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Annual Report

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PURPOSE TO ENABLE AUSTRALIAN ATHLETES TO BE WORLD’S BEST VISION COLLECTIVELY DRIVEN SUSTAINED INTERNATIONAL PODIUM SUCCESS POSITION SHOOTING AUSTRALIA IS THE PEAK BODY RESPONSIBLE FOR LEADING THE GROWTH, SUSTAINABILITY AND SUCCESS OF TARGET SHOOTING SPORTS IN AUSTRALIA

CONTENTS

Cover and left photo: Australians Thomas Grice and Penny Smith. Winners of the inaugural Trap Mixed Team event at the ISSF World Championship In Moscow Sept 2017.

MESSAGE FROM THE AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION

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PRESIDENT’S REPORT

5

CEO’S REPORT

10

GENERAL MANAGER HIGH PERFORMANCE REPORT

12

GENERAL MANAGER HIGH PERFORMANCE REPORT RESULTS

14

MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS REPORT

18

GOVERNANCE REPORT

19

COACHES REPORT RIFLE

21

COACHES REPORT SHOTGUN

24

COACHES REPORT PISTOL

26

COACHES REPORT PARA-SHOOTING

28

THE 2016 SHOOTING AUSTRALIA AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE

29

FINANCIAL REPORT

30

MARSH ADVANTAGE INSURANCE REPORT

42

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The Australian Sports Commission (ASC) thanks all of our partner national sporting organisations (NSOs) for your continued hard work and commitment to excellence. All of you understand innately the importance of sport in Australian life. It’s much more than a source of national identity and pride, it’s the fabric that binds us together - a common language for all, with multiplier benefits in health, education, social cohesion and the economy. There were many great sporting events to celebrate during the course of last year – the launch of both the AFL Women’s competition and the National Netball League with prime-time TV coverage, our most successful winter sports season ever on the world stage, and fairytale victories against the odds for Cronulla in the NRL and the Western Bulldogs in the AFL. Last year’s Olympic and Paralympic Games underscored the challenge however for Australia in retaining its status as one of the world’s preeminent sporting nations, given rising competition from developed and developing nations alike. We must keep innovating, being bold and willing to change both on and off the field if we are to succeed, not just in Olympic and Paralympic sports but across the sporting spectrum.

We appreciate the willingness of NSOs to embrace this challenge. We commend athletes for their dedicated commitment to training ahead of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games, the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games and, further ahead, the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Finally, I say a big thank you to the army of volunteers – parents, coaches, officials and administrators - who contribute their time and services for the good of Australian sport. You bring community strength, passion and great value to the identity, productivity, cohesion and health of our nation.

One of the most important long-term challenges for our country is to help our children be physically active, to participate in sport and enjoy its lifelong benefits.

The ASC wishes you every success in the year ahead. We look forward to working closely with you for the common good of Australian sport.

The ASC’s Sporting Schools program has now reached more than 5,600 primary schools around Australia and has already begun a targeted program for high schools. It is vital to ensure physical education is reemphasised in the national school curriculum. To this end, the ASC has been doing ground-breaking work on physical literacy for children and youth and we look forward to rolling this out nationally in the year ahead.

JOHN WYLIE AM CHAIR AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION

As the national leadership organisation for sport in Australia, the ASC was delighted when our new Minister for Sport the Hon. Greg Hunt recently proposed a National Sports Plan, the preparation of which will be led by the ASC. This will create, for the first time, a comprehensive blueprint for Australian sport. It’s an outstanding initiative and we thank the Minister for his leadership and vision. We hope all NSOs take the opportunity to contribute their views to the plan. Most of you will know that this year the ASC welcomed a new CEO Kate Palmer, a talented sports leader, who has quickly built excellent relationships with sports and is embracing the challenges ahead with an inspiring enthusiasm.

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// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

PRESIDENT’S REPORT It is a delight to be able to report to you on another successful year for Shooting Australia (SA). This past year we have had multiple successes by our athletes including our junior athletes on the international stage, continued strong support from the Australian Sports Commission (ASC), Australian Olympic Committee, Australian Paralympic Committee and Commonwealth Games Australia, and also new appointments to the SA Board of Directors and staffing positions in the SA Office.

INTERNATIONAL COMPETITIONS IN AUSTRALIA We are at present in the midst of hosting several international competitions with more to come in 2018. These are all very important events for shooting in Australia and SA is working feverishly to ensure that they are successful. This can’t happen without the boundless generosity of our organisers, volunteer officials, range staff and administrators to whom we are most grateful. We have the Commonwealth Games Test Event (Commonwealth Shooting Federation Championships) and Oceania Shooting Federation Championship underway at the time of our SA Annual General Meeting in late October early November. Then we have the SA Open in early December when we will also hold our SA Awards of Excellence. Then in March 2018 we have the ISSF Junior World Cup Rifle/Pistol/Shotgun at the Sydney International Shooting Centre (SISC) followed very closely by the XXI Commonwealth Games at Belmont in Brisbane in April 2018. A very busy time ahead for all of us and it promises to be most exciting. We wish our athletes all the best for the above events.

ATHLETE INTERNATIONAL SUCCESS At the time of writing this report four (4) SA athletes are in the ISSF World Top Ten Rankings with: Catherine Skinner 2nd in Trap Women; James Willett 2nd in Double Trap Men; Paul Adams 7th in Skeet Men; and Laetisha Scanlan 9th in Trap Women. Our Paralympic athletes World Top Ten rankings include: Natalie Smith 2nd in Women 10m Air Rifle SH1 and 4th in Women’s 50m Rifle 3 Position SH1; Chris Pitt 5th in Mixed 25m Pistol SH1; and Anton Zapelli 9th in Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1.

ISSF WORLD CUPS SA athletes have performed admirably at World Cups in this past year including: 2016 World Cup Final Rome, Italy James Willett won Gold in the Men’s Double Trap. 2017 World Cup New Delhi, India James Willett won Gold in Men’s Double Trap, Penny Smith won Gold in Women’s Trap, and Paul Adams won Bronze in Men’s Skeet. 2017 World Cup Acapulco, Mexico James Willett won Silver in Men’s Double Trap, and Paul Adams won Bronze in Men’s Skeet.

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IPC WORLD CUPS Our Paralympic athletes also performed very well this year: 2017 World Cup in UAE in February Anton Zappelli won his first World Cup medal (Bronze) in R6-Mixed 50m Rifle Prone with his new PB. 2017 World Cup in Osijek, Croatia in September Anton Zappelli won his second Bronze, this time in R3-10m Air Rifle Prone, and Chris Pitt won the Bronze in P3-25m Mixed Pistol.

2017 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS Following Catherine Skinner’s Gold medal at the Rio Olympic Games last year she has come back strong winning Silver at the 2017 ISSF Shotgun World Championship in Moscow, Russia in her first International competition since Rio. Jack Wallace won the bronze medal in Trap Men Junior and then won gold with teammates Mitchell Iles and Adam Bylsma in the Trap Men Junior Team event for the three to be named 2017 Trap Junior Team World Champions. Then to top it off Australian’s Tom Grice and Penny Smith won the inaugural ISSF World Championship in the Trap Mixed Team event. Our Big Bore rifle shooters have also achieved much this year with the Australian Under 25 Rifle Team winning in South Africa in March 2017. The Australia senior team came 2nd. At the World Championships in Canada in August in the World F Class (Long Range) Championship an event that involves individual and team events, the individual F Open championship (three days) concluded with Rod Davies (Cessnock NSW) winning with a score of 489.41 and Adam Pohl (Kapunda SA) won the

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bronze medal with 482.33. The Australian F Open Team defended its 2013 title winning the World F Open Team Championship (the Farquharson Trophy) with a score of 3511.342. Australia was runner up in the World FTR Teams Championship (the Richardson Trophy) with a score of 3394.327. The winners were USA on 3400.264. Our Sporting Clays Australia (SCA) athletes have also performed very well this past year. At the World FITASC Sporting Championships the Ladies team won Bronze in Hungary and at the World Universal Trench Championships in France the Junior Team won Bronze; the Senior team won Bronze; the Senior Individual (Tom Turner) won Bronze; and the Junior Individual (Thomas Armstrong) won Gold. Congratulations to our winners and all our athletes who have worked hard and given their best to compete for Australian shooting.

The outcome of the EGA was that the proposed motion ‘The ISSF General Assembly in disagreement with the recommendations sent by ISSF last February 23 to the International Olympic Committee, deeming the procedural methods not sufficiently inclusive, not sharing anyway its contents INVITES the ISSF Executive Committee and all other ISSF Competent Body to seriously engage for the reintegration in the Olympic Programme - in compliance with the Equity Gender IOC requirements – of the three major shooting events: 50m Rifle Prone, 50m Pistol and Double Trap.’ was not accepted by the EGA Chair (ISSF President). The ISSF President undertook to establish a Forum to discuss future consideration of reintegration of the three events in 2024/2028.

ISSF EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL ASSEMBLY, MUNICH Member Nations of the ISSF called an Extraordinary General Assembly (EGA) that was convened on 25 June 2017 in Munich. The reason for the calling of the EGA was the matter of the ISSF recommended changes to the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Shooting Program in relation to: 50m Rifle Prone, 50m Pistol and Double Trap, to comply with the Equity Gender IOC requirements SA CEO and I attended the EGA to voice Australia’s support that the ISSF reconsider and re-engage in efforts to return 50m Rifle Prone, 50m Pistol and Double Trap to the Olympic Games program for 2024/2028.

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA WHOLE OF SPORT GOVERNANCE REVIEW The Whole of Sport Governance Review that commenced last year has been a process initiated and led by SA, funded by the Australian Sports Commission (ASC) and supported by the five Member Bodies of SA. The need for this review didn’t come from a problem or reaction; it came from a desire by the Board of SA to continue to look at ways for our sport to be more effective and efficient. The Board has a responsibility to ensure the sport is best placed to meet the challenges of a rapidly evolving sport landscape. In the past year significant progress has been made with the Whole of Sport Governance Review. The initial Governance Review Workshop conducted in Brisbane 12-13 November 2016 was a positive and open-minded conversation between State and National delegates, representing every State and Territory and all five member disciplines. There was agreement that there are things we can do better if we work together as one sport. The Workshop agreed the following outcomes as the initial priority areas; Whole of Sport Participation Plan; Aligned pathways; Investigate a shared insurance scheme – to provide a better, cheaper and simpler insurance for all Members and Clubs;

The follow-up workshop held 27 May 2017 also in Brisbane primarily focussed on the Whole of Sport Participation Plan 2017 – 2020. Again the Workshop atmosphere was positive with presentations on aspects of the Plan and the experiences of clubs/states in attracting new shooters as well as collaborative discussion on the Participation Plan which was at that stage a draft.

SHARED INSURANCE SCHEME

WHOLE OF SHOOTING SPORT PARTICIPATION PLAN

The Aiming4Gold Funding Initiative has undergone review and a revised procedure has been adopted by SA for funding of MB athlete development programs under this initiative. The new procedure involves the SA High Performance (HP) Committee to review the distribution of the funds for initiatives that have the capacity to address specific focus areas that need financial support and assistance within the HP pathway and ensure that participation funding is being allocated in line with the SA Strategic Plan.

The Participation Plan Working Group has completed their task and we now have a National Whole of Sport Participation Plan that is ready for implementation. The intention is to schedule the first National Come and Try Day to follow the 2018 Commonwealth Games. This will allow us to leverage off our successes at the Commonwealth Games. The SA Board urges all Member Bodies/States/Clubs to get behind the Participation Plan and the National Come and Try Day/s and help make it successful and ongoing.

For the first time SA and all Member Bodies are working together on a shared insurance scheme. We have recently gone to market for options and quotes on the Shared Scheme. More news on this will be provided as it is finalised.

MEMBER BODY ATHLETE DEVELOPMENT

ALIGNED PATHWAYS SA has developed a draft Whole of Shooting Sport Pathways document. Some Member Bodies (MB) have had more input and been more involved in the development and hence there are gaps in the current pathway documents. SA will continue to collect and collate MB feedback over the coming months and bring the Pathways Committee back together to further develop aligned pathways.

Supporting Clubs – Sharing best practice to enable us to develop practical tools, resources and actions to assist Clubs to be healthy and sustainable.

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AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION SA has continued to work with the ASC to implement the required levels of accountability for performance results, improved governance structures and revised reporting and monitoring requirements. The ASC requires sports to adhere to the updated Mandatory Sports Governance Principles (MSGP) that underpin the governance regulations within national sporting organisations (NSOs). The ASC has recently advised that it is reviewing the ASC strategy and its future positioning. The review will include the infrastructure of the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) in Canberra, and the need to change the Investment Allocation Model for performance support. The ASC has indicated that it sees that this needs to shift and should include one funding amount across all parts of the sport (High Performance, Participation, Performance Support, etc.). The ASC/AIS anticipates it will become a smaller organisation. This will mean restructure of the organisation and increased integration of SIS/SAS.

FIREARMS INDUSTRY REFERENCE GROUP The Federal Government released the 2017 National Firearms Agreement (NFA) in March this year. Contrary to the expectations of licensed shooters the NFA 2017 is a restatement of the NFA 1996 with the inclusion of the National Handgun Agreement 2002 (NHA). The Firearms Industry Reference Group (FIRG) of which I am a member sought assurance from Michael Keenan MP, Minister for Justice that States/Territories would not use the NFA 2017 to change their

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existing legislation and regulations. The Minister advised that there was no undertaking from States/ Territories as to future State legislation and regulation changes regarding firearms. The Minister noted that legislation takes priority and that the NFA is not binding on States; that any future changes to existing State/ Territory firearms legislation and regulation flowing from NFA 2017 is at the discretion of the relevant States/ Territories authorities. Noting that a statutory review of the NSW Firearms Regulations is underway, the above emphasises the need for stakeholders at State/ Territory level to be in constant contact with their Police Ministers and work with them to insure that they do not change their existing legislation to be more restrictive on licensed shooters. SA is working with the Minister for Justice and other politicians to achieve outcomes that are for the betterment of our sport. We will continue to keep Member Bodies informed on these matters.

CONCLUSION I would like to extend my sincere thanks to Kelvyn Prescott and Lisa Cook for their valuable contributions to the SA Board over the past years. Thank you also to all the volunteers in our Member Bodies. It is through the enduring hard work and dedication of our volunteers that we are able to develop and support our athletes and provide opportunities to them for success in the international arena. I would like to thank the members of the SA Board, the CEO, Management Team and staff for all their hard work and support during the year. Also thank you to the Member Bodies for their support and input and I look forward to your continued support and assistance in the coming year.

CATH FETTELL PRESIDENT SEPTEMBER 2017

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA BOARD AND MANAGEMENT In February, appointed director Lisa Cook completed her term on the SA Board. Unfortunately soon thereafter Kelvyn Prescott stood down from his Director position on the Board due to personal reasons. SA embarked on a recruitment campaign for replacement Directors and in August appointed Andrew Sims and Clive Pugh to the Board. In the SA Office Jaime Drumm, as Community Development Officer, and Georgina Watt, as the Admin Assistant have joined the SA staff through the year.

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT


CEO’S REPORT Well another year has come and gone, but what has not gone is the terrific momentum created by and for our sport. After returning to the top of the Olympic dais in 2016 thanks to Catherine Skinner’s wonderful performance our sport has continued to go from strength to strength. The signs of further improvement, increased credibility, and best practice are all around us. In the past year some highlights that reflect our continuing success, growing maturity, and enhanced reputation have been: Penny Smith and Thomas Grice winning Gold at the World Championship in the Trap Mixed Teams Event. The first time this new Olympic event is staged and two of our most promising athletes create history for Australia. We also had Catherine Skinner and Jack Wallace in the final finishing in 4th place. 50 teams entered, we finished first and fourth and the average age of our four athletes was only 23–what a great result for these athletes, our team, our future, and Australia. Agreement from all Member Bodies and Shooting Australia to create and deliver a Whole of Sport Participation Plan. The Plan has been delivered, a new Community Development Officer has been employed, and work is underway to increase the capacity and capability of our grassroots to increase our sports participation rates.

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Executive Officers from Member Bodies and Shooting Australia coming together to discuss operational synergies and opportunities. Member Bodies and Shooting Australia working together to investigate a joint insurance scheme to create better coverage at a cheaper rate for all members and clubs around Australia. Shooting being recognised as a program sport by the Victorian Institute of Sport and South Australian Sports Institute for the first time. This is generating a significant shift in our daily performance environment, ongoing athlete support, and development and access to greater resources and expertise like we have never seen before. Increased funding from the Australian Sports Commission, Australian Institute of Sport, and Commonwealth Games Australia for the 2017/18 financial year due to our proven results, demonstrated future potential, and increased confidence in the structures, policies, leadership and frameworks we have in place. Successful bidding for international events. We have an ISSF Junior World Cup in 2018 and are working on securing the 2019 World Shooting Para Sport World Championship for 2019. The delivery of a camp for our entire Aiming4Gold Squad in partnership with the AIS. The remarkable item was not the camp bringing together our best 50 athletes and coaches–sports do that all the time–it was the courage shown to lean into tough conversations and to deliver a camp that focussed purely on our athletes as people. We worked on understanding each other and

how, whether we like it or not, we are part of a team, so our actions and behaviours can and do impact the team. It is no coincidence we are the first ever World Champions in a Mixed Teams event.

We are doing wonderful things. Our sport is in a great place and getting better. I need to take this opportunity to thank a number of people and organisations, because with a sport our size, we rely on people to make things work: To the Australian Sports Commission and Australian Institute of Sport, our major funder, but more importantly our major partner, we thank you greatly for your ongoing support. We look forward to this new era led by Kate Palmer and we cannot wait to continue the great work we have begun together. Commonwealth Games Australia, a major investor and supporter of Shooting Australia. To Craig Phillips and his team we look forward to delivering a successful team on the Gold Coast next year and we are in better shape because of your assistance and guidance. To the Australian Paralympic Committee and Australian Olympic Committee, thank you for your generosity of time and support. Thank you to the Member Bodies of Shooting Australia and I would like to particularly single out the Executive Officers and Staff, a resilient and resourceful group who do so much for their members and stakeholders with so little. To the volunteer Directors, Office Bearers, and officials who are the lifeblood of the sport, thank you for your time, energy, and efforts.

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

To the staff of Shooting Australia a warm and heartfelt thank you. I am blessed to work with such an amazing group, people who continue to inspire and amaze me–a group of individuals who give more to the sport than most people will ever know.

INCOME 2016/17 ($) Affiliation Fees Commission Competition Proceeds

INCOME 2015/16 ($)

27,000.00

27,000.00

8,074.49

10,780.65

11,679.11

86,618.03

Discount Received

1,755.92

4,338.02

Interest

8,469.05

19,440.51

Other income - Other ACGA

1,846.94

12,339.51

212,000.00

147,000.00

Thank you to the Board of Shooting Australia led by Cath Fettell. A wonderful group of people who are amazing custodians for our sport. Thank you on behalf of the sport for your collective leadership and unwavering diligence in ensuring our sport continues to grow and prosper.

AOC

1,250.84

440.29

APC

5,000.00

5,346.47

ASC

2,288,250.00

2,515,000.00

Finally and most importantly to our athletes, thank you for representing our sport so proudly. You are Shooting Australia and you are the ones that represent who we are, how we are going to get there, and what it is going to look like. We are lucky to have such an amazing group of ambassadors. Continue to strive for excellence, don’t accept mediocrity, and let’s continue to hold each other to the lofty standards we agreed in Canberra. Only together will we truly achieve great things.

Grants - Other IPC SIS/SAS Sale of Goods

100,000.00 141.18

Purchases - Goods

181.75

241.49

Total Cost Of Sales

181.75

241.49

2,672,202.64

3,515,655.05

Affiliate Support

15,000.00

100,000.00

Audit & Accounting Fees

11,800.00

8,200.00

Cost Of Sales

GROSS PROFIT Expenses

Bank Charges Board/Governance Expense

2,147.42

3,114.94

74,712.39

157,117.45

Computer Expenses

2,077.34

5,009.00

Cleaning/Pest Control

3,392.73

2,890.00

Consultancy Fees

17,110.62

16,880.00

Depreciation

9,600.00

10,000.00

Entertainment Costs Legal Fees Media Meeting Expenses

6,095.63

1,970.29

26,575.26

57,330.35

4,575.23

8,839.82

79,367.42

69,434.91

Membership Fees Paid

5,162.68

4,447.89

Postage, Freight, Courier

3,393.36

5,985.81

Printing & Stationery

7,093.83

5,093.89

Publications/Subscriptions

2,041.03

1,010.20

Recruitment Expenses

2,387.22

1,541.46

56,022.82

53,868.12

8,066.88

4,695.89

Telephone Fax Internet

29,895.88

31,544.24

Uniforms

26,662.33

13,796.25

Utilities

13,938.90

13,330.58

Insurance Salaries and Wages

11,228.46

12,341.73

418,926.47

342,904.56

Program costs

518,537.98

Superannuation Payable

87,119.24

83,264.70

Payroll Tax

18,764.72

14,254.72

Workcover

8,958.79

7,955.07

10,580.00

54,244.87

Salaries and Wages HP

Athlete and Coach Support

Please note: These figures provide an overview and were completed before the financial audit. For full financial statements please refer to the Financial Report.

641,987.06

3,515,896.54

Sundry Expenses

CEO

45,606.00

0.00

2,672,384.39

Total Income

Rent

DAMIEN MARANGON

6,916.86

Coach Development

5,560.22

8,899.34

Development Project

56,598.28

9,413.34

Volunteer & Officials

40,394.48

674.90

Staff Development

12,301.41

5,208.28

Training & Comp. - Paralympic

249,255.63

269,913.19

Training & Comp - Pistol

266,523.05

142,684.39

Training & Comp - Rifle

371,999.15

232,688.43

Training & Comp - Shotgun

597,240.12

443,666.96

SA Events

55,828.61

186,817.31

International Events

20,000.00

523,416.02

Benchmark Event

20,463.48

0.00

Expenses - Other

87.19

1,251.88

2,658,948.27

3,434,238.76

13,254.37

81,416.29

Total Expenses

NET PROFIT/(LOSS)

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GENERAL MANAGER HIGH PERFORMANCE REPORT 2016-2017 is the beginning of a new Olympic cycle for Shooting Australia’s (SA) High Performance (HP) Program. Fuelled by the success of our athletes at the Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games there have been a number of important and exciting developments in the program’s strategy and delivery that are intended to underpin even greater success in Tokyo in 2020. These include:

HP STRATEGY AND INVESTMENT 2017-2020 In November 2016, SA presented its HP Strategy for the period 20172020 to a meeting of the National Institute Network (NIN). The meeting provided an opportunity for SA and the NIN Directors to discuss a range of critical factors that had impacted the progress and performance of Shooting’s HP Program during the four years leading up to Rio. It also created a forum for SA to discuss with the NIN how it might contribute to the continuing growth and improved success of Australia’s Olympic and Paralympic Shooting Teams in the future. As a result of these discussions SA successfully negotiated an increase in the Australian Institute of Sport’s (AIS) investment in HP Shooting for the 2020 Olympic cycle and new partnerships and investment from

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the Victorian Institute of Sport (VIS) and the South Australian Sports Institute (SASI). It is important to note that this is the first time state institutes and academies of sport have sought to engage in Shooting’s HP Program and represents the NIN’s growing confidence in SA’s ability to contribute significantly to ‘Australia’s Winning Edge’ performance targets in the years to come. We should pause to reflect on and be proud of this historical development and the efforts (i.e. of many) that have led our sport to this point, particularly when so many other sports are struggling to become and/or remain competitive at the world level. We should also remind ourselves that this progress hasn’t been easy or always popular to achieve. We cannot afford to become complacent about the high standards that we must set for ourselves, or the hard work that we will need to do to maintain and improve these standards in every aspect of our business moving forward.

Our NCEs were launched in March 2017 through a series of orientation and induction camps for athletes in SA’s ‘Aiming4Gold’ (A4G) Squads. The primary focus of these camps was the establishment of strong working relationships between athletes, coaches, and performance support staff. Athletes were invited to explore through individual meetings with a range of service providers how they might incorporate different elements of performance support (e.g. strength and conditioning, psychology, nutrition, skill acquisition, etc.) into their daily training environments, and their preparation for and performance in competition (i.e. both domestic and international). Importantly, our NCEs and the access to services and support that they provide will never replace the need for our athletes to work hard on the range but they do provide significant opportunities for curious and committed athletes to learn more about themselves and how they might realise more of their performance potential, particularly when under the pressure of international competition.

NATIONAL CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE SA’s new partnerships with the VIS and SASI have enabled the establishment of two new National Centres of Excellence (NCE) - One for Pistol and Shotgun in Melbourne, and the other for Rifle in Adelaide. These new NCEs will significantly enhance the work that SA’s National Coaches are doing with our elite and developing elite athletes through the provision of world-class performance support (i.e. sports science and medicine). This represents the start of a ‘brave new world’ for high performance Shooting in Australia and it will both challenge and support our people to become the best they can be and for some, the best in the world.

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

COMPETITION PERFORMANCE Following Catherine Skinner’s goldmedal performance at the Rio Olympics our athletes have continued to shine in international competition. Other medal-winning performances by Australian athletes include: 2016 ISSF World Cup Final James Willett Gold / Men’s Double Trap 2017 ISSF World Cup India Penny Smith Gold / Women’s Trap James Willett Gold / Men’s Double Trap Paul Adams Bronze / Men’s Skeet 2017 WSPS World Cup UAE Anton Zapelli Bronze / R6 50m Rifle Prone Mixed 2017 ISSF World Cup Mexico James Willett Silver / Men’s Double Trap Paul Adams Bronze / Men’s Skeet 2017 ISSF Shotgun World Championships Penny Smith and Thomas Grice Gold / Trap Mixed Teams Catherine Skinner Silver / Women’s Trap Jack Wallace Bronze / Junior Men’s Trap Jack Wallace, Mitchell Iles and Adam Bylsma Gold / Junior Men’s Trap Teams 2017 WSPS World Cup Croatia

These performances, along with those of a growing number of athletes who have qualified for finals and narrowly missed out on podium finishes, suggest that we can be optimistic about our potential to perform at benchmark events in the years to come. Next year’s Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast, and the WSPS and ISSF World Championships in Korea will be important milestones in our journey towards Olympic and Paralympic success in Tokyo 2020.

Through this camp and other camps/ activities in the future we hope to create a strong, positive and inclusive performance culture where individuals feel the support of our group but without compromising their own or each others’ personal needs when preparing for and engaging in competition as members of our A4G Squads and National Teams.

PERFORMANCE CULTURE Despite some promising performances, we cannot afford to be complacent about how challenging it is to be sustainably competitive on the world stage. In addition to the resources that we are continuing to invest in the continuing development of our athletes and coaches, SA and the AIS are collaborating to deliver a program that will seek to enhance the performance culture within Shooting’s HP Program. In July 2017, SA’s entire A4G Squad (more than 40 athletes) plus National Coaches and performances support staff from the VIS, SASI and the Queensland Academy of Sport (QAS) participated in a leadership development camp at the AIS in Canberra. The primary purpose of this camp was to help people learn more about who they are and how they operate (consciously and unconsciously), and to understand how their personal styles might impact on their interactions with others around them, particularly when they are in pressurised situations (e.g. at benchmark events).

Chris Pitt Bronze / P3 25m Pistol Mixed Anton Zapelli Bronze / R3 10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed

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GENERAL MANAGER HIGH PERFORMANCE REPORT RESULTS

RIFLE

ISSF WC NEW DELHI, INDIA PISTOL/RIFLE/SHOTGUN 22nd FEBRUARY - 4th OF MARCH 2017

SWEDISH CUP - INTERNATIONAL AIRGUN COMP SAVSJO, SWEDEN 4th - 7th JANUARY 2017

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Dane Sampson

Men’s 50m Rifle 3 Positions

22nd

1141

Men’s 50m Rifle Prone

20th

615

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Men’s 10m Air Rifle

6th

624

Laura Coles

Skeet Women

25th

62

ISSF WC NEW DELHI, INDIA PISTOL/RIFLE/SHOTGUN 22nd FEBRUARY - 4nd OF MARCH 2017

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Dane Sampson

Men's 10m Air Rifle (Day 1)

GOLD

624

Men's 10m Air Rifle (Day 2)

GOLD

620

Men's 10m Air Rifle (Day 3)

SILVER

623.1

Women's 10m Air Rifle (Day 1)

DNS

DNS

ISSF WC MUNICH, GERMANY PISTOL/RIFLE 17th - 24th MAY 2017

Paul Adams

Skeet Men

BRONZE 123

Women's 10m Air Rifle (Day 2)

DNS

DNS

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

James Willett

Double Trap Men

GOLD

138

Women's 10m Air Rifle (Day 3)

DNS

DNS

Dane Sampson

Men’s 50m Rifle 3 Positions

32nd

1167

Mitchell Iles

Trap Men

22nd

112

Men’s 50m Rifle Prone

16th

624.1

Thomas Grice

Trap Men

21st

112

Men’s 10m Air Rifle

45th

623.9

Laetisha Scanlan

Trap Women

7th

66

James Daly

Men’s 50m Rifle Prone

7th

625.8

Penny Smith

Trap Women

GOLD

68

Jennifer Hens

Women’s 10m Air Rifle

87th

409.8

Emma Cox

Trap Women

24th

60

Rachael Ross

PISTOL

GRAND PRIX OF PLZEN PLZEN, CZECH REPUBLIC 12th - 15th JANUARY 2017

MEYTON CUP TIROL INNSBRUCK, AUSTRIA 20th - 24th JANUARY 2017

SHOTGUN

Aislin Jones

Skeet Women

23rd

64

Keith Ferguson

Skeet Men

14th

119

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Olivia Erickson

Women's 10m Air Pistol

12th

365

Jack Rossiter

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 1)

6th

611.6

Women's 10m Air Pistol Junior

6th

371

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 2)

8th

614.4

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 1)

17th

603.7

ISSF WC GABALA, AZERBAIJAN PISTOL/RIFLE 6th - 14th JUNE 2017

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 2)

23rd

595.3

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 1)

8th

612.3

Dane Sampson

Men’s 50m Rifle 3 Positions

38th

1161

Laura Coles

Skeet Women

9th

68

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 2)

9th

612.7

Men’s 50m Rifle Prone

33rd

621

Aislin Jones

Skeet Women

12th

66

Women's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 1)

6th

411.2

Men’s 10m Air Rifle

50th

617.9

Keith Ferguson

Skeet Men

27th

114

Women's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 2)

18th

405.6

Women’s 10m Air Rifle

36th

412.5

Paul Adams

Skeet Men

BRONZE 120

Women's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 1)

16th

406.5

James Bolding

Skeet Men

32nd

113

Women's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 2)

7th

409.8

Luke Argiro (MQS)

Skeet Men

MQS

107

Women's 10m Air Rifle

8th

413.2

James Willett

Double Trap Men

SILVER

135

Jack Wallace

Trap Men

7th

122

Samuel Bylsma

Trap Men

25th

119

Michael Coles

Trap Men

14th

120

Laetisha Scanlan

Trap Women

7th

70

DNS

DNS

5th

71

Sascha Kroopin

Thomas Ashmore Sergei Evglevski

Bailey Groves

Women's 10m Air Pistol Junior

9th

360

Women's 10m Air Pistol

13th

359

Women's 10m Air Pistol Junior

8th

361

Women's 10m Air Pistol Junior

11th

353

Men's 10m Air Pistol

24th

547

Men's 10m Air Pistol

13th

559

Men's 10m Air Pistol

9th

565

Men's 10m Air Pistol Junior

GOLD

560

Men's 10m Air Pistol Junior

7th

562

Men's 10m Air Pistol

26th

544

Men's 10m Air Pistol Junior

5th

564

Men's 10m Air Pistol Junior

4th

569

Alex Hoberg Daniel Clopatofsky Emma Adams Victoria Rossiter Jennifer Hens

MEYTON CUP TIROL INNSBRUCK, AUSTRIA 20th - 24th JANUARY 2017

Emma Adams

ISSF WC ACAPULCO, MEXICO - SHOTGUN 17th- 27th MARCH 2017

ISSF JUNIOR WCH SUHL, GERMANY PISTOL/RIFLE 22nd - 30th JUNE 2017 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Emma Adams

Women’s 10m Air Rifle

57th

410.5

Victoria Rossiter

Women’s 10m Air Rifle

35th

413.1

Men’s 50m Rifle Prone

39th

613.7

56th

1141

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Mitchell Bailey

INTERNATIONAL AIR GUN COMPETITION IWK MUNICH, GERMANY 25th - 28th JANUARY 2017

Dane Sampson

Men's 10m Air Rifle (Day 1)

13th

620.1

Daniel Clopatofsky Men’s 50m Rifle 3 Positions

Men's 10m Air Rifle (Day 2)

13th

622.7

Men’s 50m Rifle Prone

67th

605.1

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Jack Rossiter

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 1)

13th

610

Men’s 10m Air Rifle

58th

615.7

Olivia Erickson

Women's 10m Air Pistol Junior

48th

361

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 2)

10th

611.3

Alex Hoberg

Men’s 10m Air Rifle

29th

619.7

Men's 10m Air Rifle (Day 2)

25th

616.5

Jack Rossiter

Men’s 50m Rifle 3 Positions

63rd

1134

ISSF WC LARNACA, CYPRUS - SHOTGUN 28th APRIL - 8th MAY

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 1)

19th

606.9

Men’s 50m Rifle Prone

60th

607.8

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

18th

606.7

Men’s 10m Air Rifle

31st

619.4

Thomas Turner

Double Trap Men

29th

115

Trap Men

31st

117

Sascha Kroopin Thomas Ashmore Sergei Evglevski Bailey Groves

Women's 10m Air Pistol Junior

55th

357

Women's 10m Air Pistol Junior

55th

357

47th

363

Men's 10m Air Pistol Junior

78th

553

Men's 10m Air Rifle (Day 2)

37th

605.8

Men's 10m Air Pistol Junior

70th

562

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 1)

7th

616.4

Matthew Schiller

Trap Men

5th

122

Men's 10m Air Pistol Junior

55th

554

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 2)

SILVER

612.5

Todd Malone

Trap Men

62nd

113

Men's 10m Air Pistol Junior

28th

565

Men's 10m Air Rifle (Day 2)

29th

615.1

Gemma Dunn

Trap Women

41st

61

Women's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 1)

18th

410.0

Women's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 2)

11th

411.5

Women's 10m Air Rifle (Day 2)

28th

412.1

Women's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 1)

30th

406.3

Women's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 2)

12th

411.1

Women's 10m Air Rifle (Day 2)

25th

412.4

Men's 10m Air Pistol Junior

57th

553

Men's 10m Air Pistol Junior

34th

563

PLACE

Men’s 25m Rapid Fire Pistol Junior

21st

555

Men’s 25m Rapid Fire Pistol Junior

18th

567

ISSF WC MUNICH, GERMANY PISTOL/RIFLE 17th - 24th MAY 2017 Elena Galiabovitch Women’s 10m Air Pistol Women’s 25m Pistol

PLACE

RESULT

84th

369

21st

579

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Sascha Kroopin

Women’s 10m Air Pistol

102nd

350

Women’s 25m Pistol

65th

533

Women’s 10m Air Pistol

75th

365

Women’s 25m Pistol

17th

571

Men’s 10m Air Pistol

43rd

562

Men’s 25m Rapid Fire Pistol

20th

563

Men’s 25m Standard Pistol

12th

558

Men’s 25m Pistol

15th

576

14

INTERNATIONAL AIR GUN COMPETITION - IWK MUNICH, GERMANY 25th - 28th JANUARY 2017

ISSF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP SHOTGUN - MOSCOW, RUSSIA 30th AUGUST - 11th SEPTEMBER NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

James Willett

Trap Men

47th

115

Matthew Schiller

Trap Men

29th

117

Thomas Grice

Trap Men

21st

119

Penny Smith

Trap Women

24th

66

Laetisha Scanlan

Trap Women

40th

64

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Catherine Skinner

Trap Women

SILVER

71

Dane Sampson

Men's 10m Air Rifle

6th

628.4

James Willett

Double Trap Men

12th

137

Men's 10m Air Rifle

22nd

625.5

Thomas Turner

Double Trap Men

28th

129

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior

23rd

620.5

Paul Adams

Skeet Men

39th

118

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior

57th

614.5

Keith Ferguson

Skeet Men

38th

118

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior

65th

612.8

James Bolding

Skeet Men

65th

114

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior

42nd

616.9

Jack Wallace

Trap Men Junior

BRONZE 121

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior

74th

610.1

Mitchell Iles

Trap Men Junior

5th

121

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior

27th

619.4

Adam Bylsma

Trap Men Junior

28th

109

Women's 10m Air Rifle Junior

24th

413.7

Stephanie Pile

Trap Women Junior

9th

64

Women's 10m Air Rifle Junior

24th

413.5

Tricia Carter

Trap Women Junior

21st

59

Women's 10m Air Rifle Junior

50th

409.9

Mitchell Iles

Double Trap Men Junior

4th

138

Women's 10m Air Rifle Junior

53rd

410.3

Aislin Jones

Skeet Women Junior

4th

69

Women's 10m Air Rifle

88th

407.6

Jack Rossiter Alex Hoberg

ISSF JUNIOR WCH SUHL GERMANY PISTOL/RIFLE 22nd - 30th JUNE 2017

Sergei Evglevski

Emma Adams

RESULT

Sergei Evglevski

EVENT

Daniel Clopatofsky

Victoria Rossiter

Thomas Ashmore

Olivia Erickson

Trap Women

Women's 10m Air Pistol Junior

EVENT

NAME

Emma Cox

Men's 10m Air Rifle Junior (Day 2)

ISSF WC NEW DELHI, INDIA PISTOL/RIFLE/SHOTGUN 22nd FEBRUARY - 4th OF MARCH 2017 NAME

Alex Hoberg

*Catherine Skinner Trap Women

Daniel Clopatofsky Emma Adams Victoria Rossiter Jennifer Hens

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

15


PARA - SHOOTING 2017 SWEDISH CUP - INTERNATIONAL AIRGUN COMP SAVSJO, SWEDEN 4th - 7th JANUARY 2017

RIFLE NAME

EVENT

PLACE RESULT

*Glen McMurtrie

R1 - Men's 10m Air Rifle Standing SH1

DNS

DNS

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

DNS

DNS

WORLD SHOOTING PARA SHOOT (IPC) WORLD CUP AL AIN, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES 19th - 28th FEBURARY 2017 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

R6 - Mixed 50m Rifle Prone SH1

21st

598

RIFLE Glen McMurtrie

Anton Zappelli

R1 - Men's 10m Air Rifle Standing SH1 9th

604.8

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

22nd

618.4

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

6th

632

R6 - Mixed 50m Rifle Prone SH1

BRONZE 615.8

P1 - Men's 10m Air Pistol SH1

5th

551

P3 - Mixed 25m Pistol SH1

7th

562

PISTOL Christopher Pitt

WORLD SHOOTING PARA SHOOT (IPC) GRAND PRIX SZCZECIN, POLAND 24th - 30th APRIL 2017

RIFLE NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Glen McMurtrie

R1 - Men's 10m Air Rifle Standing SH1

9th

611.2

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

18th

624.5

INTERNATIONAL SHOOTING COMPETITION OF HANNOVER, GERMANY 4th - 14th MAY 2017

RIFLE NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Glen McMurtrie

R1 - Men's 10m Air Rifle Standing SH1

12th

606.6

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

27th

626.7

WORLD SHOOTING PARA SHOOT (IPC) WORLD CUP OSIJEK, CROATIA 20th - 26th SEPTEMBER 2017 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

BRONZE

630.9

R6 - Mixed 50m Rifle Prone SH1

10th

611.8

P1 - Men's 10m Air Pistol SH1

15th

546

P3 - Mixed 25m Pistol SH1

BRONZE

565

RIFLE Anton Zappelli

PISTOL Christopher Pitt

* This athlete was selected, but was withdrawn or did not compete

16

17


GOVERNANCE REPORT

MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS REPORT Marketing and communications activities undertaken in 20162017 reinforced Shooting Australia’s positioning as the ‘peak body responsible for the growth, sustainability, and success of target shooting sports in Australia’.

MARKETING Media releases continue to be our best form of marketing and we continue to outline the achievements of our athletes. We actively seek out and encourage media contact with our athletes while providing our athletes with the skills they require to reinforce a positive, gracious and memorable promotion of our sport. This is a message that has seen significant cut through in the time that I have been involved, and it is a joy to see our official words being used in articles and press releases from other Member Bodies, our athletes, and the community. We are designing promotional activity that will focus on “bringing Australia with us” to the home Commonwealth Games and beyond. This is an outstanding opportunity to highlight and share our sport with Australia.

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Our sport continues to receive strong coverage of domestic and international events as our Athletes deliver results; however this coverage continues to originate from Shooting Australia and get pushed to the media rather than being the result of organic recognition of the sport by the media. We are limited by our resources to create required content to maintain momentum and until this is changed our media momentum will remain limited.

SOCIAL MEDIA

We still have a long way to go to to achieve regular mainstream media coverage.

PROACTIVELY WORKING FOR STAKEHOLDERS

EVENTS The year saw the introduction of the Performance Series. Although there is much work to do in this space, having agreed criteria required before an event can receive accreditation as a Performance Series event allows us, through our High-performance team and our accredited officials, to make sure our domestic events are comparable in quality with any international events our athletes may compete in. If the venue and host cannot achieve a minimum standard required for our HP Team and our athletes then it is not a Performance Series event. Much like the “Health Tick” the Shooting Australia Performance Series “tick of approval” means that we can deliver the best domestic events for our athletes.

Shooting Australia continues to grow its online following and at October 2017 has over 8000 followers on Facebook, almost 3000 followers on Twitter, and almost 1000 followers on Instagram. Although the shooting community seems to be the largest audience of these social media channels we would like to extend this to reach an audience seeking more information about our sport.

Increasing the growth in audience for SA increases it for all. In the short term we will improve the ability to use our stories and successes to engage non-shooters in our sport, guiding them to come with us on our journey to a home Commonwealth Games. In the longer term we will continue to explore and experiment with new ways of communicating our sport and its outcomes to a broader community.

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

Below are key achievements against objectives in the Strategic Plan from the last year.

ENABLE SUSTAINED HIGH PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES EFFECTIVE ATHLETE AND COACH PATHWAYS In consultation with Member Bodies and the AIS we produced and delivered a detailed Shooting Australia Athlete Pathway. We employed a National Talent Coach in Rifle in partnership with the South Australian Sports Institute.

MEDALS AT EVENTS THAT MATTER We exceeded agreed AIS medal targets at 2017 Benchmark Events, and achieved two medals (gold and silver) in Olympic Events at World Championship level. We delivered multiple World Cup medals at ISSF junior and senior events and achieved World Championship success in nonOlympic events including National Rifle Association of Australia fullbore events in South Africa and Canada. Sporting Clays Australia athletes also saw success in the World FITASC Sporting Championship and at the World Universal Trench Championship.

MORE PEOPLE PARTICIPATING MORE OFTEN

WHOLE OF SPORT GOVERNANCE IS LED BY BEST PRACTICE

We achieved agreement from all Member Bodies to create and action a Whole of Sport Participation Plan, and delivered the plan with key performance indicators.

We completed and delivered a Whole of Sport Governance Review, and delivered two whole-of-sport workshops to review the Whole of Sport Governance Review and create the Whole of Sport Participation Plan.

We employed a Community Development Officer to build the capacity and capability of the grassroots and drive the outcomes of the Whole of Sport Participation Plan.

We appointed two new highlycredentialed Directors to the Board after a national recruitment process.

ACHIEVE THE HIGHEST STANDARD OF GOVERNANCE AND ADMINISTRATION ACROSS THE WHOLE OF SPORT KEY STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS ARE SOUGHT, DEVELOPED AND MAINTAINED We have maintained healthy and strong relationships with our major investors the Australian Sports Commission, Commonwealth Games Australia, Australian Paralympic Committee and the Australian Olympic Committee. For the first time our sport is a recognised program sport with the Victorian Institute of Sport and South Australian Sports Institute.

EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT WHOLE OF SPORT ADMINISTRATION Executive Officers from the Member Bodies and SA met for the first time to discuss operational opportunities, and agreed to work together to seek a joint insurance scheme for all Member Bodies and SA.

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PROMOTE TARGET SHOOTING SPORTS

CREATE FINANCIAL SECURITY

A POSITIVE PUBLIC IMAGE

NEW INCOME STREAMS GENERATED

SA delivered multiple sessions to athletes on public perceptions and creating a positive public image, and commenced a brand repositioning through all forms of media and communication.

SA IS POSITIONED AS A LEADING NSO SA was rated highly compared to other NSO’s in the Annual Sport Performance Review conducted by the Australian Sports Commission. A new team uniform has been designed and produced with wonderful industry feedback.

MEDIA OPPORTUNITIES MAXIMISED We are measuring all social media and communications and are seeing a significant increase in reach and audience. We have begun filming a new series of athlete stories to be utilised through the media and through our digital channels.

We have unlocked additional support through the Australian Institute of Sport to increase our funding for 2017-18 and we successfully applied for new money through Commonwealth Games Australia to assist in the preparation of our team for the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games.

COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITIES DEVELOPED AND DELIVERED We have negotiated commercial relationships with hotel suppliers in both Brisbane and Sydney. We have won the right to host an ISSF Junior World Cup in March 2018. We are currently finalising negotiations to host the 2019 World Shooting Para Sport World Championship.

COACH’S REPORT RIFLE 2017 marks the beginning of a new four-year cycle in preparation for the Tokyo Olympic Games. The main objective therefore is to build a squad of athletes who will be competitive for the future. The A4G Squad for rifle consists of six juniors and one adult, which highlights the long-term vision. This was also our first season without Warren Potent in the squad. For many Olympic Cycles we have had Warren as a dependable team member, with solid international performances and medals. In the lead up to his retirement there was fear that the rifle team would become weaker without him; however it has been pleasing to see Dane Sampson and James Daly make finals in World Cups in air rifle and prone respectively. These results are promising in the lead up to the Commonwealth Games next year. The junior athletes have also made some significant improvements, and are demonstrating more consistency in competitions. In the first ever Junior World Championships in Suhl, Germany, Alex Hoberg and Tori Rossiter both performed well and shot personal bests that were of a high standard. The Junior Male air rifle team also shot a new Australian record in Suhl.

This year Shooting Australia has formalised a relationship with the South Australian Sports Institute (SASI), a relationship which has been in negotiation for some time. The result is that we now have a fully functioning National Centre of Excellence for Shooting, and our daily training program now incorporates the strength and conditioning, psychology, nutrition, and personal excellence. This has allowed us to professionalise the preparations with the A4G Squadded Athletes who are based in Adelaide. We are very excited by the opportunities that working in partnership with SASI has given the rifle program, and we look forward to how this will develop over time. Our partnership with SASI has enabled Shooting Australia to create a new coaching role for rifle–Rifle National Talent Coach–and Carrie Quigley was employed in this role. This has allowed us to begin to work more closely in the Athlete Pathway, and to begin developing the next generation of athletes. Carrie has been actively working in this space for some time, and it is positive to see her in this position. It has been a big year for domestic competitions, and the quality of these competitions has been high. Thank you to the Volunteers, Range Officials, and Canteen Workers who have worked tirelessly for the athletes to make the competitions successful. These competitions provide necessary experience for our athletes, and we are grateful for their commitment to running them so well.

PETR KURKA NATIONAL PERFORMANCE COACH

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// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

21


22

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

23


COACH’S REPORT SHOTGUN I was appointed as National High Performance Coach of the Shotgun team in December 2016. After 23 years on the Australian team as an athlete, what a learning curve it has been for me–and also for the athletes as they come to terms with a new coach. 2017 so far has been a very successful year for the Shotgun Team, starting with the Australian National Championships in January where we witnessed many shooters, including juniors, shooting benchmark scores (BMS) across all disciplines which activated opportunities for all those athletes to participate at an international event. Rule changes in finals, the inclusion of Mixed Team events (format still TBC), and the removal of the Double Trap will certainly make it interesting as we progress through the year. In February our new A4G team was announced, with 19 athletes including juniors making up the squad. A new program has been introduced with the goal of supporting these selected athletes on- and off-range to maximize their performances with the help of a dedicated network of service providers from the VIS in the areas of sports psychology, physio, strength and conditioning, nutrition and sports science. Two training camps were held in Canberra, the focus being team culture and improving personal and team interaction. I am very pleased with the entire team’s attitude and each athlete’s commitment

24

to achieving the best result for themselves and our country. It’s great to see them all supporting each other on and off the range during international competitions as we work towards the Commonwealth Games in April 2018 and through to the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. In June we sent our A4G junior team to Germany to compete in a Grand Prix along with some of our developing juniors to gain experience and understanding of what it’s like to represent Australia and be part of a team environment. We had some great results with Aislin Jones winning Gold in Women’s Skeet, Jack Wallace winning gold and Mitchell Iles taking silver in Men’s Trap, and Stef Pile making the final in Women’s Trap.

INDIA WORLD CUP Our first International event for 2017 and what a great start to the year with Penny Smith winning gold in Women’s Trap at her first senior event and James Willett continuing from his successful 2016 year to win gold in Double Trap. Paul Adams won Bronze in Men’s Skeet which was a fantastic result for him and this discipline as it was roughly 13 years ago that we last had a Men’s Skeet shooter on the podium at a World Cup.

MEXICO WORLD CUP Long flights and issues with gun permits didn’t affect our athletes with strong performances from Emma Cox making the final finishing in 5th place and Laetisha Scanlan shooting off for a spot in the final and just missing out in the Women’s Trap. Jack Wallace still in juniors made the shoot off for the final in the senior Men’s Trap event and only just missed out finishing 7th. The ever-consistent James Willett came home with silver in Double Trap after a hard-fought

battle and again Paul Adams still on a high from India taking home another bronze in Skeet.

CYPRUS WORLD CUP Only four athletes competed at this event, which was made up of non A4G members from benchmark scores (BMS) recorded from January. Matt Schiller in his first World Cup and International event representing Australia in Men’s Trap shot 122/125 and earned a spot in the final to finish in 5th place alongside some of the world’s best. His performance qualified Matt to be part of the World Cup Final team in October. Matt’s efforts gained him a spot in the A4G squad bringing the total number of members to 20.

RUSSIA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS Our campaign started in Darwin two weeks prior to the first of our team boarding the plane. The focus at this camp was training, finishing with the SA/PS competition. Our physio was on hand for the first three days to make sure all bodies were coping with the heavy load of training and gym sessions the athletes were doing each day. This World Championships had its ups and downs in many ways but the determination and team effort from athletes and staff was incredible to watch as we came away from this event with more medals and finals inclusions than any World Championships I can remember.

two juniors along with Adam Bylsma were also crowned Junior World Champions. The inclusion of the Trap Mixed Teams at this event proved we are on track in this space, with newlycrowned World Champions Penny Smith and Tom Grice. Catherine Skinner and Jack Wallace shot off for the final but were eliminated in 4th. Mitchell Iles continued his good form only just missing a medal, finishing 4th place in a controversial Junior Men’s Double Trap. In Skeet Aislin Jones in only her second World Championships also just missed standing on the podium with a 4th place in Junior Women’s. The final event was the Skeet Mixed Pairs with Aislin Jones and Keith Ferguson unfortunately missing the final after a shoot off. Shotgun has six athletes qualified for the World Cup final and I believe the team is on the right path to deliver medals at next year’s Commonwealth Games and Olympic Games in 2020. I wish all athletes the best in their preparations for the World Cup Final and final two selection events in this 2017 calendar year.

ADAM VELLA NATIONAL HIGH PERFORMANCE SHOTGUN COACH

Catherine Skinner showed us why she is the current Olympic Champion finishing with a silver medal in Women’s Trap. Juniors Jack Wallace and Mitchell Iles both shot 121/125 making the final, with Jack taking out the bronze and Mitchell 5th place in Junior Men’s Trap. To cap it off these

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

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COACH’S REPORT PISTOL Our Pistol Athletes finished the 2016 Year by competing in the Olympic Games. All of us have tried to do our best on the day but unfortunately we have not always succeeded. Let us to look at the winners of the Olympic Games in 2016. We find that there were many young winners: 50m Men winner Jin Jongoh from Korea – 37 years old (first Olympic Games at 25 and first Gold medal at 29); 25m Rapid Fire Men winner Reitz Christian – 29 years old (first Olympic Games at 21 and first Bronze medal at 21), 10m Air Pistol Men winner Hoang Xuan Vinh – 42 years old military officer from Vietnam (first Olympic Games at 38 and the Gold Medal at 42), 25m Women Pistol winner Zang Mengxue from China – 25 years old (first Olympic Games at 25 and first Gold Medal at 25), 10m Air Pistol Women winner Korakaki Anna from Greece – 20 years old (first Olympic Games at 20 and the Gold Medal at 20). We need to direct our attention to building up our program, to developing the young generation of the athletes able to compete internationally.

SA faces a challenge – how to get young athletes to the sport? The High Performance Program in Pistol has undertaken a responsibility for young athletes; 3 years ago Sergei Evglevski, Thomas Ashmore, Bailey Grove, 2 years ago Sasha Kroopin; and now Olivia Erickson has joined the program. These young athletes have been developed along with more experienced athletes Daniel Repacholi, Lalita Yauhleuskaya, Elena Galiabovitch, Emily Esposito, and Hayley Chapman. In January this year we have selected the group of young athletes to aim at 2020 and future Olympic Games. There 7 athletes in the Program: Thomas Ashmore (ACT, 21 years old) Hayley Chapman (SA, 25 years old) Olivia Erickson (NSW, 15 years old) Sergei Evglevski (VIC, 19 years old) Bailey Groves (TAS, 20 years old) Elena Galiabovitch (VIC, 27 years old) Sascha Kroopin (NSW/VIC, 16 years old) Our young athletes have progressed well in their skills development. We have had a training camp in Germany in January following by competitions in Austria and Germany.

In Austria and Germany our young athletes have had the following performance:

AUSTRIA Olivia Erickson / Women’s 10m Air Pistol 12th 365 / Women’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 6th 371 / Women’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 9th 360 Sascha Kroopin / Women’s 10m Air Pistol 13th 359 / Women’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 8th 361 / Women’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 11th 353 Thomas Ashmore / Men’s 10m Air Pistol 24th 547 / Men’s 10m Air Pistol 13th 559 Sergei Evglevski / Men’s 10m Air Pistol 9th 565 / Men’s 10m Air Pistol Junior GOLD 560 / Men’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 7th 562 Bailey Groves / Men’s 10m Air Pistol 26th 544 / Men’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 5th 564 / Men’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 4th 569

GERMANY Olivia Erickson / Women’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 48th 361 / Women’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 55th 357 Sascha Kroopin / Women’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 55th 357 / Women’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 47th 363 Thomas Ashmore / Men’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 78th 553 / Men’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 70th 562 Sergei Evglevski / Men’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 55th 554 / Men’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 28th 565 Bailey Groves / Men’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 57th 553 / Men’s 10m Air Pistol Junior 34th 563

26

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

Overall performance has been close to the average for a group, including a personal best for Olivia in the air pistol discipline in Austria and Gold for Sergei in Austria as well.

The Junior National Team for the Junior World Championship in Germany.

In February Sergei and Thomas went to the ISSF World Cup in New Delhi, India. We gave an opportunity for both of them try the venue where we will start the qualification competition for the Olympic Games in 2019. The conditions of the competition were different and difficult for young shooters: the wind was moving the arm and body. Their performance was:

Olivia Erickson / Women’s 10m Air Pistol 75th from 106 - 365 / Women’s 25m Sport Pistol 17th from 67 - 571

Thomas Ashmore / 25m Rapid Fire Pistol Men Junior 21st 555 Sergei Evglevski / 25m Rapid Fire Pistol Men Junior 18th 567 The next important competition was the PA National Championship in Cessnock. Two of our athletes delivered a great performance: Sergei won all the National Titles in the junior division, was a winner in the Rapid Fire and Standard Pistol events, as well finishing 3rd in the Air Pistol match; Elena Galiabovitch won two National titles, Sport Pistol and Air Pistol. Our young women performed close to or higher than average. Olivia showed another good score in the air Pistol 374, Sascha’s score was 367 and she did not get to the final missing by 1 point. In the Sport Pistol they have been good as well: Sascha Kroopin shot her PB score of 566 and Olivia 558 finished in the final on 6th and 4th place respectively. Thomas Ashmore shot the second best score in the qualification; however he did not get on the podium.

The Athletes’ performances were:

Sascha Kroopin / Women’s 10m Air Pistol 102th from 106 - 350 / Women’s 25m Sport Pistol 65th from 67 - 533 Sergei Evglevski / Men’s 10m Air Pistol 43th from 98 – 562 / Men’s 25m Sport Pistol 15th from 53 – 576 / Men’s 25m Standard Pistol 12th from 40 – 558 / Men’s 25m Rapid Fire Pistol 20th from 36 – 563 The Victorian Institute of Sport has included the Pistol program and Shotgun Program in the basic sports that receive support from all services available at the VIS. It is so exciting. All our athletes starting from April were involved in the training camp with the specialists from VIS. We are looking forward for a long and successful partnership with VIS. VIS has individual scholarships in place as well. If any State would like their best young athletes to be involved in the work with SA and VIS do not hesitate to contact the VIS shooting program coordinator Nick Sanders.

VLADIMIR GALIABOVITCH

27


COACH’S REPORT PARASHOOTING AIMING4GOLD SQUAD After extensive reviews, in December 2016 SA publicised the new selection policies and new approach to the SA High Performance Program. Also in December our new A4G Squad was announced with the four Para-Shooting athletes invited to the Squad: 1. Natalie Smith QLD / Rifle / SH1 2. Anton Zappelli WA / Rifle / SH1 3. Glen McMurtrie QLD / Rifle / SH1

UAE (FEB)

CROATIA (SEP)

Anton Zappelli started season with his PB and the first ever medal in R6-’22 Prone (Bronze) and in R3-Air Prone he made the Final and finished in 6th position. Chris Pitt made 2 Finals with the solid scores and finished 5th in P1-Air Pistol and 7th in P3-25m Pistol. Our new athlete in the Squad, Glen McMurtrie shot solid scores with the best finish in R1-Air Standing in 9th position.

Once again Osijek was good for our two athletes. Chris Pitt won the bronze medal in P3-25m Pistol with 565 and a good final performance. In his second event P1-Air Pistol Chris finished in 15th position.

POLAND (APRIL) & GERMANY (MAY) Only Glen McMurtrie attended those two competitions, Glen’s intention being to gain more international experience and achieve MQS scores. In Poland Glen finished 9th in R1-Air Standing with his new international PB. In the same event in Germany, Glen finished 12th. Also, on this trip Glen achieved his MQS scores in R1 and R3.

Anton Zappelli won his second bronze in 2017, this time in R3-Air Prone. After a solid performance in qualifications Anton shot a very good Final and took the medal ahead of Paralympic Champions Vadovicova and Skelhon. Big THANK YOU to all our SA staff for their support and good work, the Australia Paralympic Committee for their ongoing support, and our athletes and support staff for their full commitment and hard work throughout the year.

MIROSLAV SIPEK NATIONAL HEAD COACH PARA-SHOOTING

4. Christopher Pit QLD / Pistol / SH1 All athletes in SA A4G Squad received an agreed individualised Athlete Performance Plan and competitions calendar, provided by the National Head Coach. As per individual plans and Selection Policy SA selected athletes for the WSPS World Cups in 2017 as follow: Al Ain UAE Anton Zappelli, Glen McMurtrie and Chris Pitt Szczecin POL & Hanover GER Glen McMurtrie Osijek CRO Anton Zappelli and Chris Pitt Bangkok THA Anton Zappelli, Glen McMurtrie and Chris Pitt

28

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

THE 2016 SHOOTING AUSTRALIA AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE The Shooting Australia Awards of Excellence were hosted by Annabelle Williams OAM in Sydney on Saturday 11 February. The event acknowledged the preceding year’s achievements from High Performance Athletes, Coaches, and Volunteers.

The 2016 Athlete of the Year and recipient of the Ashley Adams Perpetual Trophy–recognising the best and fairest athlete of a calendar year as voted upon by only Aiming4Gold squadded athletes. CATHERINE SKINNER

Also announced on the night were: The winner of the 2016 Female Shooter of the Year Award CATHERINE SKINNER The winner of the 2016 Male Shooter of the Year Award JAMES WILLETT The co-winners of the 2016 Para-shooter Athlete of the Year Award CHRIS PITT AND NATALIE SMITH The winner of the 2016 Junior Pistol Athlete of the Year Award SERGEI EVGLEVSKI The winner of the 2016 Junior Rifle Athlete of the Year Award JACK ROSSITER The winner of the 2016 Junior Shotgun Athlete of the Year Award JACK WALLACE The winner of the 2016 Volunteer of the Year Award MORRIE MUEHLBERG The winner of the 2016 Official of the Year Award GLENISS LAWRENCE The winner of the 2016 Coach of the Year Award KEN ASQUITH The winner of the 2016 Media Award THE HAMISH AND ANDY SHOW

29


FINANCIAL REPORT Australian International Shooting Ltd Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30 June 2017

DIRECTORS’ REPORT 30 JUNE 2017 The directors present their report on Australian International Shooting Ltd for the financial year ended 30 June 2017.

1. GENERAL INFORMATION

DIRECTORS The names of each person who has been a director during the year and to the date of this report are: Catherine Fettell Experience The President of Shooting Australia since 2012 and a member of the Board since 2011. Cath is an experienced Director having also been the President of Pistol Australia from 2004 to 2011 and has held numerous other Director roles at National, State and Club level. Awarded the Australian Sports Medal by the Australian Government in 2000 for recognition of services to shooting, she currently sits on the Firearms Industry Reference Group and is the Australian representative to the International Shooting Sport Federation and Oceania Shooting Federation. Bruce Scott Experience An Australian Defence Force Senior Inquiry Officer with 42 years of Military experience. He has represented Australia internationally as a long

30

range target rifle shooter (both as an individual, coach and team member) 1997 – 2007. He is a Commonwealth Games Gold Medallist, multiple Townsville Sports Star of the Year Award winner and has been either Chairman or Deputy Chairman of North Queensland Rifle Association for the last decade. Alan Smith Experience The current President of Queensland Target Sports, the President of Commonwealth Games Australia Queensland Branch and delegate to the Queensland Olympic Committee. Alan is also an accomplished athlete and coach having represented Australia on the international stage and being a Commonwealth Games Medallist. Catherine Clark Experience An experienced Board Director, CEO, and Senior Executive with previous roles in Australian and New Zealand Governments and leadership posts in national and international sports organisations. Catherine excels at leading change and innovation Catherine is the current CEO of Netball Queensland and has also previously held the role of CEO of Gymnastics Australia. Andrew Sims Appointed 1 August 2017 Experience An experienced Director and past Chairman with 15 years’ Board experience and 30 years’ senior executive experience. His CEO and senior management experience was focussed in the infrastructure investment, funds management and finance sectors. He describes himself as a lifelong and avid competitive shooter, having pursued the sport of shooting in three different countries and is a state and Australian representative.

Clive Pugh Appointed 1 August 2017

2. OTHER ITEMS

Experience An experienced Director and Senior Manager with experience on a number of not for profit and Association Boards. He has experience in commercial dealings in sales, marketing and finance in international markets as well as leading wholesale and manufacturing business in Australia. He has been actively involved in the shooting industry for more than 10 years and has a sound understanding of the challenges facing the sport from a commercial, regulatory and governance point of view.

SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN STATE OF AFFAIRS

Lisa Cook Resigned 1 March 2017 Kelvyn Prescott Resigned 1 March 2017 Directors have been in office since the start of the financial year to the date of this report unless otherwise stated.

There have been no significant changes in the state of affairs of the Company during the year.

EVENTS AFTER THE REPORTING DATE

AUDITOR’S INDEPENDENCE DECLARATION

AUSTRALIAN INTERNATIONAL SHOOTING LIMITED

The auditor’s independence declaration in accordance with section 307C of the Corporations Act 2001, for the year ended 30 June 2017 has been received and can be found below. Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors:

AUDITOR’S INDEPENDENCE DECLARATION UNDER SECTION 307C OF THE CORPORATIONS ACT 2001 TO THE DIRECTORS OF AUSTRALIAN INTERNATIONAL

No matters or circumstances have arisen since the end of the financial year which significantly affected or could significantly affect the operations of the Company, the results of those operations or the state of affairs of the Company in future financial years.

CATHERINE FETTELL

MEETINGS OF DIRECTORS

ANDREW SIMS

During the financial year, 7 meetings of directors (including committees of directors) were held. Attendances by each director during the year were as follows:

DIRECTOR

DIRECTOR Dated this 10th day of October 2017

SHOOTING LIMITED I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, during the year ended 30 June 2017 there have been: (i) no contraventions of the auditor’s independence requirements as set out in the Corporations Act 2001 in relation to the audit; and (ii) no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit. Bentleys SA Audit Partnership

DIRECTOR MEETINGS

Principal activities The principal activity of Australian International Shooting Ltd during the financial year was to support competition shooting sports opportunities. No significant changes in the nature of the Company’s activity occurred during the financial year.

Number eligible to attend

Number attended

Catherine Fettell

7

7

Bruce Scott

7

7

Alan Smith

7

6

DAVID FRANCIS

Catherine Clark

7

5

PARTNER

Andrew Sims

-

-

Clive Pugh

-

-

Lisa Cook

5

4

Kelvyn Prescott

5

4

Dated at Adelaide this 10th day of October 2017.

Members’ guarantee Australian International Shooting Ltd is a company limited by guarantee. In the event of, and for the purpose of winding up of the company, the amount capable of being called up from each member and any person or association who ceased to be a member in the year prior to the winding up, is limited to $10 for members that are corporations and $10 for all other members, subject to the provisions of the company’s constitution.

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

31


FINANCIAL REPORT Statement of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income For the Year Ended 30 June 2017

Note

Total ($)

716,679

716,679

(6,916)

(6,916)

709,763

709,763

Retained Earnings ($)

Total ($)

691,925

691,925

24,754

24,754

716,679

716,679

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

2,918,393

3,478,005

(2,630,245)

(3,421,188)

8,469

26,362

296,617

83,179

Purchase of property, plant and equipment

(58,696)

(40,325)

Net cash used by investing activities

(58,696)

(40,325)

2,672,384

3,522,818

Balance at 1 July 2016

(541,723)

(506,706)

Profit attributable to members of the entity

(21,490)

(15,278)

(309,258)

(314,885)

(74,712)

(157,117)

(1,518,300)

(1,675,532)

Pathways / participation

(117,526)

(118,312)

Balance at 1 July 2015

Events

(96,291)

(710,234)

Profit attributable to members of the entity

PROFIT FOR THE YEAR

(6,916)

24,754

TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE INCOME FOR THE YEAR

(6,916)

24,754

Revenue

4

Depreciation and amortisation expense Other expenses Board & governance High performance

2017

ASSETS

Note

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

Cash and cash equivalents

5

1,222,667

984,746

Trade and other receivables

6

55,596

71,777

1,278,263

1,056,523

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS NON-CURRENT ASSETS Property, plant and equipment

7

87,130

48,443

Intangible assets

8

8,476

12,949

95,606

61,392

1,373,869

1,117,915

TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES

Note

BALANCE AT 30 JUNE 2017

2016

Note

BALANCE AT 30 JUNE 2016

Statement of Cash Flows For the Year Ended 30 June 2017

CURRENT ASSETS

Note CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES: Receipts from customers Payments to suppliers and employees Interest received NET CASH PROVIDED BY/(USED IN) OPERATING ACTIVITIES

15

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:

CURRENT LIABILITIES Trade and other payables

9

175,287

126,690

Proceeds from borrowings

-

-

Employee benefits

11

182,819

206,843

Repayment of borrowings

-

-

Other financial liabilities

10

306,000

67,703

Net cash used by financing activities

-

-

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES

664,106

401,236

237,921

42,854

NET ASSETS

709,763

716,679

Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents held Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

984,746

941,892

Retained earnings

709,763

716,679

1,222,667

984,746

TOTAL EQUITY

709,763

716,679

EQUITY

32

Retained Earnings ($)

2016 ($)

Administrative wages

Statement of Financial Position 30 June 2017

Statement of Changes in Equity For the Year Ended 30 June 2017

2017 ($)

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

Cash and cash equivalents at end of financial year

5

33


FINANCIAL REPORT NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2017 The financial report covers Australian International Shooting Ltd as an individual entity. Australian International Shooting Ltd is a not-for-profit Company limited by guarantee, incorporated and domiciled in Australia. The functional and presentation currency of Australian International Shooting Ltd is Australian dollars. Comparatives are consistent with prior years, unless otherwise stated.

1. BASIS OF PREPARATION In the Directors opinion, the Company is not a reporting entity since there are unlikely to exist users of the financial statements who are not able to command the preparation of reports tailored so as to satisfy specifically all of their information needs. This special purpose financial report has been prepared to meet the reporting requirements of the Corporations Act 2001. The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the recognition and measurement requirements of the Australian Accounting Standards and Accounting Interpretations, and the disclosure requirements of AASB 101 Presentation of Financial Statements, AASB 107 Statement of Cash Flows, AASB 108 Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors and AASB 1054 Australian Additional Disclosures.

34

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (a) Income Tax The Company is exempt from income tax under Division 50 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997. (b) Revenue and other income Revenue is recognised when the amount of the revenue can be measured reliably, it is probable that economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the Company and specific criteria relating to the type of revenue as noted below, has been satisfied. Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable and is presented net of returns, discounts and rebates.

recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is classified as operating cash flows. (d) Property, plant and equipment Each class of property, plant and equipment is carried at cost or fair value less, where applicable, any accumulated depreciation and impairment. Where the cost model is used, the asset is carried at its cost less any accumulated depreciation and any impairment losses. Costs include purchase price, other directly attributable costs and the initial estimate of the costs of dismantling and restoring the asset, where applicable. Intangible assets - software

All revenue is stated net of the amount of goods and services tax (GST).

Software has a finite life and is carried at cost less any accumulated amortisation and impairment losses. It has an estimated useful life of between one and three years.

Interest revenue

Depreciation

Interest is recognised using the effective interest method.

Property, plant and equipment, excluding freehold land, is depreciated on a reducing balance basis over the assets useful life to the Company, commencing when the asset is ready for use.

(c) Goods and services tax (GST) Revenue, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of goods and services tax (GST), except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO).

The depreciation rates used for each class of depreciable asset are shown below:

Receivables and payable are stated inclusive of GST.

Fixed asset class Depreciation rate

The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO is included as part of receivables or payables in the statement of financial position.

At the end of each annual reporting period, the depreciation method, useful life and residual value of each asset is reviewed. Any revisions are accounted for prospectively as a change in estimate.

Cash flows in the statement of cash flows are included on a gross basis and the GST component of cash flows arising from investing and financing activities which is

Plant & Equipment 15 - 50%

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

(e) Financial instruments Financial instruments are recognised initially using trade date accounting, i.e. on the date that the Company becomes party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. On initial recognition, all financial instruments are measured at fair value plus transaction costs (except for instruments measured at fair value through profit or loss where transaction costs are expensed as incurred). Financial Assets Financial assets are divided into the following categories which are described in detail below; Financial assets are assigned to the different categories on initial recognition, depending on the characteristics of the instrument and its purpose. A financial instrument’s category is relevant to the way it is measured and whether any resulting income and expenses are recognised in profit or loss or in other comprehensive income. All income and expenses relating to financial assets are recognised in the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income in the ‘finance income’ or ‘finance costs’ line item respectively. Loans and receivables Loans and receivables are nonderivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market. They arise principally through the provision of goods and services to customers but also incorporate other types of contractual monetary assets.

After initial recognition these are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, less provision for impairment. Any change in their value is recognised in profit or loss. The Company’s trade and other receivables fall into this category of financial instruments. Significant receivables are considered for impairment on an individual asset basis when they are past due at the reporting date or when objective evidence is received that a specific counterparty will default. The amount of the impairment is the difference between the net carrying amount and the present value of the future expected cash flows associated with the impaired receivable. In some circumstances, the Company renegotiates repayment terms with customers which may lead to changes in the timing of the payments, the Company does not necessarily consider the balance to be impaired, however assessment is made on a case-by-case basis. Financial liabilities The Company‘s financial liabilities include borrowings, trade and other payables (including finance lease liabilities), which are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest rate method. Impairment of financial assets At the end of the reporting period the Company assesses whether there is any objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired.

(f) Impairment of non-financial assets At the end of each reporting period the Company determines whether there is an evidence of an impairment indicator for non-financial assets. Where the recoverable amount is less than the carrying amount, an impairment loss is recognised in profit or loss. Reversal indicators are considered in subsequent periods for all assets which have suffered an impairment loss. (g) Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents comprises cash on hand, demand deposits and short-term investments which are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of change in value. (h) Employee benefits Provision is made for the Company’s liability for employee benefits arising from services rendered by employees to the end of the reporting period. Employee benefits have been measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liability is settled. Employee benefits are presented as current liabilities in the statement of financial position if the Company does not have an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least twelve months after the reporting date regardless of the classification of the liability for measurement purposes under AASB 119 Employee Benefits. A liability for long service leave is recognised after an employee has completed five years of service based on remuneration rates current at the end of the reporting period.

35


FINANCIAL REPORT

7. PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

241,267

197,909

(178,284)

(170,104)

62,983

27,805

18,480

18,480

(14,649)

(13,986)

3,831

4,494

At cost

10,672

10,672

Accumulated depreciation

(9,860)

(9,589)

812

1,083

53,883

186,352

(36,937)

(174,678)

16,946

11,674

7,394

13,851

(4,836)

(10,464)

2,558

3,387

87,130

48,443

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

Cost

18,429

17,949

Accumulated amortisation

(9,953)

(5,000)

8,476

12,949

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

Trade payables

88,246

54,977

Accrued expenses

28,015

16,588

Other payables

59,026

55,125

175,287

126,690

TARGET EQUIPMENT At cost

3. CRITICAL ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES AND JUDGMENTS

The directors make estimates and judgements during the preparation of these financial statements regarding assumptions about current and future events affecting transactions and balances.

Accumulated depreciation

These estimates and judgements are based on the best information available at the time of preparing the financial statements, however as additional information is known then the actual results may differ from the estimates.

At cost

Total target equipment FURNITURE, FIXTURES AND FITTINGS

Accumulated depreciation Total furniture, fixtures and fittings FIREARMS

4. REVENUE AND OTHER INCOME

REVENUE FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

FINANCE INCOME Interest received

8,469

Total firearms

26,362

OFFICE EQUIPMENT

OTHER REVENUE Grants Other income

TOTAL REVENUE

3,355,379

50,497

141,077

2,663,915

3,496,456

2,672,384

3,522,818

At cost Accumulated depreciation Total office equipment DIAGNOSTIC EQUIPMENT At cost Accumulated depreciation

5. CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

6. TRADE AND OTHER RECEIVABLES

2,613,418

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

Total diagnostic equipment

Cash at bank and in hand

844,976

609,185

TOTAL PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

Short-term deposits

377,691

375,561

1,222,667

984,746

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

55,396

50,893

200

7,420

-

13,464

55,596

71,777

CURRENT Trade receivables Deposits GST receivable TOTAL TRADE AND OTHER RECEIVABLES

8. INTANGIBLE ASSETS

SOFTWARE

TOTAL INTANGIBLES

9. TRADE AND OTHER PAYABLES

CURRENT

Trade and other payables are unsecured, non-interest bearing and are normally settled within 30 days. The carrying amounts are considered to be a reasonable approximation of fair value.

10. OTHER FINANCIAL LIABILITIES

36

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

CURRENT

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

INCOME IN ADVANCE

306,000

67,703

37


FINANCIAL REPORT 11. EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

16. STATUTORY INFORMATION

Australian International Shooting Ltd 6 Walsh Avenue St Marys SA 5048 CURRENT LIABILITIES

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

76,990

84,070

Annual leave

105,829

122,773

TOTAL CURRENT EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

182,819

206,843

Long service leave

12. MEMBERS’ GUARANTEE

13. KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL DISCLOSURES

14. CONTINGENCIES 15. CASH FLOW INFORMATION

The registered office and principal place of business of the company is:

The Company is incorporated under the Corporations Act 2001 and is a Company limited by guarantee. If the Company is wound up, the constitution states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of $10 each towards meeting any outstandings and obligations of the Company.

DIRECTORS’ DECLARATION

The directors have determined that the Company is not a reporting entity and that these special purpose financial statements should be prepared in accordance with the accounting policies described in Note 2 of the financial statements. The directors of the Company declare that: 1. The financial statements and notes, as set out on pages 5 to 15, are in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001 and:

The number of key management personnel of Australian International Shooting Ltd and their respective salary bands during the year are as follows: 2017 ($)

2016 ($)

$0 - $50,000

-

-

$50,001 - $100,000

2

2

$101,000 - $150,000

2

2

TOTAL

4

4

In the opinion of the Directors, the Company did not have any contingencies at 30 June 2017 (30 June 2016: None). (a) Reconciliation of result for the year to cashflows from operating activities

(a) comply with Australian Accounting Standards as stated in Note 1; and (b) give a true and fair view of the financial position as at 30 June 2017 and of the performance for the year ended on that date in accordance with the accounting policy described in Note 2 of the financial statements. 2. In the directors’ opinion, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Company will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. This declaration is made in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors.

Reconciliation of net income to net cash provided by operating activities: Director

Profit for the year

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

(6,916)

24,754

CASH FLOWS EXCLUDED FROM PROFIT ATTRIBUTABLE TO OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Director

NON-CASH FLOWS IN PROFIT:

Dated this 10th day of October 2017

amortisation

4,473

4,473

depreciation

17,017

10,805

(profit)/loss on fixed asset disposals

2,992

-

16,181

382

238,297

(32,297)

48,597

33,324

increase/(decrease) in provisions

(24,024)

41,738

CASHFLOWS FROM OPERATIONS

296,617

83,179

CHANGES IN ASSETS AND LIABILITIES: (increase)/decrease in trade and other receivables increase/(decrease) in income in advance increase/(decrease) in trade and other payables

38

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

39


FINANCIAL REPORT

Report on the Audit of the Financial Report

INDEPENDENT AUDIT REPORT TO THE MEMBERS OF AUSTRALIAN INTERNATIONAL SHOOTING LIMITED

We have audited the accompanying financial report, being a special purpose financial report, of Australian International Shooting Limited which comprises the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2017, the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, and notes to the financial statements, including a summary of significant accounting policies and the directors’ declaration.

Opinion

In our opinion, the financial report of Australian International Shooting Limited is in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001, including: (a) giving a true and fair view of Australian International Shooting Limited’s financial position as at 30 June 2017 and of its performance for the year ended on that date; and (b) complying with Australian Accounting Standards to the extent described in Note 1 and the Corporations Regulations 2001. Basis for Opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report section of our report. We are independent of the company in accordance with the auditor independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001 and the ethical requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the

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Code) that are relevant to our audit of the financial report in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with the Code. We confirm that the independence declaration required by the Corporations Act 2001, which has been given to the directors of the company, would be in the same terms if given to the directors as at the time of this auditor’s report. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion Directors’ Responsibility for the Financial Report The directors of the company are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and have determined that the basis of preparation described in Note 1 to the financial report is appropriate to meet the requirements of the Corporations Act 2001 and is appropriate to meet the needs of the members. The directors’ responsibility also includes such internal control as the directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of a financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial report, the directors are responsible for assessing the company’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters relating to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the directors either intend to liquidate the company or to cease operations, or have no realistic alternative but to do so.

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

Auditor’s Responsibility for the Financial Report Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of this financial report. As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards, we exercise professional judgment and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. We also: • Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control.

• Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the company’s internal control. • Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the directors. • Conclude on the appropriateness of the directors’ use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the company’s ability to continue as a going concern. If we conclude that a material uncertainty exists, we are required to draw attention in our auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial report or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify our opinion. Our conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of our auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the company to cease to continue as a going concern.

• Evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial report, including the disclosures, and whether the financial report represents the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation. We communicate with the directors regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that we identify during our audit. BENTLEYS SA AUDIT PARTNERSHIP

DAVID FRANCIS PARTNER Dated at Adelaide this 10th day of October 2017

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MARSH ADVANTAGE INSURANCE REPORT We provide this report as an overview of the last twelve months sponsored income to Australian International Shooting Ltd, t/as Shooting Australia. We have summarized the current participation data for the period September 2016 to September 2017 and provided commentary on the number of policies and income compared to previous years. You will see that the data reviewed has produced an increase in participation with Shooting Australia’s income increasing from $15,419.02 in 2016 to $16,300.12 in 2017. Increased participation by member Associations in the member based firearms general property policy during the past twelve months has contributed to this increase. We trust you will find this report beneficial and welcome your feedback.

AISL INCOME SUMMARY Private & Commercial Business 30 September 2014 to 30 September 2015 POLICIES 227

Premium Earned ($) 267,428.33

Net Income to AISL ($) 11,828.18

Private & Commercial Business 30 September 2015 to 30 September 2016 POLICIES 198

Premium Earned ($) 355,630

Net Income to AISL ($) 15,419.02

Private & Commercial Business 30 September 2016 to 30 September 2017 POLICIES 237

Premium Earned ($) 361,763.95

Net Income to AISL ($) 16,300.12

Marsh Advantage Insurance Pty Ltd Level 6, 70 Frankin Street Adelaide, South Australia, Australia All correspondence to: GPO Box 2637, Adelaide SA 5001

ROBERT LOW MANAGER SPORTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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T: 61 8 8385 3588 F: 61 8 8211 8785 E: robert.low@marshadvantage.com

// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT


PO Box 1108 Pasadena SA 5042 www.shootingaustralia.org

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// SHOOTING AUSTRALIA 2016/17 ANNUAL REPORT

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