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Special Advertising Section: Women in Business Profiles

amarillomagonline.com May 2011

The

Places They’ll Go‌

Five outstanding college women are well on their way to making a name for themselves.

Alyssa Evalle at High Plains Food Bank’s garden

Retro Revival

Slip into another decade and pay homage to the fashion muses of yesteryear with retro-inspired pieces.

Kitchen Daze

Turn your kitchen into a vintage vision with linens adorned with lively patterns and novelty prints.

A Second Home

Specialized Therapy Services gives two Amarillo women and their children a home away from home.


Greater

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contents

On the cover 31 The Places They’ll Go

Their stories may be unpublished, but they are certainly bestseller material. Nominated by their professors, these five college women’s promising futures are blank pages waiting to filled with tales of inspiration and prosperity.

cover photo by PAM LARY PHOTOGRAPHY

Features

20 Retro Revival

This season, the past is present all over the runways from classic LBDs and bright suits to mod jewelry and oneshoulder dresses.

28 Kitchen Daze

Turn your kitchen into a vintage vision with linens adorned with lively patterns and novelty prints.

38 A Second Home

Contributor April Brownlee shares the story of Specialized Therapy Services founder, Karen Day, and how her dedication to special needs children has given two women and their children a home away from home.

46 Mom’s the Word

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Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011

Even the junior chefs of the household can whip up these simple, yet scrumptious meals in 30 minutes or less. What better way to tell Mom “I love you” than surprising her with a homemade gift from the heart on her Special Day?

sections

photo by Chriselda Photography

Contributors..............................6 Online Page............................10 Out & About...........................12 The Way I See It....................18 Dress Code..............................20 Home.........................................28 Special Feature.....................38

Inspire........................................42 What’s Cooking? ................46 Events........................................65 Let’s Eat! ..................................75 Retro Rewind.........................82 Spotlight..................................84


James Roybal

First Friday Artwalk May 6, 2011 5-9 p.m.


contributors Pam Lary

Chriselda

Pam photographed “Kitchen Daze” on page 28 and our cover story, “The Places They’ll Go,” on page 31. She stays ahead of photography trends through Master Photographer workshops and memberships in multiple state and national photographer associations. Pam specializes in commercial, newborn and contemporary children’s photography. See Pam’s work at pamlaryphotography.com.

Chriselda photographed the special feature, “A Second Home,” on page 38. She has been a photographer for the past 13 years. She specializes in wedding and portrait photography. She studied Film and Digital Photography at San Antonio College and University of Texas at San Antonio. To see Chriselda’s work, visit chriseldaphotography.com.

Andy Chase Cundiff

Shannon Richardson

Andy, a local artist, singer and songwriter, has called Amarillo home for 20 years. He currently plays at 575 Pizzeria and Blue Sky on Tuesday and Wednesday nights, respectively. See Andy’s artwork every month with Jon Mark Beilue’s column (page 18).

Shannon shot “Mom’s the Word” on page 46 and “Let’s Eat” on page 75. He has been photographing commercial/advertising work for the past 14 years. His photography has won numerous Addy awards including three best of shows as well as being featured in the Graphis Photo Annual 2001, JPG Magazine and Shots. He recently published a photographic book about Route 66. See Shannon’s work at shannonrichardson.com and route66americanicon.com.

Davy Knapp Davy took the photos in our fashion feature, “Retro Revival,” on page 20. He is a destination family and wedding photographer based in Amarillo. He has been a professional photographer for 13 years. Davy has traveled North and Central America using his camera as a medium to create lasting legacies of family relationships. Davy’s work has been published in numerous magazines including Rangefinder, Professional Photographer, The Texas Wedding Guide and Texas Highways including many cover features.

Christa Boyd Christa expertly transformed our models in “Retro Revival” on page 20. She is a freelance makeup artist and stylist who has worked in the field for 13 years. Her portfolio includes runway, photo shoots and film with a clientele that spans from New York City, Nashville and Austin. Christa has been married to her husband, Raymond, for 13 years and they have three children.

Beto Beto styled the hair of our look-alike models in “Retro Revival” on page 20. He has been a hair stylist since 1998. He is a part-time artist, part-time photographer and a fulltime husband and father. He enjoys working with his hands and continuously creating or recreating various projects.

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Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011

Donna Alexander Donna photographed the events in “Out & About” starting on page 12. She is a West Texas native who has lived in Amarillo for 11 years. She received her Associates of Applied Science in Photography from Amarillo College in May 2009. Donna is a member of the Texas Professional Photographers Association and specializes in commercial, real estate, event and portrait photography. She has two daughters, Alex and Krista.

Andy and T Price Andy and T cooked up the delicious dishes in “Mom is the Word” on page 46. Together, they own Real Food Company. Andy and T have been creating and serving their “made-fromscratch food with a wholesome flare” for more than 10 years.

Jeff Harbin Jeff photographed our “Spotlight” feature on page 84. He is a husband, father of two little boys, a firefighter with the Amarillo Fire Department and the owner of Life of Riley Photography. He was born and raised in Amarillo and is proud to work in the community. His passion for art and the creative process began as a child and led him to his love of photography. To see Jeff’s work, visit lifeofrileyphotography.com.


THE STYLISH NEW 2011

TOYOTA HIGHLANDER HYBRID

www.street-toyota.com t tt t 45th & Soncy • 355-9846 1-800-6STREET


Publisher

Les Simpson

Editor

Michele McAffrey 806.345.3256 michele.mcaffrey@amarillo.com

Feature Writer

Drew Belle Zerby 806.345.3223 drew.zerby@amarillo.com

Steven Adams

Creative Services Manager Designer

Brian Bussey John Earl Tyler Mitchell

VP Advertising/ Revenue Development

Mike Distelhorst

Classified Sales Manager

Cindy Brown

Retail Sales Manager

Jaime Pipkin

Online Sales Manager

Kendra Barrett

Major/National Accounts Manager

Dewey Shanks

Account Representatives

Kimberly Barclay Laura Collins Sharon Denny Trish Faris Cory Griggs Cindy Ledesma Rick Miller Hailey Morrison Michelle Parsons Natasha Reavis Marcy Weldon

Sales Assistants

Yolanda Navarette Sarena Poor Leasa Salazar

Patrick Ayala Tosh Lyons

To advertise in Amarillo Magazine, please contact Jaime Pipkin at 806.345.3432 or jaime.pipkin@amarillo.com To advertise on amarillomagonline.com, please contact Kendra Barrett at 806.345.3472 or kendra.barrett@amarillo.com

Production Director Division Controller

Mike O’Connor Mike Clayton

900 S. Harrison St., Amarillo, TX 79101 806.376.4488 • amarillomagonline.com Amarillo Magazine is a monthly publication of Amarillo Globe-News Custom Publishing. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written consent. Letters to the Editor are welcome but may be edited due to space limitations.

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s we wrapped up our annual Women’s Issue, my life was, I’m sad to say, turned upside down. One moment I was gearing up for the usual: a busy week of proofing, drowning in details and design options. The next moment, I was thrown into a whirlwind of planning a funeral. Shockingly, my sister and I had lost our precious father. Just like that.

Darren Hendricks

Graphic Artists

Online Production Manager Programmer

editor’s letter

Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011

Who was with me at a moment’s notice to hold me up? My girlfriends. I cannot recall the last time I felt so grateful and loved. They phoned from far and near and many came over as soon as they heard the awful news. My friends fed my family and thought of all the little details I didn’t have the energy to manage. And they filled my home with beautiful flowers to remind me they were there in spirit. That’s what I’ve grown to love about the strong women I call friends - when you’ve seen your share of trouble, you know what your friends need, just what to say and how to care for them. Even in my day-to-day life, solid friends keep me grounded and sane. We laugh, sometimes cry, and talk until we’ve worked it all out, whatever it might be. A few weeks ago, I met the four ladies who modeled for our “Retro Revival” feature. As I enjoyed their company and watched the camaraderie between them (the kind that only girls can share), I knew they’d be perfect for a concept we’d cooked up months before: modern translations of fashion icons from the past. Their long-time friendships were an added bonus. Thank you, girls, for wearing more makeup and product in your hair than you did on your wedding days, and making a long photo shoot a blast. Since May is the month for moms, I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention the man who I’ve always said is the best thing I’ve ever done. Mason, I can’t believe I have to say you’re a man now (boy doesn’t make me feel so old!), and I hope you know being your mom has been a priceless gift. To my husband, thank you for enlarging my heart and making me the proud mom of four beautiful stepsons. You guys are the best. Thanks for all the wonderful years and memories that make me smile. From fashion to food, the trials of special needs moms and stories of capable young women, we worked diligently to deliver fun, entertaining content for this issue. We love to hear from you, so be sure to visit our website, amarillomagonline.com, and send us your feedback. As always thanks for reading,


Marie knows . . .

The physicians and nurse practitioners at BSA Family Medical Clinic can care for your entire family. Meet Amy. She’s new in town and Marie’s new neighbor. When Amy’s husband and baby both were sick with a bad cough, Marie told Amy to take them to the BSA Family Medical Clinic. Both were seen promptly the same day and are on the road to recovery. The caring providers at BSA Family Medical Clinic can care for your entire family, too. There’s no need to go anywhere else.

ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS The clinic is staffed by physicians, nurse practitioners and nurses trained in family medicine. They can diagnose and treat family members of all ages. For appointments, please call

(806) 212-6353

(L-R) Rhonda Harris, RN, FNP • John Hierholzer, MD • Cristiane Tan, MD, Daniel Merki, MD • Nicole Lopez, MD • Kathy Kleman, RN,FNP

1000 Craig Drive (just east of Bell on 9th Avenue) Amarillo, TX 79106 www.bsahs.org A Co-Ministry of CHRISTUS Health and Baptist Community Services


online page

amarillomagonline.com Dress Code Extended Photo Gallery Take a look at more photos from “Retro Revival,” our fashion shoot with photographer, Davy Knapp.

Register to win

Submit your name and contact information to amarillomagonline.com/ contact this month for a chance to win a $100 gift card to Dillard’s. Helen Optebeke was the winner of last month’s giveaway.

Our thoughts…

Check out our blog where Michele and Drew Belle give you the inside scoop on stories, photo shoots and more.

We’re social!

Follow us (@AmarilloMag) on Twitter and like our Facebook page, Amarillo Magazine.

Contests, giveaways and more!

Like our Facebook page www.facebook.com/amarillomagazine to be eligible for weekly prizes and giveaways.

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Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011

Online Exclusive:

Our four models from “Retro Revival” met long before the fashion shoot. Read about their friendship and see behind-the-scenes photos from the shoot.

Take our survey

We need your help! In anticipation of our upcoming “Newcomers Guide,” we’ve created an online questionnaire and we want you to tell us your favorite local hangouts, activities and attractions. Visit amarillomagonline.com for more details. Participants will automatically be entered to win a wine tasting for six at Bar Z Winery.

We got a makeover!

Take a look at our website’s new design and features. Keep an eye out for online exclusives as well as weekly tips from local experts on cooking, beauty, fashion, finance and more.


Lizzie Mae’s Mercantile

2010

3,000 sq. ft. of Gifts and Home Decor in a Most Unique Cabin Setting

Huge Selection of Gift Ideas with Mother’s Day in Mind!

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May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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out & about

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Distinguished Service Award Luncheon

The Amarillo Area Women’s Forum honored local women at its Distinguished Service Award Luncheon on March 26 at the Amarillo Country Club. The annual event recognized Claudette Dove, Ellen Robertson Green, Janette Kelley, Kathryn Denko McAfee and Laura Street for their volunteerism and contributions to the community.

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1. Maisie Everett, Leticia Goodrich and Pat Irwin 2. Joe Street, Shelley Coar, Laura Street and Tylin Senvardarli 3. Ellen Robertson Green, Pauline Durrett Robertson and Gini Robertson-Baker 4. Jeanette Kelly and Georgene Salmon 5. Sally Werner and Claudette Dove photos by Donna Alexander

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Downtown Women’s Center Luncheon The Downtown Women’s Center hosted its Spring Luncheon on April 5 at the Amarillo Civic Center Heritage Room. The annual fundraiser, catered by the Ambassador Hotel, featured guest speaker Dr. Bruce Wilkinson, author of The New York Times bestseller, “The Prayer of Jabez.” 1. Priscilla Miller and Jill Watts 2. Nancy Rice and Cindy Barnes 3. David McCoy and Eveline Rivers 4. Alayna Kiskaden and Jeremy Lovelady 5. Melody Wilson, Janna Wartes and Nancy Hickman photos by Donna Alexander

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Skilled Nursing Home Care Aide Physical Therapy Main Office 806.351.8522 The Clairmont 806.322.0991

Canyonview Estates 806.358.0537

www.compassionhomecare.us

Occupational Therapy Speech Therapy Medical Social Worker Dietician

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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out & about

1

Hope Fest Banquet Sharing Hope Ministry held its Hope Fest Banquet on March 24 at the Amarillo Civic Center Grand Plaza. Proceeds from the annual dinner will benefit women who are incarcerated or recovering from destructive behavior. Food was provided by Joe’s Catering. 1. Bobby File and Greg Canada 2. Rod and Cheryl Tweet, Alynda Kimbrough and Teena Reinauer 3. Alicia Flake and Judy Lynch 4. Charlotte Thomas, Theresa McGee, Brian Thomas, Carolyn Nickerson and Cindy Johnson photos by Donna Alexander

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3

In the Pink Luncheon

The Greater Amarillo Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure held its annual “In the Pink” luncheon March 10 at the Amarillo Civic Center Heritage Room. The event, which was styled by Parie Designs and catered by BL Bistro, educated attendees about breast cancer and recognized survivors. The event featured guest speaker Dr. Banu K. Arun, professor of medical oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. 1. Tracy Archer, Amanda McCampbell and Sabrina Sisneros 2. Sunny Brush, Edwyna Honderich and Gerry Yock 3. Stephanie Smith, Maggie Velky and Farrar Mansfield 4. Lisa Hoff Davis, Lizzie Mason, Whitney Kelly and Amy-Beth Morrison 5. Loretta Woodard, Joyce Duggan and Rebecca Gregg photos by Donna Alexander

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Biology is the least of what makes someone a mother. ~ Happy Mother’s Day ~

Dudley E. Freeman, M.D. • Sarah Bergeron, RNC, WHNP George Barnett, M.D. • Cullen Hopkins, M.D. • Gregory A. May, M.D.

7620 Wallace Blvd. • Amarillo, Tx. 79124 • 806-359-5468

IF SAVER’S SWITCH® WASN’T SUCH A SMART BUSINESS MOVE, WE’D BE TEMPTED TO CALL IT A NO-BRAINER. It’s as easy as picking up the phone. It’s free…in fact, you’ll get a nice credit on your energy bill. It’s the Xcel Energy Saver’s Switch program. When you sign up, we simply install a small switch that cycles your AC on and off on the 10 or 15 hottest days of summer. Typically, no one will ever notice a degree of difference. But you’ll be helping us keep energy reliable and affordable when we all need it most.

Visit xcelenergy.com or call 1-800-481-4700 today.

© 2011 XCEL ENERGY INC.

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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out & about

1

Presbyterian Home for Children Banquet The Presbyterian Home for Children hosted its Roots and Wings fundraiser March 8 at the Amarillo Civic Center Heritage Room. Army combat veteran and author, Wes Moore, was the keynote speaker.

2

1. David Woodburn, Byron Gossett and Terry Caviness 2. Michelle Emmitt and Calley Sadler 3. Abby Rodgers, Shelby Stapp, Andi Veazey, Erin McLemore, Melissa Purser and Michele Rose 4. Jake and Traci Goodnight 5. Rose and Clay Thomas photos by Donna Alexander

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Power of the Purse Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center hosted its second annual Power of the Purse Luncheon on March 25 at the Amarillo Civic Center Heritage Room. Proceeds from the designer purse auction benefited the GiRL (Growing Relationships in Life) Power program. Political commentator Nicolle Wallace and makeup artist and TLC’s “What Not to Wear” regular Carmindy Bowyer were the keynote speakers.

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1. Suzi Miller, Carmindy and Diana Kim 2. Dr. Marjorie and Becca Jenkins 3. Marilyn Like, Claire Snead and Margaret Colquit 4. Mary Jane Hays and Pam Lary 5. Rita Bryant, Geneva Schaeffer, Helen Piehl and Barbara Bain 6. Lauren and Debbie Bonin photos by Donna Alexander

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Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011

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May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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the way i see it

Jon Mark Beilue

Waltzing is a feat with two left feet T

he last place I expected to find myself on Sunday afternoons was the Yellow Rock House Square Dance Center out on the Claude Highway. Until the middle of January, I didn’t even know there was a Yellow Rock House Square Dance Center on the Claude Highway. I’m not square dancing out there. No, I’m waltzing with about eight other couples. Or something “1-2-3, 1-2-3” that could pass for waltzing. Sometimes the way I traipse around on the dance floor on these afternoons would earn me a breathalyzer test in any other public venue. These Sunday afternoon waltz/ballroom dancing lessons over the past three months are not something I would pull out of thin air. A rehab patient told our neighbor, Susan Hunter, a nurse, how much fun waltzing was and she and her husband Steve should give it a try. So they enlisted some extended family as well as my wife, Sandy. Sandy wasn’t too keen on dancing with an invisible partner, so much so that she wanted me to go along. Hmmm, well it didn’t sound too bad. Two hours a Sunday, you say? Could be fun. I need some culture and variety in my life, and have long admired those who could get on the dance floor and trip the light fantastic. What could it hurt? Besides Sandy’s feet and my dwindling self-esteem. Probably the deciding factor was being thrown out there with several couples who were as waltz-challenged as I was. Misery loves company, and so does embarrassment. Jamie Sader, complete with wireless microphone, is our instructor. She has the patience of Job. In nearly three months her patience hasn’t run out, but in case it does, she also has a second degree black belt in one of the martial arts. She and her husband Dave, who operates the computer-generated music, make it look ridiculously easy and smooth when trying a new step. Then we try it and look like infants struggling to walk across the living room without breaking something. Two things about rhythm: It’s harder to spell and even harder to have. Some people are born dancers, who with just a little work glide across the floor from one dance move to another. Others, specifically myself, look like a cross between Gomer Pyle and Elaine Benes of “Seinfeld” shame. Must be the Baptist blood in me. We started out with a basic box waltz, which is the equivalent of reading “Run, Spot,

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Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011

Run” in waltzdom. After Jamie saw no one pulled a hamstring and got the basic dance step down, we moved on to other moves. Boy, did we. Left-turning box. Butterfly Position. Twirl the Vine. Waltz Away. Waltz Together. Solo Turn in Six. Twinkle to Sidecar. Twinkle to Banjo. Right Face Turn. Left Face Turn, Cantour and others. All the while, Sandy is whispering, “1-2-3, 1-2-3…” When Jamie incorporated “Twist the Vine” in our last few lessons, it brought back flashbacks of running through ropes during high school football practice. We have, on occasion, gone to the Dancin’ Center on Polk Street or watched Jamie and Dave and other experienced dancers go through advanced moves and I just shake my head. I don’t know if art students ever got to watch Michaelangelo work on the Sistine Chapel back in the 1500s, but if they did, they had to feel the same sense of awe. Especially when it all goes wrong for us. Just recently our class danced a complicated number – for us – called, ironically, “Dreams Come True.” Talk about a nightmare. At one point, we were all bouncing around in one corner and it looked like the bumper cars at Wonderland. At least I avoided the beginner’s mistake of raising my hands above my head and asking my wife, “What’s the deal?” When flubbing up, just keep moving and at least act like you know what you’re doing. Yet there are times, and it’s happening more frequently, when we all get it. The light bulb turns on, and the time is shortened when our brain programs the dance move and tells our feet. We are actually honestly ballroom dancing without making it look like a game of Twister. If there’s a dancing zone, we get in it for a while. And it’s happening more and more. To successfully go through all the moves of “Tips of My Fingers” is a rush. It’s fun. It’s like the heavens part and the light comes down on that little aluminum siding-covered building on the Claude Highway: “Hallelujah!” At one of our last lessons, I came in chewing gum, and didn’t bother throwing it away. Through “Tips of My Fingers,” I neither swallowed it or bit the inside of my cheek. That is how I measure progress. And a 1-2-3, 1-2-3… am

Jon Mark Beilue is a columnist for the Amarillo Globe-News. He can be reached at jon.beilue@amarillo.com or 345.3318.


dress code

etro R evival R Channel your favorite fashion icon

photos by Davy Knapp hairstyles by Ugly Press Hairdressing makeup by Christa Boyd models: Sharrisse Hulsey, Kira Mullins, Shan Allen and Shannon Wilson

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Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011


W

hoever said “don’t dwell in the past” obviously wasn’t a fashionista. This season, the past is present all over the runways from classic LBDs and bright suits to mod jewelry and oneshoulder dresses. Slip into another decade and pay homage to the fashion muses of yesteryear with retroinspired pieces.

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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dress code

1950s: Glamour

Girl

Capture Audrey Hepburn’s classic style with a little black dress and statement accessories. Add a belt for an instant waist whittler.

On Sharrise: Lotus Grace ¾-length sleeve dress $463, Lilly Finch Vince Camuto “Mista” slingback heels $110; Carolee pearl choker $60; Giovannio hat $108, Dillard’s Matte bangles $5 each, Possibilities Pearl clip earrings $22; sunglasses $30, Chico’s Hair by Beto, Ugly Press Hairdressing

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Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011


1960s:

Mod Maven

Take a cue from Andy Warhol’s muse, Edie Sedgewick, and pair tights or leggings with a mod mini. Top the outfit off with dramatic accessories to achieve Edie’s edgy look.

On Kira: Buffalo tunic $49; MICHAEL Michael Kors mesh open-toe sandals $160, Dillard’s Streets chain cuff $87, Raffkind’s Grey chain necklace $42; gold chain necklace $24; sterling silver ring $32; crystal and gemstone ring $32, Possibilities Gold disc earrings $26, Chico’s Merona fish net tights $8, Target Hair by Melissa Champion, Ugly Press Hairdressing

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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dress code

1970s:

Sultry Socialite

The Nicaraguan-born Bianca Jagger defined the disco era with her one-shoulder gowns and lavish jewelry. She may have skyrocketed to celeb status with her marriage to Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger, but it’s her style and substance that kept her there.

On Shan: Collective Concepts maxidress $69, Dillard’s Vanelli sandals $132, Raffkind’s Treska earrings $20, Possibilities Large crystal ring $28; gold cuffs $44 each; mother-ofpearl ring $26, Chico’s Hair by Beto and Melissa Champion, Ugly Press Hairdressing

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Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011


1980s: Working

Woman

Christie Brinkley was the ultimate uptown girl. The three-time Sports Illustrated cover model could work anything from a sexy bikini to a boyfriend blazer. Follow in her footsteps with a fitted pantsuit and power heels.

On Shannon: Antonio Melani blazer $199; Antonio Melani trousers $129; BCBG peep-toe pumps $110, Dillard’s Large oval necklace $54; wooden earrings $24, Chico’s Violet Love print tank $28, Possibilities Hair by Beto, Ugly Press Hairdressing

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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CHICOS.COM THE FORUM AT SONCY

���� South Soncy Road


home

urn your kitchen into a vintage vision with linens adorned with lively patterns and novelty prints. Choose a bold tablecloth that emanates the iconic checkerboard style of the 1950s or loud napkins and towels bursting with bright colors. But don’t get too carried away with your flashback. Avoid a kitschy kitchen by sticking with one decade’s style.

Clockwise from right: Le Jacquard Francais towel $23, JBS Linens; Mackenzie Childs table topper in Courtly Check $385, Et Cetera; Garnier-Thiebaut cup towels $23; Garnier Thiebaut napkins $11, Little Brown House; Mackenzie Childs green border linen napkin $25, Et Cetera

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Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011

photos by PAM LARY PHOTOGRAPHY


Clockwise from right: Food network stain-resistant tablecloth $39.99; Sonoma Life + Style Pasadena kitchen towels $11.99, Kohl’s Jessie Steele Living Dish Towels $21, JBS Linens RE style kitchen towel $2.99, Target

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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Ready for a warm-up?

2011 Nissan Altima

McGavock Nissan 4401 South Georgia, Amarillo, TX | 354-3550 | www.mcgavocknissan.com


Cover Story

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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Alyssa Evalle, 20, Amarillo College

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lyssa Evalle’s feet are firmly planted in the soil of Amarillo. Originally from San Jose, California, Alyssa was homeschooled by her mother and raised with a family who ingrained in her an appreciation of nature’s beauty. As a biology major at Amarillo College, Alyssa has immersed herself in the study of all aspects of things green or flowering and intends to become an organic farmer. n e e “I chose biology because I knew that I wanted my career The Gr to involve the natural and earth sciences,” Alyssa explains. r e Think “My love of nature started at an early age and was fostered by the freedom of home education. My interest in ecology led to a heightened awareness of environmental issues and stewardship of the earth, which is why I favor small-scale organic farming over commercial agriculture.” Community involvement is a concept deep-rooted in Alyssa’s heart and she hopes to educate others on the benefit of organic produce and betterment of povertystricken areas in Amarillo. “I would like to start my own co-op and give back to the community,” Alyssa confesses as she peers down at her TOMS shoes. “After college, I want to raise awareness about organic farming and help people get back to the earth.” Alyssa’s parents always encouraged her to explore her own interests, ensuring a fruitful future for their eldest daughter. Surrounded by her family’s garden that flourished with everything from cilantro and jalapeños to strawberries and pumpkins, Alyssa was exposed at an early age to what the earth has to offer. “Giving back to our community and our world is what makes our sojourn on earth worthwhile,” Alyssa declares. “Although we may die and return gton, ation: Washin n ti es to the earth, we have the opportunity to use our d el v a tr My No. 1 . I would st life to give life to others. This is why the idea of oa C st a E e th of ll a d n a e a cooperative organic farm is so appealing to me. . th .C , D illiamsburg W c ri to I would be able to nurture my interest in plants but also is h it is love to v e Lincoln th t, positively interact with my neighbors to foster a healthy en m u on e Washington M and interconnected community.” th d n a se White Hou After continuing her education and earning her bachelor’s Memorial, the And to . on ti u degree in biology or plant and soil sciences, Alyssa desires to do it st In e my Smithsonian er h w research and discover a new species of microorganisms or plant and is is t a th ecause considering obtaining her master’s and doctorate degrees. But her plans Rhode Island b rew up. do not just consist of career-minded goals. grandmother g “I eventually want to be a wife, homemaker and a home-school o, n sing, play pia s, k mom,” Alyssa admits. oo b d a re I y My hobbies: While Alyssa’s college life revolves around science, she still finds , knit and pla rs oo td ou ch et sk , g time to participate in school activities. As a member of the Honors in ik h go . y il m fa Program, Blue Blazers and Baptist Student Ministry, her two years at y m games with Amarillo College have been gratifying. Through her Christian mores ant and passion for the earth, Alyssa measures success not by setting goals sus Christ. I w Je : el od m le ro d n My a e but by glorifying God and serving others, she says. ic if love, self-sacr e th te “My parents have trained me to always strive to do my best and go ed la z u li a em to and margin r oo p e the extra mile,” Alyssa proclaims. “Although it may not always be the th r fo n compassio . d easy choice, I do a task to the best of my ability. At the end of a day, I te ra st on em rd want to say that I did not waste any time, resources or relationships.” that my Savio

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Cydney Friemel, 21, West Texas A&M University

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t egyn Kelly’s a M : b jo m a re d My de is nel. Her attitu n a h C s ew is N ox F ve the way she lo I d n a , g n ti intimida . le in their place able to put peop e t a poster in th h g ou b I e: ic v d My best a ve framed and a h I t a th e d ra es, second g e wall at all tim m so on e m h or kept wit ng adventure, ri a d a er th ei “Life is en Keller. nothing.”-Hel I lishment: When p om cc a st te a . My gre od into my life G d te ep cc a y finall

hile growing up on her family’s ranch in Vega with three older siblings, Cydney Friemel was exposed to a strong work ethic and picked up a plethora of trades. “I have always been very independent, being the youngest, and can put up a pretty good fight,” Cydney boasts. “Anything my brothers ever could do, I always made sure I could do the same thing, too. The job might not get done as good as if they were doing it, and Dad is probably out a few bucks for letting me do it, but I don’t think there are too many girls that can weld, drive semis/tandems/combines/grainThe carts/load-alls, dehorn calves, and just get plumr e i Financ covered in caca, to be polite, as good as I can.” Before switching her degree for the third and final time at WTAMU, Cydney held a broad range of jobs from interning at a veterinary clinic to waitressing at her aunt’s restaurant in Umbarger, trying to figure out what career field she wanted to pursue. But it was with her first business course at WTAMU’s College of Business that Cydney settled on finance. “I find finance fascinating in the fact that I use it on a daily basis as it captures my experiences and life ambitions in an entrepreneurial focus,” Cydney explains.“”I enjoy the energy levels of the futures markets and the stress of managing the risk for my growing cattle operation. Finance allows me to pursue my business career goals, yet still remain connected to the agricultural world I was raised in.” Cydney attributes her fortitude to her family and finds inspiration in her parents. “They work side by side on a daily basis and have built themselves from the ground up,” she affirms. “They have raised an outstanding family and stick together through the good times and the bad.” In addition to raising her own cattle and balancing school, Cydney is a commodities broker at Brock Thompson Trading, president of the Agribusiness team at WTAMU and project leader for SIFE (Students In Free Enterprise), which took home its 17th consecutive win at the Regional Championship in March. Graduating in May with a finance degree and accounting and agribusiness minor, Cydney will migrate in June to Minneapolis, Minnesota to join Cargill, Inc. as a Commodity Merchant Trainee. “[It’s] not much of a summer,” Cydney jokes, “But I am excited to begin a new chapter… I am curious myself to understand what exactly this title [at Cargill] means.” As far as success in the real world goes, Cydney’s banking on it and is certain no matter what obstacles God throws in her path, she will overcome them. “With each event I encounter, I always take a lesson away from it,” Cydney declares. “As I learn from them, I realize that what I thought I couldn’t do, I now can. My boss [at Thompson Trading] told me that the best way to learn how to trade is to trade your own account. After fully understanding the risk I was about to take, I did just what he had told me to... Several tears and a few gray hairs later, I guess you could say that I understand a tad bit more of what “risk” is and now can push myself further and take on new opportunities when they present themselves.” May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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Sarah Clark, 22, Amarillo College

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My dream job: I’d love to work for a nonprofit organization eithe r as a PR person or a public interest lawy er. I also wouldn’t mind working for a mag azine. My necessities: Monster energy drinks, my dog, camera, journal and of course, my family. My mantra: This world is a dangerous place, but it is human na ture to care about the community and thos e who live in it.

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vercoming a hearing disability since the age of 18 months has been the least of Sarah’s feats. “Human beings evolved to cope,” Sarah states. “Anyone with a disability overcomes it in one way or another.” Enrolled in REPA (Regional Education Program for the Deaf), Sarah learned how to communicate by reading lips and responding orally and admits to having forgotten most sign language. While the ability to speak and attend e Th regular schools has benefited Sarah, it has also r e t h put her at a disadvantage. g i F “The real challenge was the social, emotional, and mental challenges that accompanied my hearing impairment,” Sarah explains. “There is a catch-22. “I’ve never been fully accepted by the deaf community and I’ve never been fully accepted by the hearing world. As a result, I occupy a grey area that is a No Man’s land. As a teenager I struggled with this in a lot of different ways… and it’s only as a young adult that I finally accepted my lot in life and decided to give ’em all hell while I’m here.” While taking a sabbatical from her education after graduating from Tascosa High School where she was editor of the newspaper, Sarah lived in Albuquerque and managed three jobs to provide for herself but realized she needed to return to Amarillo to continue her schooling. At Amarillo College, Sarah carried over her knack for media from high school and has remained active in the journalism community, working as a page editor and photographer for the Ranger and holding the positions of assistant editor and editor for the AC Current. She was inducted in Phi Theta Kappa this past semester and received second place at the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association competition last month. “I’ve been a cashier, a waitress and a camp counselor–there’s nothing I can’t do except be a telemarketer,” Sarah says. “But give me a bit and I’ll figure out a way around that, too.” Ultimately, Sarah wants to earn her Bachelor of Arts and juris doctorate and eventually work for a nonprofit organization in the Public Relations Department or as a public interest lawyer. “I have the goal of establishing myself as an attorney–preferably in Amarillo–but I prefer to take life one bite at a time,” Sarah says. “The areas of public interest as well as the position of a federal public defender appeal to me the most.” Following in the footsteps of her father, attorney Warren Clark, is also a dream of hers. Like father, like daughter, it’s in Sarah’s genes to analyze, argue and prove she’s right, no matter the consequences. Her father’s advice, “Do the right thing. Who cares about whose feelings are hurt? Just do what’s right because it’ll pay off in the long run,” is the mantra Sarah follows. “I can’t stand being told I can’t do something or if I’m limited… If I’m dismissed or overlooked, the only thing I can do is say, ‘Oh yeah? Watch me.’”


Hanna Osteen, 21, Amarillo College

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hen Hanna Osteen traded in the viola for the cello in the seventh grade, she The didn’t foresee a future in the spotlight. As her last year at Amarillo High School flew by, usician M she was still at a loss as to what field to pursue. “I really had no idea what I was going to do next, but I knew that I wanted to continue my education,” Hanna says. “One day I found a poster at Amarillo High advertising for the orchestra at Amarillo College. I went and auditioned because I knew that I wanted to continue playing cello.” Hanna’s graduation gift from her grandfather, a new cello, could not have been more timely and appropriate. After spending a morning shopping in Albuquerque without success, Hanna finally found her match in a mysterious, yet elegant cello abandoned in the storage room of a music store, which she aptly christened “Lady.” When asked the whereabouts of her old cello as she gracefully glides the bow across the strings to the tune of Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1 in G major, Hanna coyly confesses she named it “The Tramp.” After her audition, Amarillo College soon informed Hanna she would receive a large scholarship. She was delighted to have the opportunity to foster her cellist skills while studying general courses. However, her college education has not come without obstacles. “When I got the letter offering me a scholarship, I started to realize how much college costs and I knew my family wasn’t able to help me out,” Hanna says. “I decided to take the scholarship because I knew I could definitely put the knowledge of music to good use whether I pursued a music degree later on or not.” Joining the labor force at age 15, Hanna has continued working throughout her stay at Amarillo College while maintaining excellent grades and staying active within her school. She is the Amarillo College Student Government Association’s historian, member of Phi Theta Kappa and a Blue Blazer and will travel to England this month with the Honors Program. “I think the ability to balance a job, extracurricular activities and challenging course work has strengthened my ability to manage time and stress and has proved my desire to get an education and be successful,” Hanna claims. “Everyone has the ability to get good grades and be involved in their school and their community, but my willingness to work hard is what has gotten me scholarships and awards.” And Hanna’s determination and diligence has certainly paid off. She received a full academic scholarship to The University of Texas at Arlington, an accomplishment Hanna is more than grateful for, she says. “I have always been worried about all of the loans I was going to have to take out when I went away to school,” Hanna admits, “But God has certainly taken care of everything. I feel like that scholarship was an answer to all my prayers and it’s everything that I’ve been working for.”

hes playlist stretc y M : on ti ec ll My iPod co orak, Queen, v D i, ld a iv V , blime, from Bach ed Zepplin, Su L , os ob -L la il inatra STYX, V iday, Frank S ol H e li il B , 5 Maroon g in between. and everythin ed The day I receiv t: en om m t es d as at My prou iversity of Tex n U e h T om e. fr a letter I had a full rid t a th e m g in Arlington tell y. a mom someda e b o T : b jo m a My dre

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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Sarah Thomas, 21, West Texas A&M University

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s an advertising and public relations major at WTAMU, Sarah Thomas recognizes the value of working with others. “I know when to stop and listen,” Sarah says. “I think great leaders know when to stop talking and just listen to what people have to say.” After transferring from the University of Texas at Austin, Sarah was undecided on what degree to pursue but knew she wanted to work with the media in the future. With the advice and encouragement of a professor at WTAMU, Sarah chose Advertising and Public Relations as her major. Graduating in May, the Wolfforth native plans to continue her education at WTAMU and attend its post-baccalaureate program to earn her teaching certification in which she will work directly with students next spring. Describing herself as a “go-getter,” Sarah has kept herself busy juggling schoolwork and several clubs and organizations. As a member of the Delta Zeta sorority, Sarah served as Panhellenic vice president, Public Relations Chair and Courtesy Chair and is participates in Greeks for Christ. She is a member of the Advertising/Public Relations Club and is currently trying to establish a new organization, West Texas Beauties, which will offer insight on what student life is like outside of athletics. “I am always willing and ready to take on any challenge that is set before me,” Sarah asserts. “I don’t like to settle for anything that is less than perfect. I want to go that extra mile. I have a willingness learn and I think it is so important to continue to further your knowledge each and every day.” Sarah credits her father’s nurturing nature for her zeal. “[My father] has shown me the importance of hard work and dedication,” Sarah says. “He has guided and loved me. He has given me the tools that I need to succeed. He supports, loves and believes in me. He holds a special place in my heart and I will always be a Daddy’s Girl. [He] is such an amazing man and if I can be half the person he is, I will be happy with my life.” Sarah’s brother, New Orleans Saints tight end David Thomas, is also a source of motivation for her. “My brother has shown me what it takes to succeed,” Sarah says. “He has worked harder than anyone I have ever known to be where is. He continues to inspire me to be a better person and to chase my dreams. My drive comes from knowing that I can do whatever I want to do if I set my mind to it.” With drive comes goals and Sarah has them carefully laid along with values that will surely take her to the top. “I want to strive to be the best I can be and always challenge myself to a better person,” Sarah claims. “I want be a loving wife and raise a family that is surrounded by love and built on a strong foundation. I don’t ever want my failures to keep me from reaching the next goal, but rather motivate me to work harder. I want to be able to look back on my life and know that I did everything I could be the most successful woman I could be.” am

The municator Com

My No. 1 tr avel destina tion: My ho favorite plac me. My e to be is wit h my whole family. My dream jo b: Secretivel y, I have alw wanted to be ays a Broadway Star. But in to be able to order do that you have to be ab sing, which le to I cannot do. On a serious my realistic note, dream job is to do PR for school distric a t. My words of wisdom for younger wo Don’t ever g men: ive up on yo u r goals. They the key to y are our future. It is up to you you do with what that key. I w ould challen you to unlo ge ck as many doors as pos by getting in sible volved and m eeting as m people as you any can.

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May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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special feature

A Second Home Help and hope for special needs children April Brownlee

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or parents of children with special needs, decisions are driven by a desire to help the child thrive, even when the future is a glaring question mark. Specialized Therapy Services founder, Karen Day, had a dream: providing these precious ones with the skills needed to fully integrate into society. Karen’s dedication has given two Amarillo women and their children a home away from home.

An Unexpected Surprise

STS founder, Karen Day, and Abigail Martinez enjoy Dr. Seuss together.

Chelsea Thurmon’s first Mother’s Day gift was her son, Jayden. Born 10 weeks premature, Jayden’s arrival was the first of many surprises he would bring with him. “They don’t know why he came early. We had gone to the doctor and gotten a sonogram and found out he was a boy. He came three days later,” Chelsea says. At just a week old, two-pound-twelve-ounce Jayden suffered a major seizure. An MRI uncovered a bleed in his brain. Six months later, Jayden was diagnosed with cerebral palsy. Now almost 3, Jayden is thriving and walking and doing many things the Thurmons were told he might never do. “The first time he walked meant so much to us. It’s awesome to any family, but it was extra special to us,” says Chelsea from her home where, now 18-weeks pregnant with her second child, she’s on bed rest for the remainder of the pregnancy. Jayden spends part of most days at Hands on Achievement Academy, a school for children with special needs and their non-delayed peers. Chelsea says Jayden’s time there, melded with a surgical procedure to lengthen his leg muscles, changed everything. “He’s almost three years old and he can make eight-word sentences and have a conversation with you. He’s super smart. He started Hands on Achievement in August and it’s done wonders for him.” photos by Chriselda Photography

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From Unemployed to Entrepreneur Housed at Amarillo’s Specialized Therapy Services, Hands on Achievement Academy is the vision of owner Karen Day. A speech therapist by trade, Karen was fired one day back in 2002. The next day, with just $150 in the bank, she had a new business, one very part-time employee, three contracts and a rough-around-theedges dream. “I was so hurt I didn’t think I would live. I cried for 12 hours. Then I went out and got three contracts,” Karen says. Within a month, Specialized Therapy Services would become an LLC. Karen has been busy polishing her dream for the past nine years. Now a bustling small business, Specialized Therapy Services was recently named one of the “100 Fastest Growing Inner City Businesses in America” by the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City and Bloomberg Business. STS provides speech, physical and occupational therapy services for infants through teenagers. “I think we hire the highest quality of therapists who stay on the edge of what’s new and innovative,” Karen says. More than just cutting-edge, Karen says her facility is one where every child is accepted just as they are. “I feel like everyone should be able to be in their community. We provide one of the first small microsocieties for families to be able to function.” Once STS took off, Karen knew there was more work to be done. Hands on Achievement Academy followed. The therapeutic-education private school has students age three to 10 and five full-time staff members dedicated solely to it. Four are certified teachers and have additional special education training, not to mention the host of physical, occupational and speech therapists also working with students. “The thing that impresses me most about our school is that our kids own that school emotionally. They know they belong here and they are

“The thing that impresses me most about our school is that our kids own that school emotionally. They know they belong here and they are 100 percent accepted and loved.” - Karen Day

100 percent accepted and loved. And challenged. Loving them is not enough,” says Karen. With STS growing and thriving as much as the children it serves, Karen wanted to see her vision even further. But to accomplish everything, she’s had to learn more about the business side of things. Helping Hands, a non-profit started by Karen last year, was created to help fund what STS couldn’t. “It’s taken me from being a therapist to having to learn and understand business. That’s been the hardest for me because I have this tendency to want to give everything away,” she says. Karen’s dream is like a tree that just keeps growing. Out of STS blossomed Hands on Achievement from which Helping Hands grew. Now, another branch is sprouting–Amarillo Area Autism in Action.

Ariana Trevino, Malachai Colston and Bryson Grays take time to read.

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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special feature

The Silent Treatment Alanna Hepler remembers distinctly the day her son, Ethan, stopped speaking. “It was around Christmastime and I was getting some cookies out of the oven and he said ‘Hot,’ and I said, ‘That’s right. Hot.’ And that was his last word,” she recalls. She remembers the process. “He had a regression around 18-months. He had about 20 words and was starting to join them, like, ‘Momma more’ and he slowly stopped combining and eventually stopped talking.” And Alanna remembers the exact day and time Ethan was diagnosed with Autism. “It was August 17, 2007 at 2:30 in the afternoon. I started to cry. My husband started to cry. And Dr. Habersang said, ‘It doesn’t change anything… he’s still the same sweet boy he always was,’” says Alanna. “That was also my first day of graduate school. I got the worst news I’ve ever heard and then went and sat through the first three hours of my master’s level class. I couldn’t tell you what we talked about.” Already a social worker at STS when her son was diagnosed, Alanna was well-equipped with a wealth of knowledge that would keep her afloat in the rough waters ahead. Having worked for Karen long before Ethan’s diagnosis, Alanna spends her days expertly navigating the medical system and helping families advocate for their children and cope with a devastating diagnosis. “Just like you sometimes have to have permission to die… you also have to have permission to grieve,” she says thoughtfully. “Maybe it’s because they walk and they run and they’re beautiful and healthy and it’s hard to see their disability until you get to know them. None of us chooses that. You’re grieving because you’ve had an ambiguous loss. Your child is not the same child you thought you gave birth to.” Alanna was around at STS long before the birth of Hands on Achievement Academy. She’s seen countless children embraced by a community that accepts them as they are. She knows all too intimately what that kind of community means to families of special children, especially what it means to the children themselves. “Ethan felt very lost in this world, very overwhelmed. They made him feel safe. STS and Hands on Achievement are safe for our children. It’s their place,” Alanna declares. Ethan may have found a home in Hands on Achievement Academy, and now Alanna and others parenting autistic children have their home, too. Under the umbrella of her Helping Hands non-profit, Karen created Amarillo Area Autism in Action, a group dedicated to parent support, advocacy, community education and awareness. Their first Autism Awareness Walk took off in April. “There’s just so much Karen wants to do for our community… with the school and support group,” Alanna says. Now 6, Ethan Hepler has come a long way. Still non-verbal in the traditional sense, Alanna and her son have found other ways to “talk.” “I never knew I’d have to use pictures to communicate with my child. I never knew I’d have to learn sign language to talk to my child. But because of that, I can talk to any child here [at Hands on Achievement

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Alanna Hepler and her six-year-old son, Ethan.

Academy] now,” she says. “He says ‘ummmm, ahh,’ and he’s even started growling. He’s expressing things. He has an opinion. He can show you whether or not he wants to do something or if he’s angry. I’ll sign to him, ‘I know you’re mad.’ His teachers and therapists have said to me it’s like he’s been in a coma and is waking up and he is now going through those terrible twos.” STS and its components continue to grow and evolve to meet needs as they come. For Ethan Hepler, it may soon mean getting a tangible voice. “They’re working on getting him a DynaVox Maestro here at STS. Once the child knows the symbols, they can use the computer device to give them a voice,” said Alanna. Alanna continues to go the extra mile for Ethan and for the families she sees as STS’ resident social worker. She’s even pursuing the highest-level license. “I knew my current licensure wouldn’t allow me to do what I needed to for our family. I knew I was going to have to be Ethan’s voice and be that person people in our community could call to get the help they need,” she says. For Chelsea, the lesson learned in all this is simply to seek help. “Of course you’re going to grieve. Of course you’re going to be mad. But all in all, it’s still your child and you’re still going to love them no matter what. They’re special, unique. Do all you can to make them thrive.” There will be plenty of help with that if Karen has her way. For her, the dream she’s been polishing all these years is now a gem and the facets to be found on it are April Brownlee limitless. April is a fundraising “I am spiritually professional, freelance writer connected to this and mother of three. You can see more of her work at business. When thinkabink.blogspot.com it breathes, I breathe.” am


May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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inspire

A Hidden Treasure down the Street Kathy Mitchell

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eizing a pleasant sunrise, I trot out my front door to get some exercise before tackling another day as a modern working woman (which by my definition is a sleep-deprived, multi-tasking female swimming in activities with eternal to-do lists and self-imposed personal expectations that exceed logical limits). A brisk pace takes me down the street where I spot my neighbor watering her flowers. I wave. She waves. It’s been our routine for years. As I make my way down the block, I remember a very different scenario two decades earlier when we were newcomers to the neighborhood and life was simpler. These neighbors would walk past our yard as my husband and I played with our young children and we didn’t just wave and continue with our busy lives, we stopped what we were doing and enjoyed each other’s company. I near the corner thinking I must make time to visit with her soon. I look back over my shoulder and slow my pace but before I can reverse my course, a flurry of thoughts swarm and I am contemplating the eight items that were scribbled on my to-do list before my feet made contact with my bedroom floor this morning. Gotta keep going! I pick up the pace again and take three hurried steps but hesitate with the fourth as I look back over my shoulder once more. With no further wavering, I cut a path directly to my neighbor. Standing in the dew of the morning, the sun filtering through a break in the clouds, we catch up on things we remember about each other – our families and the other usual subjects. I think about the time I walked with my children down the block to take these neighbors some cake. I think about their dog long since passed. I think about the friendliness they always shared. After those first few familiar minutes, I spend the next half-hour visiting with what turns out to be nothing less than a stranger who just happens to have been my neighbor for more than twenty years. I learn how she ended up living in Amarillo. I learn about her husband’s military service. I learn about her early days as a working woman in service to our country in a time of war. And I marvel at the fact that I am hearing these things for the first time. All I can think about is how I have neglected this lovely woman who surely could have used some company at times and how I have cheated

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We have lost contact with a generation of Americans who possess insights and life lessons so rich and deep. myself out of the richness of having known her better. I glance down the block and wonder what kind of treasures my other neighbors could share about their lives. What have I missed while my nose was buried in thousands of to-do lists? My thoughts turn to my 83-year-old father and the many questions I’ve been asking about his childhood lately. Those questions have opened his memories to times long forgotten and I am learning at least one new priceless fact about him every week. I ask my neighbor if she’s sharing her stories with her family, and she assures me she is. In our time-starved confusion of modern life, we struggle to stay connected to one another. We socialize electronically, hurriedly, in oneand two-sentence snippets and tell ourselves we’re benefitting from the ability to keep in touch with our loved ones near and far. Technology has enabled us to communicate with ever-increasing speed to a rapidly


Shouldn’t dining with friends be about the laughter versus the worry of a bad reaction to certain foods? People with food allergies live with the knowledge that some of the very things that should sustain life may take it away. In time, the worry over exposure to foods to which they are severely sensitive can become daunting. They may begin to avoid parties or eating out with friends and family, possibly leading to feelings of isolation or even depression.

expanding audience, yet our ability to communicate deeply and effectively has not progressed in my lifetime, has arguably regressed, and we have lost contact with a generation of Americans who possess insights and life lessons so rich and deep that no word short of tragic can describe the weight of that loss. As I listen to my neighbor’s accounts of her younger years, I absorb her wisdom and wish that every American could hear her and my father talk about growing up during the Great Depression and about their collective sacrifices made during World War II. It occurs to me that on nearly every street lives an older man or woman who owns a similar treasure of memories. They don’t hide these from us. They are anxious to share their wealth of experiences and they are deserving of our respect and friendship. As I leave my neighbor, I promise her I will no longer be a stranger. It is a promise I intend Kathy Mitchell Kathy is a human resources to keep – even if director by day and a freelance it means I must writer by night. place a visit with her at the top of my to-do list. am

The good news is that innovative ways of managing food allergies – even in social or restaurant situations – can bring back a sense of freedom and confidence. Proper identification by a certified allergist, followed by expert instruction on avoidance of and substitution for foods that trigger reactions – including the right way to conduct a “food challenge” – hold the promise for a brighter and happier tomorrow.

It’s Time to Feel Better!

With increased awareness, proper diagnosis and a comprehensive management program, you can overcome everyday challenges and take control of your health and well-being. Welcome back to the good life!

To find out more, contact Allergy A.R.T.S. at (806) 353-7000 or visit our Web site at www.allergyarts.com

6842 Plum Creek Drive Amarillo, Texas 79124

Constantine Saadeh, M.D., FACP, FACR

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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inspire

Th e Kin dne s s of St r ang ers I Kelli Bullard

t was a perfect spring day when I picked up the phone to hear my sister’s unsteady voice. “Mom had a heart attack,” she said. “They’ve airlifted her to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, and they’re not sure she’s going to make it.” Mom? How could that be? At 75 years old, she was the picture of health. Dad had just turned 80 but they were both in excellent health and still travelled frequently. At the time of the phone call, they were a thousand miles from their home in Ft. Worth. They had spent the day helping my uncle on his farm in Minnesota. After several hours of mowing (with a push mower, no less!), Mom started having chest pains. “Just take me back to the motel and let me rest a little,” she told my dad. But his stubbornness won out and she reluctantly agreed to go to the emergency room. By the time they arrived and got inside, Mom went into cardiac arrest. Her heart stopped and the medical personnel had to shock her twice to bring her back. The last thing they told my dad as they loaded her onto the helicopter was, “We’ll give you a call if something happens in-flight.” Dad got in his car and headed toward Rochester, silently willing his phone not to ring. It did, though. The hospital called to ask permission to take Mom into surgery. In the meantime, my sisters and I were pacing the floor, worried about Mom, of course, but also worried about Dad driving all alone in a strange city after dark and we were too far away to help. Dad arrived at the edge of the city close to midnight and didn’t have

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Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011

a clue how to get to the Mayo Clinic. Spotting a woman standing on a street corner, he pulled over and explained his dilemma. She gave him directions and even offered to ride along and make sure he found it (which he politely declined). He made his way to the sprawling complex, only to face the next challenge. Which entrance should he take, and where should he park the car? To say the Mayo Clinic is huge is an understatement. It occupies roughly 15 million square feet and employs almost 32,000 doctors, residents and medical personnel. Because it was past midnight, the streets were empty except for a few late-night partiers. Dad stopped in front of a nightclub and asked for help from a couple standing on the curb. The woman said, “Wait here and I’ll be right back.” She ran inside the club and came back with a parking permit in her hand. “Just put this on your dashboard and park in the lot out back,” she said. “Then follow this sidewalk to the entrance.” It turned out that the entrance was locked for the night but a security guard offered to let him in anyway. He even went the extra mile and helped my dad find the right wing and floor where my mom was. By the time Dad arrived, she was out of surgery and stable. The doctor had put a stent in her artery, and other than the inconvenience of having to lie flat on her back for several hours, she was going to be fine. Relief washed over me when Dad called with the good news. But it wasn’t until later that I heard the rest of the story–the amazing account


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I wish I could hug the security guard who walked those hallways with my dad. of all the people who were miraculously in the right place at the right time. I wish I could hug the security guard who walked those hallways with my dad, the woman who gave him the parking permit, the one who offered directions and assistance. They are all heroes in my eyes, angels who came to the rescue at his time of need. Today I am so thankful that my mom is still with us. A few months ago we celebrated her 76th birthday and I have purposed not to take a single one of these days for granted. Most of all, I keep my eyes open for a chance to repay the kindness of strangers. No matter how small the gesture may seem at the time, who knows? I might be an angel in disguise for someone. And you might be too. am

Kelli Bullard Kelli Bullard is Community Relations Director at Trinity Fellowship Church. An avid reader, she usually has three books going at a time and enjoys discussing them with her monthly book club. Kelli and her husband, Steve, have two teenagers, Jancey and J.P.

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Join us at the 2011

March of Dimes Walk on April 30th!

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

45


what’s cooking?

M o m’s t he Wo r d

S

it back and relax, Mom. It’s time for someone else to do the cooking and the dishes. Even the junior chefs of the household can whip up these simple, yet scrumptious meals in 30 minutes or less. What better way to tell Mom “I love you” than surprising her with a homemade gift from the heart on her Special Day?

photos by Shannon Richardson recipes provided by T and Andy Price, Real Food Company

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Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011


Chicken and Black Bean Quesadillas

Pasta with Peas and Bacon

Pita Pizzas

Pork Tenderloin Sandwiches

with Avocado Cream

with Chipotle Barbecue Sauce and Cilantro Slaw

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

47


what’s cooking? Pasta with Peas and Bacon 1 pound linguine 1½ cups grated parmesan ½ cup half and half 6-8 slices cooked bacon, chopped ¾ -1 cup frozen peas Reserved pasta water Red pepper flakes Salt and pepper Cook pasta in salted, boiling water until tender. Dip out about 2 cups of the pasta water; drain pasta and return to hot pan. Immediately add parmesan, half and half, and stir until cheese is melted, adding pasta water until desired consistency. Stir in bacon, peas, salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes to taste. Serve warm. Makes four to six servings

Chicken and Black Bean Quesadillas with Avocado Cream 4-6 large flour tortillas 2 cups cooked chicken, shredded 2 cups pepper jack cheese, grated 1 can black beans, rinsed and drained Pickled jalapeno peppers Chopped onion Other toppings of choice Lay tortillas on work surface and divide ingredients between them, placing fillings on one side of the tortilla. Fold over and spray with cooking spray. Place on preheated griddle or skillet, turning often, and cook until golden brown and cheese is melted. Avocado Cream 1 large, ripe avocado Juice of one lime 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro ¼ cup sour cream Salt and pepper Blend all ingredients in a blender or food processor. Serve as dipping sauce for quesadillas.

Pork Tenderloin Sandwiches with Chipotle Barbecue Sauce and Cilantro Slaw 1 pork tenderloin (about 1 ½-2 pounds) Sandwich rolls, toasted Pat pork dry; rub with olive oil, salt and pepper. Cook on grill (indoor or outdoor), for about 30 minutes, turning often, until internal temperature reaches 165 degrees. Brush on barbecue sauce and cook a few more minutes. Let rest about 15 minutes before slicing. Spread toasted rolls with a little sauce, top with pork and slaw (or serve slaw on the side).

Cilantro Slaw 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/3 cup chopped cilantro ½ cup mayo ½ cup sour cream Juice of one lime 1 tablespoon sugar Salt and pepper 1 package slaw mix Mix all first seven ingredients together, pour over slaw mix and toss to coat.

Chipotle Barbecue Sauce 1 cup ketchup 1 tablespoon brown sugar 1 tablespoon mustard 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons chipotle in adobo Mix all ingredients together in medium saucepan. Simmer a few minutes over low heat.

Makes four to six servings

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Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011

Pita Pizzas Build your own, according to taste. Pita breads (we like Ezekial in the frozen section) Pizza sauce 2-3 cups Italian blend cheese Sliced pepperoni, browned Italian Sausage or Canadian Bacon Black or green olives Chopped onions, bell peppers, sundried tomatoes, assorted fresh vegetables Brush both sides of pita with olive oil; place on baking sheet. Top each with sauce, cheese and desired toppings. Bake in preheated 475 degree oven until beginning to brown and cheese is melted.


The

Real Scoop Minimize your KP duty with these time-saving tips Put cooking and cleaning efforts on the backburner with these pointers from T and Andy Price. Cook a whole chicken (stovetop or oven roasted). You will save money and have enough meat for a couple of recipes (soup, quesadillas, chicken salad or pasta). In a pinch, buy a store-bought roasted chicken. When using Italian sausage, remove the casings and cook the whole package; use what you need, then freeze the rest for quick pizza, pasta or frittata. Make a list of three to five of your family’s favorite quick-fix meals, then stock your pantry and freezer with the ingredients for those times you are tempted to grab “fast food.” When preparing a casserole, soup, or stew, make enough for a second meal and freeze for later. Keep crumbs for fruit crisps in the freezer; pull out what you need the next time you bake. (Mix together, by hand, 1 cup each flour, oats and brown sugar, ½ teaspoon salt and 1 stick soft butter.) Brinner (Breakfast for Dinner) is usually a quick, tasty meal and you almost always have the ingredients. Instead of frying your bacon on the stovetop, lay strips out on a baking sheet and cook at 400 degrees until crisp, about 10 minutes. You’ll save time on clean-up after you dine. Craving more cooking tips? Then visit amarillomagonline.com where you can submit questions and comments for T and Andy and get more advice, whether you’re an expert chef or a novice cook.

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

49


Wo m ePUBLISHING n in A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION CREATED BY AMARILLO GLOBE-NEWS CUSTOM

Women in Business

Business


Women

in

Business

Maria Navarez, Amarillo National Bank

Amarillo National Bank Current Position: Credit card manager/banking officer. I process new merchant accounts for credit card processing, install equipment at the merchant site, provide backup to all credit card merchants to assist with trouble shooting. Years in Business: I have been with Amarillo National Bank for six years and six months. Education/Certifications: High School graduate Professional Memberships: Women Banking Association Greatest Professional Accomplishment: Becoming a bank officer and cross training in all of the areas in the Electronic Banking Department. A Word of Advice: Raise your spirits and follow your heart. Sometimes we put our goals and dreams aside to raise a 52 W OME N I N B U S INE S S P R O F IL E S

family. At any age it’s never too late to follow your dreams. If an opportunity is given to you go for it and be fearless. It will be a great experience and well worth it. Business Philosophy: I strive to always do my best, take great care of our customers and get the job done right the first time. Interests and Hobbies: When I am not working, I love being outdoors. I work out, five to six times a week and love being involved with my kids’ sports (baseball, basketball and track). Springtime is here and I love to have cookouts and try new recipes. Spending quality time with my family is very important to me. My daughter is a teenager and I need to be there for her as much as I can.

Amarillo National Bank P.O. Box 1 378.8000 anb.com

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


Women

in

Business

LaDonna Bonner, Circle A Title

Circle A Title

A Word of Advice: Always treat your customers with kindness and respect.

Current Position: Senior commercial escrow officer

Business Philosophy: Have a good work ethic and good communication, which is the key to success.

Years in Business: 38 years Education/Certifications: Texas Land Title School and Educational Seminars for continuing education and Escrow Licensing Professional Memberships: Texas Land Title Association Greatest Professional Accomplishment: The position that I have now and the confidence that my employer has in me for the job that I do.

Interests and Hobbies: Home, family and friends. I enjoy being outside, snow skiing and going to baseball games with our grandchildren. Greatest Personal Accomplishment: Having a son who is 18 years old graduating from Tascosa High School and going on to WTAMU.

Circle A Title

7205 Interstate 40 West Suite B 356.1441 circleatitle.com

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•

W OM EN I N BUSI N ESS PRO F ILES 53


Women

in

Business

Deana Zaccardo Belmar Bakery

Belmar Bakery Current Position: Co-owner with husband, Richard Zaccardo Years in Business: The bakery opened in 1965 but my husband and I bought it in 2002. Education/Certifications: Bachelors and Masters degree in Exercise Science from Texas Tech Professional Memberships: Retailer Baker’s Association, Greater Southwest Retail Bakers Association Greatest Professional Accomplishment: Changing from a full-time fitness professional to ownership of a bakery and café, two totally different settings and philosophies. The transition was challenging but I did it! Community Involvement: I have the opportunity to serve the community by donating our products and services to a variety of nonprofit organizations. I believe it is our responsibility to give back when we can. A Word of Advice: Listen and follow the plan God has laid before you with passion and determination. Pray for guidance and 54 W OME N I N B U S INE S S P R O F IL E S

support. It isn’t always easy to decipher but God will lead you in the professional direction you are supposed to go. Business Philosophy: We like to operate our business from Six Guiding Principles: 1) It’s all good. 2) We love our customers. 3) It’s a great experience.

4) We challenge the status quo. 5) We like to give in order to receive. 6) Belmar’s a great place to work.

Interests and Hobbies: I like to work out and spend time with my family. My kids are very active and I enjoy watching them compete in a variety of sports. Greatest Personal Accomplishment: I truly believe that nothing professionally will ever compare to being a mom and wife. My children bring me such joy and how I raise them is one of the most important jobs I will ever have.

Belmar Bakery 3325 Bell 355.0141 belmarbakery.com

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Women

in

Business

Margaret L. Scott and Adelle L. Daniels Children’s Exchange & Family Two!

Children’s Exchange & Family Two! Margaret L. Scott Current Position: Employee 2007-present, owner 1986-2006 Years in Business: 20 years Greatest Professional Accomplishment: Built a business from only two racks to 14,000 sq.ft. of consignment merchandise resulting in a successful, competitive enterprise that has become a valuable service to our community. Business Philosophy: Friendly customer service is most valuable. Greatest Personal Accomplishment: Raising four successful children who have given me five beautiful great-grandchildren. Adelle L. Daniels Current Position: Owner Years in Business: Four years Education: M.S. in Psychology from WTAMU Honors: Best of Amarillo, Consignment 2008 and 2010

Greatest Professional Accomplishment: Success in expanding my mother’s business, children’s consignment, to include consignment for the entire family. A Word of Advice: Kindness and loyalty matter Business Philosophy: Great customer service is the foundation on which everything else is built. Excellent employees built that foundation.Thank you Tamy, Sue, Brenda, Billa, Shannon, Cammie, Racheal, Letha, Deja, Kaylyn and Eug. Greatest Personal Accomplishment: There are many accomplishments I am proud of: dedication to my family and the joy of raising my 14-year-old son, earning a masters degree at the age of 32, my new-found love of running, completing my first half marathon last year and currently training for my second race. But my greatest personal accomplishment is a life lived fully and I am still working on that.

Children’s Exchange & Family Two! 4515 S. Georgia, Suite 110 352.6244 children-exchange.com

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

W OM EN I N BUSI N ESS PRO F ILES 55


Women

in

Business

Dessie Davis and Kathie Sarchet Decorating Den Interiors

Decorating Den Interiors

DESSIE DAVIS Current Position: Co-owner Years in Business: Sole owner for one year and co-owner for two years Education/Certifications: Associates of Applied Science in Interior Design from Amarillo College Honors: Woman of the Year 2004 Professional Memberships: Allied Member American Society of Interior Designers, Business Network International, Women’s Council and the Amarillo Chamber of Commerce Greatest Professional Accomplishment: Completing a project the homeowner’s are in love with. Community Involvement: Member of St. Stephen United Methodist Church where I serve as a Trustee, on the Building Committee, Lift Sunday School class, United Methodist Women, Joy Circle and a Covenant Group. A Word of Advice: Think positive and pray a lot. Business Philosophy: Always exemplify being a Christian. Interests and Hobbies: Spending time with family, entertaining, gardening, volunteering and decorating my home. Greatest Personal Accomplishment: Being married for 23 years, adopting three foster children and our two grandchildren.

56 W OME N I N B U S INE S S P R O F IL E S

Kathie Sarchet Current Position: Co-owner Years in Business: Two years Education/Certifications: Associates of Applied Science in Interior Design from Amarillo College and two semesters away from a Bachelor’s Degree in Liberal Studies from TAMU-Commerce Honors: Phi Theta Kappa, graduated with Honors from AC Professional Memberships: Allied Member American Society of Interior Designers, Lifetime Member of National Association of Executive Assistants and Administrative Professionals Greatest Professional Accomplishment: Seeing a look of satisfaction on my customer’s face. Community Involvement: Girl Scout leader, Women’s Council and Amarillo Chamber of Commerce A Word of Advice: Trust your initial reaction. You’re never too old to learn something new. Business Philosophy: Treat my customers the way I would want to be treated and be a good steward of their money. Greatest Personal Accomplishment: Going back to school later in life and starting over in a new career. I have been married for 35 years and we raised two successful daughters and have two granddaughters.

Decorating Den Interiors

21 Cypress Pt 463.7878 local.decoratingden.com/dessiedavisandkathiearchet/

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


Women

in

Business

Leslie Massey Farmers Agent

Leslie Massey Agency

influence in my clients’ lives and provide excellent customer service.

Current Position: Farmers Insurance Agent

Greatest Personal Accomplishment: I have an awesome husband, Truett, and two wonderful stepchildren, Tristyn and Colton, that have been so supportive of my agency and the long hours and time it takes to make a new business successful. They are the main reason I have been able to accomplish what I have to this point. I strive every day to find a balance between my personal and professional life.

Years in Business: Two Education/Certifications: 2001 BBA in Marketing from West Texas A&M University Professional Memberships: Apartment Association of the Panhandle, Amarillo Association of Realtors, Texas Panhandle Builders Association, Amarillo Chamber of Commerce Greatest Professional Accomplishment: Knowing that I am helping my clients protect their assets and family with insurance is very rewarding. I recently handled my first life insurance claim and saw first-hand what a blessing life insurance is for the family that is left behind. A Word of Advice: You get out of your business what you put into it! Work hard each day. Grow and learn from every mistake because it makes you a more successful person. Business Philosophy: Remain open and honest, be a positive

Interests and Hobbies: Panhandle volleyball players, tennis

My Dream Job: I can say for sure that God has a plan for us all. If you’d asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up, I wouldn’t have said an insurance agent but I can’t imagine doing anything else. Doors opened and closed in my life and I can honestly say that I am blessed to be where I am today.

Leslie Massey Agency

3601 S. Georgia, Suite C 352.7388 farmersagent.com/mmassey

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W OM EN I N BUSI N ESS PRO F ILES 57


Women

in

Business

Brandy Hall Glass Doctor

Glass Doctor

Education/Certifications: Associates of Arts from Seward County Community College, DOW certified

Current Position: Part Owner/ Office Manager

Professional Memberships: Business Builders, BNI

Years in Business: I’ve been around the glass industry my whole life and working in the business full time since 2005.

Community Involvement: Member of South Georgia Baptist Church, BNI

Greatest Professional Accomplishment: Making the transition from Wayne’s Quality Auto Glass, Inc. to Glass Doctor, implementing the Glass Doctor system and becoming Glass Doctor Office Professional of the Year.

Interests and Hobbies: Teaching the one and two-year-olds at church, playing with my boys and playing softball and volleyball.

A Word of Advice: Treat others as you would like to be treated. My dad based this company on that principle from the beginning and I feel that it has been vital to our success as a business. Business Philosophy: How the customer feels when we are finished! Honors: Glass Doctor Office Professional of the Year in 2008 58 W OME N I N B U S INE S S P R O F IL E S

Greatest Personal Accomplishment: First becoming a Christian, next marrying my husband, Neil, and then becoming a mom to Brecken and Dawson.

Glass Doctor

2515 Britain Drive 358.7684 glassrepairamarillo.com

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


Women

in

Business

Jill Gibbs-Oberbrockling and Jo Gibbs Interior Innovations

Interior Innovations Jill Gibbs-Oberbrockling Education/Certifications: Associates Degree in Interior Design from Amarillo College; Bachelor’s Degree in Business from West Texas A&M University Professional Memberships: (ASID) American Society of Interior Designers Chair 2009 and 2010, Treasurer 2004 Community Involvement: Working with the Builders Association and Habitat for Humanity building a home for a family in Wheeler who lost everything in the fires. Interests and Hobbies: Remodeling my home, golf and traveling Greatest Personal Accomplishment: My marriage to a wonderful husband, Josh. What I’ve Learned: Design is a learning process that we acquire by constant schooling, keeping up with trends and through each client’s personality. It is important to make my clients’ surroundings as comfortable and charming as possible. Jo Gibbs Current Position: Owner Years in Business: 11 Education/Certifications: Associates Degree in Interior Design, Amarillo College

Professional Memberships: Better Business Bureau, Chamber of Commerce Greatest Professional Accomplishment: I didn’t attend college until my late 40s. Jill and I graduated with design degrees, bought a small wallpaper store and have been in business since. A Word of Advice: It’s never too late to start a career doing something you love. Business Philosophy: Honesty and integrity will result in enduring customer relationships. One of the keys to our success has been talented and loyal employees, designer Tish Pullen and Sue Denham. Greatest Personal Accomplishment: Raising four daughters, one of whom has given me two wonderful grandchildren. We Want Readers to Know: We started with in-stock and special-order wallpaper and expanded to include residential and commercial interior design. We provide custom window treatments, bedding and upholstery, plantation shutters, shades, blinds, custom barstools and Benjamin Moore paint. We are moving to Summitt Shopping Center, next to Kem’s Bed & Bath in a new, larger space June 1.

Interior Innovations

3333 S. Coulter, Suite C-10 355.9700 blindsandwallpaperforless.com

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W OM EN I N BUSI N ESS PRO F ILES 59


Women

in

Business

Kay Flores, It’s So Bananas!

It’s So Bananas!

Current Position: Owner Years in Business: 23 Education/Certifications: Art and Interior Design degrees from TSTI and West Texas University Honors: 1st place Civic Center Design Notable Projects: First National Bank in Clayton, New Mexico, Frank Phillips College Activity Center, Amarillo Civic Center Greatest Professional Accomplishment: It’s So Bananas! was created from all the things I love. With 23 years of experience in flooring and design, It’s So Bananas! brings a new light to flooring, creating a mix of flooring and designs. We also carry accessories such as purses, jewelry, flip flops and more. Community Involvement: Amarillo Chamber of Commerce member Business Philosophy: To make my clients’ homes reflect their souls and personalities 60 W OME N I N B U S INE S S P R O F IL E S

Interests and Hobbies: Flooring and design have been a part of my life since 1969. Ever since I was a child, I’ve known working with flooring and design was my calling. When my family went out of town, I used to rearrange the furniture and change the floor and realized that is what I was destined to do. My Passion: I wish I could explain the joy I feel making ideas and designs come together. As a designer, I have always been in tune with my designs; I truly believe every home has an individual soul that speaks to every homeowner. Having the right environment is directly connected to your everyday life. If you are not happy with your environment, it can affect your whole being and who you are as an individual. I would like the opportunity to help make your home sing to you.

It’s So Bananas! 2010 S. Soncy 354.2010

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Flooring and fun to go


Women

in

Business

Marci Abrahamson Moonwater

Moonwater

Current Position: Owner/operator with husband, George Years in Business: I have decorated homes and businesses for more than 30 years and decorated for weddings for 17 years. Education/Certifications: Associates degree in Display from a merchandising college in Dallas. Professional Memberships: Member of the Texas Builders Assoc. Greatest Professional Accomplishment: Working with builders, on Parade Homes and residential and commercial projects from the ground up. It is wonderful to transform a space using a customer’s existing items or adding new. I love working with different textures, fabrics and furniture placement. I also design draperies and bedding. Business Philosophy: If you are passionate about your work, it will show. I love to make people happy in their homes. Home is important, where memories are made.

A Word of Advice: Your home should be an inviting retreat! When decorating a home, I believe it should be a reflection of you and your family. A business needs to reflect what you are accomplishing. It should be comfortable and organized. Weddings are personalized and show a couple’s united interest. Interests and Hobbies: Family, friends, home, creating, designing and entertaining Greatest Personal Accomplishment: My two beautiful daughters: Anna Browning and Desiree Walz. Anna, my oldest daughter, and husband, David, have two children, Brianna and Talton. Desiree and husband, Jonathan, live in Houston. Something to Remember Everyday: We need to focus on our purpose in life and no matter how difficult things are, there is always something good to thank God for. Life is preparation for eternity.

Moonwater

10701 W. Amarillo Blvd. 236.1799 moonwater-weddings.com

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

W OM EN I N BUSI N ESS PRO F ILES 61


Women

in

Business

Nalini Patel Nalini’s Day Spa

Nalini’s Day Spa Current Position: Owner Years in Business: 20 years Education/Certifications: Two years of college, cosmetology instructor, master in waxing, master instructor of permanent cosmetics, Iridology, Schlerology, Auricular therapy, ear stapling, herbal therapy, Ayurvedic treatments, yoga, Dosha diet counseling and Marma massage. Honors: No.1 Day Spa by KVII TV, Most Ethical Business by Better Business Bureau Professional Memberships: Allied Health, IICE, IIPA, Herb Mentor, Herbal Legacy, AHG Greatest Professional Accomplishment: To be able to stay in business for more than 15 years with clients located all over the United States and other countries. Mastering both speed and technique in all services offered at Nalini’s. Community Involvement: Nalini’s donates services and gift baskets to many local charities and organizations to help with 62 W OME N I N B U S INE S S P R O F IL E S

fundraising. Some of our donations help The American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, Women’s Council, United Way and the BBB. A Word of Advice: Always keep the highest ethics, treat clients the way you want to be treated and help with health and stress. Business Philosophy: Get training in any service that will be offered at your business and keep current on new techniques. Keep your standards high. Always challenge yourself to do better. Interests and Hobbies: I thrive on finding new, unique services, reading, attending conferences and developing organic products. Greatest Personal Accomplishment: Being able to raise a wonderful family. Coming Soon: We are opening a Holistic Health and Ayurveda Spa where we will help heal people inside and out with all-natural, organic products, yoga, Reiki and Dosha diet counseling.

Nalini’s Day Spa 4310-L S. Western 354.0101 nalinis.com

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


Women

in

Business

Rose Davenport Street Toyota

Street Toyota and Scion Current Position: Sales Years in Business: Three years Greatest Professional Accomplishment: Any time I have a customer who tells me they’ve had terrible experiences purchasing cars in the past and I show them that the process should be fun and exciting. Then they become friends instead of just customers! Community Involvement: Habitat for Humanity, United Way, PTA Board A Word of Advice: Stay true to who you are and live your life. Greatest Personal Accomplishment: Raising my three children to be generous, kind, considerate, God-loving people. They are the reason I do what I do – to show them when work is something you love, you can be yourself and be a success.

My Dream Job: I never saw myself in this line of work, but I’m so glad that I am! Street Toyota is a great place to be. Joe Street created a fantastic environment here and put the right people in place, such as Mike Good and Cory Dupriest. I wouldn’t want to work anywhere else. From service and parts, to finance and sales, the talent is amazing. I know my customers will be treated with the same level of kindness and respect throughout the dealership. I can’t say that I would still be selling cars had I not started out at Street Toyota. They took a chance on me three years ago and I hope to be here for many years to come.

Street Toyota and Scion 4500 S. Soncy 355.9846 street-toyota.com

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

W OM EN I N BUSI N ESS PRO F ILES 63


i need to go to the

are we there yet?

i’m thirsty

bathroom

MOM!

2011 Nissan Quest

he won’t

stay on his side

no complaints here

not about the car anyway

McGavock Nissan 4401 South Georgia, Amarillo, TX | 354-3550 | www.mcgavocknissan.com


events May

Featured Event

Amarillo Botanical Gardens Celebrate the end of April’s showers and resulting May’s flowers at Amarillo Botanical Gardens. This month, the Botanical Gardens offers a variety of recreational and educational programs from floral arrangements to fitness. Join the Botanical Gardens for its annual GardenFest. Purchase or just peruse beautiful plants while finding inspiration for spring gardening projects. The free event will also include an art show and sale, snacks and live entertainment. Stop by on Mother’s Day for the 42nd annual Iris Show. Instead of buying Mom a bouquet for her Special Day, spend the afternoon with her admiring nearly 100 varieties of iris plants. Get in touch with nature or pick up one of the Botanical Gardens’ class offerings. Start the morning off right with a refreshing exercise routine surrounded by nature. Breathe in the aromas of flowers and meditate while toning up with Hatha yoga. Not much of an early bird? Sign up for an evening class on herb gardens, container gardens or water gardening. Classes will also be available Saturday mornings.

Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday: Yoga in the Garden 7-8 a.m. May 7 GardenFest 10 a.m. May 8 Iris Show 1:30-5 p.m. in the Auditorium May 5 Creating an Herb Garden 6:30-8:30 p.m. May 12 Creating Container Gardens 6:30-8:30 p.m., May 14, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. May 19 Introduction to Water Gardening 6:30-8:30 p.m., May 21, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Contact Amarillo Botanical Gardens for more details. Summer hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday Amarillo Botanical Gardens 1400 Streit Drive 352.6513 amarillobotanicalgardens.org

To have an event listed on the calendar, email details to michele.mcaffrey@amarillo.com or fax a press release to 806.345.3282. View an updated listing of events throughout May at amarillomagonline.com

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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Arts & Entertainment May 5

ALT Presents “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” 8 p.m. Amarillo Little Theatre 2019 Civic Circle, 355.9991  First Thursday Art Showing the 806 coffee + lounge 2812 SW 6th, 322.1806

May 6

Tran-Siberian Orchestra 8 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Coliseum 401 S. Buchanan, 378.3096 ALT Presents “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” 8 p.m. Amarillo Little Theatre 2019 Civic Circle, 355.9991 First Friday Art Walk 5-9 p.m. The Galleries at Sunset 3701 Plains Blvd., 353.5700

May 7

ALT Presents “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” 8 p.m. Amarillo Little Theatre 2019 Civic Circle, 355.9991

May 12

Caprock Cluster Concert 7 p.m. Globe-News Center for the Performing Arts 500 S. Buchanan, 378.3096 ALT Presents “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” 8 p.m. Amarillo Little Theatre 2019 Civic Circle, 355.9991

May 13

ALT Presents “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” 8 p.m. Amarillo Little Theatre 2019 Civic Circle, 355.9991

May 14

ALT Presents “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” 8 p.m. Amarillo Little Theatre 2019 Civic Circle, 355.9991 An Enchanted Evening of Dinner and Dancing 7 p.m. Join Chamber Music Amarillo as they conjure up memories of the Golden Age of rail travel. The Galleries at Sunset 3701 Plains Blvd., 236.3545

May 15

ALT Presents “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” 2:30 p.m. Amarillo Little Theatre 2019 Civic Circle, 355.9991

May 19

ALT Presents “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” 8 p.m. Amarillo Little Theatre 2019 Civic Circle, 355.9991

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Third Thursday 6:30-9 p.m. Amarillo Museum of Art 2200 S. Van Buren, 371.5050

Amarillo Heart Ball 6 p.m. Amarillo Country Club 4800 Bushland, 355.3371

May 20

May 7

Lone Star Ballet Academy Unleashed 7 p.m. Globe-News Center for the Performing Arts 500 S. Buchanan, 378.3096 ALT Presents “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” 8 p.m. Amarillo Little Theatre 2019 Civic Circle, 355.9991

Vintage Amarillo “Old Wines from a New World” dinner and wine auction 6:30 p.m. Dinner catered by OHMS with South American wines as well as silent and live auctions. Khiva Temple 305 SE 5th, 376.8782

May 21

Amarillo Heart Ball 6 p.m. Amarillo Country Club 4800 Bushland, 355.3371

ALT Presents “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” 8 p.m. Amarillo Little Theatre 2019 Civic Circle, 355.9991

FOSA Annual Luncheon 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. B. Byron Price, Director of the University of Oklahoma Press and the Charles M. Russell Center for the Study of Art of the American West, will present “The Western Stock Saddle as Art.” Proceeds benefit the Friends of Southwestern art. Panhandle Plains Historical Museum, Hazelwood Lecture Hall 2503 4th, Canyon, 651.2244

Lone Star Ballet Academy Unleashed 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Globe-News Center for the Performing Arts 500 S. Buchanan, 378.3096

May 22

ALT Presents “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” 2:30 p.m. Amarillo Little Theatre 2019 Civic Circle, 355.9991 Lone Star Ballet Academy Unleashed 3 p.m. Globe-News Center for the Performing Arts 500 S. Buchanan, 378.3096

Benefits and Fundraisers May 5

Creole at the Lake 7 p.m. Art Force of Amarillo hosts its 20th series of Gourmet Cooking classes. Join friends in the homes of Amarillo’s most outstanding hosts and hostesses to enjoy the culinary delights of guest chefs. Tuition helps provide scholarships for Fine Arts students attending Amarillo College. Prepared by chef Alfonso Armstrong, hosted by Laresa and Larry Chesley. For more information, call 359.0100.

May 6

Vintage Amarillo “Old Wines from a New World” Pre-Party 6:30 p.m. Hosted by the Amarillo Symphony. Evening includes wines and hors d’oeuvres to accompany the South American theme as well as an exclusive, small live auction. At the home of Dr. Anthony and Michele Agostini. 376.8782

May 12

12 x 12 Exhibition and Silent Auction Event includes an optional preview party at 6 p.m. Viewing and auction begin at 7 p.m. and includes cocktails and hors d’oeuvres by the AMoA Alliance. Proceeds benefit the donating artist and AMoA education programs. Amarillo Museum of Art 2200 S. Van Buren, 371.5050 A South American Feast 7 p.m. Art Force of Amarillo hosts its 20th series of Gourmet Cooking classes. Join friends in the homes of Amarillo’s most outstanding hosts and hostesses to enjoy the culinary delights of guest chefs. Tuition helps provide scholarships for Fine Arts students attending Amarillo College. Prepared by OHMS, hosted by Clay Holcomb and Nelson Williams. For more information, call 359.0100.

May 14

Homer’s Backyard Ball 11 a.m. Benefit for Make-A-Wish Foundation includes live music and a championship barbecue cook-off. Event located behind Splash Water Park on I-40 East and Whitaker Road. 358.9943


Hot Night in Havana 7 p.m. Art Force of Amarillo hosts its 20th series of Gourmet Cooking classes. Join friends in the homes of Amarillo’s most outstanding hosts and hostesses to enjoy the culinary delights of guest chefs. Tuition helps provide scholarships for Fine Arts students attending Amarillo College. Prepared by Rick Alley, hosted by Christine and Lane Cox. For more information, call 359.0100.

May 19

Dinner with Frank 7:30-9:30 p.m. Art Force of Amarillo hosts its 20th series of Gourmet Cooking classes. Join friends in the homes of Amarillo’s most outstanding hosts and hostesses to enjoy the culinary delights of guest chefs. Tuition helps provide scholarships for Fine Arts students attending Amarillo College. Prepared by Friends of Frank, hosted by Robin and David Weir and Reese Beddingfield. For more information, call 359.0100.

May 20

Paella on the Patio 7:30 p.m. Art Force of Amarillo hosts its 20th series of Gourmet Cooking classes. Join friends in the homes of Amarillo’s most outstanding hosts and hostesses to enjoy the culinary delights of guest chefs. Tuition helps provide scholarships for Fine Arts students attending Amarillo College. Prepared by Heather and Hugh Russell, hosted by Christian and Tom Ladd. For more information, call 359.0100.

May 21

Every Foodie’s Star 7 p.m. Art Force of Amarillo hosts its 20th series of Gourmet Cooking classes. Join friends in the homes of Amarillo’s most outstanding hosts and hostesses to enjoy the culinary delights of guest chefs. Tuition helps provide scholarships for Fine Arts students attending Amarillo College. Prepared by Richard Chen (Kabuki), hosted by Connie and Bennie Latham. For more information, call 359.0100.

Classes and Seminars Yoga in the Garden! 7-8 a.m. every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Amarillo Botanical Gardens. Class taught by Connie Kornegy. 1400 Streit Drive, 352.6513

May 3

Writer’s Voice Presents National Poetry Month 6:30 p.m. Acclaimed poet Richard W. Todd will teach how to write poetry. Amarillo Public Library East Branch 2232 SE 27th, 342.1589

May 5

Creating an Herb Garden 6:30-8:30 p.m. Amarillo Botanical Gardens. Class taught by Linda Washington. 1400 Streit Drive, 352.6513

May 12

Creating Container Gardens 6:30-8:30 p.m. Amarillo Botanical Gardens. Class taught by Greg Lusk. 1400 Streit Drive, 352.6513

May 14

Creating Container Gardens 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Amarillo Botanical Gardens. Class taught by Greg Lusk. 1400 Streit Drive, 352.6513 Paranormal Class and Ghost Hunt 6 p.m.-2 a.m. Scott McKinney, medium, and Ty Phillips, a parapsychologist, will teach the class. Event is hosted by the Palo Duro Area Paranormal Society. Amarillo Activity Youth Center 816 S. Van Buren, 584.1553, eventbright.paranormalclass.com

May 17

Writer’s Voice Presents National Poetry Month 6:30 p.m. Acclaimed poet Richard W. Todd will teach how to write poetry. Amarillo Public Library East Branch 2232 SE 27th, 342.1589

May 19

Introduction to Water Gardening 6:30-8:30 p.m. Class taught by Ken Pirtle.1400 Streit Drive, 352.6513

May 21

Introduction to Water Gardening 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Class taught by Ken Pirtle.1400 Streit Drive, 352.6513

May 24

Writer’s Voice Presents National Poetry Month 6:30 p.m. Acclaimed poet Richard W. Todd will teach how to write poetry. Amarillo Public Library East Branch 2232 SE 27th, 342.1589

exclusively at

May 31

Writer’s Voice Presents National Poetry Month 6:30 p.m. Acclaimed poet Richard W. Todd will teach how to write poetry. Amarillo Public Library East Branch 2232 SE 27th, 342.1589

2613 Wolflin Village

806.358.2457

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Exhibitions Panhandle High School Student Show Open through May 1. Amarillo Museum of Art 2200 S. Van Buren, 371.5050 Selections from the AMoA Collection Open May 2-9. Amarillo Museum of Art 2200 S. Van Buren, 371.5050 People and Places of the Panhandle Open through May 15. Panhandle Plains Historical Museum, Hazelwood Lecture Hall 2503 4th, Canyon, 651.2244 Ciria: Rorschach Heads, The Paintings of Jose Manuel Ciria Open May 21 through July 31. Amarillo Museum of Art 2200 S. Van Buren, 371.5050 Spiritual Places Open May 28 through January 2012. Panhandle Plains Historical Museum, Harrington Changing Gallery, 2503 4th, Canyon, 651.2244 Eastern American and European Art from the Permanent Collection Open through September 5. Panhandle Plains Historical Museum, Foran Gallery, 2503 4th, Canyon, 651.2244 Not Just for Show: Saddles from the Permanent Collection Open through October 9. Panhandle Plains Historical Museum 2503 4th, Canyon, 651.2244 Opening the Cabinet Doors: Clothing and Accessories from the American Indian Collection Open through October. Panhandle Plains Historical Museum 2503 4th, Canyon, 651.2244 Made to Fit: Amarillo Little Theatre and the Texas Panhandle Open through November. Panhandle Plains Historical Museum, Textile Gallery 2503 4th, Canyon, 651.2244 From Hell Week to Homecoming: Campus Life at WT, 1953-1971 Ongoing exhibit at Panhandle Plains Historical Museum 2503 4th, Canyon, 651.2244 Hunters of the Sky Ongoing exhibit at Don Harrington Discovery Center 1200 Streit Drive, 355.9547 Amazing Bodies! Ongoing exhibit at Don Harrington Discovery Center 1200 Streit Drive, 355.9547 Space Lounge Ongoing exhibit at Don Harrington Discovery Center 1200 Streit Drive, 355.9547 Planetary Landscapes Ongoing exhibit at Don Harrington Discovery Center 1200 Streit Drive, 355.9547

Music Andy Chase Cundiff 7 p.m. every Tuesday night. 575 Pizzeria 2803 Civic Circle, 331.3627 Andy Chase Cundiff 7 p.m. every Wednesday night. Blue Sky 4201 I-40 West, 355.8100

May 5

Greater Southwest Music Festival 7-10 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center 401 S. Buchanan, 378.3096

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Bat 9 p.m. Butler’s Martini Bar 703 S. Polk, 382.4462

May 6

Greater Southwest Music Festival 7-10 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center 401 S. Buchanan, 378.3096 AFK 8-11 p.m. Cattle Call Too 4111 Wolflin, 353.1227 Yvonne Perea 7:30 p.m. D’Vine Wine 2600 SW 22nd, 553.5311 DJ Gemini 9 p.m. Butler’s Martini Bar 703 S. Polk, 382.4462

May 7

Greater Southwest Music Festival 7-10 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center 401 S. Buchanan, 378.3096 Tommy Gallagher Band 8 p.m. Golden Light Cantina 2906 SW 6th, 374.0097

May 12

DJ Gemini 9 p.m. Butler’s Martini Bar 703 S. Polk, 382.4462

May 13

DJ Gemini 9 p.m. Butler’s Martini Bar 703 S. Polk, 382.4462

May 14

Landon Smith 9 p.m. Butler’s Martini Bar 703 S. Polk, 382.4462

May 19

DJ Gemini 9 p.m. Butler’s Martini Bar 703 S. Polk, 382.4462

May 20

James Lann 10:30 p.m. Midnight Rodeo 4400 S Georgia, 358.7083 Remedy Mix 7:30 p.m. D’Vine Wine 2600 SW 22nd, 553.5311 Electric Gypsies 10:30 p.m. Hoot’s Pub 2424 Hobbs, 358.9560 Average Joes 8-11 p.m. Cattle Call Too 4111 Wolflin, 353.1227 Yvonne Perea 9 p.m. Butler’s Martini Bar 703 S. Polk, 382.4462

May 21

Electric Gypsies 10:30 p.m. Hoot’s Pub 2424 Hobbs, 358.9560

DJ Gemini 9 p.m. Butler’s Martini Bar 703 S. Polk, 382.4462

May 22

Susan Gibson 12 p.m. Memorial Park 2400 S. Washington

May 26

Bat 9 p.m. Butler’s Martini Bar 703 S. Polk, 382.4462

May 27

Texas Blues Rangers 8-11 p.m. Cattle Call Too 4111 Wolflin, 353.1227 Josh Paulson Butler’s Martini Bar 703 S. Polk, 382.4462

May 28

Jay Psaros 8 p.m. Fire Slice Brick Oven Pizzeria 7306 SW 34th, 331.2232 DJ Gemini 9 p.m. Butler’s Martini Bar 703 S. Polk, 382.4462

Nature

May 1

Lunch with the Longhorns 1:30 p.m. The park longhorns receive their ration (lunch) from the Park Interpreter in the pasture across from the entrance office. Ask questions and learn about these animals and the part they played in Texas history. Palo Duro Canyon State Park 11450 Park Rd. 5, 488.2227

May 7

Bird Walks and Talks 8:30-10 a.m. Learn about the birds in Palo Duro Canyon. Meet at the parking lot of the Palo Duro Trading Post. Weather permitting. Bring binoculars. No pets, please. Palo Duro Canyon State Park 11450 Park Rd. 5, 488.2227

May 8

Mother’s Day at the Amarillo Zoo 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. All mothers accompanied by a child will receive free admission and a free flower. Event will include live music and children’s crafts. 200 Comanchero Trail, 381.7911

Snake Feeding 3 p.m. every Saturday in May. Wildcat Bluff Nature Center 2301 N. Soncy, 352.6007

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Iris Show 1:30-5 p.m. Amarillo Botanical Gardens. 42nd annual Iris Show hosted by the North Plains Iris Society. ABG Auditorium 1400 Streit Drive, 352.6513

May 13

Mother’s Day Mothers get in free. Don Harrington Discovery Center 1200 Streit Drive, 355.9547

Discover After Dark: FEAR 7-10 p.m. An adults only night of risky behavior and freaky science. Don Harrington Discovery Center 1200 Streit Drive, 355.9547

May 14

Texas Outdoor Family Workshop  The Workshop is a weekend with all the equipment furnished and experts to assist you. For full details and reservations, contact tpwd.state.tx.us or call 512.389.8903. Palo Duro Canyon State Park 11450 Park Rd. 5, 488.2227

May 21

Bird Walks and Talks 8:30-10 a.m. Learn about the birds in Palo Duro Canyon. Meet at the parking lot of the Palo Duro Trading Post. Weather permitting. Bring binoculars. No pets, please. Palo Duro Canyon State Park 11450 Park Rd. 5, 488.2227 Conservation Celebration–Bringing Back the Wild! 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Event recognizes International Endangered Species Day. The event highlight will be a USFW Service exhibit featuring a live black-footed ferret – one of the most critically endangered mammals in North America. Amarillo Zoo 200 Comanchero Trail, 381.7911

May 28

Family Nature Hike 10-11 a.m. Take a leisurely hike on the ½-mile Pioneer Nature Trail and learn about the canyon. Easy trail for young children. Weather permitting. No pets, please. Palo Duro Canyon State Park 11450 Park Rd. 5, 488.2227

Special Events May 7

GardenFest! 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Amarillo Botanical Gardens. Plant and art show/ sale, yard and garden products/info and more.1400 Streit Drive, 352.6513 Astronomy Day Make your own telescope to take home. Don Harrington Discovery Center 1200 Streit Drive, 355.9547

May 10

342-4729 • Tues - Sat: 11 am - 5:30 pm 1408 s.w. 15th • amarillo

gift wrapping and delivery available 70

Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011

Amarillo Reads Author Presentation 7-9 p.m. Globe-News Center for the Performing Arts 500 S. Buchanan, 378.3096

Amarillo College Graduation 7 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Coliseum 401 S. Buchanan, 378.3096

May 14

WTAMU Spring Graduation First session: 10 a.m.-12 p.m., second session: 3-5 p.m. First United Bank Center 3301 4th, 651.1400 Refreshed by Fire – an Evening of Worship 7-11 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Heritage Room 401 S. Buchanan,  378.3096

May 19

Happy State Bank Athlete of the Year Banquet 7 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Heritage Room 401 S. Buchanan, 378.3096 American Legion Birthday Party 2 p.m. Event includes food, door prizes and activities to celebrate the post’s birthday and selection for the National Historic Register. American Legion 617 W. 7th, 373.4907

May 21

Celebrating Freedom and Honoring Service Banquet 6-10 p.m. Presented by American Supports You Texas, featuring Congressman Mac Thornberry. Amarillo Civic Center North Exhibit Hall 401 S. Buchanan, 681.3596

May 24

Eastridge Multi-Cultural Festival 6-8 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Auditorium 401 S. Buchanan, 378.3096

Sports & Recreation May 1

WT Ladies Golf vs. NCAA Super Regional Four All day. Tascosa Country Club 2400 N. Western, 651.1414

May 2

WT Ladies Golf vs. NCAA Super Regional Four All day. Tascosa Country Club 2400 N. Western, 651.1414

May 3

WT Ladies Golf vs. NCAA Super Regional Four All day. Tascosa Country Club 2400 N. Western, 651.1414


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May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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May 7

May 26

May 12

May 30

May 13

May 31

Amarillo Sox vs. Wichita Wingnuts 7:05 p.m. Amarillo National Bank Sox Stadium 3303 E. 3rd, 242.4653

Trade Shows

Route 66 Roller Derby 7 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center North Exhibit Hall 401 S. Buchanan, 378.3096

Amarillo Sox vs. Wichita Wingnuts 7:05 p.m. Amarillo National Bank Sox Stadium 3303 E. 3rd, 242.4653

WTAMU Men’s Track vs. Buff Last Chance Meet All day. WT Track Complex at Buffalo Sports Park, Canyon, 651.1414

WTAMU Women’s Track vs. Buff Last Chance Meet All day. WT Track Complex at Buffalo Sports Park, Canyon, 651.1414

May 14

Amarillo Venom vs. Oklahoma City 7:05 p.m. “A Salute to the Troops”military appreciation night. Amarillo Civic Center Coliseum 401 S. Buchanan, 378.3096

Amarillo Sox vs. St. Paul Saints 7:05 p.m. Amarillo National Bank Sox Stadium 3303 E. 3rd, 242.4653

May 7

Spring into Summer Health & Wellness Fair 1-4 p.m. Local health care providers, veterinarians and banks will offer information, samples, demonstrations and drawings for prizes. Center Court at Westgate Mall 7701 I-40 West, 468.9911

May 12

Business Connection 2011 VIP show 10 a.m.-4 p.m., general admission 1-4 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center 401 S. Buchanan, 373.7800

May 15

May 13

May 20

Amarillo Sox vs. Shreveport-Bossier Captains 7:05 p.m. Amarillo National Bank Sox Stadium 3303 E. 3rd, 242.4653

May 21

Amarillo Sox vs. Shreveport-Bossier Captains 7:05 p.m. Amarillo National Bank Sox Stadium 3303 E. 3rd, 242.4653

May 22

Amarillo Sox vs. Shreveport-Bossier Captains 6:05 p.m. Amarillo National Bank Sox Stadium 3303 E. 3rd, 242.4653

May 24

Amarillo Sox vs. Sioux Falls Pheasants 7:05 p.m. Amarillo National Bank Sox Stadium 3303 E. 3rd, 242.4653

May 25

Amarillo Sox vs. Sioux Falls Pheasants 7:05 p.m. Amarillo National Bank Sox Stadium 3303 E. 3rd, 242.4653

Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011

Amarillo Sox vs. St. Paul Saints 7:05 p.m. Amarillo National Bank Sox Stadium 3303 E. 3rd, 242.4653

Amarillo Sox vs. Wichita Wingnuts 7:05 p.m. Amarillo National Bank Sox Stadium 3303 E. 3rd, 242.4653

Amarillo Sox vs. Wichita Wingnuts 6:05 p.m. Amarillo National Bank Sox Stadium 3303 E. 3rd, 242.4653

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Amarillo Sox vs. Sioux Falls Phesants 7:05 p.m. Amarillo National Bank Sox Stadium 3303 E. 3rd, 242.4653

Scholastic Book Fairs 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Regency Room 401 S. Buchanan, 378.3096 Head to Toe Women’s Expo 4-9 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Heritage Room 401 S. Buchanan, 378.3096

May 14

Pioneer Gun Show 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center South Exhibit Hall 401 S. Buchanan, 378.3096 Scholastic Book Fairs 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Regency Room 401 S. Buchanan, 378.3096

May 15

Pioneer Gun Show 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center South Exhibit Hall 401 S. Buchanan, 378.3096


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May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

73


Dream The Harold and Joyce Courson Clinic

New Comprehensive Cancer Care Facility A state-of-the-art healing environment for cancer patients, where the people of this region can stay near home and be assured world-class care. We are inspired every day by our patients at Harrington Cancer Center. They put their heart and soul into beating cancer. We owe it to our neighbors, friends and family to fight with them and for them. Please join us in fulfilling our dream of giving them the gift of a comfortable, beautiful and healing environment in this proposed treatment facility. For information about donating, please contact Amy Juba, Campaign Coordinator, at (806) 354-5875 ext 126 or e-mail ajuba@harringtoncc.org.

An Affiliate of BSA Health System

1500 Wallace Boulevard • Amarillo, Texas 79106 806.359.4673 • 800.274.4673 www.harringtoncc.org ©2011– Baptist St. Anthony’s Health System; BSA-20992

Shane Gregory, father of Ian, a 7-year-old leukemia survivor and Harrington Cancer Center patient “The Harrington Cancer Center is an amazing place. The way they handle children is just wonderful. At other hospitals, they were always talking to me, to dad. At Harrington, they talked to Ian. “I was just a witness. I was supposed to hear, listen and know, but everything was directed at him, involved him, which made him feel special and more trusting. Because of the way they treated him and talked to him, he wasn’t scared a bit.” For Ian’s full story, see video at

www.harringtoncc.org/stories


month or let’s eat! RESTAURANTS info • FOOD • SPIRITS

let’s eat! Morning Glory Tea Room At Morning Glory Tea Room, consider yourself high society. After frequenting tea houses throughout her European travels, Paula Nichols decided to open her own tea room. Morning Glory serves sweet and savory treats at High Tea as well as breakfast, lunch and suppers-to-go. Patrons can choose from an array of staple dishes such as chicken salad sandwiches and cream scones in addition to new fare featured weekly. In honor of Mother’s Day, Morning Glory is hosting its fourth annual Mother’s Day Brunch and High Tea. Spoil Mom with a triple chocolate torte and a cup of freshly brewed tea–she deserves it. Please call for more information and reservations.

photo by Shannon Richardson

Morning Glory Tea Room, 1608 4th Ave., Canyon, 655.7221, 282.1325 Open Tuesday through Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Breakfast served all day; lunch served from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

PRICING GUIDE $ most entrees under $10 $$ most entrees $11 to $20 $$$ most entrees over $21

RESTAURANT KEY Outdoor Dining ☎ Reservations Recommended T Live Music y

c Full Bar C Beer and/or Wine only ^ Best of Amarillo Winner

NEW New to Let’s Eat! UPDATE

Updated entry

The Let’s Eat! Guide is a reader service compiled by the Amarillo Magazine editorial staff. The magazine does not accept advertising or other compensation in exchange for a listing. The guide is updated regularly. To correct a listing or recommend a restaurant for consideration, contact Michele McAffrey at michele.mcaffrey@amarillo.com.

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Amarillo

575 Pizzeria Toppings runneth over at 575 Pizzeria, not to mention the specials that rotate every month. (Check the board when you walk in.) It’s family-owned and family-friendly, so it’s a great Friday night dinner choice. 2803 Civic Circle, 331.3627, 575pizzeria.com $$ C T ^ Acapulco Mexican Restaurant & Bar When the weather’s nice, enjoy sitting on Polk Street while you enjoy a margarita and a traditional Mexican-style shrimp cocktail. 727 S. Polk, 373.8889, acapulcomexicanrestaurant.net $$ c T y Applebee’s We love the new smaller portions at Applebees, like the Sliders, a bite-size selection of easy to eat sammies each with a side of fries. Finish off your meal with Dessert Shooters, the just-enough dessert for every sweet tooth. 5630 Amarillo Blvd. West, 677.7470 / 2810 Soncy, 351.2810, applebees.com $c B L Bistro The intimate, cozy atmosphere creates the ideal date place, not to mention the food is plated perfection. Note: You might want to leave the kids with a sitter. 2203 S. Austin, 355.7838, blbistro.com $$$ c ☎ y ^ The Back Porch An Amarillo original, this quaint tea room serves up great lunch fare. The Chicken Avocado Sandwich on croissant is the way to go. Get the lunch plate with a cup of cheesy veggie soup and chips. Wash it all down with the excellent flavored tea. 3440 Bell, 358.8871, backporchamarillo.com $

$30-$45

352-7575 | 2500 Paramount 76

Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011

Baker Brothers American Grill Even a half order of a Baker Brothers sandwich or salad yields a generous portion and your bank book will appreciate the low price. Next time you drop in try the Taos salad, chockfull full of roasted chicken and a spicy mixture of black beans, corn and diced tomatoes. Be sure to pour on the barbecue sauce with the Ranch. Only then is the salad complete. 3300 Soncy, 352.6135 / 1901 S. Georgia, 352.9000, bakerbrosdeli.com $ y

Belmar Bakery Open since 1965, Belmar Bakery is an Amarillo tradition. Loyal customers abound and each one has a favorite treat they return for again and again (we’re big fans of the thumb print cookies). The café offers a cozy place to meet for early morning coffee and pastries or tasty lunch with friends. 3325 Bell, 355.0141, belmarbakery.com $^ NEW The Burger Bar The Burger Bar is the most recent food joint to hit Amarillo’s downtown scene. The restaurant operates on a straightforward concept and offers a simple, yet sweet menu that includes shakes, floats and of course, burgers and fries. You may be tempted to forgo the aforementioned and give the ripper, a deep-fried hot dog, a shot. Have your fill of feel-good food for an early lunch or late dinner. 614 S. Polk, 376.4700, burgerbaramarillo.com $$ c Cactus Bar & Grill When you’re hungry, the larger-thanusual portions at Cactus Bar & Grill satisfy like nothing else. The Grill serves made-from-scratch American dishes, barbecue and burgers in a friendly down-home atmosphere. When you visit, try the chicken-fried rib eye. 1900 SE 34th, 322.0970 $$ c Calico County An Amarillo favorite for decades, the home-cooked taste keeps people going back for more. You can’t beat the petite cinnamon rolls dripping in butter, the squash casserole and the chicken-fried chicken. Be sure to try the excellent waffles as well. 2410 Paramount, 358.7664, calicocountyamarillo.com $ Carolina’s Wood-Fired Italian Despite the small interior, Carolina’s is great for a date or even the whole family. Start your meal off right with a first-rate Caesar salad and garlic bread. You can’t go wrong with any of the authentic pasta entrees. 2916 Wolflin, 358.2099 $$ C Cheddars There’s a reason there is always a crowd at Cheddars. You’ll find outstanding American-style food at prices that won’t break your budget, which makes it the perfect place to bring the whole family. Treat yourself to a basket of buttery, honey-kissed croissants with your meal, and no matter what you order, you’ll discover that everything’s good. 3901 I-40 West, 358.2111, cheddars.com c $$ ^


Cowboy Gelato Who says Italian-style gelato and cowboy hats don’t mix? We’ll admit that the saloon décor and “Hi ya’ll” greeting might throw you, but this isn’t your average ice cream shop (it is Amarillo, after all). After more than a few sample spoonfuls of gelato, we settled on the lime and the banana chocolate chip, but it’s all good. 2806 6th, 376.5286, cowboygelato.com $

Embers Steakhouse Embers offers an array of cuisine from hamburgers and steaks to mahi mahi and swordfish. We have our eye on the goat cheese and applewood smoked bacon burger. Enjoy the extensive wine list and food pairing suggestions while relaxing on the patio. You’ll enjoy a feast at lunch or dinner, seven days a week. 2721 Virginia Circle, 350.3303 $$ - $$$

Crush Wine Bar & Deli Have you always wished for your very own Cheers? A place where everybody knows your name? Forget the beer and peanuts, Crush Wine Bar & Deli has that beat by a mile. Not sure how to choose from the extensive wine list? No worries, they’ll school you on the choices and you can try a smaller pour just to be sure. Give the excellent tapas, sandwiches and desserts a try as well. 701 S. Polk, 418.2011, crushdeli.com $$

Fernando’s Restaurant & Cantina Family-owned and operated, Fernando’s serves up classic Tex-Mex with a twist. The self-serve salsa bar caters to the tastes of even the most delicate diner. From spicy to mild, zesty to sweet, there’s something for everyone, even cucumber and chipotle salsa. 2028 Paramount, 356.0342 $ c

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Doug’s For a quick, tasty meal, stop at Doug’s and try the chopped beef sandwich. The menu is reasonably priced and the barbecue sauce is fantastic. 3313 S. Georgia, 352.8471 $ Eat-Rite The food at Eat-Rite isn’t just good for you, it’s delicious as well. Feast on the organic salad bar or choose from a variety of tasty sandwiches, soups and entrees. The marinated carrots are pure, tasty goodness. 2441 I-40 West, 353.7476, eat-rite.com $ Eddie’s Napolis Napoli’s has created an oasis in downtown Amarillo. Indulge yourself in the homemade bread while you browse the ample menu. We gently nudge you toward the Amarillo Special or a personalized New York-style pizza. 700 S. Taylor, 373.0927, napolisonline.com $$ c ☎ T y ^ El Tejavan Authentic Mexican food is definitely on the menu at El Tejavan. We love the homemade guacamole served up thick with onions and cilantro. The Ceviche makes for a great starter or a light meal. For authentic taste, try the soft corn tortilla chicken tacos. The recipes at El Tejavan have been passed down for generations, so everything’s good. 3801 I-40 East, 372.5250 / 3420 I-40 West, 354.2444, eltejavan.com $$ c T

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Fire Slice Brick Oven Pizzeria You know you’re in for a good time at Fire Slice when you see the menu. Choose from pizza specialties like “Tommy Boy” and “Hot Momma” or build your own. Each pizza is made fresh in a custom-built pizza oven. 4706 34th, space 10 (behind Chop Chop) 331.2232, fireslice.com $$ C

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Furrbie’s From the old-fashioned grilled onion burgers and array of sandwiches, to salads, seafood and ice cream treats, Furrbie’s has something for everyone. Hot dog enthusiasts will love the famous Nathan’s Hot Dogs, the originals from Coney Island, New York made with 100 percent Kosher American Beef. Looking to cool off? Choose from seven fruityflavored ice treats or ice cream. 210 6th, 220.0841 $ Golden Light Café As the oldest operating restaurant in Amarillo, the Golden Light has been in business since 1947, all in the same location. For a great burger and fries, this is the place to go. 2908 6th, 374.9237, goldenlightcafe.com $CT^ Hayashi Japanese Restaurant Hayashi offers a fun atmosphere for a night out with friends or family. Cook tables allow diners to watch the chef in action or sit back and relax in the Tatami room with low tables and floor seating. The cuisine is Japanese-style with a sushi bar. 3401 I-40 West, 322.8988, hayashiamarillo.com c $$

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May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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Home Plate Diner Take your favorite baseball fan out for a baseballinspired meal. The walls at Home Plate are covered in local and national baseball memorabilia, and Home Plate serves everything you might order to eat at a game at prices that are easy on your wallet. 5600 Bell, 359.4444 $ Indian Oven The moment you enter Indian Oven, you’ll be enveloped by the fragrances of cardamom, ginger, anise, garlic and chili wafting from the kitchen. Start your meal with a generous portion of Naan as you work your way through the extensive menu. Feast on chef specials like Chicken Tandoori and Chicken Tikka Masala or try a little of everything on the generous buffet. Finish up with the to-die-for rice pudding. Don’t leave without sipping the Mango Lassi. 11000 I-40 East, 335.3600 $$ Jake’s Bar & Grill Jake’s Bar & Grill offers an upscale, yet casual, atmosphere and the menu has anything from burgers and sandwiches to steaks and seafood. The restaurant boasts a pleasant bar area as well as a wine room. It’s the perfect setting for an evening out at a reasonable price. Try the Apricot Chipotle Pork Chop or something simpler such as flat bread pizza. You won’t be disappointed. 3130 Soncy, Suite 100, 358.2222 $$ c Jimmy John’s Gourmet Sandwiches Jimmy John’s prides itself on its fresh ingredients and friendly service. Feeling healthy, but can’t bear to pass up the homemade French bread? Then try the 8-inch vegetarian sub layered with provolone cheese and packed with alfalfa sprouts, cucumber, lettuce, tomato and real avocado spread. 2330 S. Soncy Rd., Suite 500, 354.9200, jimmyjohns.com $ Joe Taco Great atmosphere and a variety of Southwest favorites make Joe Taco a great place to sit and relax. Especially while enjoying a signature margarita. 7312 Wallace Blvd., 331.8226, joetaco.net $$ c T ☎ y Jorge’s Mexican Bar & Grill In the mood for fajitas? Look no further than Jorge’s Mexican Bar & Grill, specifically the new location at Hillside and Bell. Portion sizes are generous and prices are reasonable. 6051 S. Bell, 354.2141 $$ c y ^ K-N Root Beer If you’ve tried K-N’s yummy burgers and floats, then you know why it’s been a success for more than 40 years. The K- N Special, a double meat, double cheese burger melts in your mouth. You can’t beat the old-fashioned, icy mug of root beer. 3900 Olsen, 355.4391 $ Kolache CafĂŠ If you like authentic beirox, you’ll be delighted with Kolache CafĂŠ. And it doesn’t stop there. Choose from a variety of meat and fruit fillings for a satisfying breakfast, lunch or dinner. Everything on the menu is baked fresh daily and so affordable that you can grab a dozen kolaches to go for a quick, tasty meal. 2207 S. Western, Suite B1-90, 322.3278 / 6200 Hillside, Suite 100, 318.3955 $ y UPDATE


La Campana La Campana offers flavorful, inexpensive Tex-Mex with options that will please the entire family and the salsa is made fresh daily. We suggest the Manchacas and Huevos Rancheros served with beef sauce. Don’t overlook the Papas Frijoles covered with cheese. 2220 Canyon Dr., 373.4486 $ C

Malcolm’s Ice Cream & Food Temptations Malcolm’s offers the ultimate in classic soda-fountain food: burgers, sandwiches and salads–everything’s good. Be sure you save room for dessert. Better yet, start with a treat. After all, it’s the most important part of the meal at Malcolm’s. 2100 Paramount, 355.3892 $

Leal’s Leal’s serves dishes that blend the traditional flavors of Mexico with a few twists that will delight you. Try excellent non-traditional items like quail and salmon along with new sauce combinations and desserts. Let’s not forget about the fresh-squeezed lime margaritas, some of the best margaritas anywhere.1619 S. Kentucky, 359.5959, lealsmexicanfoods.com $$ c T ^

Marty’s Stop by for Marty’s expansive Sunday brunch, and you’ll leave satisfied and ready for an afternoon nap. The madeto-order omelets are definitely worth the trip. If you’re not in the mood for traditional breakfast fare, try the prime rib or Canyon Rose chicken. 2740 Westhaven Village, 353.3523 ^ T

Macaroni Joe’s Macaroni Joe’s isn’t just a place to eat a great meal. The Tuscan-inspired rooms are the perfect place for creating memories. Whether for a first date, the start of a new life together, or celebrating important milestones, the restaurant offers excellent service and an exquisite food and wine menu. It’s at the top of our list. 1619 S. Kentucky, Suite 1500, 358.8990, macaronijoes.com $$ - $$$ c y ☎ ^

OHMS Café & Bar Set in downtown Amarillo, OHMS serves lunch buffet style and dinner in style. The chefs feature specials each week that range from seafood and smoked duck to beef tenderloin. Excellent cuisine and service make this a delightful place to linger. 619 S. Tyler, 373.3233, ohmscafe.com $$$ ☎ T c ^

CATE R I NG

On the Border Become a part of the revolution at On the Border. The fajita revolution, that is. Made-to-order fajitas will knock your socks off. Of course, good Mexican food is even better with a cold beer. Go ahead, indulge. 2401 Soncy, 468.9800, ontheborder.com $$ c Pancake Station With breakfast this good, you’ll be glad to know that the Pancake Station serves it all day long. The restaurant also offers great café-style meals. We recommend the huge omelets and fresh pancakes. 2800 Virginia Circle, 355.0211 $ ^ Pei Wei Pei Wei is always busy, but it’s certainly worth the wait. Your dining experience isn’t complete without the Lettuce Wraps. From there, delight your taste buds with Beef Ginger Broccoli. 3350 Soncy, 352.5632, peiwei.com $$

C^ Pescaraz Italian Restaurant Come ready to linger when you visit Pescaraz. From the charming décor and impressive bar area to the array of entrees, soups, salads and impressive wine list, you’ll want to take time to savor every bite. Enjoy excellent service and live music in the evenings. 3415-K Bell, 350.5430, pescaraz.com $$

The Plaza A long-time Amarillo favorite, the many loyal customers of the Plaza attest to the great food and affordable prices. Eat your fill of fresh chips and hot sauce and enjoy the laid-back atmosphere. Perfect for a family night out, the menu offers enough variety to suit the pickiest eaters. Check out its new location. 2101 S. Soncy, 358.4897 $ c UPDATE

Red Hana From Lubbock comes the Asian restaurant Red Hana. Nestled inside Bell Plaza, Red Hana offers an array of dishes from sushi to Mongol-andHibachi-grilled items. The Mongolian barbecue will certainly hit the spot. Stop by Monday through Sunday for lunch or dinner or even just relaxing in the sake lounge. 5807 SW 45th, 356.7045 $$ Red Lobster Seafood is a real treat in the Texas Panhandle and Red Lobster is an old stand-by when you have a hankering for shrimp. Our favorite? The scampi swimming in delicious garlic butter complemented by tasty garlic cheese biscuits. 3311 I-40 West, 353.9596, red lobster.com $$

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Robinson’s BBQ Robinson’s has mastered the art of barbecue. We especially love the chopped beef sandwiches. But don’t limit yourself to just a sandwich; try the tasty Frito pies. If you’re in time for breakfast, try the excellent breakfast burritos. 5920 Hillside, 358.2194 $ Sabaidee Sabaidee offers a fusion of Asian tastes along with delicious, authentic Laotian dishes like sticky rice with beef jerky, chicken wings and tomato sauce, and papaya salad. Try the Sabaidee Special for a guaranteed taste-treat. 2313 S. Georgia, 331.6720 $ Saltgrass Steak House Certified Angus Beef + Sidewinders = mouthwatering taste. Saltgrass has plenty of steaks to choose from and you can pair it with juicy Gulf shrimp or try the Seafood Fondeaux with Shiner Bock Beer Bread. Take our advice: Save room for the Two-Fork Cheesecake. It’s a piece of heaven that melts in your mouth. 8300 I-40 West, 351.0349 saltgrass.com c $$ ^ Scott’s Oyster Bar If you are a fresh oyster connoisseur, Scott’s is the place for you. Even though it’s a little on the small side, the quick service and excellent seafood make it one of our favorite places to hang out. 4150 Paramount, 354.9110 $$ y C Smokey Joe’s A welcoming bar and grill located in the historic antique district on Route 66, Smokey Joe’s is one of Amarillo’s best-kept secrets. With an outside patio and live music on the weekends, this is the place to be. When you visit, ask for the Legendary Spink. You won’t regret it. 2903 6th, 331.6698 $$ c y T T.G.I. Friday’s T.G.I. Friday’s new right portion, right price menu fills you up even when your wallet’s a little on the light side. Try any of the Jack Daniels glazed steaks, ribs, chicken or shrimp for a juicy, flavorful treat. 3100 I-40 West, 468.8000, tgifridays.com $ – $$ c Thai Taste If you’re feeling a bit finicky, Thai Taste will fix that. With more than 20 lunch and dinner entrees, you’ll certainly find a dish that satisfies you, whatever your craving. To spice up your night, try the Chili Special. 7710 Hillside, Suite100, 352.4444 $

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Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011

Tsunami Tsunami offers traditional Japanesesteakhouse fare at affordable prices. Start out with Southwestern Egg Rolls then fill up on the Salmon Teppan Meal or Teppanyaki Steak. We guarantee you won’t leave hungry. 1108 Bell, 352.2688 $ Village Bakery Café The Village offers a large selection of handmade European pastries and breads to complement fresh, gourmetstyle breakfasts, lunches and dinners. The casual bistro setting makes it the perfect place for a special lunch date. 2606 Wolflin Village, 358.1358, villagebakerycafe.com $ ^ y Wheels, Chicken & Waffles You’ll feel like you’ve gone back in time to a quaint old-fashioned diner when you visit Wheels. The inside is covered with vintage car memorabilia and wheels galore. We love the southernfried chicken with waffles. The mix of savory and sweet is delicious. Save room for dessert when you dine because you won’t want to miss the waffle cheesecake. It’s a big, Belgian waffle piled high with cheesecake filling, whipped cream and both chocolate and caramel syrup. 2710 10th, 342.5400 $ Wild Bill’s Decorated like a classic gas station, Wild Bill’s offers American food and friendly service. Bring the whole family since there’s plenty of seating inside and out. The Green Chili Cheese Burger with hand-cut seasoned fries is our personal favorite. 3514 6th, 372.4500 $ y C Young Sushi Rocks The friendly greeting you receive when you walk into Young’s is your first clue that your experience will be a good one. The helpful staff is always willing to offer suggestions regarding the sushi. If sushi’s not your thing, try the authentic Thai cuisine. 202 SW 10th, 371.7200 $$

C^ Zest Eat & Drinkery The chef at Zest puts a delightful twist on classic dishes. The menu has everything from duck and lamb to steaks and seafood. With an array of food options and a full bar with daily drink specials, Zest presents a lively atmosphere and upscale dining. Plus, you’ll enjoy an affordable, yet excellent wine list. 4000 I-40 West 352.1498 $$

c☎


Canyon

Buffalo’s Southwest Café Buffalo’s offers traditional Southwestern fare with hardy ingredients like corn, black beans and chili in a number of the specialties. Everything’s tasty but we recommend starting with the famous hot wings. 2811 4th, 655.4400 buffaloscafe.com $ c El Patio Mexican Restaurante Sometimes the only thing that will satisfy pesky hunger pains is great TexMex and that’s exactly what you’ll find at El Patio. The comfortable atmosphere and exceptional service add up to a perfectly satisfying meal. 1410 Hereford Hwy., 655.4300 $ Fat Boy’s BBQ Fat Boy’s has been dishing up delicious Texas-style barbeque since 1988 so it’s safe to say they know what they’re doing. The meat has the perfect amount of smoky flavor. Top that off with sweet barbeque sauce and a few homemade sides and your taste buds will thank you.104 23rd, 655.7363 $

Feldman’s Wrong Way Diner Step into Feldman’s and you might wonder where you are: Gilligan’s Island, a model train shop or an eatery. As soon as you catch a whiff of the classic American food, you’ll know. The fun, casual atmosphere and model trains that run a course along the ceiling make Feldman’s a great place for the whole family. Try the made-fresh burgers or the Tortuga chicken, satisfaction guaranteed. 1701 5th, 655.2700, feldmansdiner.com $ NEW The King and I Craving fresh sushi? The King and I will surely satisfy. Try the customer favorite, the Canyon roll, and savor every scrumptious slice of crab, tempura shrimp, avocado, cucumber and cream cheese topped with red tuna, white tuna, shrimp and eel. If you still have an appetite, order the fried bananas covered with powdered sugar and strawberries. 104 15th, 655.2491 $$ Morning Glory Tea Room Morning Glory offers a charming eatery for your next special occasion or lunch out with the girls. While you’re there, browse through their furniture and accessories while you wait for your food. The tea room serves breakfast or lunch Tuesday through Saturday with a menu that changes weekly. 1608 4th, Canyon, 655.7221 $$

Ranch House Café The Ranch House Café has a small-town, home-cooked family atmosphere. The Café offers breakfast, lunch, dinner and take-out as well as specials seven days a week. On a budget? You can order one hotcake, an egg and your choice of bacon or sausage for only $3.10. 810 23rd, Canyon 655.8785 $ Rock N Roll Soda Shoppe Located in downtown Canyon, the Rock N Roll Soda Shoppe offers classic soda shop fare along with Southwestern treats. The Chick-a-Dilla, a chicken fajita quesadilla served with hot sauce and guacamole, is a taste-treat paired with any of the specialty drinks. Give the Trash Can Lid Sundae Sampler a try. It’s a smaller portion of all the sundae flavors served up on a trash can lid. 404 15th, 655.3381 $ y Sayakomarn’s Sayakomarn’s offers a variety of traditional Thai dishes with daily lunch specials that won’t empty your wallet. Be sure you try their Boba tea made with tapioca balls and shaken into fruitflavored or milk tea. It’s yummy. 419 16th, 655.2698 $

Something Different Grill The Something Different Grill has made a great name for itself in Canyon. The menu offers a variety of entrees ranging from sandwiches and burgers to pasta and Asian noodle bowls. The service is quick but you can forget fast-food taste. Everything tastes like home-cooked goodness. 210 23rd, Canyon 655.6565 $

Hereford

Brix Steakhouse Brix is more than just a steakhouse. The diverse menu offers something for everyone including seafood and chicken. You’ll enjoy the relaxed, cozy atmosphere as you dine. 1404 W 1st, 364.2583 $ c

Vega

Boot Hill Saloon Chef Rory, a Jersey native, features her signature recipes at the Boot Hill Saloon. She’s been a guest on “The Rachel Ray Show” and worked with chefs Bobby Flay, Giada Delaurentis and  Paula Dean, to name a few. So when you visit, you know you’re in for a treat. The food is superb, a mixture of great culinary skill with a Texas twist, and the“Sweet After Thoughts” are to die for. 909 Vega Blvd, 267.2904, boothillvega.com $$ y ☎ c

taste of the city SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Kabuki Romanza

Kabuki Romanza would like to introduce wine dinners at Kabuki, an evening filled with exquisite dining and perfectly balanced wines to compliment. We hope you will join us in the exploration of fine wine and exquisite cuisine at future wine dinners. Each wine dinner will feature a unique dining experience balanced with tantalizing wines, perfect for any occasion. Call Carey or Venita at 353.4242, ext. 6 for more information. Open seven days a week. 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. – 10 p.m. 8130 I-40 West, Amarillo, 353.4242

May 2011 • amarillomagonline.com • Amarillo Magazine

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May

photo courtesy of Amarillo Public Library Archives

retro rewind

Princess of Prussia

Mrs. Cecilie Harris and her daughter, Kira, pose for a photograph in the late 1950s at their home on Van Buren Street. Before marrying Oklahoma native Clyde Harris, Cecilie Viktoria Anastasia Zeta Thyra Adelheid was the princess of Prussia and daughter of Crown Prince Wilhelm and great-great-granddaughter of Queen Victoria. She renounced her title to marry Clyde, a commoner, and the couple was married in 1949. They moved to Amarillo where Clyde had established his shop, Clyde Harris Interior Furnishings & Design. 82

Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011


Crouch Fine Art

www.CrouchFineArt.com 3701 Plains Blvd. #121 (806)353 5700 (806)352 2706 Monday - Saturday 10-6 Sunday 1-5


spotlight

Cara Young

Artist, jewelry designer, nature lover

A

photo by Jeff Harbin, Life of Riley Photography

t the heart of Cara Young’s jewelry is nature. From the time she was a toddler, relatives have instilled in her a love of art and the environment. “My parents raised [my two brothers and me] to be exposed to lots of different things,” says the 28-year-old WTAMU graduate. “Family would always give me books about watercolors and artists. They noticed it was a desire of mine and they really tried to motivate me.” While visiting family in Tucson a few years ago, Cara developed a close relationship with her grandmother’s friend, a bead maker, who passed the trade down to Cara. “I really wanted to learn [bead making] and she extended that opportunity to me,” Cara recalls. “It was just a really cool experience. She taught me a lot about clay and about life.” Finding inspiration in nature and using beads from all over the globe, Cara molds, glazes and fires her own clay. Outside of work and her hobby, Cara participates in a book club and contributes to an organic food co-op. am

Q&A My friends and family call me… Caratam. It’s my first name and maiden name turned into one word. Or just Cara. The most famous or interesting person I’ve ever met is… I think that all people are interesting! You just have to take the time to get to know them to find out. My go-to stress reliever is… a glass of wine, playing pool, spending time with good, old friends or running. One of my favorite childhood toys was… I don’t really remember having a favorite toy. I liked to play outside as often as possible which taught me about the world and its workings. I found the nests of field mice, watched birds grow from eggs, witnessed the change of seasons in the fruit trees. You may be surprised to know that I… can chop my own firewood, sort of. I just learned and last time I hit myself in the leg with a sledge hammer. But I keep practicing.

For the full story, log on to amarillomagonline.com 84

Amarillo Magazine • amarillomagonline.com • May 2011

If I were a character in a book, I would be… the Lorax from the Dr. Seuss story. He was a voice for those who did not have a voice and persistent even when he was discouraged.


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Amarillo Magazine | May 2011