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THE BIM ISSUE

FEATURING

TRANSFORMATION OF YOU CAN TEACH CONTRACTORS AN OLD DOG NEW TRICKS CONSTRUCTION THE FLOW OF DIGITAL INFORMATION

AIQS PRESIDENT PETER CLACK

COMMON MISCONCEPTIONS OF BIM

SEPTEMBER 2017


AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF QUANTITY SURVEYORS

“The Academy is an online training portal that can be accessed from your computer or laptop...from any location you choose!”

The AIQS Academy The AIQS Academy is an on demand, online training portal available for all professionals. This platform will provide further CPD options to AIQS Members or Non-Members and can be accessed from your home, office or a location of your choice. Each topic takes approximately two hours, but completion can be at your own pace and work around your busy schedule. During the course of 2016, the AIQS Academy will roll out up to 100 topics. The topics on offer have been individually reviewed and assessed to the highest standard of what is expected by the AIQS in continuing professional development. The AIQS Education Committee will regularly review and update the offerings of the AIQS Academy, to ensure a wide ranging and interesting set of topics. The Academy can be used as your organisational training and can improve your level of competency against key issues facing the industry of today and the growing topics of high importance.

Meet AIQS’s Membership Entry Requirements

Continuing Professional Development

The Academy can help you identify knowledge gaps, learn new skills, upgrade existing skills or up-skill project teams. The Academy can be used as a pathway to AIQS Membership and can help ensure you have the necessary skills required to meet the Institute’s academic entry requirements.

The Academy can provide continuing professional development (CPD) opportunities for Members and Non-Members of AIQS. CPD can be used to measure your level of competency in today’s competitive environment and ensure your skills are current.

Applicants seeking Institute Membership without a fully qualifying degree (Pathway 2), will be able to meet the academic entry requirements by completing the 100 Academy topics available. Participants who complete 100 topics, will receive the AIQS Certificate in Quantity Surveying and a Professional Certificate of recognition.

This platform will help provide further CPD opportunities to AIQS Members, in order to fulfill their CPD requirements for continued membership. Each course is worth 2 CPD Points and on successful completion of the assessment, two CPD points will be awarded.

How do I purchase Academy topics?

Contact AIQS Level 3 70 Pitt St Sydney NSW 2000 +61 2 8234 4000 education@aiqs.com.au

Go to www.aiqs.com.au and click on the Academy link. You must first sign-in or create a login before you can view or purchase the topics available.

How much does a topic cost and are there discounts available for AIQS Members?

Members = $65 per topic and Non-Members = $75. By purchasing topic bundles (5-10) you can receive up to 20% discount. Pre-purchase all 100 Topics and save $1,500. (Members = $5,000, Non-Members = $6,000).

Is the offering topical, relevant and of high quality?

The AIQS Education Committee is regularly reviewing and updating the offering, to ensure a wide ranging and interesting set of topics on offer. Topics have been individually reviewed and assessed to the highest standards.

What topics are currently available?

Currently there are 37 topics available. Topic bundles currently available include Basic Skills, Budgetary Processes, Cost Planning, Cost Estimating, Tender Process, General Procurement Advice, Claims and Dispute Resolution, Resource Analysis and Construction Change Management.

When will all the 100 topics be available? Most of the 100 topics will be available by mid 2016, with the remainder to follow in the early 2016/2017 Financial Year.

Is the Academy available on mobile devices? The Academy is available on mobile devices, however the current platform is not mobile responsive. You can currently view the Academy on your smart phone or tablet such as iPad, iPhone and Google Android devices, but the Academy website will be upgraded in coming months, in order to further improve the viewer experience on mobile devices.


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THE DIGITAL REVOLUTION WHAT ABOUT THE HUMANS?

The digital revolution that has been coming seems to be almost upon us. Should we fear it or embrace it with opened arms and no qualms?

27

TRANSFORMATION OF CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS

The digitization of building information is reshaping the roles and responsibilities of many of Australia’s top Tier 1 and 2 contractors, including their relationship to project stakeholders up- and down- stream of delivery who plan, design, operate, and maintain buildings and infrastructure.

Graphic Designer Guilherme Santos CEO Grant Warner

Mates in construction is Australia’s leading industry suicide prevention organisation focusing on raising awareness, building capacity, providing help and research.

08 BIM&THEQS

BREAKING DOWN BARRIERS

AIQS PRESIDENT Peter Clack FAIQS CQS, Steve Appleby MAIQS, Lukman Dereinda MAIQS, Paul Roberts, Andrew Brady FAIQS and Nathan Trevaskis AIQS (Affil.); AIQS BIM Committee members share their insight on BIM and the QS for the industry today and into the future.

02 32 04 41 REGULARS 08 49 SEP 2017 CONTENTS

INSIGHT DIGITISED INFORMATION AND THE

Managing Editor Stephanie Ifill

35

MATES IN CONSTRUCTION

Editorial Contributions The Australian Institute of Quantity Surveying encourages readers to submit their articles relating to quantity surveying, the built environment and associated industries including; construction economics, cost estimating, cost planning, contract administration, project engineering and the macroenvironment. T: +61 (02) 8234 4009 E: marketing@aiqs.com.au

FROM THE CEO

LEGAL CASE NOTES

SNAP SHOT

CONFERENCE REPORT & SOCIAL

WORK PLACE SOFTSKILLS

BUILDING COST INDEX AVAILABLE IN PRINT ONLY

Subscriptions The Building Economist is available to AIQS Members online. If you would like to receive the print version, subscribe for 1 year (4 editions) for $110 (inc. GST) or purchase a single edition for $55 (inc. GST) at www.aiqs.com.au. Disclaimer The Institute does not take any responsibility for the opinions express by any third parties involved in the development of the Building Economist Magazine.

Advertising To advertise in the Building Economist, contact AIQS Marketing & Communications for more information on available opportunities. Marketing & Communications T: +61 (02) 8234 4009 E: marketing@aiqs.com.au W: www.aiqs.com.au

THE BUILDING ECONOMIST - SEPTEMBER 2017 - 1


FROM THE CEO

THE BIM ISSUE This edition of the Building Economist is focusing on Building Information Modelling (BIM). While this is not new technology, the Institute’s has recognised that it has an important role to play in providing independent, impartial, and expert advice to all stakeholders concerning the optimal application of BIM as a tool to assist in delivering improved productivity across the built environment.

A number of years ago, it was recognised that Building Information Modelling, also known as (amongst other things) Digital Engineering, Digital Information Modelling and Digital Asset Management, would transform the way urban assets are constructed and managed. The issue for most professionals engaged in construction and asset management, is how this will be achieved and what are the benefits in utilising BIM technology. In Australia, the Productivity Commission has highlighted that widespread adoption of BIM could enhance productivity across the construction sector and have a positive impact on the cost structures of infrastructure projects. In addition, the Australasian BIM Advisory Board (ABAB), with leaders from government, industry and academia are partnering to provide leadership on the adoption of BIM and Project Team Integration (PTI). The ABAB’s goal is to promote best practice and consistent approaches to BIM practices, standards, and requirements. For the Institute and the broader Quantity Surveying profession, the implementation of BIM represents an opportunity to engage with stakeholders to ensure they understand the importance of appointing a quantity surveyor first, (prior to other professionals including design consultants), as a truly independent professional who can best advise on the financial integrity and risks of the project. It is important to remember that BIM is merely a software tool, it is not the golden egg that is going to transform the construction industry. What will make BIM truly transformational are the professionals who utilise BIM from project inception right through to and

including asset management. Only then will the full advantages of utilising BIM be realised. As noted in the article by Andrew Brady, if you put garbage in, your're going to get garbage out.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS IN UTILISING BIM TECHNOLOGY. For its part, the AIQS has established a BIM Committee to develop and deliver best practice information addressing the utilisation of BIM to the quantity surveying profession and other stakeholders involved in the development and management of construction assets. The Institute’s vision is to establish and disseminate a best practice, “Wholeof-life” approach for the utilisation of BIM, aligning the Quantity Surveying profession, and all other stakeholders using BIM as a tool for construction and asset management purposes. To achieve this the Institute aims to deliver on a number of initiatives, including; •

Development of an education framework which reflects modern methods of delivering quantity surveying services during design, construction and asset management

Development of information to assist clients understand the role of the quantity surveyor and quantity surveyor’s skill set, including the use and value of BIM.

Developing a template section for inclusion in a BIM Execution Plan which reflects the role of the

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quantity surveyor •

Development of a framework that aligns ASMM with BIM for compatibility

Establishing framework for BIM as contract deliverable (understanding the technology)

Develop a standard on how BIM models should be developed to ensure consistent application to deliver quotations

Development of a Framework for integrating the Australian Cost Management Manual (ACMM) into BIM

We have commenced providing baseline information to members and other stakeholders via eNews and the Building Economist on BIM to ensure there is a uniform understanding of what BIM is and how it can best be implemented. The Institute is also participating with kindred organisations in other countries including Hong Kong, Singapore, and Malaysia in promoting the benefits of implementing BIM via joint international conference series. This year the conference is being held in Hong Kong in November, and in 2018 it will form part of the PAQS – ICEC conference being hosted by the AIQS in Sydney. BIM should be embraced for what it is, technology, the utilisation of which, could assist in placing the quantity surveyor as the key professional of the construction industry.

Grant Warner

CEO The Australian Institute of Quantity Surveyors


Integration with estimating tools


SNAPSHOT INDUSTRY NEWS

SMART CITIES STANDARDS SMART CITIES COUNCIL AUSTRALIA NEW ZEALAND (SCCANZ) CONVENED A ROUNDTABLE OF GOVERNMENT, PRIVATE SECTOR AND INDUSTRY REPRESENTATIVES ALONG WITH STANDARDS BODIES TO DISCUSS AND IDENTIFY OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENSURING SMART CITIES STANDARDS PLAY A NECESSARY ROLE IN CATALYSING AND SCALING SOLUTIONS TO ADVANCE SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH TECHNOLOGY, DATA AND DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION. Adam Beck, Executive Director of SCCANZ, acknowledged the importance of standards and frameworks to help build a thriving smart cities market in Australia, claiming that many smart cities efforts were being advanced with little or no structure to their approach, or acknowledgement of the core principles for smart cities success, such as interoperability. “We have an opportunity in Australia to embrace the rich ecosystem of smart cities standards and frameworks available throughout the world, and ensure we create a common understanding and shared purpose when applying technology and data solutions in our cities and towns. It is fundamental that we at least acknowledge the support that is available through these resources,

and be open to applying them, at least in a voluntary way,” Mr Beck says. To raise awareness of what smart cities standards and frameworks are available, SCCANZ released at the roundtable a guidance note that provides foundational information on global smart cities standards and frameworks. The guidance note, prepared in collaboration with Professional Construction Strategies Group (PCSG), one of SCCANZ’s member companies, provides an overview of the value of smart cities standards, and presents a catalogue of strategic, process, and technical-based smart cities standards and frameworks. For further information and to view the ‘Smart Cities Guidance Note’ - please visit www.anz.smartcitiescouncil.com

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SNAPSHOT INDUSTRY NEWS

INFRASTRUCTURE PRIORITY LIST: CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

INFRASTRUCTURE AUSTRALIA IS CALLING ON AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENTS AND INDUSTRY LEADERS TO IDENTIFY INFRASTRUCTURE PROBLEMS AND OPPORTUNITIES OF NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE AS PART OF ITS 2018 INFRASTRUCTURE PRIORITY LIST (IPL) UPDATE. The revised IPL is due for publication in February 2018 and is being updated to guide investment decisions across Australia's key infrastructure sectors. “We are keen for states and territories and other partners to submit initiatives that solve the most pressing infrastructure problems facing our nation,” Infrastructure Australia CEO, Philip Davies. “The 2018 IPL will build on the current list, with new initiatives to reflect emerging infrastructure priorities across Australia, and updates to existing initiatives.

WSA CO LIMITED SECOND AIRPORT FOR SYDNEY Ministers Paul Fletcher and Mathias

WSA Co will be chaired by Mr Paul

Cormann are pleased to confirm the

O'Sullivan. Mr O'Sullivan is the current

incorporation of the WSA Co Limited.

Chair and former Chief Executive of

This is the next significant step in the

Optus. His deep experience leading

Government's priority to deliver a

an infrastructure business as it

second airport for Sydney.

established market share against a

With an investment of up to $5.3 billion in equity, WSA Co will operate as a Commonwealth Company, prescribed as a Government Business Enterprise.

long established incumbent will be of great value as Western Sydney Airport is planned and constructed before commencing operations by 2026.

“We welcome submissions for all types of infrastructure, including programs of related works and programs for network optimisation,” Philip Davies. Infrastructure Australia is an independent statutory body with a mandate to prioritise and progress nationally significant infrastructure. The submission period will close on 27 October 2017. Proponents can make a submission via the ‘Infrastructure Priority List— Call for submissions’ page. Please visit www.infrastructureaustralia.gov.au for more information.

THE BUILDING ECONOMIST - SEPTEMBER 2017 - 5


SNAPSHOT AIQS NEWS

USE OF

MEMBER LOGO

AIQS ACADEMY TOPIC SPOTLIGHT: BUILDING SERVICES This topic sets out to give the Quantity Surveyor (QS) an understanding of the technical variety and make up of Building Services that will be encountered in QS activities associated with Building Design and Construction. This topic is divided into eight sections that cover the following areas: •

Introduction

Regulatory and Local Authority requirements for building services

Electrical Services technical requirements

Hydraulics services: storm sewer & pressure piping

HVAC/Mechanical Services

Fire Services

Security transport & communications services

Spatial requirements and high-rise buildings

Visit https://www.aiqsacademy. com/aiqs/value-engineering-valuemanagement to purchase this topic.

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Current Corporate Members of the AIQS are encouraged to use the AIQS Member logo to promote the Institute and their membership. In May 2016 the Board endorsed the Member logo pictured. Please note that any older versions of the AIQS logo should no longer be used by individuals or companies. The AIQS Member Logo may be used if you are: 1. An Individual Corporate Member of AIQS (excluding Student, Affiliate and retired Members) 2. A company who has more than 50% of their staff as AIQS Corporate Members (whether Member or Fellow) For further information and to download the application form to obtain an electronic version of the new AIQS Member Logo, visit www.aiqs.com.au (log-in required).


SNAPSHOT AIQS NEWS

AIQS DIVERSITY & INCLUSION COMMITTEE The AIQS are calling for volunteers to express their interest in forming part of the AIQS Diversity & Inclusion Committee. The Institute will be focusing their efforts on a campaign to encourage more women into Quantity Surveying as a profession. The purpose of establishing a Diversity and Inclusion committee for the AIQS is to develop: •

Guidance and “toolkits” to assist member and their firms understand

the key elements and challenges around creating a diverse and inclusive workplace •

A White paper on strategies to attract more women into the QS profession

Recommendations from the White Paper and implement strategies

Interested members please send their Expression of Interest and CV to contact@aiqs.com.au by 30 September 2017.

APPLICATIONS FOR CQS APPLICATION FOR CERTIFIED QUANTITY SURVEYOR (CQS) DESIGNATION IS AVAILABLE TO AIQS CORPORATE MEMBERS IN GOOD STANDING (CORPORATE MEMBERSHIP HELD PRIOR TO JANUARY 2017), AND NEW APPLICANTS TO CORPORATE MEMBERSHIP (FROM 1 JANUARY 2017) Certified Quantity Surveyor (CQS) is an additional designation to your current Corporate Membership grade. It does not change your membership grade, it provides your clients an additional assurance of your level of expertise. AIQS Members with the CQS designation represent the highest level of expertise within the profession. As a CQS, you: •

Possess defined Quantity Surveying competencies that clients value

Have an internationally recognised badge of competence, benchmarked and transferable with standards applicable in other parts of the world

Are recognised by the community, industry and governments as a professional and responsible contributor to the industry

Have demonstrated outstanding Quantity Surveying competence and commitment to professionalism

Are committed to the AIQS Code of Professional Conduct

Have confirmed a commitment to excellence and currency

For further information, including eligibility visit www.aiqs.com.au (log-in required).

THE BUILDING ECONOMIST - SEPTEMBER 2017 - 7


VIEWPOINT

You Can Teach an Old Dog New Tricks PETER CLACK FAIQS CQS AIQS PRESIDENT

My journey to understand and accept the use of the BIM technology started not long after I took over the Presidency of the AIQS in October 2015. One of the initiatives I wanted to push was for the Quantity Surveying industry as a whole to adopt this new technology. BIM technology at this point had been around for approximately 10 years with various professions totally embracing the use and development of BIM while others sat by and watched. The AIQS had had a BIM sub-committee for some time but unfortunately it had never really been treated as a high priority as the AIQS expected the QS industry to adopt BIM as a natural progression in delivering its services. Unfortunately the QS profession was in the ‘sat by and watch’ category.

Over the last 21 months I have gone from being a complete BIM luddite to someone who is starting to understand the principals and the applications of using BIM technology, even to the point where I am now advocating all take offs in my office are carried out on 3D technology when available. So what caused this dramatic turn around for an ’old timer’ who started his career measuring on paper using the ‘cut and shuffle’ methodology based on Fletcher/Moore measurement principals (for the younger ones reading this, your homework is to research cut and shuffle and Fletcher/Moore). The AIQS holds industry lunches each year in the major cities and certain regional centres, these lunches are hosted by the AIQS President and CEO. Directors from all major firms are invited as well as industry leaders from outside the QS profession. During the 2016 round of lunches one constant theme kept emerging, ‘What is the AIQS doing about BIM?’ It was obvious from this feedback, from

every centre across the country, that the QS profession was looking to the AIQS to lead the way in educating both firms and members on how this new technology could be adopted in the QS’s every day working life in delivering cost plans and bills of quantities. As a result of this feedback the AIQS realised for the current BIM sub-committee to be effective, it needed more support from the Board. At the October 2016 Board Meeting the AIQS BIM sub-committee was given specific directions that a strategy needed to be put in place to educate members on the BIM technology and its application. At this point I started to work very closely with Andrew Brady who was one of the members of this BIM sub-committee to put this strategy in place and to get a better understanding of the principals behind BIM. As part of the 2017 round of industry lunches the AIQS encouraged members who were actively engaged in the use of BIM to be part of a larger BIM committee that the AIQS was establishing. Andrew Brady then invited me to the BILT ANZ 2017 conference that was held in

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Adelaide in May 2017. As a result of attendance of this conference I posted this message on the AIQS e-Bulletin forum: BILT ANZ 2017 was lead last weekend (25th – 27th May) in Adelaide a ‘BIM related conference ‘for users, by users where this year for the first time an ‘Estimating ‘ stream was introduced… however what it demonstrated to me was that there is a fundamental lack of understanding by the design team, of how the Quantity Surveyor can best be used in the whole BIM process There was clear evidence from the many presentations by both design professions and clients that they did not even consider engaging with the Quantity Surveyor as part of the BIM process but preferred to leave the QS to prepare their cost plans based on the traditional 2D process. In fairness to the design professions and the clients, QS's traditionally have not embraced the whole BIM process as the standard tool for delivering quantity surveying services. What I had learnt in my journey up to


this point is that BIM is simply another tool for the QS profession to use in preparing quantities for use in cost plans and bills of quantities.

BIM WILL NOT AND DOES NOT HAVE THE ABILITY TO REPLACE THE QUANTITY SURVEYOR, AS ADVOCATED BY SOME DESIGN PROFESSIONS BECAUSE QUANTITIES CAN BE GENERATED VIA THE PUSH OF A BUTTON FROM BIM. Design professionals that advocate this position clearly have a complete lack of understanding of the skill set of qualified Quantity Surveyors. In preparing cost plans on projects, from the concept stage through to preparing pre-tender estimates, is all about understanding the specific risk areas associated with each stage of each project, and then making allowance for these risks whether they be for items still to be designed or inherent risks. BIM programming will never have this skill set. BIM, therefore, is simply another tool for the Quantity Surveyor to use in delivering our services. So maybe this ‘Old Dog’ does not need to learn ‘New Tricks’, just a new way of delivering these ‘Old Tricks”.

BIM is just the natural progression from paper measurement with a scale rule (cut and shuffle), to 2D electronic measurement to now 3D electronic measurement. Most estimating software providers now provide the facility to measure in 3D and provide training on how to carry out the 3D measurement. This then brings us to the challenge facing Quantity Surveyors and our profession, how do we educate clients and the design professionals to engage with the QS from day one so the BIM model is set up in such a way that the model is an effective tool for Quantity Surveyors to prepare realistic and accurate cost plans that provide assurance for the client to make informed decisions. My understanding moving forward is that the QS profession needs to provide a united and consistent approach when advising design professional on how we would like the models set up so we can extract quantities from the 3D software that are meaningful. Design professions to date, have been reluctant to issue 3D drawings for the QS to generate quantities from until the drawings are 100% complete, for fear of being held responsible for the quantities generated. We as a profession need to reassure the design professions that the accuracy of quantities generated from 3D drawings, as with 2D drawings are the responsibility of the Quantity Surveyor. i.e. we take ‘ownership’ of the quantities included within our cost plans. We as Quantity Surveyors ‘should never assume’ always check, check and check again whether that be quantities generated from 2D or 3D software.

THE BIM TOOL IS HERE TO STAY, NOW IS THE TIME FOR ALL QUANTITY SURVEYORS TO START USING BIM As I said earlier in this article, the Board has tasked the BIM sub-committee in delivering a strategy that will assist its members and firms in embracing BIM technology. To this end the AIQS has expanded the BIM sub-committee with the following goals to be delivered over the next 12 – 18 months:

STANDARDS •

Establish a scope of work that Quantity Surveyors will deliver.

Develop BIM Execution Plan (What is the QS’s role in construction management and what is required to enable the QS to deliver the services required by the client).

Develop a framework that aligns to ASMM for BIM compatibility.

Establishing a framework for BIM as contract deliverable (understanding the technology).

Identify available BIM software products, while ensuring AIQS is software agnostic.

Develop a standard on how a BIM model should be developed to ensure consistent application to deliver cost plans.

THE BUILDING ECONOMIST - SEPTEMBER 2017 - 9


VIEWPOINT

Develop a User Manual for ACMM – how does BIM integrate with ACMM.

EDUCATION •

Develop an education framework which incorporates technology (the role of technology such as BIM). Develop information content (value proposition) to assist clients

understand the role of the QS and the QS skill set, including the use and value of BIM (as a tool). Even though I may not be technically savvy, (I’ll leave that to the younger ones), from my involvement in the BIM sub-committee, I now understand and appreciate that we as a profession must move forward and embrace BIM. I for one will be championing

BIM on all projects I am involved with moving forward, and with the assistance of the AIQS BIM sub-committee hopefully this will assist other members and firms in taking a similar approach. As I said, it’s just ‘Old Trick’s’ with a new delivery method.

Like all changes that occur, it commences with a mind-shift. The solution may be a digital one, but its success will come when we start to embrace the benefits, rather than fearing them STEVEN PETER APPLEBY MAIQS

There has been a lot written about ‘Digital Disruption’ and it is never far from the news these days. Whether it is Amazon.com in retail, AirBnb in property rentals, Uber in taxi and food delivery, or Blockchain for financial transactions, not a week goes by without some new example of technology disrupting an industry.

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, PRACTICE LEAD AECOM

BIM PRACTICE LEAD AECOM

Whilst we hear snippets of 3D-printed houses and drones flying above our sites to do survey work, in reality our industry is slow to adopt technology. A recent report by McKinsey shows that the construction industry spends less than 1% of revenues on R&D, compared to 3.5% in the automotive industry and 4.5% in aerospace. We are the least digitised industry, with only agriculture and hunting coming out worse.

BUILDING INFORMATION MODELLING AND INDUSTRY CAPABILITY One area where we have seen good progress is in the use of Building

STEPHEN CUMMINS

Information Modelling (also called Building Information Management by some), which is an intelligent modelbased process that links a graphical 3D model with a project information database. BIM provides all project stakeholders with access to the data they need, when they need it. In our view, BIM is an analogy for industry reform. As a process, BIM provides a link between design and construction and into operations; it is providing clients with increased certainty, reduced risk profiles and greater quantities and quality of data. Whilst the maturity of the industry is still relatively low, due in part to the lack of standards and guidance, we have seen

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huge improvements over the last 12-18 months as major public- and privatesector clients mandate its use on their projects. With recent announcements from the Queensland, Western Australian and Victorian governments, you can expect to see BIM become a requirement on a lot more projects, including for the quantity surveyor (QS). For the QS, it is important to work with the project managers and the wider project design partners to understand how BIM is being developed on projects and how quantity extraction and cost planning can add value to the project.


CURRENT PROCESS FOR QS/LIMITATIONS IN THE MODELS Whilst the profession has taken steps to harness the power of digitisation, we have some way to go before we fully embrace digital disruption. However, the change is coming, and the time is now.

“WE ALWAYS OVERESTIMATE THE CHANGE THAT WILL OCCUR IN THE NEXT TWO YEARS AND UNDERESTIMATE THE CHANGE THAT WILL OCCUR IN THE NEXT TEN.” Bill Gates.

Like all changes that occur, it commences with a mind-shift. The solution may be a digital one, but its success will come when we start to embrace the benefits, rather than fearing them.

prevalent across the industry. Fear of providing models for quantification is another barrier between design teams and quantity surveyors. As a designer, am I liable for these outputs? New ways of working will generate additional work, cost and risk for me. Again, these are real barriers to change. The key to abolishing fear is to build trust, and we only trust when we truly understand. There is a huge educational curve for the industry to climb before adopting model-driven take-off becomes the norm. Leaders in the industry and in organisations have a crucial role to play. As leaders, we must be pioneers of change, understand the subject matter and be able to showcase the benefits of new ways of working. We cannot push this to the tech expert in the corner and hope they resolve it for us. As Quantity Surveyors, we must educate ourselves before we educate others. The first step in the process is to realise that a change in quantification methodology doesn’t mean a change in what we do, and why we do it.

Fear is at the core of resistance to change. Quantity surveyors recognise that their differentiator is the ability to be accurate, precise and to provide their clients with confidence that their projects will proceed successfully. Scale rules, pen and paper, and AutoCAD are all methods that provide quantity surveyors with the precision they require to deliver accurate work. Manual take-offs are tangible, and the manual process of quantification provides a sense of gratification and contentment, knowing it’s a ‘job well done’.

For example:

Flipping this on its head creates fear. I do not trust what I cannot see. How can I put my name to something that I don’t understand? If I am not in control of this process, what is my role? These are all questions that are understandable and

Upon project commencement, we would always sit down with clients and the design team to discuss ‘rules of engagement’, roles and responsibilities and information management. Working in a ‘BIM’ environment is no different; however, the aforementioned conversation focuses on a BIM Execution Plan (BEP) where, as a team, we detail how the team will operate in a digital environment. As pro-active cost planners, we should always be informing the design team of the quality of documentation we expect to see upon completion of each design stage to provide the required level

of accuracy. This is no different in a digital environment, where we are able to formalise this as a project team through the creation of a Model Content Plan (MCP). •

Producing Model Maps to drive quantity take-off requires the same thought process as manual measurement, but takes the format of formulas and computer code rather than traditional means.

Interrogation of the model for accuracy and completeness is no different to bulk checking quantities and page turning drawings, taking the time to consider what has been missed and what is yet to be developed.

The skill of the quantity surveyor to add value to their clients does not change. The opportunity to add more value increases, by spending more time controlling the variable components of the project (e.g. market factors and risk identification). At AECOM, we have a client-centric culture, and we recognise our clients’ risks are our risks, and a benefit to a client is a benefit to us. When managed well, digitisation and automation can lead to improved accuracy of all elements of a cost plan. In turn, cost accuracy allows the project to move swiftly through the design stages, avoiding the need to cut costs, remove scope, re-work design and disappoint stakeholders. The links are real, and we have seen great benefits for our clients by embracing new ways of working. Digital disruption is upending the traditional QS model and successful QS practices have to redefine the way they work, providing clients with a deeper level of understanding, improved client service and an integrated approach to solving their problems. As we have outlined, AECOM is embracing this change, which offers benefits to both clients and Quantity Surveyors.

THE BUILDING ECONOMIST - SEPTEMBER 2017 - 11


VIEWPOINT

LUKMAN DEREINDA MAIQS SENIOR COST PLANNER LENDLEASE

What are the common misconceptions of BIM in the construction Industry? For many years I have been intrigued by technology and how it can improve the way we work. In 1997 while I was finishing my last year at university, the internet was just beginning to reshape the way the business world communicates.

During this time, I undertook a project case study to understand how the technology available to us, was being utilised by Professional Quantity Surveyors (PQS) at the time. While the internet had been around for several years, I was surprised to learn that many PQS were still relying on printed drawings as their main source of documentation, as opposed to soft copy files being emailed or downloaded from the internet. Back then a buzz word was ‘Interoperability’ - designers would prepare a design on a file, other disciplines would then take a digital print of the file and then use it to obtain quantities, put together project schedules or working out staging and construction methodologies in a different software/platform. Fast forward 20 years: in late 2016 I attended a World Conference on Digitalisation of the Construction Industry in Guangzhou, China. What I saw there was the construction world increasing its pace in adopting new technologies that had been successfully implemented by other industries (e.g. consumer electronics, auto-mobiles and even aviation) to improve efficiency and increase productivity. It was clear to me then that the construction industry in Australia will not be able to shelter itself from what is happening in the rest of the world. We hear a lot about the integrated

industry in construction using Building Information Modelling (BIM), where it is supposed to Revolutionise the industry. However, when we ask any professional of the industry of what BIM has done in the ‘real world’ many of them will say, “it’s great in theory, but it is impractical”. So what are the common misconceptions of BIM in the construction Industry? Here are five things I have encountered in the past couple of years within the Australian construction industry.

1. MORE CLIENTS REQUEST BIM ON THEIR PROJECT, BUT NOT SURE WHAT THEY ARE GETTING There are aspirations from various stakeholders in the construction industry that BIM will enable a streamlined design process. The thought being an integrated model will allow all disciplines to have ‘one source of truth’, that can evolve from concept stage in a form of massing all the way to a very detailed and information rich model to allow facility management to use it through the life of the asset. However, when we dig deeper into what they really need from the implementation of BIM on their project, there is not much information available to provide them with meaningful benefit at the end of the project. At the moment

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BIM is a Façade of what is a ‘state of the art’ project, without having the depth of meaningful information to make to most out of the model. BIM has been mostly used for initial presentations to clients to demonstrate how their project would look in 3D, but the model itself does not have enough information or structure to be used for anything other than a dynamic display. There is still a fair amount of client education still to be done and also the requirement to management expectation of what BIM can actually provide to clients. Having said that, clients are in the best position to utilise BIM on projects and really push the implementation of BIM to the construction industry.

2. THE BELIEF THAT BIM WILL DRAIN AN ENORMOUS AMOUNT OF TIME AND COST IF A PROJECT IS SET-UP IN BIM. At a glance, most of us who dive into the world of BIM will agree to the statement that BIM does take a lot more time and cost to prepare a project at the start. We get frustrated that a simple task of doing a take-off of a conventional method of using a 2D drawing and a common QS take-off software such as CostEx, Buildsoft or On Screen take-off will take a fraction of the time to complete a take-off compared


to preparing an integrated model with proper attributes that could be used to provide a take-off. Often, the model has the wrong information on an object (e.g. where a floor reference is wrong as an object is copied from other levels to create a model) which makes take-off using BIM less accurate. All the little things that make BIM ‘intelligent’ requires careful and coordinated planning between designers and other disciplines who will be using BIM to rely their project data from such as project planners, construction managers and cost planners. The upside of doing the homework in creating a robust model at the start will pay-off on subsequent changes and modification of the project down the line. BIM will enable quick reassessment of the design as all the objects have been properly assigned to their corresponding components in other disciplines (e.g. BIM model that is linked

to a Bill of Quantity is easily updated to quantities of objects that have been previously identified on earlier revisions). What the industry is currently going through is a significant learning curve to take advantage of BIM. In the scheme of things, this investment in building our collective knowledge on how to create efficient BIM will go a long way in creating more efficient and competitive industry.

3. QUANTITY SURVEYOR NO LONGER NEEDED WHEN BIM IS FULLY IMPLEMENTED IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY This is probably one of the greatest fears of our profession where we are seeing our task being taken over by technology. It is the same analogy as robots taking over assembly lines in the automotive industry. The concern is that a BIM model

can include all the cost information required for any objects modelled that a fully functioning 5D model (3D design with cost attached) will make the role of a quantity surveyor obsolete. Although there is some truth in the statement, what is being taken over are the more time draining/ mundane task of takingoff quantities from the design/ drawing. A quantity surveyor or cost planner’s role on a project is much more than just putting a price tag on an object. There are many other tasks that a quantity surveyor is providing to the industry that can be significantly improved: provide bulk checks on the integrity of the model, management of design development from cost perspective, source alternative materials, cost efficient solutions and managing project budget from concept to delivery. These are the areas that the quantity surveyor profession should be

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VIEWPOINT

seeking to maintain in the future of the construction industry.

5. IT IS IMPOSSIBLE TO SET A STANDARD THAT EVERYONE IN THE INDUSTRY WILL AGREE FOR BIM

4. ONLY MAJOR PROJECTS CAN AFFORD TO IMPLEMENT BIM

There has been many national and international bodies (e.g. NATSPEC, NIBS - US, BIM Task Group – UK, The Building and Construction Authority (BCA) – Singapore, BIM Acceleration Committee – NZ), and countless conferences to discuss a common naming convention and standard for BIM implementation for so many years. As yet not many organisations have agreed on the one standard that they are happy to adopt. Not to mention when you are working with international designers and stakeholders who will have their ‘in-house’ standards and own way of doing things, it is impossible to impose any standards that any project stakeholders can agree on. This is one of the fundamentals of having a good model: there is a common ground on how models are created and agreed nomenclature of objects are used on models. Without a standard, the benefit of having BIM on a project will diminish as the stakeholders who relied on a common platform will need to customise their system to the various standards. This has been one of the major challenges we are facing as pioneers on BIM implementation in the industry (especially Australia), where no one has been able to convince the industry which standard to use.

Similar to the second myth above, the perception of only major projects can ‘afford’ to implement BIM as it is seemed to be time consuming and a design consultant will charge enormous additional fees to provide BIM. In the current state of the industry, I tend to agree that smaller projects will struggle to implement BIM and benefit from it as there are not enough professionals in the industry who can proficiently use the power of BIM on their project. However, the biggest beneficiaries of BIM will be smaller more modular projects such as apartment buildings, industrial buildings, carparks, train stations, hospitals, hotels and other ‘static design projects’ as they will be able to standardise most of their design and integrate the information with Bill of Quantities and schedules. BIM can even be used to contain facilities management information as the objects are relatively the same/ similar between projects (e.g light fittings, AC units, sprinkler heads, soft finishes). The opportunity to continuously improve on object information with every new project (e.g. shelf life, re-ordering reference, location, etc.) is very high.

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While this is a challenge, it is also a great opportunity for Institutions like The AIQS to take the lead in setting standards to reap the benefit of BIM in the industry. AIQS and quantity surveyors can play a pivotal role in kick starting BIM implementation in Australia by working closely with other institutions and government bodies to set clear and robust guidelines and standards for the professions of the industry to use in implementing BIM on a wide platform beyond a single project or organisation. From a few cases above, it is clear some of the myths and misconception of BIM in the construction industry exists, given we are at an early stage of being introduced to the concept of BIM implementation and many are going through a steep and hard learning curve. The truth of the matter is that the world is moving in its implementation of BIM to improve efficiency and competitiveness to reap the benefit of the ever interconnected world of the construction industry. If the professions and businesses of the Australian construction industry do not embrace the BIM revolution that is taking place in other parts of the world, in a short time the Australian construction industry will be taken over by world players who are more efficient and competitive as they embrace technology and information that is available at their fingertips. Let’s dive in and make that change!


PAUL ROBERTS AAIQS DIRECTOR RAWLINSONS (W.A.)

5D BIM or a PQS

Quantity Surveyors are widely recognized, by the industry, as the bench-markers of construction costs, quantifiers of construction materials and managers of cost in construction. Isolating our affairs as this, quite possibly you could be mistaken in thinking computer software is an easier tool than the human being.

However, the Professional Quantity Surveyors (PQS) is more than that, much more than a ‘counter of bricks’. We provide effective cost management and cost control to cover the full asset development cycle from evolution to execution and life time occupation. And we provide that as an individual service not a copy and paste. 5D is part of the 21st century technology BIM or Building Information Modeling – another tool to make things happen quicker and more efficient. It is a tool that helps us to represent the project in a live format using real time information. If used effectively, BIM provides opportunities to vastly improve upon traditional methods of design and construction coordination

thereby reducing the potential for costly changes. It allows multiple opportunities for client review and participation through 3D visualisation. Yes - 5D is a measurement process that helps us to extract the quantities and identify their individual and collective cost to the project in an accuracy and speed that traditional methodology does not. And 5D can be undertaken by the uninitiated. And 5D can be activated as a robotic process. In many ways this is no different to many a Quantity Surveying company out of the Philippines or India. The measurement is a part of the service and a part of the service that can be done at low cost but not necessarily at a high performance. The BIM process whether used by the designer, Quantity

Surveyor, engineer or fabricator is still only a tool and it requires an accurate input to get an accurate output. An accurate input can only be acclaimed by experience and understanding. Rawlinsons have been working in BIM for several years now even on projects that have not required any level of LOD by the client or design team. Provided the designers and engineers are using a revit based software our team has developed the 4D and 5D model for our internal use. For the team it offers clear vision of many sections of the structure that has not been captured in the 2D documents. It gives us a very efficient method of bulk-checking. However the model does not replace the individuals’ experience of knowing what goes into every building structure. The PQS mentally builds every project identifying objects that are not specifically picked up by the designers or

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their sub-consultants. The PQS has to do this to cost manage accurately. Every item in the structure has a cost yet it is not necessarily drawn or specified. The PQS identifies this. 5D BIM does not mentally construct the building. It therefore does not identify all objects that make the building structure. It helps dramatically in understanding the methodology and ideology but overlooks the ‘nitty gritty’ bits and pieces. It can quantify and cost something repetitive but is weak on something ‘a little out there’.

THESE ITEMS ARE ONLY FOUND BY EXPERIENCE AND THE ACCURACY OF THE DOCUMENTATION THAT THE DESIGNERS, PQS AND THE SUB-CONSULTANTS COORDINATE AND COLLABORATE. As technology evolves and perceives to be a more efficient and cost effective in

ANDREW BRADY FAIQS MD, GRC QUANTITY SURVEYORS AIQS BOARD MEMBER

every step there remains a constant – coordination and collaboration of every disciplines’ ideas. Technology through BIM provides a form to do this but relies on someone to check it is done – stand up the Professional Quantity Surveyor. The PQS continues to undertake this role just as they have done with the pen and paper design documentation through the CAD and Excel combination and into Building Information Modeling. 5D is the golf club and the PQS the golfer and as many a wise father has said – it is not how good the tool is but how good you use the tool - that is what counts.

The key skill to being a good Quantity Surveyor has been, and always will be, the ability to measure an item that isn’t on the drawing, or in the digital model, or potentially not even thought about by the design team

The property and construction industry is embracing BIM technology and developing new methodologies, processes, standards and guidelines and will continue to do this with or without involvement from the Quantity Surveying profession. This is a critical time for the Quantity Surveying profession to engage and collaborate with industry bodies that are potentially setting the platform for the future.

You may view this change pessimistically or see it as an opportunity to re-establish the quantity surveying profession as a key role that provides value throughout the project lifecycle. I believe that we currently have an unprecedented opportunity to strengthen our role by leveraging off the digital model/BIM, and using the plethora of tools (software platforms) available, to enhance our traditional service delivery.

However, for our profession to reestablish this key role on each project we need to make sure we work together to promote the profession, educate ourselves on required skill sets, and work with the industry ‘with a united voice’ on what and how a Quantity Surveyor can add value in this digital age.

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As you may be aware, we have several challenges ahead of us to achieve this. Key challenges include: •

Perceived value of the Quantity Surveyor


Multiple user groups creating their own standards and guidelines

Lack of understanding in what and when to expect different amounts of documentation

Quality and accuracy of digital models

Current lack of skills and knowledge of Quantity Surveyors in the BIM space

IT IS IMPORTANT TO NOTE THESE CHALLENGES ARE NOT JUST AN AUSTRALIAN QUANTITY SURVEYOR ISSUE. I am on the international Pacific Association of Quantity Surveyors (PAQS) BIM Committee - which comprises 12 other countries – and, interestingly, they are all facing similar challenges.

PERCEIVED VALUE OF A QUANTITY SURVEYOR There is a misconception that a Quantity Surveyor just measures quantities (and the name of our profession may add to the confusion). But a competent Quantity Surveyor requires a lot more skill than quantification. The key skill to being a good Quantity Surveyor has been, and always will be, the ability to measure an item that isn’t on the drawing, or in the digital model, or potentially not even thought about by the design team.

Then, to be able to price it accurately with numerous influences happening simultaneously in the market is a whole other specialist skill set. Quantity extraction is not Quantity Surveying.

to have a united voice to make sure that we not only contribute to these guidelines but that we add value to the process and educate the design teams how and where we can apply our skills.

Another important point is that we need to be careful about being known only as 5D Quantity Surveyors as it is devaluing our profession. 5D is commonly understood to be the extraction of quantities from the digital model. Therefore, if an architect or engineer extracts quantities from a digital model or produces quantity schedules from their native design software are they now considered a 5D Quantity Surveyor? For some time, architects and engineers have realised they continue to provide the same services and that only the tool (software) they use is different. Therefore, they don’t call themselves BIM architects or BIM engineers. I believe the Quantity Surveying profession needs to do the same.

As you may be aware, the Australasian BIM Advisory Board has been formed - among other entities such as ACIF, APCC, Australian Department of Defence, Natspec, Building Smart, various State Government agencies and AIQS - and it will be interesting to see what effect this group has on the direction or guidance of national BIM standards and guidelines.

MULTIPLE USER GROUPS DEVELOPING THEIR OWN STANDARDS I know of more than 20 user groups working on their own standards and guidelines and I’m sure there are many more. The good news is that a number of these groups have identifed and realised that Natspec is becoming more of the quasi nationally recognised guideline in Australia. Due to this, a number of these groups are now collaborating with Natspec. It is worth noting that although some of the main guidelines make numerous references to ‘cost’ and ‘cost management’ they do not reference the Quantity Surveyor. This is why I believe the Quantity Surveying profession needs

LACK OF UNDERSTANDING IN WHAT AND WHEN TO EXPECT DIFFERENT AMOUNTS OF DOCUMENTATION There are currently two main challenges regarding consistency and reliability of digital models. One is the lack of consistency in the roles and responsibilities and information management of how and by whom the digital model/BIM is to be authored. The second is the quality (and to some extent) the quantity of documentation we expect at each design stage through the digital design environment. It would be prudent to have a united view and educate design teams what and when we require specific information to be able to apply our skills. This is where I believe a national standard base BIM Execution Plan (BEP), and potentially some form of model content plan or similar, could be of great assistance. If issued by, or contributed by, the AIQS it could not only reflect what and when information is required but also reference our Australian Cost Management Manual (ACMM). I strongly believe our ACMM is the one true consistent approach that already exists and aligns all Quantity Surveyors across the country.

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VIEWPOINT

QUALITY AND ACCURACY OF DIGITAL MODELS Not only is there a lack of established information requirements and established processes and methodologies for BIMbased projects through design but there can be some major issues with quality and accuracy of digital models. For a Quantity Surveyor, being the downstream user of the information/documents is extremely frustrating as it may look like a fabulous model aesthetically but could be almost useless for measurement purposes. This is when a ‘model isn’t a model’ and the acronym GIGO (Garbage In, Garbage Out) applies. Some of the most common challenges faced with poor quality models include: •

Poor geometry: Quality, completeness or object duplication

Poor object data: Misleading object data, inconsistency of object data or

NATHAN TREVASKIS AIQS (AFFIL.) DIRECTOR BIMFIRE

wrong staging of objects applied •

Modelling methodology: This simply means to create the model as you would build the project in real life e.g. Columns separated at each floor, not 1 column that is 78 stories tall etc.

Wrongly allocated project phasing: When there are existing items, items to be demolished and new items to be constructed all in the digital model and they are allocated incorrectly

Correct units of measure: This may sound simple but it’s not. For example, downpipes are measured in metres, not number. It is no good for a quantity surveyor to know there are 10 downpipes as there is obviously a difference if the building is 1, 10 or 100 stories tall.

Generally, not much has changed for a Quantity Surveyor. Similar to how we normally quality check a set of documents (to identify clashes, missing

data, mistakes, etc), we now interrogate the digital model. All in all, what Quantity Surveyors ideally want is to work with the design consultants to understand and potentially increase the level of reliability we have in a model at each stage of the design phase.

EXCITING TIME TO BE A QUANTITY SURVEYOR Digital Models/BIM are no longer coming. They are here now whether the Quantity Surveying profession is ready or not. Now is the time to embrace the paradigm shift occurring not only within our profession but within the property and construction industry in which we operate. The opportunities for our profession in this digital age are enormous. This is our opportunity to change the industry, illustrate and prove the true value of a quantity surveyor on any project. Together, with a united voice, we can make a difference.

the reality of full BIM implementation from the feasibility, design, shop drawing, construction, commissioning and operation is essential The Quantity Surveying profession has reason to be particularly enthusiastic about the tangible industry development of Building Information Modelling. You could even say that the members of the AIQS have reason to be the most enthusiastic of any of the relevant AEC professional disciplines.

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Entire industries find themselves partially or in some cases fully immersed in the reality of BIM and the opportunities it presents. Fear of the unknown has delayed the evolution of uptake of the sophisticated digital procurement method; however even within a traditionally adversarial project delivery structure, the benefits and efficiencies still manage to emerge, providing value to all who are exposed. For those who pursue excellence in the realms of efficiency, collaboration, transparency, value and integrity the reality of full BIM implementation from the feasibility, design, shop drawing, construction, commissioning and operation is essential. Traditional procurement simply cannot match a fully enabled BIM procurement model.

SO THE QUESTION LAID BARE IS WHERE DO WE START THE CONVERSION? First there needs to be a declaration within the Request for Tender document outlining the objective, two live examples include: •

It will be a requirement for this project that the successful consultants will utilise BIM technology and tools. This project will require BIM Level of Development (LOD) 300 for design, LOD 400 for shop drawings and LOD 500 for collection of as built data and site driven changes. Confirm that your Firm will utilise BIM technology and detail your Firm’s recent experience with BIM technology, citing the project(s) where this technology was used and

outlining how your Firm used BIM to benefit the project. Refer to Appendix C for the Principal’s BIM Requirements. •

The Contract is to be delivered in a Building Information Modelling (BIM) environment. The Contractor shall submit a BIM implementation plan for approval by the Superintendent. As a minimum the BIM implementation plan shall outline the Contractor’s proposed approach to delivering…

Second, an independent BIM Manager appointment who is charged with ensuring the project sticks to the course and will hold the entire project team accountable through the lifecycle of the project. Key roles performed by the BIM Manager should include:

facilities/asset management •

Facilitate development of as-built data with the appropriate FM data

Facilitate co-ordination of the design teams and subcontractors to ensure appropriate collection and coordination of construction and installation data for use in development of the As-Built model suitable for facility management use.

The third key element to success is selecting a team that is committed to the vision of working in a digital format and is encouraged to collaborate in order to increase efficiency, better manage the programme and budget whilst targeting elimination of site re-work and waste. Should a Quantity Surveyor, Cost Planner or Cost Engineer will themselves into this project environment, the following will be your reward:

Establish the Project BIM Execution Plan addressing the SOW

Increased accuracy in quantities

Facilitate collaboration and promote team orientated communication

Reduced measurement turnaround times

Provide advice to team members in the creation of model content

Increased time allowed for gathering pricing

Develop and maintain the federated project model through the project lifecycle

Increased time for value engineering

Increased frequency in cost updates to the client as a result in reduced take off times

Consistency and transparency in the quantities, weather measured by the Quantity Surveyor or the Contractor

A visualisation tool that can quickly articulate the missing or inconsistent information/documentation

Decreased time in mundane and repetitive measurement

Happy Staff

Happy Clients

Produce clear reports of outstanding coordination issues

Chair model management and coordination meetings

Facilitate data exchange with the Construction Planning team and link their Primvera/MP

Facilitate data exchange with the Quantity Surveying and the Contractors Project Estimator

Determine the clients’ required data for collection for use with their

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INSIGHT

THE DIGITAL REVOLUTION IS UPON US! BUT WHAT ABOUT THE HUMANS?

ADRIANA HAS BEEN DOING RESEARCH IN AUSTRALIA AND INTERNATIONALLY FOR OVER 10 YEARS RESULTING IN A NUMBER OF APPLIED OUTCOMES AS WELL AS ACADEMIC AND INDUSTRY PUBLICATIONS. HER MOST RECENT BOOKS ARE: INTEGRATING INFORMATION IN BUILT ENVIRONMENTS: FROM CONCEPT TO PRACTICE AND DELIVERING VALUE WITH BIM: A WHOLE-OF-LIFE APPROACH. SHE IS A COMMISSION COORDINATOR OF AN INTERNATIONAL TASK GROUP ON INFORMATION

INTEGRATION IN CONSTRUCTION (IICON) THROUGH HER WORK AT THE SUSTAINABLE BUILT ENVIRONMENT NATIONAL RESEARCH CENTRE (SBENRC, HEADQUARTERED AT CURTIN UNIVERSITY). CURRENTLY, SHE TEACHES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW SOUTH WALES AND UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY SYDNEY AS WELL AS CARRY OUT RESEARCH INTO URBAN RESILIENCE POLICY, INCLUDING THE USE OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS TO IMPROVE DECISION-MAKING PROCESSES.

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In Australia, and globally, we are facing challenges due to economic unpredictability, changing climate and technological advances. In 2013, the Australian Department of Industry identified lifting productivity and economic growth as one of our most important challenges. Internationally, governments around the world have also tried to increase the efficiency and sustainability of the built environment industry by embracing new digital technologies and integrating information across organisations and software platforms. In Australia this is being done, among other ways, under the banners of smarter cities, digital engineering and building information modelling (BIM).

These approaches have been heralded to represent a paradigm shift in how we plan, deliver and manage built assets that will bring a bounty of returns. These benefits have been and continue to be widely researched and showcased across the world, leading to government and private actors setting ambitious goals for implementation. The UK Government for example mandated BIM starting 2016 and has developed a vision for a “digital Britain”. Like them, many other governments and state departments have also moved to lead by example. In Australia, the Transport and Infrastructure Council published their Digital Engineering Principles and has a task group working on developing them more comprehensibly. At the state level, different government departments have already pledged to implement BIM across major infrastructure projects or are currently considering it. The digital revolution that has been coming seems to be almost upon us. Should we fear it or embrace it with opened arms and no qualms?

THE DIGITAL VS THE HUMAN While I am an enthusiastic advocate for information integration, our research at the Sustainable Built Environment National Research Centre (SBEnrc) has shown that the answer is not that simple. BIM for example is not a single software package that you just “plug and play”. This means that for an implementation strategy to be most successful it should be framed by clarity around what specific benefits are expected and a clear understanding of potential hurdles and basic requirements such as standards, skills, information management protocols, etc. More broadly speaking, a more integrated digital built environment has the potential to transform our lives and the world we reside in. As rightly pointed out in Digital Britain though, this transformation will require addressing both digital and human factors simultaneously. What does this mean? The digital factors are basically information and technology,

which in the near future will include things like real-time remote sensing and monitoring of assets and network performance, automated control systems, 3D printing and smart factory automation, open data and internet services. The “human” factors, though, are as important if we are to successfully transition into this brave new world. These include things like the cultural change required to work within more integrated project environments as well as finding a balance between business elements such as systems and strategies with social issues that include values, skills, staff requirements and management style. Australia’s brief National Digital Engineering Policy Principles mention the potential value of these new approaches. Here, benefits like higher efficiency, value for money, productivity and innovation are balanced against more processoriented goals such as standards and protocol harmonisation across government organisations and life-cycle phases, collaborative efforts to drive best practice across industry and government, capability building and the collection and active incorporation of lessons learned. International research also exemplifies these contrasting aspects of a more digitally integrated built environment. A French research published earlier this year , presented two studies of large asset managers who sought to improve the energy performance of their portfolio through the use of more integrated information management approaches. The first case included the use of a centralised control station for the renovation, operations and maintenance of 18 high schools. This approach provided the operator, administrator and occupants * “Digital Engineering may be defined as the convergence of emerging technologies such as Building Information Modelling (BIM), Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related systems to derive better business, project and asset management outcomes” (Australian Government, 2016, National Digital Engineering Policy Principles).

THE BUILDING ECONOMIST - SEPTEMBER 2017 - 21


with access to energy usage and equipment performance data almost in real-time. This eventually led to achieving ambitious energy saving targets and improving coordination of tasks. The second case was a social housing company who digitised its housing stock to improve their strategic asset management using BIM (they manage 32,836 dwellings servicing some 65,000 tenants across France). They wanted to “promote information sharing, monitoring and transfer and to integrate 3D modelling with facility management and operations processes”. Taking advantage of the size of their stock, the cost of digitising this information came down to less than $50 (€32) per dwelling. This company reported immediate benefits such as more accurate tenders for restoration of facades, time and financial savings by contractors, more reliable information and better informed strategic asset management decisions. Despite both studies reporting benefits resultant from their respective approaches, the study concluded that turning digital data into actionable information requires being aware of the specific context of each project. The approaches used in the two cases can be defined as socio-technical. This means that

THEIR SUCCESS DEPENDS ON THE INTERACTION BETWEEN PEOPLE AND DIGITAL SYSTEMS. These types of approaches have a strong organisational impact on procurement and management processes. These studies speak of how leveraging more integrated information systems

presents both technical and human challenges. In the social housing case, the main issue was related to the lack of interoperability between software packages used at renovation and operational stages. In the high school case, however, the main barrier to realising benefits was human. The high turnover in the managing company led to a continual loss of knowledge and expertise which was accompanied by the administrator and occupants not having the skills to interpret the information they were given. All of this initially limited the energy saving they were able to achieve from the renovation and more integrated system. This study also concluded that the benefits of new approaches such as BIM have to be evaluated over the long term because of the time that takes to develop the rights skills and integrating the new processes into business as usual. However, until now a significant fraction of what is published about more integrated information systems focuses on technical aspects of creating and managing digital information. The “people” aspects are often not as thoroughly investigated and developed. But, “people are information integrators, independently of the physical information carriers” . In Australia, the Sydney Opera House has recently started implementing its BIM4FM interface. Here, key lessons from the implementation journey have include highly social aspects Their BIM interface aims to be “an open solution, robust yet adaptable, able to link to multiple information sources and to become the single source of truth for all information queries” . This meant to them that “to succeed, everyone had to be taken through the journey to increase ownership and ensure that the final outcome was relevant and useful”. It also meant that many people without necessarily having a BIM background would need to use the interface in an

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everyday basis. One of the ways they have dealt with this is by having an information systems support group. “These are the super users: highly capable and BIM experienced team members who form a special task force of sorts to start the project and help less experienced users”. Other lessons learnt included the importance of having and encouraging a culture of engagement across all organisational levels, and developing and nurturing a new set of skills beyond technical expertise.

WHAT ABOUT SMES? Cultural barriers in the form negative attitudes towards skills development have historically been one of the greatest hurdles affecting Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in the building sector. In the UK in 2013, 23% and 15% of respondents to a survey by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) identified culture and lack of collaboration respectively as barriers to implementing BIM. These have since been reduced in the case of BIM and other information integration approaches through the use of on-the-job and/or more informal training where the direct link between cost and benefit is more visible. In contrast, a survey carried out in Australia in 2016 showed that while 42% of SMEs here have adopted basic levels of BIM, the majority is still on the fence due to uncertainty about potential returns . SMEs also tend to find adapting to the changes of particular clients more difficult than larger companies. This is often due to the financial cost burden of using different software

* In Bougrain, F (2017) Turning energy data into actionable information: The case of energy performance contracting, in A.X. Sanchez, Hampson, K.D. and London Geoffrey (Eds), Integrating Information in Built Environments: From Concept to Practice, London: Routledge.


* Meistad, et al. (2017) Stakeholder perspectives and information exchange in AEC projects, in A.X. Sanchez, Hampson, K.D. and London Geoffrey (Eds), Integrating Information in Built Environments: From Concept to Practice, London: Routledge. * Linning, C. et al. (2016) Tips with Hindsight, in A.X. Sanchez, Hampson, K.D. and Vaux, S. (Eds) Delivering Value with BIM: A Whole-oflife Approach”, London: Routledge. * Hosseini, R et al. (2016) BIM adoption within Australian Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs): an innovation diffusion model, Construction Economics and Building, 16(3): 71-86 * McGraw-Hill Construction (2012) “The business value of BIM for infrastructure: Addressing America’s infrastructure challenges with collaboration and technology SmartMarket report”, Bedford, MA: McGrawHill Construction.

packages and upskilling their workforce. However, a survey carried out in the US in 2012 found that, due to their shorter duration, small projects present more opportunities to introduce the use of BIM and the smaller size of organisations is advantageous in driving higher levels of implementation. This survey showed that 67% of all BIM users reported a positive return on investment for BIM use in infrastructure projects. A similar survey in Australia in 2014 across designers and contractors, reported that 70% for buildings and 94% for infrastructure reported moderately to very positive returns on investment with only 25% of all surveyed having more than 5 years of experience.

IN SUMMARY

decision-making requires processes that ensure that the data gathered matches the question that needs answering rather than just gathering data for “data’s sake”.

TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS SUCH AS BIM AND ADVANCED ICT GENERALLY MUST THEREFORE BE PROMOTED HAND-IN-HAND WITH STRATEGIES AND APPROPRIATE LEADERSHIP TO OVERCOME PROCESS AND CULTURAL BARRIERS.

Value management and communication are a key part of this journey, especially for SMEs and risk-adverse organisations. While there is some advancement in this area for BIM with tools such as BIMValue, the BIM Dictionary and the BIM Toolkit, this issue of technical versus human aspects is but one of the many complexities, challenges and opportunities found in the growing and broader field of information integration. There is still much work remaining to capture and leverage the lessons learned from successes and difficulties encountered on the path to a more integrated built environment industry.

Integrating information strategies for

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VIEWPOINT

EFFECTIVELY MANAGED, SHARED AND COMMUNICATED? AMALIA ATHANASSOPOULOS

With infrastructure projects increasing in size and complexity, teams increasing to match, and a growth in the number of varying disciplines working together, means the amount of data being generated, shared, tracked is growing exponentially. How can these mega projects be better managed? Additionally, how can all the digital data that is being created, be more effectively managed, shared and communicated? In my view the answer lies in the increased use of technology

THE ‘ISSUE’ OF COST The biggest argument at the moment against this is cost. The implementation and ongoing management of technology is a costly exercise. Yet we forget that to start up a sizeable project, companies have already factored in the cost of technology. For example, the use of specialist programs for disciplines are now their common tools. These programs are inherently the authors for a number of inputs in BIM, however we still seem to isolate this standard practice, classify it as ‘technology’ and associate it with a higher price tag. Taking what we are already using and maximising the outputs from the data that is being generated is what the industry is still learning. While there is a cost associated with the purchase of an additional number of specialist programs and time required to train personnel in new ways to optimise the use of their outputs, the cost of not doing a job right and getting it built in time, far outweighs the cost of adding these additional specialist programs to our tool set. It costs more to fix things at the end. It costs more when you past your practical completion date and need to pay daily liquidated damages for failure to meet practical completion. The argument of cost is null and void in comparison to

the amount of money that can be lost if a project is not savvy enough to get on board at the beginning of the entire process, and endorse a smarter way to build.

IT IS NOT HOW GOOD THE TOOL IS BUT HOW GOOD YOU USE THE TOOL

MANAGE TECH WITH TECH The goal is to have a collaborated 3d model for all disciplines. However ensuring that this model is coordinated between all disciplines, that required updates are carried out and clear communication between teams occurs, appears to be a task in itself. Nowadays quick interdisciplinary checks can be carried out between design models. These checks highlight areas that need review. For example if the structural model doesn’t follow the architectural model then the structural team will need to update their model. Similarly, if the building services model clashes with the structural model then the building services team will need to adjust their model to ensure that their design does not clash with the structural design. Although these checks are easy to carry out, what has become apparent is that constant follow up checks are required from parties external to the design team to ensure that the models are on track. It is in this 3D review space that you notice

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which discipline has not informed another discipline of a change and which discipline hasn’t carried out the tasks required. It has become easier to identify this due to the pace of change from 2D drawing reviews to 3D model reviews. Previously when a 2D drawing was completed, issued and submitted, it had its QA process in place. This process has not yet matured yet in the 3D space. Not all reviewers have the basic skills to review the design in 3D, even to undertake a task as simple as ensuring the modellers have properly completed the tasks they were assigned to complete. This is where it is important to be able to have the skill set to review data in the environment in which it is created. Now it is no longer a quick look over a 2D drawing there is a need to ensure that the 3D model which the modellers are updating is true and accurate. A 2D drawing is simply an output of the 3D model. If the 3D model is not correct then the 2D drawing will also be incorrect. With this new way of working contractors


are now able to clearly see what the designers are doing. Not solely at the key design delivery dates of Final Design or Issued For Construction (IFC) when you are issued with a stack of pdfs to review, contractors now have the ability to review the design before it is submitted. Contractors can now see if the designers are working collaboratively or in their silos. The reason we are now able to do this is through technology.

TECH & CULTURAL CHANGE/TRAINING The issue doesn’t lie in cost, the argument for cost is an easy excuse for those who are unaware of the benefits that the right technology, the right training and the right personnel can bring to a project. The issue is bigger than cost, it is changing the traditional mindset of the wider construction populous to adopt and work with something new and more efficient. This is not directed at any age group it is to those who are stuck in their ways because they are familiar with a process. Which begs the question if the process is flawed, does a flawed process not warrant change.

BENEFITS OF USING TECH The majority of projects are now working in 3d, modelling in 3d, collaborating in 3d, coordinating in 3d. The question needs to be asked of how can the 3d models that are already being used be refined and fed into the wider BIM workflows, into 4D, 5D, 6D and 7D. Simply put, how can all the data, which is being generated be put in the right form so there is faster and easier dataflow and communication between teams and stakeholders? If these processes and workflows are set up and implemented right from the start, with the right tech and personnel, projects will inadvertently save money and time as data is able to be processed and communicated much more effectively and efficiently

Hand in hand with change is a need for training, a clear commitment in direction from the project hierarchy, continuous support, monitoring and adjustment until the change becomes the norm. Herein lies the biggest hurdle, on large infrastructure projects that are accompanied by large teams filtering this message through, changing the traditional way of thinking can prove difficult. However, as this area is maturing, this way of working and thinking is spreading. As people move from project to project and see new and better ways of working, they are taking their experience with them and gradually working more productively with technology is becoming their new norm.

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SPONSORED ADVERT


REPORT

THE FLOW OF DIGITISED INFORMATION AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTORS – HOW HANSEN YUNCKEN ARE LEVERAGING DATA AS AN ENTERPRISE ASSET OVER THE PAST TWO DECADES, THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY HAS BENEFITED FROM THE RAPID INCREASES IN COMPUTING POWER THAT WERE ANTICIPATED MORE THAN FIFTY YEARS AGO AND GAVE RISE TO THE CONCEPT OF MOORE’S LAW. WITH THE CONCOMITANT REDUCTIONS IN THE SIZE OF COMPUTING DEVICES AND INCREASES IN THE MULTIFUNCTIONALITY OF IT, THIS DEVELOPMENT HAS PROVIDED MUCH-NEEDED FUEL TO DRIVE INNOVATION IN CONSTRUCTION WITH THE POTENTIAL TO CHANGE FUNDAMENTALLY BOTH BUSINESS MODELS AND ENTRENCHED CULTURES

JULIE JUPP ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR DIGITAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SCHOOL OF BUILT ENVIRONMENT FACULTY OF DESIGN ARCHITECTURE AND BUILT ENVIRONMENT

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The use of digital building data is transformative for all construction industry professionals, and above all for the main contractor. The digitization of building information is reshaping the roles and responsibilities of many of Australia’s top Tier 1 and 2 contractors, including their relationship to project stakeholders up- and down- stream of delivery who plan, design, operate, and maintain buildings and infrastructure. The flow of digitised information, through the use of building information modelling (BIM), the Internet of Things (IoT), machine learning, and smart infrastructure, has the potential to enable greater levels of integration across both the project and corporate activities of construction firms, which have long been considered separately. Whether related to the building product, its management processes or the contractor’s business strategy, digital information is no longer collected, analysed and made available through a contractor’s single mainframe computer; it is now available in a highly distributed manner. For tech-savvy construction contractors, data collection either occurs automatically via the IoT – including embedded sensors and small consumer devices such as smartphones – or in a semi-automated way via standardised workflows and structured process roadmaps. Storage of this data is distributed in the cloud across multiple virtual data stores. Increasingly, analysis algorithms are employed by contractors so as to enable 24/7 real-time monitoring and decision support using a virtually unlimited number of central processing units. Analytical sophistication ranges from simple comparisons to the use of complex models involving many relationships and elements of data.

DATA MINING, MACHINE LEARNING, AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ARE BEING USED MORE FREQUENTLY TO ANALYSE DATA AND MAKE PREDICTIONS ABOUT THE FUTURE. As a result of these rapidly evolving capabilities in computing, it is not surprising that main contractors are seeking new ways to leverage the vast amounts of data generated on projects, across programs of projects, and throughout their organisations’ functional business units. The integration systems that can create a ‘digital thread’ are now being developed and implemented, which provides a link between the building product and project with corporate and strategic level business activities. Such integration and flow of digital information thus signals an important turning point for main contractors. Enterprise-level information systems are not new, and high levels of maturity are typically found in the integration platforms that support the development and production processes of complex products in discrete manufacturing, such as the aerospace and automotive sectors. Arguably, the same levels of integration have until recent years been unfeasible in the construction sector due to the structural differences between these industries. The new levels of data integration and information flow across temporary project stakeholders (and their

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previously very separate activities) in the development and delivery processes of construction require sophisticated quality control systems and standardised digital workflows throughout project delivery and across the corporate business activities. This systems approach emphasises the importance of aligned implementation and integration across a construction contractor’s organisational network and throughout the entire project life cycle. The potential of increased integration raises new questions about the potential for delivery and corporate business improvement whilst also presenting new challenges in the longer term use and reuse of information about the built asset itself. There are questions about the collation of data to support operational decisions (at the project and program level) as well as strategic decisions (at the business and corporate level). There is also increasing potential for contractors to use data analytics to interrogate this information in new ways to improve both the building’s performance and help improve the performance of owners operating and maintaining the facility being delivered. New challenges also arise as the volume of digital data is doubling in size every two years. Building projects that were delivered through paper-based methods are now modelled across multiple dimensions and with a variety of model uses. Together with the vast amounts of project management data collected, a need to better leverage the flow of digital information is seeing a steady but deliberate change in the way contractors approach its use and reuse. Research on the transformative effects of digitised information on construction contractors in Australia is nascent.


UTS RESEARCHERS IN CONJUNCTION WITH HANSEN YUNCKEN HAVE UNDERTAKEN A SERIES OF RESEARCH PROJECTS THAT SEEK TO UNDERSTAND THE OPPORTUNITIES ENABLED BY NEW INFORMATION MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES. The research highlights the innovative approach taken by Hansen Yuncken to enterprise-level information management. As part of a systems innovation initiative, Hansen Yuncken’s development and nation-wide use of a bespoke integration platform, known as HYway, takes an integrated approach to the flow of digital information and its utilisation in the delivery of construction project and for business intelligence. HYway is being studied by UTS researchers as an exemplar of the rapid

innovation that is changing the way contractors do business. The research shows how HYway has transformed Hansen Yuncken’s approach to construction services and corporate decision making. UTS researchers have also focused on understanding the impacts of HYway to support the consistent application of technologies, processes and policies that enable the use of BIM. Research study findings have demonstrated HYway’s ability to support three significant functions in the daily activities of construction contractors, including (i) Real-time datadriven decision making and transparent reporting across project, program- and corporate-level functions; (ii) Use of predictive analytics for performance evaluation and business planning; and (iii) More consistent deployment of BIM. One of the key achievements of HYway surrounds the integration of data with standardised project, program, and corporate processes, which were first mapped and optimised prior to implementation. Taken together, this process-oriented approach to enterprise information management is able to drive change and consistency across the enterprise

- informing decisions in real time, harnessing project information captured at the source, utilising data derived from BIM models, and reporting across all levels of the business using sophisticated analytics and user-friendly role-specific dashboards for visualisations. By providing access to live, relevant and contextual data for the management of projects, regional programs and the business as a whole, HYway is capable of helping designers, managers, and senior executives select the best solutions and make more informed business decisions. As technology advances, HYway’s integration platform is thus playing a key role in Hansen Yuncken’s approach to delivering intelligent construction services. HYway advances the management of safety and environmental performance using proactive data-driven workflows; it also facilitates more effective online management of project related data pertaining to time, cost and quality performance criteria. The digitisation of buildings requires the systematic handling of large volumes of data. Structured data captured and generated via BIM applications are connected with construction management data so as to inform project performance.

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HYway’s flexible systems architecture allows the business to adopt innovative, best-of-breed technologies to support project and organisational functions using an agile modular approach. Its alignment with the broader business strategy at Hansen Yuncken has resulted in leaner, consistent and more transparent corporate processes. The UTS study shows that the HYway platform’s ability to inform decision making at the project coalface and in the boardroom has positive impacts on not only the triple bottom line but also on organisational change, fostering an environment that encourages innovation and increasing the efficiency of work processes. Hansen Yuncken’s project managers use HYway’s dashboards in daily activities utilising performance graphs and risk indicators from project disciplines and sub-contractors. Automated reporting capabilities from information captured at the source process is saving days in the preparation of monthly reports. Added value lies in the elimination of ‘cleansed’ reporting (commonly prepared by project managers) and early risk identification that utilise ‘lead’ indicators in mitigation strategies. Further, site management staff use mobile devices with electronic forms for all site-based Safety, Quality and Commissioning processes. Project information collected via HYway is analysed and displayed showing individual project and collective

project- or program-level performance. Business intelligence generated from tens of thousands of safety and quality checklists, issues and observations facilitate further refinement of Hansen Yuncken’s process as a continuous improvement loop. Hansen Yuncken’s administrators utilise tailored electronic dashboards, roadmaps, forms and approval processes supporting consistent procurement. The business has realised savings of approximately 2hrs of processing time for each of the 12,000+ trade packages that have been performed electronically to date. Further benefits include improved risk mitigation, transparency, automated reporting and refined process for lessons learned. State-of-the-art technologies are providing further efficiencies that leverage HYway’s extensibility. Using the IoT, the project commissioning phase is being supported via the use of QR codes with the condition of assets recorded via iPads in structured reporting dashboards. Data captured from codes, sensors and iPads during commissioning can then be mapped and visualised in HYway’s graphical BIM display. This is leading to HYway’s ability to monitor in real-time the location and condition of assets, mapping any discrepancy with the as-built model, further reducing the time it takes to discover and solve problems. Research undertaken in collaboration with Hansen Yuncken has demonstrated via case studies some of the key innovations enabled by the HYway platform, which have only previously been seen in discrete manufacturing sectors, including: •

New forms of data and process integration. HYway systems architecture enables decision-making and procurement processes to have

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the speed and scale required to make noticeable gains in productivity. •

New ways to communicate and support decision-making. HYway provides a level of consistency in reporting that is unprecedented in construction, allowing contractors, subcontractors, and owners to have a common understanding of how the project is faring at any given time in relation to cost, time, quality, safety and environmental indicators.

Unprecedented levels of performance management and business oversight. Integration across HYway’s Business Development, Procurement, Site Management, Project Management and Community modules means that issues are resolved and do not stack up because of lack of communication and accountability.

Improvements in contractual certainty. Procurement teams typically negotiate contracts, and this is almost always dense and complicated. HYway has standardised and streamlined these workflows within a dedicated Procurement module that links with historical performance data on sub-contractors. Consequently, fewer issues arise due to increased oversight. When a problem does comes up, project and senior managers alike are able to understand how to proceed using HYway’s dashboards.

Innovative connections between project and business planning. The different levels of planning, from high-end preparation to day-byday programs have greater levels of connectivity. If the daily work is not finished on site, schedulers and


senior project managers need to know—and using HYway they are able to update priorities in real time. •

New forms of short-term business planning. Hansen Yuncken’s business executives are now not only able to understand what needs to happen in the next two to three months, but are also able to understand and analyse what needs to happen in the next week or two using HYway dashboards and its business intelligence reporting functions that are based on live data feeds from the project. State-of-the-art approach to risk management. HYway’s connection of data-driven processes across Business Development, Procurement, Site Management, Project Management and Community modules and their focus on lead indicators of risk means that both long-term and short-term risks get considerable consideration. This level of risk management is unprecedented

in construction since the kinds of short-term risks that crop up on the job are not able to be given as much attention due to the traditional focus on lag indicators, whereby the focus is on incident reporting. •

New capabilities in talent management. HYway enables Hansen Yuncken to find the best contractors and sub-contractors for each job. HYway’s intelligent reporting delivers a suggested direction based on the collective and real-time analysis of cost, safety, quality, environment and time data. This is a first in assisting managers with making decisions in relation to the best contractors and sub-contractors based on their previous performance.

TOGETHER THESE INNOVATIONS ARE SIGNIFICANT TO THE ADVANCEMENT OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY AS A WHOLE. HYway’s approach to integrated enterprise information management is enabling greater and unprecedented levels of productivity gains to be realised. Hansen Yunken’s IT and innovation strategy points to a long-term orientation, where success relies on investment in the HYway infrastructure to drive their business forward over the next 50 years. As an integration platform, HYway is an exemplar of Australian-owned construction contractor innovation that will enable firms like Hansen Yuncken to compete in a global market by leveraging the flow of digital information from across the building network.

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LEGAL CASE NOTES

BIM AND THE ADVANCEMENT OF DIGITAL DATA

IN RELATION TO THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT ‘THE WHOLE ETHOS DRIVING BIM IS THAT OF A ‘BUILD IT TWICE’ MENTALITY – ONCE VIRTUALLY, ONCE IN REALITY’ (BIM – A BLUEPRINT FOR SUCCESS, MCLAREN AN IDOX COMPANY)

The digital age has undoubtedly caused the construction industry to experience significant technological advancements, which has had a widespread influence on how projects are managed and delivered. In particular, the use of Building Information Modelling (BIM) has been utilised by many developed nations around the world, and users have experienced significant time, cost and quality benefits. As such, the Commonwealth Government co-funded the National Building Information Modelling Initiative (NBI) Report, which provided recommendations for the inclusion of BIM into the Australian construction industry.

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WHAT IS BIM? BuildingSMART, the International leading body driving the global use of BIM defines it as: “digital representation of physical and functional characteristics of a building. As such it serves as a shared knowledge resource for information about a building forming a reliable basis for decisions during a life-cycle from inception onward”

mutually exchange data and monitor the progress of the project. It allows users to effectively harness the power of technology and collaboration and decrease the cost and time of construction delivery and improving the final product (Mcgraw Hill Construction, ‘Smart Market Report (2009).

BIM provides users to a construction project with a collaborative digital platform where involved parties can access all relevant documents and material relevant to the design, construction and management of a project. This platform is accessible and updated in real time, enabling all users to simultaneously collaborate,

THERE ARE LEVELS OF BIM WHICH DETERMINE THE WAY THAT A PROJECTS ARE MANAGED NAMELY: BIM Level 0

BIM Level 2

No collaboration

Sharing of information, collaborative and using digital technology

THE PAST

BIM IN THE UNITED STATES AND THE UK The 2014 McGraw-Hill Construction Report in the United States revealed that the use of BIM had increased from 17% in 2007, to over 70% in 2012. This dramatic increase was the result of significant increases in project accuracy and reduced time and financial costs. Additionally, the UK government has recognised its substantial benefits and decided that from July 2016, all government funded construction projects would involve BIM. These two nations have developed certain policies and national standards including the UK’s PAS 1992-2:2013, which functions analogous to the BIM model. Research from these developed nations

THE FUTURE BIM Level 1

BIM Level 3

3D and 2D work, no collaboration

Full collaboration between all parties through a single shared digital data environment

has found that the use of an integrated collaborative data sharing platform reduces the ability of opportunistic parties from bringing frivolous claims against others. This opportunistic behaviour has plagued the construction industry for decades, and so the increased use of BIM has demanded greater transparency and accountability for the involved parties. Adopting a collaborative platform also reduces the chance of any miscommunication, misunderstanding or incompatible designs between any of the involved parties. Given the complex nature of construction projects and the vast number of parties involved who all have diverse and often competing interests, BIM allows a more comprehensive and

streamlined understanding of the works to be completed. As miscommunication is the leading cause of construction disputes, having open dialogue and readily available information has alleviated these pressures. The UK Cabinet Office BIM Strategy Paper 2011 found that the use of BIM attributed to a reduction in project conflict and project re-work between 47%-65%.

BIM IN AUSTRALIA Chair of BuildingSMART John Mitchell stated that “our [Australia’s] national competitiveness is at stake if nothing is done to address the issues that are the

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focus of the strategy outlined in the NBI… Building information modelling is a set of processes and technologies that, after 25 years’ gestation, is being adopted by all of the leading international construction economies. The pace of this adoption is gaining great momentum, and it is important that Australia does not get left behind in this. It is essential that Australia takes a proactive role in contributing to this work to derive a truly national economic benefit. Our studies show that the Australian economy could be better off by as much as $7.6 billion over the next decade”. Therefore, whilst the Australian construction industry has made some progress towards the inclusion of BIM (having utilised the model on major projects such as the Sydney Opera House Facilities Management Exemplar Project and the UTS Chau Wing Building), it has not been embraced like the US or the UK. Whilst there has been a discussion of BIM to be included in all government projects worth over $50 million, Australia is certainly behind other developed nations in terms of institutionalising BIM through policy development. BIM’s integration in Australia has been mostly ad-hoc, with no guidance from the development of national standards which has undoubtedly hindered its progress.

LEGAL IMPLICATIONS There are a number of legal implications that may surface when using BIM. This is greatly due to the very nature of the platform as it is open and collaborative, rather than involving individually controlled obligations and clearly delegated risk. Some of these implications include:

Contract One of the key legal implications

restricting the use of BIM and more specifically the more complex forms of BIM in Australia, is that typical construction contracts cannot be easily integrated with the system. The early collaboration required by BIM is arguably only functional with the alliancing model, which is occasionally used in Australia. Further, successfully adopting BIM requires a contract delivery method whereby it is incorporated into the procurement of the contract. It is likely that a new Standard Form Contract that is compatible with BIM is required. Nevertheless, ‘a report of the Government Construction Client Group: Building Information Modelling (BIM) working party strategy paper’ March 2011 (GCCG) (UK) stated that “...little change is required in the fundamental building blocks of copyright law, contracts or insurance to facilitate working at Level 2 of BIM maturity. Some essential investment is required in simple, standard protocols and services schedules to define BIM-specific roles, ways of working and desired outputs”. The same has been said for the application of level 0 and level 1 BIM in Australia being compatible with common contracts such as AS2124 and AS4902. However, to harness the capabilities of a fully integrated BIM system (level 2 and 3) is likely to require parallel national standards.

Risk Assigning risk allocation of a project can be difficult when multiple parties are involved who are simultaneously contributing to and inserting data on the system. Parties may wish to include proportionate liability clauses to govern risk allocation in this instance. Further, the use of a single digital platform could potentially create error if information is incorrectly inserted or a technical

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deficiency occurs. It may then become difficult to identify the cause of the error, leading to time and cost delays. For this reason, BIM contracts in the United States have had the tendency to involve broad disclaimers to protect users from the fault of another party.

Copyright The use of BIM poses a significant issue in terms of copyright and ownership. Copyright laws exist to protect the author of an idea. However, when multiple parties are contributing to a particular design element, deciding which party contributed what may become blurred and cause complications. Therefore, difficulties may arise in determining who owns the information in the model. The digital age has certainly transformed the way construction projects operate. As the inception of BIM in Australia is only recent, it is still yet to be seen how the legal implications will unfold. However, as the United States and other developed nations have experienced positive results, Australia, having adopted aspects of BIM in major projects such as the North West Rail Link, the Barangaroo development and the Sydney CBD light rail early works is progressing in a similar direction. The implementation and investment in technological advancements will not happen overnight but the long term benefits of BIM implementation to small and large projects alike are likely to see a significant increase and in turn a driving force of change in the way the construction industry functions.

Legal case notes has been brought to you by Doyles Construction Lawyers for further information or if you have any questions in relation to this article please visit www. doylesconstructionlawyers.com or contact doyles@doylesconstructionlawyers.com


REPORT

CONSTRUCTION WORKERS ARE SIX TIMES MORE LIKELY TO DIE FROM

SUICIDE THAN AN ACCIDENT AT WORK Jorgen Gullestrup, CEO MATES in Construction

MATES IN CONSTRUCTION IS AUSTRALIA’S LEADING INDUSTRY SUICIDE PREVENTION ORGANISATION FOCUSING ON RAISING AWARENESS, BUILDING CAPACITY, PROVIDING HELP AND RESEARCH.

Every year in Australia, over 3,000 people take their own life. The vast majority of these cases are men. The number of suicides occurring in the population each year is far greater than the number of deaths due to traffic accidents, homicide, and other assaults. Another relevant outcome is suicide ideation (thoughts about suicide), which is associated with considerable psychological distress. Aside from this, suicide ideation is a likely predictor of later attempts and death by suicide, and thus is an important variable on which to intervene. Suicide is elevated in construction workers compared to other workers in Australia. This is particularly the case for labourers, where the rates are markedly above the male general population. The high rates of suicide in the construction industry underscores the importance of promoting mental wellbeing as a means of reducing suicide. In saying this, the rates of suicide among construction workers have been dropping. Between 2001 and 2003, the rates of suicide in construction workers were over 2.3 times that of other male workers (Figure 1). Between 2011 and 2013, these rates were 1.7 that of other male workers.

SUICIDE RATE PER 100.000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 0

10 CONSTRUCTION

20

30

40

NON-CONSTRUCTION

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WHY IS THERE A NEED FOR MATES IN CONSTRUCTION? Construction workers are six times more likely to die from suicide than an accident at work. For our young workers, the facts are that they are well over two times more likely to take their own lives than other young Australian men. For workers in the construction industry, suicide seems to be a part of the reality of working in the industry. Work within the industry is highly transient with most workers employed on a project by project basis, for periods from a few weeks, to at best a few years. Other research has shown us that workers find it difficult to discuss feelings and emotions with colleagues at work and the nature of the work made social support more difficult. Pride was identified as an issue with saying they had a problem being seen as not manly. Participants of the research held a strong belief that suicide was an impulsive act and that someone intending to take their own life would show no signs and would not discuss it. Recommendations from research conducted in the industry recommended that a campaign raising awareness, about mental health and wellbeing, combined with good gate keeper training, should be implemented in combination with an industry specific program for workers with suicidal thoughts. So the MATES in Construction program was developed.


REPORT

IF YOU ARE CONCERNED ABOUT A MATE, IT IS IMPORTANT YOU TAKE ACTION AND TALK WITH THEM. You don’t have to fix them, but rather let them know you can see they are struggling or doing it tough. How do we know they are doing it tough? Often, it’s because we know they are going through a stressful event or a number of events often related to a loss in their life (job, relationship, health, grief). It can also be because you have noticed changes in their behaviour (withdrawn, angry, moody, giving away possessions, unusually calm). What they say can also raise concerns (“they would be better off without me, I can’t do anything right, I can’t take anymore”). Sometimes it can just be a gut feeling that they are not right.

If someone is struggling or know of someone struggling, what would you advise them to do? Listen without judgement or trying to fix them. Ask directly about suicide if this is your concern (eg. “sometimes when people are going through what you are going through, they think about suicide – is this what you are thinking?”). Stay with them until you connect them to a safe resource (GP, friend, hospital, helpline, etc.) If you ring a helpline such as Suicide Call Back on 1300 659 467 or Lifeline on 13 11 14, make certain you stay with them until the call is finished. Most people find it very difficult to ask for help so you may even need to dial the number for them. If you are in Construction, Mining or Energy you can ring 1300 642 111 as a safe connection. If you are on a MATES in Construction site, you can talk to a Connector or an ASIST person – you can recognise them by their logos on their hardhat. Remember that sometimes just talking to a mate can make all the difference and possibly save their life. Take 10 seconds of courage and tell them what you know, see, hear or sense. To combat/prevent the issues raised in your MIC Summary Report: Mental Health in the Construction Industry; what would you say are the top three things that all organisations and firms can and should do throughout the year or/& on an annual basis? Talk regularly about mental health. Put the same emphasis on mental health as you do safety. Implement peer support program.

IF YOU ARE DOING IT TOUGH RIGHT NOW Life is often tough and unfair. One event or the accumulation of stress overtime can overwhelm us. This is normal and happens to most people at some stage in their life. At these times, it’s important not to make any major decisions. Connect with someone who can help you see all your options clearly and keep you safe.

If you are in crisis now, we suggest you call: Suicide Call Back 1300 659 467 Lifeline 13 11 14 MATES in Construction 1300 642 111

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WORKPLACE

GETTING THE BALANCE RIGHT ARE YOUR SOFT SKILLS LOSING YOUR ORGANISATION MONEY? INTRODUCTION

AAKASH GAWADE MPM GRADUATE BOND UNIVERSITY

PROF. ALAN PATCHING ASSOCIATE DEAN (FACULTY) BOND UNIVERSITY

In their Sistemas & Gestão article published in 2016, Noari and Chary identified that 58% of problems occurring in projects were due to poor communication among team members. In light of this finding, there is little wonder that Emotional Intelligence (EI) has proved itself to be an indispensable aspect of project success. Doyens of EI, Salovey and Mayer, defined it as “the ability to monitor one’s own and others’ feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one’s thinking and action” (Emotional Intelligence, 1990). With the increasing importance of good communication to project outcomes, EI really does need to be at the centre of the relationships that are so crucial to successful delivery of projects. However, what exactly constitutes ideal EI for the projects environment? Recent research undertaken at Bond University provides some interesting insights into that question. These are addressed under the simple headings of ‘what?’, ‘how?’, ‘who?’ and ‘where?’.

WHAT? The research confirmed that EI has proved to be a critical component in leadership and communication in the corporate world. That qualitative research study also investigated the

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role of EI in project success from the perspective of experienced project managers. The findings revealed that, while leadership and strong communication amalgamate as core components of successful projects, ‘soft’ or emotional skills contribute significantly to the effectiveness of that leadership and communication, and so to those successful project outcomes.

HOW? The research methodology involved discussion questions in semistructured interviews to determine the importance of EI in various aspects of project management. Six experts were interviewed for this pilot. The outcomes of the study suggested that EI plays a crucial role in project management knowledge areas such as human resources, communications and stakeholder management.

WHO? Experts participating in the study represented a variety of work designations including project manager, project director, professor of project management, executive coach, counsellor and trainer. Their experience in project management ranged from 10 to more than 45 years and included internationally respected certifications.


WHERE? Due to globalisation, projects have shifted focus from national teams to global teams. Nowadays, teams exhibiting different ethnicities and work cultures manage projects. This presents a significant challenge for project managers who do not possess high EI. Curiosity by project managers concerning how and why team members may act or react in a certain way can be a valuable aspect of EI, but the ability to understand and manage team members’ emotions remains a rare but increasingly in demand skill in the complex project environment.

PARTICIPATION On projects involving globally distributed human resources, project managers need to make sure all team members are engaged through frequent communication and on these types of project in particular, a successful project outcome is substantially dependent as much on the EI abilities of the project leader as it is on his or her technical skills and intellectual aptitude. Projects in a matrix-structured corporate environment also rely heavily on EI-centric project managers for successful delivery. We still live in a world where the majority of projects undertaken can be delivered only with the involvement of human resources. Dealing with people means dealing with their emotions. Projects require constant communication between team members and stakeholders. Whenever communication takes place on a project, human emotions come into play, and project outcomes depend more and more on the project manager’s competence to recognise and manage emotions in him or herself and in those with whom he or she interacts. Overall, positive emotions can lead to higher productivity on projects, while the

toxic nature of negative emotions can quickly deliver an unfavourable project impact. This being the case, emotionally intelligent project leadership plays a significant role in the success of most modern projects. According to one of the experts participating in Bond’s research, “... the stronger the communication, the greater participation between team members and the higher the team productivity based on that strong bonding between the team members.” A lack of communication increases the negative risk in a project substantially. With decreasing effectiveness of communication, one can expect decreasing levels of team members’ knowledge of, and confidence in, how to deal with assigned tasks. To manage each and every stakeholder, soft skills are a necessary part of communication. EI involves applying appropriate emotional competencies at appropriate times to attain with a positive outcome when dealing with project stakeholders. People are generally more unpredictable than one might imagine. While they can be self-determining and self-motivated, they can also be self-centred. This last characteristic in particular can lead to disruption of even the most carefully planned project simply by a team member refusing to work, or to do work as requested, or acting in a way that might not be in the best interests of their team or the client organisation. A modern project manager must possess the leadership skills to manage this sort of behaviour in the workplace. Even though conflict can be of great benefit to a project if it is of the productive type, much negative conflict can be destructive and this type is often unpredictable. It is crucial to have strategies in place to deal with any negative conflict generated on a project.

COMMUNICATION Communication is the imparting or exchanging of information by speaking, writing or some other medium. Technology has transformed communication with video conferences and teleconferences, and various forms of phone calls, messaging, emails and social media all adding to the mix of options that can be of significant enhancers of project human interaction. Nearly 100% of the activities in a project are communication-based. According to another expert in Bond’s research, “without communication, a project is exactly like a set of programmed robots performing their programmed tasks”. Face-to-face communication forms a crucial part of communication in project management, regardless of whether it occurs on a regular basis or seldom occurs. Technology-based communication may provide ease of communication but the effect of limitation on the interchange of emotions, verbal and nonverbal cues, gestures, mood indicators and responses, etc. must be recognised in order that the appropriate means of communication can be selected for particular purposes. As one interviewed expert stated, "face-to-face communications in large part is made up of body language and tone – technology for the most part eliminates both or one of these.” Globally, it has been widely preferred to hire project managers based on their technical skills and their intelligence quotient (IQ). Bond’s research found that “while more project managers are gaining certification and more organisational dollars are being expended on technical training programs, many organisations still report little progress by way of project management maturity and improved project delivery. Certification which is competency-based

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WELLNESS

is helpful but it’s just one aspect of the ideal solution”.

IT SEEMS THAT ORGANISATIONS ARE POURING MORE AND MORE OF THEIR BUDGETS INTO INCREASING THE TECHNICAL SKILLS OF THEIR EMPLOYEES, BUT MIGHT BE FORGETTING ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF SOFT SKILLS, SUCH AS EI. Certification, however, does not address nor develop the behavioural competency or soft skills identified as being needed for true effective delivery of projects and programs of work. EI contributes to a number of important workplace performance indicators. However, EI without technical skills does not work - emotional competencies, intellectual competencies and technical skills are required for getting a solution to the problems encountered on complex projects. In other words, technical skills form a crucial part of project management, but in today’s competitive environment, organisations must also focus on training employees with soft skills if they want to stay competitive. Technical tasks on a project might demand an individual to execute solutions with intellectual skills, but emotional competencies are also required to discuss the problem with team members and arrive at the ideal technical solution. The leadership style of a project manager

affects the people working on the given project. The style of leadership of a project manager creates an impact on project teams and their behaviour towards the project manager. Using an inappropriate leadership style in the wrong context at the wrong time might affect the team in way that could affect the project success. Accordingly, a project manager’s leadership style should be flexible, and the manager demonstrating the highest level of leadership flexibility is likely to achieve superior project outcomes. Projects are dynamic in nature so upturns and downturns in progress are to be expected. Downturns may create fear, uncertainty, demotivation, depression and anxiety, while upturns in a project can lead to motivated and inspired team members. These changes in a project impact either positively or negatively on emotions of the project teams and must be managed carefully.

TECHNICAL SKILLS ARE JUST THE BEGINNING – PEOPLE DELIVER PROJECTS, TOOLS AND SYSTEMS DO NOT. According to one of the interviewed experts, a project manager's role is best done by MBWA, or “Managing By Walking Around”, which would encourage more face-to-face communication on projects. Open-ended communication and use of strategic interpersonal skills by a project manager are essential. People deliver projects; systems and tools do not. Systems and tools usually follow a set of processes. EI does not. EI’s importance needs to be recognised on projects as it has a major influence on success or failure. We can have a perfect

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technical Project Management Plan, with everything in place, but people’s attitude, emotions and behaviours cannot be accounted for in any such plan. EI leads to project success. EI is not just a concept or a theory, but also a tool to take corrective action whenever it might be needed in a project scenario. Communication strategies and EI training should be implemented from the beginning, and not just used as a way to control damage. A good project manager will have a solid communications plan and execute it throughout the course of a project. A project manager could also consult communication specialists to gain further insight on how to form a communications plan.

CONCLUSION EI might prove to be a change catalyst wherever face-to-face communication would commence in a project scenario. A project manager with strong emotional competencies can use EI as a tool to implement corrective measures. The Bond research findings suggested that increasing EI in project teams though training could be directly correlated with increased project success. Project managers could use a variety of methods to educate teams, such as courses, classes, presentations, and other means of professional development. Even though the theories backing EI have been researched for decades, there is still an urgent necessity for the importance of it to be promulgated through the corporate world. This is especially true in project management where the role of project manager is causal and crucial in delivering a unique and successful project.


CONFERENCE REPORT

21ST PAQS ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Vancouver, Canada 23rd July to 25th July 2017 ABOUT PAQS

The Pacific Association of Quantity Surveyors (PAQS) is an international association of national organisations representing Quantity Surveyors in the Asia and Western Pacific region.

LIST OF PAQS ORGANISATIONS: MEMBER •

Australian Institute of Quantity Surveyors (AIQS)

Canadian Institute of Quantity Surveyors (CIQS)

China Engineering Cost Association (CECA)

Philippine Institute of Certified Quanity Surveyors (PICQS)

Hong Kong Institute of Surveyors (HKIS)

Singapore Institute of Surveyors and Valuers (SISV)

Royal Institution of Surveyors Malaysia (RISM

ASSOCIATE MEMBER

Institution of Surveyors Engineers & Architects, Brunei (PUJA)

Building Surveyors Institute of Japan (BSIJ)

New Zealand Institute of Quantity Surveyors (NZIQS)

Ikatan Quantity Surveyor Indonesia (IQSI)

Institute of Quantity Surveyors Sri Lanka (IQSSL)

Fiji Institute of Quantity Surveyors (FIQS)

Korea Institution of Quantity Surveyors (KIQS)

OBSERVER MEMBER •

Association of South African Quantity Surveyors (ASAQS)

The association meets annually to •

promote best practice of Quantity Surveying (QS) in the region

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CONFERENCE REPORT

encourage dialogue and regional cooperation between member organisations

foster research to further the understanding of building practice in the region

provide assistance to members of member organisations working within an associated country

In 2018, The Australian Institute of Quantity Surveyors (AIQS) is proud to host the joint International Cost Engineering Council (ICEC) & 22nd Annual Pacific Association of Quantity Surveyors (PAQS) Conference. The conference will provide a unique opportunity for quantity surveyors, cost engineers and project management professionals from around the world to discuss the latest techniques, standards and issues facing the industry today and in the future.

EVENT DETAILS ICEC-PAQS 2018 Conference Sunday 18 November to Tuesday 20 November 2018 International Convention Centre Sydney, Australia www.icecpaqs2018.com

Save the date and keep an eye out for updates in the lead up to the conference. We look forward to seeing you there.

A YQS PERSPECTIVE In July 2017, four AIQS YQS representatives attended the YQSG Program as part of the wider 21st PAQS Annual Conference held in

Vancouver. Joanne Chan (VIC), Ben Nicholson (NSW), Josh Antram (WA) and Caitlin Shields (QLD) attended the two-day program which included a formal education series of 15 minute presentations by a representative from each PAQS organisation on the chosen topic: Green Technologies. In addition to the formal presentations, the program included local tour of Vancouver, which highlighted town planning, local construction information and enabled attendees to appreciate the reality of Vancouver’s Green targets. Most importantly, the program provided valuable opportunities to network and discuss local initiatives and methods with peers from other PAQS organisations. AIQS demonstrated Green Technologies in two parts: A focus on technology, through a case study of the new Royal Adelaide Hospital (nRAH) and a spotlight on volumetric timber construction delivered by Joanne Chan and Ben Nicholson. The presentation discussed the trend of utilising automated technology to assist hospital staff with their daily duties, taking over some of the mundane work of transporting goods and equipment around the huge hospital and allowing staff to provide better patient care. It was mentioned that the Automated Guided Vehicles at nRAH would be used to move equipment and supplies around the hospital when it opens. These vehicles would be used to pick up loaded trolleys which contains items such as linen, pharmacy products and patients’ meals from service corridor to the required levels via a designated lift. In addition to the AGV system, the hospital has also installed a Pneumatic Tube System which will be used to transport drugs, documents and specimens to and from multiple stations, labs, pharmacies, blood banks across multiple floors. The state of the art support technologies offers

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CONFERENCE REPORT

opportunities for hospital management to improve the traditional logistic management process and promote effective and efficient operation of the orderly services at the hospital. Additionally, the presentation also covered new construction methodologies in Australia particularly focusing on volumetric timber construction. Several example projects were presented including a residential and a civic project with the advantages and complexities of safety, program and cost investigated. An examination of the shift away from conventional residential floorplates toward more efficient, duplicated layouts to suit volumetric construction was discussed with examples presented. Following the YQSG Program, we were able to attend the 21st PAQS Annual Conference featuring keynote speakers such as David & Sarika Suzuki.

remain as the Treasurer and agreed to appoint Grant Warner in this role. On the 24th and 25th July the 21st Annual PAQS conference was held with this years theme being Sustainable Developments. Presentations and speakers were of a very high quality with the standout speakers being David Suzuki and his daughter Sarika. David outlined the many issues facing the survival of the world, leaving many in the audience to ponder where our future lies. Sarika then talked about how her generation was finding ways to right the wrongs of the past and gave the audience a glimmer of hope for the future. AIQS Board representatives, Peter Clack, Anthony Mills and Andrew Brady, along with CEO Grant Warner also initiated meetings with the following associations present at the conference: •

Thank you to the AIQS for supporting our participation, and we look forward to hosting the next PAQS YQSG program in Sydney in November 2018.

Philippines Institute of Quantity Surveying

Indonesian Association of Quantity Surveyors

Joanne Chan (VIC), Ben Nicholson (NSW), Josh Antram (WA) and Caitlin Shields (QLD)

China Engineering Cost Association

Hong Kong Institute of Surveyors

Singapore Institute of Surveyors and Valuers

Canadian Institute of Quantity Surveyors

THE PRESIDENT’S PERSPECTIVE The 21st Board Meeting for PAQS was held on 23rd July with AIQS represented by Peter Clack, Anthony Mills and Grant Warner. The AIQS has held the position as Treasurer to PAQS for numerous years with Trevor Main being the AIQS representative in this role. Unfortunately, as Trevor is no longer on the AIQS Board he was no longer eligible to carry out this role. The AIQS and the PAQS Board thank Trevor for his time and efforts over the years in the role as PAQS Treasurer. I am pleased to announce the PAQS Board unanimously agreed the AIQS should

To discuss areas of commonality and to see how the various associations could work closer in the future. As a final note the International Construction Measurement Standards Coalition, of which the AIQS is an active member, launched the International Construction Measurement Standards: Global Consistency in Presenting Construction Costs. For further information on the ICMS please visit the website (https://icms-coalition.org/) Peter Clack, President

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SOCIAL

VICTORIAN CHAPTER ANNUAL DINNER

Melbourne, Victoria 4th August 2017

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SOCIAL

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UAE BRANCH OUTREACH PROGRAM Malis, Philippines 10th July 2017

The UAE Branch of the AIQS International Chapter, as part of their social responsibility project, provided school bags and supplies for children in the Philippines. Mr. Nonilo Vergara and his family handed over the donations to the children on behalf of the UAE Branch. Mr. M. Sathiyaseelan, secretary of the UAE branch and Mr. Ajantha Premarathna, chairman also played a large part in supporting this project. The UAE Branch has carried our similar projects such as flood relief support to victims in Sri Lanka through the Consulate General Office of Sri Lanka in Dubai by arranging 100 foldable mattresses on 26th May 2016. In 2015, earthquake victims in Nepal were provided with 500 winter blankets through Red Crescent Society of the UAE.

If you have held or attended an AIQS event in your area and want to be featured in the Social Pages please send the event details and photographs to marketing@aiqs.com.au

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ICEC–PAQS Conference 2018 Sydney, Australia

ICEC - PAQS 2018 CONFERENCE SUNDAY 18 - TUESDAY 20 NOVEMBER 2018 INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE, SYDNEY GRASSROOTS TO CONCRETE JUNGLE DYNAMICS IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

The Australian Institute of Quantity Surveyors (AIQS) is proud to host the joint conference for the International Cost Engineering Council (ICEC) and the Pacific Association of Quantity Surveyors (PAQS) in November 2018. The conference is expected to attract over 400 local and international participants from a variety of professions including: •

Quantity Surveyors

Cost Planners

Cost Engineers

Cost Estimators

Project Managers

Contract Administrators

Cost Managers

DRAFT PROGRAM ICEC – PAQS 2018 Conference Sunday 18 November 2018

ICEC-PAQS Conference Exhibition Cocktail Reception

Monday 19 November 2018

ICEC-PAQS Conference Exhibition Conference Dinner

Tuesday 20 November 2018

ICEC-PAQS Conference Exhibition

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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS DEADLINE MONDAY 30 APRIL 2018

proceedings. These submissions will be double-blind reviewed.

The ICEC-PAQS 2018 Conference is calling for submissions for both industry and academic presentations for the upcoming conference.

Conference Program Themes

We are seeking submissions that will provoke debate, stimulate discussion, offer new ideas, learning and/or encourage the dissemination of research findings.

Abstracts which cover the one or more of the following themes are invited for submission:

ICEC-PAQS can help you: Put your business in the spotlight both locally and internationally

Get in front of your target market

Formulate lead generation and new contacts

Sustainability

Get your brand noticed

Risk Management

Smart Cities/Smart Infrastructure

Attract new clients, new customers, new business

Building Resilience/Post Disaster Reconstruction

Give attendees a “taste” of your business

Human Resource Management

Market your business cost effectively

Innovation in Construction

Building Information Modeling (BIM)

Project Controls/Cost Management

Law & Contracts

Technical Presentations

Project Management

Presentations are encouraged from industry professionals on current and future projects, methodologies and technologies.

Technical presentations will be expected to submit an extended abstract for inclusion in the conference proceedings.

Research based academic presentations will be expected to submit a full paper for inclusion in the conference

The ICEC-PAQS 2018 Conference offers a unique opportunity to increase your organisation’s exposure to a diverse cross-section of both local and international industry professionals.

Academic Paper Presentations

SPONSORSHIP & EXHIBITION OPPORTUNITIES

Suitable topical submissions not covered within the above themes may also be considered.

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For more information or to discuss available opportunities, please contact: Australian Institute of Quantity Surveyors Level 3, 70 Pitt Street Sydney NSW 2000 AUSTRALIA Tel: +61 2 8234 4000 Email: events@aiqs.com.au www.icecpaqs2018.com


BCI

BUILDING COST INDEX THE BUILDING COST INDEX IS PUBLISHED IN THE PRINT VERSION OF THE BUILDING ECONOMIST. IT CONTAINS DATA THAT CAN BE USED AS A PREDICTOR FOR THE ESTIMATED TIMES FOR DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION AND INCLUDES A SUMMARY OF THE PAST, PRESENT AND ESTIMATED FUTURE CONSTRUCTION COSTS.

BUILDING COST I N DEX SEPTEMBER 2017 THE BUILDING ECONOMIST - SEPTEMBER 2017- 49

The Building Economist - September 2017 - The BIM Issue  
The Building Economist - September 2017 - The BIM Issue  

The Journal of the Australian Institute of Quantity Surveyors