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2012 AWARD RECIPIENTS

VINEET BHOSLE DANI HILL MARCELA GRACIA

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY AIAS MEMBER TALIESEN WEST AIAS MEMBER UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA AIAS MEMBER

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PR A TE O R or 60 J O IZ 2. F E 25 AR C 2. 42 O C T 00 H S IT N EC C EL TS O A C IG [S M pro eleb IB TU P me fes rat ILI DE E e s T ev mb ion th Y N T T IT fea eryw ers al a e a R C c E tur he of rch hie Q H IO ing re AIA ite ve U AP M c w m N rg

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marissa ann mendoza 100

retention pond

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The Design School, Arizona State University 2013 National Rowing Center

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connection of river to site

grove

mamendo5@asu.edu 602.617.3484 38238335

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A collaborative effort of Milagros Zingoni’s Spring 2012 studio.

Bachelor’s of Science in Architectural Studies from the Design School at Arizona State University 2013. Summa Cum Laude

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level 3

The form of the boathouse responds to the climatic conditions of Connecticut while the position of the building is dictated by a 100 year flood line that pushes the boathouse away from the river’s edge.

Design Excellence Winner of Fall 2010 + Spring 2012 Team Director of the ASU Chapter AIAS’ Freedom by Design Program Daily Rower’s Schedule.

AIAS 2013 Class Representative

The design of the National Rowing Center was based heavily off both site analysis and the daily life of the users of the facility.

Thread. The boathouse responds to both the site and context and integrates the building, athletes and nature. It is organized by the boat bays which create a platform where smaller pavilions rest on top and green courtyards nestle in between, pulling nature through the building connecting it back to the site.

level 2

top left: view of gym side: view from west top right: detail section of light well corridor bottom: entry rendering

level 1

section cut from forest to river. site plan


DANI LOYRN CHRISTI HILL e dlch@rocketmail.com m 207.890.3412

2x8 stud Rigid insulation and damproofing Curtain wall system

1

3 a fireplace and bar

2x6 stud

b group saunas with northern views to lake c outdoor roof deck for cooling b

Rigid insulation and damproofing 2'x8' top swinging casement window

w dlchdesign.com aias 38169147

NORTH FACADE MAIN ENTRY

E

a

b A C

The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture at Taliesin West 2013

Interior insulation and 5/8" gypsum wallboard finish

c

c b

B

8" poured in place reinforced concrete wall

Social House - Lahti, Finland

2'x8' System A porcelain tile in Nero (Black)

Floor air vent Visionwall Element 4 R-8

Marazzi ventilated wall system

Metal spandrel panel

Visionwall 4-Element Capped curtain wall system. Double height entry vestibule

The goal of social housing production is to design homes that are of high quality, and affordable, in order to provide comfortable and good quality living for all citizens. To deminish social barriers and impower the individual through community connections and pride.

EDUCATION

Insulation

alu rivet 4.8x12x16 anchor base clip

Drain 1" Sand and gravel under concrete slab on grade

CONCEPTS

D

Ceramic plate

Insulation up to 4” thick

4 e fire place and meeting area f community g main egress

2" Sand and Gravel under conrete slab on grade

5' below grade concrete footing

Taliesin FLLWSA - M. Arch Candidate AIAS Secretary

Refernce notes below

Dick Carney Memorial Scholarship “Awarded for demonstrating potential, growth and excellence in the field of architecture.”

Fabric filter Foundation drain Rigid insulation and 4" concrete mud slab under 8" structural slab

2

Foundation drain Rigid insulation and 4" concrete mud slab under 8" structural slab 2x6 stud

2x8 stud Rigid insulation and damproofing

g UP DN

massing

Rigid insulation and damproofing

Karen Beck Felton ‘61 Scholarship for quality in Academic Achievement 2010

i fire place j atrium space k promenade l playground m drive to parking

g

SOUTH FACADE COURTYARD

h i

Interior insulation and 5/8" gypsum wallboard finish

Floor air vent Visionwall Element 4 R-8

2'x8' System A porcelain tile in Nero (Black)

m

Metal spandrel panel

Marazzi ventilated wall system

j

j

Visionwall 4-Element Capped curtain wall system. Double height entry vestibule

Ceramic plate

Insulation up to 4” thick

k

Insulation

EXPERIENCE

alu rivet 4.8x12x16

j

j

anchor base clip

Drain 1" Sand and gravel under concrete slab on grade

SITE

l

2" Sand and Gravel under conrete slab on grade

5' below grade concrete footing Refernce notes below

Waterproofing membrane 6" minimum cover of gravel or crushed stone

3iVE LLC - Cambridge, MA Architecture Intern - 2010

Fabric filter

Waterproofing membrane 6" minimum cover of gravel or crushed stone Fabric Filter Foundation drain Rigid insulation and 4" concrete mud slab under 8" structural slab

Foundation drain Rigid insulation and 4" concrete mud slab under 8" structural slab

1 Northern Wall detail of north facade conidtions Ventilated Wall System 2 Wall detail of southern facade conditions Vision Wall System 3 Roof Level nts 4 Residential Levels 3-6 nts 5 Ground Level nts 7 Building Sections nts 8 North East Elevation nts 9 South East Elevation nts

CONCEPT Lahti

SITE PLAN nts

a Double barrier sunspace with opperable curtain wall. 16’ floor to ceiling b Sliding windows open to courtyard view below c Planters incorporated in each unit d Sliding glass doors e Built in storage near entry f kitchen is back-to bathroom in order to minimize plumbing walls. g ceilings and floors are Finnish birch h storage is built along north wall to provide thermal and sound barrier between main eggress routes and interior i Units mirror with doors to egress along north wall.

The 100,000 SF building responds to Finland’s harsh climate through building orientation and efficient exterior skin. The program spans 7 stories, including sub grade parking, a commercial ground level with community gardens, courtyard, and bike paths, with residential spaces, and rooftop sauna above. The narrow, stacking form allows southern sun to penetrate through the buildings core, lighting and warming all spaces. The exposed concrete structure provides thermal mass and the operable facades allow natural ventilation when cooling is needed. Inhabitants have views and access to personal gardens and public courtyard. The north facade is massive and dark, providing contrast to the overcast Finnish sky, while the southern facade mirrors the landscape and sky creating endless courtyard.

UP DN

f

8" poured in place reinforced concrete wall

Danish Institute for Study Abroad Copenhagen, DK 2010 Interior Architecture

The project is a multi-use, income based social - rentable, housing in the Sopinkorpi District of Lahti, Finland. The goal was to create the macro diversity of a city block within the context of a building, to aid the growth of micro communities, and economy in the revitalized industrial area.

i

2'x8' top swinging casement window

f

5 h entry

Endicott College - Beverly, MA 2011 Bachelor of Science in Interior Design

Taliesin AP Residential Charette: O’Rourke Residence - May 2012 First Place Design

f

Waterproofing membrane 6" minimum cover of gravel or crushed stone Fabric Filter

Curtain wall system

AIA Arizona Student Competition 2012 Gold

Blank Studio - Phoenix, AZ International Competition Design Team Current

g f

N

Waterproofing membrane 6" minimum cover of gravel or crushed stone

e UP DN

TYPICAL UNIT

SUN SPACE

i

LOFT

g h

GREAT ROOM

f

b

e c

a

d

Top of Structure 70' - 0"

Roof

60' - 0" Detail B

Level 6

E

50' - 0"

Level 5 40' - 0"

Level 4 30' - 0"

Level 3

rv

So

tu

ka

n ari

20' - 0"

Level 2 10' - 0"

Ground 0’- 0"

Parking 60' - 0"

7

8

9


andrea rose

level 12 | growing level

rosea@email.arizona.edu 651.324.1025 University of Arizona College of Architecture + Landscape Architecture / 2015 Vertical Farm + Market urban farming concept

s hade s y s t e m plan de t ail

level 5 | growing level

education :: university of arizona bachelor or architecture 2010-2015

steel cha nnel a tta ches b ox to m ullions

technical skills ::

m ullions clip p ed to structure

rhinoceros 5 autodesk revit 2013 adobe cs6 autodesk 3ds max ies-ve

p olyethylene fa b ric skin

level 2 | growing level + green roof

s hade s y s t e m de t ail 1

honors :: arc 102 merit award | 2011 dean’s list | 2009-2012 ro ll p owe re d by motor a lu m in u m b ox h o u s e ro ll a n d motor a n g le c lip s b ox t o m u llio n

vertical farm + market ::

Housed within a single structure, the urban farm is combined with a community market to sell the goods directly to the public, serving as an iconic gathering and learning space. The building demonstrates its presence and function to the rest of the city through its enclosure system for a new perspective on sustainability and farming.

a lu m in u m t ra c k

level 1.5 | market balcony perspective from entrance

s hade s y s t e m de t ail 2

operable skin system

c

1.22

2.44

0.61

30

150

10, 000 sq f t 37.5

b

8, 000 sq f t

75

60

30

5, 000 sq f t

30

5, 000 sq f t 37.5

6 , 000 sq f t 8, 000 sq f t

growing level

8, 000 sq f t

a

level 1 | market

150

120

Downtown Los Angeles is an urban hub providing housing, work and recreation for a growing population of over 50,000 people. Limited space for expansion provides a design problem for supplying enough food to the city. Vertical farms are space-saving multistory structures that grow produce in an urban area, eliminating the space needed for a traditional farm. Located in the transitional historic core of downtown Los Angeles, the area will serve the demographics of the historic core as well as the financial district.

b o lt s

8, 000 sq f t 4, 000 sq f t 4, 000 sq f t market

plant organization

PROCESSING HERBS LETTUCE ZUCCHINI SPINACH BEANS PEPPER + ONIONS STRAWBERRIES TOMATOES

0.5A1 = 9,000 11,448 sq ft total

b1+b2 = 15,750

15,644 sq ft total

b3+c1 = 19,125

5,238 sq ft total

B4 = 7.875

15,028 sq ft total 14,860 sq ft total

c2+0.5c3 = 16,875 0.5c3+c4 = 16,875

7,236 sq ft total

C5 = 11,250

7,102 sq ft total

0.75C6 = 8,437

12,508 sq ft total

0.25C6+C7 = 14,063

market interior

natural ventilation section

10’ 20’

40’


Maria Wilson mtwilso3@asu.edu (949) 395-1421 boat bays elevate the building to the 100 yr. flood line

Arizona State University 2013 “stich”

Education: Bachelor of Science in Design (BSD in Architectural Studies) Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

building platform

Leadership: • Captain of Freedom by Design • Historian for the ASU chapter of the American Institute of Architecture Students

gym as “heart” of the project angled to face the river

“stich” done in collaboration with: Yen-Shao Liu, Lauren Mackernzie, Marissa Mendoza and Everett Scofield. This project is a boat house for the national rowing team in New Milford Connecticut. The design is called “stich” because this building connects the rowers to the natural landscape. The design was derived from two major concepts. One being to facilitate a rower’s daily routine through programming and another being to design the form within the constraints of the site. The 100 year flood line covered over 50% of the site and the set backs for this “residential zone” were 20 feet from the property line. Our design solution was to elevate the building platform by 12 feet. This allowed us to place the necessary inhabitable spaces above the water line and occupy the empty space beneath with storage for the row boats. The site was also where the water run-off from the neighboring hills was dumped. We were not allowed to deviate the flow of this water elsewhere. Our solution was to create a pond with a running track around it. This way we created a functional use out of a constraint.

a

c

living bays the separation of each allows for different age and gender groups to have their own place

green corridors plants extend nature through the building

N

site plan not to scale

air circulation allows for greater thermal comfort

site plan not to scale

section c: not to scale

section a: not to scale


Dean Feldhausen dfeldhau@asu.edu 602 505 0781 1202004158 Arizona State University 2014 Urban Projection

Experience JMK Landscapes Arizona May - August 2012 Knudson Masonry South Dakota, Nebraska June 2011 Education Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona 2010-present BSD in Architectural Studies Minors: Design Studies and Sustainability Mesa Community College Mesa, Arizona 2007-2009 Working towards Associates of Arts & Sciences Degree Project Description Geared around density, efficiency, and identity, this prefab student housing project focuses on shared common spaces while projecting urban student life to the street. Putting the amenities on display not only acts as advertising, but also utilizes the “eyes on the street� in order to reduce crime. Five unit types face either the street or the courtyard; in order to optimize privacy, exterior circulation is minimized by internalizing stairways within units. Stacked prefab modules create diverse housing volumes that give the project its identity.


Amy Leber aleber@taliesin.edu 913-563-9037 Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture/May 2014 Sunset Haven Retirement Community

Exterior Rendering.

• •

Attended Johnson County Community College for Computer Drafting: 08/2005-05/2009 Recieved Bachelors of Architectural Studies from the University of Kansas School of Architecture and Urban Design in May 2011 Accepted at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture as a Masters Candidate

21 " "- 6 /2

Project Programming found on the AIAS Competition Website: http://www.aias.org/website/article. asp?id=2397

21 "/2

OEC F DR E " RIN 6 ML "A WA "V IC EN F OX R E T H IS IR

" 4

OEC F DR E " RIN 8 MIC "A " VWA L

SE M A B L T (L V W EL IN L E )GA E T A P E T L P WT OIB C N A H ORT SL

21 "- 8 /2 " 21 "/2

Secretary for student council at Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture Treasurer for AIAS Chapter at Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

My goal for this project is to create a safe, healthy place for the elderly that gives families peace of mind, encourages community interaction between residents, is a supportive place to work for caregivers, and promotes communication with the larger community by setting up opportunities for growth. I used three similar projects as case studies to base my design on. • The GUILD House by Robert Venturi shortens or eliminates hallways making it easier for elders to navigate. • The Corinne Dolan Alzheimer’s Center by Stephen Nemtin incorporates a central axis in the building to simplify navitation. • Mary’s Meadow by EGA PC Architects has a biaxial symmetry within the building to create community spaces.

North 1/16" = 1'-0"

2

SL EP IC

All drawings oriented as North being up. All drawings not to scale.

1

South 1/16" = 1'-0"

3

East 1/16" = 1'-0"

4

West 1/16" = 1'-0"

Site Plan.

Floor Plan.

Elevations.

Interior Rendering of the Chapel.

Interior Rendering of the Dining Area.

Interior Rendering of a residence.


Roy E Peer

floor structure

rpeer@email.arizona.edu (818) 585-5781 AIAS Membership #: 38267329

floor glazing

cable track

hot/cold water supply

hvac

concrete

Univeristy of Arizona 2014

7

8

5

6

5

4 steel panels insulation

structural glass

truss mullion

9

4

supply fans

Information + Collaboration Center

3

1 lobby 2 study carrel 3 study room

2 1

cable track

hot/cold water supply

4 library 5 art gallery

10

6 cafe

floor glazing

7 exterior auditiorium floor structure

8 auditiorium 9 admin 10 parking

concrete

Project Description The center lies in a campus full of a variety and culture. When thinking of the mixture of ideas, talents, and thought i studied the insect, who in the need to collect pollen, cross pollinates the flowers it visits. In search of creating cross pollination in architecture the program begins to intersect, collect, and even avoid each other in hopes of creating not an organized program but spontaneous events. This is human entomophily.

ELLER

Undergraduates:

5,476

ENTOMOPHILY IN NATURE

Graduate:

Large Work Room 400 Medium Work Room 250 Large Study Room (8-10) 200X11=2,200 Small Study Room (4-5) 75X16=1,200 Conference Room 200X2=400 Visiting Faculty Office 100X8=800 Audio Visual Lab 100X2=200 Music Rehearsal Room 100X4=400

service

0101010010001111010110 1010100100011110101101 0101001000111101011010 1010010001111010110101 0100100011110101101010 1001000111101011010101 0010001111010110101010 0100011110101101010100 1000111101011010101001 0001111010110101010010 0011110101101010100100

is a form of pollination whereby pollen or spores are distributed by insects.

POLLINATORS

POLLEN/INFORMATION

432

Graduate:

117

Total:

549

admin

90,193

CALA

Undergraduates:

SITE

Engineering 2,266

Graduate:

OTHER VEHICULAR

609

Total:

2,875

SOCIAL COMMUNITIES

COMPUTER ENGINEERS

Open Study Area 9,000 1 Study Carrels 70X60=4,200

609

5,476

HUMAN ENTOMOPHILY (A CROSS POLLINATION OF DISCIPLINES)

awareness

19

CENTRAL HUB

STUDENT UNION

Total:

Graduate:

2,875

CALA

663

Undergraduates:

432

Total:

Daily Visitors:

Graduate:

117

6,139

SITE

Total:

549

ARTS

18,800

URBAN SPACE

2,266

Graduate:

Undergraduates:

public

exterior 5,000 public

Lobby + Reception 3,000 Café 500 Library Reference 1,500

20

FUNCTIONALITY ARCHITECTURE

ART UNION GOERS

Engineering

Undergraduates:

ELLER

visibility

FORCE INTEREST

BICYCLISTS

3,560

Gallery 1,500 Gallery Private Collections 4,000 Auditorium 6,000 1 Library Collections 7,000 1 Community Meeting Room 300

events in space

CALA

Undergraduates:

22,000

Breakout 120 Coffee 200 IT 220 Storage 120 Servers 900 Administration Offices 2,000

82,693

sf TOTAL w EXTERIOR

collaboration

6,139

352

Total:

1,946

Daily Visitors:

BGSF TOTAL based on 30% Multiplier

7,500

Total:

1,594

Graduate:

STUDENT UNION

5,850

63,610

ext.

Outdoor Café 1,500 Exterior Terrace 6,000

663

ARTS

Undergraduates:

collaboration

NASF TOTAL

13,200

22,000

Undergraduates:

1,594

Graduate:

352

Total:

1,946

COLLABORATION CENTER + SITE FORCES

N

11

10

points

lines

planes

solids

3 15

2

8

15

6

15

Education College of Architecture Fall 2009- Spring 2014 (expected) University of Arizona Bachelors in Architecture  Dean’s List 2012, 2011 Academic Year Academic Distinction  Leadership Institute Program: AIA National Convention Speaker  Mentorship Program 2012-13: Mentor

2

9

5

changes in sensory experience:

movement and path:

space definers:

program:

entrance

stairs

opaque walls

library

exits

hallways

translucent walls

art gallery

thresholds

walkways

ceilings

auditorium

interactions

elevators

floors

reception

events

areas of rotation

negative space by-product

study rooms

3

moments

areas for movement

material

bathrooms

4

auditorium

5

library

6

libary reference

7

meeting room

15

1

points help dictate changes in space

lines are the movement between dif-

Before solids come planes, and ulti-

solids, or pieces of program, can be

along paths or changes in sensory

ferent experiences.

mately

the

negative

designed in the same fashion as lines

solids

and

adjacent

intake. if the user experiences a

space

between

spatially

to

threshold this is considered a point.

when designing with lines and points

if a user is exposed to a new smell

we deconstruct common notions about

or change in air pressure, this is

circulation and begin to integrate it

What

considered a point. Whether or not

more closely to the program.

building and the surrounding site?

naturally

travel

between

point. hence the saying, “from point in

experience

there

spaces

between

your

fines its overall composition.

building exposed, hidden, or focused?

interesting events occur when whole

Planes can be made of any material

pieces of program begin to build

from line and point design.

but

relationships.

importance

is

the

formal

space it creates.

movement of the user, or of the surroundings perceived.

17

LEVEL 2

must

almost always be movement whether the

19

tunities and events that can result

the

16

tion you will find a space that de-

diagrammed below are different oppor-

a to point b.” but for there to be a change

within ever line and point configurathe

15

10

What is seen, is it a treat or is your

the change was consciously observed. people

15

and points.

points and lines. are

3

legend

18

SCALE 1/16”=1’0”

NORTH:

1

lobby

2

study carrel

5

gallery

8

s study room

9

m study room

10

l study room

11

conference

12

admin

13

servers

14

it

15

stair

16

elevator

17

loading area

18

mechanical

19

bathroom

20

storage

21

cafe seating

14

15

16

4 20

19

20

18

SCALE 1/16”=1’0”

LEVEL 4

NORTH:

library [target] point b

when the standard line is modified the user can be exposed to different points along the path. this gives the architect more control, and allows the user to experience new events in space.

level 1-2 stair

With planes one can manipulate the

level 1-2 stair

level 4

level 5

study

experience by concentrating on how the spaces and points are created

gallery

through the movement of lines around

[origin] point a

cafe

space.

[target] point b

gallery

user b

when the paths cross between two different used the opprotunity for an event, or meeting, or change in awareness of the other can occur.

study

rendering view point y

er

user a

systems/circulation

ext. auditorium

information

auditorium

gallery library

admin

plan parti

collaboration

section parti

library

exterior auditorium

cafe

gallery

library

program diagram

study

study

lobby

parking

parking

systems/circulation

gallery

library

cross of paths: event created

ll

[origin] point a

ga

Awards  Archinect’s top ten images on their “Student Work”  AIA Design Excellence Student Traveling Exhibition: MOCA, several architectural firms, Development Services office, etc.  Manuel A. Pombo Scholarship 2012  AIA Design Excellence Fall 2011 Winner  Arizona Excellence Award Fall/Spring 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009  International Youth Sketch Design Competition: Shortlist - Certificate of Achievement Summer 2011

Public Stair 300X4=1,200 Public Rest rooms 300X2X4=2,400 Cafe Deliveries 200 General Loading Area 200 1 1 200 Mechanical 2,000 1 4 8,000 Janitorial Storage 500 1 4 2,000 Elevators 100 2 4 800 Exit Stairs 300 2 4 2,400 17,200

Entomophily:

point + line principles applied

parking

higher speed circulation

cross programming principles applied

N

glazing

solar panels

7

5

6

solar panels

ROOF SYSTEM

8

5

glazing

4

structure

structure 9

4

N

water proofing

water proofing

3

2 1

10

Professional Experience  Sustainable City Project Project Designer 01/2013-present  Treehouse Design Group Revit Technician + Graphic Presentation Drawings 08/2012-09/2012  The Daily Wildcat Designer 08/2012-01/2013

1 lobby 2 study carrel 3 study room 4 library 5 art gallery 6 cafe 7 exterior auditiorium

A

8 auditiorium 9 admin

S-N SECTION

SCALE 1/16”=1’0”

10 parking

NORTH:

PERSPECTIVE LOOKING SOUTHWEST

insulation

SKIN SYSTEM

B A

exterior steel

B

mullion

A N A

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

A


kirsten keane kirsten.keane@asu.edu 480.286.4344 38279654 ASU Design School/2013 Standard Wax Retail Store

Education Masters of Interior Architecture, ASU, May 2012-May 2015 Experience AIAS - Events Direction 2013-14 The Design School at ASU Graduate Teaching Assistant, August 2012-present Design Excellence Nomination, The Design School at ASU, Fall 2012 ASU PRIME Center SketchUp Instructor, Fall 2012

standardwax

Technical Skills Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, SketchUp, Revit, AutoCAD, AGI 32 The concept for the Standard Wax store, a 1,140-square-foot retail space located at 134 E. Colorado Avenue, was inspired by the company’s philosophy of using natural products and their love of handcrafted decor. To achieve this same philosophy, materials such as reclaimed wood (walnut and dune), plexiglass, brick, and grass, were combined with sleek and simple geometric fixtures. Taking into consideration the customers’ relationship with the products, the store embodies the warm atmosphere a candle provides. The design showcases the art of candle-making by including a workshop area where customers can observe and learn the candle-making process firsthand. What most reflect the values of Standard Wax in the design are the pieces of custom millwork. The “beehive” shapes that make up the window display shelves and the main display tables represent the raw materials used to make the candles, which often include beeswax and soy. The perimeter shelving incorporates reclaimed wood as well as recycled plumbing piping as the supports.

perimeter shelving sections not to scale

architectural plan not to scale


Nathan Leber nleber@asu.edu 480.968.2090 38119154 Arizona State university/2014 Tempe Senior Housing

Education: Arizona State University Fall 2010 - Present Dean’s List Work displayed at 2012 Open House Fall 2012 Design Excellence Honors: Senior Unit

Arcbazar: Chiropractor Office - 2013 Honorable Mention ASU Studio - 2012 Design Excellence ARA: Home Competition - 2012 Honorable Mention NASA: The Future of Flight - 2011 First Place An infill development on the Tempe Light Rail Corridor with senior housing units and market rate apartments. Central to each apartment is a courtyard containing a tree. The individual L shaped units form two sides of the courtyard. Repetition of units creates the third wall of the courtyard leaving one side open to the residential community. A twelve foot square grid orders the layout of the single story senior housing units and the two story market rate units. The rotated grid reflects the unique opportunity provided by the triangular site. Shops along the south create a more vibrant street-scape with a more private community space to the north.

Market Rate Unit - First Floor

Site Plan

Not to Scale

Section A-A

Not to Scale

North â–˛

Market Rate Unit - Second Floor


Russell Wisniewski rlwisnie@asu.edu 928.230.9229 38070861 The Design School - ASU / 2014 URBAN CANYONS - Multi-Family Mixed Use Housing

Goal To understand the details of how buildings work, not just why they should work. To be an outspoken advocate for Architecture and Design. Education Arizona State UniversityB. S. in Design: Architectural Studies Minor in Material Science Engineering Experience Student IDP Coordinator for ASU through NCARB Asst. Estimating Coordinator Asst. Marketing Coordinator Interstate Mechanical Corp. (IMCOR) Phoenix, AZ 2010 -2012 Petty Officer 2nd Class (E-5) Operations Specialist US Navy 2005 -2010 Awards Design Excellence Nominee -Spring 2013 URBAN CANYONS was designed as intelligent response to the social, climactic, and aesthetic conditions that have become part of the urban sprawl that is the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. Socially, Phoenix has a large homeless and transitional population. In 2009, over 7,568 sheltered homeless (i.e. in transitional housing, homeless shelters, etc.) with the total count for Maricopa county at over 10,000 homeless people. Climatically, it was important to respond to the striking but harsh Arizona sun and while still capturing the amazing views offered in the desert landscape. Aesthetically, URBAN CANYONS is striving to redefine growth in the Phoenix metropolitan area as vertical, dense, and diverse.


CONNOR MCKELL BINGHAM cbingham@Taliesin.edu 720-940-0596 38270786 Taliesin, The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture TWG.DWG

Resume: Aesthetics Director for Progressive Properties 2009

Current Gate

Studied at Brigham Young University Hawaii 2010-2011 Studies at Taliesin, The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture 2012-current. (B.A.S. ARCH) Current Student Body Vice-President New Gate

Project Description: TWG.DWG (TaliesinWestGate.DWG) responds to the current need of controlled and experiential access to this historical landmark. A gate has been developed that echoes the elegant shape of the surrounding buttes and represents a sure arrival.

EXISTING SITE PLAN

SITE PLAN

FLOOR PLAN

WEST ELEVATION

The two-way road has been separated insuring focused and individualized arrival and departure sequences. Desert vegetation brought up to the edge of the road offers the visitor a sense of “oneness with nature,� limits damage of off-roading, and is planted hierarchically to preserve or dilute views.

SECTION A

SECTION B

Swales have been created to collect and sink water, naturally irrigating the desert foliage. Visitors should initially notice the desert, then the buildings arising and falling gradually as a coexistent of the Sonoran pallet.

EAST ELEVATION


Nathan Rist nrist@taliesin.edu (970) 497-9607 AIAS # 38169149

Water

Sparge

Water

Kettel

Hops

Seperation

Taliesin/2014 Solids Telluride Brewing Company

Cooling Fermenting

Mill

Malt

Mash

Water

Yeast

Brite Tank

Lauter

Water

Sparge

Water

Water

Kettel

Hops

Solids

Seperation

The goal of this project was to provide a structure that provides the facilities to produce 45,000 barrels of beer annually with room for expansion and create a unique tasting room that celebrates the beer, its production, and its unique position 3 miles to the west of Telluride, CO.

CO2

Packaging

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

B

B

B

F

F

F

F

F

F

B

B

B

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

17 Up

18

Cooling

The Project Currently, the Telluride Brewing Company produces approximately 4,000 barrels of beer annually. After winning the Gold Medal at the 2012 Great American Beer Festival for “American Style Brown� and the brewery also won the Gold Cup at the 2012 World Beer Cup, Telluride Brewing Company is expanding rapidly.

Site Plan

Barrel

Bachelor of Environmental Design University of Colorado at Boulder, 2006-2011 Extracurricular AIAS - Taliesin, Chapter President current

Interior Rendering of Tasting Room

Cooling

Yeast

Schooling Master of Architecture, candidate Taliesin, the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture 2011-present

Yeast

Fermenting Yeast

Cooling

Emergency Exit Door 22oz Bottles- 151 Case Pallets Stacked Two-High 12oz Cans - 180 Case Pallets Stacked Three-High

6 7 8 9 10

Canning/Bottling/Kegging Refridgerated Storage Room Loading dock Deck Leveler Refuse Area

11 12 13 14 15

16 Hot Liquor Tank 17 Oak Bordeau Barrels 18 Elevator Mechanical Room 19 Keg Cooler 20 Employee Lockers

F

Fermenter

B

Brite Tank

21 Office 22 Storage 23 Bar

21

Milled Malt

First Floor Plan

22

East Elevation

Mash

Brite Tank

1,500 Bushel Silo Dry Storage/mill Boiler Room Mash/Lauter Tun Brew Kettel/Whirlpool

Yeast

Barrel Yeast

1 2 3 4 5

Wort Beer

23

CO2

Packaging

The Brewing Process

Milled Malt

Exterior Rendering

West Elevation

Tasting Room Plan

East-West Section

Mash Wort Beer

South Elevation


2

5

3

4

4

5

6

5

6

10' - 0"

110' - 0"

ameliae@email.arizona.edu (602) 908 - 1001 aias member id: 38073514

10' - 0"

30' - 0"

30' - 0"

30' - 0"

10' - 0"

Roof 67' - 0"

20' - 0"

Roof 67' - 0"

20' - 0"

university of arizona college of architecture / 2014

Level 3 47' - 0"

16' - 0"

arc401 center for information and collaboration

Level 3 47' - 0"

31' - 0"

16' - 0"

91' - 0"

Level 2 31' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0" 12' - 0"

Education University of Arizona : 2008-present Arizona in Italy : summer 2012 Desert Vista High School : 2004-2008

Level 2 31' - 0"

91' - 0"

12' - 0"

Parking Level -1 -12' - 0"

31' - 0"

Parking Level -2 -24' - 0"

1

Section 1 1/8" = 1'-0"

Scholarship Wildcat Excellence Scholarship 2008-2012 The Durrant Foundation Scholarship 2013-2014

12' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

Involvement AIAS member : 2010-present AIAS UA chapter treasurer : 2011-13

12' - 0"

Parking Level -1 -12' - 0"

Work Experience Future SmithGroup JJR Intern : summer 2013 Structures Grader, for Chris Trumble : fall 2012

2

Detail of Entry 1/4" = 1'-0"

5

4

2

1 10' - 0"

3 30' - 0"

4

110' - 0"

6

5 30' - 0"

30' - 0"

10' - 0"

30' - 0"

N

30' - 0"

M

30' - 0"

L 3

K 30' - 0"

outdoor cafe

30' - 0"

J

cafe

cafe deliveries and storage

H 30' - 0"

restrooms

DN

UP 360' - 0"

gallery

G

30' - 0"

2

F 30' - 0"

lobby

E DN

30' - 0"

backstage janitorial storage

auditorium

D 30' - 0"

UP

1

mechanical room

30' - 0"

C

UP

B 30' - 0"

Project Description This project’s goal was to design and refine a building to promote collaboration between art, engineering, architecture, photography, and business students on the UA campus. Located in the parkinglot behind the architecture building, the center’s location allows for it to become a hub for intermingling disciplines. Division of program hierarchically became the ordering system for the building, organizing and intermingling groups of students based on the scale of occupancy and scale of space. To the south, the largest program, the auditorium, anchors the building to the site both as a physical mass and as the richest and most dynamic program. Each adjacent space transitioning north becomes more focused on the individual, becoming more quiet and naturally lit, and lifting off the ground to form a giant cantilever. The intermingling of group activities with individual will create an environment conducive to collaboration.

A2.1

Parking Level -2 -24' - 0"

A Level 1 1/16" = 1'-0"

arc401.technical systems integration. fall2012. brad lang:mark cone. amelia elliott. 05 december 2012

1

SECTIONS

amelia elliott


Kenneth Lowe kwlowe@email.arizona.edu 520.820.3638 38073501 University of Arizona School of Architecture | 2014 Center for Information and Collaboration

Education Associates in Liberal Arts Pima Community College (Tucson, AZ) May 2009

UA Campus

Bachelors in Architecture University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ) May 2014 Recognition AIA Design Excellence Award 2010-2011 AIA Design Excellence Award 2011-2012

Project Description This project serves as a new nexus for interdisciplinary research and collaboration at the University of Arizona. Its design is to demonstrate the successful integration of CALA and College of Fine Arts library collections with a variety of meeting, study and work spaces. The directing design force behind the Center of Information and Collaboration is the notion of people from all work forces entering into one common space. For this reason the site is split in half by the circulation. Through this section cut the program is divided as to have a conversation one side with the other while showcasing the inner activities of the building to the students who pass between. The main programmatic element are pushed to the inner edge of the section while other elements are pulled back determining the outline of the building. Like a Geode the cut will be smooth glazing so the interior spaces become prominent and bring interest to the flat façade of the building. The east and west walls will be pushed and pulled by the inner program to generate a decomposed feel and provide self-shaded exterior spaces for students and faculty to use.

Precinct 2

Precinct 3

Precinct 1

Precinct 4

126' - 4 9/16" 20' - 0" Lobby + Reception CafĂŠ Library Reference

-

3,000 500 1,500 5,000

Gallery Gallery Private CollectionsAuditorium Library Collections Community Meeting Room -

1,500 4,000 6,000 7,000 300 18,800

Open Study Area Study Carrels (60)

-

9,000 4,200 13,200

Large Work Room Medium Work Room Large Study Room (11) Small Study Room (16) Conference Room (2) Visiting Faculty Office (8) Audio Visual Lab (2) Music Rehearsal Room (4)-

400 250 2,200 1,200 400 800 200 400 5,850

Breakout Coffee IT Storage Servers Administration Offices

-

120 200 220 120 900 2,000 3,560

Public Stair Public Restrooms (8) Cafe Deliveries General Loading Area Mechanical (4) Janitorial Storage (4) Elevators (8) Exit Stairs (8)

-

1,200 2,400 200 200 8,000 2,000 800 2,400 17,200 TOTAL 63,610

Net - 46,410 Gross - 81,544 Efficiency factor - 57%

20' - 0"

20' - 0"

20' - 0"

20' - 0"

20' - 0"

21' - 6"

20' - 0"

20' - 0"

20' - 0"

20' - 0"

20' - 0"

pp Site 65'Plan - 0" 60' - 0" Level 4 45' - 0" Level 3 30' - 0" Level 2 15' - 0"

Mechanical/other Cafe Auditorium Gallery

Level 1 0' - 0"

Offices/faculty Library Open study area study rooms

U Level 1 -15' - 0" Parking 1 -30' - 0" Parking 2 -45' - 0" 5 0 10 C Section 4 2 1/32" = 1'-0"

20


Amanda Schwarz anschwarz@email.arizona.edu 520.870.3236 38118961 The University of Arizona College of Architecture + Planning + Landscape Architecture / 2016

Second Floor Plan

The Abandoned Platform : Private Dwelling

RESUME • University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona / 2011-2016 B. Architecture/Minor in Math GPA: 3.869

Third Floor Plan First Floor Plan

• Sahuarita High School Sahuarita, Arizona / 2007-2011 GPA: 4.23, Valedictorian • AIAS / 2011 – Present Vice President Elect / 2013-2014 Secretary/2012-2013 Board Member/2011-2012 • Honors College Ambassadors University of Arizona/2011-2012 PROJECT Program Multi-family dwelling consisting of three units: A: one bedroom for sculptor B: two bedroom for chef + child C: three bedroom for curator + collector + two children Site

A brick core holds all of the utilities and circulation, connecting each unit to the history of the site using the material of the site. The units then span through the core, futher emphasizing this connection and are made from steel beams and corrugated steel in reference the the history of the trains. These are lifted from the platform to allow for a sculpture garden on the ground floor - a space for reflection and observation - preserving the sense of abandonment on the site.

section

Second Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

Stone Ave. + Sixth St. Tucson, Arizona Former location of the SPRR Freight Headquarters - now an abandoned concrete platform Concept To preserve the sense of abandonment and the distinct culture of the historic warehouse arts district

section SCALE: 1/32” = 1’

N

0’ 5’ 10‘

30


Miriam Strauss miriams1@email.arizona.edu 520.236.5413 38073495 University of Arizona College of Architecture 2015 Chapel+Beacon for Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Northwest Tucson

Ridge

Ordering Axis

Third- Year, Undergraduate Architecture Student University of Arizona 2010 Graduat of Buena High School top 10% Member of the Honors College Recipient of the National Collegiate Leadership Conference Certificate Carpentry Internship Thalmeier Einrichtugen Finalist for Smithgroup JJR Scholarship/Internship 2013 Fluent in English & German Nature Chapel design for the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Northwest Tucson. This chapel for ten is set in the foothills and looks down on the congregation’s campus. At night the double wall of canvas is illuminated from the inside and the structure acts as a beacon, making the community more visible from the street as the site is secluded. During the day the structure shades its occupants from the harsh desert sun and provides a space to reflect without distractions. The path up to the chapel is a time to enjoy nature and cuminates in an enclsed space that draws one’s focus to the heavens and the divine.

View

5

10 ft

Nature Chapel + Beacon Procession Ascent Higher Power Meditation Communication Illumination

Summer Sun

Air Flow

Fabric

Lights

Winter Sun

Steel Frame

Concrete

Ascension Section: North West - South West

5

10 ft

Procession

Illumination

Connection with a Higher Power


Andrea Young acyoung@email.arizona.edu 602-316-9729 38073555 University of Arizona :: College of Architecture, Planning, Landscape Architecture :: 2014 Center for Information + Collaboration arc401 :: Systems

University of Arizona College of Architecture, Planning, Landscape Architecture B.Arch Candidate 2014 American Institute of Architecture Students: University of Arizona 2012 - 13: President 2011 - 12: Vice President AIA So. Arizona Board of Directors 2012 - 13 : AIAS Representative 2012 - 13 : AIAS National Membership Committee

main collaboration space

south entry

Intern WSM Architects: Tucson, AZ July 2012-present

14

1

14

1

14

1

2

2

2 25

25

30

20

University of Arizona 2012 CAPLA Scholarship Award 2011 CAPLA Scholarship Award 2011 CAPLA Design Excellence

31

3

3

22

3

18 20

28

24

17

32

26

19

13

13

14

13

14

13

13 2

2

22 21 28 27 3

3

Project Overview: On a college campus, there is a push and a desire for collaboration and integration. Pedestrian and bike circulation are apparent in the existing conditions. The vectors of people walking to and from class can shape a building - allowing it to respond to what is already established but also to encourage a new path - a central path - one that allows for integration and collaboration. The building has been carved from these circulation vectors. Individual buildings rise and join; a symbol of dissimilar becoming similar - with main collaborative and open spaces on the third level. By situating public spaces near ground level, they have become accessible to everyone. Similar program is near each other horizontally and well as vertically.

23

25 29

16 22

14

14

second floor plan

third floor plan

fourth floor plan

envelope detailed wall section

site plan

north-south sections facing east

AIA Arizona 2013 Student Project Competition  

AIA Arizona is celebrating the academic achievements of architecture students at each of the three professional schools in Arizona, offering...

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