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Reversing School-toPrison Pipeline

African-American News and Issues Newspaper

Vol. 23 Issue 6

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Greater Houston - Black History

TEXAS TRAILBLAZER LIFE AND LEGACY

School culture/climate specialists with the Center for Safe and Secure Schools, a division of HCDE: (left) Janice Owolabi and Julia Andrews SEE PG. 6

We Salute

Petty Officer 3RD Class Markel Carter

SEE PG 4

Imani School student steppers, choir and Bravo members SAN DIEGO – A 2008 Thurgood Marshall graduate and Missouri City, Texas, native is currently serving aboard the largest amphibious warship in the Navy. CONT. @

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Your Money & Your Vote

ARE THE MOST POWERFUL THINGS YOU HAVE; BE CAREFUL WHO YOU GIVE THEM TO. ~Roy Douglas Malonson, Publisher~

GET OUT & VOTE! Early Vote NOW thru March 2 Vote Tuesday, March 6, 2018


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American News&Issues

Editorial & Opinion

Letter to the Editor: Black and Vegan

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BY: Zachary Tolliver

omewhere along the line, while getting through this thing called life, I came across these words by the late, great Maya Angelou and turned them into a personal mantra:

“I did then what I knew how to do. Now that I know better, I do better.”

I've relied heavily on this quote for personal development. It's helped me choose where to spend my money and how to treat other human beings, and yes, practicing these words has a lot to do with why I'm vegan. Once I understood that just like humans, chickens, pigs, cows and all other animals feel pain, experience

Roy Douglas Malonson Chairman Shirley Ann Malonson President/C.E.O. Chandra Jarmon

Production/Editor

Kimberly Taylor

Production Asst.

General: news@aframnews.com Ads: sales@aframnews.com Website: www.aframnews.com African-American News&Issues is published by African-American News & Issues, Inc., 6130 Wheatley Street, Houston, Texas 77091, (713) 692-1892. Our office hours are Monday-Friday, 9am - 5pm. The entire contents of the paper are copyrighted by African-American News & Issues, Inc. All rights reserved. Material in this publication may not be reproduced in any form without the expressed written consent of the publisher. African-American News&Issues is not responsible for any claims made by advertisers. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the publisher. African-American News&Issues assumes no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs and other material, unless accompanied by a self-address stamped envelope.

Letter to the Editor

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e welcome all original responses from our readers to content found in the AfricanAmerican News&Issues. Letters to the Publisher may be sent via e-mail to news@aframnews.com. Please keep all letters under 300 words. Be sure to include the author’s name, area of residence. All letters and articles may be verified before they are published. All letters are subjected to editing or being cut for spacing purposes. Thank you in advance for your submission.

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The Harvest Box (LMAO!)

fear and value their own lives, I banned dead animal parts from my life. I knew better, so—for animals—I did better. However, Black vegans certainly "do better" for more than animals. No matter if I'm recognizing Black History Month, an ordinary April or even National Doughnut Day, I understand that I'm only here because of my ancestors and the struggles they endured—and I owe every one of them my best, to honor their legacies. Right now, America in general, but African Americans in particular, face a health crisis. According to the American Heart Association, Black Americans are disproportionately affected by obesity and more likely to have diabetes than their white counterparts. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that African Americans have nearly double the risk of dying early from heart disease and strokes as whites. These aren't arbitrary statistics. My own father—who eats a stacked plate of ribs for a meal— struggles with diabetes. Most people can hardly understand my grandmother when she speaks due to multiple strokes. My uncle Harrison prided himself on his signature mustard and collard greens with ham hock, and he also died of heart disease. These are all links in my ancestral lineage ravaged by an unhealthy diet. It's a shame when folks mistake slave food for soul food. "Foods" like chitlins (animal intestines) or hog maw (pig stomach), lard and pigs' feet harm our bodies. Our enslaved ancestors had to consume these disgusting body parts to survive horrifying atrocities and in no way could they "do better." Continue @ aframnews.com

Straight No Chaser By: Arielle Johnson

I

thought the idea of a wall was ludicrous, and was very vocal about it to my circle of friends. Now that it is no longer a joke, I have had to eat those words. Just the other day, I thought to myself, what’s next, in terms of 45’s level of pettiness, and would it top the wall stunt. Ladies and gentlemen, believe it or not, your boy has done it again with the boxed food program for SNAP recipients. And this may be the best one ever. So the plan is to cut the SNAP program by $21 billion dollars per year, by removing 50% of the benefit SNAP recipients usually receive on their card. Supposedly, the other 50% will arrive in a box. Unfortunately, I can see all sorts of problems going on with this here idea. Are the delivery people going to ask people to show their id when they drop the box off? I mean, everyone of us has gotten packages delivered to us although they were addressed to someone else. Hell…that happened to me on Christmas. Someone I don’t know sent a package to my house from Neiman Marcus. And sadly enough, I went back and forth in my head about what I was gonna do. Neiman Marcus has lots of money and the recipient or sender of the gift could always request a refund, and would get every dime of their money back too. But I’m honest, so I dropped it off at the Post Office and told them not to do that again, because I may not be in the Christmas spirit next time. How big will the box be and how many items will it have in it? It ain’t gonna work if they looking

TEXAS • FEBRUARY 26 - MARCH 4, 2018

for a box to hold half the stuff I see those ladies coming through on the grocery line with either in front of me or behind me on the first of the month. Those baskets be filled to the brim and overflowing. Who gon’ collect my box when I ain’t there? I can see it now. People sitting in the human services office all day, and arrive home to find a box outside their apartment opened with all the juice, and canned meat and dry milk taken out of it. How about the people living in the woods with a pack

to the shelves. I always took the long route because I was so dayum bored. But as I walked through the store, I would often asked myself, how the retailer could afford to stay in business, when they only had customers on the 1st and second week of the month. Now according to the newspapers and blogs, most retailers are getting 30% of their income from the SNAP program. Personally, I beg to differ. I was there checking out folks and at least 7 times out of 10, somebody was whipping out THE CARD. Do you know a lot of workers would be without jobs because there would be no way to pay them? You and I both know, nutrition is not the focus of people who are surviving off of these cards. And there is a whole gang of government officials who are vehemently opposed to the availability of unhealthy foods to Snap recipients. So... Why is the federal government subsidizing unhealthy foods anyway?

of wild wolves running around in the front yard and grizzly bears that already have can openers they stole from campers and are just hanging around lurking and waiting on the next delivery? As a delivery person, are you going to hop out of your car and place a box on the recipient’s front porch after walking around the bear? I think not! And while everyone is up in arms about the recipients, what about the whole retail chain business? 45 is going to put some retailers out of business with this plan. A couple of years ago, I worked at Winco Foods and towards the end of every month, business was so slow, we didn’t know how we were going to make it through our shift. Meanwhile I would purposely take long walks through the store returning items

I really don’t know how it got to be this way, but I want to encourage everyone out there to read between the lines. If we giving out tax breaks, we got to make up the difference somehow, so without spelling it out for you, some genius came up with this plan. Canned foods contain traces of metal. Look it up if you don’t believe me. Canned foods kill and are not supposed to be a part of our regular diet. So basically, by offering this Death Box, you are telling us, certain lives are dispensable? It is a slow death once you get to reading about those things that are killing us which we ingest. However, what are we going to do when we don’t have the resources to make a choice. Bottom line family, this is an asinine suggestion being made to cut federal spending.*

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TEXAS • FEBRUARY 26 - MARCH 4, 2018

Editorial & Opinion

African American Communities Need Black Police Officers The Standard View Billy “Hollywood” Groves

All across America there are large black communities; the need for African American Law Enforcement people is of great urgency. The reason we (African Americans) need more black policemen is because of the massive mistreatment of black people by America’s police forces. I’m not saying that every American police person has an anti-African American prejudice and I’m not suggesting that black communities don’t need law officers. The point that I’m focusing on is the damage that is happening to Black families when so many Black people, especially Black males are arrested and put in prisons. At times it seem like large parts of America’s police system are dedicated recruiters for America’s Prison Industrial Complex. I know for a fact, that dedicated Black police officers who are good decent people would be fair dedicated super positive assets to Black communities. The leadership of dysfunctional racist police departments must be addressed, challenged and reorganized by changing the leaders. This is the way we must conduct this business, for fair results, it’s the American way. A lot of times these racist corrupt Police chiefs and other leaders in law enforcement try to deceive, fool and exploit the public. Sometimes they hire Black or minority police officers and force them through their power to abuse black people. The only way these people can keep their jobs and get

a job promotion or salary raise is to impress their boss. These confused police officers often wreak havoc and destruction on Black people in order to please and impress their boss or leaders. We don’t need any more of these crooked, racist directed people posing as police officers and viewing everyone Black as a potential criminal. We need Black police officers who understand Black people, who know that everybody Black is not a bad person because they look a certain way. We need Black police officers who have the courage to tell their police chief that they are not going to break the law by falsely arresting and charging Black people with crimes they didn’t commit. Again, I must emphasize that I’m not saying that we don’t want our Black communities to have law enforcement officers, because we do want officers in our communities. But I am reminding everyone that there is a lot of truth in the old saying, “If you do the

same thing over and over and expect a different result, then

you must be a fool”. If we keep believing the “fake threats”, that corrupt law persons are telling us about Black people and we keep refusing to make any changes; then we know what position “We the People” will remain in. I will end this article by saying, “We have the power and ability to change this deadly situation that Black people face every day”. If someone is reading this and has doubts about the truthfulness of these words, then go and visit your nearest Black community and make your own judgement about this situation. Continue @ aframnews.com

African

American News&Issues

IT IS TIME FOR OUR BLACK LEADERS TO STAND UP!

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hatever your life’s work is, do it well. A man should do his job so well that the living, the dead, and the unborn could do it no better.” Furthermore, it is, “the quality, not the longevity, of one’s life is what is important” these most wholesome words were rendered by the late great Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

I agree with him and believe that if anyone was worthy of making such a statement then certainly, he was. Dr. King stood and spoke the truth as it relates to the situation of Black America during the era in which he lived. Since that time, there has not been a leader that vigorously stood and consistently cried out with a voice in the same manner in which he did. Therefore, I believe that in fact Dr. King did contribute work in the area in which he operated in that, “no man, living, dead or unborn, could do better”. Accordingly, it is my belief that modern-day preachers, activists, politicians and leaders overall would be wise to take note of Dr. King’s words and follow suit. Research and statistics show that there are more AfricanAmerican men and women in influential posi-tions in this country than ever before, in the history of these United States. Today, we have African-Americans that are lawyers, doctors, engineers, senators, governors and even up to the highest office in the land, president. But what good are influential people within a culture or society if they don’t stand for anything; and especially if they do not pay homage to those who paved the way for them to have the opportunity to preside in the offices of which they presently do? Our present-day leaders have inherited offices that were built off of the sweat, blood, tears, hard work, lives and sacrifices of

our ancestors and leaders, like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Thus, an obligation is owed to our ancestors to study and embrace our heritage. We MUST Understand, that though we have come a long way, it is just not long enough. This is why it saddens my heart that so many pow-erful and influential leaders are dying off and there are not many successors that have the passion to lead as our great leaders of old did. The intent and angle is different now, present-day leaders are more concerned with notoriety and what their counterparts will think of their stances and views on certain issues that affect Black America. Now make no mistake, I am aware that there are still some young people that are in office that actually care and are concerned about deep rooted issues that affect our com-munities. But the majority is more than not. Our great leaders, patriarchs, and warriors are dying off in scores of numbers. Yet perhaps, the most mind-boggling attribute to this situation is that the youth of our community doesn’t know anything about leader-ship, less known what it takes to be an effective leader. Good leadership abilities initiate out of one’s ability to be able to follow. Everyone does not have the charisma, talent, or gift of being a leader. So if in fact you are someone who just happens to be a member of the Black community and are operat-ing in a role of leadership or authority then it would behoove you to use the powers that you have to help and sup-port members of your own commu-nity. I am sick and tired of politicians, preachers and other leaders saying that they have the best interest in mind for African-Americans, but then when

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We MUST Understand Roy Douglas Malonson, Publisher

they get into office or to a place they feel they have arrived it can easily be determined that their walk does not match there talk. Even still what bothers me most is that members of the Black community still see fit to support these individuals, regardless of. We MUST Understand, that Black leaders should be held account-able to the offices, pacts and promises that they make to the community before they inherit office. We MUST send a message to these leaders that use us to get into office that we will not continue to stand by and support them and once they get into office they totally neglect and forget about us. This is not to state that every preacher, politician or leader does not keep their word and hold true to their commitment. I would not dare insinuate that, because some of my greatest friends happen to be preach-ers, politicians, activists and others in authoritative roles. Nonetheless, the fact still remains that there are those who lie to get into office and then totally misuse or renig on the promises they made. We MUST Understand that, we have an obligation to our ancestors to pass our history on to the generations that follow us, so that they will know that they must be held accountable when their time comes to stand in the same places that many of us have stood. But how can we effectively pass this information on, when so many leaders deny the truth about: what has happened, what continues to happen and what will continue to happen unless some form of change comes to the status and situation of Black America? * TX-3


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African

American News&Issues

Legacy from page 1

By: LaTreshia A. Hamilton, J.D.* Photo Credit: Thomas Carter of AAPA

HOUSTON - On July 12, 1976, U.S. Representative Barbara Jordan (TX-18) delivered the keynote address at the 1976 Democratic National Convention. When she arrived at the podium, John Hershey's Deep in the Heart of Texas resounded throughout Madison Square Garden. Jordan received a standing ovation as the crowd chanted her name. After simmering the audience, she boldly

about that night—a woman from Houston's Fifth Ward, who was a graduate of Phillis Wheatley High School and Texas Southern University (TSU), was the first African American to deliver a keynote address at the Democratic National Convention. Even then, Congresswoman Jordan was cognizant of the historical significance of her very presence and of her solidified place in history.

Born on February 21, 1936, in Houston, Texas, Barbara Jordan was a lawyer, Texas Senator, U.S. Representative, and educator. Reared in Houston's Fifth Ward, Jordan attended Phillis Wheatley High School, where she excelled in her academics and was a member of the debate team. She would later graduate in 1952 with the highest honors. Due to segregation, she could not attend The Dr. Kimberly Brown Pellum accepts resolution from the Office University of Texas of State Representative Shawn Thierry by Steven James, at Austin, and instead Director of Community Affairs chose to attend TSU, proclaimed of the momentous where she majored in political occasion: "[T]here is something science and history. While at TSU, different about tonight. There is Jordan, along with Otis King, and something special about tonight. under the tutelage of Dr. Thomas What is different? What is special? F. Freeman, became a national I, Barbara Jordan, am a keynote champion debater, defeating opspeaker." Her bold proclamaponents from Yale and Brown and tion was immediately met with tying Harvard University. Jordan pomp and circumstance as the also pledged the Delta Gamma crowd cheered her on! There was chapter of Delta Sigma Theta indeed something different about Sorority, Inc. while at TSU. After that night, something special graduating magna cum laude in

Honorable Judge Fredericka Phillips - Vice-Chair of Texas Democratic Party; Antoinette “Toni” Jackson; Algenita Scott Davis

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cover story 1956, Jordan continued her studies at Boston University School of Law, where she graduated in 1959. In 1960, after graduating from law school and passing both the Massachusetts and Texas bar exams, respectively, Jordan returned to Houston where she became active in politics by campaigning for the Democratic presidential ticket of John F. Kennedy and fellow Texan Lyndon B. Johnson. In 1962, Jordan launched her first bid for office, seeking a seat in the Texas House of Representatives. After two unsuccessful attempts in 1962 and 1964, Jordan was elected to the Texas Senate in 1966, becoming the first African American state senator since Reconstruction and the first Black woman to serve in that body. Re-elected to a full term in the Texas Senate in 1968, she served until 1972. She was the first African American woman to serve as president pro tem of the state senate and served one day, June 10, 1972, as "Governor for a Day." To date, Jordan is the only African American woman to serve as governor of a state (excluding lieutenant governors). In 1972, Jordan was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, the first woman in her own right to represent Texas in the House. She received extensive support from former President Lyndon B. Johnson, who helped her secure a position on the House Judiciary Committee. In 1974, she was thrust into the national spotlight during President Richard M. Nixon's

Texas • FEBRUARY - MARCH 4, 2013 2018 Texas • 26 August 12-18,

Watergate scandal. Jordan stood as a moral compass for the nation during this time of crisis, calling for the impeachment of President Nixon for his involvement of the political enterprise. In a fifteenminute nationally televised speech during Nixon's impeachment proceedings, Congresswoman Jordan declared, "[I] am not going to sit here and be an idle spectator to the diminution, the subversion, the destruction, of the Constitution."

Mrs. Patricia Hogan Williams, Head of Imani

In 1979, Jordan retired from politics and became an adjunct professor teaching ethics at The University of Texas at Austin's Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs. In 1992, she would again deliver the keynote address at the 1992 Democratic National Convention. In 1994, President Bill Clinton awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Throughout her career, Jordan suffered from multiple sclerosis and leukemia. On January 17, 1996, at the age of 59, Jordan died due to Kayse Musse, junior music major in the Thomas F. Freeman Honors College of complications from pneumonia. Although twenty-two years have passed since the untimely death of Congresswoman Jordan, her life and legacy lives on—especially, by and through her sister, Mrs. Rose Mary McGowan, and Houstonians alike. On Wednesday, February 21, 2018, TSU's College of Liberal Arts and Behavioral Sciences (COLABS) hosted its second annual event: Honoring & Celebrating Barbara Jordan's Birthday and Her Legacy at Work. Coincidentally,

Texas Southern University

the celebration occurred on Congresswoman Jordan's actual birthday, on which she would have turned eighty-two years old! Prior to the start of the event, attendees and guests were treated to light hors d'oeuvres and live musical performances by TSU's Jazz Ensemble, whom the late Congresswoman dubbed the official state band when she was "Governor for a Day." Continue @ aframnews.com

Members of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. From Left to Right: Honorable Rhonda Skillern-Jones, President of Board of HISD; Dr. Carla D. Brailey, Assistant Professor of Sociology, TSU; Dr. Rockell Brown-Burton, Associate Professor of Communication, TSU; Andrea Vick; Lynn Munford of Munford Consulting


Texas • FEBRUARY 26 - MARCH 4, 2018

Texas Round-Up

Read us online! www. aframnews. com

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Texas Excels in School Breakfast Participation AUSTIN - A national report released Tuesday ranks Texas tenth best among states in school breakfast participation, the third consecutive year that Texas has scored in the top ten. According to the report from the Food Research Action Center (FRAC), 1.6 million low-income Texas children ate breakfast at school last year, or 63 percent of the number receiving school lunch. In 2013, the Texas State Legislature required high-need schools to make school breakfast available to all students at no charge. The bipartisan law is widely credited with boosting school breakfast participation, in turn leading to higher test scores, less tardiness, and fewer disciplinary referrals. We urge school districts to increase their engagement in federal nutrition programs as a means to boost academic achievement and child health,said Cole. According to the report, further increasing breakfast participation in Texas to 70 percent (a rate already exceeded by the Dallas, Houston and San Antonio ISDs) would draw down an additional $51 million in federal child nutrition funding each year. Congress is currently considering other important child nutrition programs for potential cuts, including SNAP.

SEND YOUR WEEKLY NEWS BRIEFS TO NEWS@AFRAMNEWS.COM Reward for information in Dallas postal worker slaying

DALLAS — Investigators are offering a $50,000 reward as they search for a suspect in the fatal shooting of a U.S. Postal Service worker who was found dead in his mail truck in Dallas. Federal investigators announced Tuesday they were offering the reward for information leading to an arrest and conviction following the death of 58-year-old Tony Mosby. Dallas police say Mosby was shot early Monday while driving a mail delivery truck on Interstate 30 near downtown Dallas. The shooting took place in an area near two major postal service complexes. Officials are also trying to determine a possible motive for the attack. The reward is being offered by the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, the law enforcement and security arm of USPS. The agency is working with Dallas police on the case.

Teen Dating and Violence HARRIS COUNTY - In honor of February being Teen Violence Awareness Month, Precinct One Constable Alan Rosen invites parents and teens to attend a discussion on abuse in teen relationships on February 28, 2018, 6-8p.m. Constable Rosen and members of his staff will discuss dating safety, abusive relationships, predator drugs and bullying. Michelle Sacks from Crime Stoppers of Houston will provide an overview of cyber safety for teens and parents. Preregistration is required to attend. Contact Erica Davis at 713-755-3372 or erica.davis@cn1.hctx. net to RSVP for the event. Due to the nature of the discussion topic, it is recommended that those under the age of 17, be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

H-E-B Excellence in Education Awards HOUSTON - Three additional Houston educators were named finalists for the 2018 H-E-B Excellence in Education Awards, spotlighting them as some of the best educators in Texas. H-E-B’s Excellence in Education is the largest monetary awards program for educators in Texas, and among the largest in the nation. The honor was kept a surprise from the educators, who learned they were finalists when H-E-B representatives visited their classrooms and schools with balloons, cookies, and flowers. Two teachers were presented with a $1,000 check for themselves and a $1,000 check for their schools. One principal received a $1,000 check for herself and a $2,500 check for her school. The finalists are: • Jennifer Chase, The High School for Performing & Visual Arts, Houston ISD (Rising Star Secondary) • Vanessa Reyes, V.W. Miller Intermediate, Pasadena ISD (Principal Secondary) • Terri Armendariz, Carpenter Elementary, Deer Park ISD (Lifetime Achievement Elementary) Two more Houston area finalists will be announced this week. All finalists are invited to Houston on May 5-6 to compete on a statewide level for larger cash prizes totaling $430,000. TX - 5


te and size of Ad to run in AAN&I’s Greater Houston edition. EDITION DATE: February 19 - 25, 2018 (Vol. 23 Issue 5) DITION DATE: February 26 - March 4, 2018 (Vol. 23 Issue 6) T • FEBRUARY 26 - MARCH 4, 2018

what’s happenin’

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Marketplace Heading: WEDNESDAY Public Notice FEBRUARY 28, 2018 Houston Community College Shepard - Acres Homes Contact Information Town Talk: The Black Request for Proposals (RFP) Legends Name: Marilyn M. Vega, MBA Perspective Student Experience Software as a Phone: 713.718.7410 The Ensemble Theatre 4TH ANNUAL Services (SaaS) Project No. 18-15 Houston Email: marilyn.vega@hccs.edu STUDENT ESSAY 3535 Main St, Houston, Texas for Tearsheet/Copies: Address Sealed proposals will be received in CONTEST Procurement Operations (3100 Main 77002 3100 Main Street DEADLINE: Street, Room No. 11B01, Houston, From 7pm-9pmHouston, Texas 77002 WEDNESDAY Texas 77002) until 2:00PM (local FOR MORE INFO VISIT: FEBRUARY 28, 2018 time) on Thursday, March 8, 2018. (713) 520-0055 Submit Entires to Documents can be obtained at: AD COST Beulah Shepard- Acres Home www.hccs.edu/procurement. SUBSCRIBE TODAY! Neighborhood Library Community NewsCost to run ad for 2 weeks 8501 W. Montgomery Rd. Updates $259.20 Houston, TX 77088 www.aframnews.com AWARDS PROGRAM: MONDAY & TUESDAY SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26 & 27, 2018 WEDNESDAY MARCH 24, 2018 REMINGTON COLLEGE FEBRUARY 28, 2018 Beginning at 10am A Tribute to Women BLOOD DRIVE FOR MORE INFO: Dan Electro’s Guitar Bar Greenspoint Campus (832) 393-1700 Houston 11310 Greens Crossing Blvd www.houstonlibrary.org/aahm 1031 E 24th St #300, for approval and fax back to 713-692-1183 PleaseStesign Houston, TX 77009 From SUBSCRIBE Houston, TX 77067 by 12 NOON Wednesday8pm-11pm the week before Monday FOR MORE INFO: FOR MORE INFO VISIT: (713) 520-0055 (832) 699-2221

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Cordially invites you to our Date

Annual Awards Banquet Friday, March 2, 2018 7pm - 9pm

Keynote Speaker: Ruby Lee Mosley Community Matriarch Phone: (713) 692 - 7003 Email: info@acreshomescenter.org RSVP by Friday, February 23, 2018

Theme:

“Wake Up Everybody” TX - 7


te and size of Ad to run in AAN&I’s Greater Houston edition. EDITION DATE: February 19 - 25, 2018 (Vol. 23 Issue 5) DITION DATE: February 26 - March 4, 2018 (Vol. 23 Issue 6) T • FEBRUARY 26 - MARCH 4, 2018

what’s happenin’

EXAS

Marketplace Heading: WEDNESDAY Public Notice FEBRUARY 28, 2018 Houston Community College Shepard - Acres Homes Contact Information Town Talk: The Black Request for Proposals (RFP) Legends Name: Marilyn M. Vega, MBA Perspective Student Experience Software as a Phone: 713.718.7410 The Ensemble Theatre 4TH ANNUAL Services (SaaS) Project No. 18-15 Houston Email: marilyn.vega@hccs.edu STUDENT ESSAY 3535 Main St, Houston, Texas for Tearsheet/Copies: Address Sealed proposals will be received in CONTEST Procurement Operations (3100 Main 77002 3100 Main Street DEADLINE: Street, Room No. 11B01, Houston, From 7pm-9pmHouston, Texas 77002 WEDNESDAY Texas 77002) until 2:00PM (local FOR MORE INFO VISIT: FEBRUARY 28, 2018 time) on Thursday, March 8, 2018. (713) 520-0055 Submit Entires to Documents can be obtained at: AD COST Beulah Shepard- Acres Home www.hccs.edu/procurement. SUBSCRIBE TODAY! Neighborhood Library Community NewsCost to run ad for 2 weeks 8501 W. Montgomery Rd. Updates $259.20 Houston, TX 77088 www.aframnews.com AWARDS PROGRAM: MONDAY & TUESDAY SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26 & 27, 2018 WEDNESDAY MARCH 24, 2018 REMINGTON COLLEGE FEBRUARY 28, 2018 Beginning at 10am A Tribute to Women BLOOD DRIVE FOR MORE INFO: Dan Electro’s Guitar Bar Greenspoint Campus (832) 393-1700 Houston 11310 Greens Crossing Blvd www.houstonlibrary.org/aahm 1031 E 24th St #300, for approval and fax back to 713-692-1183 PleaseStesign Houston, TX 77009 From SUBSCRIBE Houston, TX 77067 by 12 NOON Wednesday8pm-11pm the week before Monday FOR MORE INFO: FOR MORE INFO VISIT: (713) 520-0055 (832) 699-2221

NOW OPEN

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CARRIERS & WRITER Outside Sales Person Must have knowledge of maps and African-American Communites For more information call 713-692-1892 Send Resume to sales@aframnews.com

MAR

SATURDAY MARCH 3, 2018 THE HOUSE OF PRAISE WORSHIP CENTER

CRAWFISH BOIL

10660 JONES RD Houston, Texas 77065 From 12pm-3pm FOR MORE INFO VISIT: (979)525-7675

FRIDAY MARCH 30, 2018 CLIFFDALE BC

24TH ANNUAL EASTER EGG HUNT 854 Enterprise St Houston, Texas 77088 From 12pm-4pm FOR MORE INFO VISIT: (281) 447--8850 cliffdale_bc@yahoo.com

Interested in Advertising? Email sales@aframnews.com

ADVERTISE TODAY!

2018 MEDIA KIT

AVAILABLE ONLINE NOW !!! www.aframnews.com For more information

Email sales@aframnews.com

O# 112784

Beulah Ann Shepard Building 6112 Wheatley Street ▪ Houston, Texas 77091

29

th

Cordially invites you to our Date

Annual Awards Banquet Friday, March 2, 2018 7pm - 9pm

Keynote Speaker: Ruby Lee Mosley Community Matriarch Phone: (713) 692 - 7003 Email: info@acreshomescenter.org RSVP by Friday, February 23, 2018

Theme:

“Wake Up Everybody” TX - 7


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African

American News&Issues

Texas • FEBRUARY 26 - March 4, 2018

African-American News&Issues Vol. 23 Issue 6 (February 26 - March 4, 2018) HOU  

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African-American News&Issues Vol. 23 Issue 6 (February 26 - March 4, 2018) HOU  

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