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September / October 2019

Assessing manual Handling Risk An examination of the manual handling risk often encountered daily by on-site technicians using the HSE’s MAC Tool

COMPLEX BROWNFIELD RESIDENTIAL SITES

TECHNICAL AND SAFETY CONCERNS OF DCP TESTS

WORKING ON RAIL INFRASTRUCTURE

How companies can tackle reducing risk and preventing claims

A look at safety and technical risks following AGS Working Group discussions

An AGS Guide provided by the AGS Safety Working Group


ABOUT THE AGS

Chair’s Foreword This week has marked the start of Autumn in the UK and the weather appears to have responded accordingly with torrential downpours across the country leading to flash-flooding in some areas. It is in scenarios like this that our industry really earns it’s bacon. Members across the country will receive calls from concerned Clients who are reacting to scour problems or landslips and mud slides which have affected properties and infrastructure. Of course, the raw power of Mother Nature is sometimes inevitable, however we as a geotechnical community can do our absolute best to reinforce those floodgates and avoid further catastrophe. As luck would have it, this month’s issue has a particularly keen focus on reducing and preventing risk. This begins with an analysis of complex brownfield residential sites from the experts at NHBC; an examination of whether we are doing enough to reduce manual handling risk for onsite technicians, and also a look at the use of DCPs and their associated safety and

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technical concerns. In addition to these entries that have a focus on health and safety, we also have a Working Group update from the Loss Prevention team, a Q&A with Ian Farmer Associate’s Adam Latimer and a Standards Update. Finally, we also have details of AGS Sponsorship opportunities for 2020 - don’t miss out and grab them whilst you can! We are always on the lookout for additional, informative content for the magazine, so if you have a case study or technical article that you think the wider geotechnical and geoenvironmental public would find beneficial, please do get in touch. We would be interested in your feedback on the magazine and our future plans. Please contact ags@ags.org.uk if you have any comments.

The Association of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Specialists (AGS) is a nonprofit making trade association established to improve the profile and quality of geotechnical and geoenvironmental engineering. The membership comprises of UK organisations and individuals having a common interest in the business of ground investigation, geotechnics, geoenvironmental engineering, engineering geology, geochemistry, hydrogeology, and other related disciplines. EDITORIAL BOARD Julian Lovell, AGS Chair Ciaran Jennings, Forum Court Associates Katie Kennedy, Forum Court Associates Chris Swainston, Soils Limited Stephen West, Ramboll Calum Spires, Equipe Group Neil Parry, GEL EDITORIAL STORY If you have a news story or event which you’d like to tell our editorial team about, please contact the AGS on 020 8658 8212 or ags@ags.org.uk. Please note that articles should act as opinion pieces and not directly advertise a company. The AGS is under no obligation to feature articles and events received. CONTACT US Association of Geotechnical & Geoenvironmental Specialists Forum Court, Office 205 Devonshire House Business Centre, 29-31 Elmfield Road Bromley, Kent, BR1 1LT

 ags@ags.org.uk

Julian Lovell AGS Chair

 020 8658 8212  Association of Geotechnical & Geoenvironmental Specialists  @agsgeotech www.ags.org.uk


Inside this month’s issue

FEATURE PAGE 8

 COVER STORY PAGE 14  A close look at the HSE’s MAC Tool which provides guidance on acceptable manual handling limits.

Reducing risk and preventing claims on complex brownfield residential sites Adam Gombocz, Senior Geotechnical Engineer and John Jones, Engineering Manager at NHBC discuss how companies can look to reduse risk and potentially prevent liability claims on complex brownfield residential sites.

Safety & technical concerns of using a DCP PAGE 18  A look at DCP’s and their relative safety and technical risks following AGS Working Group discussions.

AGS GUIDE: Working on Rail Infrastructure PAGE 24  A comprehensive guide to working on the UK’s rail network from the AGS Safety Working Group.

Q & A: ADAM LATIMER PAGE 28  The AGS Magazine conducts a Q & A with Ian Farmer Associates’s Adam Latimer.

MORE INSIDE

PAGE 4

News in Short: Incl. 2020 AGS Sponsorship

PAGE 31

AGS Working Group Update Loss Prevention

PAGE 32 

Standards Update September 2019

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News in Short 2020 AGS Sponsorship Packages Arrange your sponsorship for the year in one go, with comprehensive coverage across all AGS events in 2020. The sponsorship can cover all or a selection of the following events: •

January 2020 – Commercial Risks conference, Manchester Conference Centre, Manchester

April 2020 – AGS Annual Conference, National Motorcycle Museum, Birmingham

July 2020 – Instrumentation & Monitoring conference, London

September 2020 – Data Format conference, National Motorcycle Museum, Birmingham

Please contact AGS to discuss joint and discount packages. You can still sponsor on an individual conference basis. Prices follow. All prices exclude VAT & subject to availability.

PLATINUM SPONSORSHIP PACKAGE (AGS Member Rate: £1250 / Non-Member Rate: £1500) •

Board level Q&A in our AGS magazine on a thought leadership topic (4150 subscribers, 1pp) • Full page advert in AGS Magazine** • Entry for three delegates into the event • Company logo on each attending delegates’ lanyard • A designated area to exhibit company initiatives, research and software. This exhibition space can showcase marketing materials, literature and banners • Company logo on the event PowerPoint presentation holding slide • Company logo and overview on the event programme • Company overview on the AGS website • Three announcements of your company’s involvement on the AGS Twitter page • Three announcements of your company’s involvement on the AGS’ LinkedIn page   *one package available **terms and conditions apply 4

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DIAMOND SPONSORSHIP PACKAGE (AGS Member Rate: £1250 / Non-Member Rate: £1500) • •

Catering sponsor with logo on menu Board level Q&A in our AGS magazine on a thought leadership topic (4150 subscribers, 1pp) • Full page advert in AGS Magazine** • Entry for three delegates into the event • A designated area to exhibit company initiatives, research and software. This exhibition space can also showcase marketing materials, literature and banners • Company logo on the event PowerPoint presentation holding slide • Company logo and overview on the event programme • Company overview on the AGS website • Three announcements of your company’s involvement on the AGS Twitter page • Three announcements of your company’s involvement on the AGS’ LinkedIn page   *one package available **terms and conditions apply


GOLD SPONSORSHIP PACKAGE (AGS Member Rate: £750 / Non-Member Rate: £1000) • •

Entry for two delegates into the event A designated area to exhibit company initiatives, research and software. This exhibition space can also showcase marketing materials, literature and banners • Company logo on the event PowerPoint presentation holding slide • Company logo and overview on the event programme • Company overview on the AGS website • Announcement of your company’s involvement on the AGS Twitter page • Announcement of your company’s involvement on the AGS’ LinkedIn page   *Limited packages available

SILVER SPONSORSHIP PACKAGE (AGS Member Rate: £500 / Non-Member Rate: £650) • • •

Entry for one delegate into the event ¼ page advert in AGS magazine Company logo on event PowerPoint Presentation holding slide • Company logo on the event programme • Company overview on the AGS website • Announcement of your company’s involvement on the AGS Twitter page All prices exclude VAT. Unlimited silver sponsorship packages available. For information on the sponsorship packages available or to register your interest, please contact Joanna Franaszczuk on 0208 658 8212 or email ags@ags.org.uk

The top three AGS publications for Sept’ 2019 1. AGS Guidance on Waste Classification for Soils - A Practitioners Guide 2. AGS Guide to Ground Investigation Reports 3. Guidance for Safe Intrusive Investigation of Contaminated Land To download the publications for free; click here.

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AGS Commercial Risks & How to Manage Them Conference 2020 Following the success of the AGS Commercial Risks Conference in London, this half day seminar organised by the Association of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Specialists will provide a focus on the management of commercial risks. Taking place on the afternoon of Wednesday 22nd January 2020 at The Manchester Conference Centre, in Manchester, this CPD conference is aimed at both junior and experienced ground engineers, who are interested in improving their knowledge and skills within this sector. The event will also be relevant to practitioners approaching Chartership, as well as those in smaller practices where there may be limited or no in-

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house legally qualified sources of help or advice. The conference will end at 4:30pm. Chaired by Jo Strange, Technical Director at CGL, attending delegates will be provided with an introduction of the guidance and advice provided by the AGS Loss Prevention Working Group, with particular attention being given to recent hot topics.

Ticket Prices AGS members may attend for ÂŁ70, whereas non-AGS Members may attend for ÂŁ130. Prices exclude VAT. To confirm your attendance please complete the registration form and return it to ags@ags.org. uk at your earliest convenience. Spaces are limited so we recommend early booking. Application forms received after 8th January 2020 may not be accepted.


Event Programme Registration and Lunch: 12:30 WELCOME ADDRESS AND INTRODUCTION Jo Strange, Technical Director CGL RELIANCE, COLLATERAL WARRANTIES AND LIMITING LIABILITY Zita Mansi, Senior Associate at Beale & Company THE IMPORTANCE OF DEFINITIONS WHEN AGREEING SCOPES AND OBJECTIVES Hugh Mallett, Technical Director at BuroHappold Engineering. GETTING IT RIGHT…. AND WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU DON’T Stephen Hargreaves, Director at Griffiths & Armour THE BATTLE OF THE FORMS – A FOCUS ON CONTRACT FORMATION AND PURCHASE

ORDERS Dr Russell Jones, Principle at Golder Associates UK REDUCING RISK AND PREVENTING CLAIMS ON COMPLEX BROWNFIELD RESIDENTIAL SITES Adam Gombocz, Senior Geotechnical Engineer at NHBC FITNESS FOR PURPOSE OR REASONABLE SKILL AND CARE Rachel Griffiths, Contracts Manager at Fugro POTENTIAL LIABILITIES FOR LANDFILL TAX Jonathan Atkinson, Technical Specialist at the Environment Agency CLOSING ADDRESS Event to end at 4:30pm. To register your attendance or for details on our available sponsorship packages, please contact Joanna Franaszczuk at ags@ags.org.uk

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Reducing risk and preventing claims on complex brownfield residential sites

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HBC is the UK’s leading warranty provider for new homes in the UK with a market share of around 80%. We deal with over 4,000 sites per year from 9,000 house builders on our Register with around 165,000 new homes currently registered annually.

Standards to be acceptable for Buildmark warranty cover. The Standards specify the Technical Requirements of NHBC along with the performance standards to be achieved in the design and construction of new homes. Guidance is also provided on how the performance standards may be met.

Builders on the NHBC Register are required to build new homes in accordance with NHBC’s

Part 4 of the NHBC Standards covers foundations including requirements for;

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land quality, building near trees, strip and trench fill foundations, raft, pile, pier and beam foundations, and vibratory ground improvement techniques.

Consultants and/or specialist contractors preparing remediation strategies or substructure designs for NHBC registered house builders should be aware of the requirements of NHBC’s Standards.

Consultants and/or specialist contractors preparing remediation strategies or substructure designs for NHBC registered house builders should be aware of the requirements of NHBC’s Standards. This is to ensure that the designs prepared will satisfy NHBC’s Technical Requirements and performance standards in order to be acceptable for Buildmark warranty cover.

Additionally landowners, land developers, development agencies and third parties remediating brownfield land for sale to house builders for residential development should also be aware of NHBC’s Standards and requirements. This will help house builders to avoid potential difficulties when they register the site for Buildmark warranty if the remediation strategy adopted, and the verification of any works undertaken, prior to acquisition of the land does not satisfy NHBC’s requirements. NHBC can offer support to non-NHBC registered companies remediating land for subsequent sale for residential development through a Land Quality Endorsement (LQE) service (www.nhbc.co.uk/ lqe). The NHBC Standards are available online at: http://www.nhbc.co.uk/Builders/ ProductsandServices/Standardsplus2019/#7 In Part 4 of the NHBC Standards, Chapter 4.1: Land Quality – managing ground conditions provides a framework for managing geotechnical and contamination risks with the objective of ensuring that:

All sites are properly assessed and investigated for potential geotechnical and contamination hazards. • Foundations and substructure designs are suitable for the ground conditions. • Sites are properly remediated where necessary or appropriate, and design precautions are taken.

• Appropriate documentation and verification are provided to NHBC. On potentially hazardous sites, NHBC seeks to adopt a pro-active risk management regime on developments registered for Buildmark warranty with the aims of: •

Reducing the potential for defective or damaged buildings.

Ensuring risks to human health are addressed.

Mitigating the likelihood of claims against Buildmark and significant claims costs for both house builders and NHBC.

Avoiding reputational damage for all stakeholders.

With the increased use of brownfield and marginal land for residential development, sites frequently have significant geotechnical and environmental issues that need to be satisfactorily addressed in order to meet the requirements of NHBC. It is essential that a holistic approach to the overall remediation strategy is adopted for all brownfield and marginal sites. This is to ensure that both the geotechnical and environmental issues are considered in tandem and are aligned, so that the aims and objectives of each individual strategy are not unduly

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Example 1 – Excessive ground movement

compromised, and the overall strategy delivers the desired performance over the 60-year design life required for new homes. When undertaking technical assessments for new residential developments on brownfield or marginal sites with complex geotechnical and environmental issues, typical areas of concern and focus on proposals and designs submitted to NHBC for Buildmark warranty cover include:

The appropriateness of proposed ground treatment(s) to achieve the required bearing capacity and settlement characteristics for the development platform.

Suitability of engineered fill specifications particularly when proposed for the direct support of spread foundations, including; compaction method, testing regime, testing frequency, treatment of failures and verification.

a) Geotechnical

It is essential that a holistic approach to the overall remediation strategy is adopted for all brownfield and marginal sites.

Inadequate or insufficient geotechnical site investigation and testing.

The presence of soft and compressible alluvial soils prone to large and potentially long-term settlements.

Deep un-engineered or partially engineered fills within landfills and quarries.

Landforming on sites with deep Made Ground or compressible soils with significant cut and/or upfilling resulting in heave or significant settlements.

Clarity of objectives for geotechnical remediation strategy including proposed foundation solutions.

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The potential for collapse compression/inundation settlement on deep fill sites due to rising groundwater or infiltration including consideration of building drainage solutions on the site.

• The robustness of the verification reporting on the implementation of the earthworks strategy.

Planned development over, or in close proximity, to high walls.

Long term settlements secondary and/or creep settlements over the 60-year design life of the new homes. Typically, NHBC will require any assessment to demonstrate that angular distortions/tilts will be no


conceptual site models. •

Inadequate or insufficient geoenvironmental ground investigation, testing and assessment following Phase 1 investigations.

The appropriateness of the contaminant testing suite and the frequency of testing and distribution on the site.

The use of appropriate assessment criteria for contaminants in soils and controlled waters.

The interpretation and assessment of environmental data obtained from ground investigations and appropriate updating of the conceptual site model.

Appropriate characterisation of ground gas regimes and any protection measures that may need to be adopted.

The robustness of the verification reporting following implementation of the environmental remediation strategy.

Co-ordination of geotechnical and environmental remediation strategies.

Co-ordination of post-remediation infrastructure/development works to ensure the geo-environmental remediation works undertaken are not compromised.

worse than 1 in 400 over the design life. •

Potential short and long-term differential movements between rigid foundations solutions (e.g. piles) and external areas over the design life of the new homes.

Robust analysis and assessment of short and long-term settlements due to; building loads, raised ground levels, consolidation of cohesive soils and long-term creep in deep backfills and/or Made Ground. This includes the adoption of appropriate geotechnical parameters in settlement analyses/ estimates.

Theoretical settlement estimates/ assessments validated by load testing and/ or settlement monitoring to demonstrate the actual load/settlement characteristics of the remediated development platform.

Due allowance for negative skin friction in pile designs on sites with deep fills and Made Ground or significant upfilling.

Co-ordination of geotechnical and environmental remediation strategies.

Co-ordination of post-remediation infrastructure/development works to ensure the geotechnical remediation works undertaken are not compromised or adversely affected (e.g. further changes to ground levels after remediation)

b)

Environmental concerns

The adequacy of desk studies/Phase 1 assessments.

Robustness and completeness of

Often when things go wrong, the investigation of claims against Buildmark identify how these could have been avoided as the following examples demonstrate:

Example 1 – Excessive ground movement In this example, the new homes were constructed on a site with soft compressible soils, including peat, to depths of 9m below the original ground levels. The properties were on piled foundations with a cantilevered path around the perimeter of the building to support services and safeguard the threshold at entrances to the buildings. However, during development, a piling mat

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Example 2 – Excessive ground movement

potential for post development ground movements was not considered. In this case, the site was underlain by soft and very soft alluvial clays to depths of 15m. Piled substructures were adopted due to the poor ground conditions, but no consideration was given to post development settlements that may occur. A piling mat was provided to facilitate the piling works and some upfilling of the site was undertaken. This resulted in consolidation of the soft alluvial soils with between 75mm to 100mm of differential movement between the substructure and external that compromised access to the building and incoming services. Once again, claims on these properties could have been avoided by ensuring that the strategy for the site not only considered the foundation solution for the buildings but also the effects of raising ground levels on the underlying soft compressible soils.

Example 3 – Contamination in soils

Example 2 - Excessive ground movement

On this rural development of 5 plots with extremely large rear gardens, fibrous boarding was identified in the gardens following occupation by the homeowners. Subsequent investigations revealed the presence of Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) in the topsoil and subsoil, typically within 500mm of ground level but locally up to 1m in depth. The volume and concentration of ACM in the soil was determined to represent a significant risk to human health and substantial remediation was required in the gardens. Investigations identified; inadequate site investigations were undertaken prior to development along with lax control during the decommissioning and demolition of buildings previously occupying the site. The claims on these properties could have been avoided with an adequate site investigation and conceptual site model for the site, together with appropriate controls during the demolition of the original buildings.

This example is another situation where

In the examples given above, the claims

was installed, and ground levels were also subsequently increased by up to 1m to suit final development levels. No measures were implemented to mitigate settlement of the underlying soft ground due to the increase in ground levels. After 12 months, 200mm to 300mm of settlement was recorded around the properties resulting in excessive differential movement occurring between the rigid piled substructure and the external ground. This incurred significant remedial costs on the affected properties. Claims on these properties could have been avoided by ensuring that the strategy for the site not only considered the foundation solution for the buildings but also the effects of raising ground levels on the underlying soft compressible soils.

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Example 3 - Contamination in soils

against Buildmark warranty resulted in significant claims costs and disruption to the lives of the affected homeowners. These could have been avoided had the ground conditions been fully appreciated and appropriately managed, during both the development of the scheme design and subsequent construction.

expected to satisfy Chapter 4.1: Land Quality – managing ground conditions. All designers providing services to NHBC registered house builders and/or land owners or land developers remediating brownfield sites for residential enduse should ensure they are familiar with NHBC’s requirements to; avoid development proposals being determined as unsuitable for Buildmark warranty cover, to assist in reducing risks and to help prevent claims for the benefit of all stakeholders, particularly home owners.

In summary, it is essential that all brownfield and marginal sites with complex ground conditions are appropriately investigated and assessed to identify the potential geotechnical and environmental risks.

In summary, it is essential that all brownfield and marginal sites with complex ground conditions are appropriately investigated and assessed to identify the potential geotechnical and environmental risks. This should include consideration of; the works required to create the development platform and any additional risk this may create, the types of building proposed and the intended foundation solutions etc. For residential sites registered for NHBC Buildmark warranty, development designs and proposals will be assessed against the requirements of NHBC’s Standards and

If you’d like to learn more about our LQE service please visit www.nhbc.co.uk/lqe or contact us on lqe@nhbc.co.uk

Article contributed by Adam Gombocz, Senior Geotechnical Engineer & John Jones, Engineering Manager, NHBC

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Manual Handling Operations - Have you assessed your risk?

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s the litigious nature of society grows and employees appear to be encouraged more than ever to pursue claims with their employers, the likelihood of claims for manual handling injuries is also likely to increase. Manual handling injuries are part of a wider group of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). The term ‘musculoskeletal disorders’ covers any injury, damage or disorder of the joints or other tissues in the upper/lower limbs or the back. HSE states that statistics from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) indicate that MSD cases, including those caused by manual handling, account for more than a third of all work-related illnesses reported each year to the enforcing authorities. So, what aspects of geotechnical site work may be exposing the workforce to risks of manual handling injury which could lead to an unexpected claim.

Legislative Background The Manual Handling Operations Regulations, 19921 is the main part of legislation which employers should be familiar with but

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additionally they should also be aware of other related HSE guidance such as the Manual Handling Assessment Charts (the MAC tool), INDG383 (rev 3)2. This sister guidance to the Regulations provides a detailed insight into how an employer should assess the risk through three types of assessment: lifting operations, carrying operations and team handling operations. Most employers and hopefully their employees will be aware that the law does not identify a maximum weight limit. It places duties on employers to manage or control risk; measures to take to meet this duty will vary depending on the circumstances of the task. Things to be considered will include the individual carrying out the handling operation (e g strength, fitness, underlying medical conditions), the weight to be lifted and distance to be carried, the nature of the load or the postures to be adopted or the availability of equipment to facilitate the lift.

The HSE MAC Tool The MAC tool provides a colour coded and


G = GREEN – Low level of risk Although the risk is low, consider the exposure levels for vulnerable groups such as pregnant women, disabled, recently injured, young or inexperienced workers. A = AMBER – Medium level of risk Examine tasks closely. R = RED – High level of risk Prompt action needed. This may expose a significant proportion of the working population to risk of injury. P = PURPLE – Unacceptable level of risk Such operations may represent a serious risk of injury and must be improved. numerical approach to risk assessment which takes into account all of the above factors but in a pragmatic and user-friendly approach and defines the following levels of risk:

The tool indicates that for two person lifts a weight in excess of 65kg is a high-risk activity and lift weights in excess of 85kg is an unacceptable risk.

The first part of the assessment is to assess the load weight and for lifting and carrying for individuals this requires the employer to assess the weight of the load but also the frequency/repetition of the task. Although most single person lifting operations have ‘manageable’ load weights i.e. bags of sand/ gravel/bentonite are limited to 25kg and bulk samples are around 25kg, if there is a repetitive nature to the task then the operation may go into the RED or even PURPLE. Therefore, tasks such as manually loading a lorry with bulk bags or unloading a couple of pallets of bentonite/gravel may push the task into the RED which would be deemed a high-risk task requiring prompt action. This is not surprising and why the employer must ensure collections and deliveries are assessed and where required are made with hi-ab lorries or tail lifts and have pallet trucks or a forklift available.

Team Lifting Team lifting operations in our industry are

generally a two-person lift. In this instance the MAC tool requires the employer to simply assess the load weight and does not take into account the frequency. The tool indicates that for two person lifts a weight in excess of 65kg is a highrisk activity and lift weights in excess of 85kg is an unacceptable risk. Employers can obtain equipment weights from the manufacturers and suppliers and a list of standard cable percussion tooling weights is provided in the current BDA Cable Percussion Guidance3. Therefore, as examples: a sinker bar of 80kg or a 6” casing lead length of 77kg would mean a high-risk lifting operation whilst a U100 slide hammer at 93kg and a standard SPT drop hammer at 115kg would be an unacceptable risk. The choice of core boxes is another area of concern. A 3m two channel core box containing S size core of Chalk (a relatively low density rock) can still weigh in excess of 77kg which takes the lift into a high level of risk whereas higher density rock may become an unacceptable level of risk. As the frequency of the lift is not a factor then for each and every lift where there is a potential for a manual handling injury there is a potential claim.

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Other factors The MAC Tool does not simply use weight and frequency alone to assess the risk and also requires the employer to assess: B – Hand distance from the lower back C – Vertical lift zone D – Torso twisting and sideways bending E – Postural constraints

Any claim for a Manual Handling injury will result in the court looking at the current Regulations and Guidance and the measures the Employer has taken to reduce the level of risk of the task so far as reasonably practicable.

F – Grip on the load G – Floor surface H – Carry distance I – Obstacles on route J – Communication, co-ordination and control K – Environmental factors Therefore as an example, the assessment for using wooden core boxes has to start factoring in: having to bend down to pick the load up (B), leaning to one side as the box is picked up and carried (C & D), the use of looped rope handles which cut into the fingers (F), potential lifting on slippery or uneven ground (G) and potential obstacles (I), then the overall risk of the task becomes high risk as a minimum and therefore prompt action is required.

Risk Control Measures The first step required to comply with the Regulations is that the employer should, so far as is reasonably practicable, avoid the need for their employees to carry out manual handling operations that involve a risk of injury. If this is not reasonably practicable then the risks to employees of the manual handling operations carried out in the normal course of their work should be assessed and reduced. On geotechnical sites that means using hi-ab

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lorries, winches or other mechanical lifting devices where possible, reducing the length of casings and other equipment, working on hard standing or creating more solid work areas with bog matting, using mounted hydraulic SPT hammers and using support vehicles and trailers to move equipment and materials around the site.

So what about the wooden core boxes? The employer may be able to improve the ground surface conditions and use mechanical lifting devices when in the core store or once on pallets but the weights are still going to mean a high to unacceptable level of risk in the field and in many core stores. Improvements to the handles will also help but the overriding problem will still be the weight and therefore the only solution left open to the employer is to reduce the size of the core box. Any claim for a Manual Handling injury will result in the court looking at the current Regulations and Guidance and the measures the Employer has taken to reduce the level of risk of the task so far as reasonably practicable. Have you?

References 1 HSE, Manual Handling Operations Regulations, 1992 2 HSE, Manual handling assessment charts (the MAC Tool), INDG 383 rev3, 2019 3 BDA, Guidance for the operation of cable percussion rigs and equipment.

Article contributed by Julian Lovell Managing Director Equipe Group


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Example of Lightweight Deflectometer equipment

Photo credit: Tom Green, Socotec

Safety and technical concerns of using a DCP

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he use of the Dynamic Cone Penetrometer (DCP) also commonly known in the UK as the TRL Penetrometer or TRL Probe has been under discussion recently in the AGS Safety and Geotechnical Working Groups due to concerns raised by members regarding the significant danger of injury from damage to underground utilities, manual handling injury and the quality of the geotechnical data output. The Dynamic Cone Penetrometer (DCP) is an instrument designed for the rapid in-situ

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measurement of the structural properties of existing road pavements constructed of unbound materials. The robust and simple design means that the DCP is quick and easy to use, portable, low cost and suitable for use in locations where access may be difficult. It is commonly used in the UK to determine a California Bearing Ratio (CBR) profile for pavement design. This article discusses the history of the test, the safety concerns and geotechnical design limitations of the DCP in modern practice and


Typical DCP/TRL Probe

The Transvaal Roads Department in South Africa began using the DCP to investigate road pavement in 19733. Kleyn reported the relative results obtained using a 30° cone and a 60° cone. In 19824, Kleyn described another DCP design, which used a 60° cone tip, 8 kg (17.6 lb) hammer, and 575 mm (22.6 in) free fall. This design was then gradually adopted by countries around the globe including the USA and by Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) in the UK. In 2004, the ASTM D6951-03 Standard Test Method for Use of the Dynamic Cone Penetrometer in Shallow Pavement Applications described using a DCP with this latest design5.

DCP Procedure

provides alternative methods which must be considered by the Designer.

Historical Background

The 8 kg free fall hammer is manually lifted and dropped through a height of 575mm. The distance of penetration of the cone tip is then recorded and the cycle repeated. Continuous measurements The earliest can be made down to a technical depth of approximately references to the 850mm or when extension Dynamic Cone rods are fitted to a maximum Penetrometer (DCP) recommended depth of 2 metres. suggest that it was

The earliest technical references to the Dynamic developed in 1959 by Cone Penetrometer (DCP) DCP testing consists of suggest that it was developed Professor George F. using the DCP’s free-falling in 1959 by Professor George hammer to strike the Sowers... F. Sowers, Professor of Civil cone, causing the cone to Engineering, Georgia institute penetrate the base or subgrade soil, and then of Technology, Atlanta, USA1. The original measuring the penetration per blow, also DCP used a 15 lb weight dropping over 20 ins called the penetration rate (PR), in mm/blow. and used a 40o cone. This DCP was originally This measurement denotes the stiffness of developed for field exploration and for the tested material, with a smaller PR number verifying individual footing foundations during indicating a stiffer material. In other words, the construction. The DCP was further developed PR is a measurement of the penetrability of in South Africa for the evaluation of in-situ the subgrade soil. pavement strength or stiffness of newly Technical Output from the DCP constructed roads in the 1960s. Dr. D. J. van Vuuren designed this version of the DCP with a The most common use of the Dynamic Cone 30° cone2. Penetrometer (DCP) is to provide a quick and

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simple field test method for evaluating the insitu stiffness of base and subgrade layers for roads and highways, and DCP testing has been used in many countries and US States for subgrade evaluation and QA/QC procedures. The greatest advantage offered by the DCP is its ability to penetrate underlying layers and accurately locate zones of weakness within the pavement system.

“

Correlations have been established between measurements with the DCP and conventional in-situ CBR so that results can be interpreted and compared with CBR specifications for pavement design.

Correlations have been established between measurements with the DCP and conventional in-situ CBR so that results can be interpreted and compared with CBR specifications for pavement design. TRL Report TRL5875 is the

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most common correlation method used in the UK and is widely specified. A typical test takes only a few minutes and therefore the instrument provides a very efficient method for obtaining information which would normally require the digging of test pits.

Technical Limitations

This instrument is typically used to assess material properties down to a depth of 1000 mm below the surface. The penetration depth can be increased using drive rod extensions. However, if drive rod extensions are used, care should be taken when using correlations to estimate other parameters,


since these correlations are only appropriate for specific DCP configurations. The mass and inertia of the device will change and skin friction along drive rod extensions will occur.

“

Health and Safety

The standard Concerns equipment The nature of the test means comprises in basic it is manually operated terms a metal cone from ground level without which is connected to view of the materials and metal rods which are ground conditions being penetrated. The standard driven into the ground equipment comprises in using a metal weight basic terms a metal cone and slide mechanism. which is connected to metal

Correlations to CBR in homogenous, fine grained soil types are potentially the best use of the tool, or for finding boundaries of known (engineered or natural) layers where there is significant difference in resistance i.e. soft clay over dense gravel. Heterogenous soil types, e.g. Made Ground, with a recommended CBR from DCP may represent a false materials characterisation presented in a report to a civils designer not fully understanding the technique’s limitations.

rods which are driven into the ground using a metal weight and slide mechanism. Incidences of personal injury from manually driving or pushing metal spikes or road pins into buried services have been well documented and must be considered a significant risk. The equipment is not insulated and the procedure requires the operative to hold the equipment6,7 and includes the

ď Ž

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potential to force-drive through obstructions which might include unobserved buried services.

in a safer way which can reduce or even eliminate the risk.

Alternative methods for CBR

Although not a DCP test but effectively a The common practice to determine CBR values similar process, AGS in 2017 (SP Energy before DCPs were through collecting a bulk Networks) reported an incident where an sample from hand excavated pits and carrying operative drove a steel road pin into a HV out laboratory testing. It is acknowledged that electrical cable and more recently a Safety Alert was released by Geoffrey Osborne in 2019 excavating a trial pit to obtain a sample is not without risk, but that is a recognised industry relating to a similar incident. Driving of road methodology and would be expected to have pins on Network Rail requires a permit as it mitigation to avoid underground services is deemed a significant risk strikes. and many contractors have With regard to banned the use of road pins In situ CBR values can be or the driving of other metal manual handling, obtained from surface or the rods (i.e. earth spikes) into the equipment is bulky base of a hand excavated the ground. trial pit using In-situ CBR

“

and unstable unless held firmly at what may be head height for some operators including the 8 kg hammer at the top.

With regard to manual handling, the equipment is bulky and unstable unless held firmly at what may be head height for some operators including the 8 kg hammer at the top. Generally, it requires two persons to perform the operation, but is often carried out by single operators to minimise cost. Although some DCP systems have mechanical jacks to extract the rods the typical use in the UK is by back hammering or manual pulling if there is resistance during extraction of the rods and cone. These practices could lead to not only damage of the equipment but the risk of musculoskeletal injuries must be considered.

The device was designed before modern standards in health protection, or the practicality of manual handling in a more regulated industry was considered. It is the role of the Designer in CDM to reduce or preferably eliminate risks. Designers specifying a DCP as part of a compliant ground investigation to obtain data for pavement design are simply failing in their CDM duty where this hazard is identified because a CBR value can be obtained

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equipment or Plate Load Test (PLT) equipment in accordance with BS 1377 procedures. The limitation of these tests is that they only provide a single value and not a profile and results can be detrimentally affected by coarse materials in mixed soils or near surface desiccation in fine soils. If a CBR by depth profile is essential for design then the use of equipment such as the Lightweight Deflectometer (LWD) could be considered. The LWD is a device that estimates the in-situ modulus of a material using the impulse load produced by the impact of a falling weight. LWDs are particularly useful for estimating the moduli of asphalt, aggregate base, granular subbase and subgrade pavement layers. LWDs consist of a mass (often 10 kg), an accelerometer or geophone, and a data collection unit and are designed to be light enough to be moved and operated by one person.

Conclusions The use of DCP to provide QA/QC data for


newly constructed highways The method has and earthworks where the been extended for location of buried services is known is considered to be purposes beyond its a useful, quick, low cost and original design which relatively low risk method. often do not take into However, when DCPs are account the modern specified along routes for new environment. highways or more generally to determine CBR values for pavement design the risk becomes methods. significantly greater from injury through damage to buried services and the method has References technical and quality concerns.

“

1.

The method has been extended for purposes beyond its original design which often do not take into account the modern environment. The construction CBR value provided through laboratory testing which also provides soil type and compacted density, or through an in-situ surface test such as In-situ CBR/ PLT is recommended as being faithful to the original correlation with Californian rock gravel performance under relevant loading conditions. The use of LWD equipment could reduce both the risk of injury from damage to buried services and manual handling even further and this method will provide a CBR depth profile which is now the most common reason in ground investigations for specifying a DCP. The justification for the Designer to specify DCP must be carefully considered and not driven by lowest cost and a robust risk assessment must be carried out. Ground investigations, especially those on brownfield sites, using the DCP may not be considering the technical limitations of the test and may not fully take into account the safety risks. Therefore, Designers under CDM may be failing in their duty to eliminate or reduce risk and through specifying DCPs are putting persons at harm.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

The AGS is currently considering the safe use of DCPs and alternative methods in order to reduce or eliminate the safety risks to members. It would welcome opinions and thoughts from its members and also technical data which could support the promotion of alternative

George F. Sowers and Charles S. Hedges: 1966 : Dynamic Cone for Shallow In-Situ Penetration Testing - Vane Shear and Cone Penetration Resistance Testing of In-Situ Soils, ASTM STP 399, Am. Soc. Testing Mats., p. 29. van Vuuren, D. J. : 1969 : Rapid Determination of CBR with the Portable Dynamic Cone Penetrometer, The Rhodesian Engineer. Kleyn, E. G. : 1975 : The Use of the Dynamic Cone Penetrometer (DCP). Transvaal Roads Department, South Africa. Kleyn, E. G., Maree, J. H., and Savage, P. F. : 1982 : The Application of a Portable Pavement Dynamic Cone Penetrometer to Determine in situ Bearing Properties of Road Pavement Layers and Subgrades in South Africa. The European Symposium on Penetration Testing, Amsterdam, Netherlands. ASTM D6951 / D6951M - 18 : 2018 : Standard Test Method for Use of the Dynamic Cone Penetrometer in Shallow Pavement Applications. Zohrabi, M and Scott, P.L : 2003 : TRL Report TRL587, The correlation between the CBR value and penetrability of pavement construction material. Transport Research Laboratory Done, S.; Samuel, P. : 2004 :User manual UK DCP 2.2. Measurement of road pavement strength by Dynamic Cone Penetrometer. Jones C R and J Rolt (1991). Operating instructions for the TRL dynamic cone penetrometer (2nd edition). Information Note. Crowthorne: Transport Research Laboratory. BS 1377 : 1990 : Methods of test for soils for civil engineering purposes. British Standards Institute

Article contributed by James Harrison, previously Delta Simons & Julian Lovell, Equipe Group

August 2019

23


AGS Guide to...

Working on Rail Infrastructure Photo credit: David Higgs, CCGI

T

little to avoid striking plant, his guidance is written Unlike working on tools, or personnel in the for anyone involved in geotechnical or the highway, where path of a train. geo-environmental work vehicles are a threat Hazards on Network Rail’s Managed to individuals in all Infrastructure (NRMI). The principal hazards accessible locations, Separate guidance is available associated with working rail traffic is confined for working on the London on or near the line are as Underground network. A to the tracks. follows: railway, whilst potentially very • Struck by trains or other hazardous environment, is also a on-track plant. highly regulated and controlled place of work.

Unlike working on the highway, where vehicles are a threat to individuals in all accessible locations, rail traffic is confined to the tracks. However, most trains travel much faster than road vehicles, have much longer braking distances and are often not heard until the last minute when approaching. Drivers can do very

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Presence of an unguarded conductor or “third” rail (live at 750V DC).

Presence of overhead line equipment (OLE) (live at 25,000V); a particular hazard when climbing a cutting face, when working at height, working on structures, and using


plant.

...there is a strict 12-hour doorto-door policy when working on NRMI, with a minimum of 12 hours rest between turns of duty.

Trip hazards: icy, or otherwise slippery conditions underfoot; sleepers and ballast; abandoned construction materials; lineside cables and troughing; and drainage covers.

Fatigue; there is a strict 12-hour door-todoor policy when working on NRMI, with a minimum of 12 hours rest between turns of duty.

Biological hazards: Weil’s disease, abandoned syringes, hypodermic needles and human waste (most commonly in urban areas). Adders, which frequently use the concrete troughing.

Fog or low light conditions which reduces sighting distance of oncoming trains.

Dense and overgrown vegetation that may; impede movement; obstruct sighting and narrow the cess (the area alongside the railway); or be an invasive species (i.e. Giant Hogweed or Japanese Knotweed).

Whenever you work on NRMI a Controller of Site Safety (COSS) or Safe Work Leader (SWL) will be appointed to set up and take responsibility for the work. They will be responsible in ensuring that nobody is put at risk by train movements, live electrification equipment, or other hazards. The COSS/SWL will undertake a SWP and TBS briefing at the access location the start of the shift. This will focus on: •

The nature and location of the work.

The access point, route to site and welfare arrangements.

The limits of the site and how they are defined.

The line speed and direction of travel and which lines are blocked and which remain open.

Isolation of either AC or DC electrification at site

and “ Dense overgrown

vegetation that may; impede movement; obstruct sighting and narrow the cess...

For any project on the rail a Construction Phase Plan (CPP), Work Package Plan (WPP), Task Briefing Sheet (TBS) and Safe Work Pack (SWP) will be required. These will include information on all the planned activities and site-specific hazards likely to be encountered.

• Details on site specific hazards.

• Details of the warning method for approaching trains and the positions of safety for operatives.

Distraction as a result of using a mobile phone whilst on or near the line.

Safe System of Work

• Contact details for all key personnel and emergency procedures.

Equipment and PPE The following PPE is compulsory when working on NRMI: •

Orange high visibility upper body clothing with Class 2 reflective tape and orange high visibility lower body clothing with class 1 reflective tape, all to BS EN 471 and 

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Railway Group Standard RIS-3279-TOM. •

A safety helmet which complies with BS EN 397.

Safety footwear which complies with BS EN ISO 20345, provides support to the ankle, includes midsole protection and has a protective toe cap.

It is usually compulsory for staff working on the railway to be Personal Track Safety (PTS) trained and be in possession of a valid Sentinel (smart) card.

General purpose gloves that meet the Cut5 standard and complies with EN 388.

Appropriate eye protection which complies with EN 166.

A head torch at times of low visibility.

Training It is usually compulsory for staff working on the railway to be Personal Track Safety (PTS) trained and be in possession of a valid Sentinel (smart) card. Without a Sentinel card, you will not be allowed access on or near the railway line unless you have a valid Track Visitor’s Permit (TVP), provided by an authorised Sentinel sponsor.

on NRMI. The log book helps the sponsor decide when an individual has enough experience to be deemed as being competent. At that point a white hard had can be worn.

In order to undertake the PTS training, you will be required to undertake a Network Rail approved pre-sponsorship medical which covers hearing, sight and general fitness. The medical lasts for a maximum of 10 years (age and Risk Assessed dependent). In addition, a drugs and alcohol screen is required which needs to be retaken if you change sponsors. Network Rail operates a strict drugs and alcohol policy, not only for its own staff, but for everyone working on NRMI. Compliance with the policy also extends to those working in an office on railway-related work as this is classed as safety critical works and has a zero tolerance for any that contravene this policy.

A valid PTS card does not allow individuals to work alone, or to take responsibility for the safety of others. In the railway environment, individuals with Before undertaking PTS responsibility for safety A valid PTS card training, you must first usually have separate roles gain sponsorship from an does not allow from those undertaking approved Sentinel sponsor ‘work’, although individuals individuals to work (usually your employer). Your may dual role within the alone, or to take sponsor will be responsible work site if it is safe to do responsibility for the for providing: all safety critical so. A person charged with safety of others. equipment (including PPE); ensuring the health and maintain your rail-related safety of others working training records and mentoring; on the railway must hold provide you with regular briefings Controller of Site Safety (COSS) certification on changes to standards and H&S briefings; as a minimum. Geotechnical engineers and provide adequate insurance to work on undertaking routine inspections of earthworks the infrastructure. Until deemed competent by and other railway assets frequently their sponsor, workers must wear a blue safety possess Individual Working Alone (IWA) helmet and keep a record of the work they do certification which allows lone working on the

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Photo credit: Eric Downey, Structural Soils

infrastructure.

References and Further Guidance

Reporting Procedures

A Guide to Personal Track Safety RT3170.

Wherever you work; whether you are trackside; in an office; or visiting a site, if you have concerns about safety Network Rail’s Worksafe procedure gives you the right to stop work and have the situation assessed in a fair way. If you’re asked to undertake a task without the required training, equipment or personal protective equipment, or if there is no safe system of work then you have the right to refuse to work. You can also contact the Confidential Incident Reporting & Analysis System (CIRAS) to report any breaches of health, safety and environmental concerns with all cases dealt with by an independent organisation in a confidential manner.

Sentinel Scheme Rules.

Network Rail Life Saving Rules.

This guidance document is, of necessity, generic and is not intended to be a complete or comprehensive statement of the facts, nor does it constitute legal or specialist advice. It is intended only to highlight issues that may be of interest to AGS members. Neither the writer, nor AGS, assumes any responsibility for any loss which may arise from accessing, or reliance on the material and all liability is disclaimed accordingly. Professional advice should be taken before applying the content of the guidance document to particular circumstances.

Article contributed by AGS Safety Working Group

August 2019

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Q & A with...

Jonathan Adam Latimer (BSc (Hons), FGS, NEBOSH, AIIRSM)

Job Title: Operations Director Company: Ian Farmer Associates (1998) Ltd Brief Biography: Adam is an Operations Director with over 25 years of professional experience working in the ground investigation sector. Adam has worked on a wide variety of investigations, including land development, contaminated land, infrastructure (both road and rail) and utilities projects. Adam holds an undergraduate degree in Geology and holds a vocational qualification in NEBOSH National Certificate in Construction Health and Safety. Adam is also a Freeman of the City of London and is a committee member for both the AGS and BGA.

What or who inspired you to join the geotechnical industry? There isn’t any one person who inspired me to join the industry, however I have always had a keen interest 28

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in Geology from a young age, growing up in the North Pennines with its rich Geology and Mining History. When I left Durham University in 1993, I had already rejected the opportunities of working in the mining and exploration sector (working in politically unstable parts of the world wasn’t really an appealing prospect). I studied a traditional Geology degree and the Geotechnical Industry wasn’t an industry I as was particularly familiar with or aware of. Many undergraduates from Durham would ultimately become involved in the oil and gas sector, law or accountancy. On leaving University I cast a wide net, applying to a wide variety of businesses so I suppose I stumbled into the industry partly by accident.

What does a typical day entail? I don’t have a typical day and as such it can be quite varied. Like everyone else involved in this industry, the days can be long. As I have progressed up the managerial ladder my role has become more of a support function for the business. With multiple offices and the business now being part of the

RSK Group, I have found my time split between all sections of the company. Typically, I will spend most of my time in business development, forecasting, budgeting, estimating, training, auditing and reviewing and developing new documentation. Sadly, my time visiting sites and undertaking reporting and technical reviews has reduced with more managerial duties being the norm.

Are there any projects which you’re particularly proud to have been a part of? I have been involved in a number of large scale and challenging ground investigations during my time in the industry and I can’t really focus on any one project over another. I am very passionate about the ground investigation industry and the most rewarding part of my job is helping to inspire the next generation of ground engineers, whether this is through the work within the AGS and BGA or through mentoring and training within


Ian Farmer Associates.

What are the most challenging aspects of your role? My role within the business has developed over the past few years and has become more focussed on the business development side and as such a huge challenge is adapting to volatile market conditions. Our industry suffers historically from significant peaks and troughs and you need to react quickly during buoyant times and when there is a downturn. The industry as a whole has also suffered from an acute shortage of experienced engineers and this coupled with a reduction in graduates entering the industry has put enormous pressures on existing staff to meet ever demanding timescales.

What AGS Working Groups are you a Member of and what are your current focuses? I am currently the lead for the Safety Working Group and a member of the Executive Committee. Currently we are working on delivering the inaugural safety conference (Safety in Mind) on the 21st November at the National Motorcycle Museum. We have secured an excellent line up of speakers and some thoughtprovoking presentations which I am sure will make it a success. As a group we are continuing to gather feedback

from our members on trial pitting and whether it remains a safe and effective method in a changing geotechnical world. We are also at the early stages of a working group on avoidance of buried services with collaboration with the BDA and FPS.

What do you enjoy most about being an AGS Member? The AGS provides a unique opportunity for like-minded people to discuss issues within the industry in an honest and frank way. The AGS membership is an essential vehicle to share good practices in an open forum for the greater good of the industry.

What do you find beneficial about being an AGS Member? Being a member of the AGS provides members with an unrivalled opportunity to have a voice in how the Geotechnical Industry should operate. Fantastic work has been done by the members of the AGS to shape the future of the industry and that is credit to the diligence and tireless work of all the professionals we are fortunate to have working in the sector. There is a wealth of publications, position papers and articles which provides invaluable information and all this is available for the benefit of the members on the website or through the conferences held annually.

Why do you feel the AGS is important to the industry? The AGS offers a unique opportunity for like-minded professionals who are passionate about the industry to work collaboratively for a common goal to improve the image of the Geotechnical sector. The AGS is the only trade association which includes a mixture of contractors, consultants and clients which offers a wealth of knowledge and experience to help shape a strong and stable future and only with us working together can we make a tangible difference.

What changes would you like to see implemented in the geotechnical industry? The Geotechnical Industry has seen significant strides in technology and health and safety since I joined in the mid-90s. There is of course lots of work to do and as an industry we can’t standstill and need to continue to evolve. The recent survey between the AGS and BDA on the state of the industry offered some food for thought for all of us working in ground investigation and although the results may not have been a big shock, there is still much work to do in order to improve the image of the industry, not just within our membership but also throughout the wider construction sector.

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CONSULTANCY & TESTING SERVICES

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Our LQE services deliver technical risk management in line with NHBC standards for land quality, for clients looking to undertake remediation or reclamation of their sites, before they are sold on for residential development. LQE is fast becoming a pre-requisite for many land developers managing large brownfield sites, with typical locations including landfills, quarries, gas works, mine works, industrial complexes and collieries.

To find out more visit nhbc.co.uk/lqe or call 0344 633 1000 and ask for ‘LQE’

NHBC is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority. NHBC is registered in England & Wales under company number 00320784. NHBC’s registered address is NHBC House, Davy Avenue, Knowlhill, Milton Keynes, Bucks MK5 8FP. P439 09/19


AGS Working Group Focus

Loss Prevention Overview

Hugh Mallett, Leader of the Loss Prevention Working Group, has provided an update on the top issues the Loss Prevention Working Group discussed at a recent meeting which took place in September 2019.

1. Commercial Risks and How to Manage Them Conferences The first AGS Commercial Risks and How to Manage Them Conference took place on 3rd July at One Moorgate Place in London. Due to the success of the half-day conference, the conference is being repeated in Manchester

on Wednesday 22nd January 2020 at the Manchester Conference Centre. The CPD conference is aimed at both junior and experienced ground engineers, who are interested in improving their knowledge and skills within this sector. For information on speaker line-up, sponsorship packages and ticket prices, please visit the AGS website.

the AGS Data Management Working Group about the issue regarding ownership of AGS Data. The issue first arose at the AGS Members’ Day in 2018 following a presentation given and the two groups are still looking for a conclusion to the issue. Once the issue has been concluded, the AGS will look to push out the information to the AGS members.

2. PI Insurance Premiums

4. New Leader for 2020

There are concerns within the Loss Prevention Working Group regarding the significant increase of PI insurance premiums in the last year. This issue is confirmed to be commercially driven, rather than risk driven. However, the group are looking to discuss this issue further and draft an article on the topic to advise AGS members.

After becoming the Leader of the Loss Prevention Working Group in 2014, Hugh Mallett has decided to step down from the role in 2020. Therefore, the role will be up for election next year and further details will be circulated in early 2020. If you are interested in the role, but have any questions, please contact ags@ags.org.uk.

3. AGS Data Format There is an ongoing discussion between the AGS Loss Prevention Working Group and

If you wish to attend AGS Loss Prevention Working Group meetings, please contact the AGS Secretariat by emailing ags@ags.org.uk.

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Standards Update

September 2019

STANDARD BS EN ISO 22477-1:2018 + Corrigendum August 2019 BS ISO 15800:2019

RECENTLY PUBLIS SUBJECT / TEST S Geotechnical investigation and testing – testing of geotechnical B structures - Part 1: testing of piles – static compression load testing Human exposure I

STANDARD BS 10176

BRITISH STANDARDS ON SOIL, GROUND SUBJECT / TEST S Sampling soils for determination of VOCs N

BS5930 Amendment 1

Ground investigation

E

ISO STANDARDS ON SOIL & SITE S B

STANDARD BS ISO DIS 11063

SUBJECT / TEST Direct extraction of soil DNA

ISO DIS 16751

Environmental availability of non-polar organic compounds – Determination of the potentially bioavailable fraction and the nonbioavailable fraction using a strong adsorbent or complexing agent Guidance on the choice and evaluation of bioassays for ecotoxicological characterization of soils and soil materials Conceptual site models for potentially contaminated sites

BS ISO 17616 BS ISO 21365 BS EN ISO 25177 (REVISION) STANDARD BS ISO DIS 18674-4

BS EN ISO 22475-1 (REVISION) BS ISO DIS 22476-9 PAS 128 (REVISION)

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N

B

N

Soil quality – Field Soil Description B SELECTED INTERNATIONAL & EUROPEAN “GE SUBJECT / TEST S Geotechnical investigation and testing – Geotechnical monitoring by N field instrumentation – Part 4: Measurement of pore water pressure: Piezometers Geotechnical investigation and testing – Sampling of soil, rock and B groundwater – Part 1 – Technical principles Ground investigation and testing – Field testing –Part 9: Field vane test N (FVT and FVT-F) Underground utility detection, verification and location P


SHED STANDARDS SUPERSEDED/WILL SUPERSEDE BS EN ISO 22477-1:2018

STATUS Published

PUBLICATION DATE August 2019

ISO 15800:2003

Published

September 2019

D & SITE ASSESSMENT - In preparation STATUS SUPERSEDED/WILL SUPERSEDE New standard Draft for Public Comment issued for comment by 31 August Existing standard Amendment expected to be published for comment October 2019 E ASSESSMENT - In preparation STATUS SUPERSEDED/WILL SUPERSEDE BS EN ISO 11063:2013 DIS issued for comment by 26 October

New standard

DIS issued for comment by 25 September

BS ISO 17616: 2008

Final Draft International Standard (FDIS) issued for comment by 22 September New Standard Final Draft International Standard (FDIS) issued for comment by 20 August BS EN ISO 25177: 2011 Proceeding to publication EOTECHNICAL” STANDARDS – In preparation STATUS SUPERSEDED/WILL SUPERSEDE New Standard DIS issued for comment by 9 September

PUBLICATION DATE 2020 2020

PUBLICATION DATE 2021

2021

2020 2020 2019 PUBLICATION DATE 2020

BS EN ISO 22475-1:2006

Second DIS issued for comment by 19 August 2020

New Standard

Comments on DIS required by 24 September

2020

PAS 128

Public consultation planned for September.

2020

August 2019

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Upcoming Events

AGS Annual Conference Date: Thursday 2nd April 2020 Location: National Motorcycle Museum, Birmingham The AGS are pleased to announce that their Annual Conference is taking place on Thursday 2nd April 2020 at the National Motorcycle Museum in Birmingham. This full day seminar will focus on the work and achievements of the AGS and see expert speakers present on geotechnical and geoenvironmental topics and summarise lessons learnt. The full agenda and speakers will be confirmed in Autumn 2019. Lunch and refreshments will be provided. TICKETS A limited number of delegates per AGS member company may attend the conference free of charge. The number of complimentary tickets provided are dependent on the number of practitioners in your company – please see Table on the registration form. Additional tickets may be purchased for £60 (plus VAT) per AGS Member. Non-members may attend for £120 (plus VAT). If you wish to attend, then please email ags@ags.org.uk for a booking form. SPONSORSHIP PACKAGES Promote your organisation, services and skills – take advantage of one of our great sponsorship opportunities, which include benefits such as exhibition stands, advertising space and more. To register your attendance or for details on our available sponsorship packages, please contact Joanna Franaszczuk at ags@ags.org.uk.

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AGS Safety in Mind Conference Date: Thursday 21st November 2019 Location: National Motorcycle Museum, Birmingham This full day conference will focus on topics of interest such as occupational health, mental health, the challenges of HSE investigation and dangers associated in working around pipelines. There will also be two break-out workshops to allow delegates to participate in more intimate round-table discussions. TICKETS Tickets will be priced at £145 for AGS Members and £215 for non-members, and will include catering and refreshments. Prices exclude VAT. Event registration closes on Friday 1st November. If you wish to attend, then please email ags@ags.org.uk for a booking form. SPONSORSHIP PACKAGES - STILL AVAILABLE Promote your organisation, services and skills – take advantage of one of our great sponsorship opportunities, which include benefits such as exhibition stands, advertising space and more. To register your attendance or for details on our available sponsorship packages, please contact Joanna Franaszczuk at ags@ags.org.uk.

AGS Commercial Risks & How to Manage Them Conference 2020 Date: Wednesday 22nd January 2020 Location: The Manchester Conference Centre, Manchester This CPD conference, which will provide a focus on the management of commercial risks, is aimed at both junior and experienced ground engineers, who are interested in improving their knowledge and skills within this sector. The event will also be relevant to practitioners approaching Chartership, as well as those in smaller practices where there may be limited or no in-house legally qualified sources of help or advice. The conference will end at 4:30pm. Chaired by Jo Strange, Technical Director at CGL, attending delegates will be provided with an introduction of the guidance and advice provided by the AGS Loss Prevention Working Group, with particular attention being given to recent hot topics. TICKETS AGS members may attend for £70, whereas non-AGS Members may attend for £130. Prices exclude VAT. To confirm your attendance please email ags@ags.org.uk for a booking form. Spaces are limited so we recommend early booking. Application forms received after 8th January 2020 may not be accepted. SPONSORSHIP PACKAGES Promote your organisation, services and skills – take advantage of one of our great sponsorship opportunities, which include benefits such as exhibition stands, advertising space and more. To register your attendance or for details on our available sponsorship packages, please contact Joanna Franaszczuk at ags@ags.org.uk. August 2019

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SiLC Introduction day - Edinburgh SiLC is pleased to announce an Introduction Day taking place on the 30th October 2019 taking place at Acies, 1 Randolph Crescent, Edinburgh, EH3 7TH SiLC Introduction Days are open to all those who are considering applying to become a SiLC. They will provide an overview of the SiLC scheme, information on the assessment process and an opportunity to meet peers and discuss your application with SiLC Assessors. The examination now embraces the requirements of the NQMS, subject to success in the SiLC exam and at the professional interview becoming a SiLC will automatically result in becoming an SQP. To attend, please contact silc@silc.org.uk for a booking form. (Please confirm any dietary requirements when booking) SiLC Introduction Day fees for 2019 are: •

Private Sector: £190 + VAT Total: £228

Public Sector: £140 + VAT Total: £168

This price includes the full day 9.45am - 4.30pm attendance with refreshments and lunch provided. Delegates who attend will receive a £70 discount off their application fee.

Cone Penetration Testing in Geotechnical Practice Date: 6th -7th November 2019 Location: Brunel University, London An essential comprehensive training course and refresher for geotechnical & geo-environmental practitioners involved in Cone Penetration Testing for Onshore and Offshore Geotechnics. The course is devoted to raising awareness of current test procedures, advances, data derived from the tests and the importance of quality control. SPEAKERS Dr John Powell, Technical Director, GEOLABS Ltd Darren Ward, Managing Director, In Situ SI Tom Lunne, Expert Advisor, NGI Joseph Hobbs, Technical Manager, Lankelma Ltd What delegates will learn: • • • • •

Have an understanding of the importance of using CPT specialists Advantages and limitations of CPT tools and techniques An understanding of how CPT data can be used for soil interpretation An understanding of how CPT data can be used for design An appreciation of recognising suspect/erroneous data

COST: £350 + VAT per delegate HOW TO REGISTER: Please visit www.equipegroup.com or email info@equipegroup.com

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WITH WORLD CLASS GEOTECHNICAL TRAINING FROM EQUIPE Health and Safety Courses

Delivered in partnership with RPA Safety Services

IOSH Safe Supervision of Geotechnical Sites (3 Days) - £495 + VAT

Learn in detail how to keep yourself and your on-site operatives safe in the field

IOSH Avoiding Danger from Underground Services - £175 + VAT

In accordance with the requirements and guidance set out within HSG47

IOSH Working Safely (on Geotechnical Sites) - £175 + VAT

A foundation to site safety for all personnel involved in the drilling and geotechnical industry

Other Health and Safety Courses Delivered in partnership with EB Safety Soltuions & RPA Safety Services

MARGI - Managing & working with Asbestos Risk in Ground Investigation - £225 + VAT

Comprehensive guidance to deal with asbestos in a GI environment, including CAR 2012

Geoenvironmental Courses Delivered in partnership with Land Quality Management

Contaminated Land in Geotechnical Practice - £250 + VAT

An introduction to contaminated land for those involved in ground investigations and geotechnical work

Sampling and Scheduling for Geoenvironmental Testing - £250 + VAT

Forming good practice and completing appropriate geoenvironmental testing schedules

Geotechnical Courses

Soil Description Workshop - £275 + VAT

Delivered by UK's leading Soil & Rock Description expert - Prof. David Norbury

Rock Description Workshop - £275 + VAT

Delivered by UK's leading Soil & Rock Description expert - Prof. David Norbury

Geotechnical Foundation Design - £250 + VAT

Comprehensive overview for geotechnical practitioners and engineers

Slope Stability Design - £250 + VAT

Comprehensive overview for geotechnical practitioners and engineers

August 2019

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Training Courses

CL:AIRE 2019 training courses now available • E-Learning Courses : Brownfield Site investigation; Soil and Groundwater Risk Assessment; Sustainable Remediation Appraisal & Asbestos Awareness for Land Professionals https://www.claire.co.uk/commerce/112346-elearning •

CAR-SOIL

Non Licensed Work for Land Professionals

Non Licensed Work for Groundworkers

https://www.claire.co.uk/commerce/112352-asbestos-in-soil-and-construction-demolitionmaterials-training •

Verification of Gas Protection Systems

https://www.claire.co.uk/commerce/112374-gas-protection All courses (except elearning and gas verification) also available on a bespoke basis. Please go to Help Desk and provide your requirements: https://www.claire.co.uk/help-desk

Revised Training: Specialist Geotechnical Heath and Safety Courses Equipe Training and their health and safety training partners RPA Safety Services and EB Safety Solutions are delighted to announce their collection of specialist health and safety courses for the geotechnical market have been revised and renewed for 2019. These courses are approved and certified by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH) and meet the requirements of UK Health and Safety regulations for working on geotechnical and land drilling sites. Upcoming courses include: • 16th – 18th October 2019 - IOSH Safe Supervision of Geotechnical Sites • 14th November 2019 - IOSH Working Safely (on Geotechnical Sites) • 11th October 2019 - IOSH Avoiding Danger from Underground Services Other health and safety courses include our latest H&S, asbestos-focussed course: •

8th October 2019 - Managing and working with Absestos Risk in Ground Investigation

Places on these courses can be booked online here, or via contacting Equipe on +44 (0)1295 670990 or info@equipegroup.com 38

Magazine


How to become a Member of the AGS AGS Members all share a commitment to quality in the geotechnical and geoenvironmental industry. This has become widely recognised by clients, governmental bodies and other associations that touch issues to do with the ground. We welcome both companies and individuals who want to be recognised for their quality of practice to join our growing membership of over 130 Members. We shape our industry, continually improve practice and collaborate on issues that affect us all; from clients, all the way through to the people who use the land and the buildings we help develop. To become a Member of the AGS, please visit http://www.ags.org.uk/about/become-a-member and submit your application online. Please note that all membership applications are reviewed by the Membership Committee 6 weeks in advance of each quarterly Senate meeting. The deadline for the next round of completed applications isThursday 15th October 2019.

AGS Chemical and Legal Helplines All Members of the Association of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Specialists are entitled to free chemical and contractual advice through the use of Loss Prevention Committee Members, Marquis & Lord and Beale & Co. For advice on chemical safety and best practice, Marquis & Lord will provide 30 minutes of free advice to all AGS Members. Additionally, if you’re an AGS Member and are looking for legal advice, please contact Beale & Co and ask quote ‘AGS Helpline’ where the first 15 minutes of legal advice will be free of charge. CHEMICAL SAFETY HELPLINE Marquis & Lord Tel: +44 (0) 121 288 2386 www.marquisandlord.com

LEGAL HELPLINE (Please quote Beale & Co ‘AGS Helpline’) Tel: +44 (0) 20 7469 0400 www.beale-law.com

Member Reporting Service for Industry Issues If you have any queries regarding AGS Data Format, there is a discussion forum on the AGS Data Format website, where queries can be posted and answered by the Data Format team. If a Member has any issues with regard to Safety, Contaminated Land, Geotechnical or Laboratories which you think the industry should be aware of please email ags@ags.org.uk, we will then forward your email to the relevant AGS Working Group.

Disclaimer These articles are the opinions of the authors and are not intended to be a complete or comprehensive statement of the law, nor do they constitute legal or specialist advice. They are intended only to highlight current issues from date of publication that may be of interest. Neither the writer, nor the AGS, assumes any responsibility for any loss that may arise from accessing, or reliance on the material and all liability is disclaimed accordingly. Professional advice should be taken before applying the content of the articles to particular circumstances.

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Advertising and Rates An online advertising campaign within the AGS Magazine will help to build and increase industry awareness of your company’s profile, initiatives and offerings. The AGS can help build a package to suit your needs and budget; whether it’s a series of adverts across multiple issues, a combination of event sponsorship and advertising, or a single advertorial. How to Advertise in the AGS Magazine The AGS Magazine is a free email publication which looks at a range of topical issues, insights and concerns, whilst publishing new guidance notes, working group activities and information on upcoming industry seminars. With 10 issues each year, our subscribers include industry professionals such as practitioners, chartered specialists, senior decision makers and managing directors To receive a media pack or to discuss advertising rates, please contact Caroline Kratz on 0208 658 8212 or email ags@ags.org.uk

Adversiting Requirements

Advert Sizes and Rates

All adverts should be sent in a PDF, PNG, JPEG, TIFF, PSD (Photoshop) or EPS (Illustrator) format.

 FULL PAGE W: 210mm H: 297mm RATE: £400  HALF PAGE W: 210mm H: 145mm RATE: £250  QUARTER PAGE

company name address contact number email

W: 105mm H: 145mm RATE: £160

logo

 DIRECTORY Company name, address, contact number, email and one logo.

RATE: £50

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All advertising artwork must be supplied in 114 dpi resolution.

Magazine

Artwork must be delivered to the AGS using the agreed artwork specification size listed left. Artwork should be emailed to ags@ags.org. uk no later than 10 days prior to publication.


Directory

ADVERTISE HERE FOR JUST £50

ADVERTISE HERE FOR JUST £50

AGS Dates for Your Diary Upcoming AGS Events AGS Safety Conference National Motorcycle Museum in Birmingham Thursday 21st November 2019 For more information, contact ags@ags.org.uk

the AGS Commercial Risks and How to Manage Them Conference Manchester Conference Centre Wednesday 22nd January 2020 For more information, contact ags@ags.org.uk August 2019

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Profile for AGS Magazine

AGS Magazine - September/October 2019  

AGS Magazine is a FREE magazine from the Association of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Specialists. The magazine focuses on geotechnics,...

AGS Magazine - September/October 2019  

AGS Magazine is a FREE magazine from the Association of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Specialists. The magazine focuses on geotechnics,...