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shootingaustralia.org

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WIN ER

2015 16

Annual Report


About Shooting Australia Shooting Australia is the National Sporting Organisation for the sport of shooting in Australia. It is recognised by the Australian Sports Commission, the Australian Olympic Committee, the Australian Paralympic Committee, the Australian Commonwealth Games Association, the International Shooting Sports Federation, the Oceania Shooting Federation, the Commonwealth Shooting Federation, and the International Metallic Silhouette Shooting Union. Shooting Australia’s key internal stakeholders are the national member bodies, their member State and Territory shooting associations, and affiliated clubs. Shooting Australia has five full affiliated member bodies (the Australian Clay Target Association, Sporting Clays Australia, the National Rifle Association of Australia, Pistol Australia, and Target Rifle Australia) and one associate member (the NSW Shooting Association).

Result Highlights

33%

INCREASE in Total Income

$126,322.40

GROSS PROFIT

generated from the IPC World Cup

Purpose − To enable Australian Athletes to be World’s best. Vision − Collectively driven sustained internal podium success. Position − Shooting Australia is the peak body responsible for leading the growth, sustainability and success of target shooting sports in Australia.

49% 25% INCREASE

invested in Member Bodies through the Aiming4Gold Funding Initiative

INCREASE

in incentive athlete support paid directly to athletes


Contents ASC Chairman’s Message

1

Committee Report - High Performance

21

President’s Report

2

Committee Report - Technical

22

CEO’s Report 5

LUCIE 23

HPM’s Report 7

Committee Report - Coaching

25

Results 10

Committee Report - Athletes

26

Operations Manager Report

14

Governance Report

27

Media, Marketing & Comms Manager’s Report

15

Financial Report 28

Coaches Report - Pistol

16

Marsh Insurance Report

43

Coaches Report - Shotgun

17

Awards of Excellence

47

Coaches Report - Rifle

18

Olympic and Paralympic Games

Coaches Report - Para

19

Shooting Australia PO BOX 1108 Pasadena SA 5042 T +61 8 8177 1860 F +61 8 8177 1914 shootingaustralia.org facebook.com./shootingaus instagram.com/shootingaus twitter.com./shootingaus

48


Message from the Australian Sports Commission The Australian Sports Commission (ASC) congratulates our National Sporting Organisations (NSOs) on their achievements this year. In particular, we congratulate all of our athletes who represented Australia in the Rio Olympic and Paralympic Games. You did so with great distinction. The country is proud of your commitment and dedication, and the manner in which you conducted yourself throughout the campaigns.

The ASC is equally committed to increasing community participation in sport, particularly amongst our children and youth. We have been pleased this year to see our flagship participation program Sporting Schools reach over 4,300 schools in partnership with NSOs.

In the aftermath of the Games, the Board of the ASC has re-committed to the core principles of Australia’s Winning Edge, the ASC’s ten year plan for high performance sport introduced in 2012. The four key principles are: high aspirations for achievement; evidencebased funding decisions; sports owning their own high performance programs; and a strong emphasis on improved leadership and governance.

We also staged our inaugural Athlete and Coaches Forum, giving Australia’s elite athletes and coaches the opportunity to share their experiences and enhance their leadership capabilities.

We are confident these principles serve the long term interests of sporting sector.

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

We will also use the experience of the last four years to seek to improve implementation of Winning Edge in ways that will benefit the sector.

1

“THE COUNTRY IS PROUD OF YOUR COMMITMENT & DEDICATION.”

Innovations by the ASC this year included the release of our Integrity Guidelines for Directors and Leaders of Sporting Organisations, which provides directors with comprehensive and practical guidance for the first time on anti-doping, sport science and medicine, illicit drugs, match-fixing, child protection and member protection – vital issues for maintaining trust and respect in the sporting sector.

And we were delighted to see fruits of our efforts to improve female opportunity in sports, with improved elite and participation opportunities in women’s sport, better media exposure, some outstanding new commercial deals, and an increase in female representation at NSO board level from 27 per cent to a 39 per cent across the top 23 NSOs.

Looking ahead, ASC priorities include: •

further institutional and governance reform in sport, with an emphasis on increased national integration and alignment

increased funding for sport, including new non-government sources of funding

further embedding sport in schools’ educational programs

improved national coordination of sports infrastructure spending, and

Improved use of data and technology in sports.

Reforms like this are often hard to achieve but have profound long term benefits. The evermore competitive environment in world sport on display in Rio highlights the critical importance of further reform if Australia is to maintain its proud reputation and traditions as a sporting nation. The ASC thanks all of our sector partners for your effort and contribution to Australian sport. We look forward to continued success and progress together.

JOHN WYLIE AM

CHAIR AUSTRALIAN SPORTS COMMISSION


President’s Report

CATH FETTELL

Athlete International Success

We have enjoyed continued strong support from the Australian Sports Commission, Australian Olympic Committee, Australian Paralympic Committee, and Australian Commonwealth Games Association. We have also had a new appointment to the Board of Directors as well as appointments to key positions in the SA management team.

Three Shooting Australia athletes are in the IPC World top ten rankings:

The year started on an exciting note with the 2015 Sydney IPC Shooting World Cup 13-19 September at the Sydney International Shooting Centre (SISC). This event for our para-shooters was one of only three World Cups in 2015 where our athletes could win Olympic quota places for the 2016 Rio Paralympic Games. At the Oceania Shooting Federation Championships, which took place in Sydney 25 November-2 December, Australia won 14 from a possible 15 Olympic quota places. Having won four places on the open market this gave our athletes 18 quota places at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games, one more than we achieved for the 2010 London Olympic Games. Our Para-Shooters won 7 quota places for the Rio Paralympics, 1 of these at the Sydney IPC World Cup in September 2015.

At the time of writing five Shooting Australia athletes are in the ISSF World Top Ten Rankings: •

Catherine Skinner, 1st in Trap Women;

James Willett, 3rd in Double Trap Men;

Laetisha Scanlan, 6th in Trap Women;

Warren Potent, 7th in 50m Prone Rifle; and

Emma Cox, 10th in Trap Women.

Natalie Smith, 2nd in Women 10m Air Rifle SH1, 2nd in Women’s 50m Sport Rifle 3 Position SH1 and 10th in Mixed 50m Rifle prone SH1;

Chris Pitt, 3rd in Mixed 25m Pistol SH1; and

Libby Kosmala, 6th in Women 10m Air Rifle SH1

World Cups and International Competitions

Through the year our ISSF athletes performed very well at World Cups, showing demonstrable improvement. In Double Trap Men James Willett won Gold at the 2016 World Cup in Rio de Janeiro and Bronze at the 2016 World Cup in Nicosia; in Trap Women, Emma Cox won Gold at the 2016 San Marino World Cup; in 50m Rifle Prone, Warren Potent won Silver at the 2016 World Cup in Rio de Janeiro. Also many of our athletes across disciplines competed in the finals at ISSF World Cups in the past year.

“FIVE SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ATHLETES ARE IN THE ISSF WORLD TOP TEN RANKINGS” Similarly our Paralympian athletes had great successes at World Cups in the past year. At the 2015 Osijek World Cup in Croatia Natalie Smith won Silver in R8 3 Position, Libby Kosmala won Bronze in R2 Air Rifle Standing, and Anton Zappelli won Bronze in R3 Air Rifle Prone. At the 2015 Sydney World Cup Mark Bradley won Silver in R5 Air Rifle Prone and Bronze in R4 Air Rifle Standing. At the 2015 Fort Benning USA World Cup Natalie Smith won Gold in R8 3 Position. At the Al Ain UAE 2016 World Cup Natalie Smith won Gold in R8 3 Position and Silver in R2 Air Rifle Standing. At the Szchechin Poland 2016 World Cup Luke Cain won Gold in the R4 Air Rifle Standing and Natalie Smith won Silver in R2 Air Standing. At the annual National Rifle Association of Great Britain Grand Championships contested in July NRAA athlete James Corbett produced exceptional shooting to win with a score of 701.96. James won the same championship in 2012 with 700.107 and was 2nd in 2014 with 698.101. He is the only Australian to win this event twice.

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

2015-16 has been a great year for Shooting Australia, one of our most successful in recent memory. We have had multiple successes at international events and then topped this with a Gold Medal at the Rio Olympic Games. We acknowledge Catherine Skinner’s Gold medal, our Olympic and Paralympic finalists’ achievements and the fact that all our athletes did their very best.

2


“THIS IS A PROMISING SIGN OF THE QUALITY OF OUR EMERGING JUNIOR ATHLETES.” Junior World Cups

Australian juniors competed at the ISSF Junior World Cup in Suhl, Germany in May earlier this year and returned these positive results: •

Jack Wallace, Samuel Bylsma, and Adam Bylsma, 1st in Trap Men Teams;

Sergei Evglevski, 2nd in 25m Rapid Fire Pistol;

Sergei Evglevski, 3rd in 25m Standard Pistol Men;

Jack Wallace, 3rd in Junior Trap Men;

Stephanie Pile, 3rd in Junior Trap Women;

Sergei Evglevski, Thomas Ashmore, and Bailey Groves 3rd in the 25m Standard Pistol Teams; and

Sergei Evglevski, Thomas Ashmore, and Bailey Groves 3rd in the 25m Pistol Men Teams.

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

This is a promising sign of the quality of our emerging junior athletes.

3

Paralympic and Olympic Team Announcement and Awards of Excellence

Shooting Australia worked closely with the Australian Olympic Committee to hold the announcement of our Olympic Team at the AOC Headquarters in Sydney in April. The event provided significant media exposure for our athletes and our sport and was held in conjunction with our Annual Awards of Excellence. At the Awards ceremony Shooting Australia awarded the inaugural Ashley Adams Perpetual Trophy for the best and fairest athlete to James Willett. The event was a huge success for our sport and further proof of the overall improvement of our positioning and our increasing credibility as a mainstream sport.

ISSF General Assembly Moscow

I attended the ISSF 2016 General Assembly in Moscow 1-2 July 2016 at which Shooting Australia nominated Gleniss Lawrence for the Shotgun Committee and Sharon Reynolds for the Pistol Committee. Of the two nominations for re-election only Sharon Reynolds was successful. Gleniss missing out is a great shame as we know all the good work that she has done for the ISSF Shotgun Committee. In a break from previous ISSF meetings this year the ISSF Administrative Council elected the members of the various Section Committees directly, meaning that Shooting Australia was not able to vote for our nominees. At the previous ISSF General Assembly the election of the Section Committees was done at the General Assembly meeting where all country member delegates present participated in the voting. The proposed new edition of the ISSF Constitution intended to provide improved governance, transparency, and accountability did not receive the required 2/3 majority vote and was not approved. Prior to the General Assembly the ISSF Administrative Council had suspended the Kuwait Shooting Federation from the ISSF. This followed the International Olympic Committee suspension of the Kuwait Olympic Committee from the IOC. Following an appeal from the KSF the General Assembly meeting voted to uphold the suspension. As with other suspended countries individual athletes from Kuwait were permitted to compete at the Olympic Games under the flag of the International Olympic Athletes.

2016 Rio Olympics and Paralympics

The Olympic and Paralympic Games staged in Rio de Janeiro in August and September were a great success for us. Shooting Australia and all Australians are justifiably proud of our 18 Olympic and 6 Paralympic shooting athletes and their performances in Rio. We appreciate the hard work and many sacrifices they made to represent our country. We are proud of Catherine Skinner’s Gold medal, our finalists’ fighting spirit to win medals, and most importantly the fact that all our athletes did their very best for their country.

Member Body Athlete Development

The Aiming4Gold Funding Initiative continues to provide funding assistance to Member Bodies for athlete development programs that contribute to the achievement of targets as set out in the Australian Sports Commission “Australia’s Winning Edge”.

Australian Sports Commission

Shooting Australia has continued to work with the ASC to implement the required levels of accountability for performance results, improved governance structures, and revised reporting and monitoring requirements. The ASC requires sports to adhere to the updated Mandatory Sports Governance Principles (MSGP) that underpin the governance regulations within national sporting organisations. The ASC requires Shooting Australia to comply with the MSGPs as a condition of continued ASC funding. The ASC is also providing assistance to Shooting Australia with the Whole of Sport Governance Review.


The Whole of Sport Governance Review field work was completed earlier in the year. External agency Suiko Consultancy was tasked with interviewing, surveying, collecting data and producing an independent report containing findings and recommendations based on the input of more than 300 individuals across all States and Territories and across all shooting disciplines. Importantly, data informing the findings and recommendations has come from the grass roots of our sport with 227 Clubs completing the survey. The Review Report was recently distributed to Member Bodies. Shooting Australia and the Member Bodies must now consider the Review recommendations and take forward where feasible and agreed.

Firearms Industry Reference Group Following the Federal Election earlier this year Hon Michael Keenan MP was reappointed to his previous portfolio of Minister for Justice. Minister Keenan has advised of his intention to continue his consultation with the Firearms Industry Reference Group. Minister Keenan also announced that the Review of the National Firearms Agreement is due to be considered by Commonwealth, State and Territory Ministers later this year. Shooting Australia remains committed to representing our sport to Government and to pursuing outcomes that are in the best interest of our sport.

Participation Survey

At the time of writing the Shooting Australia Participation Survey is underway, with the report to be distributed to Member Bodies when finalised.

Future events

International events that SA will be hosting in the near future include: •

2018 Commonwealth Games Test Event from 30 October to 9 November 2017 at the Belmont Shooting Complex, Brisbane. This event is to be staged as both the Commonwealth Shooting Federation Championships and Oceania Shooting Federation Championships for 2017;

2018 ISSF Junior World Cup 20-29th March at SISC; and

The 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games, with the shooting events to be held at the Belmont Shooting Complex, Brisbane from the 4th to the 15th April 2018.

Conclusion

I extend my sincere thanks to all the volunteers in our Member Bodies. It is through the generous spirit, hard work, and dedication of our volunteers that we are able to develop and support our athletes and provide opportunities to them for success on the international stage. I thank the members of the Shooting Australia Board, the CEO, Management Team, and staff for all their hard work and support during the year. I also thank the Member Bodies for their support and input and I look forward to your continued support and assistance in the forthcoming year. October 2016

CATH FETTELL PRESIDENT

Shooting Australia Board and Management

In April Shooting Australia welcomed new Director Catherine Clark to the Board as an ‘Appointed Director’. Kelly Wright joined Shooting Australia as the Media, Marketing, and Communications Manager. As you know High Performance Manager Tim Mahon recently left us to work with the ACGA and Adam Sachs has taken the reins since Tim’s departure.

“SHOOTING AUSTRALIA REMAINS COMMITTED TO REPRESENTING OUR SPORT TO GOVERNMENT AND TO PURSUING OUTCOMES THAT ARE IN THE BEST INTEREST OF OUR SPORT.”

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Shooting Australia Whole of Sport Governance Review

4


CEO’s Report

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

As we pause to reflect on another successful year, it is timely that we also celebrate what has been an outstanding four years for the sport of shooting in this country. Make no mistake, this sport is better positioned than it has ever been. Major achievements during this time include:

5

Significant staffing re-structure and rejuvenation

Complete overhaul of all financial management and reporting

High Performance Review conducted and outcomes implemented

Constitutional changes approved at the AGM

Aiming 4 Gold Funding Initiative supporting Member Bodies launched and more than $200,000 has been spent on Member Body initiatives

Re-branding of the organisation from AISL to Shooting Australia

Awards of Excellence created and delivered

Six Individual Gold medals won at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow

2 Medals won at the World Championships

Full Organisation Policy Review undertaken

All of sport Pathways framework created for the first time

Independent Female Directors appointed to the Board

Volunteer Management System launched

International Paralympic Committee World Cup delivered

A strategic direction designed and delivered through a new Strategic Plan

A new Culture framework established for the sport - LUCIE

A ‘Whole of Sport Governance Review’ undertaken

Shooting delivered 1 of only 8 Gold Medals won by Australia at the Rio Olympic Games

This list is a celebration of the wonderful achievements that our sport has enjoyed since 2013 and shows just how far we have come. In previous reports I have spoken a lot about the significant undertakings we must pursue to ensure our long term success and viability and the above is a reflection on just some of the achievements that today position us closer to that reality. Later in this report we detail further achievements that have occurred over the last year. Due to the outstanding success of our athletes, wonderful organisational reform, and improvements and significantly enhanced position and credibility, the future of the sport of shooting in Australia is bright. I would like to highlight just a few of the major pieces of work that we are planning or that are now possible because of the achievements we have created in recent times: •

Institute Programs – In 2017 we will for the first time ever be a partner sport with both the Victorian Institute of Sport and South Australian Sports Institute. These programs reflect the credibility and success we have established in both our athlete cohort and their performances, but also the leadership and management of our sport and these programs. Whole of Sport Collaboration – As a result of the improved communication and collaboration with Member Bodies we will be pursuing opportunities that enhance all of our organisations. The outcomes of the Governance Review provide a framework for substantial

improvement in areas such as governance, commercialisation, media and promotion, participation, coaching, volunteer management, event delivery and competitions. •

Volunteer Program – with many important events coming to Australia in the coming years we will be ensuring that we do more to recruit, retain and reward our tireless volunteers. Without these people we don’t have a sport, so more must be done to help these wonderful individuals

Participation – the sport of shooting has not done enough in this area and it provides a major growth area for our sport. Shooting Australia will now be focussing on this area of the sport to work with Member Bodies in ensuring our sport is healthier at the grassroots level.

Domestic Competitions – Shooting Australia will be doing more to support Clubs, States and Member Bodies in the delivery of their events. We want to ensure we add value to new and established events and not work against them, by overcrowding a busy competition schedule.

It would be remiss of me to not thank many of the people and organisations that have made our achievements possible. To the Board of Shooting Australia and President Cath Fettell for their tireless and unwavering support thank you. Many of the successes above are due to the vision and direction of the SA Board and they give of their time freely as passionate volunteers. To the Australian Sports Commission and Australian Institute of Sport, they are much more than our major investors, they are our partners. In particular to John Wylie, Simon Hollingsworth and Matt Favier, thank you for your leadership, support and guidance. To the Australian Commonwealth Games Association and its new leader Craig Phillips, we thank you for your ongoing support and assistance.


To the staff of Shooting Australia an extraordinary group who give so much for this sport, for your unbelievable work ethic, resilience and passion, thank you. To Tim Mahon who leaves our organisation after three and a half years I would like to say thank you. The role of change agent is never an easy one, but you have done a terrific job in challenging our system to be better and the results are vindicated in the performances of our athletes and in the new cohort of athletes that is emerging. To our Member Body Boards and Executives thank you. You are tireless in your efforts to make the sport of shooting better.

“CATHERINE HAS SET THE STANDARD OF WHERE WE WANT TO BE WITH HER GOLD MEDAL” Finally to our athletes, thank you for your pursuit of excellence. The journey this sport is on is only just being written and I eagerly look forward to seeing it unfold in Tokyo and beyond. Catherine has set the standard of where we want to be with her Gold Medal and now it is up to us together to enable more of you to achieve your wildest sporting dreams.

DAMIEN MARANGON CEO

INCOME 2015 - 16

INCOME 2014 - 15

Affiliation Fees

$27,000.00

Affiliation Fees

$27,000.00

Commission

$10,780.65

Commission

$11,330.43

Competition Proceeds

$86,618.03

Competition Proceeds

$48,499.78

Discount Received

$4,338.02

Discount Received

$3,434.89

Interest

$19,440.51

Interest

$23,946.01

Other income - Other

$12,339.51

Other income - Other

$2,642.83

ACGA

$147,000.00

ACGA

$147,000.00

AOC

$440.29.00

AOC

$0.00

APC

$5,346.47

APC

$300,000.00

ASC

$2,515,000.00

ASC

$2,071,200.00

Grants - Other

$45,606.00

Grants - Other

$3,000.00

IPC

$641,987.06

IPC

$15,000.00

Total Income

$3,515,896.54

Total Income

$2,653,053.94

Purchases - Goods

$241.49

Purchases - Goods

$192.82

Total Cost Of Sales

$241.49

Total Cost Of Sales

$192.82

GROSS PROFIT

$3,515,655.05

EXPENSES 2015 - 16

GROSS PROFIT

$2,652,861.12

EXPENSES 2014 - 15

Affiliation Support

$100,000.00

Affiliation Fees

$67,145.45

Annual Leave Expenses

$0.00

Annual Leave Expenses

-$8,890.81

Audit Fees

$8,200.00

Audit Fees

$8,114.01

Bank Charges

$3,114.94

Bank Charges

$2,572.93

Board/Governance Expense

$157,117.45

Board/Governance Expense

$48,930.83

Computer Expenses

$5,009.00

Computer Expenses

$2,626.45

Cleaning/Pest Control

$2,890.00

Cleaning/Pest Control

$3,145.68

Consultancy Fees

$16,880.00

Consultancy Fees

$13,552.83

Depreciation

$10,000.00

Depreciation

$13,022.52

Entertainment Costs

$1,970.29

Entertainment Costs

$3,603.29

Legal Fees

$57,330.35

Legal Fees

$39,527.00

Long Service Leave Expenses

$0.00

Long Service Leave Expenses

$1,224.13

Media

$8,839.82

Media

$7,269.53

Meeting Expenses

$69,434.91

Meeting Expenses

$62,221.08

Membership Fees Paid

$4,447.89

Membership Fees Paid

$2,473.77

Postage, Freight, Courier

$5,985.81

Postage, Freight, Courier

$3,468.08

Printing & Stationery

$5,093.89

Printing & Stationery

$6,381.26

Publications/Subscriptions

$1010.20

Publications/Subscriptions

$229.82

Recruitment Expenses

$1541.46

Recruitment Expenses

$650.00

Rent

$53,868.12

Rent

$52,828.06

Sundry Expenses

$4,695.89

Sundry Expenses

$4,220.04

Telephone Fax Internet

$31,544.24

Telephone Fax Internet

$32,127.47

Uniforms

$13,796.25

Uniforms

$17,000.00

Utilities

$13,330.58

Utilities

$12,732.68

Insurance

$12,341.73

Insurance

$12,424.52

Salaries & Wages

$342,904.56

Salaries & Wages

$357,645.48

Salaries & Wages HP

$518,537.98

Salaries & Wages HP

$511,898.32

Superannuation Payable

$83,264.70

Superannuation Payable

$81,178.88

Payroll Tax

$14,254.72

Payroll Tax

$13,171.44

Workcover

$7,955.07

Workcover

$6,397.13

Athlete & Coach Support

$54,244.87

Athlete & Coach Support

$43,375.63

Coach & Official Development

$8,899.34

Coach & Official Development

$12,404.37

Development Project

$9,413.34

Development Project

$2,933.51

Other

$674.90

Other

$6,502.33

Staff Development

$5,208.28

Staff Development

$3,828.49

Training & Comp. - Paralympic

$269,913.19

Training & Comp. - Paralympic

$285,280.69

Training & Comp - Pistol

$142,684.39

Training & Comp - Pistol

$160,320.21

Training & Comp - Rifle

$232,688.43

Training & Comp - Rifle

$233,597.81

Training & Comp - Shotgun

$443,666.96

Training & Comp - Shotgun

$447,585.60

Events

$186,817.31

Events

$89,418.46

IPC World Cup

$523,416.02

IPC World Cup

$7,248.64

Expenses - Other

$1,251.88

Expenses - Other

$18,159.31

Total Expenses

$3,434,238.76

Total Expenses

$2,689,546.92

NET PROFIT / (LOSS)

$81,416.29

NET PROFIT / (LOSS)

-$36,685.8

Please note: These figures provide an overview and were completed before the financial audit. For full financial statements please refer to the Financial Report

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

To our other significant partners, The International Shooting Sport Federation, The Australian Olympic Committee, the Australian Paralympic Committee and the International Paralympic Committee.

6


High Performance Manager’s Report With all roads leading to the Olympic and Paralympic Games, 2016 saw the promising performances of Australian athletes leading to these benchmark events convert to one podium performance in one event and a number of finalists in a further five events. These results are testament to the hard work and focus from athletes, coaches, support staff, and SA administration and demonstrated shooting can continue to contribute to Australia’s Winning Edge (AWE) outcomes. We aim for a system that increases the probability for every athlete to be better both on and off the range. Our focus continues to revolve around the performance drivers of athletes, culture and values, coaches, leadership and management, daily training environment, competition, research and innovation, personal excellence, partnerships and performance review. These drivers, outlining our progress and achievements for the past year, are summarised below.

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

7

1

The Athlete which is the focus of our approach

66 Expressions of Interest were received from athletes to be part of the 2016 A4G program. Selectors, made up of the National Coach, the High Performance Manager and member body representative, met to identify those athletes who possessed the necessary attributes, attitude, and potential to meet AWE short and long-term outcomes. 48 athletes were offered an A4G placement broken down to 8 EAD athletes; 1 full-bore athlete; 9 pistol athletes; 9 rifle athletes; 21 shotgun athletes.

Individual Athlete Performance Plans (IAPP) were finalised focusing on athlete needs from a technical, tactical, psychological, physical, and sport and life balance point of view. These plans also served the purpose to monitor the progress of athletes to the achievement of agreed performance outcomes. Off the range, I acknowledge the excellent work of Carrie Quigley as Personal Excellence Coordinator who continued to work with our athletes to be better equipped to make informed decisions that will impact their performance in shooting and life.

2

Our Values which guide our decision making process A4G benchmarks itself against the best both organisationally and personally. We are not ashamed to admit we aspire to win! To achieve a competitive edge, the core of the A4G culture continued to focus on our core values of continual improvement, the creation of a continual learning environment and a willingness to do whatever it takes.

3

Our Coaches who are the primary leaders of their discipline program

Our National Coaches are highly regarded for their technical knowledge, experience and passion. I publicly acknowledge Miro Sipek (EAD), Petr Kurka (rifle), Val Timokhin (shotgun) and Vlad Galiabovich (pistol) for their work and commitment to A4G for the year. SA formalised the performance support available to the program for 2016 with the AIS. This support included coordination, psychology, strength and conditioning, physiotherapy, performance analysis, recovery and skill acquisition. I publicly acknowledge AIS staff Michael Speranza (Strength and Conditioning), Kristine Dun (Psychology) and Mitch Mooney (Skill Acquisition) and Nick

Sanders (VIS coordination) for their work and input with our coaches and athletes. Likewise, our physiotherapists Nat Tyson and Paula Peralta who oversaw the medical and physical therapy needs of our athletes. I also acknowledge and thank Marc Portus, AIS Head of Movement Science for his support of the A4G program to ensure our athletes’ performance needs were met.

“WE AIM FOR A SYSTEM THAT INCREASES THE PROBABILITY FOR EVERY ATHLETE TO BE BETTER BOTH ON AND OFF THE RANGE. ”

4

Leadership & Management through our key stakeholders

All members of A4G have a defined leadership role: the High Performance Manager who strives to create, develop and lead a high performance program, team and culture aimed at achieving international success; our High Performance Committee consisting of our Member Bodies representatives; our National Coaches who lead the long range planning, development and execution of their discipline’s high performance program; our Performance Services Coordinator who coordinates a Performance Enhancement Team to enable the best possible integration of the key athlete services including research and innovation; and our athletes who have a leadership role in the way they commit, behave and support the


TIM MAHON

The SA Athlete Pathway recognised the importance of a systematic process of athlete development across all target-shooting sports. Based on the Foundations Talent Excellence Mastery (FTEM) framework and completed in consultation and collaboration with the AIS and Member Bodies, the pathway gives opportunity and direction for our Member Bodies to redefine their own pathways to this Framework. Member Bodies pathway alignment including the establishment of a prescriptive skill-set per level is phase two of its development and will be delivered by our newly established Pathways Working Group, which involves Member Bodies representatives. SA through its Pathway Coordinator Carrie Quigley continue to have dialogue with our Member Bodies identifying key people/champions per discipline and the establishment of pathway-specific MOUs. I publicly acknowledge the work Carrie has done in the space to get this project to such an exciting phase.

5

The Daily Training Environment for our athletes

An athlete’s development and success achieved is largely dependent on the quality of the daily training environment (DTEs) and the ways in which the athlete interacts with it.

The de-centralised nature of our sport shows the constant challenge of creating effective DTEs for our athletes inclusive of coaching, facilities, equipment and specialist services. To enhance our athlete’s DTEs, we renewed our engagement with the State Institutes/Academies of Sport (SIS/ SAS) through their Individual Athlete Scholarship Schemes. Whilst this support has enriched the DTEs of our athletes, the inconsistency in the prioritisation of servicing, the ability to service regionally based athletes and performance feedback across SIS/SAS is a constant challenge. The Athlete Management System (AMS) continued to monitor DTEs and better integrate early intervention/identification of training or medical issues for athletes.

6

The domestic & international Competition exposure for our athletes

Competitions were identified for all A4G targeted athletes as part of their Individual Athlete Performance Plans (IAPP). These competitions were appropriate to the ability of the athlete and had realistic target outcomes to be achieved. These outcomes were made in consultation with the athletes and constantly reviewed. Our results across the four disciplines for the 2016 international season are outlined elsewhere in this Annual Report. The results achieved in World Cups show an increase in the number of medallists and finalists, which gave us great confidence leading to the Olympics and Paralympics. Combining this with Australia winning a total of 18 Olympic and 7 Paralympic Quotas for Rio meant that our Olympic and Paralympic teams would be at near capacity.

I congratulate all athletes who were chosen and represented Australia at both Games and acknowledge the performances of all athletes, in particular Olympic gold medallist Catherine Skinner, Olympic finalists Laetisha Scanlan and James Willett and Paralympic finalists Natalie Smith and Chris Pitt.

“THE RESULTS ACHIEVED IN WORLD CUPS SHOW AN INCREASE IN THE NUMBER OF MEDALLISTS AND FINALISTS”

7

Research & Innovation to enhance performance

SA continued to explore areas that would enhance performance. A4G established ongoing performance analytics of senior international competitions to monitor finals score trends. Our current athletes are tracked against scores required to final (World Benchmark Scores WBS) to determine if this performance gap is decreasing. WBS have been integrated into the HP program and selection policies. In conjunction with the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS), work began to establish an Individual Athlete Missed Target Profile (MTP), a statistical model incorporating domestic and international performance score data with technical measurements to identify specific interventions to improve performance.

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

program. The High Performance Committee continued to oversee, monitor and give input into the direction of A4G. It is comforting to know that decisions made by this Committee have the endorsement of the Member Bodies that they represent. I thank our Member Body representatives – Elaine Forward (shotgun), Ray Andrews (pistol), Trish Van Nus (rifle) and Catherine Berry (full bore) and AIS Performance Manager Andrew Dee for their time, advice and counsel.

8


“WE MUST CONTINUE TO MAINTAIN A PERFORMANCE FOCUS (AND ITS ASSOCIATED ACCOUNTABILITY)” In conjunction with the Australian Paralympic Committee (APC), work began through pressure mapping to individualise the travel seating needs of our athletes to minimise the issues relating to travelling.

8

The provision of support through Personal Excellence

Off the range, I acknowledge the excellent work of Carrie Quigley as Personal Excellence Coordinator who continued to work with our athletes to be better equipped to make informed decisions that will impact their performance in shooting and life. Current strategies included squad orientation, de-selection, re-location, retirement and the influence of significant others.

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

9

9

Our Partnerships with our key stakeholders

A4G continued to form strong relationships with our partners and values the financial and in-kind support from the Australian Sports Commission (ASC), AIS, APC, Australian Commonwealth Games Association (ACGA), Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) our Member Bodies and the National Institute Network (NIN) through the Queensland Academy of Sport (QAS), NSW Institute of Sport (NSWIS), Victorian Institute of Sport (VIS), South Australian Sports Institute (SASI) and West Australian Institute of Sport (WAIS). Thank you all for your continued involvement and support.

10

Continuous Performance Review to ensure we enhance our strengths and learn from our mistakes

A4G is not about being the best; it’s about being better. We strive to be better today than yesterday. This philosophy is relevant to athletes, coaches, service providers and administrators alike. Our monthly athlete performance service meeting discussed the progression of targeted athletes against agreed outcomes and intervention strategies where needs be. These meetings consisted of representatives from the AIS (sport science), VIS (performance services) and SA (HPM and coaches). The annual A4G survey was sent to all A4G athletes to evaluate the programs impact, what was working well and what can be improved. Feedback indicated most athletes understood what A4G is trying to achieve, their responsibilities and expectations through their Individual Athlete Performance Plan and Athlete Agreement. Most agreed the standard of competition was appropriate and noted the good work of SA administration in overall assistance. Opportunities for improvement included consistent communication across disciplines and squads, coaching outside where National Coaches reside, personal financial constraints, performance psychology and nutrition.

In response to these results, additional strategies to enhance effective communication, coaching, access to psychology, financial guidance and personal excellence were instigated in 2016.

Conclusion As can be seen, the A4G program continues to evolve. Despite constant criticism through social media, the direction of the program has enabled Australia to once again grace the Olympic podium. We are not afraid in taking courageous decisions that will improve the probability of achieving agreed outcomes. But there is still a lot more to do and I am confident this momentum will continue over the next four years. To win medals on the world stage is not easy. We must continue to maintain a performance focus (and its associated accountability) or we run the risk of broadening our approach and simply participating in international competitions and the acceptance of mediocrity.

TIM MAHON

HIGH PERFORMANCE MANAGER


High Performance Manager’s Report (Results) PISTOL

ISSF WORLD CUP MUNICH, GER 19 - 26 MAY 2016

MEYTON CUP INNSBRUCK, AUT 22 - 27 JAN 2016

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Daniel Repacholi

50m Pistol Men

DNQ

541

10m Air Pistol Men

48th

575

10m Air Pistol Women

25th

382

25m Pistol Women

21st

578

10m Air Pistol Women

40th

379

25m Pistol Women

25th

578

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Elena Galiabovitch

10m Air Pistol Women Day 1

7th

365

10m Air Pistol Women Day 2 Sascha Kroopin

10m Air Pistol Women Day 1 10m Air Pistol Women Day 2

Daniel Repacholi

6th Bronze

381

Elena Galiabovitch

376

Gold

378

10m Air Pistol Men Day 1

Bronze

567

10m Air Pistol Men Day 2

11th

566

Lalita Yauheuskaya

ISSF WORLD CUP BAKU, AZE 20 - 29 JUN 2016

INTERNATIONAL AIR GUN COMPETITION IWK MUNICH, GER 27 - 31 JAN 2016

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

NAME

Daniel Repacholi

50m Pistol Men

28th

547

10m Air Pistol Men

51st

563

10m Air Pistol Women

34th

378

25m Pistol Women

47th

561

10m Air Pistol Women

37th

376

Elena Galiabovitch

EVENT 10m Air Pistol Women Day 1 10m Air Pistol Women Day 2

Sascha Kroopin

Daniel Repacholi

10m Air Pistol Junior Women Day 1

PLACE 40th DNS 11th

RESULT 374 DNS

Elena Galiabovitch

376

10m Air Pistol Junior Women Day 1

9th

376

10m Air Pistol Men Day 1

71st

563

10m Air Pistol Men Day 2

32nd

575

Lalita Yauheuskaya

25m Pistol Women

29th

574

David Chapman

25m Rapid Fire Pistol Men

30th

563

Blake Blackburn

10m Air Pistol Men

48th

565

50m Pistol Men

MQS

526

ISSF WORLD CUP BANGKOK, THA 1 - 9 MAR 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Daniel Repacholi

50m Pistol Men

6th

553

ISSF WORLD CUP RIO DE JANEIRO, BRA 13 - 25 APR 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Daniel Repacholi

50m Pistol Men

51th

537

10m Air Pistol Men

61st

562

25m Pistol Women

15th

578

10m Air Pistol Women

32nd

376

Lalita Yauhleuskaya

XXXI OLYMPIC GAMES RIO DE JANEIRO, BRA 5 JUL - 21 AUG NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Lalita Yauheuskaya

25m Pistol Women

14th

578

10m Air Pistol Women

24th

379

25m Pistol Women

31st

569

10m Air Pistol Women

43rd

369

50m Pistol Men

28th

545

10m Air Pistol Men

44th

565

Blake Blackburn

10m Air Pistol Men

36th

570

David Chapman

25m Rapid Fire Pistol Men

26th

551

Elena Galiabovitch

Daniel Repacholi

ISSF JUNIOR WORLD CUP SUHL, GER 29 APR - 6 MAY 2016 EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Thomas Ashmore

25m Rapid Fire Pistol Junior Men

8th

564

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

25m Standard Pistol Junior Men

12th

545

Thomas Ashmore

25m Standard Pistol Junior Men

Bronze

554

25m Sport Pistol Junior Men

8th

572

10m Air Pistol Junior Men

25th

550

10m Air Pistol Junior Men

42nd

557

25m Pistol Junior Men

7th

569

50m Free Pistol Junior Men

35th

502

25m Rapid Fire Pistol Junior Men

4th

568

25m Rapid Fire Pistol Junior Men

DNS

DNS

25m Standard Pistol Junior Men

Silver

555

25m Standard Pistol Junior Men

13th

542

10m Air Pistol Junior Men

17th

558

25m Sport Pistol Junior Men

17th

564

25m Pistol Junior Men

Bronze

574

10m Air Pistol Junior Men

34th

561

25m Rapid Fire Pistol Junior Men

Bronze

567

25m Rapid Fire Pistol Junior Men

Silver

577 +20

10m Air Pistol Junior Women

13th

366

25m Standard Pistol Junior Men

Bronze

561 +48

25m Pistol Junior Women

12th

552

25m Sport Pistol Junior Men

5th

575

10m Air Pistol Junior Women

8th

370

10m Air Pistol Junior Men

45th

556

25m Pistol Junior Women

13th

548

10m Air Pistol Junior Women

25th

368

25m Standard Pistol Junior Men

8th

536

10m Air Pistol Junior Men

29th

546

25m Pistol Junior Men

12th

559

Bailey Groves

Sergei Evgevski

Sascha Kroopin

Sergei Evglevsk

Sascha Kroopin

Alison Heinrich

Hans Hummer

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

ISSF JUNIOR WORLD CUP GABALA, AZE 16 - 23 SEP 2016

NAME

10


RIFLE

ISSF WORLD CUP RIO DE JANEIRO, BRA 13 - 25 APR 2016

PILZEN GRAND PRIX, PILZEN CZE 14 - 17 JAN 2016

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Warren Potent

50m Rifle Prone Men

Silver

626.6

Dane Sampson

50m Rifle Prone Men

DNQ

614

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men

50th

1147

10m Air Rifle Men

39th

621.9

NAME Dane Sampson

Jack Rossiter

Jennifer Hens Victoria Rossiter

Emma Adams

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

10m Air Rifle Men Day 1

14th

620.2

10m Air Rifle Men Day 2

17th

681.2

10m Air Rifle Junior Men Day 1

Gold

623.2

10m Air Rifle Junior Men Day 2

Gold

618.6

10m Air Rifle Women

20th

410.9

10m Air Rifle Junior Women Day 1

17th

406.7

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

10m Air Rifle Junior Women Day 2

27th

402.7

Jennifer Hens

10m Air Rifle Women

20th

409.4

10m Air Rifle Junior Women Day 1

13th

407.6

10m Air Rifle Junior Women Day 2

5th

410.3

MEYTON CUP INNSBRUCK, AUT 22 - 27 JAN 2016

IWK BERLIN, GER 13 - 17 APR 2016

ISSF JUNIOR WORLD CUP SUHL, GER 29 APR - 6 MAY 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Emma Adams

10m Air Rifle Junior Women

29th

410.6

Victoria Rossiter

10m Air Rifle Junior Women

36th

409.5

Jack Rossiter

50m Rifle Prone Junior Men

24th

610.1

10m Air Rifle Junior Men

4th

621.5

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Dane Sampson

10m Air Rifle Men Day 1

12th

623.2

10m Air Rifle Men Day 2

16th

620.2

10m Air Rifle Men Day 1

27th

614.2

Mitchell Bailey

50m Rifle Prone Junior Men

19th

611.4

10m Air Rifle Men Day 2

23rd

617.6

Daniel Clopatofsky

50m Rifle Prone Junior Men

39th

605.5

10m Air Rifle Junior Men

Silver

615

10m Air Rifle Junior Men

71th

538.8

50m Rifle 3 Positions Junior Men

25th

1125

Jack Rossiter

Jennifer Hens

Victoria Rossiter

Emma Adams

10m Air Rifle Junior Men

Silver

619.5

10m Air Rifle Women Day 1

26th

411.6

10m Air Rifle Women Day 2

17th

413.4

10m Air Rifle Junior Women Day 1

15th

408.7

10m Air Rifle Junior Women Day 2

30th

403.9

10m Air Rifle Women Day 2

37th

401.9

10m Air Rifle Junior Women Day 1

17th

407.8

10m Air Rifle Junior Women Day 2

22nd

407.9

10m Air Rifle Women Day 1

30th

410.3

47TH GRAND PRIX OF LIBERATION PLZEN, CZE 5 - 8 MAY 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Mitchell Bailey

50m Rifle Prone Men

41st

622.3

Jack Rossiter

50m Rifle Prone Men

115th

613.4

10m Air Rifle Men

71st

612.9

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men

104th

1118

50m Rifle Prone Men

Silver

629.5

10m Air Rifle Men

22nd

622.1

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men

54th

1151

50m Rifle Prone Men

57th

620

Dane Sampson

INTERNATIONAL AIR GUN COMPETITION IWK MUNICH, GER 27 - 31 JAN 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Dane Sampson

10m Air Rifle Men

44th

623.2

Jack Rossiter

10m Air Rifle Junior Men

10th

621.9

Jennifer Hens

10m Air Rifle Women Day 1

46th

413.3

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

10m Air Rifle Women Day 2

38th

414.6

Fred Woodhouse

50m Rifle Prone Men

DNQ

618

10m Air Rifle Junior Women Day 1

50th

408

Jennifer Hens

10m Air Rifle Women

75th

411.5

10m Air Rifle Junior Women Day 2

62th

406.7

Warren Potent

50m Rifle Prone Men

10th

627.1

10m Air Rifle Junior Women Day 1

59th

407.4

Dane Sampson

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men

DNQ

1154

10m Air Rifle Junior Women Day 2

65th

405.8

50m Rifle Prone Men

28th

624.4

10m Air Rifle Men

33rd

623.7

Jack Rossiter

10m Air Rifle Men

63rd

620.9

William Godward

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men

DNQ

1149

50m Rifle Prone Men

MQS

614.3

Victoria Rossiter

Emma Adams

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

ISSF WORLD CUP BANGKOK, THA 1 - 9 MAR 2016

11

NAME Warren Potent

Dane Sampson

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Frederyk Woodhouse

ISSF WORLD CUP MUNICH, GER 19 - 26 MAY 2016

50m Rifle Prone Men Day 1

27th

617.8

50m Rifle Prone Men Day 1

Silver

620.1

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men

30th

1142

50m Rifle Prone Men Day 1

29th

614.3

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

50m Rifle Prone Men Day 2

35th

611.8

Jack Rossiter

50m Rifle Prone Men

51st

610.3

26TH MEETING OF THE SHOOTING HOPES PLZEN, CZE 25 - 28 MAY 2016

10m Air Rifle Men

13th

624.9

10m Air Rifle Men

5th

623

William Godward

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men

26th

1145

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men

46th

1125

Jack Rossiter

10m Air Rifle Men

35th

616.6

Mitchell Bailey

50m Rifle Prone Men Day 1

29th

606.8

50m Rifle Prone Men Day 2

24th

613.7

ISAS DORTMUND, GER 10 - 20 MAR 2016 NAME Jennifer Hens

EVENT 10m Air Rifle Women

PLACE 35th

INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION EUROSTAND LORRAINE, FRA 9 - 15 JUN 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Jack Rossiter

50m Rifle Prone Men Day 1

21st

615.9

50m Rifle Prone Men Day 2

24th

605.4

RESULT

10m Air Rifle Men Day 1

18th

618.8

411.2

10m Air Rifle Men Day 2

19th

617.6


Jennifer Hens

50m Rifle Prone Men Day 1

4th

626

50m Rifle Prone Men Day 2

Bronze

624.6

10m Air Rifle Men Day 1

4th

625.3

10m Air Rifle Men Day 2

8th

626.9

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men Day 1

6th

1171

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men Day 2

Bronze

1169

10m Air Rifle Women Day 1

16th

413.5

10m Air Rifle Women Day 2

8th

416.3

ISSF WORLD CUP BAKU, AZE 20 - 29 JUN 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Jennifer Hens

10m Air Rifle Women

47th

410.3

XXXI OLYMPIC GAMES RIO DE JANEIRO, BRA 5 JUL - 21 AUG 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Jennifer Hens

10m Air Rifle Women

39th

410.1

Dane Sampson

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men

20th

1169

10m Air Rifle Men

37th

619.3

50m Rifle Prone Men

31st

620.6

William Godward

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men

39th

1156

Jack Rossiter

10m Air Rifle Men

46th

612.4

Warren Potent

50m Rifle Prone Men

35th

620

ISSF JUNIOR WORLD CUP GABALA, AZE 16 - 23 SEP 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Jack Rossiter

10m Air Rifle Junior Men

14th

615.4

Victoria Rossiter

10m Air Rifle Junior Women

27th

406.7

Emma Adams

10m Air Rifle Junior Women

13th

411.3

SHOTGUN QATAR OPEN DOHA, QAT 11 - 18 FEB 2016

ISSF WORLD CUP RIO DE JANEIRO, BRA 13 - 25 APR 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Adam Vella

Trap Men

13th

117

Michael Diamond

Trap Men

21st

115

Laetisha Scanlan

Trap Women

6th

70

Catherine Skinner

Trap Women

5th

69

Paul Adams

Skeet Men

11th

119

Keith Ferguson

Skeet Men

27th

116

James Willett

Double Trap Men

Gold

138

ISSF JUNIOR WORLD CUP SUHL, GER 29 APR - 6 MAY 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Stephanie Pile

Trap Junior Women

Bronze

66

Aislin Jones

Skeet Junior Women

22nd

60

Jack Wallace

Trap Junior Men

Bronze

117

Samuel Bylsma

Trap Junior Men

10th

116

Adam Bylsma

Trap Junior Men

27th

110

Nathan Argiro

Trap Junior Men

37th

108

FAZZ’A ITALIAN GREEN CUP YPDI, ITA 19 - 30 MAY 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

James Willett

Double Trap Man

12th

137

Laetisha Scanlan

Trap Women

14th

68

Aislin Jones

Skeet Women

18th

63

ISSF WORLD CUP SAN MARINO, SMR 1 - 11 JUN 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Emma Cox

Trap Women

Gold

73

Penny Smith

Trap Women

10th

69

Stephanie Pile

Trap Women

56th

55

Laura Coles

Skeet Women

23rd

66

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Mitchell Iles

Trap Men

23rd

117

Aislin Jones

Skeet Women

8th

70

Jack Wallace

Trap Men

85th

109

Laura Coles

Skeet Women

14th

67

Keith Ferguson

Skeet Men

28th

117

Joshua Bell

Skeet Men

36th

113

James Willett

Double Trap Men

7th

138

Penny Smith

Trap Women

16th

66

Catherine Skinner

Trap Women

Bronze

69

Teegan McCloy

Trap Women

13th

67

Stephanie Pile

Trap Junior Women

Bronze

63

Adam Vella

Trap Men

16th

117

Jack Wallace

Trap Junior Women

Silver

114

Mitchell Iles

Trap Men

4th

122

Michael Coles

Trap Men

46th

108

Adam Bylsma

Trap Junior Women

Bronze

109

Sam Bylsma

Trap Junior Women

4th

109

ISSF WORLD CUP NICOSIA, CYP 17 - 25 MAR 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Michael Diamond

Trap Men

17th

118

Laetisha Scanlan

Trap Women

9th

68

Catherine Skinner

Trap Women

21st

64

James Willett

Double Trap Men

Bronze

138

ISSF WORLD CUP BAKU, AZE 20 - 29 JUN 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Laetisha Scanlan

Trap Women

4th

70

Catherine Skinner

Trap Women

7th

70

Adam Vella

Trap Men

8th

120

James Willett

Double Trap Men

19th

131

Aislin Jones

Skeet Women

8th

70

Paul Adams

Skeet Men

17th

121

Keith Ferguson

Skeet Men

10th

122

XXXI OLYMPIC GAMES RIO DE JANEIRO, BRA 5 JUL - 21 AUG 2016 NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Catherine Skinner

Trap Women

Gold

67

Laetisha Scanlan

Trap Women

5th

70

Aislin Jones

Skeet Women

17th

63

Adam Vella

Trap Men

12th

115

Mitchell Iles

Trap Men

26th

110

Paul Adams

Skeet Men

19th

118

Keith Ferguson

Skeet Men

10th

120

James Willett

Double Trap Men

5th

140

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Dane Sampson

12


6TH WORLD UNIVERSITY CHAMPIONSHIPS BYDGOSZCZ, POL 14 - 18 SEP 2016

PISTOL

NAME

Chris Pitt

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Luke Argiro

Men Skeet

17th

108

Mat Costa

Men Skeet

23rd

104

ISSF JUNIOR WORLD CUP GABALA, AZE 16 - 23 SEP 2016

563

10th

553

PLACE

RESULT

IPC WORLD CUP SZCZECIN, POL 27 APRIL - 4 MAY 2016

NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

NAME

EVENT

Jack Wallace

Trap Junior Men

Gold

119

Natalie Smith

R8 - Women’s 50m Sport Rifle 3 Position DNS

DNS

Nathan Argiro

Trap Junior Men

28th

100

R6 - Mixed 50m Rifle prone SH1

DNS

DNS

Sam Bylsma

Trap Junior Men

6th

119

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle prone SH1

5th

629.3

Adam Bylsma

Trap Junior Men

24th

110

R2 - Women’s 10m Air Rifle Standing SH1

Silver

408.7

Lachlan Holdsworth

Trap Junior Men

15th

113

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

23rd

619.8

Stephanie Pile

Trap Junior Women

4th

69

R2 - Women’s 10m Air Rifle Standing SH1

5th

402.5

R5 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH2

27th

626.5

R4 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Standing SH2 Gold

629.4

R4 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Standing SH2

11th

627.1

R5 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH2

17th

630.3

PLACE

RESULT

Libby Kosmala

Luke Cain

IPC WORLD CUP AL AIN, UAE 23 - 27 JAN 2016

Bradley Mark

RIFLE NAME

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

Natalie Smith

R2 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Standing SH1

Silver

403.1

R6 - Mixed 50m Rifle Prone SH1

6th

618.5

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

24th

627

NAME

EVENT

R8 - Women’s 50m Sport Rifle 3P SH1 Gold

569

Natalie Smith

R8 - Women’s 50m Sport Rifle 3 Position 4th

562

Team R3 Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1 Bronze

1881.5

R6 - Mixed 50m Rifle prone SH1

29th

600

R4 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Standing SH2

17th

622.3

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle prone SH1

21st

631.5

R5 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH2

26th

622.2

R2 - Women’s 10m Air Rifle Standing SH1

7th

409.3

R5 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH2

11th

631.9

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

19th

633

R4 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Standing SH2

13th

625.1

R2 - Women’s 10m Air Rifle Standing SH1

6th

406.7

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

29th

623.3

R5 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH2

39th

623.9

R4 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Standing SH2 21st

625.2

R4 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Standing SH2

17th

627.6

R5 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH2

15th

633.8

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

7th

635.7

R6 - Mixed 50m Rifle Prone SH1

18th

608.9

P3 - Mixed 25m Pistol SH1

12th

544

P1 - Men’s 10m Air Pistol SH1

26th

544

PLACE

RESULT

Tracey Jackson

Luke Cain

Libby Kosmala

Anton Zappelli

R2 - Women’s 10m Air Rifle Standing SH1 5th

402.2

Team R3 Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1 Bronze

1881.5

R6 - Mixed 50m Rifle Prone SH1

19th

608.6

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

4th

631.2

Team R3 Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

Bronze

1881.5

PISTOL Chris Pitt

ISCH HANNOVER, GER 6 - 15 MAY 2016 RIFLE

Libby Kosmala

Luke Cain

Bradley Mark

Anton Zappelli

PISTOL P3 - Mixed 25m Pistol SH1

7th

556

P1 - Men’s 10m Air Pistol SH1

14th

543

Chris Pitt

IPC WORLD CUP BANGKOK, THA 12 - 20 MAR 2016

PARALYMPIC GAMES RIO DE JANEIRO, BRA 7 - 18 SEP 2016

RIFLE

RIFLE

NAME Glen McMurtrie

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

8th

P1 - Men’s 10m Air Pistol SH1

RIFLE

PARA-SHOOTING

13

P3 - Mixed 25m Pistol SH1

Natalie Smith

Anton Zappelli

EVENT

PLACE

RESULT

NAME

EVENT

Elizabeth Kosmala

R2 - 10m Air Rifle Standing Women SH1 18th

396

R3 - 10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH1

622

R6 - Mixed 50m Rifle Prone SH1

28th

564.5

R6 - Mixed 50m Rifle Prone SH1

29th

613.8

R1 - Men’s 10m Air Rifle standing SH1

15th

596.8

Natalie Smith

37th

R2 - 10m Air Rifle Standing Women SH1 5th

406.1

31st

626.4

Team R3 Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1 5th

1872.2

R3 - 10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH1

Team R6 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone

1752.6

R6 - 50m Free Rifle Prone Mixed SH1

24th

608.8

R8 - Women’s 50m Sport Rifle 3 Position 4th

561

R8 - 50m Rifle 3 positions Female SH1

8th

558

R6 - Mixed 50m Rifle prone SH1

14th

596

R3 - 10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH1

18th

629.9

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle prone SH1

16th

629.6

R6 - 50m Free Rifle Prone Mixed SH1 36th

598.3

R2 - Women 10m Air Rifle Standing

4th

409.5

R4 - 10m Air Rifle Standing Mixed SH2 12th

627.2

R5 - 10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH2

29th

627.3

R4 - 10m Air Rifle Standing Mixed SH2

26th

619.9

R5 - 10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH2

33rd

623

P3 - 25m Pistol Mixed SH1

4th

566

P1 - 10m Air Pistol Men SH1

14th

557

5th

Team R3 Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1 5th

1872.2

Team R6 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone

5th

1752.6

R6 - Mixed 50m Rifle Prone SH1

16th

592.1

R3 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

17th

628.8

Team R3 Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone SH1

5th

1872.2

Team R6 - Mixed 10m Air Rifle Prone

5th

1752.6

Anton Zappelli

Bradley Mark

Luke Cain

PISTOL Chris Pitt


Operations Manager Report

I wish to start by thanking the many volunteers who contribute so selflessly to the Sport of Shooting. Since stepping into this role I have been overwhelmed by your passion and knowledge I thank those of you who have taken and continue to take the time to share your invaluable knowledge with me. I am excited to launch the SA Volunteer recognition awards in the very near future. In preparation for the 2017 Oceania Continental Championships, 2018 ISSF Junior World Cup in Sydney and Gold Coast Commonwealth games, SA will provide additional support and opportunities for new and existing officials to be mentored, evaluated, and educated at SA-endorsed events. Hosting these world-class events here in Australia will certainly provide additional opportunities for AUS Officials to gain valuable international experience.

“I AM EXCITED TO LAUNCH THE SA VOLUNTEER RECOGNITION AWARDS IN THE VERY NEAR FUTURE.” At the completion of the IPC World Cup in Sydney last year, focus shifted quickly to the Oceania Continental Championship and Grand Prix at the Sydney International Shooting Centre at Cecil Park November 25-December 2. Being the final continental qualifying shooting event for Rio 2016, athletes from eight nations (including eventual Rio Olympic Gold and Silver Trap Women medal winners Catherine Skinner AUS

and Natalie Rooney NZL) competed for the last chance to win quotas. Including the Oceania Grand Prix Events a total of 250 competitors across 342 starts represented Australia, Fiji, Guam, New Caledonia, French Polynesia, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, and New Zealand. Australia fielded the largest team with 95 competitors, followed by New Zealand with 58 and Papua New Guinea with 13. With 2016 being an Olympic and Paralympic year the importance of the limited domestic events on the SA Calendar was significant as athletes competed for selection at the nominated selection events. Following the SA International Grand Prix, Oceania Continental Championship and Grand Prix, and Junior National Championships at the conclusion of 2015, SA hosted 10 Australia Cup and Grand Prix competitions at the Sydney International Shooting Centre (SISC), Target Rifle SA, and International Clay Target Club Ltd. In addition to these events SA Endorsed an additional 7 National and State events hosted by ACTA, PA, TRA, NSWCTA, WACTA, SACTA, NSWAPA. As always the running of these events would not have been possible without the assistance of the fantastic volunteers and officials involved, and I thank them on behalf of SA and the athletes. Shooting Australia held its annual Awards of Excellence in April this year. The event was different from previous awards presentations as it was designed around the announcement and presentation of the Australian Olympic and Paralympic Team Nominees. It was wonderful to see our Olympic and Paralympic teams share the stage along with coaches and support staff, and the evening allowed those present to celebrate all of the athletes nominated to go to Rio equally. In addition to the Shooting Australia 2015 Shooter of the Year, Coach of the Year, Official of the Year, Volunteer of the Year, and SA Media Awards, the first ever Ashley Adams Perpetual Trophy was awarded for the best and fairest athlete as voted by the 2015 A4G Squadded

Athletes. The event was a huge success for our sport and it was wonderful to share the evening with the Annual Award Winners and nominees, Rio bound athletes, their families and friends, but also special guests such as AOC President John Coates, APC President Glenn Tasker and ASC Director Kathy Bates. Sports Administrator Zina Stone has done a phenomenal job supporting the SA Staff, Coaches, and Athletes throughout what has been a hectic year. In addition to coordinating the usual domestic and international team travel for the A4G Squad and selected team members, Zina worked tirelessly with High Performance Manager and Team Leader Tim Mahon to coordinate the requirements of the AOC and APC throughout the Rio nomination and selection processes.

KERRY COPPER

OPERATIONS MANAGER

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

October 2015 to September 2016

14


Media, Marketing & Communication Manager’s Report Marketing and communications activities undertaken in 2015/16 reaffirmed Shooting Australia’s position as the peak body responsible for the growth, sustainability, and success of target shooting sports in Australia.

Events

Advertising

SA launched a new-look website in February and improvements have continued throughout 2016. The site has already received 105,000 page views in traffic, the most popular pages being the home page, athlete profiles and athlete performances.

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Media releases continue to be our effective form of advertising. We regularly outline the achievements of our athletes and the benefits of a supporting governing body. We actively facilitate and encourage media contact with our athletes while providing the athletes with advice to ensure they portray our sport positively. This strategy has gained significant traction in the time that I have been involved. We are actively looking at promotional activity with a focus on promotion of our sport to young female participants and we look forward to sharing those with you in the near future.

15

Coverage of Shooting and our athletes has been provided by Women’s Health Magazine, Coaching Life Magazine, Hamish and Andy, Channel 7, 7Two, 7Live and Yahoo News, Paralympics Post, RSN Racing and Sports, 9 News, Daily Mail, Daily Telegraph, Sunshine Coast Daily, Western Times, SMH, Fox Sport, news.com.au, The Australian, The Courier Mail, Herald Sun, The Advertiser, NT News, The Mercury, Perth Now, The Border Mail, Stuff, The Roar, ABC News, Mansfield Courier, Clearinghouse for Sport, The Daily Examiner, Outlook (private magazine produced for Godfrey Pembroke), Northern Star, The Chronicle, The Queensland Times, The Morning Bulletin, WN.com, SBS, NBC, and many more.

Events are a potential source of public visibility and media coverage. We can do better in this space in terms of advertising that these events are on for audience participation. Events also give people who are interested in the sport of shooting the opportunity to see our elite athletes competing.

Website

Social Media

SA continues to grow its online following and at 20 September has reached almost 8000 followers on Facebook and almost 2000 followers on Twitter. The most recently-created account, Instagram, grew quickly through the Olympic period and already has over 500 followers. The use of social media is a great example of extending the reach to an audience that seeks more information about our sport and interaction with our athletes.

New Communications Tools

SA continues to investigate and test new tools to help us communicate with our external and internal audiences more effectively. Our electronic direct mail campaigns have an average open rate of nearly double that of the sports industry as a whole.

Issues Management

SA continues to act as a voice for the sport of shooting in Australia and when contacted by media tries to ensure balance in media coverage of our sport and our athletes. Strategies are also in place to minimise negative media coverage. A crisis plan was created in the lead up to the Olympic and Paralympic Games and rolled out behind the scenes. This plan will continue to stay in place for our athletes and staff who travel around the world for our sport.

“SOCIAL MEDIA IS A GREAT EXAMPLE OF EXTENDING THE REACH TO AN AUDIENCE THAT SEEKS MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OUR SPORT” Proactively working for Stakeholders

Looking to the future SA aims to engage with our stakeholders in 2017 by hosting a range of representatives from our member bodies in biannual roundtable events. These events will enhance collaborative marketing and communication between SA and Member Bodies. The 2017 roundtable series is an opportunity for all representatives to gain a thorough understanding of the future opportunities to engage and collaborate on marketing and communication initiatives relevant to our sport. SA will also host key forums with an overview of key communication issues, allowing SA to gain a first-hand understanding of the challenges facing Member Bodies in this area. The insights obtained from these events will enable SA to identify challenges, analyse trends, discover future opportunities, and find ways for more effectively communicating our messages.

KELLY WRIGHT

MEDIA, MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER


Coaches Report - Pistol

1. We have involved the provisional candidates for the Olympic Games in the international competitions through September 2015 to July 2016: •

SA International Grand Prix (individuals) in Sydney and the Oceania Continental Championship in Sydney (two teams in each of ISSF disciplines)

Air Pistol Competitions in Austria and Germany (D. Repacholi, E. Galiabovitch, S. Kroopin)

ISSF World Cup in Bangkok (D. Repacholi)

ISSF World Cup in Rio de Janeiro (D. Repacholi and L. Yauhleuskay)

ISSF WC in Munich (D. Repacholi, L. Yauhleuskaya and E. Galiabovitch)

ISSF WC in Baku (D. Repacholi, L. Yauhleuskaya, E. Galiabovotch, B. Blackburn and D. Chapman) There were some results that were closed to the international performance level: D. Repacholi has made a final in 50m Men Pistol with the score of 562 points; E. Galiabovitch has made a final in Austria with the score of 381 points and was 25th in the ISSF WC in Munich with the score of 382 points. We have the youngest winner of the Meyton Cup – Sascha Kroopin has won and has been third in both finals in the air pistol in Austria with the corresponding scores 378 and 376 points.

2. In the 2015 Oceania Continental Championship the pistol athletes have won the quotas in all disciplines: Daniel Repacholi (50m Men Pistol), Chris Summerell (10m Men Pistol), David Chapman (25m Men Pistol) Lalita Yauhleuskay (10m Women Pistol) and Elena Galiabovitch (25m Women Pistol). 3. The relocation of A4G athletes Chris Summerrell and Emily Esposito has had a positive impact on their performances. However, having many days and weeks off for the training camp and competitions left both of them in the situation that they were not able to keep their casual jobs. For Chris and Emily it has been difficult to find other jobs or come back to work with the same income. Unfortunately both Emily and Chris were not successful in being selected for the Olympic Games. 4. During the reporting period SA and PA have continued to work towards establishing the pathway and partnership between the A4G and PA NDS programs. Serg Evglevski and Elena Galiabovitch have been members of the PA NDS prior to acceptance to the A4G. During 2016 while the adult athletes prepared for the Olympic Games young A4G members S. Kroopin, B. Groves, T. Ashmore, and S. Evglevski were able to attend the PA Junior training camps in Canberra where they have been supervised by PA coaches P. Heuke, A. Kupke, and M. Guistiniano. There were two combined training camps for A4G and PA NDS members in 2016.

“OUR ATHLETES HAVE GIVEN THEIR BEST IN RIO. THANKS TO ALL OF THEM.” All our athletes that have been selected to the Olympic Team are full time workers. The preparation and participation in the Olympic Games by our pistol athletes to the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro has been planned according to their availability for training and competing. The performance level during 2014 – 2015 of most of our athletes has been in average 10 or more points lower than the international performance level. Therefore our aim was to get the best possible level of the technical performance in training and the competitions during 2015 - 2016 and sustain it for the Olympics. Three of our athletes: D. Repacholi, L. Yauhleuskaya and E. Galiabovitch showed promising performances during the Australian Cup 3 in Sydney in July 2016 three weeks prior to the Olympic Games (Daniel – 577 and 579 points in the Air Pistol, 557 points in 50m Pistol; Lalita – 583 and 584 in Sport Pistol, Elena 385 points in the Air Pistol and 585 in the Sport Pistol). However, we were not able to maintain such levels of performance in Rio. From my point of view our athletes have given their best in Rio. Thanks to all of them. We are analysing the outcome to be sure that their best performances will be reached sooner. (It is obvious that most Olympic Team athletes could reach international performance level by continuing their development for additional 1 – 2 years in the permanent training environment).

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Initially we will consider how the strategies that were outlined in the previous report were implemented:

16


Our young generation of athletes has shown promising results during this year’s domestic and international competitions. Above I have mentioned Sascha’s success in Austria. Sascha has been 9th and 10th in the Air Gun Competition in Munich with scores of 376 points both times. In addition at the PA Nationals Sascha became the youngest (14 years old) National Champion in the Air Pistol with the score of 377 points. Serg Evglevski is continuing his progress in the Rapid Fire event. In July in Sydney Serg has won the competition with a remarkable score of 583 points. Bailey Groves was the best junior athlete at the PA Nationals in Perth. Thomas Ashmore is continuing his progress in the Rapid Fire Pistol. Serg and Thomas have been the main contributors in the success of the Pistol Junior Team at the 2016 Junior World Cups in Suhl and Gabala. Serg has added another 3 individual ISSF World Cup medals he won in Gabala to his two individual medals he won earlier this year in Suhl. In Gabala Thomas first time came on the podium in such level of

competitions; in the Standard Pistol his score of 554 points allowed him to take the Bronze medal. Serg, Thomas and Hans Hummer have been on the podium in the Standard Pistol and Sport Pistol per team events winning Silver medals. In Gabala Alison Heinrich with the score of 370 points has achieved the final performance. I would like to acknowledge the assistance of PA management and PA Executives who have made participation in 2016 Junior ISSF World Cups possible by providing financial support and other resources. In December 2015 for the first time for a long period the pistol shooters participated in the overseas training camp in South Korea. It was interesting to train along with the best pistol athletes. We received very good care in Korea. The Korean Federation is keen to assist in the States exchange program. In December 2016 the Japan National Team will visit Australia for the training camp. We are planning to have a combined training camp with them.

In 2015 – 2016 SA staff and coaches have been doing a great deal of cooperating with PA in developing a good working relation; understanding each other’s roles and tasks. So far we have made a few steps forward. In front of us there are some important steps that will make us successful: to increase the participation in the pistol shooting at all levels - involve as much as possible mature and young athletes to pistol shooting; to create the centres of excellence in the State and the coaching positions for the permanent trainings for young athletes and the State teams; to make the training and competitions more attractive.

VLADIMIR GALIABOVITCH

NATIONAL HIGH PERFORMANCE PISTOL COACH

Coaches Report - Shotgun

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

2016 was very successful for the shotgun team - a Gold medal at the Rio Olympics in Women’s Trap event by Catherine Skinner, 12 years since Australia won gold at Athens.

17

2016 was also successful for a few of our young shooters. During 2016 the shotgun team won 13 medals at International tournaments, ISSF World Cups (excluding World Cup Final), and BME - all of them won by the new generation athletes. At the Qatar Open: •

J. Willett – 2nd place in Trap Men, A. Bylsma - 3rd place in Trap Men; S. Pile - 3rd place in Junior Trap Women and C. Skinner won the Bronze medal in Trap Women.

At the ISSF World Cup in Nicosia J. Willett won Bronze in Double Trap, then later in April he won Gold at another ISSF World Cup in Rio. E. Cox won the Women’s Trap event at the ISSF World Cup in San Marino. Very good performances were received from our juniors. At the ISSF Junior’s World Cup in Suhl the Men’s Junior Team won Gold, J. Wallace was 3rd in the individual event, and S. Pile also was 3rd in Women’s Junior Trap.

“THE SHOTGUN TEAM WON 13 MEDALS - ALL OF THEM WON BY THE NEW GENERATION ATHLETES.”

At another ISSF Junior World Cup in Gabala J. Wallace improved his performance and won the Trap Men Junior. As it mentioned above, at our benchmark event, Olympic Games 2016 in Rio, we won one Gold medal in Women Trap event (C. Skinner) and L. Scanlan was 5th. In Rio Olympics we had three shooters from 2016-2020 Squad at the Top 6 with, as mentioned above, one Gold medal in the Women’s Trap event from (C. Skinner), a 5th-place finish from L. Scanlan and a 5th place finish for James Willett in Men’s Double Trap. As a coach I am very happy with results of shotgun shooters in 2016.

VALERIY TIMOKHIN

NATIONAL HIGH PERFORMANCE SHOTGUN COACH


Coaches Report - Rifle

Rifle shooters won six quota places for Rio 2016 (Warren Potent and Fred Woodhouse – Men’s Prone; Jack Rossiter - Men’s Air Rifle, Dane Sampson - Men’s 3P, Jennifer Hens - Women’s Air Rifle and Emma Woodroofe – Women’s 3P). In comparison with other Shooting Federations this is a very high number of quota places for one country. The Australian Rifle Team used their full opportunity and won five quota places at the Oceania Championships, with only one quota place won in the “Open Market” at the World Championships in 2014 by Warren. The ratio of quota places won in the Oceania Continental Championships to the Open Market shows that Prone is the discipline where we have the greatest opportunity and where we focus our attention in training. The selection criteria for the Olympic Games were well developed and ensured that in Rio we would be represented by the best Australian rifle shooters. The first selection competition was held in mid-December last year and the second one followed in February this year. In both competitions, all athletes had the opportunity to earn automatic selection if they managed to meet the specified criteria. After these events, the Selection Committee filled the outstanding quota places. The Committee also unanimously requested the transfer of the Women’s three position rifle QP to Skeet Women, which was granted by the ISSF. The Olympic Games Rifle team consisted of five Rifle athletes – Warren Potent, Dane Sampson, Jack Rossiter, Will Godward and Jennifer Hens.

“TOKYO 2020 IS ALREADY IN THE VIEWFINDER OF OUR ATHLETES.” Preparation plans took place as per the originally proposed plan with only minimal changes. Not everyone was able to take part in all the competitions and camps (with work or school obligations), but even so, they participated in international competitions and prep-camps according to their availability. Overall, the preparation of our best shooters this year was almost impossible to reproach. Equipment-wise all the best athletes have this at the required level. We would benefit greatly from having a Force plate, which is used for training to improve control of the athlete’s balance, where stability is the key to success. The performance of the rifle athletes at the Olympics in Rio was unsuccessful. The shooters were especially disappointed. The closest to achieving his defined goal was Warren, which was expected. He was holding a position for the final until the last series, where he missed the final; however, I was pleasantly surprised with his three position result of 1169. Sport is sport, and the goals for the future along with the big tasks and targets for the coming years are in planning. Tokyo 2020 is already in the viewfinder of our young athletes. I must also mention some positives to the nearly completed shooting season. In 2016 rifle shooters achieved a total of nine final positions in major international competitions and secured a total of seven medals. Warren was the most successful with two medals out of his three starts at World Cups. This has secured him a place in the World Cup Final which will take place in October in Italy. Dane Sampson, Jack Rossiter and Emma Adams earned the other finals places and international medals. This year some shooters have improved, and managed to increase their personal records or create new national records. Despite these positives, our top rifle shooting team has little depth, and in the Men’s and Women’s categories in

some disciplines the situation is critical. We have some promising young athletes who, despite being of junior age, are already performing at a very solid level. There is much we can be doing to support the future development of Australian athletes in rifle shooting – without this as a focus for the future we will continue to have a problem. Without optimism and faith in success, however, we cannot work and think about future medals. I believe that we have some young athletes within our rifle team, who will replace Warren soon and will continue in his footsteps. I also believe that cooperation between Shooting Australia and Target Rifle Australia will go ahead the right way and will soon improve the situation for ongoing athlete development. Assistance from the Australian Olympic Committee, Australian Institute of Sport and the most excitedly, a new relationship between Shooting Australia and the South Australian Sports Institute will help us to raise the talent to the master’s level. Finally, as every year, I would like to thank especially all the volunteers and coaches in Rifle Clubs across the country for their help. Without their support, we could not have achieved what we have in the past, or be looking to the future. Thanks also Target Rifle South Australia and the shooting clubs in our preparation centre in Adelaide (Wingfield and Reynella), where they welcome us very warmly, and where we have very good conditions for preparing our best shooters. Special thanks go to Carrie, who brought huge hopes, optimism and showed the way to work in clubs in our small sport called Rifle Shooting.

PETR KURKA

NATIONAL HIGH PERFORMANCE RIFLE COACH

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

2016 was the culmination of a four-year cycle from 2013 to 2016, where the clear objective was the successful performance of our shooters at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. This goal was also the subject of our preparation this year. At the same time, it was important to continue the training and preparation for those athletes who were not selected for the Olympic Games.

18


Coaches Report - Para-shooting SA Aiming4gold Squad

After receiving applications from 13 athletes, 7 athletes were accepted in SA A4G Para-shooting Squad with the Squad announced on October 2015. After good domestic performances Glen McMurtrie was added to the Squad in February 2016. 1. Natalie Smith

QLD

Rifle

SH1

2. Elizabeth Kosmala

SA

Rifle

SH1

3. Bradley Mark

QLD

Rifle

SH2

4. Luke Cain

VIC

Rifle

SH2

5. Anton Zappelli

WA

Rifle

SH1

6. Christopher Pitt

QLD

Pistol

SH1

7. Tracey Jackson

QLD

Rifle

SH2

8. Glen Mc Murtrie

QLD

Rifle

SH1

All athletes in SA A4G Squad received an individualised Athlete Performance Plan and competitions calendar, provided by the National Head Coach. A4G Squad members attended training camps and domestic competitions and selected team members competed at the IPC World Cups in USA, UAE, Poland and ISCH Germany.

UAE (Feb)

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Team of 6 (Cain, Jackson, Smith, Pitt, Kosmala and Zappelli) attended the first IPC WC in Al Ain (UAE).

19

Natalie Smith won GOLD in 3 Position match and SILVER in Air Rifle Standing with the world class performance. Anton Zappelli made the Final in R3 Air Rifle Prone and finished 4th, Libby Kosmala made the Final in R2 Air Rifle Standing finishing 5th and Chris Pitt made the Final in P3 25m Sport Pistol and finish on the 8th position.

Thailand (March)

Team of 4 (Smith, Zappelli, Pitt and Mc Murtrie) attended IPC World Cup in Bangkok. Natalie Smith made the Final in R2 Air Standing and R8 3 Position and in both events finished 4th, and Chris Pitt made the Final in P3 25m Sport Pistol finishing 8th. For Glen McMurtrie it was his first international experience.

Poland (April)

Team of 4 (Mark, Cain, Smith and Kosmala) competed in Poland at the IPC WC, 10m only. Luke Cain had an excellent Final and won the GOLD Medal in R4 Air Rifle Standing, Natalie Smith finished her R2 Air Rifle Standing match with the SILVER Medal. Also Natalie made the Final in R3 Air rifle Prone finishing 5th and Libby Kosmala made the Final in R2 Air Standing finishing 6th.

Germany (May)

After Poland our team of 4 (Mark, Cain, Smith and Pitt) moved to Hanover and competed in combine ISSF & IPC International Competitions (ISCH) in Germany with more than 40 countries attending. Christopher Pitt and Anton Zappelli joined our team in Hannover. Our athletes made 4 Finals, Zappelli in R3 Air Prone with his PB finished 8th, Libby and Natalie made the Final in R2 Air Standing finishing 6th and 7th, and Natalie finished 4th in R8 3 Position match. Hanover was our last international competitions before the Paralympic Games. In early June the Brisbane Shooting Range was closed, due to extensive renovation for the 2018 Commonwealth Games and our Rio Team members Bradley Mark and Natalie Smith needed adequative solution to continue their preparation for Rio. We provided Bradley the new electronic target to continue training in his house, but as there was no alternative for temporary 50m range, Natalie Smith moved to Sydney to be able to continue her training and she stayed there from the mid-June until 21st of August.

International Training Camp – Suhl Germany (25 Jul-5 Aug)

As Hanover in early May was the last international competition in 2016, around 15 countries decided to attend the International training camp in Suhl GER as the final preparation for Rio.

It was excellent opportunity for around 60 athletes from all around the world to train together and also attend friendly competitions and finals organised by coaches and team leaders. Our 4 athletes (Zappelli, Pitt, Cain and Kosmala) attended this training camp and it was great training at the excellent facilities in Suhl. Intensive training helped athletes to work on their technique and also compete at the high level friendly competitions. Bradley didn’t like to take a risk and travel long distance as he needs longer recovery after those trips, and Natalie decided to stay with her family and practise in Sydney.

Training Camp Sydney (15-21 Aug)

Our last training camp before leaving to the Paralympic Games we used for the free individual training and a few test competitions with the finals. It was a good week of training and athletes were on the rise with their performances.

Paralympic Games Rio Brazil (8-18 Sep 2016)

After winning total of 7 Quota places for Rio’16 at the end of 2015, based on eligibility and athletes performances in March we nominated to the APC 6 athletes for the Rio Paralympic Shooting Team.

Selection •

APC and SA selection process was advertised and understood by all

Team was selected 5 months prior the Games

Six athletes selected into the team:

1. Natalie Smith

QLD

R2 R3 R6 R8

2. Elizabeth Kosmala

SA

R2 R3

3. Bradley Mark

QLD

R4 R5

4. Luke Cain

VIC

R4 R5

5. Anton Zappelli

WA

R3 R6

6. Christopher Pitt

QLD

P1 P3


As Qantas could not confirm our needs for upgrades and seating requirements and because of the time difference of 13 hours between AUS and BRA, I requested for our team to arrive to Rio on the opening day of the Paralympic Village, 31st of August and have a few more days for recovery.

Paralympic Games

- The selected team was the best possible choice and at the training camps leading up to the Games all the athletes worked hard, and have shown improvement day by day which reflected their individual abilities. All 6 athletes were competitive at the IPC World Cups 2015-2016 and were able to make the Olympic Finals. - Kosmala, Mark, Cain and Smith are experienced athletes, already competed at the Paralympic Games but for Zappelli and Pitt this was the first attempt to compete at the highest international level. - Our goal was to make 3-4 Finals and win 1-2 Medals in what was a much more competitive environment than at the any previous Games. Unfortunately, we made 3 Finals (Smith in R2 & R8, and Pitt in P3) but we didn’t win the medal.

1 Natalie Smith After competing in 2 events (R2 & R3) and winning Bronze Medal in the London ’12 Paralympic Games, in 2013 Natalie started to practice another 2 events (R6-‘22 Prone and R8-3 Position). Giving birth to her first child Daniel in 2014 Natalie had almost 18 months break, coming back to international scene in 2015. At the end of 2015 in USA Natalie establish new AUS Record in R8 with an excellent 576 and in last 12 months she was very competitive in R2 & R8 at the IPC World Cups, winning several medals. Going to Rio Natalie was a genuine medal prospect in R2 & R8, she made 2 Finals but finished in the 5th and 8th positions. Good performances.

2 Elizabeth Kosmala At her 12th and last Paralympics Libby didn’t make the Final and she was very disappointed with her performance in Rio. For more than 40 years Libby was inspiration for the athletes from all around the world and one of the best Paralympian ever. Congratulations for the achievements over the years and THANKS LIBBY!

3 Bradley Mark Very unlucky in London 4 years ago, shooting the perfect score of 600 and not making the Final, Bradley was Medal prospect in Rio but this time Bradley’s scores were not enough for the medal hunt. In R4-Air Rifle Standing Mark finished 12th and in R5-Air Rifle Prone 29th.

4 Luke Cain Luke is the athlete who worked very hard, but his performances over the last few years have been up and down with more consistency in R4 (Air Standing). Luke doesn’t make many finals but when he makes the final he is very competitive and most finals he converts into medals. At his second Paralympics Luke didn’t make the finals.

5 Anton Zappelli

Over the last two years Anton improved his performance to the high international level and in Rio in his best event R3 (Air Prone) he achieved respectable 629.9 and finished on 18th position. First Games for Anton and valuable experience for Tokyo ’20 with the goal to be medal prospect in his events R3 (Air Prone) and R6 (’22 Prone).

6 Christopher Pitt Chris was the only athlete competing in pistol events and at his first Games he did an excellent work. Over the last 3 years Chris was constantly improving his performances and in Rio he had a very good match in P1 (Air Pistol) finishing respectable 14th and just missing the final. In his best event P3 (25m Pistol) Chris did an excellent performance and with 566 made the Final, won the shootoff match and narrowly missing Bronze medal finished on the 4th position. These performances in Rio will help Chris to continue his career with the confidence that he can compete with the very best at the biggest stage.

Conclusion

It is a very fine line between achieving goals and being disappointed. Making 3 Finals was a good result but in last few years our athletes were winning medals at almost every IPC World Cup and we failed to do it in Rio. Athletes worked very hard and they put a lot of pressure on themselves to win and it didn’t work in Rio. I believe we did everything possible for the best preparation for Rio, we definitely selected our best athletes for the Paralympic Games and our post reviews and analysis will show what we can do better to improve our performances in the future. At the end of this short report, I would like to congratulate the athletes for their results and big thanks to the support team: Tim Mahon (Section Manager), Annie Bugden, Margaret Zubcic, Yvonne Cain and Stuart Smith for their excellent job and help leading up to and during the Games in Rio. Big THANK YOU to SA Board and all the staff for their support and good work, the Australian Paralympic Committee for their ongoing financial support and our athletes and support staff for their full commitment and hard work throughout the years.

MIROSLAV SIPEK

NATIONAL HIGH PERFORMANCE EAD COACH

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

As some of our team members had concerns about traveling from AUS to RIO, upgrades and seating become one of our priorities.

20


Committee Report - High Performance

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

The High Performance Committee (HPC) met quarterly to oversee the Aiming4Gold High Performance Program. This Committee comprised High Performance Manager Tim Mahon as Chair, representatives from our Member Bodies including the Australian Clay Target Association (Elaine Forward), Pistol Australia (Ray Andrews), Target Rifle Australia (Tricia Van Nus), National Rifle Association of Australia (Catherine Berry) and Shooting Clays Australia (Glen Rider); National High Permformance Coaches Miro Sipek (EAD), Val Timokhin (Shotgun), Vlad Galiabovitch (Pistol) and Petr Kurka (Rifle); SA Personal Excellence & Pathway Coordinator Carrie Quigley with Minute Secretary Zina Stone; SA Athlete Commission representative Robyn Ridley; and AIS Consultants Andrew Pratley and Andrew Dee.

21

Shooting Australia is fortunate to engage such a knowledgeable and diverse group of stakeholders to value-add the A4G program. It is important to note that all decisions are reached in consultation with and through the collaboration of these stakeholders to ensure buy-in and external advocacy. A number of key outcomes were achieved by this Committee which include: •

Ratification and induction of the A4G16 Squads;

Support for the 2015/16 A4G budget;

Endorsement of 2016 World Cups, Junior World Cups, University Games and Shotgun World Championships selection policies;

Simplification of the Australian performance system;

Finalisation of the 2016 Calendar;

Monitoring of performance of our A4G athletes;

Ratification of the 2017-2020 A4G strategy to align national programs within the National Institute Network;

Support for an athlete pathway that

“SHOOTING AUSTRALIA IS FORTUNATE TO ENGAGE SUCH A KNOWLEDGEABLE AND DIVERSE GROUP OF STAKEHOLDERS TO VALUE-ADD THE A4G PROGRAM.”

aligns to the AIS “FTEM” within their own shooting disciplines’; •

Endorsement of strategies resulting from feedback of the 2015 Athlete Evaluation Survey;

Finalisation of our responses to the AIS Annual Sports Performance Review table;

Endorsement of the 2017 Domestic Series format; and

Allocation of dAIS and “Next Generation” investment for A4G athletes;

I publicly thank and acknowledge all members of the High Performance Committee for their input, debate, guidance, and support.

TIM MAHON

CHAIR HIGH PERFORMANCE COMMITTEE


Committee Report - Technical

The new updated version of the SA Technical Officials Course has been completed. This includes competencies with the LUCIE principals, a Recognition of Currency, and Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL). These courses will be rolled out in 2017. Tricia Van Nus has done a great job of getting this ready to go.

ISSF World Cups 2017

ISSF Jury applications for World Cups 2017 have been selected and forwarded to the ISSF. Successful appointees (if any) should be notified by late 2016.

ISSF Licence Renewals

All disciplines have been sent renewal notices and application forms for those who have licences due. Those will have been returned to SA to be forwarded to ISSF.

Elaine Forward

ACTA

Sharon Reynolds

PA

Paul Golden

TRA

Catherine Berry

NRAA

Gleniss Lawrence

ISSF

Competitions

Our Officials and volunteers have had another busy year with SA Events and SA endorsed competitions which have been conducted in most states.

ELAINE FORWARD OAM CHAIR TECHNICAL COMMITTEE

Thanks To Our Voluneers

The Committee acknowledges and thanks all the volunteers for their time and help, at their own cost, at the many competitions held for SA around the states, and looks forward to your support in the future. We couldn’t run these events without you.

“THE COMMITTEE ACKNOWLEDGES AND THANKS ALL THE VOLUNTEERS FOR THEIR TIME AND HELP”

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

The Technical Committee has met on two occasions in the past twelve months, with further communications by email and telephone. There have also been several catch-ups at Shooting Australia competitions.

22


23

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16


24

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16


Committee Report - Coaching Carrie Quigley

SA

Tricia Van Nus

TRA

Suzy Balogh

ACTA

Peter Heuke

PA

Catherine Berry

NRAA

Tracey Grayer

SCA

The Coaches Committee is a representative committee with membership from each Member Body. The purpose of the committee is to coordinate strategy, monitor the education and development of coaches, and deliver coaching within the Member Bodies.

Shooting Australia has received inprinciple approval of The Advanced Coach Accreditation level, and the Coaches Committee is now in the process of deciding some details before it is finally approved. While this is an exciting step in the overall Shooting Australia Coach Pathway, I would take this opportunity to discuss the important role of Club Coaches. The Club Coach is the first point of contact for new athletes to this sport, and as such they play an important role in providing guidance and information about basic skill development and introduction of the Athlete Pathway. The Coaches Committee acknowledges that it is important that we continue to provide ongoing opportunities for Club Coaches so they are supported and part of a coaching team. Shooting Australia was pleased to acknowledge the dedicated contributions of our volunteer coaches at the Awards of Excellence night. Congratulations to Annie Bugden who won the 2015 Shooting Australia Volunteer Coach of the Year award. Annie has been an active coach for over 20 years, and has been an invaluable part of the EAD Team. Her knowledge and understanding of shooting is immense, and her quiet, gentle approach to athletes is loved and appreciated by all. Thank you Annie!

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Thank you to the members of the SA Coaches Committee for your ongoing contributions.

25

“THANK YOU TO THE MEMBERS OF THE SA COACHES COMMITTEE FOR YOUR ONGOING CONTRIBUTIONS” CARRIE QUIGLEY

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA PATHWAYS COORDINATOR


Committee Report - Athletes

The current committee members are: Robyn Ridley (Chair)

TRA

Michael Diamond

ACTA

Emily Esposito

PA

Elizabeth Kosmala

TRA

Matthew Pozzebon

NRAA

Tim Mahon

SA

We have also been able to have a representative present at all High Performance Committee Meetings over the past 12 months allowing us to make sure an athlete’s point of view is heard on the many High Performance issues and decisions that have been made.

During the year we chose our charity partner to work with and were pleased to choose the Bully Zero Foundation Australia. I’m sure our athletes are looking forward to working with the foundation to give something back to the community and help stamp out bullying. One of the best ways to do that is to lead by example in the shooting community. I would like to thank Michael, Matthew, Emily and Libby for their hard work over the past year. I look forward to working with them again next year as we continue to represent High Performance Squad member athletes and give them an avenue to voice any concerns or suggestions for improving our sport.

Finally, I would like to say congratulations on behalf of the athletes committee to all the Olympic and Paralympic athletes who went to Rio. We are very proud of the effort you put into your performances and the excellent representatives you were for our sport. And a special congratulation to Catherine Skinner for winning a gold medal.

ROBYN RIDLEY

ATHLETE’S COMMITTEE CHAIR

“WE CHOSE OUR CHARITY PARTNER TO WORK WITH AND WERE PLEASED TO CHOOSE THE BULLY ZERO FOUNDATION AUSTRALIA.” SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

The Athletes Committee was quieter this year as most athletes were concentrating on selection for the Olympic Games. I congratulate all athletes for the hard work and dedication they have shown though the year whether or not they made the team.

26


Governance Report Key Outcomes Enable Sustained High Performance Outcomes •

Delivered 1 Gold Medal at the Rio Olympics

Secured in principle agreements for the sport of shooting to become for the first time a program sport with the Victorian Institute of Sport and South Australian Sports Institute from 2017

Conducted reviews into the high performance selection policies for the next four years and into the delivery and execution of domestic events

Achieve the Highest Standard of Governance and Administration Across the Whole of Sport • •

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

27

Created and implemented a culture framework for the organisation We have undertaken a ‘Whole of Sport Governance Review’. Possibly the largest piece of work the sport has ever undertaken. Further strengthened our relationship with our key external stakeholders including the Australian Sports Commission, Australian Institute of Sport and International Shooting Sport Federation.

Promote Target Shooting Sports •

Launched a new website

Significantly increased the amount of media created about the sport of shooting

Generated major increases in social media traffic, hits and reach

Create Financial Security •

Increased funding from the Australian Sports Commission

Increased funding for Gold Coast Preparation from the Australian Commonwealth Games Association

Secured in-principle agreements with the Victorian Institute of Sport and South Australian Sports Institute for program support Delivery of International Events

“SIGNIFICANTLY INCREASED THE AMOUNT OF MEDIA CREATED ABOUT THE SPORT OF SHOOTING”

Director’s Meetings

This table sets out the number of directors meetings held during the financial year and the number of meetings attended by each individual director (while they were a director). During the financial year, eight board meetings were held.

DIRECTOR

MEETINGS HELD

ATTENDED

Alan Smith

8

7

Bruce Scott

8

8

Catherine Clark

4

2

Catherine Fettell (Chair)

8

8

Kelvyn Prescott

8

7

Lisa Cook

8

8

Lisa Hasker

1

0

Board Sub-Committee’s FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE

MEETINGS HELD

ATTENDED

Bruce Scott (Chair)

3

3

Lisa Cook

3

3

Shaun Walker (Independent)

3

3

Damien Marangon (Executive Officer)

3

3


Financial Report

1 General information Information on directors

The names of each person who has been a director during the year and to the date of this report are: Catherine Therese Fettell Bruce Scott Alan Smith Kelvyn Prescott Lisa Cook Lisa Hasker (Resigned 03/03/2016) Catherine Clark (Appointed 03/03/2016)

Directors have been in office since the start of the financial year to the date of this report unless otherwise stated.

Principal activities

The principal activity of Australian International Shooting Ltd. during the financial year was to support competition shooting sports opportunities. No significant changes in the nature of the Company’s activity occurred during the financial year.

2 Operating results and

review of operations for the year

Operating results The profit of the Company amounted to $ 24,754 (2015: $ (36,708))

3 Other items Significant changes in state of affairs

There have been no significant changes in the state of affairs of the Company during the year.

Events after the reporting date No matters or circumstances have arisen since the end of the financial year which significantly affected or may significantly affect the operations of the Company, the results of those operations or the state of affairs of the Company in future financial years.

Indemnification and insurance of officers and auditors

No indemnities have been given or insurance premiums paid, during or since the end of the financial year, for any person who is or has been an officer or auditor of Australian International Shooting Ltd..

Auditor’s independence declaration

The lead auditor’s independence declaration in accordance with section 307C of the Corporations Act 2001, for the year ended 30/06/2016 has been received and can be found on page 29.

Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors: Director: Director: Dated this day of 16th of October 2016

Directors’ Declaration

The directors have determined that the Company is not a reporting entity and that this special purpose financial report should be prepared in accordance with the accounting policies described in Note 1 to the financial statements. The directors of the Company declare that: 1. The financial statements and notes, as set out on pages 7 - 20, are in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001 and: (a) comply with Accounting Standards as stated in Note 1; and (b) give a true and fair view of the Company’s financial position as at 30/06/2016 and of its performance for the year ended on that date in accordance with the accounting policies described in Note 1 to the financial statements. 2. In the directors’ opinion, there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Company will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. This declaration is made in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors.

Director: Director: Dated this day of 16th of October 2016

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

The directors present their report on Australian International Shooting Ltd. for the financial year ended 30/06/2016.

28


Financial Report Independent Audit Report to the board members of Australian International Shooting Ltd. Report on the Financial Report We have audited the accompanying financial report, being a special purpose financial report of Australian International Shooting Ltd., which comprises the statement of financial position as at 30/06/2016, the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, notes comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information, and the directors’ declaration.

Directors’ Responsibility for the Financial Report

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

The directors of the Company are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and have determined that the basis of preparation described in Note 1 to the financial report is appropriate to meet the requirements of the Corporations Act 2001 and is appropriate to meet the needs of the members. The directors’ responsibility also includes such internal control as the directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of a financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

29

Auditor’s Responsibility

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial report based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Those standards require that we comply with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report is free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial report. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the Company’s preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the directors, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial report. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

Independence

In conducting our audit, we have complied with the independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001. We confirm that the independence declaration required by the Corporations Act 2001, which has been given to the directors of Australian International Shooting Ltd., would be in the same terms if given to the directors as at the time of this auditor’s report.

Opinion

In our opinion the financial report of Australian International Shooting Ltd. is in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001, including: (a) giving a true and fair view of the Company’s financial position as at 30/06/2016 and of its performance for the year ended on that date; and (b) complying with Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Corporations Regulations 2001.

Basis of Accounting

Without modifying our opinion, we draw attention to Note 1 to the financial report which describes the basis of accounting The financial report is prepared for the purpose of fulfilling the directors’ financial reporting responsibilities under the Corporations Act 2001. As a result, the financial report may not be suitable for another purpose.

GRAY PERRY DFK

CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

BRENDON J SKATES

1st Floor 89 - 92 South Terrace Adelaide SA 5000 Dated this day of 19th of October 2016


Auditors Independence Declaration under Section 307C of the Corporations Act 2001 To the Board of Directors of Australian International Shooting Ltd.

I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, during the year ended 30 June 2016, there have been:

GRAY PERRY DFK

CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

(i) no contraventions of the auditor independence requirements as set out in the Corporations Act 2001 in relation to the audit; and

BRENDON J SKATES

(ii) no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit.

Dated this day of 19th of October 2016

1st Floor 89 - 92 South Terrace Adelaide SA 5000

2015 $

Revenue

3,522,818

2,653,054

Depreciation and amortisation expense

(15,278)

(13,023)

Other expenses

(578,395)

(420,950)

Employee benefits expense

(1,026,785)

(963,275)

Competition and Training

(1,877,606)

(1,292,514)

Profit (Loss) for the year

24,754

(36,708)

Total comprehensive profit (loss) for the year

24,754

(36,708)

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

2016 $

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements.

30


Financial Report Statement of Financial Position 30/06/2016 NOTE

2016 $

2015 $

Cash and cash equivalents

2

984,746

941,892

Trade and other receivables

3

71,777

72,159

1,056,523

1,014,051

61,392

36,345

Total non-current assets

61,392

36,345

Total assets

1,117,915

1,050,396

ASSETS Current assets

Total current assets Non-current assets Property, plant and equipment

4

LIABILITIES Current liabilities Trade and other payables

5

126,690

93,366

Employee benefits

6

206,843

165,105

Other financial liabilities

67,703

100,000

Total current liabilities

401,236

358,471

Total non-current liabilities

401,236

358,471

Net assets

716,679

691,925

Retained earnings

716,679

691,925

Total equity

716,679

691,925

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Non-current liabilities

31

EQUITY

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements.


Statement of Changes in Equity For the Year Ended 30/06/2016 RETAINED EARNINGS

TOTAL $

Balance at 1 July 2015

691,925

691,925

Profit attributable to members of the entity

24,754

24,754

Balance at 30 June 2016

716,679

716,679

RETAINED EARNINGS

TOTAL $

Balance at 1 July 2014

728,633

728,633

Profit attributable to members of the entity

(36,708)

(36,708)

Balance at 30 June 2015

691,925

691,925

2016

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

2015

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements.

32


Financial Report Statement of Cash Flows For the Year Ended 30/06/2016 NOTE

2016 $

2015 $

Receipts from customers

3,478,005

2,709,434

Payments to suppliers and employees

(3,421,188)

(2,686,355)

Interest received

26,362

23,946

83,179

47,025

Purchase of property, plant and equipment

(40,325)

(10,715)

Net cash used by investing activities

(40,325)

(10,715)

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents held

42,854

36,310

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

941,892

905,582

984,746

941,892

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Net cash provided by operating activities

11

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

2

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Cash and cash equivalents at end of financial year

33

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements.


1

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

a. Basis of Preparation

The directors have prepared the financial statements on the basis that the not-for-profit Company is a nonreporting entity because there are no users dependent on general purpose financial statements. These financial statements are therefore a special purpose financial statements that has been prepared in order to meet the requirements of the Corporations Act 2001. The financial report has been prepared in accordance with the significant accounting policies disclosed below which the directors have determined are appropriate to meet the needs of members. Such accounting policies are consistent with the previous period unless otherwise stated. The financial statements have been prepared on an accruals basis and are based on historical costs unless otherwise stated in the notes. The accounting policies that have been adopted in the preparation of this report are as follows:

Rounding of amounts

The Company is an entity to which ASIC Class Order 98/100 applies and, accordingly, amounts in the financial statements and Directors’ Report have been rounded to the nearest dollars.

b. Comparative Amounts

Comparatives are consistent with prior years, unless otherwise stated. Where a change in comparatives has also affected the opening retained earnings previously presented in a comparative period, an opening statement of financial position at the earliest date of the comparative period has been presented.

c. Property, Plant and Equipment

d. Financial instruments

Financial instruments are recognised initially using trade date accounting, i.e. on the date that Company becomes party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. On initial recognition, all financial instruments are measured at fair value plus transaction costs (except for instruments measured at fair value through profit or loss where transaction costs are expensed as incurred).

Classes of property, plant and equipment are measured using the cost or revaluation model as specified below.

Financial Assets

Where the cost model is used, the asset is carried at its cost less any accumulated depreciation and any impairment losses. Costs include purchase price, other directly attributable costs and the initial estimate of costs of dismantling and restoring the asset, where applicable.

• loans and receivables;

Assets measured using the revaluation model are carried at fair value at the revaluation date less any subsequent accumulated depreciation and impairment losses. Revaluations are performed whenever there is a material movement in the value of an asset under the revaluation model.

Plant and equipment

Plant and equipment are measured using the cost model.

Depreciation

The depreciable amount of all property, plant and equipment, except for freehold land is depreciated on a reducing balance method from the date that management determine that the asset is available for use.

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements.

Financial assets are divided into the following categories which are described in detail below:

financial assets at fair value through profit or loss; and

• held-to-maturity investments Financial assets are assigned to the different categories on initial recognition, depending on the characteristics of the instrument and its purpose. A financial instrument’s category is relevant to the way it is measured and whether any resulting income and expenses are recognised in profit or loss or in other comprehensive income.

Loans and receivables

Loans and receivables are nonderivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market. They arise principally through the provision of goods and services to customers but also incorporate other types of contractual monetary assets. After initial recognition these are measured at amortised cost, less provision for impairment. Any change in their value is recognised in profit or loss.

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Notes to the Financial Statements For the Year Ended 30/06/2016

34


Financial Report The Company ’s trade and most other receivables fall into this category of financial instruments Discounting is omitted where the effect of discounting is considered immaterial. Significant receivables are considered for impairment on an individual asset basis when they are past due at the reporting date or when objective evidence is received that a specific counterparty will default. The amount of the impairment is the difference between the net carrying amount and the present value of the future expected cash flows associated with the impaired receivable. For trade receivables, impairment provisions are recorded in a separate allowance account with the loss being recognised in profit or loss. When confirmation has been received that the amount is not collectable, the gross carrying value of the asset is written off against the associated impairment provision Subsequent recoveries of amounts previously written off are credited against other expenses in profit or loss.

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

35

Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss include financial assets: • acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the near future or • designated by the entity to be carried at fair value through profit or loss upon initial recognition.

Assets included within this category are carried in the statement of financial position at fair value with changes in fair value recognised in finance income or expenses in profit or loss.

Held-to-maturity investments

Held-to-maturity investments are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturity. Investments are classified as held-to-maturity if it is the intention of the Company’s management to hold them until maturity. Held-to-maturity investments are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with revenue recognised on an effective yield basis. In addition, if there is objective evidence that the investment has been impaired, the financial asset is measured at the present value of estimated cash flows. Any changes to the carrying amount of the investment are recognised in profit or loss.

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are recognised when the Company becomes a party to the contractual agreements of the instrument. All interest-related charges and, if applicable, changes in an instrument’s fair value that are reported in profit or loss are included in the income statement line items “finance costs” or “finance income” Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at fair value through profit or loss’ or other financial liabilities depending on the purpose for which the liability was acquired. The Company‘s financial liabilities include, trade and other payables, which are measured at amortised cost.

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements.

Impairment of financial assets

At the end of the reporting period the Company assesses whether there is any objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired.

Financial assets at amortised cost

If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss on financial assets carried at amortised cost has been incurred, the amount of the loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present value of the estimated future cash flows discounted at the financial assets original effective interest rate. Impairment on loans and receivables is reduced through the use of an allowance accounts, all other impairment losses on financial assets at amortised cost are taken directly to the asset.

e. Impairment of non-financial assets

At the end of each reporting period the Company determines whether there is an evidence of an impairment indicator for assets Where this indicator exists, the recoverable amount of the assets is estimated. The recoverable amount of an asset is the higher of the fair value less costs of disposal and the value in use. Value in use is the present value of the future cash flows expected to be derived from an asset. Where the recoverable amount is less than the carrying amount, an impairment loss is recognised in profit or loss.


Cash and cash equivalents comprises cash on hand, demand deposits and short-term investments which are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of change in value.

g. Employee benefits

Provision is made for the Company’s liability for employee benefits arising from services rendered by employees to the end of the reporting year. Employee benefits have been measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liability is settled. Employee benefits are presented as current liabilities in the statement of financial position if the Company does not have an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the reporting date regardless of the classification of the liability for measurement purposes under AASB 119. A liability for long service leave is recognised after an employee has completed five years of service based on remuneration rates current as at the end of the reporting period.

Termination benefits

Termination benefits are those benefits paid to an employee as a result of either the entity’s decision to terminate an employee’s employment before the normal retirement date or an employee’s decision to accept an offer of benefits in exchange for the termination of employment.

Termination benefits are recorded as a provision at the earlier of the following dates: •

When the entity can no longer withdraw the offer of those benefits; and

• When the entity recognises costs for a restructuring that is within the scope of AASB 137 Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets and involves the payment of termination benefits.

h. Provisions

Provisions are recognised when the Company has a legal or constructive obligation, as a result of past events, for which it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will result and that outflow can be reliably measured.

k. Goods and Services Tax (GST)

Revenue, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of Goods and Services Tax (GST), except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). Receivables and payable are stated inclusive of GST. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO is included as part of receivables or payables in the statement of financial position.

i. Income Tax

No provision for income tax has been raised as the company is exempt from income tax under Div 50 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997.

j. Revenue and other income Revenue is recognised when the amount of the revenue can be measured reliably, it is probable that economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the entity and specific criteria relating to the type of revenue as noted below, has been satisfied.

Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable and is presented net of returns, discounts and rebates. All revenue is stated net of the amount of Goods and Services Tax (GST).

Interest revenue

Interest is recognised using the effective interest method.

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements.

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

f. Cash and cash equivalents

36


Financial Report 2

Cash and cash equivalents 2016 $

2015 $

Cash at bank and in hand

609,185

316,331

Short-term bank deposits

375,561

625,561

984,746

941,892

RECONCILIATION OF CASH Cash and cash equivalents reported in the statement of cash flows are reconciled to the equivalent items in the statement of financial position as follows: Cash and cash equivalents

984,746

941,892

2016 $

2015 $

Trade receivables

42,204

68,467

GST receivable

13,464

-

Other receivables

16,109

3,692

Total current trade and other receivables

71,777

72,159

3

Trade and other receivables

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

CURRENT

37

The carrying value of trade receivables is considered a reasonable approximation of fair value due to the short-term nature of the balances.

The maximum exposure to credit risk at the reporting date is the fair value of each class of receivable in the financial statements.


4

Property, plant and equipment 2016 $

2015 $

At cost

197,909

173,023

Accumulated depreciation

(170,104)

(167,706)

Total plant and equipment

27,805

5,317

At cost

18,480

18,480

Accumulated depreciation

(13,986)

(12,824)

Total furniture, fixture and fittings

4,494

5,656

At cost

10,672

10,672

Accumulated depreciation

(9,589)

(9,228)

Total firearms

1,083

1,444

At cost

186,352

182,773

Accumulated depreciation

(174,678)

(169,263)

Total office equipment

11,674

13,510

At cost

17,949

6,709

Accumulated depreciation

(5,000)

(1,128)

Total web page development

12,949

5,581

TARGET EQUIPMENT

FURNITURE, FIXTURE AND FITTINGS

FIREARMS

WEB PAGE DEVELOPMENT

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

OFFICE EQUIPMENT

38


Financial Report Property, plant and equipment continued 2016 $

2015 $

At cost

13,851

13,231

Accumulated depreciation

(10,464)

(8,394)

Total diagnostic equipment

3,387

4,837

Total property, plant and equipment

61,392

36,345

Total property, plant and equipment

61,392

36,345

DIAGNOSTIC EQUIPMENT

Movements in carrying amounts of property, plant and equipment Movement in the carrying amounts for each class of property, plant and equipment between the beginning and the end of the current financial year:

TARGET EQUIPMENT $

FURNITURE, FIXTURES & FITTINGS $

FIREARMS $

OFFICE EQUIPMENT $

Balance at the beginning of year

5,317

5,656

1,444

13,510

Additions at cost

24,886

-

-

3,579

Depreciation expense

(2,398)

(1,162)

(361)

(5,415)

Balance at the end of the year

27,805

4,494

1,083

11,674

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2016

39

WEBSITE DIAGNOSTIC DEVELOPMENT $ EQUIPMENT $

TOTAL $

Balance at the beginning of year

5,581

4,837

36,345

Additions at cost

11,240

620

40,325

Depreciation expense

(3,872)

(2,070)

(15,278)

Balance at the end of the year

12,949

3,387

61,392

YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2016


TARGET EQUIPMENT $

FURNITURE, FIXTURES & FITTINGS $

FIREARMS $

OFFICE EQUIPMENT $

Balance at the beginning of year

7,148

8,131

1,927

21,391

Additions at cost

-

-

-

-

Disposals

-

(1,009)

-

-

Depreciation expense

(1,831)

(1,466)

(483)

(7,881)

Balance at the end of the year

5,317

5,656

1,444

13,510

YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2015

WEBSITE DIAGNOSTIC DEVELOPMENT $ EQUIPMENT $

TOTAL $

Balance at the beginning of year

18

38

38,653

Additions at cost

5,610

6,114

11,724

Disposals

-

-

(1,009)

Depreciation expense

(47)

(1,315)

(13,023)

Balance at the end of the year

5,581

4,837

36,345

YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2015

Trade and other payables

CURRENT

2016 $

2015 $

Trade payables

54,975

24,952

Sundry payables and accrued expenses

55,127

48,273

Accrued expenses

16,588

15,029

GST Payable

-

5,112

126,690

93,366

UNSECURED LIABILITIES

All amounts are short term and the carrying values are considered to be a reasonable approximation of fair value.

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

5

40


Financial Report 6

CURRENT

2016 $

2015 $

Provision for employee benefits

206,843

165,105

206,843

165,105

7

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Key Management Personnel Disclosures

MANAGEMENT REMUNERATION

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES

$0 - $50,000

0

$50,000 - $100,000

2

$100,000 - $150,000

2

8

41

Employee Benefits

Remuneration of Auditors

REMUNERATION OF THE AUDITOR OF THE COMPANY

2016 $

2015 $

Auditing or reviewing the financial report

8,000

8,000

8,000

8,000

9

Contingencies

In the opinion of the Directors, the Company did not have any contingencies at 30/06/2016 (30 June 2015:None).

10

Members’ Guarantee

The company is incorporated under the Corporations Act 2001 and is a company limited by gurantee. If the company is wound up, the constitution states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of $100 each towards meeting any outstandings and obligations of the company.


11

Cash Flow Information

Reconciliation of result for the year to cashflows from operating activities Reconciliation of net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

Profit (loss) for the year

2016 $

2015 $

24,754

(36,708)

CASH FLOWS EXCLUDED FROM PROFIT ATTRIBUTABLE TO OPERATING ACTIVITIES: - depreciation

15,278

13,023

CHANGES IN ASSETS AND LIABILITIES, NET OF THE EFFECTS OF PURCHASE AND DISPOSAL OF SUBSIDIARIES: - decrease/(increase) in trade and other receivables

382

(19,675)

- (increase)/decrease in other assets

(32,297)

100,000

- increase/(decrease) in trade and other payables

33,324

(1,949)

- increase/(decrease) in provisions

41,738

(7,666)

Cashflow from operations

83,179

47,025

12

Company Details

The registered office of and principal place of business of the company is:

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Australian International Shooting Ltd. 6 Walsh Ave St Marys SA 5048

42


Marsh Insurance Report Introduction We provide this report as an overview of the last twelve months sponsored income to Australian International Shooting Ltd, the report also includes commentary on Marketing and Claims for member programs. We have summarized the current participation data for the period September 2015 to September 2016 and provided commentary on the number of policies and income compared to previous years. You will see that the data reviewed has produced an increase in participation with AISL’s income increasing from $11,828.18 in 2014 to $15,419.02 in 2016. Increased participation by member clubs and the introduction of a member based firearms policy during the past twelve months has contributed to this increase.

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

We trust you will find this report beneficial and welcome your feedback.

43

Marsh Service Team

Marsh Advantage Insurance approach to Insurance Broking is the provision of personal service through a dedicated service team who are totally focussed on your business. As has been previously advised, Lauren Coburn has overall responsibility for the AISL business reporting to Robert Low. Your service team is:

ROBERT LOW (Manager - Commercial, Sport & Entertainment) Office Direct Line:

(08) 8385 3588

Fax:

(08) 8211 8785

Mobile:

0404 463 148

Email:

robert.low@marsh.com

LAUREN COBURN (Account Executive) Office Direct Line:

(08) 8385 3616

Fax:

(08) 8211 8785

Email:

lauren.coburn@marsh.com

JANINE HOOK (Assistant Account Executive) Office Direct Line:

(08) 8385 3524

Fax:

(08) 8211 8785

Email:

janine.hook@marsh.com

Marsh Office ROBERT LOW

Office Address: Level 6, 70 Franklin Street, Adelaide SA 5000

Level 6, 70 Frankin Street Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

Postal Address: GPO Box 2637, Adelaide SA 5001

MANAGER – SPORTS & ENTERTAINMENT MARSH ADVANTAGE INSURANCE PTY LTD

All correspondence to: GPO Box 2637, Adelaide SA 5001 Tel: 61 8 8385 3588 Fax: 61 8 8211 8785 Email: robert.low@marshadvantage.com www.marshadvantage.com.au

Contact Number(s): Phone: (08) 8385 3600 Fax: (08) 8211 8785

Our general website

Visit our website at www.marsh.com.au for information about our extensive range of products and services.

Insurance Market Report

Australian Insurance premiums are forecast to continue to fall across multiple classes, as underwriters seek to maintain and expand their client books, with the exception of a few specific insurance classes such as directors and officers (D&O) and group life. In the case of primary D&O there are signs that the market has started to toughen, while stability is returning to the group life market which has been experiencing hard market conditions for a number of years. While a number of underwriters attempted to change the market dynamics in the early part of the first half of 2016 (H1) by resisting premium reductions, a shift in their strategy was observed in the latter part of the second quarter in a bid to retain clients and win new business. June renewals saw the market return to the competitive discounting behaviour after experiencing insureds moving their program in search of lower premiums, albeit at lower percentages than in recent years. Clients continue to focus heavily on cost control during renewals, as businesses in general are still hurting due to the unfavourable economic environment of low growth and the continuation of low commodity prices. The impacts of market consolidations over the last 12 months are slowly playing out in 2016. There has been no major disruption to the market, it is evident that a number of the merged entities such as XL Catlin and ACE/Chubb, have adopted an aggressive stance in their strategies in order to maintain and indeed grow their client portfolios. Berkshire Hathaway Specialty have been quietly competitive but not overly aggressive, steadily assimilating into the Australian market and focusing on niche opportunities to expand their book.


With the cost of claims creeping upwards and room for premium discounts dwindling, insurers have reached a “critical mass” dilemma, In H1, we have seen an increase in “bundle” deals by packaging up multiple policies, allowing insurers to leverage a greater premium volume and be more competitive on a portfolio basis. For some insurers, this has been driven by an expanding appetite for new risks, while others have been looking to better cross-sell existing product lines. Britain’s decision to leave the European Union (Brexit) is not expected to have any immediate fore seeable impact on the Australian insurance market, despite London being the primary entry point into the European market historically. While there is the possibility for some redomiciling to Europe, capacity is unlikely to shrink. Although capacity is likely to remain at current levels regardless of the political repercussions of Brexit, any consequential currency and securities market volatility could lead to a potential increase in claims. Many of the global insurers and reinsurers have reported disappointing H1 results on the back of increased catastrophe (CAT) losses worldwide. A continuation of this trend in H2 may result in the alteration of strategy for the big losers.

Marketing & Claims

We provide the following information on our marketing during 2015/2016 and claims for the twelve month period.

Marketing

We produced a marketing campaign via mailed letters to member clubs offering Property insurance and established a Member based Firearms Insurance cover in the last twelve months. These campaigns introduced new business to the scheme which has been reflected in the increased income. Activity for the next period will include:

EVENT ACTIVITY DUE DATE New Offering Member based October/ Firearms Insurance November 2016 Club Property Insurance

Letters to clubs in November/ January/June

Claims

All portfolios have run well during the past twelve months with Domestic and Associations Liability insurance having the majority of claims. The loss ratio for all insurance products is good compared with the industry average:

TYPE OF INSURANCE

LOSS RATIO

Property Insurance 18% Public & Product Liability

10%

Personal Accident

25%

Travel Insurance

29%

Associations Liability

50%

Private Client Services

37%

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

A number of the internationally owned insurers operating in Australia are trying to grow their businesses by expanding their product ranges and discounting premiums against traditional market participants.

44


Marsh Insurance Report AISL INCOME SUMMARY

AISL income includes the number of policies, premium paid and income generated:

POLICIES

PREMIUM EARNED

NET INCOME TO AISL

Private & Commercial Business - 30 September 2010 to 30 September 2011 87

$144,323.83

$6,014.49

Private & Commercial Business - 30 September 2011 to 30 September 2012 189

$206,197.35

$8,693.07

Private & Commercial Business - 30 September 2012 to 30 September 2013 238

$230,617.16

$10,211.73

Private & Commercial Business - 30 September 2013 to 30 September 2014 241

$234,727.78

$10,755.38

Private & Commercial Business - 30 September 2014 to 30 September 2015 227

$267,428.33

$11,828.18

Private & Commercial Business - 30 September 2015 to 30 September 2016 198

Important Notices

These notices outline your rights and obligations in relation to entering into insurance contracts. It is essential that you read these notices carefully and advise your Account Executive immediately if you wish to make a further ‘declaration’ or have questions about general or policy specific* notices.

Disclosure

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Your Duty of Disclosure - contracts of general insurance subject to the Insurance Contracts Act

45

Before you enter into a contract of general insurance with an insurer, you have a duty, under the Insurance Contracts Act 1984, to disclose to the insurer every matter that you know, or could reasonably be expected to know, is relevant to the insurer’s decision whether to accept the risk of the insurance and, if so, on what terms. You have the same duty to disclose those matters to the insurer before you renew, extend, vary or reinstate a contract of general insurance.

$355,630

Your duty, however, does not require disclosure of matters: that diminish the risk to be undertaken by the insurer, that are of common knowledge, that your insurer knows or, in the ordinary course of its business, ought to know, or as to which compliance with your duty is waived by the insurer.

Non-Disclosure

If you fail to comply with your duty of disclosure, the insurer may be entitled to reduce its liability under the contract in respect of a claim, or may cancel the contract. If your non-disclosure is fraudulent, the insurer may also have the option of avoiding the contract from its beginning. Please note that your duty to disclose applies also when you amend, alter, vary or endorse a policy.

$15,419.02

Disclosure – Subsidiary & Associated Companies

Your Duty of Disclosure - Cover which is arranged for subsidiary and/or associated companies in addition to named insured’s. If you enter into a contract of insurance on behalf of any subsidiary and/or related company of the named insured, that subsidiary and/or related company has the same duty of disclosure as the named insured. We recommend that you ensure that each subsidiary and/ or related company is made aware of the duty of disclosure and given an opportunity to make any necessary disclosures.

Utmost Good Faith

Every insurance contract is subject to the doctrine of utmost good faith, which requires that parties to the contract should act toward each other honestly and fairly, avoiding any attempt to deceive in assuming and performing contractual obligations. Failure to do so on the part of the insured may permit the insurer to refuse to pay a claim or to cancel the policy or both.


It is vital that you advise the insurer of any changes to your company’s usual business. For example, insurers must be advised of any: mergers or acquisitions, changes in occupation or location, new products or services, or new overseas activities. If you are in doubt as to whether to notify your insurer of a change in business operations, please consult Marsh. Please note that your duty to disclose applies also when you amend, alter, vary or endorse a policy.

Subrogation

Some policies contain provisions that either exclude or reduce the insurer’s liability for a claim if you waive or limit your rights to recover damages from another party in relation to any loss. You may prejudice your rights with regard to a claim if, without the prior agreement from your insurers, you make any agreement with a third party that will prevent the insurer from recovering the loss from that, or another party. If you have such agreements, we may be able to negotiate with the insurer to permit them and therefore we request you advise Marsh of their existence. Examples of such agreements are the ”hold harmless” clauses which are often found in leases, in maintenance or supply contracts from burglar alarm or fire protection installers and in repair contracts. If you are in doubt, please consult Marsh.

Un-named Parties

Most policy conditions will exclude indemnity to other parties (eg. mortgagees, lessors, principals, etc.) unless their interest is properly noted on the policy. If you require the interest of a party other than the named insured to be covered, you must specifically request this.

Privacy Notice

Marsh Pty Ltd (“Marsh”) and the insurers that Marsh place your insurance with (“Insurer”) are bound by the requirements of the Privacy Act 1988 as amended by the Privacy (Private Sector) Act 2000 (“the Act”), which sets standards on the collection, use, disclosure and handling of personal information. Personal information is essentially information about individuals where the individual can be identified. It may include information such as your name, contact details, age, insurance history or financial details. Sensitive Information is a particular kind of personal information and includes information about an individual’s health; racial or ethnic origins; membership of political, professional or trade associations; political opinions or philosophical or religious beliefs; criminal record; or sexual preferences.

Marsh, and we can also facilitate you accessing the information supplied to your insurers through us by contacting: The Privacy Officer Marsh Advantage Insurance Pty Ltd (ABN 86 004 651 512) PO Box H176 Australia Square NSW 1215 Tel : 02 8864 7688 Email privacy.australia@marsh.com

Marsh and your insurers disclose personal information to third parties both in Australia and overseas, where it is believed necessary for us to provide our services to the professional standard you expect. These parties may include (but are not limited to) insurers, reinsurers and other intermediaries. All parties may also disclose this information, as needed, to employers, health workers, investigators, lawyers, loss adjusters and to government departments if required by law to do so. Where practical, information will be collected from individuals directly, however sometimes it may be collected indirectly by way of a representative. When you give Marsh or your Insurer personal information about other individuals, we rely on you to have made them aware that you will or may provide their information to us, the purposes for which we use it, the types of third parties we disclose it to and how they can access it (as described in this notice). If it is sensitive information we rely on you to have obtained their consent to these matters. If you have not done these things, you must tell us before you provide the relevant information.

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Change of Risk or Circumstance

Where required you can access the personal information you provided to

46


2015 Awards of Excellence The Shooting Australia Awards of Excellence function took place in Sydney on Friday 8 April, 2016. Not only did we present the 2016 Rio Olympic and Paralympic Games Shooting Team Nominees, we also introduced the Ashley Adams Perpetual Trophy which will henceforth be presented to the SA Athlete of the Year Award winner. The Ashley Adams
 Perpetual Trophy for Athlete of the Year

The winner of this inaugural Athlete of the Year Award will be presented with the Ashley Adams Perpetual Trophy. Ashley was the first athlete to compete at both ISSF and IPC Shooting World Cup events. This award is named in his honour, not simply because he was an outstanding athlete, but because of the way he behaved and conducted himself on and off the range. Ashley was world-renowned as a great competitor and human being and loved within the shooting community and beyond. This award is voted upon only by A4G squadded members and the winner is the athlete who best upholds the values and behaviours of our culture and who has performed outstandingly in a calendar year.

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Presented by Kate Bates, Commissioner, Australian Sports Commission, the nominees were:

47

Male Shooter of the Year

Official of the Year

Dane Sampson

Margaret Baker

James Willett

Gleniss Lawrence

Jack Rossiter

Alexander Maranik

Presented by John Coates, President, AOC, the nominees were:

The winner of the 2015 Male Shooter of the Year Award was: James Willett.

Female Shooter of the Year Presented by Fiona De Jong, CEO, AOC, the nominees were: •

Laetisha Scanlan

Lalita Yauhleuskaya

Aislin Jones

The winner of the 2015 Female Shooter of the Year Award was: Laetisha Scanlan.

Shooter of the Year - Elite Athlete with a Disability

Presented by Glenn Tasker, President, APC, the nominees were: •

Natalie Smith

Bradley Mark

Libby Kosmala

The winner of the 2015 EAD Shooter of the Year Award was: Natalie Smith.

Presented by Ray Andrews, President, Pistol Australia, the nominees were:

It’s a tie! The co-winners of the 2015 Official of the Year Award were: Margaret Baker and Alexander Maranik.

Coach of the Year

Presented by Gordon Duncan, Chairman, NRAA, the nominees were: •

Jim Bailey, NRAA

Anne Bugden, Queensland Target Sports / Target Rifle Australia

Alex Kupke, Burdekin Pistol Club; Pistol Shooting Queensland; Pistol Australia

The winner of the 2015 Coach of the Year Award was: Anne Bugden.

Media Award

Presented by Kelly Wright, Marketing & Communications Manager, Shooting Australia, the nominees were: •

Del Irani, ABC #TalkAboutIt - MISC feature

Wes Cusworth / Tom Kelly, WIN News Gippsland - Aislin Jones feature

Fletcher Doherty, Prime 7 News – James Willett feature Roje Adaimy, AAP Newswire

Volunteer of the Year

Emma Cox

Presented by Rod Sampson, 
President, Target Rifle Australia, the nominees were:

James Willett

Anne Bugden

Laetisha Scanlan

Jim Bailey

Natalie Smith

Charlie Kiewiet

Warren Potent

Vince Gatt

The winner of the 2015 Media Award was: Fletcher Doherty.

The winner of the Ashley Adams Perpetual Trophy as 2015 Athlete of the Year was: James Willett.

The winner of the 2015 Volunteer of the Year Award was: Anne Bugden.


Olympic & Paralympic Games

CATHERINE SKINNER Trap Women

LAETISHA SCANLAN Trap Women

AISLIN JONES

Skeet Women

ADAM VELLA Trap Men

MITCHELL ILES Trap Men

PAUL ADAMS Skeet Men

KEITH FERGUSON

LALITA YAUHLEUSKAYA

JACK ROSSITER

ELENA GALIABOVITCH

WARREN POTENT

25m Pistol Women 10m Air Pistol Women

25m Pistol Women 10m Air Pistol Women

DANIEL REPACHOLI 50m Pistol Men

10m Air Pistol Men

BLAKE BLACKBURN 10m Air Pistol Men

DAVID CHAPMAN

25m Rapid Fire Pistol Men

JENNIFER HENS

10m Air Rifle Women

DANE SAMPSON

Skeet Men

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men 10m Air Rifle Men 50m Rifle Prone Men

JAMES WILLETT

WILLIAM GODWARD

Double Trap Men

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men

10m Air Rifle Men

50m Rifle 3 Positions Men

ELIZABETH KOSMALA

R2 -10m Air Rifle Standing WomenSH1 R3 -10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH1

NATALIE SMITH

R2 -10m Air Rifle Standing WomenSH1 R3 -10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH1 R6 - 50m Free Rifle Prone Mixed SH1 R8 - 50m Rifle 3 positions Female SH1

ANTON ZAPPELLI

R3 -10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH1 R6 - 50m Free Rifle Prone Mixed SH1

BRADLEY MARK

R4 -10m Air Rifle Standing Mixed SH2 R5 -10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH2

LUKE CAIN

R4 -10m Air Rifle Standing Mixed SH2 R5 -10m Air Rifle Prone Mixed SH2

SHOOTING AUSTRALIA ANNUAL REPORT 2015−16

Congratulations to our athletes who represented Australia at the Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

48


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Shooting Australia Annual Report 2015 - 16  

Shooting Australia Annual Report 2015 - 16