Page 1

E DMONTON

West Ritchie [rid Ues 5.nd

iNaocp_ftF:CIT Mr:c7colur

effifonton

PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1

1

PURPOSE STUDY AREA STUDY METHODOLOGY

1 1 1

2.0 LAND USE ANALYSIS

5

1.2 1.3

2.1 INTRODUCTION 2.2 PLANNING HISTORY 2.3 EXISTING LAND USE AND POPULATION 2.4 REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES 2.5 REDEVELOPMENT SCENARIOS 2.6 SUMMARY

3.0 TRANSPORTATION ANALYSIS 3.1 INTRODUCTION 3.2 EXISTING ROADWAY NETWORK 3.3 EXISTING TRAFFIC DATA 3.4 TRAFFIC ASSESSMENT 3.5 INTERSECTION ANALYSIS SUMMARY 16 TRAFFIC ANALYSIS CONCLUSIONS 3.7 SUMMARY

4.0 CONCLUSION 4.1

INTRODUCTION 4.2 CONCLUSION

5 5 8 8 11 17

20 20 20 22 22 34 35 35

37 37 37

REFERENCES

R-1

APPENDIX A

A-1

APPENDIX B

B-1


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

List of Tables Table 1. Existing Land Use Table 2. Summary of Existing Residential Units and Population Table 3. Building Condition Rating Definitions Table 4. Definition of Redevelopment Potential Ratings Table 5. Specific Assumptions and Regulations Applied for Redevelopment Scenarios Table 6. Short Teiiii Build Out Scenario Under Current Zoning Table 7. Long Term Build-Out Scenario Under Current Zoning Table 8. Summary of Redevelopment Scenarios Table 9. AAWDT Volumes Table 10. 82 Avenue Commercial Trip Generation Rates Table 11. Net Trips Generated by Redevelopment Scenario C Table 12. Trip Distribution Table 13. Existing and Future Daily Volumes Table 14: 82 Avenue and 99 Street Table 15: 82 Avenue and 101 Street Table 16: 82 Avenue and 103 Street Table 17: 82 Avenue and 104 Street Table 18: Traffic Volumes and Environmental Capacities Table 19. Summary of Roadway Environmental Capacity

8 8 9 10 12 14 16 19 22 26 26 27 28 31 32 33 34 36 36

List of Figures Figure 1. Study Methodology Figure 2. 2002 PM Peak Hour Background Traffic Volumes Figure 3. PM Peak Hour Future Traffic Volumes

4 23 30

List of Maps Map 1. Study Area Map 2. Existing Land Uses Map 3. Planning History Map 4. Current Policies and Zoning Map 5. Redevelopment Potential Map 6. Transportation Network

2 3 7 13 18 21

v. September 24, 2003

11


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

1.0 Introduction 1.1 Purpose The purpose of this study is to assess land use and transportation and to determine the effect that redevelopment may have on the existing transportation infrastructure and to make recommendations for balancing redevelopment with the capacity of the area transportation system.

1.2

Study Area

The study area is shown in Map 1. It is bounded by Whyte (82) Avenue to the north, Gateway Boulevard to the west, 99 Street on the east, and 79 Avenue on the south, including the south block of 79 Avenue from 100 Street to 99 Street. The area is characterized by a combination of residential, commercial, and industrial land uses as shown on Map2. The majority of development occurred between 1940 and 1960. The area is currently in a period of transition with commercial and multi-unit residential development asserting increased development pressures. An application for rezoning the large property located at 79 Avenue and 101 Street for a 217 unit apartment development has been recently approved by City Council. This Study is in response to Council's concern, during the rezoning, regarding the impact that future development may have on the roadway capacities in the west Ritchie area. Commercial development largely consists of small low-rise buildings, characterized as having a "boom-town" appearance. Single family homes range in vintage of 1910 to 1960. The seven existing three-storey apartment buildings were constructed during the 1970's. More recent redevelopment includes three, four-storey apartment buildings located on 80 Avenue at 99 Street and a seniors residence with park and parking at 80 Avenue and 100 Street constructed during the 1990's, and the current construction of a 48 unit apartment building with ground floor commercial at 80 Avenue and 101 Street.

1.3

Study Methodology

The methodology provides the framework for this study. Project steps from land use analysis, transportation analysis, to conclusions and recommendations are illustrated in Figure 1. The methodology describes a joint land use and transportation planning process to be carried out by Planning and Development and the Transportation and Streets Departments.

1


_-'.‘,t

a' •

1101 Vis

, It...,`,..

t

-: I:

. C -7 - ....,

'Th

r

5

AW

•" '-,

It

r I

.

Dr I !

-

r• a.

412

:4.4A

;1:1111111/111hiti •

11.altas4

.164

• a

..,

,6.25..wc 0.

is a Nrima

'Mk

1111[11;111;4111i1

7 afignammi,,,

111111E11E

412

114k

kr

78 Yap

Stud

Area

— Study Area Boundary

Neighbourhood Boundary August 2002


1111

1

II

1

I

11

I

1

I

1

1

I

I

I

I

I

82 AVE. —a

cp

11111111 cn 81 AVE.

MI

III

I

80 AVE.

Land Use and Transportation Study

West Ritchie

cn

II

cn •

79 AVE

Map 2 — Existing Land Uses Study Area Boundary

Two Unit Dwelling

One Unit Dwelling

Other Residential

1. Commercial

Apartment

Apartment/Commercial Mixed Use

Open Space / Recreation

Institutional

Transportation/ Parking

Vacant / Undeveloped

Religious Assembly

Industrial / Utilities

A

August 2002


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Figure 1. Study Methodology

Land Use I. Existing Land Use • zoning history • site inventory

II. Redevelopment Potential • site analysis • standardized criteria • individual properties evaluated • potential categorized as high, moderate and loW

Ill. Redevelopment Scenarios (Build-out Under Current Zoning) • assumption made • redevelopment scenarios • two timeframes: short and long term

Transportation I. Existing Roadway Network • existing volume inventory • determine existing roadway capacity

II. Apply Redevelopment Scenarios • short and long term • determine trip generation

111.0pportunities and Constraints • compare trip generation to current and future capacities

Conclusions and Recommendations I. Is There a Problem? • determine what roadway problems exist and what benefit or cost may arise from possible solutions

If Yes - Recommend course of action:

If No - No further action is required

City of Edmonton Planning and Development Department

4


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

2.0 Land Use Analysis 2.1

Introduction

The land use analysis will provide an understanding of the history, existing land use and future redevelopment potential. This information serves as the basis for build-out scenarios and assessment of the effect that future development will have on the transportation infrastructure. Build-out scenarios are a calculation of how much development is possible in the future under the current zoning, in the short term (10 years) and long term (25 years). 2.2

Planning History

There was no zoning bylaw for the area prior to 1962. The adoption of Bylaw 2272 in 1962 allowed for the development of walk up apartment buildings, zoned R-4 west of 99 Street to 100 Street the equivalent to the now RA7 zoning. Between 1970 and 1980 the area zoning was: -

M-2 Industrial District between 102 Street to 100 Street and the north block of 81 Avenue to 79 Avenue; P-3 Residential District in the NW corner of 100 Street and 80 Avenue; C-3 General Commercial District along 82 Avenue; and R-4 General Residential District between 100 Street to 99 Street and 81 Avenue to 79 Avenue.

There was no change to the zoning in the area with one exception being the addition of the P-3 zone in 1979 for a group of lots located in the northwest corner of 100 Street and 80 Avenue. P-3 designated residential uses held by the City of Edmonton or the Province of Alberta for public housing. Upon adoption of the Land Use Bylaw 5996 in 1980, the zoning was reclassified to the equivalent zones of TM Medium Industrial District (M-2), CB2 General Business District (C-3), RA7 Low Rise Apartment District (R-4), and RA7(p) Low Rise Apartment District (P-3). Significant changes in zoning occurred between 1980 and 1989 with the development and implementation of Area Redevelopment Plans. The Old Strathcona Area Redevelopment Plan was prepared in 1981, followed by the Scona East Plan in 1986 and the Strathcona Area Redevelopment Plan prepared in 1998. The Plan prepared in 1998 includes the areas covered by the Old Strathcona and Scona East Plans and recognizes the goals and objectives of both. The zoning changes implemented through these plans are shown in Map 4. In the West Ritchie Study area, the Old Strathcona Plan applied to the area between 102 Street and 101 Street, and the Scona East Plan applied to the area east of 101 Street to 99 Street. These boundaries are shown on Map 3. Today, the Strathcona Area Redevelopment Plan applies to the study area with the exception of the large parcel located south of 80 Avenue and west of 101 Street.

5


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

The Old Strathcona Plan (1981) identified the area west of 101 Street to 102 Street as the "LRT Station Sub-Area". The intent of the plan here was to encourage comprehensive development of the LRT Station area by providing for high density mixed office/retail uses and retail/residential uses around the LRT station. These plan objectives were implemented through rezoning in 1981 from IM to RMX and DC5. At the time the plan was adopted, an LRT station was contemplated south of 82 Avenue, near the existing rail lines. The Scona East Plan, 1986 policies (4.2.9, 4.3.6 and 4.5.2) designates much of the area for light industrial and commercial uses and recognizes the existence of religious assemblies through zoning to US, and retains the RA7 zoning between 99 and 100 Streets. The proposed land use districts that were implemented through this plan have not changed significantly since 1986. The area was rezoned from IM to D3 and US. The RA7 area remained unchanged. The Strathcona Area Redevelopment Plan, adopted in 1998, recognizes the above two previous plans, and incorporates into the land use concept, the commercial/light industrial area as part of the "Whyte Avenue Commercial Area" and aggregates the US and RA7 areas into the "Walk Up Apartment" area. These areas and associated Statutory Plan Overlays - Stacked Row Housing and Apartment (RF6 and RA7) District and the Whyte Avenue Commercial District are designed to maintain the existing scale and be proportionate to other buildings and promote a pedestrian oriented environment. The current zoning and plan overlays are shown in Map 4. Specific requirements of these plan overlays are included in Section 2.6. The area has experienced a transition from being largely an industrial area to an area with a mix of residential and commercial land uses with limited industrial uses. The remaining block and a half of industrial uses will likely be replaced with residential or a mix of commercial and residential land uses in the future. Currently commercial land uses dominate along 82 Avenue and 102 Street with residential land uses in the interior and along 99 Street. Anticipated redevelopment of residential land uses is expected to be medium density in the form of medium and low rise apartments, semi-detached, and duplex housing. The potential for high density development in relation to a future LRT station is no longer feasible as development of the LRT and station is no longer contemplated for this area.

6


II

III

Was Ritchi

•

IM I I I I I I I I I

Ma o 3 - Planning History Study Area Boundary

-

Old Strathcona ARP Zoning Changes 1981

1

Scona East ARP Zoning Changes 1986

=

Strathcona ARP

Fit]Zoning Changes

Current Zoning

1998

August 2002


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

2.3

Existing Land Use and Population

There are 156 properties in the study area and consist of the following land uses:

Table 1. Existing Land Use Land Use Apartments Mixed Use (residential/commercial) Commercial Single Family Homes Single Family Homes with Business Industrial Park Parking/Storage Institutional Vacant Total

Properties 11 2 60 61 3 4 2 7 1 5 156

The statistics published in the 1999 City of Edmonton Civic Census, for the Ritchie Neighborhood, indicates there are, on average, 1.5 persons per apartment unit and 2.17 persons per single detached unit. Based on this information, there is an estimated population in the study area of approximately 351. Upon construction of the recently approved apartment building at 79 Avenue and 102 Street, the population will be 676.

Table 2. Summary of Existing Residential Units and Population Existing Dwelling Units 234 2.4

Approved Dwelling Units 217

Total Dwelling Units 451

Approximate Population 676

Redevelopment Opportunities

Redevelopment potential was assessed in the study area using a comparative approach using information gathered on building age and condition, zoning, and property ownership patterns. Infoimation was collected through the tax assessment database, zoning maps, and a visual inspection of the area. A numerical ranking system was used to rank properties as having high, moderate, and low redevelopment potential. The comparative criteria used is described in more detail below and the criteria for high, moderate, and low redevelopment potential is presented in Table 3. Property consolidation. A review of property ownership illustrates any trends toward property consolidation, which is an important indicator of redevelopment potential. Property consolidation is important to redevelopment as aggregation of three or more standard lots is necessary to provide a land base sufficient to redevelop to an economically viable use under the RA7 or CB2 zone. A standard lot in the study area is 15 m (50 ft) in width. Map 5 illustrates land ownership and the variation between consolidated lots and individual standard lots.

8


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Condition, utilization, and age of existing structures. Building condition ratings for the area take into account the current utilization of existing buildings, utilization of the site, condition of roofs, foundations, eaves troughs, paint, obvious structural disrepair, and general level of maintenance. Table 3 describes condition ratings used. Vacant properties that are underutilized and properties with a temporary land use such as parking lots indicate a likelihood for redevelopment. The age of various structures was not as important as the physical condition in this analysis, except for perhaps the rating of excellent.

Table 3. Building Condition Rating Definitions Condition Rating

Definition

Excellent

Recent or new construction between 1990 to present, well maintained.

Good

Stable, well maintained structure and yards, no signs of significant wear, structure appears solid (no leaning), eave troughs attached properly, roof appears level and solid, shingles show no signs of wear or curl, exterior cladding in good shape, no visible cracks in foundation. Age of construction is between 1970 — 1989.

Fair

Requires maintenance for structure (and/or yards, may be a good rating if repairs done), structure appears solid (not leaning), eave troughs may require some work, no roof sagging, shingles showing signs of wear, requires some repair to exterior cladding (paint, new boards), suitable for existing use but likely would be significantly altered with a change in use. Age range is between 1940 - 1969.

Poor

Requires significant maintenance, structure does not appear solid (leaning), eave troughs detached, fascia boards rotting, windows missing, foundation visibly cracked, property underutilized or vacant Age of construction is between 1910 and 1940.

Zoning. Current zoning provides the guidelines to what type, scale and density development will likely occur. Although zoning can be amended, the current zoning is most likely to be implemented through redevelopment.

Properties were ranked individually and grouped into areas based on redevelopment potential rating of high, moderate, and low. These rankings are illustrated in Map 6 and individual property redevelopment potential calculations are presented in Tables 6 and 7. The comparative redevelopment potential ratings are defined in the following table.

9


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Table 4. Definition of Redevelopment Potential Ratings RANK Redevelopment Potential

Lot Consolidation I

High

3 or more lots

Moderate

2

Low

1

CRITERIA Building/Property Condition, Utilization and Age Poor — Fair 61 —90 years old Fair — Good 31 —60 years old Good — Excellent 0-30 years old

.

Zoning

CB2 and RA7 (or higher) RF4 - RF6 RF1 — RF4

The preceding planning criteria and redevelopment potential analysis does not anticipate future market forces, real estate values, or other considerations that do not normally fall into the purview of public policy analysis. Based on the redevelopment potential under the current zoning, being CB2 and RA7, and DC2 129, build-out scenarios are presented in the next section to determine demand on transportation infrastructure.

A standard lot is 15 m (50 ft) in the West Ritchie area.

10


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

2.5

Redevelopment Scenarios

2.5.1 Introduction Redevelopment or "build-out" scenarios are presented in order to calculate the number of dwelling units and square footage of commercial development under the existing zoning. These results are then used to determine the traffic generation and impact to the transportation infrastructure. Two scenarios are presented to represent both the short term and long term redevelopment potential of the area under the current zoning. The short-term scenario include redevelopment of properties shown in red on Map 6, and is an immediate to 10-year vision. The long-term scenario is includes the redevelopment of the properties shown in orange on Map 6 in addition to the short-temi scenario, and provides a 25-year vision of what the area redevelopment may include. The current zoning in the area is shown on Map 4, and can be generally described as: -

CB2 west of 100 Street, north of 80 Avenue, and along the entire length of 82 Avenue; TB between 100 Street and 101 Street, between 79 Avenue to the alley north of 80 Avenue; RA7 east of 100 Street to 99 Street; DC2 129 for two sites located at 101 Street and 81 Avenue; IM for the large site located at 102 Street and 97 Avenue currently under application for DC2; and US for the church, park and seniors' housing located at 100 Street and 81 Avenue.

2.5.2 Assumptions and Regulations Applied Several general and specific assumptions are required, in addition to applying the development regulations in the zoning bylaw, to generate the scenarios. Specific assumptions are outlined in Table 5. General assumptions are: -

-

the CP Rail yards will remain west of 102 Street and south of 79 Avenue; the commercial development along 82 Avenue will remain commercial only with the exception of sites zoned DC2; neighboring properties will be consolidated over time; land uses south of 82 Avenue zoned for commercial will include a residential component; the current zoning and development regulations will remain with the exception of a conversion of the remaining industrial land use to residential-commercial mixed use in the short and long term; and market factors such as land costs, residential vacancies, commercial expansion pressures from 82 Avenue will play a part in influencing future development, but are not contemplated as part of this report.

Should these general assumptions change within the short and long Willi in this study, the redevelopment scenarios would have to be re-evaluated accordingly. For example, the

11


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

abandonment and relocation of the CR Rail yards would enhance and likely accelerate further residential expansion in the west Ritchie area.

Table 5. Specific Assumptions and Regulations Applied for Redevelopment Scenarios Zone DC2 129

Assumptions

CB2

-

Density of 125 u/ha3. Underground parking will be provided. Sites located along 82 Avenue within the CB2 zone will be commercial only. Sites located south of 82 Avenue within the CB2 zone will contain a mix of residential and commercial.

RA7

Regulations - Two apartment towers. - Building A = 210 u/ha2; 7 storeys. - Building B = 506 u/ha; 12 storeys. - Commercial main level. - Floor area ratio = 2.0 - Maximum height is 14m or 4 storeys. - Whyte Avenue Commercial District Overlay (WAC) applies.

-

TB

-

Industrial business uses will be developed to the maximum building height of 3 storeys.

All Zones

-

Development proposals will be approved, and not appealed under current zoning.

-

Maximum building height = 11m or 3 storeys. Maximum density = 125 u/ha. Minimum site area = 800m2 Minimum site width = 20m. Stacked Row Housing and Apartment District Overlay applies. Floor area ratio = 1.2 Maximum building height =3 storeys. No Statutory Plan Overlay.

For sites zoned CB2, two scenarios are presented in Tables 6 and 7 as this zoning allows for residential apartment development as a discretionary use only where the first storey is used for commercial purposes. 2

u/ha = units per hectare. The calculation to generate the number of units under the CB2 zoning based on the FAR of 2.0 is equivalent to 125 u/ha. The density calculation using FAR is: # units = (FAR1 [SITE AREA] x [AREA OF RES. STOREYS] # STOREYS AVG. UNIT SIZE

3

12


I

I

I

I

I

I

=NW V WAU VA Ir A _ d G

WAW A r rr Pr AeffliMIA

ral

/7" ..4 4 : Ar iiii Fr-4, rig/ 01Agai pr A rpr Forrpw 11411

v

UVAIW

IPA

4.4

Mt,

NOWIMILWWWIWW

80 AVE.

X

IB

III HI III

IM t

CB2

.

G

7 9 • AVE,

IH

'p

WestRitchie

a

im

AJ

78 AVE

11I mill

Map 4

11I In

1111

Current Policies and Zoning

Study Area Boundary

Strathcona ARP Boundary

ElpM

Whyte Avenue Commercial District Overlay

\Mk\

Stacked Row Housing and Apartment District

August 2002


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

2.5.3 Short Term Redevelopment Scenario The number of potential dwelling units for the sites having high redevelopment potential are considered to represent the short-term scenario. The build-out is presented in the following table. These sites are identified on Map 6 in red.

Table 6. Short Term Build Out Scenario Under Current Zoning Site

Area (m2)

A

1599 (0.4 ac.) 1612.2

B

(0.4 ac.) C

1566.7 (0.4 ac.)

D

1599.4 (0.4 ac.)

E

808.9 (0.2 ac.)

F

2829.3 (0.7 ac.)

G

807.6 (0.2 ac.)

H

1620.2 (0.40 ac.)

I

10307.4 (2.5 ac.)

4

Current Zoning

Scenario A

Scenario B

Scenario C

(all commercial)

(mixed use)

(most likely)

DC2 (129) -north

34 units/ 711.6m2 commercial

34 units/ 711.6m2 commercial

DC2 (129) - south

82 units/ 720 m2 commercial

82 units/ 720 m2 commercial

CB2 (WAC4 overlay)

3133 m2 commercial

20 units/ 783.4 m2 commercial

20 units/ 783.4 m2 commercial

CB2 (WAC overlay)

3200 m2 commercial

20 units/ 800 m2 commercial

20 units/ 800 m2 commercial

CB2 (WAC overlay)

1616 m2 commercial

10 units/ 404 m2 commercial

10 units/ 404 m2 commercial

B3 (no overlay)

3395 m2 development up to 3 storeys

35 units/ 1415 m2 commercial

35 units/ 1415 m2

113 (no overlay)

969 m2 development up to 3 storeys

10 units/ 403.8 m2 commercial

10 units/ 403.8 m2

RA7 (stacked row housing and apartment overlay)

20 units

DC2 596 (application waiting 3rd reading)

217 units

WAC = Whyte Avenue Commercial District Overlay, Strathcona Area Redevelopment Plan

14


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Site

Area (m2) Area (m2)

Site

J

3624.3 (0.90 ac.)

Current Zoning Current Zoning

Scenario A

Scenario B

Scenario C

(all commercial)

(mixed use)

(most likely)

Scenario A

Scenario B

Scenario C

(all commercial)

(mixed use)

(most likely)

48 units/ 1990m2 commercial

48 units/ 1990m2 commercial

259 units/ 7228 m2 commercial/

496 units/ 7228 m2 commercial/

CB2 (under construction)

TOTAL SHORT 1ERM 7949 m2 commercial/ 4364 m2 industrial business

During the short term, over a 10 year planning horizon, the most likely redevelopment scenario includes 496 residential units. This number of residential units will mean a population of 744 residents5_ The short-teim redevelopment potential of commercial space is expected to be 7228 m2. A substantial amount of industrial land will be redeveloped to mixed-use residential/commercial development on Site I.

2.5.4 Long Term Redevelopment Scenario The long-term redevelopment potential includes areas rated as having moderate redevelopment potential, and is added to the short-teim scenario. Properties with a moderate potential are expected to redevelop over the longer term, being a 25-year planning horizon. Commercial properties zoned CB2, if redeveloped may include the addition of residential units on three floors above main floor commercial. The additional sites for the long-term redevelopment scenario are shown in orange in Map 6. 5

Population calculations are based on an average of 1.5 persons per apartment unit and 2.17 persons per single family residential unit for both Ritchie and Strathcona neighborhoods, 1999 Civic Census.

15


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Table 7. Long Term Build-Out Scenario Under Current Zoning Site

Area (m2)

Current Zoning

Scenario A

Scenario B

Scenario C

(all commercial)

(mixed use)

(most likely)

1

4171.6

CB2 (WAC overlay)

8343 m2 commercial

52 units/ 2085 m2 commercial

8343 m2 commercial

2

805.8

CB2 (WAC overlay)

1610 m2 commercial

10 units/ 402 m2 commercial

10 units/ 402 m2 commercial

3

2819.5

CB2 (WAC overlay)

5638 m2 commercial

35 units/ 1409 m2 commercial

35 units/ 1409 m2 commercial

4

5255.3

CB2 (WAC overlay)

10 510 m2 commercial

65 units/ 2627 m2 commercial

10 510 m2 commercial

5

2826.5

CB2 (WAC overlay)

5653 m2 commercial

35 units/ 1413 m2 commercial

35 units/ 1413 m2 commercial

6

2427

CB2 (WAC overlay)

4854 m2 commercial

30 units/ 1213 m2 commercial

30 units/ 1213 m2 commercial

7

4438.6

IB (no overlay)

5326 m2 industrial

55 units/ 2219.3 m2 commercial

55 units/ 2219.3 m2 commercial

8

1609

IB (no overlay)

1446 m2 industrial

20 units/ 804.5 m2 commercial

20 units/ 804.5 m2 commercial

9

2828

IB (no overlay)

3393 m2 industrial

35 units/ 1414m2

35 units/ 1414m2

10

1620

CB2 (WAC overlay)

3240m2 commercial

20 units/ 810 m2 commercial

3240m2 commercial

11

1624

CB2 (WAC overlay)

3248m2 commercial

20 units/ 812 m2 commercial

3248m2 commercial

12

1620

CB2 (WAC overlay)

3240 m2 commercial

20 units/ 810 m2 commercial

20 units/ 810 m2 commercial

16


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Site

Area (m2)

Current Zoning

Scenario A

Scenario B

Scenario C

(all commercial)

(mixed use)

(most likely)

6032 m2 commercial

38 units/ 1508 m2 commercial

38 units/ 1508 m2 commercial

13

3016.3

CB2 (WAC overlay)

14

2025

RA7 (SRH&A6 overlay)

25 units

15

1166

RA7 (SRH&A overlay)

14 units

16

1216

RA7 (SRH&A overlay)

15 units

17

1212

RA7 (SRH&A overlay)

15 units

18

1199

RA7 (SRH&A overlay)

15 units

SUBTOTAL LONG 1ERM 52 368 m2 commercial/ 10 165 m2 industrial

435 units/ 17 527 m2 commercial/

362 units/ 36 534 m2 commercial/

TOTAL LONG TERM 60 317 m2 (short-telin + long-term) commercial/ 14 529 m2 industrial

694 units/ 24 755 m2 commercial/

858 units/ 43 762 m2 commercial/

The most likely scenario for redevelopment over the long term, if sites are developed out to the maximum allowable density, will be mean the addition of 362 residential units and 36 534 m2 of commercial space in addition to the short-term scenario. This will mean a residential population increase of 543. 2.6 Summary In the short term, there is an opportunity, and perhaps likelihood, that there will be an additional population of 744 residents in the study area, development of 496 residential units, and redevelopment of 7228 m2 of commercial space. Over the long-term, there is potential for the population to grow to 1287 residents, and for redevelopment to include 858 residential units and 43 762 m2 commercial space.

6

SRH&A = Stacked Row Housing and Apartment District Overlay, Strathcona Area Redevelopment Plan

17


C B2 DC2

2 I

8

ta) Lik

AVE.

2

i'Mrece—A

8

)

CD

(i)

2

1.

3

11

1 a

LI

RA7

80 AVE. CD 0

1F1

I r7

fte g• Ritchie

LandUse and TrarDsportation Study

of)

:AVE.,

:=1

R 7

V

AJ

Illinl

rill

Mao 5 - Redevdopment PotentW Study Area Boundary

High (Short Term)

Moderate (Long Term)

Low (Very Long Term)

• Site = a Reference August 2002


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Table 8. Summary of Redevelopment Scenarios Land Use Residential

Short Term 496 units

Long Term 427 units

Total 923 units

Population

744

640

1384

Commercial

7228 m2

28 651 m2

35 879 m2

Industrial

-

-

-


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

3.0 Transportation Analysis 3.1 Introduction Section 2.0 outlined the potential for redevelopment in the West Ritchie Area in the short (10 year) and long (25 year) terms. The land use schedules developed for Scenario C (most likely) under the short and long terms were used to evaluate the effect that re-development will have on the existing roadway infrastructure. 3.2

Existing Roadway Network

West Ritchie is located in the south central area of the City and is bounded by 99 Street on the east, Whyte (82) Avenue on the north, the Canadian Pacific Railroad line to the west, and 72 Avenue to the south. The traffic impacts associated with the redevelopment of West Ritchie have been assessed for the internal local roadways and for signalized intersections along 82 Avenue between 99 Street and 104 Street. A brief description of the key roadways and their characteristics within the study area follows:

99 Street between 63 Avenue and 82 Avenue was upgraded to a four-lane divided arterial in 2001. Left turn bays are now provided at each intersection along 99 Street in the vicinity of West Ritchie. There is a full traffic signal at 82 Avenue, and a pedestrian signal located at 79 Avenue. All other intersections are controlled by stop signs on the east and west approaches.

82 Avenue (Whyte Avenue) between 99 Street and 104 Street is a four-lane divided arterial with left and right turn bays provided at key intersections. Parking meters are located on-street along the length of 82 Avenue adjacent to West Ritchie. The intersections of 82 Avenue and 99 Street, 101 Street, 103 Street, and 104 Street are signalized. All other intersections are stop controlled with the stop signs located on the north and south approaches. The internal roadway network that was included in this study is comprised of 100 Street, 101 Street, 102 Street, 79 Avenue, 80 Avenue, and 81 Avenue as shown in Map 6. The transportation assessment is limited to traffic within the boundaries of 79 Avenue, 82 Avenue, 99 Street and 102 Street. There is an internal local roadway connection to the south along 100 Street to 72 Avenue, however it does not provide improved access to 99 Street so the section of 100 Street south of 79 Avenue was not analyzed in detail. The intersection of 82 Avenue and 101 Street provides the only signalized access into or out of the West Ritchie area. As such, this intersection becomes one of the key intersections for evaluation in the transportation assessment. Other key intersections include: 82 Avenue and 99 Street, 82 Avenue and 103 Street, and 82 Avenue and 104 Street.

20


le le el 0 01 0 el 0 01 eeIC l/ .=11

LandUseand TransportationStu

82 AtIt:

Map 6' — West Rtechie

Study Area Boundary Signal Arterial Collector '1 IR Pedestrian Signal kuoal

1,,\Y

Edmonton

TRANSPORTATION AND STREETS

ef,Von/ .3 seMi

0 le le 0 0 le 0


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

3.3

Existing Traffic Data

The Average Annual Weekday Daily Traffic (AAWDT) volumes for the roadways in and adjacent to West Ritchie are summarized in Table 9.

Table 9. AAWDT Volumes On Roadway 99 Street 100 Street 101 Street 102 Street 79 Avenue 80 Avenue 81 Avenue 82 Avenue

From 79 Avenue 81 Avenue 81 Avenue 81 Avenue 99 Street 99 Street 99 Street 101 Street

To 80 Avenue 82 Avenue 82 Avenue 82 Avenue 100 Street 100 Street 100 Street 102 Street

AAWDT 28,700 1280 3230 1230 540 400 700 34,400

Year of Count 2001 2002 2002 2002 2002 2000 2000 2001

PM Peak hour intersection turning movement counts were also used in the traffic assessment. The counts were adjusted to reflect the same one-hour time period and were balanced where there were no accesses located between the intersections. Figure 2 on the following page illustrates the 2002 PM peak hour background traffic volumes for key signalized intersection in the study area.

3.4

Traffic Assessment

3.4.1 Trip Generation The number of new daily and PM peak hour trips generated by the redevelopment scenarios were estimated using the following trip generation rates.

Residential Traffic - Daily Trip Rate The daily trip generation rate for residential units in West Ritchie was derived from information in the City of Edmonton's Household Travel Survey Project Report (May 1995) and the 1999 City of Edmonton Civic Census. According to the 1999 City of Edmonton Civic Census there are, on average, 1.5 persons per apartment unit and 2.17 persons per single detached unit, in the Ritchie Neighborhood. The proposed land use schedule for West Ritchie includes the development of additional apartment units. As indicated in the Household Travel survey the total number of person trips generated by a household can range from 3.77 person trips/day for a single person household to 19.30 person trips/day for households with 5 or more people. Extrapolating the information results in an average person trip generation rate of 5.45 person trips per day for households averaging 1.5 people.

22


alq0111:1iseA4 4CCI1O ONO

N

411

36 -43— 960 •:%-- 27

_96

10 291

45 1281 45

950

340—Z7

i-0

82 AVE 153 1045

COON Mgt

CON

co 44. a v.

156 620 143

1-.

co

co 0 v.

154

1-.

co a)

Figure 2: 2002 PM Peak Hour Background Traffic Volumes TRANSPORTATION nt011 AND STREETS '"O' elin


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Mode split to auto information was also obtained from the household travel survey. West Ritchie is located within the Southeast Inner area, but as it is close to the University and Downtown, excellent bus service is provided to these areas. A review of mode split to auto percentages for the City of Edmonton as well as for the Southeast Inner and University areas resulted in a conservative mode split to auto estimate of 80% for use in this analysis. Using the above information, a daily vehicle trip generation rate of 4.4 vehicle trips/day/unit was used in the traffic analysis for the residential component of the land use schedule. As there are currently a number of single family units in West Ritchie that are currently generating vehicle traffic, the trip generation rate was only applied to the net increase in dwelling units for each scenario.

Residential Traffic — PM Peak Hour Trip Rate Trip generation rates for residential land uses as outlined in the Institute of Transportation Engineers "Trip Generation, 6th Edition" (I'M were reviewed to determine an appropriate PM peak hour trip rate. A recent transportation impact assessment prepared for a development in the West Ritchie area used a PM peak hour trip rate of 0.58 trips/dwelling unit, which was considered an appropriate rate by the Transportation and Streets Department. In order to be consistent with previous work completed in the area, a PM peak hour trip rate of 0.58 trips/dwelling unit was used in the analysis.

Commercial Trips —Trip Rates There are a number of commercial properties located in West Ritchie that are identified for redevelopment in the future but are currently generating traffic. The properties along 82 Avenue are highly visible and are anticipated to be redeveloped in a similar manner to other properties along 82 Avenue west of the railroad tracks. The properties in West Ritchie that do not front 82 Avenue are anticipated to have different trip generation characteristics and have therefore been dealt with separately.

82 Avenue Properties The properties along 82 Avenue currently include retail, restaurant, and vehicle maintenance land uses. The redevelopment scenarios include main floor commercial space with up to three additional floors of office or residential space. The office and residential spaces are considered new areas compared to existing land uses. The redeveloped commercial space will replace commercial land uses that are currently generating vehicle trips. A comparison of the size and trip making characteristics of the existing and future land uses was completed to determine if additional trips will be generated from the commercial space under the redevelopment scenarios. The size of the existing properties was estimated from tax roll files and aerial photos and was then compared to the proposed commercial component of the redevelopment scenarios. Parcels A, I, 4 and 11 are anticipated to be redeveloped with a similar amount of commercial area as is

24


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

currently available. Parcel 10 is anticipated to be redeveloped with an additional 510 square metres of commercial area. Many of the land uses that are currently open along 82 Avenue represent small, independent specialty shops. Although the Land Use By-law does not discern between retail land uses in relation to ownership or popularity of the land use, it is important to estimate if the redevelopment of the land uses would result in a higher number of vehicle trips than are currently being generated. The properties along 82 Avenue are anticipated to have higher trip generation potential once they are redeveloped as they have high visibility and are anticipated to build on the success of the properties west of the railroad tracks and draw from a larger market area. The commercial trip generation rates used in this assessment are based on the ITE "Trip Generation, 6th Edition". The redevelopment of the properties along 82 Avenue is anticipated to include a combination of land uses that are similar to convenience markets, restaurants, drug stores, and may continue to contain specialty retail stores. An aggregate daily rate of 1.08 trips/m2 and a PM peak hour rate of 0.076 trips/m2 were estimated for future commercial land uses. Since the existing commercial properties are currently generating traffic, only the additional trips generated by the redevelopment proposals should be included in the estimate of future trips. The existing commercial properties along 82 Avenue are similar to Specialty Retail land uses that have a daily trip generation rate of 0.44 trips/m2 and a PM peak hour trip generation rate of 0.035 trips/m2. For properties that will be re-developed to the same size as the existing retail property, the difference between the future and existing rates was used. For properties where the redevelopment will result in a larger retail space, the future commercial rates were applied to the net increase in retail space. 82 Avenue is a unique commercial area in Edmonton as it is adjacent to residential communities with higher densities than suburban neighbourhoods and there is also excellent transit to the area. From a trip generation perspective this makes it different than other commercial sites in Edmonton that are more vehicle oriented. Based on this, the mode split to auto of 80% has also been applied to the trip generation rates for commercial land uses. Therefore the estimated daily trip generation rate for existing commercial land uses is 0.35 vehicle trips/m2 and the daily trip generation rate for future commercial land uses is 0.86 vehicle trips/m2. The estimated PM peak hour trip generation rate for existing commercial land uses is 0.0279 trips/m2 and is 0.061 trips/m for future commercial land uses. Table 10 summarizes the trip rates used for the commercial properties along 82 Avenue.

25


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Table 10. 82 Avenue Commercial Trip Generation Rates Trip Generation Rates PM Peak Hour Rate Daily Rate

Site

Existing/Future Space

Size (m2)

A

Existing Space

711.6

0.51 trips/m2

0.0331 trips/m2

1 4

Existing Space Existing Space

2086 2627.5

0.51 trips/m2 0.51 trips/m2

0.0331 trips/m2 0.0331 trips/m2

10

Existing Space

300

0.51 trips/m2

0.0331 trips/m2

Future Additional Space

510

0.86 trips/m2

0.061 trips/m2

0.51 trips/m2

0.0331 trips/m2

11

812

Existing Space

West Ritchie Commercial Properties The proposed commercial land uses within the West Ritchie neighbourhood south of 82 Avenue are anticipated to be similar in trip generation characteristics to the commercial land uses that currently exist. Many of the properties included in the redevelopment scenarios will include residential uses on upper floors. The new commercial area is anticipated either provide a new home for existing retail businesses or provide services to the residents of West Ritchie. These land uses are anticipated to have a base trip rate similar to specialty retail stores described previously. As many of these properties are currently generating traffic, the vehicle daily trip generation rate of 0.35 trips/m and the PM peak hour rate of 0.0279 trips/m2 have been applied only to the net increase in commercial area under the redevelopment scenarios.

Office Land Uses Along 82 Avenue the upper stories of new buildings are anticipated to be office space. Using trip rates from ITE Trip Generation, 6th Edition, and a mode split to auto of 80% results in a daily trip generation rate of 0.095 vehicle trips/m2 and a PM peak hour trip generation rate of 0.016 trips/m2. Table 11 summarizes the number of daily and PM peak hour trips generated by the short and long term redevelopment scenarios for West Ritchie. Detailed trip generation tables are included in Appendix A. Table 11. Net Trips Generated by Redevelopment Scenario C

Time Frame Short Term Long Tem% Total Time Frame Short Term Long Term Total

Daily Trips Generated Outbound Inbound 1,768 1,767 4,314 4,313 6,082 6,080 1 PM Peak Hour Trips Generated Outbound Inbound

Total 3,535 8,627 12,162 Total

245 376

151 511

396 887

621

662

1,283

26


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

3.4.2 Trip Distribution The distribution of traffic from the West Ritchie area for the short and long teini horizons was based on infoimation contained in "Origin — Destination Auto Vehicle Trips for Edmonton and the Surrounding Region" provided by the Transportation and Streets Department. The short term horizon used an average of the 1997 and 2020 data and the long term horizon used the 2020 data. Traffic from the West Ritchie area initially has access to two arterial roads. Table 12 summarizes the percent distribution of traffic to each direction of these two arterials for the different time periods and horizons. Table 12. Trip Distribution Daily Trips — Short Term Trips Originating in West Ritchie Trips Destined for West Ritchie To the: From the: North on 99 Street 10% North on 99 Street 10% South on 99 Street 28% South on 99 Street 28% East on 82 Avenue 43% East on 82 Avenue 42% West on 82 Avenue 19% West on 82 Avenue 20% Daily Trips — Long Term Trips Originating in West Ritchie Trips Destined for West Ritchie To the: From the: North on 99 Street 10% North on 99 Street 10% South on 99 Street 28% South on 99 Street 29% East on 82 Avenue 43% East on 82 Avenue 41% West on 82 Avenue 19% West on 82 Avenue 20%

PM Peak Hour Trips — Short Term Trips Originating in West Ritchie Trips Destined for West Ritchie To the: From the: North on 99 Street 11% North on 99 Street 12% South on 99 Street 28% South on 99 Street 27% East on 82 Avenue 43% East on 82 Avenue 38% West on 82 Avenue 18% West on 82 Avenue 23% PM Peak Hour Trips — Long Term Trips Originating in West Ritchie Trips Destined for West Ritchie To the: From the: North on 99 Street 11% North on 99 Street 12% South on 99 Street 29% South on 99 Street 28% East on 82 Avenue 42% East on 82 Avenue 37% West on 82 Avenue 18% West on 82 Avenue 23%

27


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

3.4.3 Trip Assignment The new trips generated by the redevelopment of West Ritchie were assigned to the roadway network based on the above distribution and the accesses available into and out of the community. The available accesses included all of the local roadway connections to the arterial roadway network. The intersection of 82 Avenue and 101 Street is a predominant access point as it provides the only signalized access out of the community. This is important when assigning trips that may have to make left turn or through movements across busy arterial roadways. This was also considered when assigning trips to 99 Street. During peak hours of traffic activity it is difficult to make a left turn from the community onto 99 Street. 3.4.4 Traffic Analysis

Daily Traffic The new trips generated by the redevelopment of West Ritchie were added to the background AAWDT volumes to determine the projected future daily traffic on the roadways within West Ritchie. Table 13 summarizes the existing and total estimated future daily volumes and compares them to the environmental daily capacity of the local roadways. The environmental capacity of local residential roadways is based on community residents tolerances for traffic volume and noise and is estimated at an average of 1,000 vpd per local road. The land uses adjacent to the 101 Street corridor are typically commercial/industrial in nature. As a result, the environmental capacity is estimated at 3,000 vpd. Table 13. Existing and Future Daily Volumes On Roadway

At

100 Street

South of 82 Avenue South of 82 Avenue South of 82 Avenue West of 99 Street West of 99 Street West of 99 Street

101 Street 102 Street 81 Avenue 80 Avenue 79 Avenue Total **

Spare Capacity (Over Capacity)

4395

Environmental Capacity 1000

3500

8980

3000

(5980)

190

140

1560

1000

(560)

700**

340

1150

2190

1000

(1190)

400**

270

440

1110

1000

(110)

540

450

150

1140

1000

(140)

7380

3535

8460

19375

8000

(11375)

2002 Daily Volume* (vehicles/day) 1280

Short Term

Long Term

Total Future

35

3080

3230

2250

1230

Estimated 2002 Average Annual Weekday volumes 2000 AAWDT volumes

28

(3395)


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

As shown in Table A-2 (in the Appendix) the redevelopment of West Ritchie over the long term according to Scenario C will result in all the local roadways exceeding their available daily environmental capacity. Without a designated collector in the neighbourhood there is no single route that has been designed to collect the local traffic and distribute it to the adjacent arterial roadway network. With an environmental capacity of 5,000 vehicles/day for a typical residential collector, the re-designation of a single roadway within West Ritchie would still not accommodate build out of the area under Scenario C.

PM Peak Hour Traffic The environmental capacities for local and collector roadways are a qualitative measurement of how traffic is perceived by residents within a community. The actual roadway capacity is based on the physical geometry of the roadway and type of traffic control used at intersections. For the West Ritchie area, an additional measurement of capacity is based on the access and egress opportunities available for the community. As the access and egress opportunities are also dependent on how well the adjacent arterial roadways are operating, a PM peak hour traffic analysis was completed for the key signalized intersections along 82 Avenue. The PM peak hour 10 year and long term traffic volumes generated by the build-out of the West Ritchie area superimposed on the 2002 background traffic volumes are illustrated in Figure 3. Synchro 5 was used to assess the existing and future operations of each of the key signalized intersections along 82 Avenue between 99 Street and 104 Street. The analysis indicates the volume to capacity ratios and average delay for each movement of the intersection_ The City of Edmonton considers intersection movements with v/c ratios of 0.9 or higher as an indication that the movements are at or near capacity. Average control delays in the order of 55 to 80 seconds are also indications of movements that may be congested.

2010 Background Traffic Estimated 2010 background traffic volumes were also reviewed in the traffic analysis. The traffic along 82 Avenue and along 99 Street is anticipated to increase on average from 4% to 5% by 2010 and will then remain approximately stable into the long term. Stability in the long term is anticipated because the roadway network will reach capacity and will not be able to accommodate additional growth. Adding an additional 4% to 5% of existing traffic onto the two West Ritchie scenarios analyzed in this report will further deteriorate the roadway network and increase the number of movements that exceed capacity. Additional Synchro runs were not completed as it was determined that the results of the analysis would not change significantly.

29


SMS 10 1129 297

-I"

156 880 176

82 AVE

45 1283 71

70

340

36 •=1.-. 960 106

102 1138

oo

169 -1?. 1109 154

Long Term West Ritchie Volumes Superimposed on 2002 Background Volumes O C co co co co 36 960 171

121 1145

Q.__ 10

1183

316

1033 340

45 1313 117 --Z.-

70

1105

)4()

156 963 231

82 AVE 225 1323—=222

°Ar6 (63

(f3 ct) er)

Figure 3: PM Peak Hour Future Traffic Volumes

;04

€diffkinton itIrgars TAm"

elq91M1i Se/4

10 Year West Ritchie Volumes Superimposed on 2002 Background Volumes


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

The traffic analysis included a review of potential modifications to either the cycle lengths or phases at the key signalized intersections to determine if minor signal timing changes could improve the intersection operations. The intersections along 82 Avenue belong to a coordinated network so changes to cycle length have to be reflected in the analysis for all the intersections. A number of movements at the 82 Avenue/99 Street intersection reached capacity in the 10-year and long term horizons, so a cycle length of 120 seconds was evaluated to determine if the longer cycle length would improve the intersection operations. To be consistent with this analysis, any signal timing revisions reviewed for the other key intersections analyzed used a 120 second cycle length. It should be noted that the impacts of the CP railroad crossing 82 Avenue east of 103 Street were not included in the evaluation, as it is difficult to assess without using more complex microsimulation models. There are often trains crossing 82 Avenue during the peak hours, which further deteriorates the movement of traffic along 82 Avenue. As the analysis includes a comparison of existing and future traffic conditions, the estimated impacts associated with the continued redevelopment of West Ritchie are still valid. Details regarding the intersection analysis are included in Tables 14 to 17. Table 14: 82 Avenue and 99 Street Scenario

EB L

EB T

EB R

WB WB WB NB NB SB SB R TR T L T L L 2002 Existing Conditions 149 1162 153 1045 154 143 820 156 141 1078 64 Volume 26.8 72.4 79.6 52.2 Delay 39.7 44.1 28.7 74.5 31.9 35.4 v/c ratio 0.81 0.43 0.92 1.00 0.85 0.73 0.97 0.95 0.98 1.00 2002 and Short Term Development Scenario 64 149 1173 Volume 169 1109 154 176 880 156 141 1078 Delay 108.7 60.4 78.4 62.4 30.3 121.9 36.1 26.8 99.6 35.4 v/c ratio 1.02 1.06 0.73 1.12 1.04 1.19 0.88 1.43 1.08 0.95 2002 and Short Term Development Scenario with Revised Signal Timings (120s cycle) Volume 169 1109 154 176 880 156 141 1078 64 149 1173 Delay 81.0 74.5 55.3 117.8 37.4 334 86.4 38.7 67.8 55.0 v/c ratio 0.99 1.05 0.83 1.15 0.85 0.63 0.99 0.90 0.94 1.00 2002, Short and Long Term Development Scenarios Volume 225 1323 222 231 963 156 165 1078 64 149 1197 Delay 194.0 130.9 76.1 197.6 50.6 26.8 137.9 36.7 108.7 65.8 v/c ratio 1.06 1.55 1.30 1.03 1.56 0.98 0.43 1.26 0.93 1.12 2002, Short and Long Term Development Scenarios with Revised Signal Timings (120 s cycle) Volume 225 1323 222 231 963 156 165 1078 64 149 1197 Delay 111.3 152.4 108.3 122.2 46.0 33.6 100.5 51.7 136.2 111.6 v/c ratio 1.18 1.29 1.15 1.17 0.94 1.20 1.16 0.64 1.08 0.98 Note: NB and SB Left Turns lane width set to 3.6 metres and 1/2 vehicle per cycle removed on intergreen

SB R 91 20.8 0.18 110 21.1 0.21 110 23.8 0.21 131 21.5 0.26 131 33.5 0.59

As shown in Table 14, the intersection of 82 Avenue and 99 Street currently has six movements that are at or nearing capacity in the PM peak hour. As the additional West Ritchie volume is added to the roadway network the intersection operations deteriorate to the point where at least

31


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

one movement on each approach will exceed the available capacity. Delays also increase substantially. Table 15: 82 Avenue and 101 Street Scenario

EB TR

EB L

WB L

NB TL

WB TR

NB R

SB LTR

2002 Existing Conditions 29 52 69 36 138 49 27 960 40.0 33.0 53.5 7.4 4.8 3.1 0.67 0.83 0.26 0.14 0.46 0.61 2002 and Short Term Development Scenario 29 121 69 166 49 960 36 1283 71 106 Volume 45 45.4 89.4 34.8 13.2 7.5 5.3 Delay 4.8 0.74 1.01 0.48 0.50 0.58 v/c ratio 0.16 0.63 2002 and Short Term Development Scenario with Revised Signal Timings (120s c cle) 121 69 29 166 49 106 960 36 1283 71 Volume 45 42.3 43.9 32.1 10.6 21.3 8.9 10.0 Delay 0.59 0.78 0.36 0.56 0.77 v/c ratio 0.20 0.71 2002, Short and Long Term Development Scenarios 29 49 271 69 960 36 258 1313 117 171 Volume 45 114.7 122.2 7.1 197.2 55.0 Delay 6.1 5.4 1.09 1.18 1.04 0.51 1.53 v/c ratio 0.16 0.67 2002, Short and Long Term Development Scenarios with Revised Signal Timings (120 s cycle) 29 271 069 36 258 49 117 171 960 Volume 45 1313 69.2 70.5 73.2 89.0 45.2 6.3 Delay 25.8 0.85 0.96 1.02 1.05 0.60 v/c ratio 0.22 0.98

Volume Delay v/c ratio

45 4.3 0.16

1281

45

60

60

60

60

60

Currently the intersection of 82 Avenue and 101 Street is operating very well with only the northbound through/left movement nearing capacity. Since the intersection of 82 Avenue and 101 Street is the only signalized access out of the West Ritchie area, traffic volumes into and out of the community will increase significantly at this intersection. The intersection will be able to accommodate the addition of traffic associated with the short term development scenario with adjustments to the signal timings and phasing. The addition of traffic associated with the long term development will result in movements exceeding capacity on the east, west and south approaches.

32


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Table 16: 82 Avenue and 103 Street NB WB NB EB WB R R TL T T 2002 Existing Conditions 1404 451 298 1116 96 Volume 70 983 41.2 6.7 30.2 6.0 2.5 8.4 Delay 0.90 0.18 0.90 0.63 0.76 v/c ratio 0.53 2002 and Short Term Development Scenario 1404 459 298 1138 102 1031 Volume 70 43.9 30.2 7.5 2.9 9.6 Delay 6.7 0.92 0.19 0.90 0.66 0.77 v/c ratio 0.56 2002 and Short Term Development Scenario with Revised Signal Timings (120s cycle) 1404 459 102 298 1031 1138 Volume 70 52.7 20.2 29.5 28.8 Delay 9.2 3.6 0.95 0.21 0.85 0.69 0.81 v/c ratio 0.65 2002, Short and Long Term Development Scenarios 471 298 1404 1145 121 70 1105 Volume 48.6 30.2 12.2 8.3 6.8 3.3 Delay 0.94 0.22 0.90 0.70 0.82 v/c ratio 0.56 2002, Short and Long Term Development Scenarios with Revised Signal Timings (120 s cycle) 1404 471 298 1145 121 1105 Volume 70 44.8 14.2 25.3 4.5 29.3 Delay 23.9 0.93 0.79 0.81 0.94 0.27 v/c ratio 0.88 Scenario

EB L

As shown in Table 16, the northbound movements at 82 Avenue and 103 Street are at/near capacity. As traffic from the West Ritchie area is added to the roadway network, the east and westbound movements begin to near capacity as well. The signal timings may be adjusted to improve a specific movement, however as shown under the 2002, Short and Long Term Development Scenarios with Revised Signal Timings it is typically done at the cost of another movement.

33


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Table 17: 82 Avenue and 104 Street Scenario

EB T

EB R

WB L

WB NB SB SB SB TR TR L T R 2002 Existing Conditions Volume 950 340 291 1113 10 0 2 101 1527 71 Delay 33.3 25.6 26.0 10.9 2L0 24.0 38.2 23.1 v/c ratio 0.85 0.94 0.86 0.74 0.01 0.29 0.94 0.20 2002 and Short Term Development Scenario Volume 982 340 297 1129 10 0 2 117 1527 71 Delay 35.1 54.2 32.0 11.4 21.0 24.4 39.9 23.1 v/c ratio 0.88 0.95 0.90 0.75 0.01 0.33 0.95 0.20 2002 and Short Term Development Scenario with Revised Signal Timings (120s cycle) Volume 982 340 297 1129 10 0 2 117 1527 71 Delay 40.3 63.3 39.6 12.0 23.5 27.3 37.2 25.6 v/c ratio 0.87 0.97 0.77 0.92 0.00 0.33 0.89 0.19 2002, Short and Long Term Development Scenarios Volume 1033 340 316 1183 10 2 0 140 1527 71 Delay 39.5 59.5 54.3 12.8 21.0 25.1 39.9 23.1 v/c ratio 0.92 0.97 1.00 0.79 0.01 0.40 0.95 0.20 2002, Short and Long Term Develo • ment Scenarios with Revised Signal Timin s (120 s cycle) Volume 1033 340 316 1183 10 0 2 140 1527 71 Delay 39.1 55.6 42.5 10.2 24.5 29.6 43.4 27.0 v/c ratio 0.87 0.94 0.98 0.71 0.01 0.41 0.94 0.20

The addition of traffic from the redevelopment of the West Ritchie area will primarily impact the westbound left turn at the 82 Avenue/104 Street intersection. The left turn is anticipated to increase in volume by approximately 25 vehicles in the PM peak hour. The distance between 103 Street and 104 Street is limited so the length of the westbound left turn bay at 104 Street cannot be adjusted as additional traffic is added to the network. As traffic volume is added to the westbound left turn, the potential for the vehicles to spill out of the left turn bay increases, which in turn impacts the movement of all westbound traffic at this intersection as well as at intersections further east. This is often seen in the summer months when there is increased pedestrian activity along 82 Avenue limiting the ability of westbound left turns to complete the movement on the main phase. Although the increase in westbound left turning volume is limited, it has the potential to significantly impact the 82 Avenue corridor in the westbound direction.

3.5

Intersection Analysis Summary

The intersection of 82 Avenue and 99 Street is the most critical intersection along the adjacent arterial roadway network. The intersection currently handles high volumes of traffic on all four approaches and some movements are currently near or at capacity for the PM peak hour. The 82 Avenue/99 Street intersection is an arterial/arterial intersection which will continue to see increases in traffic volumes until the intersection is at capacity, whether the additional volume comes from the redevelopment of the adjacent neighbourhood or from areas further south or east.

34


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Since redevelopment and in-fill development in inner city neighbourhoods is beneficial to the long term sustainability of Edmonton, the Transportation and Streets Department is, in some cases, willing to support slightly higher levels of utilization at inner city arterial/arterial intersections. The key is to balance the amount of redevelopment or in-fill development with the overall traffic demands on the network, and to find additional ways to manage traffic demands in the future. The other signalized intersections along 82 Avenue can accommodate some additional traffic. The analysis indicates that the additional traffic from the short term development will impact the intersections, however revisions to signal timings will help to accommodate the traffic. Both the 82 Avenue/99 Street and the 82 Avenue/101 Street intersections will not be able to accommodate the traffic demands associated with the long-term development scenario. The intersections of 82 Avenue/103 Street and 82 Avenue/104 Street will also experience higher levels of congestion under the long term scenario.

3.6

Traffic Analysis Conclusions

The capacity of the roadway network within and adjacent to West Ritchie is based on the daily environmental capacity of the roadways within the neighbourhood, and more importantly, the capacity of the access/egress intersections and the adjacent arterial roadway network during the peak hours. The redevelopment of West Ritchie over the long teiin according to Scenario C will result in all the local roadways exceeding their available daily environmental capacity. Without a designated collector in the neighbourhood there is no single route that has been designed to collect the local traffic and distribute it to the adjacent arterial roadway network. With an environmental capacity of 5,000 vehicles/day for a typical residential collector, the re-designation of a single roadway within West Ritchie would still not accommodate build out of the area under Scenario C. Both the 82 Avenue/99 Street and the 82 Avenue/101 Street intersections will not be able to accommodate the traffic demands associated with the long-term development scenario. The intersections of 82 Avenue/103 Street and 82 Avenue/104 Street will also experience higher levels of congestion under the long term scenario.

3.7 Summary Based on the analysis, the internal roadway network and the adjacent arterial roadway network will not be able to accommodate the increased traffic that will be generated by the combination of the short and long term redevelopment of the West Ritchie area. Options available to mitigate this situation of over-capacity are considered and presented in the next section. The existing over-capacity situation of the roadways in West Ritchie is summarized in the following tables.

35


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Table 18: Traffic Volumes and Environmental Capacities On Roadway Existing (vpd) Short Term Long Term Total Future Environ-mental Capacity

Spare Capacity (Over Capacity)

540

35 2250 190 340 270 450

3080 3500 140 1150 440 150

4395 8980 1560 2190 1110 1140

1000 3000 1000 1000 1000 1000

(3395) (5980) (560) (1190) (110) (140)

7380

3535

8460

19375

8000

(11375)

100 Street 101 Street 102 Street 81 Avenue 80 Avenue 79 Avenue

1280 3230 1230 700** 400**

Total

Estimated 2002 Average Annual Weekday volumes 2000 AAWDT volumes

Table 19. Summary of Roadway Environmental Capacity Existing 100 Street 101 Street 102 Street

7

% of EC7 128 108 123

Short-Term 100 Street 101 Street 102 Street 81 Avenue

% of EC 132 183 142 104

EC = Environmental Capacity

36

Long Term 100 Street 101 Street 102 Street 81 Avenue 80 Avenue 79 Avenue

% of EC 440 299 156 219 111 114


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

4.0 Conclusion 4.1 Introduction The previous sections provided a background and analysis of potential redevelopment in the West Ritchie area and the potential effect that may have on the roadway infrastructure. This section outlines the conclusion of the study.

4.2 Conclusion The West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study responds to a motion made at the May 1, 2002 Public Hearing at City Council, "to approach the Ritchie Community League to explore the possibility of a study of the West Ritchie Area." This Council motion originated from a rezoning of property in the West Ritchie area for a medium-rise apartment development. The focus of the motion was the impact that future developments would have on the roadway infrastructure within the West Ritchie area and possibly beyond it. The resulting Study provides a forecast of development over 10 and 25 year time horizons under the existing zoning. This forecast was then used to generate anticipated traffic volumes, on both internal (local) roadways as well as turning movements from boundary (arterial) roadways (82 Avenue and 99 Street) in and out of West Ritchie. Two transportation problems were identified: (1) over-capacity for local residential streets, and (2) poor access to West Ritchie from 82 Avenue and 99 Street. Potential land use (zoning) changes to reduce future development intensities and transportation (local traffic planning) measures to increase roadway capacity and to provide improved access from 82 Avenue and 99 St. were investigated. The results of this analysis is contained in Appendix B. A benefit-cost analysis and a limited consultation with local businesses and residents indicated there would be no net benefit in implementing these potential solutions. Due to the mixed-use nature of development in the area, the proposed solutions could cause worse problems than those being initially addressed through this Study.

4.2.1 Roadway Capacity Do the local roadways within West Ritchie have sufficient capacity to handle existing and future development? The analysis uses a standard, called "available daily environmental capacity" (1000 vehicles per day for local roadways) to measure the capacity of local residential roadways. Based on the analysis and this standard, the internal roadway network and the adjacent arterial roadway network will not be able to accommodate the increased traffic that will be generated by the short term (10 year) and long term (25 year) redevelopment of the West Ritchie area. Table 18 of the Study describes the existing and projected daily traffic volumes. The over-capacity of local roadways, as measured by "available daily environmental capacity" remains a more perceptual problem than a real one and it does not apply well to non-residential or mixed-use areas. For example, businesses generally thrive with increases in vehicular traffic passing by their establishments. On the other hand, local residents have a different perception of traffic and will generally object to increases in local traffic movements.

37


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

4.2.2 Access and Egress The second transportation problem is related to access from the boundary arterial roadways, 82 Avenue and 99 St., in and out of the West Ritchie area. The intersection of 82 Avenue and 101 Street is the only signalized intersection serving the West Ritchie area's internal roadway system. Furthermore, other signalized intersections along 82 Avenue, at 99 St., 103 St. and 104 St. result in short spacing of traffic volumes and contribute generally to poor access into West Ritchie. The analysis indicates that the signalized intersections along 82 Avenue can accommodate some additional traffic in the short term (10 year), with some revisions to signal timings. Both the 82 Avenue/99 Street and the 82 Avenue/101 Street will not be able to accommodate the traffic demands associated with the long-term (25 year) development scenario. Empirical evidence already suggests that poor access has discouraged local businesses from locating in recent mixed-use development in the area. Also, a survey of local businesses indicates that poor access is a major contributor to the smaller size of these establishments.

4.2.3 Possibility of a Solution Available land use (zoning) and transportation options to mitigate this situation of roadway overcapacity and poor access were evaluated and are presented in Appendix B of the Study. The land use options can be summarized as possible down-zoning of selected areas with the potential for redevelopment in the next 10 to 25 year period. Down-zoning would reduce the intensity of development and reduce the anticipated number of vehicle trips generated by redevelopment. Transportation options do not include widening of either local or arterial roadways but rather other means of increasing roadway capacity and improving access. These options include limiting parking, re-evaluating designated truck routes, a second, new, access to West Ritchie, signalization and finally, some traffic calming measures. An analysis of the net benefit of these combined land use and transportation options revealed some reduction in vehicular trips being generated, but not sufficient enough to resolve the problems as measured in the analysis. More importantly, costs were identified which would likely result in harm both to local businesses and residents. Two examples can be used to illustrate this point: • •

the elimination of parking in front of local businesses would immediately hurt existing businesses that rely on on-street parking for customers; and much of the eastern portion of West Ritchie is residential in character and would be harmed by measures to increase roadway capacity or improve access.

These measures would introduce more non-local through traffic into their neighbourhood. The mixed use character (residential, commercial, industrial, institutional) of West Ritchie complicates the establishment of consensus around the desirability of increasing roadway capacity. As previously mentioned, some evidence suggests that poor access rather than roadway capacity is the more significant issue and that local residents and businesses have coped reasonably well with the transportation problems. These problems, particularly that of poor access will diminish commercial opportunities within the West Ritchie area, and thereby decrease internal (local) roadway demand without intervention through transportation or land use measures.

38


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

4.2.4 Future Redevelopment The West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study provides base line data for the civic review of development proposals. Development requiring Traffic Impact Assessments can be evaluated against the Study's findings. The findings will also likely influence the developer's choice of development options, particularly in discouraging commercial development. Finally, the Study is useful in providing future planning direction. For example the relocation of Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) truck access at 101 Street and 79 Avenue would be a planning objective should a major redevelopment of the CPR Strathcona Yard occur.

39


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

References Planning and Development Department. Old Strathcona Area Redevelopment Plan, Bylaw 6382. City of Edmonton, 1981. Planning and Development Department. Scona East Area Redevelopment Plan, Bylaw 8156. City of Edmonton, 1986. Planning and Development Department. Strathcona Area Redevelopment Plan, Bylaw 11890. City of Edmonton, 1998. Transportation and Streets Department. City of Edmonton's Household Travel Survey Project Report. City of Edmonton, 1995. 1999 City of Edmonton Civic Census. City of Edmonton, 1999. Institute of Transportation Engineers. Trip Generation, 6th Edition. ITE 1997. Transportation and Streets Department. Origin — Destination Auto Vehicle Trips for Edmonton and the Surrounding Region.

R-1


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Appendix A Table A-1: Net Increase in Daily Trips Generated — Short Term Site

Potential Land Use Low Rise Apartment Commercial

34 711.6

B

High Rise Apartment Commercial

C

Units Trip Generation Rate units 4.4 m2 0.51

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

75 182

75 181

150 363

82 420

units m2

0.35

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

180 74

181 73

361 147

Low Rise Apartment

20

4.4

veh trips/unit

44

Commercial

0

units 2 m

0.35

veh trips/m2

0

44 0

88 0

Low Rise Apartment Commercial

20 0

units 2 m

4.4 0.35

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

44 0

44 0

88 0

Low Rise Apartment

9

veh trips/unit

304

units m2

4.4

Commercial

20 54

40 107

F

Low Rise Apartment Commercial

35

G

Low Rise Apartment

A

D E

Commercial

Size

1115

units 2 m

9 403.8

units m2

4.4

/unit

Inbound Outbound

Total

0.35

veh trips/m2

20 53

4.4

veh trips/unit

77

77

154

0.35

veh trips/m2

196

195

391

4.4 0.35

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

20 71

20 71

40 142 71

H

Low Rise Apartment

16

units

4.4

veh trips/unit

35

36

I

Low Rise Apartment

217

units

4.4

veh trips/unit

478

477

955

J*

Low Rise Apartment

units m2

4.4

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

106 113

106 113

212

Commercial

48 645

Apartment Commercial

490 3599.4

1079 689

1080 687

2159 1376

1768

1767

3535

Total

0.35

Total Daily Trips Generated * Main Floor Commercial Area Confirmed with Developer

A-1

226


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Table A-2: Net Increase in Daily Trips Generated - Long Term Site

Potential Land Use

Size

1

Commercial Office

2086 6257.25

2

Low Rise Apartment

10

Commercial

402

3

Low Rise Apartment

35

Commercial

609

Commercial Office

4 5

Low Rise Apartment Commercial

Units Trip Generation Rate m2

0.51

m2

0.095

units 2 m

4.4

/unit

Inbound Outbound

Total

veh trips/m2 . 2 veh trips/m

532

532

1064

298

297

595

22

22

44

0.35

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

70

71

141

4.4

veh trips/unit

77

77

0.35

veh trips/m2

107

107

154 214

2627.5

units 2 m 2 m

0.51

7882.5

m2

0.095

veh trips/m2 veh trips/m2

671 374

670 375

35

units 2 m

4.4 0.35

veh trips/unit • 2 veh tr ips/m

77

77

154

663

117

116

233

units m2

4.4

66

66

132

1341 749

6

Low Rise Apartment Commercial

30 0

0.35

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

0

0

0

7

Low Rise Apartment

49

units

4.4

veh trips/unit

108

Commercial

919.3 19

m2

0.35

veh trips/m2

216 322

units

4.4

42

204.5

m2

0.35

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

161 42

108 161 36

84 72

Low Rise Apartment Commercial

31 514

4.4

veh trips/unit

68

69

137

0.35

veh trips/m2

90

90

180

Commercial

510

units m2 m2

8 9 10

Low Rise Apartment Commercial

Commercial Office

300 2430

Commercial Office

812 2436

12

Low Rise Apartment

16

Commercial

810

13

Low Rise Apartment Commercial

31

14 15

11

36

0.86

veh trips/m2

220

219

439

m2

0.51 0.095

veh trips/m2 veh trips/sq.m.

76

m2 2 m

116

77 115

153 231

0.51 0.095

veh trips/m2 veh trips/m2

207 116

208 116

415 232

4.4

veh trips/unit

35 142

71 284

m2

units 2 m

0.35

veh trips/m2

36 142

1508

units 2 m

4.4 0.35

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

68 264

69 264

137 528

Low Rise Apartment

20

units

4.4

veh trips/unit

44

44

88

Low Rise Apartment

13

units

4.4

veh trips/unit

29

29

58

16

Low Rise Apartment

12

units

4.4

veh trips/unit

27

26

53

17

Low Rise Apartment

12

units

4.4

veh trips/unit

26

27

53

18

Low Rise Apartment

12

units

4.4

veh trips/unit

27

26

53

Total

Apartment Commercial Office

325 11965.05 19005.75

717 2693 904

717 2693 903

1434 5386 1807

4314

4313

8627

Total Daily Teps Generated

A-2


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Table A-3: Net Increase in PM Peak Hour Trips Generated — Short Term Site

Potential Land Use Low Rise Apartment

Size

Commercial

711.6

B

Low Rise Apartment Commercial

82 420

units m2

C

Low Rise Apartment

20

units

Commercial

0

m2

Low Rise Apartment Commercial

20

units

A

D

34

Units Trip Generation Rate units 0.58 m2 0.0331

/unit veh trips/unit

Total

13

7

veh trips/m2

12

12

20 24

32

0.0279

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

16 6

48 12

0.58

veh trips/unit

8

4

12

0.0279

veh trips/m2

0

0

0

0_58 0.0279

veh trips/unit

8

4

12

veh trips/m2

0

0

0

0.58

veh trips/unit

4

2

0.58

0

m2

Low Rise Apartment

9

Commercial

304

units m2

F

Low Rise Apartment Commercial

35 1115

units m2

0.0279

veh trips/m2

G

Low Rise Apartment Commercial

9 403.8

units m2

0.58 0.0279

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

E

Inbound Outbound

6

0.0279

veh trips/m2

5

4

6 9

0.58

veh trips/unit

14 16

7

21

16

32

4 6

2 6

6 12

H

Low Rise Apartment

16

units

0.58

veh trips/unit

7

3

10

I

Low Rise Apartment

217

units

0.58

veh trips/unit

83

43

126

J*

Low Rise Apartment

48

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

10

645

0.58 0.0279

18

Commercial

units m2

9

9

28 18

Apartment Commercial

490 3599.4

191 54

98 53

289 107

245

151

396

Total

Total Daily TrIps Generated

A-3


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Table A-4: Net Increase in PM Peak Hour Trips Generated - Long Term Site 1 2

Potential Land Use Commercial

2086

Office

6257.25

Size

Units Trip Generation Rate 2 m 0.0331 m2 0.016

/unit veh trips/m2 veh trips/m2

Inbound Outbound

Total

35 17

35

70

84

101

Low Rise Apartment

10

0.58 0.0279

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

2

402

units m2

4

Commercial

6

6

6 12

Low Rise Apartment

35 609

units m2

0.58 0.0279

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

14

7

21

Commercial

8

9

17

4

Commercial Office

2627.5 7882.5

m2

0.0331 0.016

veh trips/m2 veh trips/m2

44

43 105

87 127

5

Low Rise Apartment

35

0.58

veh trips/unit

14

7

21

Commercial

663

units m2

0.0279

veh trips/m2

9

10

19

Low Rise Apartment

30 0

units m2

0.58 0.0279

veh trips/unit

12

veh trips/m2

0

6 0

18 0

Low Rise Apartment

49

0.58 0.0279

19

919.3

units m2

veh trips/unit

Commercial

veh trips/m2

13

10 13

29 26

8

Low Rise Apartment

19

units

veh trips/unit

8

4

12

Commercial

204.5

m2

0.58 0.0279

veh trips/m2

3

3

6

9

Low Rise Apartment Commercial

31

units 2 m m2

0.58

veh trips/unit

12

6

18

0.0279

veh trips/m2

8

7

15

0.061

veh trips/m2 veh trips/m2

16

16

32

0.0331 0.016

veh trips/sq.m.

5 7

5 32

10 39

0.0331 0.016

veh trips/m2 veh trips/m2

13 7

14 32

27 39 10

3

6

Commercial 7

10

514

m2

22

Commercial

510

Commercial Office

300 2430

11

Commercial Office

812 2436

m2 2 m m2 m2

12

Low Rise Apartment Commercial

16 810

units m2

0.58 0.0279

veh trips/unit veh trips/m2

7 12

3 11

Low Rise Apartment

31

units

0.58

veh trips/unit

12

Commercial

1508

m2

0.0279

veh trips/m2

21

6 22

43

14

Low Rise Apartment

20

units

0.58

veh trips/unit

8

4

12

15

Low Rise Apartment

13

units

0.58

veh trips/unit

5

3

8

16

Low Rise Apartment

12

units

0.58

veh trips/unit

5

2

7

17

Low Rise Apartment

12

units

0.58

veh trips/unit

5

2

7

18

Low Rise Apartment

12

units

0.58

veh trips/unit

5

2

7

Total

Apartment Commercial Office

325 11965.1 19005.8

130 193 53

64 194 253

194 387 306

376

511

887

13

Total Daily Trips Generated

A-4

23 18


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Appendix B While the problems of local roadway capacity and intersection congestion are quite apparent in the study, solutions are not so easily deteimined. They could involve some tolerance for roadway congestion and intersection delays to the preparation of a local traffic study to a reduction in redevelopment potential for underdeveloped properties through zoning. The only non-viable option is the possibility of increasing roadway capacity through the acquisition of properties for local roadway widening to a collector standard. The following section describes solutions considered to develop a recommendation. The most likely scenario will include a combination of transportation and planning solutions. i) ii) iii)

Transportation Solutions: improve the physical capacity of the existing roadway network; Zoning Solutions: decrease the redevelopment potential of West Ritchie; or Combined Solution: improve the physical roadway network and decrease the redevelopment potential of West Ritchie.

B.1 Transportation Solutions Considered: Increase Roadway Capacity Because the existing roadway network is currently constrained by adjacent development, road right of way is not available to make large-scale improvements to the 82 Avenue or 99 Street corridors. The Transportation Master Plan also does not support widening existing arterial roadways within the inner ring road to provide additional roadway capacity. Limit Parking Small improvements, such as limiting parking at intersections, may be implemented, however these will not provide enough additional capacity to mitigate the impacts of long term development in West Ritchie. Re-Evaluate Designated Truck Routes The entire West Ritchie area is designated as a truck route. By reviewing this policy and perhaps designating only one or two roadways in the area as truck routes, the impacts of truck activity adjacent to residential properties can be limited. Truck route changes, however, will not be sufficient to mitigate the impacts of the West Ritchie redevelopment. Provide a New Access to West Ritchie from 103 Street 79 Avenue or 80 Avenue could potentially be extended eastward through to 103 Street (Gateway Boulevard). The Transportation and Streets Department does not support this alternative at this time. Opening a route through West Ritchie that would connect west of the railroad tracks would create a major short-cutting route through West Ritchie. Although the Transportation and Streets Department does use traffic calming as one way to mitigate the impacts of short-cutting

B-1


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

traffic, the most effective measures include diverters and road closures, which would defeat the purpose of opening the route in the first place. Signalization The addition of a traffic signal on 99 Street at 80 Avenue would improve egress from West Ritchie to 99 Street northbound, reducing some of the pressure on the 101 Street/82 Avenue signal. The installation of traffic signals to accommodate residential access to arterial roadways may also create short-cutting routes through the neighbourhood. The roadway network in West Ritchie is a grid system, which creates a higher potential for short-cutting activity if additional signals were installed along 99 Street. Community Traffic Management Plans — Traffic Calming According to the analysis, the potential for redevelopment in West Ritchie will result in higher traffic volumes on the local roadway network. Traffic Calming and Community Traffic Management Plans are used to address community concerns such as short-cutting traffic. Shortcutting traffic is defined as vehicles not originating or destined to the neighbourhood. Because the additional traffic discussed in the traffic analysis will be generated by land uses within the West Ritchie area under the redevelopment scenarios, it is not short-cutting traffic, and traffic calming measures would have no effect on reducing the overall traffic volumes. As indicated above, some measures to increase the capacity of the local roadway network and improve the access and egress opportunities for residents and businesses in West Ritchie would also create potential routes for short-cutting traffic. The Transportation and Streets Department undertakes Community Traffic Management Plans to help mitigate the impacts of short-cutting traffic in Communities, however, these plans are typically reactionary rather than proactive. In a reactionary plan, traffic calming measures that would best address short-cutting concerns include road closures or diverters, which prevent access all the way through a community. In West Ritchie there is the opportunity to be proactive by not opening up short-cutting routes to begin with. B.2 Zoning Solutions Considered To decrease the re-development potential in the West Ritchie area, a review of existing zoning and examination of potential reduction in zoning is recommended. Upper Limit Trip Generation An upset limit of trip generation could be set for the area. Once the capacity is reached, no further re-development or development permits would be issued for new uses or expansion of existing uses in the area. This option would cause a 'rush' to be first in with a development proposal and it is not legally enforceable where a use is 'permitted' under the existing zoning.

B-2


West Ritchie Land Use and Transportation Study

Decrease in Development Potential by Down-Zoning A reduction in development potential, or "down-zoning" to decrease the development potential in the area under the following guiding principles was tested. i) ii)

iii)

avoid creation of "non-conforming" land uses focus on decreasing zoning where redevelopment opportunities are limited by land ownership, limited economic viability, or where existing land use reflects a less intense zoning focus on a reduction in zoning on interior sites not yet developed fully under existing CB2 zoning, where economic viability of more intensive commercial uses my be limited by competition or access maintain business industrial land uses around the CPR facilities to serve as a buffer to residential land uses

The analysis showed that by reducing the development potential through down-zoning would still result in an over-capacity of the internal roadways in both the short and long term.

B-3


The following table provides a summary of the trips per day generated in the short and long term development based on the down-zoning scenario presented above.

Table B-10 Summary of Solutions Considered Do Nothing

Existing Short Term Long Term Capacity

Transportation Solutions (i)

total over/(under) total veh/day capacity veh/day 7380 620 -8% 7380 10915 (2915) 36% 10915 19375 (11375) 142% 19375 8000

100%

10000

Zoning Solution (ii)

over/(under) capacity 2620 -26% (915) 9% (9375)

total veh/day 7380

94%

10725 19042

100%

8000

Combined Solutions

over/(under) total capacity veh/day 620 -8% 7380 (2725) 34% 10725 (11042) 138% 19042 100%

over/(under) capacity 2620 -36% 7% (725) (9042) 90%

10000

100%

160% 140% 120% 100% 80% 60% Over Capacity Environmental Capacity Under Capacity

40% 20% 0% -20%

I

-40% -60%

ID Existing

Do Nothing

Transportation Solutions (i)

Zoning Solution (ii)

Combined Solutions

-8%

-26%

-8%

-36%

0 Short Term

36%

9%

34%

7%

0 Long Term

142%

94%

138%

90%

Assumptions i) Transportation Assumptions - Add signalization at 80 Avenue and 99 Street, increases environmental capacity by 2000 - Relocate truck route access to area, increases capacity by x - Implementation of a one-way couplet system increases capacity by x - Transportation solutions may cause short-cutting through the neighbourhood - Vehicle Trips/Day Short Term Long Term ii) Land Use (Zoning) Assumptions - Assume that CB1 is restricted to one floor commercial, with no residential development opportunity - Zoning solution may discriminate against "under-developed sites

B-2

Edmonton (Alta.) - 2003 - West Ritchie land use and transportation study (2003-09-24)  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you