, Leesburg. The family-owned and operated microbrewery features five housemade beers, a full beer and wine menu, local music artists, open mic nights and more. The business hopefully survived a “We Survived COVID-19” party in April. Call 352.638.9207 to find out.


THE BEAUTY AROUND US: Amid canceled events, Villagers still have an opportunity to get outside and enjoy nature. The community is filled with wildlife and scenic views along trails, in parks and at preserves, highlighted by the Sharon Wiechens Preserve and Fenney Nature Trail. For a complete list of parks and trails, visit districtgov.org.

THE ‘FIRST MOTHER’: Anna M. Jarvis is credited with starting the modern Mother’s Day. After her mom died in 1905, she campaigned for a national day to honor mothers. On May 10, 1908, a Mother’s Day service was held in West Virginia at a church where Anna’s mother had taught, according to almanac.com. West Virginia became the first state to adopt the holiday, and in 1914, President Woodrow Wilson approved a legal holiday dedicated “to the best mother in the world, your mother.” Don’t forget your mother on May 10.

PICK IT UP: The Leesburg Partnership recently launched a customer pickup service promotion to support local restaurants and employees during the COVID-19 precautions. To participate: Visit leesburgeats.com for participating restaurants and menu information; call in your order; drive to the restaurant’s designated curbside pickup lanes, marked by bright green cones, and pick up your food.

BROADEN YOUR HORIZONS: It’s not like being at home is the end of the world. And you don’t need to sit in front of the TV all day. Try these ideas to pass the time: Read, take a virtual museum tour, learn a language, go for a run, try a new recipe, video chat with family or friends, meditate, nap, play a board game, put together a puzzle, create art or—if it comes to this—tackle those longstanding handyman chores around the house.

BE A DONOR: Blood donations are always in demand, and coronavirus has heightened the need for a ready blood supply to local hospitals. Generally healthy people ages 16 or older who weigh at least 110 pounds can donate blood, according to OneBlood, a not-for-profit blood center. Find out where you can donate by visiting oneblood.org.

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 023


PERSON OF INTEREST

PEO PLE

Michaela McLean Miss Florida 2019 is a homegrown, eighth-generation Floridian. INTERVIEWER: JAMES COMBS

≈ PHOTOS: NICOLE HAMEL

L V I TA AT S ST

• Hometown: Clermont. • Won Miss Florida Outstanding Teen (2014), Miss Florida Citrus Queen (2019) and Miss Florida (2019). Finished in top 15 in 2019 Miss America pageant.

• Graduated in 2019 from University of Alabama with double major in dance and public relations. • Family runs McLean Family Farms and Uncle Matt’s Organic.

What do you think of the changes to the Miss America pageant, eliminating the emphasis on personal appearance? Miss America rebranded almost a year and a half ago to Miss America 2.0. The organization is now focusing on the intelligence of the candidates, as well as their ambition, their social impact on the communities where they live and their overall brand. Eliminating the physical portion of the competition—judging them on their swimsuit body or how they look in an evening gown—allows judges and the audience an opportunity to know the women as a whole. I’m in favor of letting everyone know what I stand for and who I am.


Do you think pageants are keeping up to date with women’s views in today’s society? They are. Pageants are one of the top women empowerment programs. The Miss America organization is one of the top scholarship providers for young women. I got to graduate the University of Alabama last May completely debt-free because of the scholarships I earned through Miss Florida and my time with Miss America. Pageants are trying to highlight and promote the best qualities of women and let the public know we’re more than just a beauty queen. We are intelligent. We are future doctors, lawyers and CEOs.

During Miss America, you had a social impact initiative called “Brave and Beautiful: Breaking Free from Behind the Screen Through Social Media Literacy.” Can you tell us about that? Sure. I want women to know they’re not going to find their true worth and identity in the number of likes, comments and followers on their social media accounts. Brave and Beautiful gives women timely and relevant messages, showing them that they are created on purpose for a purpose. You don’t have to gauge your self-worth based on your social media accounts.

What was the most challenging aspect of preparing for the Miss America competition? Balancing the preparation with the duties that come from being Miss Florida. I refer to both of them as overtime jobs. There’s so much paperwork and behind-the-scenes video footage that you submit to NBC so the network can craft a story on you. You have to be prepared for your on-stage question. I practiced answering a variety of political and personal questions, knowing that they’ll ask you anything under the sun.

Did watching your family’s hard work in the citrus industry help prepare you for the hard work of being Miss Florida? Absolutely. My

Know a person of interest? Tell us!

dad, uncle and grandfather have all been organic farmers. I grew up going to the groves and watching them grow okra, organic citrus and cucumbers. I’ve seen them go out in the middle of the night to make sure the crops are growing OK during cold temperatures. My family has instilled in me to work hard and continue pushing forward no matter how difficult things may seem.

The pageants are highly competitive. Are the women respectful toward one another or is there backstabbing? I know there’s a

fire under me to change the world. I really do think my generation is going to prove a lot of people wrong.

What are your future plans? Having the title of Miss Florida allowed me to work with The Discovery Channel, NBC and Nickelodeon. Now, I have a desire to be in the television industry. I would like to be a soft news/TV morning show host or a public relations practitioner for an entertainment firm. I’m looking to the New York City and Los Angeles markets.

stereotype that pageants are cutthroat and the women are hateful. However, that’s so opposite of how it really is. These girls motivate me, and with every single competition I’ve been involved in, I’ve become more knowledgeable and felt encouraged to give it my all in everything I do. We really are each other’s biggest cheerleaders.

Can you elaborate on how busy you’ve been as Miss Florida? Since being crowned Miss Florida, I’ve driven 45,000 miles in my car from the Panhandle to Miami and everywhere in between. Every single day, I’m in a different city. I’m an ambassador on behalf of the Everglades Foundation, which educates students on our Everglades ecosystem. As a result, I’ve traveled to elementary schools and read to students about alligators and why they’re beneficial to the Everglades. The other organization I work for is Advanced Recovery Systems. I educate middle school, high school and college-age students about the risks and realities of drug and alcohol abuse. This year, I’ve visited roughly 35 schools.

Do you think your generation is unfairly stereotyped as lazy and inattentive? Yes. As Miss Florida, I have visited public schools and colleges and have seen the massive potential that today’s students have. When I have an elder say something about my generation, it lights a

Email your recommendation to james@akersmediagroup.com.

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 025


OUTSTANDING STUDENT

PEO PLE

Hadley Fales 5-year-old is an avid reader. INTERVIEWER: VICTORIA SCHLABIG

When did you start reading? When I was a baby.

Do you have a favorite book? “Uni the Unicorn.”

Where’s your favorite place to read? In my bedroom.

How many books have you read so far? Maybe, 89? (“In reality, we’ve read over 5,000 books together!” mom Heather Fales says.) What do you like to do besides reading? Play outside. What’s your favorite food? Cheez-Its. If you could have any superpower, what would it be? I would be a mermaid!

What do you want to be when you grow up? A librarian. Know an outstanding student? Fill us in!

026 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

Email your recommendations to victoria@akersmediagroup.com


E H T T SHU ! R O O D T N FRO OPIOID-FREE ANESTHESIA FOR JOINT REPLACEMENTS? At UNOVA Hip and Knee Center, our surgeons utilize an Opioid Free anesthesia protocol to control peri operative pain. This allows our patients to awaken from anesthesia alert and orientated, ensuring rapid mobilization and allowing same day discharge home.

CALL US TODAY TO BOOK A CONSULTATION.

(888) 847-4895 UnovaHealth.com


MY FIRST TIME

PEO PLE

Holly Dickerson A Lady Lake mom recalls her first (and only) skydiving adventure. INTERVIEWER: THERESA CAMPBELL

t was a beautiful day in 2005, my husband was working, and I had decided to go over to DeLand to a skydiving facility with a few friends. I was pretty much going to watch because I knew my husband, Judd, wouldn’t want me to skydive. As I watched one of my friends do it, I thought, “Oh my gosh. That is so awesome!” And I talked myself into it, signed up for it, got geared up. I went up in the plane, like 13,500 feet in the air. The guy who was a tandem instructor was on my back. He told me before we jumped that he would tap my shoulder when it was time to hold my arms out like we were flying.

What about your first time?

028 /

≈ PHOTO: NICOLE HAMEL

When we got to the edge of the plane, I looked down and thought, “I can’t believe I am doing this.” But I just went for it, and we started doing all of these flips in the air. It was so awesome and beautiful. Then, when the instructor tapped my shoulder, I knew it was my cue. But the wind gust was so powerful, it blew my arms back (so) super-fast that my left shoulder popped completely out of socket when we were freefalling, and I was in so much pain. My husband had to meet me at The Villages Regional Hospital, and (the doctors) had to put me asleep to put the (shoulder) back in. Needless to say, it was my first skydiving experience and my last!

If you’d like to share your first time doing a significant event, email theresa@akersmediagroup.com.

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0


IN THE VILLAGES

PEO PLE

He’s an old cowhand Villager Bob Oburn time-travels back to the great American West. STORY: JOE ANGIONE

illagers’ recreational activities are as varied as the 3,000 clubs they’ve organized to help enjoy them. But these clubs don’t represent what Hacienda North resident Bob Oburn, 67, does for fun and exercise. From April to October, Bob lends himself out for a couple of weeks as a trail hand on a cattle ranch somewhere in Wyoming, New Mexico, Kansas, Idaho or Arizona. These aren’t “dude” ranches but working ranches that raise and move thousands of cows, and horses, to market. They want physically fit, highly capable riders who know what to do on a horse in rugged country. They also must be prepared to do the risky things that keep herds together. “When a cow wanders down a rocky ravine, the trail boss must be sure you know that, if the cow got down there, your horse can get down there, and you better be able to stay in the saddle and bring the cow back home,” Bob says. Bob grew up on a small Pennsylvania farm where he became an excellent rider and learned to love the rural life. “Being a cowhand lets me return to the past and assist ranches run by hardworking, patriotic American families,” he says.

Bob isn’t paid for his work. He pays for the privilege of participating in the lifestyle of the people who built the great American West. He also covers the costs of his travel to and from the ranch and medical bills, should he get hurt. But his food, hearty chuck-wagon fare, is free; so is sleeping out in a bedroll or a chilly trail tent. There is no time for sightseeing. Bob is responsible for herding, sorting, branding, vaccinating, fixing fences and moving cattle to spring or fall pastures. Cowhands frequently work at high elevations where it gets very cold. And they work in sun, rain, snow and sleet. Ranches call for volunteers, stipulating 70 as the maximum age, but they make exceptions based on your physical condition and experience. Bob spent years in the federal government as a helicopter maintenance test pilot—another risky occupation—and then worked in federal agencies in the Washington, D.C., area. He also played arena polo for the Navy War College. No wonder he’s an excellent horseman. His longtime travel partners include another excellent horseman from The Villages and one who lives in Pennsylvania. This year, Bob will return again to the great American West.

Joe Angione loves to share stories of his adventures. If you want to contact him, email joeangione@aol.com.

030 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0


ANY SEASON, ANY REASON

Receive up to $8,000 at 10% APR for up to 48 months* Speak with a Financial Services Representative to apply today! *APR = Annual Percentage Rate. Receive up to $8,000 at 10.0% APR for up to 48 months with payments of $25.36 per each $1,000 borrowed. Minimum credit score of 650 required. Maximum Debt Ratio of 50%. Approval based on creditworthiness and underwriting factors. Proof of income is required at the time of loan funding. This promotional rate is available for a limited time and cannot be used to pay existing Insight Credit Union loans. All Credit Union loan programs, rates, terms, and conditions are subject to change at any time without notice. This offer cannot be combined with any other offers. Not all applicants will qualify for the lowest rate. Standard Insight Credit Union personal loan rates apply for borrowers that do not meet promotion qualifications. Minimum loan amount $2,500.00. Interest accrues from the date of contract. Offer may be withdrawn at any time. Other restrictions may apply. Federally insured by NCUA.


THIS 'N' THAT

CO MMENTARY

FOR WHOM THE TOLL TOLLS You’ll never take me alive, coppers! STORY: CHRIS GERBASI

≈ ILLUSTRATIONS: MEGAN MERICLE

was driving in Tampa and didn’t want to go through town, so I jumped on the freeway. I got mixed up for a while before I finally found an Ybor City exit. But when I got off, there was a sign that read, “Toll Ahead.” I didn’t know I was getting off on a toll road. I thought I was on a “freeway.” This was before the cash toll suspension. At the end of the ramp sat an unmanned toll booth with no gate arm; just a red stoplight and a basket to collect change. A digital sign at the booth read, “You owe 50 cents.” I owed 50 cents. I had a quarter. And I had a dollar bill. I didn’t have 50 cents. I had tipped a bartender with four quarters instead of a dollar bill

032 /

and in the back of my mind, I thought, “I shouldn’t give away my toll quarters.” Sure enough … OK, it was only 50 cents. What’s the worst that could happen if I didn’t pay? Well, a posted sign stated something about a statute and violators will be photographed or prosecuted or some such thing. So, what does someone do at 1:30 in the morning at some godforsaken exit in some godforsaken port

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0


area of Tampa when they don’t have 50 cents? I tossed in the quarter. “You owe 25 cents.” What could I do? I couldn’t toss in the dollar bill. The booth seemed to have some sort of swiping device. Does the DOT take Visa for 25-cent tolls? How about an IOU? “Dear DOT, sorry I missed you. Catch you next time.” Should I pull over, get out of my car and start walking around the deserted port asking for change? “Brother, can you spare a toll?” I sat there for a while, contemplating what would happen if I went through the stoplight. I envisioned every old prison movie, where the sirens go off and searchlights scan the yard as guards start firing. “Escape! Escape! Shoot to kill!” Then I saw a tanker truck in my rear-view mirror, barreling toward me with a driver who apparently was in no mood for tolls or stopping. I pulled forward and out of the way, just in time to avoid being hit, but also going through the red light and setting off an alarm. It wasn’t a loud alarm. It’s just a 50-cent toll after all. It was more like an alarm clearing its throat. And a light flashed just as I conveniently turned around to look at the truck flying by, giving the tollbooth camera a perfect pose for my mugshot. I am a scofflaw. Catch me if you can. Now I wait for the DOT to get the drop on me. I expect a summons. “You are being prosecuted. You are a bad man.”

I could plead insanity. “Your honor, I clearly was not in my right mind at the time. Why else would I be in Tampa? I suffer from Mitsubishi Syndrome. I bypass tolls to draw attention to myself.” I could blame society. “It’s rush, rush, rush, go, go, go, no time to stop for tolls.” I could blame the economy. “The quarter has no value. You want your stinkin’ 25 cents? Here, take 25 worthless pennies. Try to get rid of those.” Maybe my parents are at fault. “I was raised in a strict anti-toll household. I was born to be a revolutionary.” Or maybe I’ll go on the lam, traveling backroads and toll-less thoroughfares, yearning for freedom while looking over my shoulder for the next tollbooth collector who’s gunning for me. A legend will be born. 50 Cent will write half a rap about me. Celebrities will protest on my behalf. I don’t know why, but it will no doubt involve Martin Sheen, Jane Fonda and Joaquin Phoenix. I’ll become a social media sensation, the Toll Troll, or maybe just “that loser who didn’t have a quarter.” The media will report occasional sightings: blowing through a toll plaza in Tulsa, a pile of burnt coin wrappers in Akron, a scrape with an ice cream vendor wearing a change maker in Frisco—“He just kept yelling, ‘Loose change is for suckers!’” The reports will trail off, and years will pass. Sometime, somewhere down the road, I’ll slip up or my conscience will gnaw at me. The DOT thugs will haul me in before the TV cameras. I’ll be unkempt, bewildered, quarterless. The DOT chief will seal my fate: “If you’re going to do the crime, you’ve got to pay the toll.”

Are you a fugitive from the law? Tell me about it so I can collect the reward. Email chris@akersmediagroup.com.

CHRIS GERBASI

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 033


Incredible lifestyle &

AMAZING HOME VALUE! On Top of the World is Ocala’s premier active-adult community with new homes from the $170s. W hen you’re age 55 years or better, staying active is so important to keeping fit and healthy in the decades to come. At On Top of the World, residents have many opportunities to live an active lifestyle, and have fun doing it.

You’ll find three golf courses, tennis courts, dogs parks, indoor and outdoor pools, fitness centers, pickleball courts, 17+ miles of walking trails, all of which add up to plenty of ways to stay active whenever — and however — you like. Because there are so many outdoor activity facilities, you won’t have to wait for a tee or court time or have to worry about not getting a lane for your laps in the pool. On Top of the World Communities LLC., Ocala, Florida a 55+ community. On Top of the World Communities reserves the right to change or withdraw any offer at any time. Prices, features and specifications are subject to change without notice. Not to be combined with any other offer. See Sales Associate for specific details.


Over 188 acres of great amenities to enjoy! On Top of the World offers so much more than just great golf! With a wide array of recreational amenities, dozens of social clubs and an award-winning lifelong learning center that features classes in a multitude of subjects that appeal to all types of interests, residents can learn new skills or just meet up with friends in pursuit of their favorite pastime. Discover the lifestyle and community of your dreams. With countless amenities, there is always something fun to do and new friends to do it with. Live life to the fullest in Central Florida’s premier active-adult community. New homes are priced from the $170’s to over $400’s.

State parks, unique restaurants, concerts and live theatre are only the beginning when it comes to offerings in the Ocala area. Residents can go antiquing in nearby historic towns or hit the “big cities” of Orlando and Tampa. Delight the grandkids with quick trips to Disney World, Universal Studios and other renowned theme parks in nearby Orlando. Visit nearby beach towns like Daytona or Clearwater to relax in the sand. It’s also close to four area hospitals, two of which are only minutes away from the community.

Visit our website at OnTopoftheWorld.com, and check out all of our decorated model virtual tours! #13535 - 5/20


036 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0


FRONTLINE

HEROES Nurses and other health-care professionals find themselves in a weary war against COVID-19. STORY: THERESA CAMPBELL

he rapidly evolving coronavirus pandemic has taken a physical and emotional toll on a worldwide battlefield, raging a war like never seen before. Some of the “soldiers” fighting an invisible enemy are nurses and health-care professionals who signed up to take care of the ill, but never fathomed an outbreak of a contagious disease that would sicken millions of people across the globe and derail the economy. As citizens throughout the United States were ordered to stay home to slow the spread of COVID-19, health-care

workers have emerged as heroes, praised for their compassion and work on the frontlines at a very vulnerable time. On the same day Dr. Tony Fauci, a lead member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, predicted the U.S. could see 100,000 to 200,000 deaths from the pandemic, a Umatilla man’s father died from the coronavirus. Kent Adcock, the CEO and president of Lake-Sumter Habitat for Humanity, says his father, Larry Adcock, 86, died March 29 in Indianapolis. Ten days later, his mother, Patsy, 83, also died from the

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 037


virus. The Adcock family couldn’t be at the hospital, but they were grateful for the nurse who was by their father’s side. “We are so very thankful that his floor nurse, who herself was a (Christian) believer, was present and holding his hand when he passed, so we know he was not alone,” Kent posts on Facebook. “Our resolve as a family is that his passing would not get absorbed as just another statistic of this deadly pandemic. My dad was an accomplished Fortune 100 executive his entire life and was quick to take his relationship with Christ into every setting where he held impact.” Health-care workers have been giving their all, doing what they are trained to do and also implementing new procedures to care for infected patients with mild-to-severe respiratory illnesses and symptoms of breathing difficulty, fever and cough. “We need to sing the praises for them,” Kent adds. Here are some of their stories:

SHANNON WEBER, NURSE PRACTITIONER AND HOSPITALIST

for 22 years. “I try not to live with stress before I need the stress.” COVID-19 has changed many hospital procedures and protocols. “Everybody is supporting each other, there’s always education going on, there’s always a new piece of information that we are receiving because this is all a huge learning curve,” Shannon says. “This virus hasn’t been around long enough for any real good lengthy study to have been done, so we are paying close attention to other hospitals, other countries, other states

“I don’t think anyone could have imagined anything like this pandemic,” says Shannon Weber, who focuses on serving UF Health Leesburg Hospital while being employed through Physicians of Central Florida. Shannon, a nurse practitioner and hospitalist, which means she provides general medical care to hospitalized patients, has seen a steady stream of COVID-19 patients at the hospital. “I do know that feeling of not knowing what you are walking into,” says Shannon, who has worked in critical care

on what they’ve had to deal with on the frontlines.” Shannon says Leesburg Hospital has benefited from incorporating procedures that have been useful elsewhere, such as prophylactic intubation of patients before they can no longer breathe on their own and use of the medication hydroxychloroquine to relieve acute respiratory symptoms of people who are infected. Another preventive measure for patients arriving with respiratory trauma, Shannon says, has been to

RALLYING THE ‘TROOPS’ Health-care workers represent one of the largest workforces in Lake County. Here is the number of employees at the major hospitals, according to spokespeople:

038 /

1,808

1,754

1,500+

1,227

AdventHealth Waterman

UF Health Leesburg Hospital

Orlando Health South Lake Hospital

UF Health The Villages Hospital

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0


place them on a breathing machine before their condition worsens. This is based on lab findings that the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in their white blood cells was higher, an indicator that the patient may get worse. “What other places have implemented, we are trying to stay ahead of (and do),” Shannon says, adding that COVID-19 is a problem because of the inflammation it causes in the lungs. “It overwhelms the lungs and that is what is ultimately getting the patients who are succumbing to it.” Shannon wears the proper personal protection equipment and, due to the worldwide shortage of PPE supplies, she reuses her N95 medical mask, a face-fitting respiratory protective device. The nurses reuse their N95 masks for a couple of days and then the masks are re-sterilized. One recent change at Leesburg Hospital while caring for COVID-19 patients: Shannon and her colleagues were advised to leave the N95 mask on all day and top it with a surgical mask when going in and out of an infected patient’s room. “That way, the surface of the N95 mask stays clean and you’re not carrying (the contamination),” she says. The fears from the pandemic obviously hit nurses closer to home. “My kids worry about me,” Shannon says of her children, ages 9, 12, 15, 24. “My father is sending me articles all the time, asking me, ‘Why aren’t they giving (health-care workers) hydroxychloroquine preventatively?’” She tells her father: “Well, they need to have it for the people who are actively ill.”

“EVERYBODY IS SUPPORTING EACH OTHER.” —SHANNON WEBER

She also heard from her sister in Germany and they compared the numbers of cases between the two countries. “They are doing a much better job,” Shannon says of Germans following social distancing and other precautions. “They listen and are more disciplined than us Americans, so yeah, my family is worried and saying, ‘Please protect yourself.’ And I am doing everything I can.” Shannon tries to have some normalcy in her life with her family and outdoor activities, while also keeping an eye on coronavirus statistics worldwide to see when the case numbers may start to level off. “I haven’t watched Italy lately because it is devastating,” she says, adding it’s also troubling to watch how the virus has affected New York City. “Number one, it is a terrible disease out there. Number two, it is stupid contagious and ridiculous,” Shannon says. “I don’t think we have any clue what we are in for

yet. I don’t remember when it started hitting Italy and if they were ever as slow as us, but I hope we got ahead of it.” The rising number of cases in Florida also has been on her mind. “I am very concerned about that because we definitely haven’t peaked,” she says, referring to Florida’s predicted peak in early May. Shannon also worries that social distancing was not practiced initially by some Floridians, including groups at church gatherings, boaters and people in The Villages who were photographed partying. “The worst thing that can happen is something happening to you or one of your children, and you can’t take that stupidity back,” she says. The nurse practitioner adds: “Just stay away from people in general right now, and that is what the government is trying to tell us to do. We have to be careful because this is something crazy. In China, they were releasing a lot of patients that had infections and had been over the symptoms for weeks, but they are testing positive again. This could go on for a long time, and I think it is going to go on for a long time.”

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 039


“...I NEED TO TAKE AN EXTRA STEP TO REMAIN HEALTHY FOR MYSELF AND MY FAMILY.” —AMY FORNEY

AMY FORNEY, EMERGENCY ROOM NURSE

Amy Forney deals with critical care situations in the emergency room at AdventHealth Waterman in Tavares, and COVID-19 has taken “critical” to a new level. “I cannot remember the last time I was frightened to go to work and come home to my family,” Amy says. “I have always known that there are scary things out there, that there are bad things happening to people in our

040 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

community. I know this because I see it, hear it and live it with my patients,” she continues. “People are panicking and are very scared of this virus. It is a real pandemic. We are scared with them. Every time I enter a patient’s room, I pray for them and for me.” Her husband, Casey, is a Mount Dora firefighter and paramedic. “We both have a very real potential to being exposed to this. We have always

been cautious, but even more so now,” Amy says. “Is today the day we bring home this virus to our son? Have we done enough and cleaned ourselves thoroughly enough to enter our own homes? The best we can do is the best we know how to do, and we will continue to do that.” To stay healthy, Amy is making more concentrated efforts, including eating nutritiously, taking vitamins and supplements and getting enough sleep. “I cannot take care of others if I do not take care of myself, but I’m more cognizant that I need to take an extra step to remain healthy for myself and my family,” she says. News of short supplies of personal protective equipment does apply to Waterman and other hospitals, Amy says. “What you hear in the media is correct: we do not have enough supplies to protect ourselves with the proper equipment for each patient, every single time,” she says. “We are having to reuse masks, specifically the N95s. That alone incites fear.” (AdventHealth Waterman states on its website: “The safety of our patients, their loved ones and our team members is our top priority. We’ve been working with our vendors and internal teams to ensure we have adequate supplies such as masks, protective equipment for team members, wipes and hand sanitizers.”) Because of COVID-19, Amy says she and her co-workers have pondered future health-care needs. “The hope is for our health-care system to be more prepared with supplies and proactive in initiating disaster relief plans; not necessarily a change to a health-care policy, but to use this current pandemic to determine the appropriate amount of emergency PPE and equipment that may be needed in the future,” she says.


CASEY FORNEY, PARAMEDIC

“It has become a factor of consideration in every aspect of life now,” Casey Forney, a paramedic and firefighter with the Mount Dora Fire Department, says of the coronavirus. “My biggest concern is unknowingly carrying the virus and transmitting it to my wife and/or son,” he says. “My health, so far, has not been affected. However, I feel as though it’s only a matter of time.” At the fire department, Casey says he and his peers take every precaution possible to prevent the spread of COVID-19. “However, we’re in such close quarters for 24 hours or more at a time that all it’d take is one accidental exposure to infect us all,” he says.

He believes the general public’s response is more troubling. “People aren’t staying home after being told repeatedly to stay put. This fuels the virus transmission rate, and there are substantial shortages of essential isolation equipment due to continued panic buying and hoarding,” Casey says. “Couple these issues together, and it’s no surprise that we have a pandemic on our hands,” he says. “I’d urge everyone to follow and stay on top of current CDC and/or WHO (World Health Organization) guidelines, and only trust reputable news sources, not social media.”

COVID-19 TIMELINE DEC. 31, 2019

Chinese authorities alert the World Health Organization of pneumonia cases with an unknown cause in Wuhan City, Hubei province. The mystery illness was determined to be a novel coronavirus causing a new disease that later was named COVID-19. JAN. 20, 2020

U.S. reports its first COVID-19 case in Snohomish County, Washington. MARCH 1

Florida has its first confirmed case of COVID-19. MARCH 28

COVID-19 cases surpass 600,000 worldwide. MARCH 29

Global death toll from COVID-19 surpasses 30,000. MARCH 31

U.S. scientists estimate the virus could kill 100,000 to 240,000 Americans.

APRIL 1

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis announces 30-day stay-at-home order for state’s nearly 21 million residents unless they are pursuing “essential services or activities.” APRIL 2

Lake County and Sumter County each report their first two deaths from coronavirus. APRIL 6

Global cases of COVID-19 top 1.2 million and deaths approach 70,000. APRIL 14

Global cases of COVID-19 approach 2 million, with nearly 125,000 deaths. Sources: WHO, CDC, Florida Department of Health, Johns Hopkins University

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 041


JAMES BELLAN, PRIVATE DUTY NURSE

James Bellan provides home health nursing care for a 27-year-old man with autoimmune deficiencies and the mental capacity of a toddler. “My main concern is somebody is going to get infected and give it to him,” says James, noting his patient lives with several family members. James, of Paisley, is employed in DeLand with Advanced Care Agency, which serves individuals with developmental disabilities. He has been in the nursing field since 1989.

“This virus has made me real cautious, almost to being compulsively cautious,” he says. After seeing how quickly coronavirus infected people worldwide, James adopted the mindset that everyone is infected and encouraged others to think that way, too. He also emphasizes the importance of safe social distancing, the need to wash hands often and thoroughly, and to avoid touching the face, mouth and eyes. “You have to do that,” he says.

ERIKA CRUCIGER, ICU NURSE

Life certainly has changed for Erika Cruciger since the coronavirus outbreak. “It’s a little stressful. You don’t know what you’re exposed to and you don’t know what you are going into,” says Erika, a cardiovascular ICU nurse at UF Health Leesburg Hospital. “I cry going home,” she says of the anxiety and stress. “I know worldwide everyone is feeling that as a nurse.” Erika has been in the nursing field for seven years and cares for openheart surgery patients and those experiencing critical complications with the heart. She worries about these patients during the pandemic. “I don’t know if I am a carrier of it, and then we have these

042 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

open-heart patients that are coming in and who knows what they have been exposed to,” says Erika, adding that the hospital continues to perform emergency surgeries for people experiencing life-threatening conditions. “Heart disease is still the No. 1 killer and we still have people out there having heart attacks, and that is why it is important to social distance, to stay home, because we need to have enough rooms, beds, ventilators, not only for COVID, but for other situations when people come with heart attacks, surgeries and other things that require PPE,” she says. Erika finds it troubling when hospitals worldwide lack personal protective equipment or nurses go without a mask when


caring for patients because there are not enough to meet the demand. “Well, nurses can’t social distance (away from patients), and that is my other issue with the whole lack of masks—there is no 6 feet away for nurses,” Erika says. While COVID-19 is causing hospitals to change policies day to day, Erika is grateful for her colleagues. “Nurses support each other, especially on my unit, we definitely do,” she says. “We are putting our family in harm’s way, essentially bringing it home to our kids, and we don’t know if we are carrying it,” Erika adds. “Pretty much a lot of nurses are self-quarantining themselves even away from their families to protect them.” She says it has been tough not being able to visit her extended family as well. “My mom is a heart patient, so I haven’t seen my mom in a very long time, so thank goodness for FaceTime,” she says of the video telephone product. “I am coming home to my kids right now, but I’m trying to mentally prepare myself for that not to be able to happen. There could be a date and time that they mandate to us that we have to work more.” Erika typically works 12-hour shifts, three days a week. Her husband, Michael, is off work during the days she works. At home, she focuses on being a mom to their 9-year-old son and 9-month-old daughter. “I try to be home with my kids and be present with them,” Erika says. “I also strive to be positive, stay focused on my health.” She makes efforts to stay hydrated, get as much rest as possible and exercise by going outside with her children. “If you mentally prepare yourself with positive thinking and don’t watch all of the TV news and you just live day by day in your moment, I feel like that is a big help,” Erika says. “I have to be strong as much as I want to cry and break down all the time. I have my moments, but you definitely have to take one step at a time and live day by day. But I definitely miss friends and family.”

“I HAVE MY MOMENTS, BUT YOU DEFINITELY HAVE TO TAKE ONE STEP AT A TIME AND LIVE DAY BY DAY.” —ERIKA CRUCIGER

Looking to the future, Erika hopes COVID-19 is a wake-up call nationally and globally about the lack of pandemic preparedness. “I hope that this brings awareness that people don’t think about. The government doesn’t realize how vulnerable we are, the hospitals are, and supplies and ventilators that are always needed. But they have such a tight budget on us, and I just feel we are one crisis away from a health-care shutdown,” Erika says. “I feel like they need to put hospitals and health-care

workers first. Without your health, nothing else matters.” She feels social distancing should be practiced during normal flu season every year. “This is not going to be the first pandemic. There will be others. This is just not going to disappear. Maybe this will be an eye-opener for the way we live now,” says Erika, sharing a paraphrased quote from philosopher George Santayana: “Those who don’t learn history are doomed to repeat it.”

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 043


We’re taking precautions to protect our health, are you doing the same for your financial well-being?

WE ENCOURAGE YOU TO TAKE NECESSARY STEPS

Now

TO PROTECT YOUR LEGACY. Our Financial Services Advisors are here to help. Call today to set up a phone consultation or virtual meeting!

Focus

Strategy

Growth

352-674-3405

Kyler Newcomb | Diana Johnson | Carlos E. Colon

Annuities | Life | Long Term Care | Disability | Preneed | Life Settlements | Asset Protection www.TheVillagesInsurance.com

Bank from Home with USB! You can do a lot from home with USB’s online and mobile banking services: • Check Your Accounts • Transfer Money • Pay Bills • Deposit a Check (mobile only) • Pay a Person (Zelle®)

Learn more and enroll today at UNITEDSOUTHERNBANK.COM 044 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

USB NMLS#419535


We stand in awe of everyone stepping up to do their part. Even if that means not stepping out at all. While most of us have been called upon to do our part by staying home, others are out ensuring essential services are available — including caregivers, first responders, grocers, utility workers and more. Winning the battle against COVID-19 is going to take a team effort, and we’re all in this fight together.

For the most current information on COVID-19, visit coronavirus.UFHealth.org


A WEL INTERV A

man overdosing on oxycodone is rushed into the AdventHealth Waterman emergency room. The ER staff immediately calls the LifeStream Community Substance Abuse Response Team. A crisis hotline counselor briefly gathers information and contacts the on-call peer recovery specialist, who arrives at the ER within the hour.

046 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

This sets in motion an intervention program that is attacking opioid addiction in Lake and Sumter counties. A partnership between LifeStream Behavioral Center, based in Leesburg, and Waterman hospital in Tavares is leading to positive outcomes in the community. They are in the second year of a three-year, $2 million grant for the program. As of March, LifeStream had treated 294 patients, including 97 from the Waterman ER, the home base for referrals. Of that group, there have


COME ENTION Opioid abusers are getting help through a program guided by LifeStream and AdventHealth Waterman. STORY: CHRIS GERBASI

been just two confirmed subsequent overdoses, according to Stephanie Mooneyham, project coordinator with Lutheran Services Florida Health Systems, the managing entity of LifeStream. “The overall goal is to capture people who are high opiate users or at risk of overdose earlier on in their care before they end up in the (emergency departments) and before their overdose could potentially become fatal,” says Samantha Strasser, director of acute care at LifeStream, which provides a continuum of behavioral health services to Lake and Sumter residents. The need for the program is great as opioid abuse is prevalent in Lake and Sumter counties, Samantha says. Opioids include prescription painkillers such as oxycodone (OxyContin),

hydrocodone (Vicodin), morphine, methadone and fentanyl, as well as illegal drugs like heroin, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a 2019 report, the Florida Health Department indicates that the non-fatal opioid overdose rate peaked statewide in 2017 but has decreased only slightly since. In just a three-month period from January-March 2019, Florida tallied 9,272 drug overdoses, including 3,340 non-fatal opioid overdoses. Opioid-involved deaths comprise the majority of fatal drug overdoses. Nationally, drug overdose deaths due to synthetic opioids other than methadone increased from 2017 to 2018, according to a March report from the Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association. In Florida, 2018 marked the fifth year of significant increases in the rate of death due to fentanyl.

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 047


“THEY HAVE A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE THAN A CLINICIAN WOULD WALKING IN THE ROOM. THEY CAN SAY, ‘I’VE BEEN THERE, I’VE OVERCOME IT AND I WANT TO HELP YOU DO THAT, TOO.’” — SAMANTHA STRASSER

AdventHealth Waterman Emergency Room Photo provided by AdventHealth Waterman

048 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0


That’s only a snapshot, but it’s still an ugly picture. “We know that addiction is an epidemic and we know that it knows no social boundaries,” says Susan Chavis, RN and director of inpatient nursing at Waterman. The main goals of the LifeStream program are to reduce the number of opioid and other drug-related deaths; reduce the number of individuals with substance use disorders who require costly interventions such as jail, emergency rooms and hospitals; and end the revolving door in the ER by connecting patients to recovery support services. Earlier intervention leads to better outcomes, says Sherry Olszanski, executive director of LifeStream Foundation. “The sooner you encounter these people at the beginning of the process when they come in, the quicker we can get them into treatment, if that’s what they’re wanting,” Sherry says. “A lot of times in the past, there hasn’t been that connection to provide the next link of service.” LifeStream created that link with the Community Substance Abuse Response Team (CSART), which includes four peer recovery specialists (PRS) and two master clinicians. Team members provide counseling, resource navigation and peer support. They can intervene at the hospital or in the patient’s community. They identify immediate and long-term resources and motivate patients to seek treatment and follow through on recovery. The peer recovery specialists have 40 hours of training and personal experience with substance abuse that ideally helps them establish a rapport with patients. “They have a different perspective than a clinician would walking in the room,” Samantha says. “They can say, ‘I’ve been there, I’ve overcome it and I want to help you do that, too.’” The peers are stationed in the Waterman ER from 1-4pm each day, a peak time for this type of patient, Susan says. They are otherwise on call 24/7. The program also is available once a week at the Umatilla Health Center, part of the state Health Department.


“These are patients that are repeatedly in our ER, they clearly have an issue with addiction, they need help,” Susan says. “Some of them realize it and do ask for help, and that’s where we’re successful, when the peer recovery specialist can hook up the resource. We’ve actually had patients leave our ER and go straight to LifeStream and get into recovery, which we really love when that happens. We’re looking to be more successful with that.” The ER staff acts as a catalyst by calling in LifeStream specialists. Lake EMS also contacts LifeStream when it receives an overdose call, saving time so a specialist can get to the hospital before a patient has been treated and released, Susan says. “One of the key pieces for success in this is that our emergency room team is on board, because they’re actually the ones that say, ‘Hey, we need a peer recovery specialist in Room 1,’” Susan says. “Then (the specialist) will go right in and talk to the patient on a level that these patients need to have in order for communication to be effective.” The PRS will talk with the patient about the circumstances that brought them to the ER and whether there is motivation to change. “This is why it’s really beneficial that these peer recovery specialists are recovered addicts themselves because they’re able to relate,” Susan says.

The peers use an approach called SBIRT—screening, brief intervention and referral for treatment—to determine the likelihood of substance use disorder. The assessment determines guidance on inpatient or outpatient services. Waterman staff does not need permission from the patient to bring in a PRS, but the patient does need to voluntarily agree to treatment. If the patient does not agree, the PRS leaves contact information and, with consent, will provide phone or in-person support for a minimum of 30 days. The majority of the contacted people enroll in the program, Samantha says. Once a patient is medically stable and released from Waterman, they would go to LifeStream’s inpatient detox facility. If they are at moderate risk, they may be referred into medication-assisted treatment (MAT) and prescribed Vivitrol or Suboxone. A majority of patients enter this treatment to continue to be opioid-free, Sherry says. Patients also may receive follow-up care from a peer if they feel like they’re going to use drugs again. LifeStream wants to ensure they reach the full level of recovery from opioid use. “That’s not to say that some people won’t relapse, because that happens a lot to addicts,” Sherry says. “But, again, that’s why the peer recovery specialists are there for the follow-up support, to try to help these people make it through those phases.”

PEER TO PEER: A RECOVERY STORY This story was written by a LifeStream peer counselor about two patients treated by the Community Substance Abuse Response Team (CSART). The counselor and patients are not identified for confidentiality reasons. When I first met “D,” he was curled up in a fetal position, he was shaking and he was covered in a sheet with only his face visible. The location was AdventHealth Waterman’s emergency room. D had just overdosed. D explained that just two days prior, his fiancée, “Y,” had stopped breathing from a drug overdose. Afraid beyond measure, D used CPR and brought her back to life. She was rushed to the hospital and, after discharge, was sent to the LifeStream Behavioral Center detox facility for treatment. The anguish of it all, D said, led to his own overdose, disappointment in himself and the emotional conversation we were having in the ER.

050 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0


LifeStream expects to expand its efforts in Sumter County, where the program primarily serves residents through referrals. The Sumter County Sheriff ’s Office also may bring patients to the LifeStream detox facility, and Lake EMS contacts LifeStream peers for cases located up to the Sumter County line. LifeStream also plans to conduct training with the SCSO on how to utilize the 24/7 call line to get a peer specialist on the scene, Samantha says. Sherry and Samantha hope for an extension of the grant, which was awarded by the Florida Blue Foundation to LSF Health Systems. Under the terms of the grant, LifeStream plans to move the program into other facilities, such as UF Health The Villages Hospital, UF Health Leesburg Hospital and South Lake Hospital. “We started one phase and we’ve seen how successful it’s been with Waterman, but now the goal in the grant was to cover all the areas,” Sherry says. “We have a ways to go,” Susan acknowledges. “We’ve started, and it’s getting all of the system hardwired and getting all of the emergency room people on board, getting people used to it. But we’ve got a great start.” Samantha adds: “I’m excited for the growth that is to come.”

D wept and shivered as he spoke, saying he would not be able to live with himself if his fiancée left LSBC substance-free while he was still a junkie. That, he asserted, would be tragic because Y would only return to the substance-abuse habit that had killed her once already. After I explained to D the details of the Florida Blue intervention program, and how I would work to help, he signed up immediately. After his discharge, I kept in constant contact with D, his family, his fiancée and her mother, all of whom are authorized participants in their treatment. I also communicated with the powers-that-be

at LifeStream, which informed me that not only would it allow the couple to detox in the same LSBC hospital, but also in the same unit. Together, D and Y often sat side by side, supporting each other as they made it through the program and withdrawal symptoms. Each was the rock the other needed, and each was guided by the efforts of myself, their peer counselor. Upon discharge, they reported being happier than ever. Substance abuse had torn their lives apart. But, thanks to the combined efforts of AdventHealth Waterman, LifeStream and the Florida Blue

HELP IS AVAILABLE DURING THE CRISIS Sherry Olszanski, executive director of the LifeStream Foundation, says the organization can’t predict whether opioid use will increase during the coronavirus pandemic. However, LifeStream has established a special 24-hour Helpline to assist people who may feel anxiety, stress, sadness or depression because of isolation and uncertainty. They can speak with a mental-health professional by calling 352.408.6625. Like all health-care facilities, LifeStream has limited supplies and is looking at many options to try to get more personal protective equipment, especially for its psychiatric hospital and residential programs, Sherry says.

program, the lovebirds are enjoying newfound health and newfound hope. “If it wasn’t for you and Florida Blue, today we might be dead,” D said during one of my visits to his home. D and Y are clean, learning to explore their new lives, working as each other’s rocks and planning a future they thought would never come. While every road to recovery has its bumps, their recovery is more than just physiological and psychological—it also is systemic. And that is because of Florida Blue’s CSART program.

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 051


24-Hour Helpline for COVID-19 Pandemic Many people may be feeling an increase in anxiety and stress because of social distancing and uncertainty. Mental healthcare professionals will be available 24-hours a day in order to provide coping skills to those feeling or experiencing symptoms of stress, anxiety, sadness and depression.

24-HOUR HELPLINE 352.408.6625 ADDITIONAL COMMUNITY RESOURCES AVAILABLE

This Helpline is a way for individuals experiencing symptoms caused by stress, anxiety or depression due to COVID-19 to speak with a professional without committing to long term therapeutic support.

24-Hour Helpline: 352.408.6625


B EF O R E

GALDER M A

2018

PR EFER R ED EXECUTIVE

MER Z

2018

TOP INJECTOR S

A F T ER

MER Z TR AINER:

EXPERT CENTER

FOR ADVANCED TECHNIQUES

B EF O R E

A F T ER

BEST OF THE

HOT

LIST

SPRING IS IN THE AIR

S ERV I N G T H E V I L L AG E S CO M M U N I T Y F O R OV ER A D EC A D E . S C H ED U L E YO U R FR E E CO N SU LTAT I O N TO DAY !

3 52 . 2 59. 8 59 9 | W W W. P L A S T I C S U R G E RY V I P.CO M 6 07 C R 4 6 6 A , FRU I T L A N D PA R K

WINNER


Do you desire an alternative to pain medications such as Opiods and prescriptions?

10 70 0

US HW Y 44 1, LEESB

352.25

URG | O PEN DA I L Y 11 A M -9

3.2442

|

CVINN

PM

IES.CO

M

We provide medical evaluation to determine qualifications in obtaining a medical marijuana card.

BEST OF THE

HOTLIST 2019

Offered at Advanced Wellness & Orthopedics 616 North Palmetto Street, Suite B, Leesburg, FL 34748 advancedwellnessorthopedics.com 352-702-0850

Can’t leave home, traveling, or too busy at work?

Telemedicine I N T R O D U C I N G

Virtually connect with our provider without leaving home or while on the go through your mobile device or computer.

John Im, D.O.

Graduate of Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine

352.391.5200 ExceptionalUrgentCare.com Mon-Fri 9am- 5pm | Sat 9am-3pm

New Location!

13767 US HWY 441, Lady Lake Next to Takis in front of Bealls. Scan this code with your smartphone to get started!

054 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

Golf cart accessible! HIPAA Compliant | Not for use with emergencies - Call 911 | Internet access required


YOUR SIGHT, OUR VISION.

Dr. Maizel

Dr. Wilker

Dr. Panzo

Dr. Baumann

Dr. Charles

Dr. Bovee

The doctors were so amazing, kind and knowledgeable. They saved my sight and really helped me see clearly. – Barbara Sue Jansen

SPECIALISTS WITH EYE-OPENING EXPERIENCE. As the premier practice in the area offering comprehensive eye care, Mid Florida Eye Center is renowned for participating in nationwide research studies and pioneering advances in vision-saving technologies. All of our ophthalmologists are board certified and fellowship trained. Most importantly, we are committed to providing the dedicated care to help change the way you see your future.

352.735.2020 MIDFLORIDAEYE.COM C ATA R AC T

ADJACENT TO THE VILLAGES ® COMMUNITY:

MOUNT DORA | LEESBURG |

RETINA

|

CO S M E T I C

STONECREST & WILDWOOD ® |

G L AU CO M A

|

L A SE R S


Education Foundation Progress Update “Our school district needs have changed from last week, to yesterday, today and will change tomorrow. Still, our most pressing need is transitioning students for academic success. I called on the community to assist our Education Foundation in leveraging business relationships and stretching contributions to tackle the oncoming challenges.” – Superintendent Diane Kornegay April 3, 2020

With the community’s help, in the first 2 weeks of April the Foundation has: • Awarded 81 scholarships in the amount of $385,000 to the senior class of 2020. • Formed a task force to identify and address student and parent needs. • Began bridging the equity gap for our low income students by purchasing 199 hot spots. • Established virtual forums to recognize our School Employee of the Year, Volunteer of the Year, Hall of Fame inductees and Top Scholars of the Class of 2020.

Diane Kornegay

Carman Cullen-Batt

Superintendent of Lake County Schools

Education Foundation Executive Director

• Welcomed 37 new Take Stock in Children (TSIC) scholars. • Facilitated 140 virtual mentor sessions with our Take Stock in Children scholars. • Prepared 40 graduating TSIC students by providing College Readiness sessions. • Provided $25,000 to sustain arts programs. • Streamlined operations to ensure programmatic sustainability in these uncertain times.

We still need your help. Please consider making a gift by visiting edfoundationlake.com

2045 Pruitt Street, Leesburg, FL 34748 352-326-1265 or 352-504-5327 Cullen-battc@lake.k12.fl.us


Central Florida Plastic Surgery A Plastic Surgery Specialty Boutique

drserra.com

HONESTY INTEGRITY LONGEVITY

All appointments and procedures are one-on-one with Dr. Serra, one patient at a time.

CENT RA L FL ORIDA PL A ST IC SURG E R Y

910 OLD CAMP ROAD, SUITE 142, THE VILLAGES 352-259-0722

DRSERRA.COM


Meet some of our team. We have highly skilled clinicians dedicated to all aspects of managing your home care safely and effectively.

Skilled Nursing (RN, LPN) Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy Certified Nursing Assistants Medical Social Services Medicare Assignment Accepted Private insurance Accepted with Pre-Authorization

L-R: Ashley Bailey, RN, ADON - Jackie Stanfield, RN, DON - Haley Smith, RN - Chrissy Nichols, COTA - Steve Van Dyke, DPT Shanitia Brown, LPN - Shayna Grunewald, CEO - Lory Baxley, Business Development - Jenny Stinson, PT - Renee Piryk, PTA - Kristin Coons, RN, Clinical Manager - Baylie Treves - Pam Balthaser, CNA - Ashley Tatum, LPTA - Cindy Bahoot, PTA

For more information about our services, staff and quality of care, contact us: 310 Market St., Leesburg, FL 34748 Phone: 352.315.0050 | Fax: 352.315.0059 HHA299992424

LAKE CENTRE HOME CARE


059

p.

agenda

MARK YOUR CALENDAR! PLAN YOUR TRIP! BE SEEN IN LAKE AND SUMTER! | EVENTS. TRAVEL. PEOPLE.

Diane and John Treadway at the Leesburg Mardi Gras Crowning Ball.

060

061

062

064

THE TO-DO LIST What’s happening — or not — this month.

BOOK CLUB Villager is “voice” of Luna the dog.

LOCAL TALENT Eustis artist makes one-of-a-kind prints.

HI, SOCIETY! See who is stepping out around town.


may THE TO-DO LIST

2020

may ON STAGE Enjoy quality entertainment on the many stages of Lake and Sumter counties.

5/1-3 @ various times CANCELED – “MOONLIGHT AND MAGNOLIAS” Bay Street Players, State Theatre, 109 N. Bay. St., Eustis. 352.357.7777.

5/6 @ 7pm OPERA GALA CONCERT BY THE VILLAGES PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA The Sharon, 1051 Main St. The Villages. 352.753.3229.

5/8-31 @ various times

This list of upcoming events is subject to change. Stay-at-home orders and bar closures were in place at press time. Contact the venues for updates:

“TUCK EVERLASTING” Moonlight Players Theatre, 735 W. Minneola Ave., Clermont. 352.319.1116.

5/15-6/7 @ various times CANCELED – “ONE SLIGHT HITCH” Sonnentag Theatre at the IceHouse, 1100 N. Unser St., Mount Dora. 352.383.4616.

5/15-17, 22-24 and 29-31 @ various times “CABARET” Melon Patch Theatre, 311 N. 13th St., Leesburg. 352.787.3013.

5/16 @ 7:30pm “LET FREEDOM RING” BY LAKE CONCERT BAND Clermont Performing Arts Center, 3700 S. U.S. Highway 27. 352.394.4800.

MOUNT DORA VIRTUAL 5K

JAZZ ON THE VINEYARD GREEN

Participants choose their own starting line—in the neighborhood, down a trail or on their treadmill—then run, walk or jog the distance and upload the time to social media with the hashtags #WeRunThisCity and #MountDoraVirtual5K. All participants receive a medal. Cost: $22.

Enjoy live jazz, wine and cheese and complementary tours and tastings at Lakeridge Winery. Bring your own lawn chairs and blankets. Admission: $10; children 12 and under admitted free.

May 1-3 @ any time / cityofmountdorarecreation.com ‘DON’T TELL NONNIE’

Someone told Nonnie there’s a virus going around, so the popular musical event usually staged at the Sharon in The Villages will go online at Facebook Live for a performance by Whitney Morse, Gary Powell on piano and special guests. May 4 @ 7:30pm / facebook.com/thesharonl.morseperformingartscenter/ ‘SPACE ODDITIES’

The Modernism Musuem in Mount Dora has a virtual tour of “Space Oddities: The Sequel—More Bowie, More Sottsass, More Memphis.” Memphis, founded under Ettore Sottsass in Milan in 1981, was a radical design movement. This exhibition includes more than 75 examples, many from the private collection of late musician David Bowie. modernismmuseum.org

060 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

May 9 @ 10am-5pm; May 10 @ 11am-5pm / Lakeridge Winery, 19239 U.S. Highway 27 N., Clermont / lakeridgewinery.com/events/jazz-on-the-vineyard-green/ ROLLING THUNDER XXXIII

The nationwide ride for freedom makes its inaugural ride in Florida with a three-day stop in Leesburg. Attractions include the Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall, music and vendors. May 22-24 @ various times / Veterans Memorial Park, 411 Meadow St., Leesburg / facebook.com VIRTUAL ACTIVITIES

The Leesburg Recreation Department webpage has added an Online Recreation Resource Center that includes links to health tips, athletic drills, exercises and virtual field trips to museums, parks and elsewhere. leesburgflorida.gov/recreation.

Art lovers also can stay active at home through the Leesburg Center for the Arts’ Virtual Art Center. Visit the center’s Facebook page or leesburgcenterforthearts.com.


BOOK CLUB

REVIEW

‘LUNA, A DOG NAMED AFTER THE MOON’ Villager Diane Dean helps a puppy ‘tell’ her story about living in Hollywood. STORY: VICTORIA SCHLABIG

iane Dean has written short stories about animals like horses, cats and goldfish. But she was uniquely inspired by her son’s family dog, Luna, and their life in Hollywood, California. “I happened to be there the day they adopted Luna, and she just started talking to me about what life was like there,” says Diane, who has lived for 16 years in Buttonwood Heights in The Villages and is a member of the Bookworm Book Club. “I just somehow put myself in the spirit of the animal and it feels to me like they’re telling me their story and talking to me, so that seemed the way to go,” she adds. The result was “Luna, a Dog Named After the Moon,” published in January. Diane, who moved to Florida from Michigan, also has written a “family and friends” cookbook titled, “Our Michigan Roots.” But “Luna” is her first novel. Though labeled fiction, the ONGOI NG book includes a lot of true situations based on the dog’s life.

She wrote the first chapter fairly quickly. But after showing it to her writing critique group in The Villages, Diane rewrote the chapter about a thousand times. “Luna” took about three years to complete. With the help of illustrator and cover designer Samantha Banuelos, Diane also was able to convert real photos of Luna and her family into sketches that readers will see in the book. Diane’s own dog is an 11-month-old Australian labradoodle named Stewart. “I’ve always had dogs since I was a little kid, so it dawned on me: everybody who’s a dog lover has got a story,” she says. So, for her next book, she wants to use stories of other people and their dogs. “Just a few chapters on the good, the bad and the ugly of everybody’s dogs,” Diane says. “Some of them are here, some of them have gone on ahead, but they still live in their memories.”

EV ENTS

Events are subject to change and cancellation.

Ready to delve into this book?

This book can be found at amazon.com and Kindle.

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 061


LOCAL TALENT

PEO PLE

Making an impression Eustis artist Jennifer Harper finds relief in printmaking. STORY: VICTORIA SCHLABIG

hile the national economy is taking a hit from COVID-19, artists also are being affected greatly. “This could really redefine people because as an artist, you’re very much, just like everybody else, dependent on an audience,” says Jennifer Harper, who operates Harper Printmaking Studio, 999 Lake Nettie Drive, Eustis. “I’ll be the first to admit that art is a wonderful thing, but is it a necessary thing in a time like this? No. It can certainly help and is very therapeutic,” she adds. Jennifer does printmaking, though it also can be called blot printing or relief printing. She uses the technique of either woodcut or linocut, which uses a linoleum plate. “It’s called relief printing because you’re carving on a plate and when you print it, you’re printing the ink going over the top of the plate and what you carved is hollowing out, is taken away, so that those areas that you carved stay white,” she says. Jennifer started taking drawing classes in high school and later attended Lake-Sumter State College and Atlanta College of Art. Though she took only one term of printmaking, she eventually got into that medium after teaching in an international school in China.

In her last year there, she was scrambling to find art supplies and ended up buying a linocut set. Her students loved it. When she came back to the United States in 2008, she bought the basic necessities for printmaking. “I just kind of really got the bug and I just kept teaching myself stuff,” Jennifer says. Nature is one of her biggest resources for ideas, leading to prints such as “The Mountaineers,” of two llamas, and “Tomoka River Tree.” She also focuses on family. But she often changes her style so she doesn’t get bored. “I don’t want to be pigeonholed with one (subject), and I go back and forth between sort of realistic and abstract,” Jennifer says. Jennifer also created the poster art for this year’s Leesburg Art Fest, scheduled for Oct. 24-25. She runs her own event called Little Big Print and teaches workshops and one-on-one classes at her studio. “I love seeing somebody print their first piece,” she says. “It’s very much a thriving little community when everybody can get here.” To make an appointment, contact her at harperprintmakingstudio.com or jenhrp@gmail.com.

Do you know talented people in the community?

062 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

Send recommendations to victoria@akersmediagroup.com.


COMMUNITY BANK SOAPY’S

OFMC PODIATRY CENTER 2131 SW 20TH PLACE OCALA, FL 34471

Podiatry Center

MRMC Wound Center

352-237-4133

Plaza

COLLEGE OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

Dermatology & Aesthetic Center

Family Practice & Diagnostic Center CENTENNIAL PARK

www.ocalafmc.com

*Ocala Family Medical Center, Inc. complies with applicable Federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.*


HI, SOCIETY!

Susie Van Landingham, Glenda Cox, and Pat Schaefer

Jean Paul Galbreath and Dr. Natalia Alejandro Joyce Huey

Michelle Frazer, Cat Reel, Cheri English, and Matt Tutton King Candidates Lance Oulman and Jeff Moore with Queen Candidates Ashton Kreidel and Janet Galbreath

Diane and John Treadway Elizabeth Knowles and Karen Stokes

C R OW N I N G M A R D I G R A S R OYA LT Y @ VENETIAN CENTER ≈ PHOTOS: NICOLE HAMEL. The Crowning Ball for the 2020 Leesburg Mardi Gras was hosted Feb. 14 at Venetian Center in Leesburg with Jeff Moore crowned as King Rex and Ashton Kreidel as Queen Divine. Local king and queen candidates raised money for the Leesburg Partnership by hosting mixers and events and selling reverse-draw tickets for a $10,000 prize. The top fundraisers are crowned Mardi Gras royalty. Ashton brought in $33,628, and Jeff collected $22,441. The funds help the Leesburg Partnership, a nonprofit, host Mardi Gras and other communitywide events.

064 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

See all the photos for this event at lakeandsumterstyle.com/hisociety

Blandine Galbreath

E 'S WHER ?! M Y P IC


“The quality of work was exceptional creating our pool paradise. The entire process was a total team effort from sales, design and the construction which made our experience hassle free. They met their time line schedule, were very responsive and approachable to any questions we had. Overall, Wiseman Pools did a very nice job, were efficient and true passionate professionals that exceeded our expectations.” — RYAN & TIFFANY LANGSTON, LEESBURG, FLORIDA

We know that every single customer is unique—Building Unique Pools is our company motto—and so every project we undertake is delivered to a client’s signature set of personal tastes and, where necessary, solves any challenges their property may present. 352-431-3766 | www.WisemanPools.com | 1517 W Main St., Leesburg Wiseman Pools is a family-owned-and-operated, licensed residential and commercial swimming pool builder with an extensive portfolio of projects. From the small—fountains and in-ground spas. To the large—million dollar installations with multiple pools and spas. Our customers, large and small, demand a quality swimming pool for a fair price. And we deliver.


See all the photos for this event at lakeandsumterstyle.com/hisociety

HI, SOCIETY!

Jenny Hanegan, Shelby Anderson, Cherie Szoradi, and Alberto Cisneros Nan Edwards, Tiffany Edwards, Liz Blackmore, Bill Mathias, Jessy Flinn, and Denise Kubon

Brianna Lemerise and Carla Swapp

Juli, Lloyd, and Sydney Pennington

E 'S WHER ?! M Y P IC

Breanna Shaw

Aisha Bowen-John, Debbie Case, Kristen Wotton, and Carley Foronjy

Jeanie Rutledge, Kevin Sullivan, Debbie Potter, and Rosanne Brandenburg

Chad Long and Amy Painter

C U L I NA RY T R E AT S @ VENETIAN CENTER ≈ PHOTOS: GARRISON HAMILTON. Gourmet Today, the Kitchen Cooking School and Mammoth Oak Brewing Co. were among several restaurants and breweries showcasing their signature foods and drinks at the annual “Taste of Lake” hosted in March at Venetian Center in Leesburg. “Taste of Lake was a blast, and we can’t wait to do it again next year,” says Sandi Moore, executive director of the Leesburg Area Chamber of Commerce.

066 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

James Floyd


your dollars WITH UP TO

1

when you open a FREE checking account3 and bring a loan4 from another lender to CAMPUS!

GET

2

when you open a FREE CHECKING ACCOUNT3.

Open an account at campuscu.com/600

GET UP TO

Call 237-9060 and press 5

when you bring a loan from another lender4.

Visit any CAMPUS Service Center

Summerfield 17950 S. US Hwy. 441 | Grand Traverse 2945 Traverse Trail

Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Marion, Lake and Sumter counties.5 May not be combined with any other offer. Offer subject to change without notice. 1. OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS CHECKING ACCOUNT OR LOANS. 2. Within the first 90 days member must elect to receive eDocuments and establish Direct Deposit of at least $200 per month. If the requirements are met and the account remains open after 90 days, the $300 reward will be made available to the member. $300 is considered interest and will be reported on IRS Form 1099-INT. 3. Credit approval and initial $50 opening deposit required. Member must elect to receive eDocuments. 4. Lines of Credit, Commercial Loans, CD/Shared Secured Loans, Signature Loans and Real Estate Loans are not eligible. Cash bonus is 1.25% of amount financed up to a maximum of $300. Limit one per household. Must present offer at time of loan closing. 5. Credit approval and initial $5 deposit required. Federally insured by the NCUA.


HI, SOCIETY!

Paula Shackley, Sarah Hagan, and Teresa Murphy

Chad Christiansen Jan Buckingham and Patti Dale

Karen Young and Michele Milam

Cheryl Rumbley and Cindy Brown

Kelly Julio, Leandra Hughes, and Valerie Timmons Sue Schwambach and Michelle Burke Beth Griffin and Michelle Hamilton

I N CA S E O F E M E R G E N C Y ≈ PHOTOS: DOUGLAS TYLER. The new Trailwinds Village ER celebrated a ribbon-cutting ceremony Feb. 13 hosted by Ocala Health. The 24/7 full-service freestanding emergency department is at 6131 Seven Mile Drive, Wildwood. The ER covers 11,630 square feet, includes 11 emergency-room beds and will care for all ages, including pediatrics. Ocala Health officials noted in a press release that the ER was built for $13 million and they expect to serve more than 11,500 patients a year.

@ TRAILWINDS VILLAGE ER

068 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

See all the photos for this event at lakeandsumterstyle.com/hisociety

Denise Meeks, Sarah Carter, and Molly O’Hara

E 'S WHER ?! M Y P IC


STARTING AT

$29* INSTALLED *per/sq.ft.

Over 300 colors in stock!

BUILDING STONE :: COUNTERTOPS :: FURNITURE :: LANDSCAPING STONE :: MISCELLANEOUS www.southeasternstoneandtile.com :: 352.629.7518 :: 1208 S.E. 3RD AVE, OCALA, FL 34478

070 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0


Fresh Seafood IS JUST A SHORT

R I D E A W AY !

FRESH SEAFOOD • STEAKS • SALADS & MORE!

DELIVER & takeo Y availab ut le LO C AT E D AT B R O W N W O O D ® S Q UA R E 2738 B ROWNWOO D BLVD. T HE VI LLAG ES , FL 3 2163

l (3 52 ) 5 71-5 3 4 4

WW W. FM K D ELI VERY. C O M


WHEN CLEAN JUST ISN’T CLEAN ENOUGH.

COMMERCIAL CLEANING SERVICES FOR: BANKS DOCTOR’S OFFICES PROFESSIONAL BUSINESSES PROPERTY MANAGEMENT CLEANING

SERVICES ALSO INCLUDE: FLOOR MAINTENANCE CARPET CLEANING WINDOW CLEANING

CALL TODAY 352.753.8653 Free Estimates // Licensed & Insured UltimateContractCleaning.com danucc@aol.com PROUD MEMBER OF:

CLEANING SUPPLIES:

PAPER // CHEMICALS // EQUIPMENT

CREATE A HAPPY

NEW YOU IN

2020! BAY STREET WELLNESS

BAYSTREETWELLNESS.COM

2020 PURIFICATION AND 10 DAY CLASS SCHEDULE January 2020 Purification Program Congratulations to our 54 participants in our Purification Program with a total weight loss of 471.5 lbs!

JULY

OCT.

6th 15th

5th 14th

10 Day Programs

10 Day Programs

Blood Sugar, Inflammation or Detox Balance

Blood Sugar, Inflammation or Detox Balance

Interested? Scan here for class details and more.

352.357.7244

2430 SOUTH BAY ST., EUSTIS

CHIROPRACTIC • FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE • ACUPUNCTURE • MASSAGE • SKINCARE

072 /

, Class Nextll And Ca rve e s Re Seat Yourday! To

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

Dr. Kimberly Besuden

Dr. Lauren Cooper


Y B A B R U O Y SEE E V I S I TS N I T U O R L L A UND AT IATES ON ULTRASO C O S S A N Y G BWITH LAKE O

Bring your pregnancy to OB/GYN Associates and see your baby throughout the pregnancy on one of our many ultrasounds during routine visits - at no extra cost!!!

Lake OB-GYN Associates of Mid-Florida, LLC

352-787-1535

leesburgobgyn.com Offices in Leesburg & The Villages


THE DISCOUNT

I M AG I N E A L I F E S T Y L E W H E R E YO U R LOV E D O N E W I L L B E

HOME IMPROVEMENT

SUPER STORE

Inspired • Engaged • Fulfilled BUILDING MATERIALS | CABINETS SHOWERS & TUBS | FLOORING DOORS & WINDOWS | PLUMBING GENERAL HARDWARE

Each day, those with memory loss are inspired by YOURLife TM of Wildwood’s exceptional lifestyle,

care and services. Because our sole focus is Memory Care, our team gets to know your loved one personally to create the lifestyle that suits their desires with care that meets their needs, complete with: – Carefully tailored plans of care based on their needs and abilities

bloom

– YOURStory TM programming personalized to preferences, interests and passions – 24-hour support for total peace of mind – The convenience of respite care, should you just need a break from caregiving

Discover the lifestyle your loved one deserves – and the support you need – call today!

352-432-1282 | YourLifeWildwood.com

frames

NOW – JUNE 30TH

20% OFF

*

&

lenses

20 OFF

$

112 E. Dixie Avenue, Leesburg, FL 34748 www.eyecarecenterofleesburg.com | 352-787-1956 *Cannot be combined with insurance or other offers. Other exclusions may apply. See optician for details. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination, or treatment.

074 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

Life

Your *

Now Open

Memory care Inspired • Engaged • Fulfilled

7330 Powell Road | Wildwood, FL 34785

Assisted Living Facility License Number Pending

TM


p.

075

menu

DISCOVER SOMETHING NEW FOR YOUR KITCHEN, GET THE SCOOP ON EATING OUT, AND TOAST THE WINE! | FOOD. DRINKS. REVIEWS.

076

080

082

IN THE KITCHEN Local farms offer fresh recipes.

SPIRITS The Sunny Pint is a craft beer oasis.

DINING GUIDE We have restaurants for all tastes.


IN THE KITCHEN

Bountiful Farms and Bistro


RECIPE

Farm-fresh goodness Local farms offer wholesome, flavorful produce picked at peak times. STORY: THERESA CAMPBELL

ursting with the freshest flavor and wholesome vitamins, produce grown and picked from local community farms is a healthy treat and provides sustainable agriculture for farmers. “Good ingredients speak for themselves,” says chef Jack Braton, of Turners Kitchen + Bar in downtown Leesburg. He proudly notes that a majority of Turners’ fresh, organic produce comes from Gareth and Jessica Gentry at Bountiful Farms in Okahumpka; Chet Blackmon at Yalaha Farms; and Aquaponic Lynx, also in Yalaha. “I love being able to support the community, and people want to know that their dollars make a difference,” adds chef Ze’ Carter, who runs the Kitchen Café and Cooking School in Leesburg with her daughter, Joy Williams.

The mother-and-daughter duo whips up soups, salads, sandwiches and rice bowls using farm-fresh ingredients in season from Dirty Dog Organics, a farm at 2026 Lewis Road in Leesburg. There’s a difference in the quality of produce picked at peak freshness compared to vegetables and fruits shipped from other parts of the country or around the world. Produce traveling from long distances often is picked before it’s ripe, and the end result is a bland taste. Dirty Dog Organics is on the farmland that has been in owner Aubrey Cash’s family since the 1940s. Through May, Dirty Dog Organics expects to grow and harvest up to 70 crops, including melons, summer squash, tomatoes, cucumber, peppers, scallions, kale, collard greens, arugula, beans and field peas. The farm’s cooperative-based store is fully stocked with local, pasture-raised meats, dairy, breads, coffee, pasta, sauces, dressings, dried spice blends, pantry items, teas, home and body care items, and art from local artisans and growers in the community—“so it’s a one-stop shop,” Aubrey says.

A tour at Bountiful Farms.

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 077


“I LOVE BEING ABLE TO SUPPORT THE COMMUNITY, AND PEOPLE WANT TO KNOW THAT THEIR DOLLARS MAKE A DIFFERENCE.” —ZE’ CARTER

The farm grows vegetables not often found in grocery stores. “Instead of red watermelons, we typically have orange watermelons or sorbet-colored watermelons,” Aubrey says. “We also have black radishes over your traditional red, and we do that to expose people to all the colors of the rainbow that are essential to health.” The farm’s goal is to help people eat better while strengthening the local food economy. Dirty Dog Organics participates in Community Support Agriculture (CSA), which allows people to buy a farm share, select items from the farm’s store at wholesale

prices and eat fresh, organic produce from a community-based, family farm. CSA support is crucial to small farms’ success. The Gentrys’ Bountiful Farms and Bistro, at 27314 County Road 33 in Okahumpka, also keeps busy to provide a fresh weekly bounty of vegetables, fruits and herbs to CSA members, residents and restaurants. Among the different staples available from November to May at the farm are Cherokee purple and Brandywine heirloom tomatoes, cabbage, kale, several varieties of lettuce, broccoli, carrots, bok choy, sprouts, onions and peppers.

The Gentrys grow blueberries, blackberries and strawberries, too, depending on the season, and they have fresh eggs, honey on tap, and tinctures made with pure, organic items—all at the store on their property. Long & Scott Farms, 26216 County Road 448A in Mount Dora, also offers fresh produce from the field right to its country store and the adjoining Scott’s Country Cafe. “Once people taste for themselves, they realize fresh tastes a whole lot better,” says Rebecca Tyndall, whose late father, Hank Scott, started the farm in 1963 with his childhood friend Billy Long. “People just love the food because it’s fresh and they love how it’s fixed,” Rebecca says. “They probably haven’t had it like that before or haven’t realized how much better it tastes when food is fresh off the farm.” The store’s most popular produce is its trademarked Scott’s Zellwood Triple-Sweet Gourmet Corn. The cafe also has drawn raves for its most popular signature dish, Scott’s Zellwood sweet corn chowder, made from the farm’s sweet corn, potatoes, onions, red pepper and bacon.

A RUGU LA SA LA D W ITH BEETS A N D G O AT C H E E S E SALAD INGREDIENTS

2

medium beets, cooked or raw-peeled, diced into bite-size pieces

2

handfuls of fresh arugula

4

tablespoons goat cheese

/

cup roughly chopped toasted walnuts

14

DRESSING INGREDIENTS

3

tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice 14

/

teaspoon dry powdered mustard

12

/

teaspoon raw sugar or honey

12

/

teaspoon salt

/

teaspoon pepper

14

DIRECTIONS

Prep time: 10 minutes. Cooking the beets time: 1 hour. To make the vinaigrette: Place dressing ingredients in a jar and shake to emulsify. Adjust ingredients to taste. Assemble the salad according to how much you want. Compose each dish with a handful of arugula leaves, a few cooked chopped beets, crumbled goat cheese and chopped toasted walnuts. Drizzle the salad with vinaigrette. Recipe courtesy of Dirty Dog Organics


S C O T T ’ S Z E L LWO O D S W E E T C O R N C H OW D E R INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

4

slices bacon, diced small

12

/

cup diced onion

12

/

cup diced red pepper

2

cups Scott’s sweet corn, cut from the cob (reserve cobs for additional flavor when soup cooks)

3

tablespoons flour

3

cups chicken or vegetable stock

1

cup medium diced russet potatoes

1

cup heavy cream

Cook bacon until crisp, add onion, peppers and corn, stirring for 2 minutes. Add flour, stirring 1 minute. Add stock and stir until smooth. Bring to boil and add potatoes and the corn cobs. Simmer 25-30 minutes or until chowder reaches desired consistency. Remove corn cobs, add cream and simmer 2 minutes. Season to taste with parsley, salt and pepper. Serves 6. Recipe courtesy of Long & Scott Farms

Coarse ground salt and pepper 1

tablespoon chopped fresh parsley

SWISS CHARD WITH ONION A ND GARLIC INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

2

tablespoons olive oil

2

medium onions, chopped

6

garlic cloves, sliced

12

/

cup white balsamic vinegar

2

bunches Swiss chard, coarsely chopped (about 16 cups)

In a 6-quart stockpot, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add onions; cook and stir until tender. Add garlic; cook 1 minute longer. Add vinegar, stirring to loosen any browned bits from pot. Add remaining ingredients; cook 4-6 minutes or until chard is tender, stirring occasionally.

12

/

cup walnut halves, toasted

Recipe courtesy of Dirty Dog Organics

14

/

teaspoon salt

/

teaspoon pepper

14

S O , W H AT D O E S I T TAS T E L I K E ? Aubrey Cash, of Dirty Dog Organics, says Swiss chard is basically a milder version of spinach with a slight hint of bitterness, but not as pronounced as in Brussels sprouts or kale. The stem of the chard, on the other hand, has a sweet and crunchy flavor. The texture most closely resembles a bok choy stem.

Hey, readers! Do you have favorite recipes or know a chef we should profile? Tell me about it! Email me at theresa@akersmediagroup.com.

THERESA CAMPBELL

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 079


SPIRITS

D RINK

Sunny days for beer lovers Tap into a variety of craft brews at a bright new spot, the Sunny Pint in Wildwood. STORY: CHRIS GERBASI

or most people, the phrase “dream job” is an oxymoron. For beer lovers, however, you can’t beat Sue Sidoti’s job. As a beer connoisseur and buyer for the Sunny Pint in Wildwood, Sue has tasted about 2,000 different craft beers. That’s enough to make your head spin. Sue and co-managing partner Simone Waddell opened the Sunny Pint in February.

080 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

“I’m always up for trying something new and it depends on my mood,” Sue says. “Everything we have has been excellent, because some of them, I’ve had to buy without tasting them, just going on recommendations. But I’ve been very pleased with everything we’ve put on tap.” The Sunny Pint offers 36 taps of local, regional and national brews—it also serves wine, but we’re here for the beer. The tap wall is like a scoreboard for beer. A large display is a big plus for novice craft beer drinkers, listing all 36 beers from light to dark, the style from IPAs to Belgians to porters to stouts, where they

are made, alcohol content and how much is left in each keg. Beerista Vaughan Gantrelle also gives a rundown of the beer menu to customers when they walk in the door. A high percentage of the beers are made in Florida. “I think we have more Florida craft beer than most places around here,” Sue says. “Some people will have a big list of beer, but they’ll also have the more familiar stuff mixed in as well. We try to do as much with Florida as we can.” Customers can also get the untappd app that shows in real time what’s on tap, how much is left in the keg and what’s on


deck in the cooler. The Sunny Pint continually rotates all of its beers. “Every time a keg blows, we’ll put something of similar style on but a different beer, so we don’t replace things with the same (beer). It’s always changing,” Sue says. Flights of four 4-ounce samples allow drinkers to try many varieties. My first flight included Ciderboys Grand Mimosa, an apple-orange hard cider from Stevens Point, Wisconsin; 7venth Sun Maibocks & Diamonds, a light, smooth amber beer with a hint of bitter from Dunedin; Left Hand Milk Stout, a definitely milky brew with a heavy chocolate-bitter coffee taste from Longmont, Colorado; and Barrel of Monks Single in Havana, a guavainfused ale from Boca Raton that tastes like pineapple juice. My colleague’s flight included DuClaw Sweet Baby Jesus, from Maryland, which is like chocolate milk with a kick of alcohol; Lake Tribe Red Cloud IPA, from Tallahassee, a citrus-flavored beer that goes down smooth and easy; Infinite Ale Works Witfinite, from Ocala, a Belgian white with a hint of citrus; and Central 28 Sunshine Greetings, from DeBary, a wheat beer with a mild wine flavor. To top it off, Lexington Brewing’s Kentucky Vanilla Barrel Cream Ale was a refreshing day cap. A third flight was a must. The foursome included Woodchuck Amber hard cider, like apple juice with alcohol, from Vermont; JDub’s Bell Cow Milk Chocolate porter, indeed like chocolate milk and slightly bitter but not enough to ruin

it, from Sarasota; Playalinda Robonaut Red Ale, a little too bitter for this taster, from Titusville; and Highland Gaelic Ale, an amber red ale from Asheville, North Carolina, that had an unusual aftertaste that was hard to place. Susan Sidoti (Left) and Simone Waddell But there’s so many more to try, and the In The Villages, they discovered revolving kegs ensure an untapped market for craft beer. an endless choice of options. Sunny They looked at franchises that had Pint also offers beer to go in cans, similar concepts but decided they bottles and 32-ounce crowlers. could do it better on their own. Simone handles the food side “We thought The Villages is a of the business, preparing a menu unique place, it’s got a lot going on, that includes meatball subs, Cuban it’s a really great location between sandwiches, appetizers and salads. the Space Coast and the (Gulf),” A patio for outside dining also is Simone says. “And then when craft dog-friendly. Food actually was the beer started coming, we said this is key ingredient in the business plan a really good spot because there’s for the taproom. nobody really picking it up here.” Sue and Simone relocated from The co-owners place an Oregon, where they found booming emphasis on getting to know craft beer scenes in both Bend and their customers. Portland. But most places didn’t “We really wanted to be focused offer much food, Simone says. on our community and to be “We said, what if we could marry part of the community that we’re up food and beer and kind of bring those things together—not too heavy in,” Simone says. And what better way to bring a of a menu so it’d be manageable, but community together than through enough that it would keep people beer. We’ll drink to that. here and interested,” Simone says.

Do you know a place where we can drink?

IF YOU GO

THE SUNNY PINT Freedom Plaza, 4110 E. State Road 44, Wildwood info@thesunnypint.com thesunnypint.com

Send your ideas to chris@akersmediagroup.com. CHRIS GERBASI

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 081


DINING GUIDE

dine

OUT Whatever your favorite dish, you can find a great place that serves it in this area. Check out what's nearby or take a little drive to a new place! Denotes locations where you can find Lake & Sumter Style

A S TAT U L A Race Car Diner 25641 Monroe St. 352.253.6940

TJ’s Family Restaurant 412 W. Belt Ave 352.793.8877 CLERMONT

ASTOR Blackwater Inn 55716 Front St. 352.759.3802 Castaways Restaurant 23525 US SR 40 352.759.2213 Sparky’s Place Restaurant 24646 SR 40 352.759.3551 William’s Landing 55716 Front St. 352.759.2802

Akina Sushi Bar & Asian Fusion Bistro 4300 S. U.S. Hwy. 27 352.243.8988 Calabria Ristorante 13900 CR 455 407.656.5144 Cheeser’s Palace Café 707 W. Montrose St. 352.404.9431

BUSHNELL

Clermont Brewing Co. 750 W Desoto 321.430.2337

Chuck’s Odd Cuples Café 117 W Belt Ave 352.568.0408

Corelli Italian Restaurant 1042 E. Hwy. 50 352.989.5924

Hong Kong Restaurant 2229 W. CR 48 352.568.8888

Devenney’s Irish Pub 16909 High Grove Blvd. 352.432.3925

Howie’s Family Restaurant 840 N. Main St. 352.793.8582

El Cerro Restaurant 811 W. Hwy. 50 352.241.9884 Friar Tuck 16640 Cagan Crossings Blvd. 352.404.6818

082 /

G’s NY Pizza 12346 Roper Blvd. 352.243.8900 Green Garden 1790 E. Hwy. 50 352.243.2077 Guru Restaurant 2400 S. Hwy. 27 352.241.9884 Legends Grille & Tavern 1700 Legendary Blvd. 352.243.1118

The Crooked Spoon Gastropub 200 Citrus Tower Blvd. 352.404.7808 Troy’s Cuban & Deli 1200 Oakley Seaver Dr. 352.241.4295 Uncle Kenny’s BBQ 157 Hwy. 27 352.394.1225

Lilly’s on the Lake 846 W. Osceola St. 352.708.6565

EUSTIS

Napolis Pizzeria 556 S. U.S. Hwy. 27 352.243.7500

Jeannie’s Place 209 E. Gottsche Ave. 352.359.0027

Robata Japanese Steak House & Sushi Bar 1500 Oakley Seaver Dr. 352.404.9688

Kiku Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar 15211 U.S. Hwy. 441 352.483.8288

Root and Branch Bistro and Bar 1200 Seaver Dr. 352.708.4529

King’s Taste Bar-B-Que 503 Palmetto St. 352.589.0404

Sanctuary Ridge Bar & Grille 2601 Diamond Club Road 352.243.0411

LaCabana Mexican Bar and Grill 2060 S. Bay St. 352.357.4600

Sarah’s Greek Cuisine & More 16640 Cagan Crossings Blvd., Ste. 305 352.404.8031

Nalan Sultan Mediterranean Grill 1 N. Eustis St. 352.357.4444

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

Combat Café 1602 N. Hwy. 19 352.483.0250

NightOwl Caribbean Restaurant 929 S. Bay St. 352.589.0256 Stavro’s & Sons of Eustis 2100 W. CR 44 352.589.9100 Taki’s Pizza House 2824 S. Bay St. 352.357.0022 Thai Sushi America 925 N. Bay St. 352.357.1949 The Crazy Gator 402 N. Bay St. 352.589.5885 The Great Pizza Company 23 E. Magnolia Ave. 352.357.7377 The Oyster Troff 936 N. Bay St. 352.357.9939

Ikaho Sushi Japanese 7965 SR 50, #900 352.557.8988

Cedar River Seafood 8609 S. U.S. Hwy. 441 352.728.3377

James Barbeque 262 W. Orange St. 352.557.4050

Chesapeake Bay Grill 4467 Arlington Ridge Blvd. 352.315.0066

Lil Anthony’s Pizza 7965 SR 50 352.429.7499 Red Wing Restaurant 12500 S. SR 33 352.429.2997 H OW EY- I N THE -HILLS JB Boondocks Bar & Grill 704 S. Lakeshore Blvd. 352.324.3600 La Hacienda Restaurant 10400 CR 48 352.324.3910

Tillie’s Tavern & Grill 31 E. Magnolia Ave. 352.602.7929

Nicker’s Clubhouse Restaurant 10400 CR 48 352.324.2718

Tony’s Pizza & Subs 2760 E. Orange Ave. 352.589.9001

L A DY L A K E

F RU I T L A N D PA R K Fruitland Park Café 3180 US Hwy. 441/27 352.435.4575 ibar-be-que Express 3170 Hwy. 27 352.315.4227 Legends Cafe 2468 U.S. Hwy. 441/27 352.728.0006 NY Deli N Diner 3325 U.S. Hwy. 441 352.365.0051 Rae Rae’s Restaurant 2468 U.S. Hwy. 441 352.323.1595 Stavro’s 3223 U.S. Hwy. 441 352.315.0028 The Rose Plantation 200 Rose Ave., Fruitland Park 352.805.4340 G R OV E L A N D Coyote Rojo 214 W. Broad St. 352.557.8999

Bamboo Bistro 700 Hwy. 441 352.750.9998 El Ranchito 1 Lagrande Blvd. 352.750.3335 Harbor Hills Country Club 6538 Lake Griffin Rd. 352.753.7000 Mom & Dad’s Italian Restaurant 504 S. U.S. Hwy. 441/27 352.753.2722 OakWood Smokehouse & Grill 860 S. Hwy 27/441 352.751.5640 Takis Greek and Italian Restaurant 13761 U.S. Hwy. 441 N. 352.430.3630 LEESBURG Blooms 610 W. Main St. 352.787.1004 Brick & Barrel 209 W. Main St. 352.431.3069 Cafe Ola 400 N. 14th St. 352.365.0089

Cousin Vinnie’s Family Sports Restaurant 10700 U.S. Hwy. 441 352.253.2442 Dance’s BBQ 1707 South Street 352.801.8885 Frank’s Place 201 N. 1st St. 352.323.1989 Gator Bay Bar & Grill 10320 CR 44 352.365.2177 God Café 300 W. Main St. 352.801.7447 Great Chicago Fire Brewery & Tap Room 311 W. Magnolia St. 352.474.2739 HP Grill 1403 S. 14th St. 352.314.0006 Ichiban Buffet 10301 Hwy. 441 352.728.6669 Kountry Kitchen 1008 W. Dixie Ave. 352.323.0852 La Palma Mexican Grill 1690 Citrus Blvd. 352.323.1444 Lilly’s Super Subs 2339 CR 473 352.343.4663 Magnolia’s Oyster Bar 201 W. Magnolia St. 352.323.0093 Main Street Cantina 205 W. Main St. 352.435.7279 Mamma’s Pizzeria 27405 US Highway 27 352.728.2020 Mrs. T’s Place, Southern Restaurant 305 Pine St. 352.431.3217 Naples Italian Restaurant 1107 W. North Blvd. 352.323.1616 Osaka 1401 Citrus Blvd. 352.728.0788


Papa Pineapples 314 W. Main St. 352.801.7097 Pine Street Bar-B-Que 408 Pine St. 352.728.1293 Plantation Oaks Restaurant 4720 Plantation Blvd. 352.530.2680 Ramshackle Café 1317 N. 14th St. 352.365.6565 Rodello’s Italian Restaurant 26736 US Hwy. 27 352.319.8093 San Jose Mexican 1337 S. 14th St. 352.805.4174 Sip Restaurant and Wine Bar 707 W. Main St. 352.435.7840 Stokes Seafood Market and More 719 W. Main St. 352.787.3474 Sully’s Smokehouse 10820 CR 44 352.483.7427 Takis Pizza Restaurant 1205 N. 14th St. 352.787.2344 Pint Sized Pub 110 S. 5th St. 352.460.0383 The Florida Porch Café 706 W. Main St. 352.365.1717 The Kitchen Cooking School 712 W. Main St. 352.901.6537 The Mojo Grill & Catering Co. 9925 US-441 352.787.0494 The Old Time Diner 1350 W. North Blvd. 352.805.4250 Turners 114 S. 5th St. 352.530.2274 Wolfy’s 918 N. 14th St. 352.787.6777 MASCOTTE Rainbow Restaurant 704 E. Myers Blvd. 352.429.2093

MINNEOLA Jack’s Barbecue 100 S. U.S. Hwy. 27 352.394.2673 Lil Anthony’s Pizza 205 N. U.S. Hwy. 27 352.394.1516 Minneola Grill 117 W. Washington St. 352.394.2555 Napoli’s Pizzeria 556 Hwy. 27 352.243.7500 The Surf Bar and Grill 650 N. Hwy. 27 202.527.0100 Tiki Bar & Grill 508 S. Main Ave. 352.394.2232 MOUNT DORA 1921 Mount Dora 142 E. Fourth Ave. 352.385.1921 Anthony’s Pizza 17195 U.S. Hwy. 441 352.357.6668 Barnwood Country Kitchen & Smokehouse 3725 W. Old US Hwy 441 352.630.4903 Beauclaire Restaurant at Lakeside Inn 100 N. Alexander St. 352.383.4101 Bocce Pizzeria 925 E. First Ave. 352.385.0067 Café Gianni 425 N. Alexander St. 352.735.3327 Cody’s on 4th Cafe 111 E. 4th Ave. 352.735.8426 Copacabana Cuban Cafe 320 Dora Drawdy Way 352.385.9000 Frog & Monkey English Pub 411 N. Donnelly St. 352. 383.1936

Let’s Do a Maine Lobster Roll 426 N. Donnelly St. 352.735.3702 Magical Meat Boutique 112 W. Third Ave. 352.729.6911 Mount Dora Pizza & Subs 2718 W. Old U.S. Hwy. 441 352.383.5303 Olive Branch MediterraneanItalian Grille 115 W. 3rd St. 352.729.6734

Angelo’s Italian Restaurant 2270 Vindale Rd. 352.343.2757 Fish Camp Lake Eustis 901 Lake Shore Blvd. 352.742.4400 Hurricane Dockside Grill 3351 W. Burleigh Blvd. 352.508.5137 Kalua Hale Beach Bar 181 S. Joanna Ave. 352.609.5910

One Flight Up 440 N. Donnelly St., Ste. 100 352.758.9818

Lake Dora Sushi & Sake 227 E. Main St. 352.343.6313

Pisces Rising 239 W. 4th Ave. 352.385.2669

Mary’s Kountry Kitchen 15945 CR 448 352.343.6823

PizzAmore’ 722 E. 5th Ave. 352.383.0092 Shiva Indian Restaurant 140A W. 5th Ave. 352.735.4555 Sidelines Sport Eatery 315 N. Highland St. 352.735.7433 Sugarboo’s Bar-B-Que 1305 N. Grandview St. 352.735.7675 The Bavarian Haus 433 N. Alexander St. 352.735.8387 The Country Club 1900 Country Club Blvd. 352.735.2263 The Goblin Market 331-B Donnely St. 352.735.0059 Whale’s Tale Fish House 2720 W. Old U.S. Hwy 441 352.385.1500 SORRENTO

Highland Street Café 185 S. Highland St. 352.383.1446

Del Franco Pizza Place 31436 CR 437 352.383.8882

Jeremiah’s 500 N. Highland St. 352.383.7444

Lisa’s Kountry Cafe 23911 CR 46 352.735.3380

J.K. Thai & Sushi 116 E. 5th Ave. 352.385.5470

TAVA R E S

O’Keefe’s Irish Pub and Restaurant 115 S Rockingham Ave. 352.343.2157 Palm Gardens Restaurant 1661 Palm Garden St. 352.431.3217 Puddle Jumpers 111 W Ruby St. 352.508.5862 Ruby Street Grille 221 E. Ruby St. 352.742.7829 Sunrise Grill 462 E. Burleigh Blvd. 352.343.7744 The Hideaway 11912 Lane Park Rd. 352.343.3585 Tiki West Raw Bar and Grill 118 W Ruby St, Tavares 352.508.5783

Belle Glade Country Club 446 Moyer Loop 352.205.8208 BlueFin Grill & Bar 2738 Brownwood Blvd. 352.571.5344 Cane Garden Country Club 1726 Bailey Trail 352.750.0627 Chengs Chinese and Sushi Restaurant 4050 Wedgewood Ln. 352.391.9678 China Gourmet III 343 Colony Blvd 352.750.4965 Chop House at Lake Sumter 1045 Old Camp Rd. 352.750.6000 City Fire Brownwood & Lake Sumter Landing 352.561.2078 Evans Prairie Country Club 1825 Evans Prairie Trail 352.750.2225 Fiesta Grande Mexican Grill 297 Colony Blvd 352.751.0400 Giovanni’s 3439 Wedgewood Lane 352.751.6674 Glenview County Club 3914 Glenview Rd. 352.753.0077 Habaneros Mexican Grill 3551 Wedgewood Ln. 352.633.2080 Hemingway’s at Havana Country Club 2484 Odell Circle 352.430.3200

Legacy Restaurant Nancy Lopez Country Club 17135 Buena Vista Blvd. 352.753.1475 Margarita Republic 1102 Main St. 352.753.4600 Mezza Luna Italian Restaurant and Bar 320 Colony Blvd. 352.753.3824 NYPD Pizzeria 4046 Wedgwood Ln 352.750.1994 Orange Blossom Country Club 1542 Water Tower Circle 352.751.4501 Palmer Legends Country Club 1635 Palmer Way 352.750.4499 RedSauce 1000 Canal St. 352.750.2930 Ricciardi’s Italian Table 3660 Kiessel Rd. 352.391.9939 Sakura 265 Colony Blvd 352.205.7393 The Lighthouse Point Bar and Grille 925 Lakeshore Dr. 352.753.7800 Tierra Del Sol Country Club 806 San Marino Dr. 352.753.8005 VKI Japanese Steakhouse and Sushi Bar 1004 Old Mill Run 352.259.9887

T H E V I L L AG E S

U M AT I L L A

Amerikano’s Grill 998 Del Mar Dr. 352.633.8027

Fish & Chix 100 N. Central Ave. 352.669.7145

Gator’s 9 N. Central Ave. 352.669.6969 Greg’s Haystax 526 Umatilla Blvd. 352.669.1555 Old Crow Real Pit Bar-B-Q 41100 SR 19 352.669.3922 Shanghai 531 N. Central Ave. 352.669.2004 The Mason Jar 37534 State Rd. 19 352.589.2535 W I L DWO O D China Jade 420 W. CR 44 352.330.5913 Continental Country Club 50 Continental Blvd. 352.748.3293 Cotillion Southern Café 101 N. Main St. 352.748.1223 Los Magueyes Mexican Restaurant 346 Shopping Center Dr. 352.461.0577 O’Shucks! Oyster Bar and Grill 1016 S Main St. 352.399.2200 Traditions Café 3107 Hwy. 44 352.748.1077 Woody’s Bar-B-Q 1220 S. Main St. 352.748.1109 YA L A H A Yalaha Bakery 8210 CR 48 352.324.3366

Cheeser’s Palace Café

GOOD GRUB

THIS MONTH'S EDITOR'S PICK

What could be better than a restaurant devoted to cheese? Cheeser’s Palace Café in Clermont serves cheese-centric breakfast and lunch items, including omelets, Benedicts, sandwiches, flatbread pizza, burgers, soups, salads and, naturally, cheese plates. For dessert, try homemade cake or strudel. Want your cheese to go? Check out the cheese and chocolate shop. Cheese and chocolate? Cheeser’s, you must be heaven sent. 707 W. Montrose St., Clermont / 352.404.9431

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 083


DINING GUIDE

The Kitchen Café 352.901.6537 | 712 W. MAIN ST., LEESBURG GETCOOKINGWITHZE.COM

Open 9am-2pm Tuesday through Saturday.

Culinary creativity comes alive at The Kitchen Café, tucked away inside the Southern Gardens Mall in Downtown Leesburg. The “create-your-own-bowl” option allows diners to choose a base product such as brown rice, sweet potatoes, good rice and riced cauliflower. From there, pick your choice of veggies, and a plant or animal based protein options like citrus grilled, herb roasted chicken, or personal meatloaf. Other menu items include thier made from scratch soups, chicken salad, and flavorful breakfast items like sweet potato hash, and a breakfast sandwich made with homestyle yeast rolls. Partnering with local food purveyors bring “fresh” back to the table.

Mom & Dad’s Italian Restaurant 352.753.2722 | 304 US-441, LADY LAKE Mom and Dad’s Italian Restaurant in Lady Lake has the distinct honor of calling itself a true family-owned restaurant. In fact, five generations of family members have represented the restaurant since its humble beginnings in May 1962. As many generations of customers have dined there throughout the years thanks to the outstanding service and scrumptious dishes such as Spaghetti a la Bruzzi, Delmonico steak, and lasagna. This food savvy family prepares everything from scratch, crafting everything with love to satisfy your taste buds.

Closed Monday and Tuesday.

Subway

Custom-made, fresh sandwiches, salads, and flatbreads made right before your eyes. The “healthy” alternative to fast food.

SUBWAY.COM LADY LAKE | 208 W. GUAVA ST. | 352.750.4929 EUSTIS | 469 PLAZA DR. | 352.357.7827 MOUNT DORA | 18870 U.S. HWY. 441 | 352.735.4376 LEESBURG | 2013 CITRUS BLVD. | 352.787.6442 10135 U.S. HWY. 441, SUITE 4 | 352.326.3234 27405 U.S. HWY. 27, SUITE 4 | 352.314.8847 THE VILLAGES | 1580 BELLA CRUZ DRIVE | 352.750.9600 8796 S.E. 165TH MULBERRY LANE | 352.750.9991 1070 LAKE SUMTER LANDING DRIVE | 352.205.8535 349 COLONY BLVD. | 352.391.1657 WILDWOOD | 480 W. GULF TO ALANTIC HWY. | 352.748.8800

084 /

Open 4pm-9pm Wednesday through Sunday.

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

Full Gluten-Free Menu


DINING GUIDE

Yalaha Bakery

Open Daily 8am-7pm

352.324.3366 | 8210 STATE ROAD 48, YALAHA The family owned German Bakery since 1995, is an award-winning Bakery that offers to customers high-quality German products made with the highest culinary standards. Fine European pastries and breads are made with organic flours, chocolates, and spices, butter, and imported European ingredients. Take home tortes, tarts, and wonderful pretzels, but before you go home, enjoy something from our delicious deli menu. We serve breakfast from 8-11am and lunch and dinner are served 11am-7pm. Enjoy German specialties like Nurnberger breakfast, Hunterschnitzel with Spätzle, Bratwurst, Reuben, Quiche, typical German soups, and maybe Semelknoedel (bread dumplings with mushroom sauce) for lunch or dinner. We offer a fine selection of German beers and wines. Whatever time of day, you’ll find something you love at Yalaha Bakery.

A German Bakery Like No Other!

On the weekends you can come and enjoy various events and music concerts on Saturdays and Sundays at our Beer Garden. You can follow us on Facebook, Twitter or via our website www.yalahabakery.com

Would you like to see your restaurant in our dining section? CALL US AT 352.787.4112

086 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0


FENCES

WOOD • VINYL ALUMINUM • RANCH RAIL CHAIN LINK • PERGOLA'S ESTATE GATES

MOSSYOAKFENCE.COM 407.900.2940


Col or

Featuring

Salon

KEVIN.MURPHY products

BEAUTY IN EVERYTHING.

PAUL MITCHELL focus salon BRAZILIAN BLOWOUT certified stylists

Call or Text 352.461.0874

touloucolorsalon.com

115 North Main Street Wildwood, FL 34785

DISABILITY CONSULTANTS

HEARINGS ARE HELD IN OUR OFFICE! CHRIS BELL, A.D.R. + JEFF BELL, A.D.R.

088 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

Are you under 65 and unable to work? 352.326.5009 1 0 1 E B E R C K M A N S T, F R U I T L A N D PA R K 1 0 2 0 N E 8 T H AV E , O C A L A

ALSO OFFERING HELP WITH MEDICARE INSURANCE


Get a new 5-star plan that takes a personalized

Get aanew plan that takes a personalized new 5-star plan that takes newGet 5-star plan that takes a personalized approach to5-star your Medicare needsa personalized

approach toto your Medicare ch to your Medicare needs needs needs approach your

Medicare

® Florida Blue Medicare now accepted by The Villages Health Florida Blue Medicare now accepted by The Villages® Health ®

Blue Medicare now accepted by The Villages Health

Florida Blue Medicare now accepted by The Villages Health

Call your Call yourlocal localHealth HealthInsurance Insurance

local Health Insurance

Call your local Health Insurance no-cost, no-obligation . no-cost, no-obligationconsultation consultation.

no-obligation consultation.

Florida Blue Medicare offers Florida Blueplans Medicare in youroffers community with a complete approach to plans in your community withFlorida a your health Blue

complete approach to your health. plans in your c

no-cost, no-obligation consultation. 1-352-259-0666

Mid-Florida Agencies – Golf Cart Accessible! 2-259-0666

1-352-259-0666

Colony Pinellas Colony Pinellas 280 Farner Place 2485 Pinellas Place 280Mid-Florida Farner Place Agencies 2485 Pinellas Place – Golf Cart Accessible! Pinellas TheThe Villages, FLFL32163 The FL Villages, Villages, 32163 The Villages, 32162 FL 32162 2485 Pinellas1-352-775-0991 Place1-352-775-0991 1-352-775-1129 1-352-775-1129

ce L 32163 Colony 29

Plans with $0

The Villages, FL 32162 1-352-775-0991 Palm Ridge Plaza

complete appro

monthly premium

Plans with $0

monthly premium

orida Agencies – Golf Cart Accessible!

®

Additional vision

Plans

and hearing coverage

Additional vision

month

and hearing coverage ■

MVP Athletic Club ■

Additi

MVP Athletic Club and hea Five out of five star rating

Pinellas ■ Our HMO received Medicare’s 280 Farner Place 2485 Pinellas Place Five out of five starplans rating 11962 CR 101 Ste 303 MVP A highest rating for quality The Villages, The FL 32163 TheinVillages, Your Local Agency The Villages FL 32162 Villages, FL 32162 Our HMO plans received Medicare’s for over a decade! 1-352-259-0666Community 1-352-775-0991 1-352-775-1129 highest rating for quality ®

Your Local Agency in The Villages® Community for over a decade!

Five out of

Florida Blue Medicare is an HMO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Florida Blue Medicare depends on contract renewal. HMO coverage is offered by Florida Blu plans Inc., DBA Florida Blue Medicare, an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. Every year, Medicare evaluates plansOur basedHMO on a 5-star rat Applicable to 2020 HMO plans on contract H1035. Other providers are available in our network. We comply with applicable Federal civil rights laws and do not discrimi highest ra ® Your Local Agency in on The Villages basisplan of race, nationalcontract. origin, age, disabilityinorFlorida gender. ATENCIÓN: Si depends habla español, tiene arenewal. su disposición servicios gratuitos lingüística. Llame al 1 s an HMO withcolor, a Medicare Enrollment Blue Medicare contract HMO coverage is offereddebyasistencia Florida Blue Medicare, 2583an(TTY: 1-877-955-8773). Si Cross w paleand Kreyòl Ayisyen, sèvis pou lang ki disponib gratis pou ou. plans Rele 1-800-352-2583 (TTY:rating 1-800-955-8770). © Community forèdover a year, decade! Medicare, Independent LicenseeATANSYON: of the Blue Blue Shieldgen Association. Every Medicare evaluates based on a 5-star system. Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Inc., DBA Florida Blue. All rights reserved. MO plans on contract H1035. Other providers are available in our network. We comply with applicable Federal civil rights laws and do not discriminate on the

tional origin, Villagesage, disability or gender. ATENCIÓN: Si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1-800- 352Accepted -8773).Y0011_98890_M ATANSYON: w1019 paleisCMS Kreyòl Ayisyen, sèvis èdcontract. pou lang ki disponib gratis pou ou. Rele 1-800-352-2583 (TTY: 1-800-955-8770). ©2020 Florida Blue Si Medicare an HMO plan withgen a Medicare Enrollment in Florida Blue Medicare depends on contract renewal. HMO coverage is offered by Blue Florida is an a Medicare contract. Enrollment Florida BlueShield Medicare depends on contract renewal. HMO cov Florida Blue Medicare Medicare, Inc., DBA Floridaplan Blue with Medicare, an Independent Licensee of the Bluein Cross and Blue Association. Every year, Medicare evaluates of Florida, Inc.,Blue DBA Florida Blue. All HMO rights reserved.

based on a 5-star system. Applicable to 2020 HMO plans on of contract H1035.Cross Other providers areShield availableAssociation. in our network.Every We comply applicable evaluate Inc.,plans DBA Florida Bluerating Medicare, an Independent Licensee the Blue and Blue year,withMedicare Federal civil rights laws and do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability or gender. ATENCIÓN: Si habla español, tiene a su Applicable 2020 gratuitos HMO plans on contract H1035. providers are1-877-955-8773). available inATANSYON: our network. WeKreyòl comply with applicable civil r disposiciónto servicios de asistencia lingüística. Llame Other al 1-800-352-2583 (TTY: Si w pale Ayisyen, gen sèvis èd pouFederal lang 19 CMS Accepted ki disponib gratis pou ou. Rele 1-800-352-2583 (TTY: 1-800-955-8770). ©2020 Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Inc., DBA Florida Blue. All rights reserved. basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability or gender. ATENCIÓN: Si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de as Villages 2583 (TTY: 1-877-955-8773). Y0011_98890_M 1019 CMS AcceptedATANSYON: Si w pale Kreyòl Ayisyen, gen sèvis èd pou lang ki disponib gratis pou ou. Rele 1-800-352-25 Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Inc., DBA Florida Blue. All rights reserved.


LWAKERIDGE &V INERY

INEYARDS

Dedicated To Your Good Taste

Florida’s Largest Premium Winery Available Online and at your Local Supermarket and Retail Outlets!

www.LakeridgeWinery.com 19239 US 27 North • Clermont, FL 34715 352-394-8627 • 1-800-768-WINE 090 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0


L-R: LaRhann Rogers, Director of Invasive/Non-Invasive Cardiology; Laurencia Sears, Supervisor of Cardiodiagnostics; Srinivas Attanti, MD, Interventional Cardiologist

A heart-to-heart When it comes to the latest trends in cardiovascular care, a symposium ensured that nurses and nursing students aren’t skipping a beat. PAID PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

rogress in cardiovascular medicine continues to move at a fast pace. New procedures, new medications and new imaging techniques enable cardiologists to treat patients like never before. However, it’s equally important for nurses to stay abreast of the latest cardiovascular breakthroughs so they can also effectively care for patients. That’s why University of Florida Health Central Florida sponsored the Heart2-Heart Cardiovascular Symposium February 27–28, 2020 at Mission Inn Resort & Club in Howey-in-the-Hills. During the two-day forum, internationally renowned cardiologists spoke to nurses and nursing students about current trends in cardiovascular care. While most of the 250 nurses in attendance work or attend nursing school in Lake and Sumter counties, some came from as far away as Lakeland, Tampa, Jacksonville and Orlando. They

earned 14 continuing education units (CEUs) to help them maintain their certification status. “Nurses who attended the event provided us with very positive feedback,” says Dr. Srinivas Attanti, a boardcertified cardiologist with Citrus Cardiology Consultants, which has 10 offices, including four in Lake and Sumter counties. “Some of them have been to national conferences all over the country and they tell me there’s nothing quite like our symposium.” Dr. Attanti started the Heart-2Heart Cardiovascular Symposium in 2004 after moving to Central Florida from New York to join Citrus Cardiology Consultants. “I saw a need to increase the level of knowledge in cardiology nurses,” he says. “Even though new advances in cardiology care were being introduced, there was no teaching at any of the local hospitals.” Since its debut 16 years ago, the symposium has attracted lecturers from

large metropolitan areas such as New York City and Chicago. They’ve spoken about a variety of cardiovascular-related topics, from basic heart anatomy to performing aortic valve replacement through a patient’s groin. Dr. Attanti also serves as a lecturer during the symposium. “I love teaching. Seeing a room full of nurses hungry for knowledge motivates me,” he says. “I also learn a lot by listening to my colleagues. Normally, I’d have to travel out of state to listen to them lecture.” Dr. Attanti is already lining up speakers for next year’s event, slated for February 25-26, 2021. “In Central Florida, there are other cardiovascular symposiums, but they’re geared toward cardiologists,” he says. “We cater ours toward nurses and nursing students because they are important members of the health care system.” As next year’s event draws closer, visit leesburgregional.org for information.

352.323.5762 / leesburgregional.org / 600 E. Dixie Ave, Leesburg

M AY ' 2 0 • L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M

/ 091


Compassionate Pet Care From Your Other Family Doctor!

Services • New Puppy And Kitten Exams • Yearly Wellness Exams • Flea And Heartworm Prevention • Yearly Blood Screening • Maintaining A Healthy Geriatric Pet • Cold Laser Therapy • Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy

Dr. Cara Erwin-Oliver

352.347.3900 // 10725 SE 36th Ave www.BelleviewVeterinaryHospital.com


Country Club Living

MAIN CLUB HOUSE

FITNESS CENTER

GOLF COURSE

SPORTS COMPLEX

BISTRO RESTAURANT

Water Oak Country Club Estates is an all-inclusive, pet-friendly gated resort-like community that provides residents with luxurious and tranquil privacy at an affordable cost. Spend your days enjoying our 18-hole championship golf course, state-of-the-art fitness center with sauna and private showers, and our lakefront clubhouse with an Olympic-size heated swimming pool and spa area. Live vibrant and enjoy active adult living in the heart of Central Florida just minutes away from The Villages and local area attractions. Come see us today and tour our model home center and community. 888.321.6013 | WaterOakCountryClub.com | 224 Magnolia Drive, Lady Lake


FINAL THOUGHT

CO MMENTARY

Empowering Surprise! Power tools are not just men’s toys. STORY: THERESA CAMPBELL

n open invitation recently caught my eye. Habitat for Humanity of Lake-Sumter and Lowe’s were seeking female community volunteers to take part in the 2020 International Women Build Week. The journalist in me knew it would make a great story about women working with power tools for the first time. I became that woman. Donning a blue hard hat and safety glasses and working under the patient tutelage of site supervisor Ernie Burley, I learned how to operate a power drill, table saw and circular saw—all for the first time. I also got an upper-arm workout swinging a hammer while installing exterior wood siding on a Eustis house under construction on West St. Louis Avenue, the future home for a single mom and her young son.

Working on the build was a spontaneous decision. Habitat was short of volunteers when an expected group was a no-show because of a scheduling conflict, so Habitat recruited some of its female office employees, two next-door homeowners and me. I loved every minute of the build, learning safety tips while working with those intimidating power tools yet marveling at what they can do. It was empowering and exhilarating to do something new and support Habitat for Humanity. The local project was part of a global effort, with thousands of women in more than 235 U.S. communities, India and Canada working to highlight the worldwide need for safe and affordable housing. A bigger Women Build event will be hosted at a later date in Leesburg, and women can learn more by visiting habitatls.org or calling Lacie Himes at 352.483.0434, ext. 146. She also can be reached at lacie@habitatls.org. I’m ready to put the hard hat back on and participate in the build. Come join me!

Hey, readers! Have you accomplished a feat you never thought you would do? Tell me, via email, at theresa@akersmediagroup.com.

096 /

L A K E A N D S U M T E R S T Y L E .C O M • M AY ' 2 0

THERESA CAMPBELL


C O M I N G J U LY 2 0 2 0


WE WILL GET THROUGH THIS CHALLENGING TIME

TOGETHER FRANK DELUCA PRESIDENT/OWNER

PAYMENT RELIEF NO PAYMENTS FOR 6 MONTHS

ON NEW TOYOTAS! NEW 2020 TOYOTA

COROLLA LE

SR 200 Ocala, FL 352-732-0770 • DELUCATOYOTA.COM

PAYMENTS MAY BE DEFERRED FOR THE FIRST 90 DAYS; INTEREST ACCRUES FROM INCEPTION. MAXIMUM TERM 75 MONTHS.DELUCA TOYOTA WILL PAY THE REMAINING THREE MONTHS UP TO$499. THIS OFFER APPLIES TOWELL-QUALIFIED BUYERS AND REQUIRES APPROVED CREDIT AND FINANCING THROUGH SOUTHEAST TOYOTA FINANCE. NOT ALL BUYERS WILL QUALIFY FOR THESE RATES. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH CERTAIN OTHER OFFERS.EXCLUDES TAX, TAG, REGISTRATION, TITLE AND $897 DEALER FEE. OFFER EXPIRES 5/31/2020.


Providing exceptional urological care to men and women for over 30 years.

TIMBER RIDGE MEDICAL CENTER 352.310.8281

9401 SW HWY 200, SUITE 403, OCALA, FL 34481

OCALA OFFICE

Non-invasive treatment options

352.310.8281

2850 SE 3RD COURT, OCALA, FL 34481

Full range of diagnostic services including: • Urodynamics • Digital Cystoscopy • Urinalysis

LADY LAKE OFFICE 352.661.1061

• PSA Screening • Ultrasound • Image-guided biopsy

808 HWY 466, LADY LAKE FL, 32159

Yes! We offer Telemedicine!

Charles King, MD

Erin Zimmer, APRN

We are able to perform some consultations and office visits entirely via the internet. Please contact us for more information.

James W. Young III, MD

Emily Perry-Hartlein, APRN, CUNP

www.uicfla.com

Same day appointments are often available.

John Somers, APRN


B EF O R E

GALDER M A

2018

PR EFER R ED EXECUTIVE

MER Z

2018

TOP INJECTOR S

A F T ER

MER Z TR AINER:

EXPERT CENTER

FOR ADVANCED TECHNIQUES

B EF O R E

A F T ER

BEST OF THE

HOT

LIST

SPRING IS IN THE AIR

S ERV I N G T H E V I L L AG E S CO M M U N I T Y F O R OV ER A D EC A D E . S C H ED U L E YO U R FR E E CO N SU LTAT I O N TO DAY !

3 52 . 2 59. 8 59 9 | W W W. P L A S T I C S U R G E RY V I P.CO M 6 07 C R 4 6 6 A , FRU I T L A N D PA R K

WINNER

Profile for Akers Media Group

STYLE Magazine, Village Edition, May 2020  

STYLE Magazine, Village Edition, May 2020