Issuu on Google+

125311

III 111111111 II

Transportation master plan Edmonton. Transport

3013

arioFIEDIAIONTON

PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT DEPT •

4020a .E3 E386 19951999m

LIBRARY 5th FLOOR, 10250 - 101 STREET NW EDMONTON, ALBERTA T5J 3P4

AppRovEd ApRL 4, 1 999


CITY OF EINAMON OEVELOMENT DEM MANNING MD LIBRARY noon,10260-101 STREET RN , WirootroN, ALBERTA 7151V4

zo

P

chRip. 3013 Ectrylori+-041s Tirarlpor+ctilori qc?

aSb-Cir" P 1C(41-

171 3924A

#4.c. DATE OUT

12-6.311 PHONE NO.

'7,•_ 13

T020 Edmonton Trans 3013 portation & Streets 1999 Edmonton's Transportation Master Plan. A.C. 125311

@ THE CITY OF

t

MOIR OA

TRANSPORTATION AND STREETS

DATE IN


TSPOFrrATION

TABLE OF CONTENTS Page #

1.0

2.0

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

7

BACKGROUND

17

1.1

19

Introduction

1.2 Context 1.2.1 Population, Employment and Demographics 1.2.2 Transportation Demands 1.2.3 Environment 1.2.4 Finances

20 20 20 23 24

1.3

25 25 26 29 30

Future Challenges 1.3.1 Growth and Demographic Changes 1.3.2 Mobility and Accessibility 1.3.3 Environment 1.3.4 Financial Demands

THE TRANSPORTATION MASTER PLAN

33

2.1

Foundations for the Plan 2.1.1 Results and Conclusions of Technical Evaluations 2.1.2 Public Values and Preferences 2.1.3 City Council's "Plan Direction" 2.1.4 Strategic Goals and Supporting Policies

35 35 36 36 37

2.2

The Plan in Detail 2.2.1 The Roadway Hierarchy 2.2.2 High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors 2.2.3 Arterial Roadway Network Modifications 2.2.4 Traffic Management Initiatives 2.2.5 Providing Travel Choices 2.2.6 Impact Mitigation Initiatives 2.2.7 Reducing Environmental Impacts 2.2.8 Safety Initiatives 2.2.9 Infrastructure Rehabilitation and Maintenance

44 44 45 51 52 55 67 68 70 70

SOLUTIONS fOR ILIE FUTURE


TABLE OF CONTENTS

MASTOOLAINt

yak

Page #

3.0

4.0

2

EFFECTS OF THE PLAN

73

3.1

Mobility 3.1.1 Movement of People 3.1.2 Movement of Goods

75 75 78

3.2

Environment 3.2.1 Vehicle Emissions and Air Quality 3.2.2 Impacts on the North Saskatchewan River Valley

79 79 80

3.3

Community Impacts 3.3.1 Traffic Shortcutting 3.2.2 Traffic Noise 3.3.3 Community Severance Effects 3.3.4 Property Loss

81 81 82 82 83

3.4

Financial Impacts 3.4.1 Capital and Operating Costs 3.4.2 Funding the Plan

84 84 85

PLAN IMPLEMENTATION

87

4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.5.1 4.5.2

89 89 90 90 91 91 91

Transportation System Bylaw Priorities in the Next Ten Years Facility Planning Preparation of Capital and Operating Programs Monitoring and Adapting to Changes Monitoring Changes Reporting Progress and Responding to Changes

SolurioNs km TkE

FUTURE


fRANSPORIATION ,e2,4

AiEr

LIST OF EXHIBITS

6 .1.

Exhibits Exhibit 1: Exhibit 2: Exhibit 3: Exhibit 4: Exhibit 5: Exhibit 6: Exhibit 7: Exhibit 8: Exhibit 9: Exhibit 10: Exhibit 11: Exhibit 12: Exhibit 13: Exhibit 14: Exhibit 15:

Proportion of Daily Trips by Mode of Travel Transit Share of Trips to Different Destinations Condition of Arterial/Collector Roads Condition of Local Roads Population Growth in the Edmonton Region Demographic Changes Extent of Severe Congestion in AM Peak Hour Extent of Severe Congestion in Inner Area in AM Peak Hour Transit Share of Daily Trips Transit Share of AM Peak Hour Trips to Downtown (Work & PSE Trips) Transit Share of Daily Trips to University (Work & PSE Trips) Walk/Cycle Share of Trips in AM Peak Hour (Work & PSE Trips) Extent of Congestion on Primary Highway Network Change in Daily Vehicle Emissions in Edmonton (1990-2020) Change in Per Capita Vehicle Emissions (1990-2020)

Maps Map 1: Map 2: Map 3: Map 4: Map 5:

Population and Employment Growth Major Trip Patterns The Major Roadway Concept The High Speed Transit Concept The Transportation Master Plan Concept

List of Tables Table 1: Table 2: Table 3:

SOIURONS [OR ThE FUTURE

AM Peak Hour Auto Trips Summary of Community Impacts Total Expenditures (1998-2020)


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The preparation of this Transportation Master Plan has involved literally thousands of people whose contributions and input have helped to shape and improve the final product. In appreciation of the effort, time and input received, I wish to acknowledge and extend my sincere personal and professional gratitude to the many people who have helped the project team develop a plan that will stand the citizens of Edmonton in good stead for many years to come.

Citizens of Edmonton Thousands of Edmontonians have taken part, in one way or another, in the development of this plan. They have contributed information , their ideas, their opinions and their preferences in many different ways. They participated in surveys, attended public meetings, wrote letters, sent faxes and telephoned. Most importantly, they cared enough about the issues to make their voices heard.

The Citizens Advisory Group A particular debt of gratitude is owed to this group of individuals who have worked very diligently throughout the course of the project to bring a wide range of views to the table for consideration. The group applied an untiring and selfless dedication to the task of conveying feedback to the project team and relaying information back to the community at large. While each individual had his or her perspective to share, they collectively never lost sight of the goal of helping the project team to prepare a plan that was in Edmonton's overall best interests.

Stakeholder Groups Throughout the course of this project, many stakeholder groups took part either formally or informally to bring their constituents' views to the attention of the project team. Their input enlarged and enriched the range and complexity of issues to be addressed.

City Council City Council is to be commended for supporting the development of this plan, along with several other strategic planning documents. While such city-wide initiatives delve into complex and difficult issues, this city will be well served by taking a longer term perspective that goes beyond the easier short term quick fixes. During the course of this project City Council and its Utilities and Public Works Committee contributed on numerous occasions to the advancement of this project through their direction and support.

4

SolurioNs [OR TkE FUTURE


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The Consulting Industry The development of this Plan relied heavily on the expertise, skill and ingenuity of professionals in the consulting industry who participated in this project. The individuals involved, together with the firms they represented, brought to bear a range of skills and experiences that allowed this project to incorporate leading edge ideas, research and practices.

City of Edmonton Departments Staff from a number of departments contributed their input and expertise at various times during the course of the project, They are recognized and appreciated for bringing a wider perspective to the project. I would like to acknowledge and thank the staff of the Planning and Development Department in particular, for their expertise, collaboration and advice throughout the course of the project. The Plan Edmonton team played a particularly important role during the latter part of the project, as the need to coordinate and ensure consistency between the two strategic documents became paramount.

Transportation and Streets Department The preparation of this plan required the assistance of every branch of the department. More importantly, it required the extraordinary effort and dedication of staff to not only assist the plan's development, but also to complete routine day to day tasks that needed to be completed as a matter of course. I wish to extend a very warm thank you to my colleagues in the Transportation Planning Branch whose knowledge, skill, experience and dedication must not go unrecognized and will not be forgotten. Thank you for pulling out all the stops, all the time, for so long. The guidance, encouragement and support of the department's senior management team is greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,

Hassan Shaheen, P. Eng. Project Manager, Transportation Master Plan

SOLUTIONS fOR TkE FUTURE

5


-

-

-


--

-

-


TRANSPORTATI,ON

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Purpose of the Plan

Executive Summary Purpose of the Plan Context for the Plan

The main purpose of the Transportation Master Plan (TMP) is to establish a framework for how the City of Edmonton will address its future transportation needs to the year 2020. The TMP establishes the policies, strategies and priorities for shorter term decisions and actions by the City of Edmonton, on behalf of its citizens. As one of several strategic plans, The Transportation Master Plan expresses the City of Edmonton's approach to the "movement of people and goods", which is defined as a strategic priority in Plan Edmonton, the City's Municipal Development Plan and senior planning document.

Overview of the Transportation Master Plan Recommended Major Roadway Improvements Recommended Public Transit and Non-motorized Travel Improvements Recommended Infrastructure Rehabilitation Practices Effects of the Plan Costs and Funding of the Plan

Context for the Plan During the 1970's and on into the 1990's Edmonton pursued transportation solutions which were less costly and had fewer impacts than freeway proposals considered in the 1960's. While significant roadway improvements were built, an extensive commitment to public transit was made through the construction of the Light Rail Transit line. The current transportation system reflects past trade-offs between mobility and other elements of the quality of life in Edmonton. The City of Edmonton's population is expected to grow from 616,300 in 1996 to 829,000 people in 2020. Growth in the region surrounding Edmonton will result in a population of 1.17 million people in the Edmonton Census Metropolitan Area by 2020. The vast majority of Edmonton's growth will occur in suburban areas of the city. Demographic changes will play an important role in the future. Edmonton's population is aging and will have a significantly larger proportion of seniors in its population. Conversely, the school-aged portion of the population will decline over time.

Background The Transportation Master Plan Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

The magnitude and distribution of growth will lead to more decentralized travel patterns in future and result in more and longer trips. Decentralized travel patterns, coupled with demographic changes, will tend to make public transit service a somewhat less attractive travel option. While Edmonton's population will increase by about a third by 2020, the extent of congestion during rush hours will more than triple. If current trends continue, growth in traffic and congestion will, however, result in only modestly higher vehicle emission levels, due to ongoing technological improvements in vehicle design. A significant challenge facing Edmonton is the state of its existing infrastructure. At present, a significant portion of the roadway network is either in fair or poor condition. With time, the inventory of older and deteriorating roads will grow and present a sizable liability.

SOIUTIONS fOR ThE FUTURE

9


MANS TATI,ON

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

7.j

Overview of the Transportation Master Plan The Transportation Master Plan responds to the future challenges with an approach that strives to: Executive Summary Purpose of the Plan Context for the Plan Overview of the Transportation Master Plan Recommended Major Roadway Improvements Recommended Public Transit and Non-motorized Travel Improvements Recommended Infrastructure Rehabilitation Practices Effects of the Plan Costs and Funding of the Plan

• • • • • •

Manage, rather than eliminate traffic congestion Provide a wider range of travel options Mitigate community impacts of the transportation system Keep the transportation system in good repair Support efforts and behaviours which limit environmental impacts Monitor and adapt to changing conditions

The Plan aims to moderate the severity of future congestion, but it does not reduce it to current levels. The challenges presented by future growth will be dealt with in a variety of ways, through a combination of strategies. This is consistent with similar approaches being taken by many cities faced with similar, or more severe transportation problems. The approach to managing traffic growth and congestion in future will rely on the following • • • • •

Selective improvements to the existing arterial roadway network to facilitate cross-town movement of people and goods Selective additions to the roadway system to support new growth Provision of a high speed transit (HST) component, as part of the public transit system, to provide a competitive alternative to the automobile Provision of a reasonable range of travel choices to reduce reliance on the automobile for a greater range of trips Use of advanced traffic management and control techniques to make the best use of existing facilities

Recommended Major Roadway Improvements

Background The Transportation Master Plan Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

The Plan recommends the development of a system of high standard arterial roadways to facilitate the movement of large volumes of people and goods over relatively long distances across the city. This system has three elements which are designed to work together to achieve their intended function: • • •

An Outer Ring Road An Inner Ring Loop Highway Connectors

The Outer Ring Road is to be located within the Transportation and Utility Corridor (TUC) established by the Province of Alberta around the periphery of the city. This facility will ultimately be developed to a basic six lane free-flow standard.

10

SOLUTIONS LOR TkE FUTURE


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Inner Ring Loop will consist of Whitemud Drive, Yellowhead Trail, 170 Street and 75 Street/Capilano Drive. Enhancements to these facilities will be aimed at raising their service level to a more free-flowing standard, where this is not already the case. The Inner Ring Loop will be developed to a minimum of six through lanes and a posted speed of 70 km per hour. Executive Summary Purpose of the Plan Context for the Plan Overview of the Transportation Master Plan

Highway Connectors are the third element of the major roadway concept. They are existing arterial roadways which will be enhanced to provide efficient connections between the Inner Ring Loop and the Outer Ring Loop, as well as providing connections to the regional highway network. In addition to the major roadway improvements discussed above, the Plan recommends the extension of the city's arterial roadways to serve newly developed areas. Upgrades to existing arterial roadways which are currently only partially developed will also be undertaken in response to growth.

Recommended Major Roadway Improvements Recommended Public Transit and Non-motorized Travel Improvements Recommended Infrastructure Rehabilitation Practices Effects of the Plan

Recommended Public Transit and Non-motorized Travel Improvements The Transportation Master Plan recognizes and recommends the continuation of an important role for public transit, but places a sharper focus on the role of the public transit mode. Specifically, this plan recognizes both the benefits and opportunities that public transit offers, but clearly acknowledges the reality that transit cannot offer those benefits universally. The Plan recommends that public transportation service be focused on the following core areas:

Costs and Funding of the Plan

• •

Background

• The Transportation Master Plan Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

Meeting the basic mobility needs of people who have no other travel alternative; basic service at reasonable cost Offering a viable and competitive alternative to private automobile transportation during peak periods of travel, in high demand corridors Expanding the carrying - capacity of the transportation system

In addition to providing a basic and affordable transit service it is recommended that Edmonton continue to plan and protect for a High Speed Transit system as a key component of its transportation system. Light Rail Transit has historically been the only technology choice to provide high speed transit service in Edmonton. This Plan recommends that the current LRT line be further extended from its current terminus at the University of Alberta, to Heritage Mall along the 114/113/111 Street corridor. In addition to the LRT extension, it is recommended that other high speed transit alternatives be considered for other sections of the City. Specifically, a busway system modelled after Ottawa-Carleton's "Transitway" system is to be given serious consideration. The Plan also recommends a number of other public transit initiatives as a means of enhancing the range of travel choices open to Edmontonians.

SOIUTTONS [OR TkE FUTURE

11


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Consistent with the desire to enhance the range of travel options, the Plan recommends a number of initiatives aimed at reducing barriers to accessibility, as well as making non-motorized modes of travel more viable for shorter trips. These initiatives are:

Executive Summary Purpose of the Plan Context for the Plan Overview of the Transportation Master Plan

• • • • • • •

Completion of the para-ramp construction program by the year 2008 Complete conversion of Edmonton Transit's fleet to low floor buses by the year 2008 Conversion of LRT vehicles to improve accessibility Construction of missing sidewalk links Provision of a high standard of sidewalk availability in new subdivisions Use of abandoned rail or other rights of way for non-motorized travel Provision of improved connections between the street system and the river valley trails

Map 5 illustrates the concept of major roadway and transit system proposals that are recommended in this Plan.

Recommended Major Roadway Improvements Recommended Public Transit and Non-motorized Travel Improvements

Recommended Infrastructure Rehabilitation Practices In order to address the significant backlog of rehabilitation needs and to avoid an unmanageable inventory of roads needing reconstruction it is recommended that:

Recommended Infrastructure Rehabilitation Practices

Effects of the Plan

Costs and Funding of the Plan

• •

Background

The Transportation Master Plan

Effects of The Plan

Plan Implementation

12

an aggressive rehabilitation program be undertaken over the next five years to clear up the existing backlog of rehabilitation needs and prevent any growth in the inventory of roads needing costly reconstruction. beyond the five year time frame, the City should commit and maintain an elevated level of funding for the ongoing rehabilitation of the City's arterial/collector roadway network. a twelve to fifteen year rehabilitation cycle be maintained and funded for the arterial/ collector roadway network. an ongoing crack sealing program should be maintained to enable the City to sustain the twelve to fifteen year rehabilitation cycle noted above the existing pavement monitoring and condition rating program should be maintained and enhanced as a means of better assessing and adjusting rehabilitation needs and priorities. the City strive for a Pavement Quality Index (POI) in the 6.0 to 7.0 range, subject to public acceptability a Bridge Investment Strategy be completed in order to identify a cost-effective means of preserving and extending the service life of Edmonton's bridges and other strategic structures. The Bridge Investment Strategy should incorporate life-cycle costing and value engineering principles. Consistent with practices advocated by the Organisation for Economic Cooperating and Development (OECD), Edmonton should strive for an annual bridge maintenance, rehabilitation and replacement program valued at 2% of the asset replacement value.

SOILITIONS Ion TkE FUTURE


MAP 5- THE TRANSPORTATION MASTER PLAN CONCEPT

LEGEND: mum Proposed Outer Ring Road Proposed Inner Ring Loop and Connectors Existing L.R.T. Corridor Possible L.R.T. Extension *114 Proposed High Speed Transit • • • • Proposed L.R.T. Extension str

-r CITY OF T ALBERT

1E3 AVE NI IE • •

0. •

# ''

. •

137 AVENUE

u v v ..................1 6.40 gas owe .041,

k

Mara

o.

111 AVE

STRA HCONA COUNTY

ISTONV PLAIN ROAD . 5,

ENUE

f

INNITEMUD DRIVE MIN MI Mill ME

'`A-• I imm

eNal

ii

UE sok AVEN. .23.m.

ti

SOIUTIONS fOR ThE FUTURE

I 1 A

li ii 1 oo I • 1

1 ) s 44

N\A\TE

Ns—

:1

,_, '

al 1

-I I r RIM IL la /AI /

13


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Effects of the Plan

Executive Summary Purpose of the Plan Context for the Plan

As noted earlier, implementation of this plan will not restore future congestion levels to 1997 levels. The Plan will however offer substantial improvements relative to the "trend" scenario, which relies on continuing current practices. • • • •

Overview of the Transportation Master Plan Recommended Major Roadway Improvements Recommended Public Transit and Non-motorized Travel Improvements

• •

The Plan will reduce congestion levels in Edmonton during morning rush hours by 47% The Plan will reduce congestion levels in the area within the Inner Ring Loop by 46% The Plan will reduce congestion on the primary highway network, which is heavily used for goods movement, by 40 °A The Plan will reverse the potential erosion of transit's market share and allow transit to gain significant ground in key travel market segments. The Plan will maintain vehicle emissions levels in line with the "trend" scenario at modestly higher than 1990 levels. The Plan will not reduce greenhouse gas emissions to levels mandated by the Kyoto agreement, but it puts in place the travel alternatives that will be necessary as and when a coordinated, national approach for reaching these targets is established. The Plan is successful in limiting community impacts both by its selective corridor upgrading approach, as well as through the various initiatives aimed at addressing traffic noise, traffic shortcutting , spill-over parking and other impacts. The Plan respects the integrity of the river valley and natural areas

Recommended Infrastructure Rehabilitation Practices Effects of the Plan Costs and Funding of the Plan

Background The Transportation Master Plan Effects of The Plan

Costs and Funding of the Plan Based on continuing current practices and trends, the City of Edmonton can expect to spend a total of $7.5 billion on transportation facilities and services from 1998 through 2020. In order to achieve the benefits which this Plan can offer, a total financial commitment of $9.1 to $9.6 billion will be required over the same time period. This represents an investment of between 21 and 28% more than what would need to be expended in any event. Estimates of available resources to the year 2020 indicate that traditional, known sources of funding such as property taxes, transit fares, provincial grants and developer contributions will generate an estimated $6.5 billion. These funds will cover about 68 - 71% of the full cost of the Plan.

Plan Implementation

Research conducted during the development of this Plan identified a range of possible funding sources which are potentially viable in terms of their feasibility and revenue generating capacity. Senior level discussions are underway between the Alberta government and Alberta municipalities to explore new funding arrangements which may include options identified by the City of Edmonton.

SOLUTIONS [OR TIM" FUTURE

15


,

_

_


fitiMPORTATI,ON

BACKGROUN D INTROdUCTiON

CONTEXT

FUTURE ChARENgES


,

BMA

itt

'

OC,tt tiro

-`

1.1 Introduction

Background Introduction

In the early 1960's, when Edmonton was undergoing rapid growth, an extensive freeway system was proposed as a solution to future transportation problems. Had the then proposed network been fully built, the roadways would have affected many of Edmonton's older, central neighbourhoods and occupied many of the river valley ravines which are now viewed as a very substantial asset. The freeway proposals of the 1960's were ultimately rejected by Edmontonians and their elected representatives on City Council.

Context Population, Employment & Demographics Transportation Demands

During the 1970's and on into the 1990's, Edmonton pursued transportation solutions with more moderate impacts and which relied more heavily on public transit. Significant arterial roadway improvements were made and some high standard facilities were constructed to ease traffic congestion. To complement this roadwork, Edmonton made a significant commitment to public transit through the construction of the Light Rail Transit line. Today's transportation system reflects the many trade-offs and choices made to date.

Environment

Finances

There have been many changes in Edmonton since the City last updated its long range transportation plan in 1983. These changes include:

Future Challenges

• An older and aging population • A more dispersed city with more people than ever living and working in suburban areas • Growth in population, business, industry and traffic • Greater awareness of and concern about environmental issues • Increased private auto use, but decreased public transit use • A larger inventory of older and deteriorating infrastructure • Significantly lower funding for transportation infrastructure and services

The Transportation Master Plan Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

Looking ahead twenty years, Edmontonians can expect significant changes, some of which can be anticipated and some which cannot. In order to be better prepared for ongoing and future changes, the City of Edmonton has undertaken a number of strategic planning exercises, one of which is this Transportation Master Plan. The main purpose of the Transportation Master Plan (TMP) is to establish a framework for how the City of Edmonton will address future transportation needs to the year 2020. The TMP establishes the policies, strategies and priorities for shorter term decisions and actions by the City of Edmonton on behalf of Edmontonians. As one of several strategic plans, The Transportation Master Plan expresses the City of Edmonton's approach to the "movement of people and goods" which is defined as a strategic priority in Plan Edmonton, the City's Municipal Development Plan.

.50/UTIONS fOR ThE FUTURE

19


1.2

Context 1.2.1

Population, Employment and Demographics

Edmonton's population was 616,000 in 1996. The geographic distribution of Edmonton's population and employment have changed significantly during the past two decades.

Background Introduction Context Population, Employment & Demographics Transportation Demands Environment Finances Future Challenges

The Transportation Master Plan Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

Up to the early 1970's, almost the entire population of Edmonton lived within what are now older, mature neighbourhoods. Today, almost half of the City's population lives in suburban areas which have developed since the early 1970's. These suburban areas are growing rapidly and continue to capture a growing proportion of new housing starts. An important influence on transportation is the location of people's jobs. Edmonton's Downtown has historically enjoyed a relatively large proportion of jobs in Edmonton. However, since the early 1980's, there has been little change in downtown employment, while there has been substantial growth in suburban areas. Today, approximately 20% of employed Edmontonians work downtown, while the remainder work elsewhere in the City. In addition to changes in the distribution of population and employment, a number of changes in underlying demographics have occurred since the 1970's and are continuing to occur. The size of demographic groups such as adult workers and senior citizens is increasing rapidly, while the percentage of school-age children is decreasing. These demographic changes affect household size, population distribution and labour force participation rates and are important with respect to their effects on transportation.

1.2.2

Transportation Demands

On an average weekday, more than three million trips are made in the Edmonton region. Of these trips, about three quarters are made within the City. Trips to and from Edmonton's downtown make up about 11 % of all daily trips made by Edmontonians.

20

50111TiONS fOR ThE FUTURE


The average length of each trip is approximately seven kilometres and lasts about twenty minutes. Exhibit 1 indicates that on an average weekday, the vast majority of trips in Edmonton are made by automobile. However, during rush hours, public transit plays a more significant role in getting people to work and post-secondary education, as indicated in Exhibit 2. Background Introduction

Exhibit 1: Percentage of Weekday Daily Person Trips by Mode

Context Population, Employment & Demographics

Auto Drivers 54%

Auto Passengers 23%

Transportation Demands Environment

Finances Future Challenges

Bicycle & Other 2 °/0

Walk 12%

Transit 9%

The Transportation Master Plan Effects of The Plan

Exhibit 2: Plan Implementation

Transit Share of Trips to Different Destinations (Work and PSE* Trips, AM Peak Hour)

18

To All Destinations

To Downtown

42

To University

Transit Share (%)

*PSE = Post Secondary Education

SOLUTIONS /OR ThE FUTURE

21


Travel on Edmonton's roads is generally congestion-free except during rush hours when certain routes near the downtown area, the university and the river crossings become congested. A little over 2% of morning peak-hour traffic experiences severe congestion. Edmonton's business community has expressed concern over the high cost of moving goods within Edmonton and points to an insufficient number of designated truck routes, too many indirect routes and congestion as contributing factors.

Background Introduction Context Population, Employment & Demographics

As indicated in Exhibits 3 and 4, Edmonton's roadways are showing signs of age. Spending on roadway rehabilitation has increased significantly in recent years and is succeeding in stabilizing the overall condition of the roadway network, although at a level considered to be below a satisfactory one.

Transportation Demands Environment

Exhibit 3:

Condition of Arterial/Collector Roads

Finances Fair

Good

Future Challenges

The Transportation Master Plan Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation Poor 19%

Exhibit 4: Condition of Local Roads

Good

Fair 36%

13%

22

SOLUTIONS fOR ThE FUTURE


t2.3

Environment

Air Quality and Vehicle Emissions

Background Introduction Context Population, Employment & Demographics Transportation Demands Environment Finances

Air quality in Alberta is rated using the Index of the Quality of the Air (IQUA) which was developed by a Federal-Provincial Committee to provide the public with a simple, yet meaningful measure of outdoor air quality. The index is a single number which is arrived at using the outdoor concentrations of carbon monoxide, the coefficient of haze (dust and smoke), nitrogen dioxide, ozone and sulphur dioxide. Despite a significant increase in population and vehicle use since 1980, concentrations of a number of pollutants contained in vehicle emissions have declined substantially since 1980. The most recently available air quality information from Alberta Environmental Protection indicates that in the last quarter of 1996, the air quality measured at all three of Edmonton's air quality monitoring stations was "good" (the highest possible rating) more than 99% of the time. Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Future Challenges

The Transportation Master Plan Effects of The Plan

Greenhouse gas emissions resulting from human activities have in recent years gained wide international attention as a significant contributor to global warming. As a result of this phenomenon, a number of international agreements have been signed to limit future emissions. As a signatory to the latest agreement, the Federal Government has committed to a Canadian reduction of greenhouse gases to a level which is 6% below 1990 levels by the commitment period of 2008 to 2012.

Plan Implementation

Greenhouse gas emissions from private vehicle use in Edmonton is currently estimated to account for about 14% of total greenhouse gas emissions from all sources. As a result of improvements in vehicle technology, greenhouse gas emissions from private vehicles have been declining in recent years and are currently estimated to be about 2% below 1990 levels. Traffic Noise Another type of environmental "pollution" is traffic noise. The most disruptive instances of traffic noise occur along high volume arterial roadways which carry high proportions of heavy vehicles. The City of Edmonton has an urban traffic noise policy in place to guide the mitigation of traffic noise impacts on residential areas. The policy affects existing residential locations, new residential development along arterial roadways and existing residential areas near proposed arterial roadways. At the present time only one location in the city experiences traffic noise levels, which under current policy, merits noise attenuation. Lack of funding and other priorities have left this as an unfunded item for a number of years.

SOLUTIONS IOR ThE FUTURE

23


Natural Areas

Background Introduction Context Population, Employment & Demographics Transportation Demands Environment

Finances Future Challenges

The Transportation Master Plan Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

24

Edmontonians have a long history of concern for the preservation of natural areas and the North Saskatchewan River Valley. A number of past transportation decisions have been influenced significantly by public concern for environmentally sensitive areas. Although the North Saskatchewan River valley presents a significant barrier to movement of people and goods, intrusions and impacts by new transportation facilities are limited through application of the North Saskatchewan River Valley Area Redevelopment Plan Bylaw. This bylaw was enacted out of recognition of Edmontonian's desire to preserve the river valley as a significant natural asset and an important part of the quality of life in Edmonton. Other sensitive natural areas outside the River Valley are also afforded some protection through City policies.

1.2.4

Finances

Transportation services and infrastructure account for a significant portion of Edmonton's municipal budget. Since transportation programs must compete for funds with other necessary civic services, the dollars available are often short of what is really needed. The actual amount of money available for transportation programs in any given year is affected by funding policies of the municipal, provincial and federal governments. The total annual transportation expenditure in Edmonton for 1997 was almost $246 million. The allocations to roadway and transit programs represent an investment mix of 49% for roadways and 51% for transit.

SOLUTIONS

fOR

ThE FUTURE


lir

1.3

Future Challenges 1.3.1

Growth and Demographic Changes

Edmonton's population is expected to grow from 616,300 in 1996 to about 829,00 by the year 2020 as indicated in Exhibit 5. Growth in Edmonton's neighbouring areas will give the Edmonton region a population of 1,171,000. The majority of Edmonton's growth will occur in the outlying suburban areas of the city.

Background Introduction Context Future Challenges

Exhibit 5: Population Growth in the Edmonton Region

Growth & Demographic Changes

1,170,700 1,000,000

edn10nt°11 C141111/*4

Mobility and Accessibility

900,000

Environment

829,000

862,600

Financial Demands

800,000 edin009°

700,000

The Transportation Master Plan

616,300 600,000

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

500,000

1996

2020

* CMA = Census Metropolitan Area

Similarly, Edmonton and its surrounding region are expected to experience significant employment growth over the next two decades. Although there is an expectation of some employment growth in Edmonton's Downtown and other existing employment centres, the highest employment growth will occur in suburban areas. Map 1 illustrates the geographic distribution of population and employment growth expected in Edmonton by 2020.

SOLUTIONS

fOR

ThE FUTURE

25


ACIWROtnii) The most significant demographic change to occur over the next two decades is the aging of Edmonton's population. The percentage of seniors within the overall population will increase from 9% to 14%. By contrast, the school-aged portion of the population will decrease as a proportion of the total. The aging of Edmonton's population will have implications on household size, population distribution, school and post-secondary enrolments, housing demand and travel behaviour.

Background Introduction

Exhibit 6: Demographic Changes

Context Future Challenges

50% 1971

Growth & Demographic Changes

1997

•2020

Mobility and Accessibility Environment Financial Demands

10% The Transportation Master Plan Effects of The Plan

0 Adult Workers Pre-School to Grade 12

Adult Other Post-Secondary Seniors Students

Plan Implementation

1.3.2 Mobility and Accessibility Edmonton's growth will have noticeable impacts on the transportation system. There will be more traffic on the roads, more people on buses and more pedestrians and cyclists. While the number of trips will grow roughly in line with population, trips will in future cover longer distances. As a result, the anticipated 33% growth in population will result in a 57% increase in vehicle-kilometres and a 57% increase in vehicles-hours travelled. As the city grows and spreads out, the extent of congestion on Edmonton's arterial roadways, during the typical morning rush hour, can be expected to more than triple by the year 2020. Commuters approaching downtown, the university, the river bridges, and Yellowhead Trail will experience the most serious congestion. A side effect of increased congestion will be a greater tendency for shortcutting on non-arterial roadways, particularly in older, central areas of the city.

26

501VTIONS Ion Tiff FUTURE


MAP 1 - POPULATION AND EMPLOYMENT GROWTH IN EDMONTON

LEGEND: Transportation and Utility Corridor Existing Development Future Residential Development Future Employment Development

CITY OF T. ALBERT 167 VENUE

137 AVE

COUNTY OF STRATHCONA

23 AVENUE

ELLER SUE ROAD

SOIUTIONS [OR Tiff FUTURE

27


-

-

-


Ctid

NV_ •

Background Introduction

In addition to the changes in congestion, there will be significant changes in travel patterns in Edmonton. As illustrated in Map 2, a significant proportion of trips will have suburban trip ends, while there will be a lesser proportion of trips destined to Edmonton's central areas. The major growth in trips will occur on non-radial cross-town routes, as they will be originating in and destined to suburban locations. Table 1 below illustrates the magnitude of growth for various trip patterns. Table 1:

AM Peak Hour Auto Trips

Context Future Challenges Growth & Demographic Changes Mobility and Accessibility

Movement

1997

2020

% Growth

Outer to Outer Outer to Inner/Inner to Outer Inner to Inner

66,000 72,000 48,000

110,000 97,000 49,000

65% 35% 2%

TOTAL

186,000

256,000

38%

Environment Financial Demands

The Transportation Master Plan

Note: "Outer" and "Inner" areas are as per Map 2

1.3.3

Environment

Vehicle Emissions and Air Quality

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

The expected future growth in population, employment and traffic can be expected to have an impact on vehicle emissions. Estimates of future emissions, conducted as part of the Transportation Master Plan, indicated that there will be modest growth in vehicle emissions by the year 2020. However, very recent information indicates that late model year vehicles have emission controls which are performing much better than previously thought and are therefore far less polluting over their life. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has indicated that new, more stringent vehicle emission standards will be in place by the year 2004. This new information, coupled with the ongoing research and development of fuel cell and hybrid-electric vehicle technologies point to evolving and potentially very positive results concerning future vehicle emissions. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from private vehicles in Edmonton indicate a projected increase of 12% by 2020 relative to 1990 levels. This is well above the target agreed to by the Canadian government at the Kyoto conference in December 1997. It is as yet unknown as to what strategies the Canadian government intends to pursue to meet the international commitments. The decision taken by the federal government and subsequently the Alberta government, may influence future municipal actions. Significant technological improvements and/or changes in travel behaviour may ultimately be needed to meet the new Canadian greenhouse gas emissions target.

SOLUTIONS fOR TkE FUTURE

29


Traffic Noise As traffic noise is very location and situation specific, a global estimate of traffic noise changes cannot be provided. Arterial roadways which will carry high volumes of traffic and/or a relatively high proportion of heavy vehicles will be most susceptible to increases in traffic noise in future.

Background Introduction

Changes to the arterial roadway network and the movement of heavy vehicles will require an assessment of traffic noise levels and a determination of noise attenuation needs.

Context Future Challenges Growth & Demographic Changes Mobility and Accessibility Environment Financial Demands

The Transportation Master Plan

1.3.4

Financial Demands

As Edmonton grows in population and in area, there will be a greater demand for more transportation facilities and services. In addition, there will be a growing need to maintain and repair the facilities which already exist. Expenditures for transit facilities and services will rise at a higher rate than for roadway programs due to the larger and more dispersed service area which will need to be covered by transit service. The financial commitments needed in the future will have to be considered together with the service level expectations. As noted earlier, congestion levels, community impacts and emission levels will deteriorate in the future. It will take a higher level of per capita spending on transportation by Edmontonians to reverse the deterioration in service levels.

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

30

SOIUTIONS [OR TkE FUTURE


MAP 2- MAJOR TRIP PATTERNS LEGEND: Inner Area Outer Area 1997

2020

26%

19%

*I.* Outer to Inner 38%

38%

Outer to Outer 36%

43%

IMIN* Inner to Inner

CITY OF T. ALBERT

COUNTY OF STRATHCONA

23 AVENUE

ELLERSLIE ROAD

SOLUTIONS 101? TkE FUTURE

31


-

-

-


TitANSPORTAIi,toiv d is;

1111E 11MISPORMION MVSIER KAN FOUNdATiONS FOR ThE PIAN ThE PLAN IN DETAil


-


2.1

Foundations for the Plan 2.1.1

Background

The Transportation Master Plan

Foundations for the Plan Results and Conclusions of Technical Evaluations Public Values & Preferences City Council's "Plan Direction" Strategic Goals and Supporting Policies

The Plan in Detail

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

SOLUTIONS [OR ThE FUTURE

Results and Conclusions of Technical Evaluations

To aid the development of this Plan, four distinctly different transportation policy options were developed and evaluated. The four policy options represented a wide spectrum of possible responses to Edmonton's future transportation demands. A comparative analysis of the four policy options was documented under separate cover in a report entitled "Transportation Master Plan, Possible Plan Directions". The most salient conclusions of this work are as follows: • Roadway congestion can best be relieved through aggressive arterial roadway construction and upgrading, particularly in the most congested central parts of the city. However, these gains command a high financial, community and environmental cost. • Upgrading of arterial roads is effective in reducing short-cutting pressures but may impose other undesirable impacts such as property loss, community disruption or loss of green space. • Significant, but unpopular deterrents to private vehicle use would be required to alter current travel behaviour and choices sufficiently to affect emissions. • Vehicle emission levels can be reduced, but only through significant auto-use disincentives, in combination with transit service enhancements. • Transit service enhancements, without auto-use deterrents, will not influence travel behaviour sufficiently to affect transit mode share or vehicle emissions. • Enhancements to transit service in the form of increased service frequencies will provide widespread benefits to transit patrons, while LRT extensions will benefit a narrower market in corridors served by LRT. • LRT extensions will not result in substantial city-wide shifts to transit from the auto, although extensions of LRT may offer corridor-specific benefits which merit further study. • Provision of higher transit service frequencies will require significantly higher operating budget commitments to transit, while LRT extensions will draw more heavily on capital budgets. • A denser, more compact urban form, when combined with other measures, can contribute to a reduction of trip lengths, more walking and more efficient transit operations, but the effects are marginal. • Edmontonians are strongly attached to the single-family dwelling type and can be expected to strongly resist any attempts to shift to denser urban development, either in existing neighbourhoods, or in new suburban areas.

35


2.1.2

Background

The Transportation Master Plan

Throughout the period of Plan development, a number of surveys were conducted to determine public values and attitudes about a variety of issues affecting transportation policy in Edmonton. The information derived from these surveys was very helpful, as it indicated the preferences and trade-offs that Edmontonians are prepared to make when considering their mobility in the context of other aspects of life in Edmonton. Some of the more important findings are: •

Foundations for the Plan Results and Conclusions of Technical Evaluations Public Values & Preferences

• •

City Council's "Plan Direction" Strategic Goals and Supporting Policies

Public Values and Preferences

The Plan in Detail

Maintaining or improving mobility and accessibility by car is very important to Edmontonians, but they are not prepared to pursue them at the expense of the integrity of residential neighbourhoods, or at the expense of the environment. Despite its high cost, there is strong public support for extension of Edmonton's LRT system to other parts of the city. Edmontonians have expressed strong support for improved public transit service as a means of dealing with future growth, but have little interest in demand management measures aimed at dissuading travel by car. Edmontonians realize that efficient goods movement is an important element of any transportation system. There is public support to enhance and upgrade key corridors to accommodate goods movement, if the adjacent residential neighbourhoods are appropriately protected with mitigative measures. In order to achieve improvements in mobility, Edmontonians have expressed a willingness to fund such improvements. User charges were the preferred means for paying for mobility improvements, while taxes and debt financing were least preferred.

Effects of The Plan

2.1.3

Plan Implementation

On September 9, 1997, Edmonton City Council adopted a "Plan Direction" for the Transportation Master Plan as a basis for development of the final plan. The "Plan Direction" evolved out of a desire to balance competing needs and values.

City Council's "Plan Direction"

City Council's "Plan Direction" called for the following: • • • • • • • • •

36

Emphasis on providing alternative travel choices in the face of rising vehicular congestion Emphasis on "managing" congestion, rather than eliminating it Emphasis on minimizing impact on inner city residential areas Emphasis on protecting the River Valley through continued adherence to the River Valley Bylaw Goods movement to be dealt with through selective upgrades and some new high speed facilities Greater reliance on Advanced Traffic Management Techniques and parking management Higher emphasis on rehabilitation of the growing inventory of older infrastructure Support for intensification/diversification of land development Development of a Financial Plan for implementing the Transportation Master Plan

Sat/BONS fOR 111E- FUTURE


ATATION fatiftri

2.1.4

Strategic Goals and Supporting Policies

The Transportation Master Plan advocates seven strategic goals, together with a number of related policies, as the underpinnings for transportation program delivery in Edmonton. Background

Strategic Goal A: The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan Results and Conclusions of Technical Evaluations

To develop and maintain an integrated system of roadways, public transit, pedestrian and bicycle facilities and services to support and enhance Edmonton as a growing, vibrant and culturally diverse city in which people choose to live, work, learn and play. Policy A-1

Public Values & Preferences

Provide an integrated system of roadway, public transit, pedestrian and bicycle facilities and services to accommodate the travel needs of citizens, businesses and visitors.

City Council's "Plan Direction"

Policy A-2

Strategic Goals and Supporting Policies

Develop and maintain a hierarchy of roadways which, through differing design standards, operational practices and operating conditions, recognizes and accommodates a diverse range of accessibility and mobility needs.

The Plan in Detail

Policy A-3 Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

Develop and maintain a system of public transportation facilities and services which: • •

•

complement and expand the carrying capacity of the transportation system. provide a basic and affordable level of accessibility and mobility for those who must rely on public transportation in order to access basic daily necessities such as employment, education, shopping, medical services and other basic needs. provide a competitive alternative to the automobile for access to selected high activity areas during periods of peak travel demand.

Policy A-4 Provide an appropriate system of pedestrian facilities in developed and developing areas to enable well-integrated, safe and convenient pedestrian accessibility to activities, amenities and services.

SOLUTIONS Ion TkE FUTURE

37


Policy A-5 Provide a transportation system which offers well-integrated, safe and convenient accessibility by bicycle, consistent with the principles and policies of the City of Edmonton's Bicycle Transportation Plan. Background

Policy A-6 The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan Results and Conclusions of Technical Evaluations

Provide transportation systems and services in a manner which reduces the physical barriers to accessibility and which enable mobility challenged citizens to participate more fully in all facets of life in Edmonton. Policy A-7

Public Values & Preferences

Provide transportation infrastructure and services in a manner which continues to support and enhance the Downtown's long-term viability as a pre-eminent centre of significant economic, commercial, educational and cultural activity in Edmonton.

City Council's "Plan Direction"

Policy A-8

Strategic Goals and Supporting Policies

Plan and expand the transportation system in a manner which enables network and travel continuity across boundaries with neighbouring jurisdictions.

The Plan in Detail

Effects of The Plan

Strategic Goal B:

Plan Implementation

Provide and maintain a transportation system which protects and enhances Greater Edmonton's ability to keep and attract business, investment and tourism in an increasingly competitive and global marketplace. Policy B-1 Recognize commercial transportation needs within Edmonton by: • • • • •

38

selectively upgrading key arterial roadways constructing new, strategic high speed facilities designating an appropriate network of arterial truck routes reviewing operating regulations for heavy vehicles, as appropriate apply roadway design standards which recognize commercial transportation needs

SOIOTIONS [OR TkE EIJTURE


N urt

5r

-14

Background

The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan Results and Conclusions of Technical Evaluations Public Values & Preferences City Council's "Plan Direction" Strategic Goals and Supporting Policies The Plan in Detail

Policy B-2 In partnership with other levels of government, develop the Outer Ring Road in stages, to a free-flow standard, to facilitate accessibility within the Greater Edmonton region and to enable convenient and timely access to the provincial and national highway system. Policy B-3 To facilitate convenient cross-town movement of people and goods, develop a high standard arterial Inner Ring Road which lies within city limits and uses Quesnell and Capilano bridges to cross the North Saskatchewan River. Policy B-4 Improve selected arterial roadways to permit convenient access to and between the inner and outer ring roads. Policy B-5 Preserve the ability to implement the inner and outer ring roads through appropriate and complementary land use and access management practices. Policy B-6 Develop and extend the arterial roadways and transit service to provide basic access to developing residential, commercial and industrial areas.

Effects of The Plan

Policy B-7 Plan Implementation

Develop and maintain a system of high speed transit facilities and services aimed at providing a competitive alternative to the automobile for access to the downtown and other high activity areas, during periods of high travel demand. Policy B-8 In partnership with regional neighbours and the private sector, support the provision of a good level of ground transportation service to the region's major air and rail terminals as a means of enhancing the City's and region's ability to keep and attract business, investment and tourism.

SoltaioNs loft ThE FUTURE

39


Strategic Goal C: Make effective and efficient use of the Transportation System. Policy C-1 Background

Encourage use of under-utilized transportation facilities as a means of avoiding or deferring the need for new infrastructure. The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan

Policy C-2 Update traffic signal timings and coordination on a regular and timely basis to ensure efficient and effective use of available roadway capacity.

Results and Conclusions of Technical Evaluations

Policy C-3

Public Values & Preferences

Implement traffic management and advanced traffic control measures, as and where appropriate, to optimize the use of transportation facilities.

City Council's "Plan Direction"

Policy C-4

Strategic Goals and Supporting Policies

Limit the adverse impacts of traffic incidents on the transportation system by implementing incident management measures as and where appropriate.

The Plan in Detail

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

Policy C-5 Take advantage of the carrying capacity of public transit as a means of managing high levels of demand on the transportation system, particularly in congested corridors inside the Inner Ring Road. Policy C-6 Manage the supply of on-street and off-street parking in Edmonton, as appropriate, in order to support a diverse range of needs. Policy C-7 Apply, where appropriate, new and emerging standards, practices, technologies and innovations in the delivery of transportation infrastructure and services. Policy C-8 Seek out and use abandoned or vacant rail and other rights of way for transit or non-motorized travel.

40

SOLUTIONS [OR Tiff FUTURE


Policy C-9 Support proposals for development or redevelopment of land which maximise the use of existing transportation facilities. Background

Strategic Goal D: The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan Results and Conclusions of Technical Evaluations Public Values & Preferences City Council's "Plan Direction" Strategic Goals and Supporting Policies

Mitigate the Community Impacts of the Transportation System Policy D-1 Reduce the adverse impacts of the transportation system, or improvements thereto, by including appropriate mitigation measures as integral parts of capital and operating programs. Policy D-2 Update and apply the Urban Traffic Noise Policy as necessary to address traffic noise impacts on residential and other sensitive land uses. Policy D-3

The Plan in Detail

Develop and implement measures and programs aimed at reducing the use of non-arterial residential roadways by through traffic.

Effects of The Plan

Policy D-4

Plan Implementation

Where possible, limit the development of new or upgraded arterial roadways, except as directed by City Council, to the periphery of existing communities and/or to existing transportation corridors, in order to minimize disruption to established residential areas. Policy D-5 In recognition of the susceptibility of older, centrally located neighbourhoods to population loss and a decline in their viability, limit the scope of changes to the transportation system to improvements which are aimed primarily at: •

• •

SoludoNs Ion ThE FUTURE

addressing safety concerns with measures such as intersection modifications, turn or auxiliary lane construction, traffic control changes, access control measures and sign installation or modification. facilitating access to adjacent commercial, industrial, institutional or residential land uses. facilitating the implementation of rapid transit or transit priority measures such as Light Rail Transit systems, busway systems or bus lanes.

41


Strategic Goal E: Support initiatives which encourage the reduction of transportation-induced impacts on Edmonton's natural environment.

Policy E-1

Background

The Transportation Master Plan

Foundations for the Plan

Policy E-2

Results and Conclusions of Technical Evaluations

Provide an improved range of travel choices in order to encourage travel behaviour which reduces energy consumption, vehicle emissions and environmental degradation.

Public Values & Preferences

Policy E-3

City Council's "Plan Direction" IP

Develop the transportation system in a manner which is consistent with the preservation of the North Saskatchewan River Valley and its tributaries, as per the North Saskatchewan River Valley Bylaw.

Strategic Goals and Supporting Policies

The Plan in Detail

Consider environmental impacts in the evaluation and selection of transportation system improvements. Policy E-4

Effects of The Plan

Explore the feasibility of voluntary programs aimed at reducing vehicle emissions in the greater Edmonton region, giving priority to reducing emissions from the older, high emitting vehicles.

Plan Implementation

Policy E-5 Develop and adopt operating practices which may be required to meet emerging environmental regulations or standards.

Strategic Goal F: Develop, operate and maintain the Transportation System in a safe and serviceable manner.

Policy F-1 Develop, maintain and operate the transportation system in accordance with accepted municipal, provincial and national standards and practices.

42

SCA/BONS fOR ThE FUTURE


Policy F-2 Develop, maintain and operate the transportation system in a manner which promotes and protects the safety of its users. Background

Policy F-3 The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan Results and Conclusions of Technical Evaluations Public Values & Preferences City Council's "Plan Direction" Strategic Goals and Supporting Policies

When undertaking safety-related initiatives, focus on reducing the incidence, rates and severity of traffic accidents. Policy F-4 Give high priority to the preservation, maintenance and repair of existing transportation facilities in order to avoid or defer the need for costly infrastructure replacement. Policy F-5 Use current design standards when rehabilitating transportation infrastructure, unless this has adverse impacts which outweigh potential benefits.

Strategic Goal G: The Plan in Detail

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

Monitor and respond to changing conditions by adapting the Transportation System as appropriate.

Policy G-1 Monitor travel patterns along with demographic, social, economic and technological trends to enable appropriate and ongoing assessment of transportation service and infrastructure needs. Policy G-2 Update the City's long-range transportation plan and related plans, programs and standards periodically, as a means of responding to changing needs over time.

SOLUTIONS [OR ThE FUTURE

43


2.2

The Plan in Detail

The Transportation Master Plan responds to future challenges with an approach that recognizes and addresses transportation needs in a way that reconciles many aspirations, goals and values. The main theme and thrust of the plan is to: Background

The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan

• • • • • •

Manage, rather than eliminate traffic congestion Provide a wider range of travel options Mitigate community impacts of the transportation system Keep the transportation system in good repair Support efforts and behaviours which limit environmental impacts Monitor and adapt to changing conditions

011). The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications

This Plan will moderate the extent of congestion that would otherwise occur. The Plan will not, however, reduce future congestion to current levels. The challenges presented by future growth will be dealt with in a variety of ways, through a combination of strategies. This is consistent with similar approaches being taken by many cities faced with similar, or more severe transportation problems. The approach to managing traffic growth and congestion in future will rely on the following: •

Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan

• • • •

Selective improvements to the existing arterial roadway network to facilitate cross-town movement of people and goods Selective additions to the roadway system to support new growth Provision of a reasonable range of travel choices to reduce reliance on the automobile for a greater range of trips Use of advanced traffic management and control techniques to make the best use of existing facilities Provision of a high speed transit (HST) component, as part of the public transit system, to provide a competitive alternative to the automobile

2.2.1

The Roadway Hierarchy

Urban streets perform a variety of different functions ranging from the provision of direct access to adjoining properties, to the provision of through mobility over longer distances. This range of needs is recognized as requiring different types of roads serving different purposes.

Plan Implementation

To recognize these differences in a formal way, it has become standard practice to classify roadways according to a hierarchy. A roadway hierarchy will typically reflect differences in roadway design, flow characteristics, traffic volume, traffic control, access control, vehicle type and land use considerations.

44

SOIUTiONS fOR ThE FUTURE


.„,

The Transportation Master Plan recognizes and reaffirms the need for such a roadway hierarchy. In Edmonton, a three-tiered hierarchy of roadways has been recognized and adopted as the basis for all planning, design and operations. This three tiered classification has proven itself in the Edmonton context and is therefore adopted as a fundamental element of this Transportation Master Plan.

Background

The three main classes of roadway in Edmonton are: The Transportation Master Plan

• • •

Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts

Local Roads Collector Roads Arterial Roads

Local roads provide direct access to adjacent properties. Typically, local roads are planned and designed to reflect lower operating speeds and low volumes of traffic. Normally, local roads are connected to other local roads or collector roads. In older areas where a formal road hierarchy was not put in place at the time of construction, local roads can be found to connect with arterial roads. Traffic control on local roads is typically accomplished through the use of stop or yield signs. Collector roads provide both access and through movement within a neighbourhood or area. As a consequence, collector roads typically carry higher volumes of traffic than local roads, but less traffic than arterial roads. As the label implies, collector roads "collect" traffic from local streets and feed it to the arterial road system. Arterial roads are major roadways whose primary function is to facilitate the movement of large volumes of traffic over longer distances, or from one part of the city to the other. Operating speeds on arterial roads are typically higher than on collector or local roadways. Compared to local and collector roads, arterial roads cater less to the provision of direct property access and more to the movement of traffic. Traffic control between arterial and other roads is typically accomplished by way of traffic lights or, in the case of high standard arterials, by way of grade separated intersections which remove some or all the traffic conflicts.

Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

2.2.2

High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors

The Transportation Master Plan recognizes the need for certain high standard arterial roadways to facilitate the movement of large volumes of people and goods over relatively long distances across the city. In light of growing decentralization of travel patterns, the most pressing need for such arterial facilities is for cross-town, non-centrally oriented trips. Accordingly the Plan includes the following: • • •

An Outer Ring Road An Inner Ring Loop Highway Connectors

The overall concept for Major Arterial Roadways is depicted in Map 3.

SOLUTIONS fOR TkE FUTURE

45


The Outer Ring Road

Background

The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts

The concept of an Outer Ring Road for Edmonton has been under consideration and study for over three decades. The idea has recently come to partial fruition with the construction of Anthony Henday Drive in West Edmonton. Along Edmonton's eastern flank, the existing Highway14/14X functions as the Outer Ring Road's eastern leg. The Transportation Master Plan reaffirms the need for continued development of the Outer Ring Road as an integral and ever more critical component of Edmonton's transportation infrastructure. The Outer Ring Road is to be developed within the Transportation and Utility Corridor (TUC) established by the Province of Alberta around the periphery of the City of Edmonton. The roadway is to be developed to a basic six through lane standard with additional lanes as needed for weaving and/or entry/exit movements. Ultimately, the Outer Ring Road is intended to function in a free-flow fashion, with all intersections to be grade-separated. The spacing of intersections and prevailing travel demand will influence the configuration of interchanges on the ring road and will be the subject of further review prior to implementation. The Outer Ring Road is expected to play a key role in the conveyance of people and goods within and through the greater Edmonton region. Its role in the region is to facilitate efficient access to and movement between Edmonton and the region's municipalities, thereby relieving the respective internal roadway systems of the burden of through movement. The Outer Ring Road's specific benefit to Edmonton will be its ability to provide effective and efficient access to Edmonton based industrial and commercial areas and reinforce Edmonton's position and strength as a distribution and manufacturing centre for northern Alberta. In particular, the Outer Ring Road will permit excellent access between Edmonton area industries and the provincial and national highway systems. This should enhance the ability of Edmonton area industries and businesses to access external markets with a minimum of locally induced transportation costs.

Safety Initiatives

The Inner Ring Loop Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

46

As a complement to the Outer Ring Road, the Plan recommends the development of a high standard Inner Ring Loop to cater to cross-town traffic within Edmonton city limits. The Inner Ring Loop would primarily entail the enhancement of existing arterial corridors as opposed to the development of new ones. To that end, the Inner Ring Loop would involve an upgraded Whitemud Drive, Yellowhead Trail, 170 Street and 75 Street/Capilano Drive.

5011/TIONS fOR Tiff FUTURE


MAP 3- THE MAJOR ROADWAY CONCEPT

LEGEND: mio.Rim=Lw4 Proposed Outer Ring Road immommia Constructed Outer Ring Road . Proposed Inner Ring Loop Proposed Connectors

-t* CITY OF,ST. ALBERT

/-

167 AVENUE

1

N

i

L,

i

% %

14*

/

137 AVENUE

S ,L,

'-'0.0:600

‘10.

Ma Aft ... is,4

1101

%

I I

%

ill AVE

%

COUN OF STRATHCONA A m

Mi .

,

ISTONY PLAIN ROAD

I I

A 1

LcT'

82 AVENUE f

1.* 44J 00 II° IMI I

WHITEMUD DRIVE IL < ln11.=111111111111111MMIMIIMMIMIP

I ? 1 I ), , 0 0: . . . . , . MI MI MI Ilft ..... -iv:. oi ,,,‘• ---)

i \* \

1... ..

'-._

4

li. % am

1 /

ki

-'23 AVENUE

23 AVENUE

i

NM SO

L4, 1 1

4.

SOLUTIONS [On ThE FUTURE

.\-

a A71

4.

--4

I

400.4latia-

E

woor30

A

,c

ELLERSLIE ROAD

4. 47


_


Background

The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan

The enhancements would be aimed at raising the service level of these facilities to a more free-flowing standard, where this is not already the case. At a minimum, the objective will be to provide a minimum of six through lanes and a posted speed of 70 km per hour. To achieve this objective, the City will strive to reduce the number of at-grade, signal-controlled intersections and to reduce direct access to these facilities, wherever practical. The roadways which make up the Inner Ring Loop are built to different standards and have different operating characteristics. In order for these facilities to fulfil their intended role as part of the Inner Ring Loop, they will need to undergo various modifications as described below. Whitemud Drive Whitemud Drive is currently a fully grade separated high speed arterial. However due to its location and high standard of design and operation, it is subject to high traffic demands and is showing signs of deteriorating operation, particularly in the section from 122 Street to 159 Street. As part of the development of the Inner Ring Loop, it is recommended that Whitemud Drive be widened from 122 Street to 159 Street and other selected areas in order to provide 6 through lanes throughout its entire length. In conjunction with this upgrading, it is recommended that Quesnell Bridge be widened to an eight lane facility. Yellowhead Trail The City has over the years been gradually upgrading Yellowhead Trail to a freer flowing standard. Yellowhead Trail will continue to act as a critical east-west artery in north-central Edmonton and doubles as the Yellowhead and Trans-Canada Highway. It is recommended that Yellowhead Trail be further enhanced to an ultimate free-flow standard through progressively more stringent access management practices and the progressive replacement of at-grade intersections with interchanges. 75 Street/Capilano Drive The eastern leg of the Inner Ring Loop is recommended to be on 75 Street/ Capilano Drive. While Capilano Drive is already built to a higher speed, free flowing standard, south of 116 Avenue, this is not the case for 75 Street.

Implementation

In order to raise the standard of operation of 75 Street, the roadway will initially need to be widened to six lanes from Whitemud Drive to Capilano Bridge. Subsequently, selected key intersections would be replaced with interchanges. In addition to the foregoing, a number of existing pedestrian routes across 75 Street will need to be replaced with pedestrian overpasses to maintain safe and convenient pedestrian access across the facility.

SOIUTIONS Ion TkE FUTURE

49


The upgrading of 75 Street will entail significant property acquisition particularly north of Argyll Road where sufficient right of way does not currently exist. Appropriate mitigation measures will need to be incorporated into the upgrading of the route to reduce impacts on adjacent properties. Background

170 Street The Transportation Master Plan

As the western leg of the Inner Ring Loop, 170 Street will perform a significant role in movement of people and goods in west Edmonton. The roadway acts as a key north-south route which serves traffic within west Edmonton as well as providing access to the major east-west routes to other parts of the city.

Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail

The demands placed on 170 Street, both as a cross-town route as well as by commercial site access along its length, are such that a number of modifications will be required to enhance its operational performance.

The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors

Given that the roadway is already developed to a six-lane standard, efforts to upgrade the facility will focus on reducing traffic stoppages through the construction of interchanges at key locations, coupled with the inclusion of "express lane" sections which are free of local access interruptions.

Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives

Highway Connectors In addition to the Outer and Inner Ring roads, a series of strategically located, high standard roadways will be needed to connect the Inner and Outer Ring roads together, as well as to provide good linkages between the City's roadway network and the provincial/national highway system outside Edmonton's boundaries. These Highway Connectors are integral components of the Inner and Outer Ring Road system and will need to be pursued as part and parcel of the broader major corridor concept.

Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan

I

The following City arterial roadways are deemed to be the appropriate Highway Connectors needed to support and complement the Inner and Outer Ring roads: • • • •

Plan Implementation

• • • • • • • • 50

Calgary Trail, south of Whitemud Drive Whitemud Drive, east of 75 Street and west of 170 Street Yellowhead Trail, east of Capilano Drive and west of 170 Street 50 Street, south of Whitemud Drive and north of Yellowhead Trail to Manning Drive Manning Drive, north of 137 Avenue Fort Road, north of Yellowhead Trail 97 Street, north of Yellowhead Trail St. Albert Trail, north of Yellowhead Trail 23 Avenue, west of Anthony Henday Drive Stony Plain Road/100 Avenue, west of 170 Street Terwillegar Drive Sherwood Park Freeway 50IUTION5 fOR TkE FUTURE


While all of the above named links play an important role as highway connectors, one of these links, Calgary Trail, has a particular and more unique function.

Calgary Trail .;

The Transportation Master Plan recognizes Calgary Trail, south of Whitemud Drive, as Edmonton's gateway to major destinations within and outside Alberta, both for personal and commercial travel. Calgary Trail's role as the connector to Alberta's busiest highway, Highway 2 and the City's link to Edmonton International Airport, will be protected and enhanced.

Background

The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan

The Transportation Master Plan recommends that Calgary Trail be ultimately developed to a higher speed, more free-flowing standard facility between Whitemud Drive and 23 Avenue. In light of the existing commercial development between the northbound and southbound carriageways, a system of express lanes is proposed which will enable efficient access to Highway 2, while preserving the ability to access the existing commercial land uses.

The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors

At 23 Avenue and to the south City limit, it is recommended that it be developed to full free-flow standard with strict access control and grade separated intersections at 23 Avenue, the Outer Ring Road, Ellerslie Road and 25 Avenue SW.

Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

SOILITiONS [OR TkE FUTURE

2.2.3

Arterial Roadway Network Modifications

As Edmonton grows over the next twenty years, there will be a need to serve this growth through an expanded arterial roadway grid. The modifications to the existing arterial roadway network will take shape in several different ways: • • •

Extension of arterial roads to serve new suburban areas Twinning of some existing arterial roads which are now only half-built Selected improvements to address localized access or safety issues

Extension of the Arterial Roadway Network The extension of the arterial roadway network will generally be based on maintaining a 1.6 km (one-mile) spacing between arterial roadways. Arterial extensions and the associated rights of way will be planned to a minimum of four lanes, but may in some cases demand six-lane roadways. The specific requirements will be established upon review of specific land development proposals over time. In most cases, these arterial roadways will be developed in stages, in concert with land development. In their initial stages, they will likely be developed as two-lane arterial roads with channelized intersections. As travel demands grow with population growth, these initial stage arterials will be expanded to their ultimate four or six lane standards. It is expected that these types of arterial extensions will take place in Edmonton's peripheral areas, where the vast majority of growth is expected to take place.

51


Twinning or Upgrading of Existing First Stage Arterials

Background

The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors

There are a number of arterial roadways in Edmonton which are currently built only to a first-stage standard. This means that they may now only be built to a portion of their ultimate planned standard. Examples include roads which have only the initial two of four (or six) lanes in place, or roads which are currently built to only a gravel or other rural standard. Twinning of first-stage arterials will take place on the basis of actual operational assessments, as opposed to a prescribed volume threshold or schedule.

Access or Safety-Related Arterial Roadway Modifications In addition to the above, there will be an ongoing need to adapt the existing arterial roadway network to respond to changing access requirements demanded by changes in adjacent land use, be it residential, commercial, industrial or institutional. Safety related modifications to the arterial roadway network may entail any or all of the following : • • • • • •

Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives

Intersection or alignment modifications Turn or auxiliary lane construction Traffic control changes Access control measures Sign installation or modification Lighting system modifications

Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

52

2.2.4

Traffic Management Initiatives

As Edmonton's streets become more heavily used and congested over time, there will be a growing need to turn to traffic management techniques as a means of gaining the greatest benefit from the available infrastructure. The strategies that warrant consideration in Edmonton include: • • • • • •

Upgrading of the Arterial Traffic Control System Traffic Signal Re-timing and Coordination Freeway and Ramp Traffic Management Systems Traveller Information Systems Incident Management Systems Parking Management Initiatives

SOILITIONS fOR TkE FUTURE


MON PLA Upgrading of the Arterial Traffic Control System

Background

The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Edmonton's traffic control system has performed extremely well over the twenty five year time frame that the current generation of equipment has been in service. The current generation of equipment does, however, have constraints which limit its effectiveness in coping with the more volatile traffic flow conditions which may be encountered as Edmonton's roadways become more congested in future. Over the next twenty years there will be a need to upgrade the current technology to a generation of equipment which is better able to respond to traffic conditions on a more responsive, real-time basis, where appropriate. Traffic Signal Re-timing and Coordination Program Over the last ten years, traffic signal timings and coordination have not kept pace with changes in travel patterns. This has led to a situation where portions of the arterial roadway network are no longer optimally timed or coordinated. Experience both in Edmonton and elsewhere, shows that maintaining optimum signal timings and coordination on a street network can offer substantial, low-cost benefits and efficiency gains. These benefits include: • • • • •

Smoother traffic flow and reduced congestion Reduced fuel consumption Reduced user costs for fuel and vehicle maintenance Reduced vehicle emissions Potential for fewer accidents and lower related costs

As a complement to the many other initiatives, this Plan recommends the reinstatement of an active and on-going signal re-timing and coordination program as an essential and effective way to gain as much benefit from existing roadways as possible. Freeway and Ramp Traffic Management Systems A number of Edmonton's roadways have and continue to be planned to higher operating and geometric standards. In order to protect and maintain this higher operating standard over time, it will be necessary to implement freeway and ramp traffic management measures at certain locations on Yellowhead Trail and Whitemud Drive. These measures are intended to serve the following key objectives:

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

SOLUTIONS [OR 1/FE FUTURE

• • •

Preserve or prolong the operating efficiency of the roadway Manage the effects of incidents Allow users to respond and adapt to changes in traffic conditions

53


PJ flit. Background

The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications 10

Traffic Management Initiatives

Traveller Information Systems

Traveller Information Systems are an integral part of any transportation system. In their simplest and most rudimentary form, they consist of fixed signs which provide users of the transportation system with information relevant to their trip or route of travel. More elaborate systems can advise travellers of changes such as construction disruptions, or detours. Even more sophisticated systems can provide travellers with route or trip characteristics on a real-time basis to allow travellers to respond or change their route or trip choices as they see fit, or as may be recommended by the system. Edmonton will, over the next twenty years, need to consider more sophisticated and more responsive traveller information systems than are currently in place. Incident Management Systems

Incidents, in a transportation context, include usually unforeseen events, which hamper the normal operation of the transportation system, or any of its components. These events can include accidents, stalled vehicles, a fire emergency, health emergency or a crime investigation. Any of these types of emergencies can cause impedances to the normal flow of traffic and can cause significant delays and congestion. These occurrences tend to be random and isolated events.

Providing Travel Choices

There are some locations in Edmonton where the public would benefit by being able to avoid or be able to change their travel decisions on the basis of information on incidents. This is one of the components of a good traveller information system, as noted above.

Impact Mitigation Initiatives

Parking Management Initiatives

Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Parking and parking management policies can take many different shapes and serve a wide variety of objectives. The Transportation Master Plan recommends several initiatives relating to parking issues: â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Review and updating of the Land Use Bylaw Parking Standards Review of commercial on-street parking Residential Parking Programs

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

54

The City's current Land Use Bylaw (L.U.B.) includes a number of parking related standards and requirements, many of which were developed on the basis of development and parking use data prevalent in the sixties and seventies. There have been significant changes in land development practices, parking generation rates, trip generation rates, as well as changes in car ownership rates to warrant a thorough reassessment of the L.U.B. parking provisions.

SOLUTIONS [OR ThE FUTURE


There is a particular need to review the following issues: • • • • • • •

Background

The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

SOLUTIONS [OR ThE FUTURE

Physical standards relating to changes in vehicle size Parking requirements for commercial sites Parking requirements for shared use sites Parking standards in mixed commercial-residential settings Visitor parking provisions Recreational Vehicle parking Long-term vs. short-term parking needs

The Land Use Bylaw deals only with off-street (on-site) parking requirements whereas, on-street parking is dealt with through Edmonton's Traffic Bylaw #5990. The issue of on-street parking comes into play in the context of parking demands generated by commercial establishments. Concerns over on-street parking also arise when parking demand for commercial or other nonresidential uses spills onto primarily residential streets. It is recommended that on-street parking for commercial purposes be reviewed on a case by case basis. Residential parking programs have been put in place in some parts of Edmonton as a means of protecting residential areas from the severe and chronic spill-over effects of parking generated by nonresidential uses. These effects are felt near major traffic generators such as the University of Alberta, the downtown, Commonwealth Stadium, the Coliseum and the Northlands facilities. The Transportation Master Plan recommends the continuation of this type of program based on careful assessment of each and every case. Together with the review of the Land Use Bylaw's parking provisions, the residential parking program is expected to ensure that susceptible residential neighbourhoods continue to be liveable residential areas.

2.2.5

Providing Travel Choices

Public Transportation Public Transportation is an integral and important element of Edmonton's transportation system. The Transportation Master Plan recognizes and recommends the continuation of an important role for transit, but places a sharper focus on the expectations of the public transit mode. Specifically, this Plan recognizes both the benefits and opportunities that public transit offers, but clearly acknowledges the reality that transit cannot offer those benefits universally, at all times of the day, for all trips, for all people, all over the city. The Transportation Master Plan therefore defines the role of transit in sharper, more focused terms than may have been the case in the past.

55


The Role of Public Transit in Edmonton Consistent with a clearly delineated role for public transportation, the following are recommended as the three core service objectives: Background

• The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

56

• •

Meeting the basic mobility needs of people who have no other travel alternative: basic service at reasonable cost Offering a viable and competitive alternative to private automobile transportation during peak periods of travel, in high demand corridors Expanding the carrying-capacity of the transportation system

A Basic and Reasonably Priced All-Day Transit Service In order to provide a minimum level of mobility and accessibility to Edmontonians, the Transportation Master Plan recommends the provision of a base level of public transit service. While service levels will vary during the day, a basic, minimum amount of service is to be provided with the fiscal resources made available during any given service year. The basic service may be supplemented with higher, or more customized service levels in areas, or corridors where patronage is able to support these higher service levels. High Speed Transit During the 1970's, Edmonton became the first North American city of its size to provide Light Rail Transit (LRT) service. Edmonton's LRT was developed at a time when the public, political leaders and professionals were searching for less intrusive alternatives to the extensive freeway proposals which were being advocated as solutions to Edmonton's transportation problems in the sixties and seventies. The 12.6 km LRT line provides access from Clareview to the Downtown in fourteen minutes and to the University of Alberta in twenty minutes; these travel times are similar to, if not better than, those achievable by private automobile. The presence of such high speed transit service, together with the convenience of Park'n Ride facilities at the outlying stations, enable Edmonton Transit to capture in excess of 50% of the travel market for trips originating in outer northeast Edmonton and destined to the downtown, during the morning rush hour. The Transportation Master Plan reaffirms the need to have a high speed transit service as an integral part of public transit in Edmonton.

SOLUTIONS fOR ThE FUTURE


In keeping with the commitment to provide a competitive alternative to automobile travel, the Transportation Master Plan recommends the extension of the existing LRT line deep into South Edmonton.

The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

SOLUTIONS [OR TkE FUTURE

Specifically, the LRT line would extend from its existing terminal at the University campus to Heritage Mall using the 114/113/111 Street corridor. The extension would be predominantly on surface except for a transition section south of the University Campus. Grade separations with roadways at key intersections may need to be considered in order to isolate the LRT from vehicular congestion and to maintain the travel time reliability and superiority it is intended to deliver. While LRT technology can be effective and appropriate under certain conditions, it is not always the right choice in all cases. The history of Edmonton's development, coupled with future land development trends, call into question the appropriateness of LRT expansion on a city-wide basis. The continuation of a dispersed pattern of urban development, coupled with the inherent rigidity of rail technology in this environment, have prompted a search for other alternatives. A preliminary review has identified "busways", modelled after Ottawa-Carleton's "transitway" system, as a potentially viable alternative to LRT. A "busway" system is essentially a rubber-tire based high speed transit system consisting of a dedicated, grade-separated roadway for buses. Successful implementations of busways are characterised by rigorous dedication and application of segregated, high speed, conflict free bus operation and service. A well implemented "busway" system has the ability to offer the following benefits: • • • • • • • •

Superior travel speeds; 45km/hr on average; up to 80km/hr maximum Travel times from suburban Edmonton to downtown of 15-20 minutes (competitive with LRT and private automobile) Ridership levels similar to LRT Fewer transfers than LRT Ability to handle a wide variety of transit services (express service, skip-stop or semi-express service, full-stop service etc.) Flexibility to accommodate shifts in travel patterns Lower capital and operating costs than LRT Busways can serve as precursors to future LRT

A preliminary analysis of a busway system indicates that the above noted benefits can be achieved in Edmonton, provided that the factors needed for success are rigorously pursued and adhered to, from planning through to implementation and operation.

57


In light of the apparent benefits of a bus-based high speed transit system the Transportation Master Plan recommends a rigorous comparison of LRT and busway systems for sections of the City which have not been explicitly identified for LRT expansion. Map 4 identifies the Transportation Master Plan's recommended High Speed Transit concept encompassing both LRT and busway options as previously discussed.

Background

The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications

Map 5 illustrates the combination of the major roadway corridors and potential high speed transit corridors. The major roadway corridors will tend to serve the growing number of more dispersed cross-town trips. The high speed transit facilities will penetrate the area inside the Inner Ring Loop and serve more concentrated, centrally oriented travel patterns focused on the downtown and the university; these are markets which are well suited to public transit.

Other Public Transportation Initiatives In addition to the foregoing, a number of other measures are seen as contributing to a broader range of travel choices for Edmontonians. These include: â&#x20AC;˘

In selected corridors, it may be productive to provide higher service frequencies as a means of enhancing the attractiveness of the transit option in some corridors. The key to providing these enhancements is to provide them selectively, where they have realistic potential for attracting ridership. These selective service enhancements could be implemented on a trial basis and should be subject to strict performance measures.

Traffic Management Initiatives 1-

Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Selected Service Frequency Improvements

â&#x20AC;˘

Transit Priority Measures - Giving Transit a Head Start Traditional transit service is at an inherent disadvantage relative to the car because of transit's need to stop to pick-up and drop-off passengers. Adding to this, is the fact that buses are susceptible to congestion just like any other vehicle on the road. Over time, as congestion builds up, transit service degrades, thereby making it an even less attractive option for time-conscious travellers. There are a number of transit priority measures which can be undertaken to reduce transit travel time and to preserve schedule reliability.

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

58

Bus-Only Lanes are traffic lanes which are reserved for exclusive use by transit vehicles. These lanes, of which there are a number of examples already in place, allow transit vehicles to operate free of interference or congestion from general traffic.

SOLUTIONS 101? TkE FUTURE


MAP 4- THE HIGH SPEED TRANSIT CONCEPT

LEGEND: Existing L.R.T. Corridor A73:, tizamma, Proposed High Speed Transit Possible L.R.T. Extension Proposed L.R.T. Extension

s's

CITY OW ALBERT

III AVE

STRATHCONA COUNTY STONY PLAN ROAD

WHITEMUD DRIVE

TbAN

;23 AVENUE

Ti AVENUE

U.

ELI TATE U USED

SOLUTIONS 102 TkE FUTURE

59


-

-

-


MAP 5- THE TRANSPORTATION MASTER PLAN CONCEPT

LEGEND: Proposed Outer Ring Road Proposed Inner Ring Loop and Connectors ...iv* Existing L.R.T. Corridor 4•' Possible L.R.T. Extension Proposed High Speed Transit Proposed L.R.T. Extension

cL7,

-t* T

CITY OF

ALBERT

•• • • • • •

V

ma ley :000

to. .0 I"'

ll A VE

ONY PLAIN 110AD *

1 LI 8, ENUE mom

O.Nn E MUD DRIVE

.--nr

..4

• • Os

amm mom NM

1,2

4

110,001

WM mom PM EL_

''1;;'1Y1;:11% 4.1 a..

23 AVENUE

El I LESLIE ROAD

50IUTIONS fOR TkE FUTURE

61


-

-

-


TION MASTER PLAN Transit-activated Signals are traffic signals which are activated by transit vehicles. These signals are provided in situations where there is not a consistent need for a full traffic signal, or in situations where there is a desire to reduce the delay experienced by transit vehicles waiting to enter a congested roadway. Background

Queue Jump Signals are specially configured traffic signals which are intended to give transit a jump or head start relative to other traffic. These signals are usually installed together with a section of bus lane at the near side of an intersection. The bus lane allows a transit vehicle to reach the front of a traffic queue, while the signal allows the transit vehicle to proceed through the intersection in advance of the other traffic. In congested conditions, this provides transit vehicles with distinct travel time benefits as well as the ability to maintain their schedule even in congested conditions.

The Transportation Master Plan

Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan

The above measures all have a place in an integrated transportation system and are recommended for use in Edmonton as and where appropriate. â&#x20AC;˘

Access to Transit Service: Extending the Reach of Transit

An effective public transportation system is more than just buses and trains and their stops. It is often taken for granted that transit stops are in and of themselves destinations which must be reached by transit patrons before they can use the transit service. The choice to travel by public transit can be affected by the trip to/from the transit stop. It is therefore important to ensure that thought is given not only to the in-vehicle portion of a transit trip, but also to the portion of the trip involving access to the stop or station. In an effort to extend the reach of transit and improve access to transit service, the Transportation Master Plan recommends provision of: New Transit Centres - As the city grows, additional transit centres will be needed to accommodate passengers needing to transfer from one bus to another Park'n Ride Facilities- Secure vehicle parking facilities at outlying transit centres to allow vehicular access to transit service Bike'n Ride Facilities - Secure, weather protected bicycle parking at major transit centres to permit access to transit service by bicycle

Plan Implementation

Bikes on Buses - Provision of on-bus racks on selected bus routes to permit bicycle access to/from bus service and thereby extend the reach of transit beyond normal walking distances Sidewalks to Transit Stops - Well-maintained sidewalk connections to bus stops, transit centres and LRT stations

SOLUTIONS [OR Tiff FUTURE

63


â&#x20AC;˘

Information Services

Provision of improved customer information through the application of technological advancements and innovations. â&#x20AC;˘

Background

In fulfilling its role and mandate to provide public transportation services, Edmonton Transit maintains an ongoing marketing program aimed at keeping the public informed about services, fares and schedules.

The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan

In keeping with the transit service initiatives recommended by this Plan for the next 20 years, the following guidelines relating to the marketing of public transportation services are offered:

The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy

Marketing and promotional campaigns should strive to more explicitly differentiate between the different services offered by Edmonton Transit.

High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors

Marketing and promotional materials should highlight and draw attention to Edmonton Transit's high quality/high speed services such as LRT, possible future busway service, express bus and limited-stop services, as well as the more community-oriented small bus services.

Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives

Marketing campaigns should be planned, designed and targeted at identified and discrete segments of Edmonton Transit's markets, both existing and prospective.

Providing Travel Choices

Marketing resources should be focused on the core areas of the business, being careful not to overextend these resources.

Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Marketing of Transit Service

â&#x20AC;˘

Transit Fare Strategies

A number of fare strategies are suggested for consideration : A move towards more advanced fare collection technologies to enable greater flexibility in fare setting, reduction of fare evasion, gathering of travel data and the use of transit fares as a promotional lever

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

Consideration of more flexible fare payment options such as weekly or seasonal passes, as well as consideration of family passes Consideration of promotional pricing which may be aimed at certain market segments, times of the day, or even towards certain geographic areas; the centre-free LRT program is a good example of such a price promotion A review of concession fare setting policy, with a view to reducing inequities and rationalizing the basis for fare concessions

64

SOIUTIONS Ion

ThE

FUTURE


crjr*I..

Background

The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors

Accessibility Initiatives An analysis of travel in Edmonton reveals that a substantial proportion of trips in Edmonton are very short and well within walking or cycling distance. At the same time, the same data shows that a relatively high proportion of these trips are made by car. It is expected that growth in Edmonton over the next twenty years will continue in a dispersed fashion with similarly dispersed travel patterns. This will tend to make the average trip longer. Edmonton's future population will have a larger proportion of people who will be faced with coping with barriers to travel that are built into current infrastructure such as missing sidewalks, sidewalks in poor condition, high curbs at intersections, high-step buses, or dimly lit streets. In an effort to address the accessibility needs of a changing population, as well offering travel choices for shorter trips, a number of initiatives are proposed: â&#x20AC;˘

Arterial Roadway Network Modifications

This program is aimed at reducing the barriers to accessibility for people. While originally motivated by a desire to aid disabled individuals, the para-ramp program has come to be of service to a much wider cross-section of Edmonton's population such as seniors, children, or adults pushing strollers. The completion date for this program is aimed to coincide with the full conversion of Edmonton Transit's vehicle fleet.

Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Completion of the para-ramp construction program by the year 2008

â&#x20AC;˘

Complete conversion of the Edmonton Transit fleet to low floor buses by the year 2008 to coincide with completion of the para-ramp completion program. This program is intended to make the mainstream public transit system more readily accessible for people who have difficulty navigating the traditional high-step buses. As with the para-ramp program, the conversion of the transit fleet will benefit a wide variety of people, far beyond those with physical disabilities.

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

SOIUTIONS fOR TkE FUTURE

65


The existing LRT system was planned and built to be fully wheelchair accessible. The operational experience gained over the twenty years of service has indicated that the elevation differences between LRT platforms and LRT vehicles vary as a function of the passenger loads on trains. In some cases, the elevation differences are too large for wheelchair-bound passengers to overcome. In addition, these elevation differences present potential tripping hazards which could lead to falls and injury. Consistent with the other initiatives recommended by the Transportation Master Plan, Edmonton Transit will pursue a conversion of all LRT vehicles to address both the accessibility barrier and safety issue relating to the elevation difference between LRT vehicles and LRT station platforms.

Background

The Transportation Master Plan Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors

Construction of missing sidewalk connections in developed areas of the city The City of Edmonton is involved, on an ongoing basis, in retrofitting missing sidewalk links in developed portions of the city as these links were not developed as part of the original infrastructure when the land was originally developed. This presents an ongoing need to construct missing sidewalks in developed parts of the city. The Transportation Master Plan recommends continuation of this program as a means of providing the greater array of travel choices, particularly for shorter trips to local amenities.

Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives

Conversion of Light Rail Vehicles to improve Accessibility and Safety

A high standard of sidewalk and walkway availability in new subdivisions As noted above, the practice of limited sidewalk or walkway construction in new urban development can in the long run present the city with an ongoing liability that can be avoided. In the spirit of affording a wider range of travel choices, particularly in regards to shorter trips, this Plan recommends the provision of sidewalks and walkways in developing areas to a standard which ensures convenient and direct pedestrian access to local neighbourhood amenities such as stores, schools, banks, churches, community halls, as well as neighbourhood transit stops.

Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan

• Plan Implementation

Use of abandoned rail or other rights of way for non-motorized travel initiatives As outlined in the Bicycle Transportation Plan approved in 1992, the City has and will evaluate the development of a linear trail system in the C.N.R. and C.P.R. rail corridors on an opportunity basis. Utility and pipeline rights of way in residential areas will be developed with a multi-use trail facility and naturalized landscaping. While some of the corridors would have limited effectiveness as a transportation facility, they may have some local recreation and accessibility functions.

66

5011/TIONS [OR IIIE FUTURE


Development of these corridors is consistent with much of the Community Greenways Project put forward in 1997. This citizen-led initiative proposes a network of multi-use trails and green corridors throughout the city. â&#x20AC;˘

Background

The Transportation Master Plan

Providing connections between the street system and the river valley multi-use trail system The river valley trail system is unique in that it serves as a convenient transportation route for many people wishing to walk or cycle to their destination. Unfortunately, access to the trail system is not as convenient as it could be. It is therefore recommended that efforts be made to improve connections into the river valley multi-use trail system from the street system above the river valley.

Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

SCATIONS [OR TkE FUTURE

2.2.6

Impact Mitigation Initiatives Residential Street Traffic Calming As Edmonton's population grows, arterial roadways will come under greater pressures, particularly during rush hours. This can be expected to lead to greater traffic shortcutting pressures on some residential neighbourhoods. The communities which are most susceptible are those in the central part of Edmonton on approaches to the downtown or the University of Alberta campus area. Some of these neighbourhoods have already experienced these pressures and the City has responded by implementing traffic calming measures to reduce the volume and speed of external, shortcutting traffic. The Transportation Master Plan supports these ongoing initiatives and foresees a heightened demand for them in the future. While there are many traffic calming measures available to address shortcutting and related issues on local streets, it should be understood that their implementation will present some level of inconvenience to local residents. Experience has shown that the trade-off made by people between reduction of shortcutting traffic and an increase in inconvenience, does vary from community to community and that a cookie-cutter approach is unlikely to lead to satisfactory results. For that reason, the City recommends a flexible approach, which allows significant community involvement in the selection of a set of appropriate traffic calming measures.

67


Arterial Traffic Noise Abatement

The City of Edmonton's current Urban Traffic Noise Policy has been in effect since the early 1980's and has dealt effectively with traffic noise along several arterial corridors. The experience gained through its application, together with greater public concerns over traffic noise, has however, revealed a need to review the policy.

Background

The Transportation Master Plan

The policy review should examine the noise level thresholds defined to trigger certain actions by the City, as well as deal with certain locational situations, which are not currently well addressed.

Foundations for the Plan

Recommendations which flow from this review may affect the City's future approach to addressing traffic noise issues and may affect the priority of urban traffic noise abatement initiatives.

The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications

2.2.7

Reducing Environmental Impacts

Protection of the North Saskatchewan River Valley

Traffic Management Initiatives

The goals, policies and programs recommended by the Transportation Master Plan respect and abide by the North Saskatchewan River Valley Area Redevelopment Plan (Bylaw No. 7188). The key transportation policies of this plan state that:

Providing Travel Choices

Impact Mitigation Initiatives

• Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

New transportation corridors will not be approved except for direct River and direct Ravine crossings which are deemed essential and approved by City Council Existing and future transportation facilities will be reviewed with the objective to eliminate, minimize or mitigate the negative effects of the facilities through design and landscaping measures Proposals for the upgrading of approved transportation corridors and attendant facilities be subject to an environmental screening assessment and that the identified impacts be eliminated, minimized or mitigated through design and landscaping measures

Effects of The Plan

Conservation of Natural Sites

Plan Implementation

The Transportation Master Plan respects the City's Policy on Conservation of Natural Sites in Edmonton's Table Lands which is aimed at preserving environmentally sensitive and significant natural areas when municipal works are contemplated.

68

5011/TiONS fOR TkE FUTURE


Air Quality and Vehicle Emissions In developing an approach towards addressing the issue of air quality and vehicle emissions, the following factors and state of knowledge were considered: Background

• The Transportation Master Plan

Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail

• •

The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors

Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts

Environmental legislation and regulation is within provincial and federal jurisdiction Air quality in Edmonton has improved over the last five years and remains high The direct linkages between vehicle emission levels, air quality and human health effects are poorly understood, but subject to ongoing research, particularly with respect to particulates Substantial technological improvements to reduce fuel consumption and vehicle emissions have occurred over the last twenty years. Substantial, further improvements in vehicle technology are on the horizon, which will reduce fuel consumption and emissions even further The City of Edmonton has, through the work carried out as part of the Transportation Master Plan, developed a leading edge capability to determine vehicle emission levels from private vehicle use and is well positioned to assess what actions are needed to respond to any new regulations. Work is ongoing to develop similar capabilities for estimation of commercial vehicle emissions Significant, but unpopular deterrents to private vehicle use would be required to alter current travel behaviour and choices sufficiently to affect emissions

In light of the foregoing, the Transportation Master Plan recommends a cautious, but pro-active approach which focuses on a traffic management approach, supplemented by positive initiatives that offer options for less environmentally damaging travel behaviour. These initiatives are described throughout sections 2.2.4 and 2.2.5.

Safety Initiatives

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

SOLUTIONS fOR ThE FUTURE

The international agreement on greenhouse gas reductions signed by Canada in December 1997 may result in mandated, but as yet unknown actions in future. Greenhouse gas emissions from private vehicle use in Edmonton represent a small proportion of total greenhouse gas emissions. If reductions in greenhouse gases are mandated, the City of Edmonton will, through the work conducted as part of the Transportation Master Plan, be well positioned to consider a number of options. It should be understood however, that while the Plan recommends a number of positive initiatives to manage future traffic loads, these will in all likelihood not be sufficient to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to levels mandated by the Kyoto Protocol.

69


The Transportation Demand Management Study, conducted as part of the Transportation Master Plan, offers a number of potential strategies which could be considered as a means of reducing emissions. Among the strategies which may prove helpful are: • • • •

Background

The Transportation Master Plan

Parking pricing Parking supply management Land use planning measures Higher fuel charges

If and when such measures are contemplated, considerable cooperation and coordination of initiatives will be needed between federal, provincial and municipal agencies, together with the private sector.

Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications

2.2.8

The Transportation Master Plan reaffirms Edmonton's strong commitment to a safe transportation system. In addition to the many initiatives already mentioned, the City will continue to pursue safety by implementing the following on an ongoing, as warranted basis: • • . . . • •

Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

Safety Initiatives

2.2.9

Risk identification Roadway modifications Signage modifications Traffic control modifications Pedestrian facility modifications Lighting modifications Enhanced security systems

Infrastructure Rehabilitation and Maintenance

The current condition and future maintenance requirements of the City's transportation infrastructure pose a significant challenge for the City of Edmonton. As of 1995, approximately 70% of Edmonton's arterial and collector roads were in fair to poor condition. Given these conditions and current levels of funding for rehabilitation, the City can expect to accumulate a significant inventory of roads in need of rehabilitation, but more significantly, a significant inventory of roads needing complete reconstruction. Experience in Edmonton shows that every dollar spent on rehabilitation can prevent up to five dollars in reconstruction costs. In addition to its inventory of roads, the City of Edmonton is responsible for over 150 structures, including bridges, grade separations, rail grade separations, pedestrian overpasses, tunnels and large diameter culverts. These facilities are estimated to have an asset value (based on replacement cost) of over $415 million.

70

SOIUTIONS [OR 1/FE FUTURE


The current average age of these structures is twenty six years. Approximately 11% of the inventory is older than the typical 50 year bridge design life. Over the next fifteen years, this will rise to about 34%.

Background

In order to address the significant backlog of rehabilitation needs and to avoid an unmanageable inventory of roads needing reconstruction, the following strategies are recommended:

The Transportation Master Plan

Pavement Investment Strategy

Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail

The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors

• •

Arterial Roadway Network Modifications

Traffic Management Initiatives

An aggressive rehabilitation program should be undertaken over the next five years to clear up the existing backlog of rehabilitation needs and prevent any growth in the inventory of roads needing costly reconstruction. Beyond the five year time frame, the City should commit and maintain an elevated level of funding for the ongoing rehabilitation of the City's arterial/collector roadway network. A twelve to fifteen year rehabilitation cycle should be maintained and funded for the arterial/collector roadway network. An ongoing crack sealing program should be maintained to enable the City to sustain the twelve to fifteen year rehabilitation cycle noted above. The existing pavement monitoring and condition rating program should be maintained and enhanced as a means of better assessing and adjusting rehabilitation needs and priorities. The City should strive for a Pavement Quality Index (PQI) in the 6.0 to 7.0 range, subject to public acceptability.

Providing Travel Choices

Bridge Investment Strategy

Impact Mitigation Initiatives

Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives

Infrastructure Rehabilitation

• Effects of The Plan

A Bridge Investment Strategy should be completed in order to identify a cost-effective means of preserving and extending the service life of Edmonton's bridges and other strategic structures. The Bridge Investment Strategy should incorporate life-cycle costing and value engineering principles. Consistent with practices advocated by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Edmonton should strive for an annual bridge maintenance, rehabilitation and replacement program valued at 2% of the asset replacement value. A growing inventory of the City's bridges and structures will require major rehabilitation or re-decking. Amongst the structures which will require this type of work are:

Plan Implementation

- Quesnell Bridge - Whitemud Drive/156 Street - Beverly Bridge - Capilano Bridge - James MacDonald Bridge - Groat Bridge - Rainbow Valley Bridge

5011/TIONS fOR ThE FUTURE

71


ION MASTER PLAN â&#x20AC;˘

Background

The Transportation Master Plan

A number of bridges and structures will require outright replacement over the next twenty years. Amongst the more prominent structures which must be replaced are: - Walterdale Bridge - Clover Bar Bridge - 102 Avenue Bridge (over Groat Road) - Latta Bridge (Jasper Avenue/91 Street) - Wellington Bridge (102 Ave/Wellington Crescent)

Foundations for the Plan The Plan in Detail The Roadway Hierarchy High Standard Arterial Roadway Corridors Arterial Roadway Network Modifications Traffic Management Initiatives Providing Travel Choices Impact Mitigation Initiatives Reducing Environmental Impacts Safety Initiatives Infrastructure Rehabilitation

Effects of The Plan Plan Implementation

72

SOINTONS [OR ThE FUTURE


fklk-i/WfitTATION LAN

EFFECTS OF THE PLANI Mobility ENVIRONMENT COMMUNITy IMpACTS FiNANCIAE IMpACTS


-

3.1

Mobility 3.1.1

Movement of People

If Edmonton continues its current transportation investment practices, Edmontonians should expect significantly greater congestion and degradation of their mobility.

Background The Transportation Master Plan

The work leading up to the preparation of this Plan has indicated that Edmonton will have a more congested transportation system in future, regardless of the policy directions that are pursued. It is not realistic to expect Edmonton to be a larger and less congested city in 2020 than it is in 1997. The Plan Direction upon which this plan is based, recognizes this reality and advocates an approach which manages, rather

Effects of The Plan Mobility

than eliminates congestion. Movement of People

The policies, strategies and initiatives of the Plan are very successful at managing Edmonton's future congestion. In fact, the Plan achieves significant reductions in congestion relative to the course being currently pursued.

Movement of Goods

Environment

As indicated in Exhibit 7, the Plan is able to reduce the extent of severe rush hour congestion from 8.3 % to 4.4 % of AM peak hour vehicle-km; this represents a 47% improvement.

Community Impacts Financial Impacts

Plan Implementation

Exhibit 7:

Exhibit 8:

Extent of Arterial Network Severely Congested in AM Peak Hour

Extent of Arterial Network Severely Congested in AM Peak Hour in Inner Area 12% 10%

8% 6% 4% 2% 0 1997

2020 Trend

SOIUTIONS [OR TkE FUTURE

2020 IMP

1997

2020 Trend

2020 IMP

75


Within the inner area of the city, that is the area inside the Inner Ring Loop, the Plan offers significant improvements as well. Edmonton's inner area will experience the greatest increase in severe congestion, rising from a current level of 1.8% to over 12% of vehicle-kilometres in the AM peak hour by 2020. The Plan will reduce this level of congestion by 46% to 6.6% of vehicle-kilometres in the AM peak hour. Background The Transportation Master Plan

Effects of The Plan

The Plan offers additional benefits which are not evident when attention is focused only on congestion measures. The growth and demographic changes facing Edmonton will tend to make mobility by public transit a substantial challenge in the future. The Transportation Master Plan meets that challenge by providing transit service enhancements that allow public transportation to hold its own, overall, and to gain significant ground in some selected, but key markets.

Mobility Movement of People Movement of Goods

The significant increase in transit's share of centrally oriented travel indicates that the Plan is able to make transit a more viable option for Edmontonians destined to the university area and the downtown. The congestion relief provided by the Plan, both city-wide and within the inner area, is achieved through three key elements of the plan working in a complementary manner:

Environment Community Impacts Financial Impacts

Plan Implementation

First, the Inner Ring Loop is able to provide significant mobility benefits for the large growth in traffic in the areas outside the Loop and enables that traffic to remain outside the central area which it does not need to access. The second key element, the Outer Ring Road allows for good cross-town and regional mobility for the more outlying growth areas and works in tandem with the Inner Ring Loop to address suburban and regional traffic growth. The third key element is the High Speed Transit component of the Plan. As mentioned, this element of the plan serves the key central areas of the city and helps to improve mobility to the central area in the face of higher vehicular congestion. The ability to provide an improved level of mobility to the central area is very supportive of other initiatives aimed at enhancing and sustaining the viability and vitality of Edmonton's downtown, and its surrounding residential and commercial areas.

76

SOILITIONS [OR ThE FUTURE


Exhibit 9: Transit Share of Daily Trips to all destinations

10% 8%

Background

6%

The Transportation Master Plan

Effects of The Plan

4%

- -

2%

- -

Mobility

0 Movement of People Movement of Goods

Environment Community Impacts Financial Impacts

1997

2020 Trend

2020 IMP

Exhibit 10: Transit Share of AM Peak Hour Trips to Downtown (Work and PSE*)

38% 37% 36%

Plan Implementation

35%

- - -

34% —

- - -

33% 1997

2020 Trend

2020 IMP

1997

2020 Trend

2020 IMP

Exhibit 11: Transit Share of AM Peak Hour Trips to University (Work and PSE*)

50% 48% 46% 44% 42% — 40%

* PSE = Post Secondary Education SOLUTIONS

IOR ThE FUTURE

77


There are a number initiatives in the Plan aimed at making non-motorized travel a more viable option for shorter trips. As with transit service, a number of trends are under way which will make trips longer, on average, in the future and render walking a less viable travel mode. However, the Plan is through the proposed initiatives, able to arrest and modestly reverse the decline in the walking and cycling share of the travel market.

Background The Transportation Master Plan

Exhibit 12: AM Peak Hour Walk/Cycle Share of Travel to Work & PSE 6%

Effects of The Plan

5.5% Mobility

0°

Movement of People Movement of Goods

5% 4.5% 4%

Environment Community Impacts

3.5% 1997

Financial Impacts

2020 Trend

2020 TMP

3.1.2 Movement of Goods Plan Implementation

The policies and strategies recommended in this Transportation Master Plan recognize the importance of the movement of goods in the Edmonton region. The proposed improvements to the roadway network will offer significant benefits to commercial traffic serving the Edmonton area. As commercial traffic makes extensive use of the primary highway network, reduction in congestion on this portion of the roadway network is a good indicator of the Plan's performance relative to goods movement. The Plan is able to provide a 40% improvement in congestion on the primary highway network by lowering the extent of congestion from 9.4% to 5.6% of vehicle-kilometres on the Primary Highway Network. Exhibit 13: Extent of Congestion on Primary Highways 10% 8% 6% 4% 2% 0 1997 78

2020 Trend

2020 IMP SofillioNs Ion TkE FUTURE


3.2

Environment 3.2.1

Vehicle Emissions and Air Quality

The expected future growth in population, employment and traffic can be expected to increase most vehicle emissions in the Edmonton region modestly. As indicated in Exhibit 14, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides from private vehicle travel are estimated to increase, while reactive hydrocarbons are expected to decrease. On a per capita basis, emissions will decline substantially through the Plan period as indicated in Exhibit 15.

Background The Transportation Master Plan

Effects of The Plan

The projected increases in emissions are well below the population growth rate and the growth in vehicle-kilometres. The emissions estimates do not take into account the expected new vehicle emission standards mentioned in section 1.3.3. Current information suggests that these standards will, despite growth in population and vehicular travel, allow emission of local air pollutants to remain near 1990 levels through to the year 2020.

Mobility Environment Vehicle Emissions & Air Quality Impacts on the North Saskatchewan River

The current high quality of Edmonton's air, coupled with the prospects of little or no major increases in local air pollutants from private vehicle travel, bodes well for Edmonton's air quality in the future.

Community Impacts

Emissions of greenhouse gases will be higher than 1990 levels with implementation of the Plan, unless vehicle technologies or travel behaviour changes sufficiently to reduce fuel consumption and/or the amount of vehicle use. If Council chooses to, or is mandated by other levels of government, the City will be well positioned to respond with demand management measures that will work in harmony with the variety of travel choice opportunities offered by this Plan.

Financial Impacts

Plan Implementation

Exhibit 14:

Change in Daily Vehicle Emissions in Edmonton CMA (1990 - 2020)

80% 70% cr)

60%

2 50%

20% 10% 0 -10% Population Veh.-KM Carbon Dioxide SOLUTIONS fOR ThE FUTURE

Carbon Reactive Nitrogen Monoxide Hydrocarbons Oxides 79


Exhibit 15:

Change in Per Capita Emissions (1990 - 2020) CO2

CO

RHC

NO,

0 Background

-10% The Transportation Master Plan

-20%

Effects of The Plan

-30%

Mobility

-40% Environment Vehicle Emissions & Air Quality Impacts on the North Saskatchewan River

3.2.2

Impacts on the North Saskatchewan River Valley

The proposals recommended by the Transportation Master Plan respect the provisions of the North Saskatchewan River Valley Bylaw. The Plan does not include any transportation system improvements within the river valley or ravine system.

Community Impacts Financial Impacts

Plan Implementation

80

The Plan does recommend two new River crossings for the Outer Ring Road crossings. There is the potential for a third crossing of the River in the vicinity of the Walterdale Bridge, to accommodate a possible busway crossing. These river crossings will all require environmental impact assessments, as and when these facilities are programmed for implementation. These impact studies will identify any impacts and make appropriate recommendations for addressing them.

SOIUTIONS fOR Tiff FUTURE


3.3 Community Impacts

Background The Transportation Master Plan

Effects of The Plan

The approach which City Council adopted for development of this Transportation Master Plan was founded on a desire to keep community impacts at a minimum and to mitigate those impacts which cannot reasonably be avoided. Upon approval of the Transportation Master Plan, a series of facility planning studies will need be undertaken to develop more detailed plans of the recommended proposals. These facility planing studies will enable the more precise determination of impacts and the development of project specific mitigation strategies. This section provides a global overview of the kinds of impacts that should be anticipated. The recommended Transportation Master Plan will, by and large, keep community impacts to a minimum. Table 2 provides a summary of expected impacts with and without this Plan.

Mobility

Table 2:

Summary of Community Impacts

Environment Community Impacts

ISSUE

1997

2020 "Trend"

2020 TMP

Traffic Shortcutting

Traffic Shortcutting

Isolated occurrences near congested corridors, in older central areas.

Potential for much greater incidence of shortcutting in older central areas.

Potential for a moderately greater incidence of shortcutting in older central areas.

Neighbourhood Severance

Some isolated severance effects

Some isolated severance effects

Potential for moderate increase in severance effects in some areas

Little of no property loss

Property losses to accommodate Inner Ring Loop and High Speed Transit.

Traffic Noise Community Severance Effects Property Loss Financial Impacts

Plan Implementation

Loss of Property

3.3.1

Traffic Shortcutting

As noted in the discussion of the Plan's mobility benefits, congestion in Edmonton will be reduced significantly by the implementation of this Plan, relative to the "Trend" scenario. By keeping congestion in check, by committing to ongoing traffic calming and by supporting residential parking programs, the Transportation Master Plan will reduce shortcutting pressures, which would otherwise be imposed on some of Edmonton's centrally located residential communities.

SOIUTIONS [OR TkE FUTURE

81


3.3.2

Traffic Noise

Traffic noise is dependent on many site specific factors that are well outside the scope of the strategic nature of this Transportation Master Plan. A rigorous, global measure of the traffic noise impact of this Plan cannot be provided. However, a general, qualitative indication of traffic noise impacts can be provided.

Background The Transportation Master Plan

Effects of The Plan Mobility Environment

Many of the initiatives recommended in this Plan will result in little or no change in traffic noise levels. There are, however, instances where the changes proposed by the Plan may result in traffic noise becoming an issue to be addressed. Corridors where there is a potential for change in the composition of the traffic flow and specifically the amount of heavy vehicles in the traffic stream, may experience changes in traffic noise that must be mitigated through noise abatement measures. The proposals of this Plan which may be candidates for such noise abatement measures are the Inner Ring routes, the High Speed Transit system, as well as some arterial roads.

Community Impacts Traffic Shortcuttin Traffic Noise Community Severance Effects Property Loss

Financial Impacts

Plan Implementation

The recommended updating of the City's Urban Traffic Noise Policy will provide an opportunity to put in place, a reasonable and updated set of criteria and standards for noise abatement, that take into account the proposals contained in this Transportation Master Plan.

3.3.3

Community Severance Effects

Community severance effects can generally be characterized as conditions which may inhibit or significantly reduce the interactions of people within a neighbourhood or community. The construction of new arterial roads within a pre-existing developed area may change the extent of the interactions between people in the area by acting as a barrier. The Transportation Master Plan is sensitive to the community severance issue and has, through its various recommendations, introduced little or no new instances of such impacts. The expansion of the transportation system has been kept primarily to existing corridors and rights of way. In Edmonton's older, central areas there is no major roadway expansion proposed. However, the introduction of High Speed Transit facilities in selected corridors, as recommended by this Plan, may introduce some barrier effects along these corridors, particularly in the central parts of Edmonton where right of way is constrained. The upgrading of arterial roadways on the Inner Ring Loop may also involve similar issues where road widening will be required along residential portions of the route. In areas where transportation facilities are expanded, community severance effects can and will be addressed through the implementation phases of these facilities by ensuring that pedestrian and vehicular connectivity is maintained. Aesthetic measures and techniques can also be applied to diminish any visual aspects of community severance. The specific treatments will vary by facility and likely by community, as community preferences tend to differ.

82

SOIUTIONS [OR TkE FUTURE


3.3.4

Background The Transportation Master Plan

Effects of The Plan

Property Loss

Some of the recommendations of this Plan will result in the need to acquire some properties, to implement the proposals. As detailed functional plans have as yet not been prepared, precise estimates of the number and location of affected properties cannot be provided. The eastern leg of the Inner Ring Loop may be the corridor where the greatest need for property is expected. The additional right of way will be needed to enable the widening of 75 Street to six lanes. There may be other, more isolated requirements for property needed for the Inner Ring Loop, particularly on Yellowhead Trail and 170 Street.

Mobility Environment Community Impacts Traffic Shortcutting Traffic Noise Community Severance Effects

0.

The recommended High Speed Transit System may also require some property acquisition, particularly in areas north of 61 Avenue where rights of way may not be wide enough to accommodate these new facilities. The acquisition of property to implement transportation improvements will invariably affect people residing in the affected properties. It is the City's practice to acquire needed properties in a reasonable, and fair minded manner based on fair market value of the properties in question.

Property Loss

Financial Impacts

Plan Implementation

SOILITIONS fOR TkE FUTURE

83


_

3.4

Financial Impacts 3.4.1

Background The Transportation Master Plan

Effects of The Plan

Capital and Operating Costs

Edmontonians have indicated that they would like to have a better transportation system than what is currently available. They have also indicated that they are willing to fund such improvements. In order to deliver the benefits that this Plan can offer, the City of Edmonton will need to expend in the order of $9.1 to $9.6 billion from now to the year 2020, for capital and operating expenses as indicated below. This represents about 21-28% more than the $7.5 billion which will need to be expended in any event based on current practices.

Mobility

Table 3: Total Expenditures (1998-2020)

Environment

(Millions, 1998$) Community Impacts

ISSUE

1998-2020 "Trend"

1998-2020 TMP

$857 $151 $18

$1,747 to $2,090 $783 to $943 $37

Financial Impacts Capital and Operating Costs

CAPITAL EXPENSES New Capital

Funding the Plan

Plan Implementation

Roads Transit Non-motorized

Sub-total $1,026 $2,567 to $3,070

Rehabilitation & Safety Roads Transit

$1,434 $338

$1,457 $338

Sub-total

$1,772

$1,795

TOTAL CAPITAL

$2,798

$4,362 to $4,865

Roads Transit Non-motorized Administration/ Planning

$1,222 $3,306

$1,245 $3,250

$202

$202

TOTAL OPERATING

$4730

$4,697

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$7,528

$9,059 to $9,562

OPERATING EXPENSES

84

SOIUTIONS fOR I& FUTURE


The range of costs provided for implementing the Plan reflects the fact there is some flexibility in the degree to which infrastructure is upgraded on some of the major elements of the Plan, such as the Inner Ring Loop, the Outer Ring Road and the High Speed Transit facilities.

Background The Transportation Master Plan

Effects of The Plan

3.4.2

Funding the Plan

An estimate of available resources to the year 2020 indicates that traditional, known sources of funding such as property taxes, transit fares, provincial grants and developer contributions, will generate an estimated $6.5 billion to the year 2020. These funds will cover about 68 to 71% of the full cost of the Plan.

Mobility Environment Community Impacts Financial Impacts Capital and Operating Costs Funding the Plan

Plan Implementation

In anticipation of a funding shortfall, a "Financing Study" was undertaken as part of the work leading up to the development of this Plan. The Financing Study identified an extensive list of possible funding sources which could be pursued by the City. In some cases, the new sources of funding will require legislative changes, while in other cases, the City does have the legal authority to proceed. The range of funding sources which were identified were demonstrated to be able to generate the funds needed to pay for the service improvements that can be delivered through this Plan. Some of the funding sources which have promise, in terms of their feasibility and revenue generation potential are: • • •

Dedicated fuel tax Vehicle registration fees Developer contributions

Some of these financing mechanisms are already in effect in other Canadian jurisdictions. The above noted options may be further explored with other levels of government and other Alberta municipalities.

SOIUTIONS fOR ThE FUTURE

85


triANSPORTAT

PLAN IMPLEMENTATION TRANSpORTATiON SySTEM BylAw PRiORiTiES IN ThE NEXT TEN YEARS

FAcilily

PIANNiNq

PREpARATiON OF CAyiTpd ANd OpERATiNq PROgRAMS MONiTORiNq ANd AdApTiNq TO ChANqES


-

-

-

-


4.1

Transportation System Bylaw The City Transportation Act requires that each city in Alberta prepare a comprehensive transportation study which identifies the development of a transportation system to serve the city's needs. In addition to the study, the Act requires that a city pass a bylaw, which designates the transportation system defined in the comprehensive transportation study.

Background The Transportation Master Plan

This Transportation Master Plan report constitutes the comprehensive transportation study indicated in the City Transportation Act. As is required by the Act, Edmonton City Council must pass a bylaw, known as the Transportation System Bylaw, in accordance with this plan. Once approved by City Council, the bylaw must be submitted to the Alberta government for approval by the Lieutenant Governor.

Effects of The Plan

Plan Implementation Transportation System Bylaw in the Next Ten O. Priorities Years

4.2

Facility Planning Preparation of Capital and Operating Programs Monitoring and Adapting to Changes

50/t1TiONS [OR TkE FUTURE

Priorities in the Next Ten Years A preliminary set of priorities for the next ten years has been developed which aims to implement the Plan in stages and on a number of fronts, as follows: • Provision of the first stage of the Inner Ring Loop; a six-lane facility with interchanges at selected intersections • Completion of the southwest portion of the Outer Ring Road, from Calgary Trail to Whitemud Drive • Upgrading of selected Highway Connector routes, particularly Calgary Trail, Yellowhead Trail and Whitemud Drive • Construct South LRT extension from University to Heritage, including transit priority measures/improved bus access for access from West Edmonton and Mil!woods/Meadows to the LRT extension • Completion of the Bus Replacement program • Completion of the para-ramp program • Extension of arterial roadways and transit services to support developing areas • Aggressive rehabilitation of arterial and collector roadways • Completion of the Bridge Investment Strategy • Rehabilitation of Quesnell Bridge and a number of other structures • Updating of the Urban Traffic Noise Policy • Implementation of initial phases of an advanced traffic management system • Develop a non-motorized facility within abandoned rail or other rights of way • Completion of necessary studies to define proposed technology, alignments, approximate costs and required right-of-way for high speed transit routes to serve the West, North and Southeast sections of the City.

89


4.3

In order to implement some of the elements of the Plan, a number of facility planning studies need to be carried out. Theses studies will permit plans for each of the proposals to be developed, costed and analysed in more detail and depth. In cases where alignments are not well established, these facility planning studies will allow for options to be examined and compared as to their feasibility, cost, effectiveness and impacts.

Background The Transportation Master Plan Effects of The Plan

Completed facility planning studies will then form the basis for further recommendations to City Council, for each of the major proposals. Once approved by City Council, facility plans will be used to produce detailed design plans which are required in order to proceed with construction.

Plan Implementation Transportation System Bylaw Priorities in the Next Ten Years Facility Planning Preparation of Capital and Operating Programs Monitoring and Adapting to Changes

Facility Planning

4.4

Preparation of Capital and Operating Programs The strategies, policies and initiatives recommended by this Plan will serve as a guide and basis for development of the City's transportation capital programs, operating programs, as well as, day to day practices. On a yearly basis, transportation capital needs will be identified and submitted for ranking with other municipal requirements. Transportation projects submitted for consideration will be assessed against other civic needs and may or may not be funded in any given year. Operating programs are developed on the basis of annual budget guidelines which place a financial envelope that city departments must work within. As with the capital items, the Transportation Master Plan will give guidance to the development of annual operating programs submitted for budget consideration.

90

SOLUTIONS [OR ThE FUTURE


PLAN

L c Eli-144110N 4.5

Monitoring and Adapting to Changes 4.5.1

Background The Transportation Master Plan Effects of The Plan

Plan Implementation Transportation System Bylaw Priorities in the Next Ten Years Facility Planning

Monitoring Changes

In order for this Plan to remain current and of value, it must be updated periodically to take into account changes that occur over time. The types of changes which may affect the relevance of the Plan in future include: • • • • • •

Changes in Population, Employment and Demographics Changes in Economic Conditions Changes in Lifestyles and Values Changes in the Environment Changes in Legislation Changes in Funding

In order to keep abreast of such changes, the City will need to conduct an ongoing monitoring program which tracks the above trends, as well their effects on people's travel patterns and behaviours. These changes may be tracked through the City's own efforts, or through review of work done by others.

Preparation of Capital and Operating Programs Monitoring and Adapting to Changes Monitoring Changes Reporting Progress and Responding to Changes

The importance of up to date and reliable population, employment and demographic data to the practice of transportation planning cannot be overemphasised. For that reason, it is imperative that the City undertake a periodic census of its population. As a supplement to reliable census data, the City should periodically conduct a comprehensive travel survey, as a means of tracking changes in travel patterns and behaviour. Other, more specialized surveys will need to be undertaken to track more specific issues, which may affect how people travel.

4.5.2 Reporting Progress and Responding to Changes To ensure that this Plan continues to act as the strategic, guiding document it is intended to be, it is recommended that a progress report be generated every three years. The progress report would summarize the state of the various proposals adopted for implementation. The document would be of value to City Council, to the administration and the general public and act as a reminder of the course set by this plan. From time to time, it may be appropriate and necessary to change portions of the Transportation Master Plan and/or the related bylaw in response to changing conditions.

SOLUTIONS [OR TLIE FUTURE

91


you I-IAVE AN QUESTOONS A3OUT TIE TRANSpORTATiON MASTER PLAN,

plEAsE CAL:

Ow (DE T _dMONTON RANS3ORTATiON ANd STREETS DEpARTMENT

OR WR[ITE TO:

Ciry of

EdMONTON

TRANS3ORTATiON ANd STREETS DEpARTMENT

113[rh RooR, CENTURy PACE 9803 - 1102 A AVENUE .cdMONTON

f

AthERTA

TJ 3A3


APPROVED As to Form Citx Solicitor

Mani* end rittveloorrent sine

LiBRARck c tamonton

As to Content Head of department

BY-LAW NO. 11778, as amended Being a By-law to Establish a Transportation System for The City of Edmonton WHEREAS the City Council for The City of Edmonton has caused to be prepared a comprehensive transportation study report in accordance with section 4 of the City Transportation Act for the development of an integrated transportation system designed to service the needs of the entire City of Edmonton, the transportation study report consisting of the following: The Transportation Study Report 1. Transportation Master Plan (March, 1999) as amended by Council resolution dated April 14, 1999. Other Reports 1. Public Involvement Program Phase 1 Report, (April, 1994) 2. Household Travel Survey, (May, 1995) 3. Economic Forecasts, Edmonton City and C.M.A. 1995 - 2020, (May 8, 1995) 4. Vehicle Emissions Project, (March 15, 1996) 5. Truck Route Study, (May, 1996) 6. Ten Year Transit Service and Fare Strategy Plan, (July, 1996) 7. Transportation Demand Management Study, (July, 1996) 8. The Cost of Transporting People in The City of Edmonton, (September, 1996) 9. Core Values Trade-Off Study, (December, 1996) 10. Possible Plan Directions, (May 26, 1997) 1. Transportation Funding Study, (December, 1997) AND WHEREAS City Council prior to second reading of this by-law has caused notice of this by-law to be published at least once a week for 2 consecutive weeks in 1 or more newspapers having general circulation within the city, the last of such publications being at least 14 days before the date fixed for the second reading of this by-law.


AND WHEREAS in the consideration of this by-law City Council has duly heard and considered representations presented either personally or through an agent of all interested parties to this by-law. AND WHEREAS City Council considers this by-law to be in the public interest. NOW THEREFORE, THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF EDMONTON duly assembled, enacts as follows: 1. This by-law (11778) shall be known as "The City of Edmonton Transportation System By-law". 2. In accordance with the transportation study reports herein before described, City Council hereby establishes a transportation system for The City of Edmonton consisting of the following: a) That plan attached to this By-law entitled "The City of Edmonton Transportation System By-law" and incorporated as part of this By-law as Appendix "A". b ) That schedule attached to this By-law entitled "Physical Description of Arterial Roadways" and incorporated as part of this by-law as Appendix "B". c) That schedule attached to this By-law entitled "Physical Description of Collector Roadways" and incorporated as part of this by-law as Appendix "C". d) That schedule attached to this By-law entitled " Physical Description of Light Rail Transit" and incorporated as part of this by-law as Appendix "D". e) That schedule attached to this By-law entitled "Principles of Light Rail Transit and Busway Development" and incorporated as part of this by-law as Appendix

subject to the following conditions, namely: a). That the financial resources necessary for the construction of the said transportation system will be available to The City of Edmonton b) That the City of Edmonton may amend this by-law from time to time by the addition or deletion of transportation facilities or in any other manner, subject to the approval of the Lieutenant Governor in Council. 3. This by-law shall come into force on the date that it is approved by the Lieutenant Governor in Council.


4. The existing Transportation System By-law, By-law 6707 as amended and all its amendments, is hereby repealed effective the date on which By-law 11778 is approved by the Lieutenant Governor in Council.

April

, A.D. 1999;

READ a second time this 14th

day of April

, A.D. 1999;

READ a third time this 14th

day of

, A.D. 1999;

READ a first time this

day of

14th

SIGNED and PASSED this

14th

April day of

Apr i l

,A.D. 1999.

THE CITY OF EDMONTON

R

CITY CLERK4Ltj


22 TP62 1123 9/4

19 ,21423 W4

TP52 R28 W4

• " e,•< 18 TP52 PM%

13 52 R2,1 W4.

39/4

kbba; 11 , 62

15 \ TP52 R23 Wk •

...---„.-

. .• 4\

.„i, '

4‘.

, R52 R23 Wk

., T

r••••. ••:••••,• :•••• 1-

'Y) , '

1:••••?

••"••••, :•t:•

:••••

•••••,•••••••

10 TP521123 9/4

••I ••C • ,

39/4

• ::••••.>

••V. 3 W4

Tp52 R23 W4

TP521123

2 T P52. 9,5399.1

1992 P2.3 W4

/

'a

CD

23 AVE '

31 TP51 P23 ‘1V4

32 TP51 R

E

RASINIPEMATION diliconton T& \

t'MZEiaal

••••,•• NM1611M•661‘

APPENDIX "A"

oft/ :•1 • 61.•

' 1123. We

kirkTP51AI 122W4

"THE CITY OF EDMONTON TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM BYLAW" ( BYLAW #11776

04

19 TP511123 W4

20 TP51 1123 Wk.

TP51 1129W4

17 TP51 1123W4

13 )1 P24 W4

EXISTING ARTERIAL ROADWAYS ..\\ PROPOSED ARTERIAL ROADWAYS EXISTING COLLECTOR ROADWAYS EKISTING LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT (LIST) PROPOSED LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT (LR729

ENO.

SCALE 1 : 50 000

12 51 1134W4

LVA2

0.5

1

luns . md=

24 1123

' 0.5

r'

'

Rifle

'

'Mrs

0

PRODUCED SY DESIGN AND MAPPING, ROADWAYS ENGINEERING BRANCH, TRANSPORTATION AND STREETS DEPARTMENT, CITY OF EDMONTON

'12 1951 823

0-0


-

-


Appendix B: Physical Description of Arterial Roadways

APPENDIX "B" PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION OF ARTERIAL ROADWAYS THE CITY OF EDMONTON TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM BY-LAW NUMBER 11778

' Indicates Proposed Facility

Page I


Appendix B: Physical Description of Arterial Roadways

I. AVENUES

ns

AVENUE

LIM

227 Avenue

17 Street N.E. West to 50 Street N.W.

195 Avenue

17 Street N.E. West to 18 Street N.W.

195 Avenue N.W.

18 Street N.W. West to City Limit

167 Avenue N.W.

Meridian Street (1 Street) West to 97 Street N.W.

*167 Avenue N.W.

142 Street N.W. West to Campbell Road N.W.

*167 Avenue N.W.

Manning Drive N.W. West to 50 Street N.W.

167 Avenue N.W.

112 Street N.W. West to Campbell Road N.W.

153 Avenue N.W.

Meridian Street (1 Street) West to Fort Road N.W.

153 Avenue N.W.

Fort Road N.W. West to Manning Drive N.W.

*153 Avenue N.W.

Outer Ring Road West to 18 Street N.W.

153 Avenue N.W.

Manning Drive N.W. West to 131 Street N.W.

*153 Avenue N.W.

131 Street N.W. West to St. Albert Trail N.W.

*137 Avenue N.E.

33 Street N.E. West to Meridian Street (1 Street)

137 Avenue N.E.

33 Street N.E. West to 17 Street N.E.

137 Avenue N.W.

Victoria Trail N.W. West to 199 Street N.W.

*132 Avenue N.W.

199 Street N.W. West to Winterbum Road N.W. (215 Street)

*128 Avenue N.W.

184 Street N.W. West to 132 Avenue N.W.

127 Avenue N.W.

66 Street N.W. West to 127 Street N.W.

118 Avenue N.W.

Yellowhead Trail N.W. West to 106 Street N.W.

118 Avenue N.W.

121 Street N.W. West to 184 Street N.W.

115 Avenue N.W.

80 Street N.W. West to Fort Road N.W.

112 Avenue N.W.

50 Street N.W. West to 90 Street N.W.

111 Avenue N.W.

101 Street N.W. West to 170 Street N.W.

*I 1 1 Avenue N.W.

170 Street N.W. West to 178 Street N.W.

Ill Avenue N.W.

178 Street N.W. to 184 Street N.W.

*I 1 1 Avenue N.W.

184 Street N.W. West to Anthony Henday Dr. N.W.

111 Avenue N.W.

Anthony Henday Drive N.W. West to 199 Street N.W.

108A Avenue N.W.

97 Street N.W. West to 101 Street N.W.

108 Avenue N.W.

116 Street N.W. West to 117 Street N.W.

107A Avenue N.W.

92 Street N.W. West to 101 Street N.W.

107 Avenue N.W.

101 Street N.W. West to 184 Street N.W.

106 Avenue N.W.

50 Street N.W. West to 84 Street N.W.

106 Avenue N.W

97 Street N.W. West to 117 Street N.W.

104 Avenue N.W.

101 Street N.W. West to 121 Street N.W.

â&#x20AC;¢ Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 2


Appendix B: Physical Description of

Roadways

AVENUE

LIMITS

103A Avenue N.W.

Jasper Avenue N.W. West to 101 Street N.W.

103 Avenue N.W.

101 Street N.W. West to 109 Street N.W.

102A Avenue N.W.

Jasper Avenue N.W. West to 101 Street N.W.

102 Avenue N.W.

95 Street N.W. West to 109 Street N.W.

102 Avenue N.W.

124 Street N.W. West to Stony Plain Road N.W.

101 Avenue N.W.

95 Street N.W. West to 95A Street N.W.

101 Avenue N.W.

34 Street N.W. West to 75 Street N.W.

100 Avenue N.W.

149 Street N.W. West to Stony Plain Road N.W.

100 Avenue N.W.

102 Street N.W. West to 116 Street N.W.

98 Avenue N.W.

50 Street N.W. West to James MacDonald Bridge

97 Avenue N.W.

James MacDonald Bridge West to 109 Street N.W.

95 Avenue N.W.

170 Street N.W. West to 189 Street N.W.

*95 Avenue N.W.

189 Street N.W. West to 231 Street N.W.

92 Avenue N.W.

E City Limit to 50 Street NW

90 Avenue N.W.

50 Street N.W. West to 85 Street N.W.

87 Avenue N.W.

109 Street N.W. West to Groat Road N.W.

87 Avenue N.W.

142 Street N.W. West to Anthony Henday Drive N.W.

*87 Avenue N.W.

Anthony Henday Drive N.W. West to 231 Street N.W.

82 Avenue N.W.

71 Street N.W. West to 114 Street N.W.

71 Avenue N.W.

113 Street N.W. West to Belgravia Road N.W.

69 Avenue N.W.

170 Street N.W. West to 188 Street N.W.

*69 Avenue N.W.

188 Street N.W. West to 199 Street N.W.

63 Avenue N.W.

86 Street N.W. West to 104 Street N.W.

61 Avenue N.W.

104 Street N.W. West to 113 Street N.W.

60 Avenue N.W.

113 Street N.W. West to 115 Street N.W.

*60 Avenue N.W.

115 Street N.W. West to 122 Street N.W.

51 Avenue N.W.

86 Street N.W. West to 122 Street N.W.

45 Avenue N.W.

184 Street N.W. West to Winterburn Road N.W. (215 Street)

*45 Avenue N.W.

Lessard Road N.W. West to Winterburn Road N.W.(2 15 Street)

40 Avenue N.W.

Terwillegar Drive N.W. West to Riverbend Road N.W.

*38 Avenue N.W.

17 Street N.W. West to 23 Street N.W.

38 Avenue N.W.

23 Street N.W. West to 34 Street N.W.

*38 Avenue N.W.

17 Street N.W. Southeast to 34 Avenue N.W.

'34 Avenue N.W.

Meridian Street (I Street) West to 34 Street N.W.

34 Avenue N.W.

34 Street N.W. West to 119 Street N.W.

28 Avenue N.W.

66 Street N.W. West to Parsons Road N.W.

â&#x20AC;¢ Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 3


Appendix B: Physical Description of Arterial Roadways AVENUE

LIMITS

23 Avenue N.W.

East City Limit West to Terwillegar Drive N.W.

*23 Avenue N.W.

Outer Ring Road Southwest to 184 Street N.W.

23 Avenue N.W.

184 Street N.W. West to Winterburn Road N.W. (215 Street)

16 Avenue N.W.

156 Street N.W. West to 170 Street N.W.

*25 Avenue S.W.

66 Street S.W. West to Calgary Trail S.W.

30 Avenue S.W.

Service Rd West of Calgary Trail S.W. West to 127 Street S.W.

41 Avenue S.W.

East City Limit West to Service Road East of Hwy. 2 S.W.

41 Avenue S.W.

Service Road West of Hwy. 2 S.W. West to 184 Street S.W.

' Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 4


Appendix B: Physical Description of Arterial Roadways 2. STREETS STREET

LIMITS

17 Street N.E.

Hwy. 16 East North to 137 Avenue N.E.

17 Street N.E.

195 Avenue N.E. North to North City Limit

17 Street

South City Limit North to Sherwood Park Freeway

â&#x20AC;¢17 Street N.W.

23 Avenue N.W. North to Whitemud Drive N.W.

18 Street N.W.

153 Avenue N.W. North to North City Limit

34 Street

South City Limit North to Sherwood Park Freeway

34 Street N.W.

Fort Road N.W. North to 167 Avenue N.W.

34 Street N.W.

167 Avenue N.W. North to North City Limit

50 Street

South City Limit North to 106 Avenue N.W.

50 Street N.W.

112 Avenue N.W. North to North City Limit

*50 Street N.W.

153 Avenue N.W. North to Outer Ring Road

66 Street N.W.

South City Limit North to Whitemud Drive N.W.

66 Street N.W.

118 Avenue N.W. North to North City Limit

*66 Street N.W.

178 Avenue N.W North to Outer Ring Road

75 Street N.W.

Whitemud Drive N.W. North to 98 Avenue N.W.

80 Street N.W.

115 Avenue N.W. North to Fort Road N.W.

82 Street N.W.

Jasper Avenue N.W. North to North City Limit

83 Street N.W

Argyll Road N.W. North to 90 Avenue N.W.

84 Street N.W.

98 Avenue N.W. North to 106 Avenue N.W

85 Street N.W.

90 Avenue N.W. North to 98 Avenue N.W.

86 Street N.W.

Stadium Road N.W. North to Fort Road N.W.

91 Street

South City Limit North (0 63 Avenue N.W

*91 Street S.W.

South City Limit Northeast to 25 Avenue S.W.

95 Street N.W.

101 Avenue N.W. North to 118 Avenue N.W.

97 Street N.W.

Jasper Avenue N.W. North to North City Limit

99 Street N.W.

31 Avenue N.W. North to Saskatchewan Drive N.W.

100 Street N.W.

MacDonald Drive N.W. North to 103A Avenue N.W.

*101 Street S.W.

South CityLimit Northeast to 91 Street S.W.

102 Street N.W.

100 Avenue N.W. North to MacDonald Drive N.W.

103 Street N.W.

Whitemud Drive N.W. North to Saskatchewan Drive N.W.

103 Street N.W.

River Valley Road N.W. North (0 97 Avenue N.W.

104 Street N.W.

Whitemud Drive N.W. North to Saskatchewan Drive N.W.

104 Street N.W

River Valley Road N.W. North to 97 Avenue N.W.

105 Street N.W.

River Valley Road N.W. North to 107 Avenue N.W.

106 Street N.W.

97 Avenue N.W. North to 104 Avenue N.W.

' Indicates Proposed

aCility

Page 5


Appendix B: Physical Description of Arterial Roadways STREET

LIMITS

106 Street N.W.

Kingsway Avenue N.W. North to 119 Avenue N.W.

107 Street N.W.

119 Avenue N.W. North to Yellowhead Trail N.W.

109 Street N.W.

61 Avenue N.W. North to Princess Elizabeth Avenue N.W.

111 Street

30 Avenue S.W. North to 61 Avenue N.W.

*111 Street S.W.

30 Avenue S.W. Northeast to Ellerslie Road S.W. (9 Avenue S.W.)

112 Street N.W.

82 Avenue N.W. North to 87 Avenue N.W.

112 Street KW.

Castle Downs Road N.W. North to 181 Avenue N.W.

*112 Street N.W.

181 Avenue N.W. North to Outer Ring Road

113 Street N.W.

61 Avenue N.W. North to 72 Avenue N.W.

113A Street N.W.

127 Avenue N.W. North to 153 Avenue N.W.

114 Street NW.

72 Avenue N.W. North to 87 Avenue N.W.

116 Street N.W.

100 Avenue N.W. North to 108 Avenue N.W.

117 Street N.W.

106 Avenue N.W. North to 108 Avenue N.W.

119 Street N.W.

23 Avenue N.W. North toWhitemud Drive N.W.

119 Street N.W.

108 Avenue N.W. North to Kingsway Avenue N.W.

121 Street N.W.

Kingsway Avenue N.W. North to Yellowhead Trail N.W.

122 Street N.W.

Whitemud Drive N.W. North to Fox Drive N.W.

124 Street N.W.

Jasper Avenue N.W. North to 118 Avenue N.W.

127 Street N.W.

118 Avenue N.W. North to North City Limit

*127 Street N.W.

169 Avenue N.W. North to Outer Ring Road

*127 Street N.W.

Outer Ring Road North to 23 Avenue N.W.

127 Street

South City Limit North to 9 Avenue N.W.

142 Street S.W.

South City Limit North to Ellerslie Road S.W. (9 Avenue S.W.)

*142 Street

Ellerslie Rd S.W. (9 Ave S.W.) North to 23 Avenue N.W.

142 Street

Ellerslie Rd S.W. (9 Ave S.W.) Northeast to approximately 9 Ave N.W.

142 Street N.W.

87 Avenue N.W. North to Yellowhead Trail N.W.

142 Street N.W.

137 Avenue KW. North to North City Limit

*142 Street N.W.

137 Avenue N.W. North to Outer Ring Road

149 Street N.W.

Whitemud Drive N.W. North to 128 Avenue N.W.

*149 Street N.W.

128 Avenue N.W. North to 137 Avenue N.W.

156 Street

Ellerslie Road S.W. (9 Avenue S.W.) North to 23 Avenue N.W.

156 Street N.W.

87 Avenue KW. North to St. Albert Trail N.W.

159 Street N.W.

Whitemud Drive N.W. North to 87 Avenue N.W.

163 Street N.W.

87 Avenue N.W. North to 107 Avenue NW.

170 Street

South City Limit North to 16 Avenue N.W.

170 Street N.W.

62 Avenue N.W. North to North City Limit

â&#x20AC;¢ Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 6


Appendix B: Physical Description of Arterial Roadways STREET

LIMITS

178 Street N.W.

62 Avenue N.W. North to 118 Avenue N.W.

184 Street N.W.

100 Avenue N.W. North to North City Limit

â&#x20AC;¢I84 Street N.W.

128 Avenue N.W. North to North City Limit

184 Street N.W.

South City Limit North to Ellerslie Road (9 Avenue S.W.)

*199 Street N.W.

132 Avenue N.W. North to 137 Avenue N.W.

199 Street N.W.

Quancirant Avenue North to Whitemud Drive N.W.

*204 Street N.W.

87 Avenue N.W. North to Muskekosi Trail N.W.

207 Street N.W.

Whitemud Drive N.W. North to Potter Green Drive N.W.

*207 Street N.W.

Potter Greens Drive N.W. to 87 Avenue N.W.

*207 Street N.W.

69 Avenue N.W. North to Whitemud Drive N.W.

207 Street S.W.

Ellerslie Road S.W. (9 Avenue S.W.) North to Quadrant Avenue

231 Street N.W.

Whitemud Drive N.W. North to Yellowhead Trail N.W.

' Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 7


Appendix B: Physical Description of Arterial Roadways 3. NAMED ROADWAYS ROADWAY

LIMITS

Alex Taylor Road N.W.

Rowland Road N.W. North to Jasper Avenue N.W.

Anthony Henday Dr. N.W.

Whitemud Drive N.W. North to Yellowhead Trail N.W.

Allendale Road N.W.

104 Street N.W. Southwest to 61 Avenue N.W.

Argyll Road N.W.

Sherwood Park Freeway N.W. Southwest to 86 Street N.W.

Belgravia Road N.W.

71 Avenue N.W. West to Fox Drive N.W.

Bellamy Hill N.W.

97 Avenue N.W. North to MacDonald Drive N.W.

Calgary Trail N.W.

South City Limit North To Whitemud Drive N.W.

Campbell Road N.W.

St. Albert Trail N.W. Northeast to North City limit

Capilano Drive N.W.

98 Avenue N.W. North to Yellowhead Trail N.W.

Castle Downs Road N.W.

153 Avenue N.W. Northeast to 97 Street N.W.

Callingwood Road N.W.

170 Street N.W. West to 189 Street N.W.

*Callingwood Road N.W.

189 Street N.W. West to Winterburn Road N.W. (215 Street)

Connors Road N.W.

90 Avenue N.W. Northwest to Low Level Bridge

Ellerslie Rd SW (9 Ave SW)

E. City Limit West to 184 Street S.W.

Ellerslie Rd SW (9 Ave S.W.)

207 Street S.W. West to Winterburn Road S.W. (215 Street)

Fort Road N.W.

86 Street N.W. Northeast to 115 Avenue N.W.

Fort Road N.W.

80 Street N.W. Northeast to 137 Avenue N.W.

Fox Drive N.W.

Belgravia Road N.W. West to Whitemud Drive N.W.

Grierson Hill N.W.

Low Level Bridge Northeast to 101 Avenue N.W.

Groat Road N.W.

87 Avenue N.W. North to 118 Avenue N.W.

Jasper Avenue N.W.

82 Street N.W. Southwest to 124 Street N.W.

Kingsway Avenue N.W.

101 Street N.W. Northwest to 121 Street N.W.

Lessard Road N.W.

Callingwood Road N.W. South/Southwest to 184 Street N.W.

*Lessard Road N.W.

184 Street N.W. Southwest to approximately 203 Street N.W.

MacDonald Drive N.W.

100 Street N.W. West to 102 Street N.W.

Manning Drive

137 Avenue N.W. Northeast to East City Limit

Mayfield Road N.W.

Stony Plain Road N.W. Northeast to 1 I 1 Avenue N.W.

McDougall Hill N.W.

Low Level Bridge North to MacDonald Drive N.W.

Meadowlark Road N.W.

87 Avenue N.W. Northeast to 156 Street N.W.

Meridian Street (I Street)

Hwy. 16 Fast North to 137 Avenue N.E.

Meridian Street ( 1 Street)

153 Avenue N.E. North to 195 Avenue N.E.

Meridian Street (1 Street)

Manning Drive N.E. North to North City Limit

•Muskekosi Trail N.W.

199 Street N.W. West to 231 Street N.W.

Norwood Boulevard NM

90 Street N.W. West to 101 Street N.W.

*Outer Ring Road

Hwy. 16 East North to Manning Drive N.W.

• Indicates Proposed Facility

Page


Appendix B: Physical Description of Arterial Roadways ROADWAY

LIMITS

*Outer Ring Road

Manning Drive N.W. West to St. Albert Trail N.W.

*Outer Ring Road

St. Albert Trail N.W. South to Yellowhead Trail N.W.

*Outer Ring Road

Whitemud Drive N.W. South/Southeast to 156 Street N.W.

*Outer Ring Road

156 Street N.W. East to HIAry. 14

Parsons Road N.W.

Karl Clark Road N.W. North to 31 Avenue N.W.

*Parsons Road

101 Street S.W. North to Karl Clark Road N.W.

Princess Elizabeth Ave N.W

Kingsway Avenue N.W. Northeast to 101 Street N.W.

Quadrant Avenue

199 Street N.W. West to 207 Street S.W.

Queen Elizabeth Pk Rd NW

Saskatchewan Drive N.W. Northwest to Walterdale Hill Road N.W.

Rabbit Hill Road N.W.

23 Avenue N.W. North/Northwest to Riverbend Road N.W.

Riverbend Road N.W.

Rabbit Hill Road N.W. Northeast to 40 Avenue N.W.

Riverbend Road N.W.

Terwillegar Drive N.W. Northwest. to Rabbit Hill Road N.W.

River Valley Road N.W.

105 Street N.W. West to Groat Road N.W.

*Roper Road N.W.

East City Limit West to 50 Street N.W.

Roper Road N.W.

50 Street N.W. West to 59 Street N.W.

*Roper Road N.W.

59 Street N.W. West to 75 Street N.W.

Roper Road N.W.

75 Street N.W. West to 86 Street N.W.

Rossdale Road N.W.

Low Level Bridge Southwest to 97 Avenue N.W.

Rowland Road N.W.

84 Street N.W. West to 95 Street N.W.

Si Albert Trail N.W.

118 Avenue N.W. Northwest to Northwest City Limit

Saskatchewan Drive N.W.

99 Street N.W. West to 109 Street N.W.

Saskatchewan Drive N.W.

University Avenue N.W. North to 87 Avenue N.W.

Sherwood Park Fwy N.W.

East City Limit West to 71 Street N.W.

Stadium Road N.W.

86 Street N.W. Southwest to 92 Street N.W.

Stony Plain Road N.W.

121 Street N.W. West to West City Limit

Strathcona (Scona) Rd N.W

Saskatchewan Drive N.W. North to Connors Road N.W.

Terrace Road N.W.

101 Avenue N.W. Southwest to 98 Avenue N.W.

Terwillegar Drive N.W.

Whitemud Drive N.W. South to 23 Avenue N.W

*Terwillegar Drive N.W.

23 Avenue N.W. Southwest to 170 Street N.W.

University Avenue N.W.

114 Street N.W. West to Saskatchewan Drive N.W.

Victoria Park Road N.W.

116 Street N.W. West to Groat Road N.W.

Victoria Trail N.W.

118 Avenue N.W. North to 153 Avenue N.W.

*Victoria Trail N.W.

153 Avenue N.W. North to 167 Avenue N.W.

Walterdale Hill Road N.W.

109 Street N.W. Northeast to River Valley Road N.W.

Whitemud Drive NW.

Fast City Limit West to West City Limit

Winterburn Road (215 St.)

South City Limit North to Yellowhead Trail N.W.

â&#x20AC;¢ Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 9


Appendix B: Physical Description of Arterial Roadways ROADWAY

LIMITS

â&#x20AC;¢Winterburn Rd(2I5 St)NW

Yellowhead Trail N.W. North to 132 Avenue N.W.

Ye!towhead Trail N.W.

East City Limit West to West City Limit

' Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 10


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways

APPENDIX "C" PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION OF COLLECTOR ROADWAYS THE CITY OF EDMONTON TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM BY-LAW NUMBER 11778

' Indicates Proposed Facility

Page I


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways

I. AVENUES AVENUE

LIMITS

211 Avenue N.E.

East City Limit West to Fort Road N.E.

195 Avenue N.E.

North Saskatchewan River West to 17 Street N.E.

179 Avenue N.W.

91 Street N.W. West to 95 Street N.W.

176 Avenue N.W.

97 Street N.W. West to 104 Street N.W.

172 Avenue N.W.

100 Street N.W. West to 109 Street N.W.

171 Avenue N.W.

109 Street N.W. West to 112 Street N.W.

171 Avenue N.W.

112 Street N.W. West to 115 Street N.W.

168 Avenue N.W.

91 Street N.W. West to 95 Street N.W.

167 Avenue N.E.

West of North Saskatchewan River West to Meridian Street (1 Street)

165 Avenue N.W.

95 Street N.W. West to 97 Street N.W.

164 Avenue N.W.

77 Street N.W. West to 82 Street N.W.

164 Avenue N.W.

100 Street N.W. West to 109 Street N.W.

162 Avenue N.W.

Castledowns Road N.W. West to 121 Street N.W.

162 Avenue N.W.

Hollick Kenyon Road N.W. West to 59A Street N.W.

161 Avenue N.W.

121 Street N.W. West to 127 Street N.W.

160 Avenue N.W.

78 Street N.W. West to 88 Street N.W.

160 Avenue N.W.

97 Street N.W. West to 100 Street N.W.

158 Avenue N.W.

127 Street N.W. West to 129 Street N.W.

158 Avenue N.W.

109 Street N.W. West to 112 Street N.W.

158 Avenue N.W.

64 Street N.W. West to Ozema Road N.W.

157 Avenue N.W.

Castledowns Road N.W. West to 121 Street N.W.

156 Avenue N.W.

59A Street N.W. West to 64 Street N.W.

156 Avenue N.W.

84 Street N.W. West to 88 Street N.W.

155 Avenue N.W.

100 Street N.W. West to Beaumaris Road N.W.

155 Avenue N.W.

129 Street N.W. West ot 132 Street N.W.

154 Avenue N.W.

73A Street N.W. West to 78 Street N.W.

153 Avenue N.E.

17 Street N.E. West to Meridian Street (1 Street)

152 Avenue N.W.

113A Street N.W. West to 121 Street N.W.

151 Avenue N.W.

21 Street N.W. West To Kirkness Road N.W.

150 Avenue N.W.

87 Street N.W. West to 94 Street N.W.

149A Avenue N.W.

72 Street N.W. West to 87 Street N.W.

149 Avenue N.W.

McLeod Road N.W. West to 72 Street N.W.

146 Avenue N.W.

21 Street N.W. West to 26 Street N.W.

145 Avenue N.W.

113A Street N.W. West to 121 Street N.W.

â&#x20AC;¢ Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 2


Appendix C: Physical Description of

Roadways

AVENUE

LIMITS

144 Avenue N.W.

20 Street N.W. West to Manning Drive N.W.

144 Avenue N.W.

50 Street N.W. West to 97 Street N.W.

142 Avenue N.W.

23 Street N.W. West to 26 Street N.W.

142 Avenue N.W.

121 Street N.W. West to 127 Street N.W.

141 Avenue N.W.

53 Street N.W. West to 54 Street N.W.

141 Avenue N.W.

74 Street N.W. West to 79 Street N.W.

140 Avenue N.W.

58 Street N.W. West to 66 Street N.W.

140 Avenue N.W.

69 Street N.W. West to 74 Street N.W.

140 Avenue N.W.

87 Street N.W. West to 94 Street N.W.

139 Avenue N.W.

23 Street N.W. West to 36 Street N.W.

139 Avenue N.W.

40 Street N.W. West to Clareview LRT Station

139 Avenue N.W.

54 Street N.W. West to 58 Street N.W.

139 Avenue N.W.

113A Street N.W. West to 121 Street N.W.

137 Avenue N.W.

20 Street N.W. West to Victoria Trail N.W.

135 Avenue N.W.

24 Street N.W. West to Victoria Trail N.W.

135 Avenue N.W.

Delwood Road N.W. West to 82 Street N.W.

135 Avenue N.W.

85 Street N.W. West to 104A Street N.W.

135 Avenue N.W.

122 Street N.W. West to 132A Street N.W.

135 Avenue N.W.

135 Street N.W. West to 140 Street N.W.

134A Avenue N.W.

104A Street N.W. -West to 107 Street N.W.

134 Avenue N.W.

37 Street N.W. West to 43 Street N.W.

134 Avenue N.W.

47 Street N.W. West to 50 Street N.W.

134 Avenue N.W.

Fort Road N.W. West to 68 Street N.W.

134 Avenue N.W.

82 Street N.W. West to 85 Street N.W.

134 Avenue N.W.

97 Street N.W. West to 101 Street N.W.

134 Avenue N.W.

107 Street N.W. West to 122 Street N.W.

134 Avenue N.W.

132A Street N.W. West to 135 Street N.W.

134 Avenue N.W.

St. Albert Trail N.W. West to 146 Street N.W.

133 Avenue N.W.

Fort Road N.W. West to 58 Street N.W.

I 32A Avenue N.W.

Clareview Road N.W. West to 34 Street N.W.

132 Avenue N.W.

Fort Road N.W. West to 140 Street N.W.

131 Avenue N.W.

127 Street N.W. West to 128 Street N.W.

131 Avenue N.W

St. Albert Trail N.W. West to 149 Street N.W.

130 Avenue N.W.

Meridian Street (I Street) West to 10 Street N.W.

130 Avenue N.W.

72 Street N.W. West to 90 Street N.W.

130 Avenue N.W.

St. Albert Trail N.W. West to 144 Street N.W.

' Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 3


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways AVENUE

LIMITS

129B Avenue N.W.

90 Street N.W. West to 97 Street N.W.

129 Avenue N.W.

50 Street N.W. West to 72 Street N.W.

129 Avenue N.W.

103 Street N.W. West to 135 Street N.W.

128 Avenue N.W.

97 Street N.W. West to 101 Street N.W.

128 Avenue N.W.

St. Albert Trail N.W. West to 163 Street N.W.

127 Avenue N.W.

45 Street N.W. West to 50 Street N.W.

126 Avenue N.W.

142 Street N.W. West to 143 Street N.W.

123 Avenue N.W.

50 Street N.W. West to 54 Street N.W.

122 Avenue N.W.

Fort Road N.W. West to 107 Street N.W.

122 Avenue N.W.

127 Street N.W. West to 129 Street N.W.

121A Avenue N.W.

142 Street N.W. West to 163 Street N.W.

121 Avenue N.E.

33 Street N.E. West toll Street N.E.

121 Avenue N.W.

34 Street N.W. West to 50 Street N.W.

121 Avenue N.W.

61 Street N.W. West to Capilano Drive N.W.

120 Avenue N.W.

75 Street N.W. West to 82 Street N.W.

119 Avenue N.W.

Abbotsfield Road N.W. West to 34 Street N.W.

119 Avenue N.W.

Fort Road N.W. West to 82 Street N.W.

119 Avenue N.W.

122 Street N.W. West to 123 Street N.W.

118A Avenue N.W.

184 Street N.W. West to Transportation Utility Corridor

118A Avenue N.W.

199 Street N.W. West to Winterburn Road N.W. (215 Street)

117 Avenue N.W.

167 Street N.W. West to 170 Street N.W.

115 Avenue N.W.

79 Street N.W. West to 80 Street N.W.

115 Avenue N.W.

Fort Road N.W. West to 97 Street N.W.

115 Avenue N.W.

Groat Road N.W. West to 149 Street N.W.

114 Avenue N.W.

34 Street N.W. West to 50 Street N.W.

114 Avenue N.W.

124 Street N.W. West to 139 Street N.W.

114 Avenue N.W.

142 Street N.W. West to 170 Street N.W.

114 Avenue N.W.

178 Street N.W. West to 184 Street N.W.

112 Avenue N.W.

142 Street N.W. West to 163 Street N.W.

112 Avenue N.W.

Winterburn Road N.W. (215 Street) West to 231 Street N.W.

1 l 1 Avenue N.W.

32 Street N.W. West to 34 Street N.W.

III Avenue N.W.

82 Street N.W. West to 84 Street N.W.

110 Avenue N.W.

149 Street N.W. West to 161 Street N.W.

109B Avenue N.W.

139 Street N.W. West to 142 Street N.W.

109A Avenue N.W.

135 Street N.W. West to 139 Street N.W.

109 Avenue N.W.

46 Street N.W. West to 56 Street N.W.

' Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 4


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways AVENUE

LIMITS

109 Avenue N.W.

146 Street N.W. West to 149 Street N.W.

109 Avenue N.W.

161 Street N.W. West to 163 Street N.W.

109 Avenue N.W.

Mayfield Road N.W. West to 166 A Street N.W.

107 Avenue N.W.

32 Street N.W. West to 34 Street N.W.

107 Avenue N.W.

46 Street N.W. West to 48 Street N.W.

107 Avenue N.W.

199 Street N.W. West to Winterburn Road N.W. (215 Street)

106B Avenue N.W.

48 Street N.W. West to 50 Street N.W.

106 Avenue N.W.

34 Street N.W. West to 38 Street N.W.

106 Avenue N.W.

45 Street N.W. West to 50 Street N.W.

106 Avenue N.W.

95 Street N.W. West to 97 Street N.W.

105 Avenue N.W.

101 Street N.W. West to 116 Street N.W.

105 Avenue N.W.

121 Street N.W. West to 124 Street N.W.

105 Avenue N.W.

170 Street N.W. West to 184 Street N.W.

104 Avenue N.W.

156 Street N.W. West to 163 Street N.W.

103A Avenue N.W.

Fulton Road N.W. West to 65 Street N.W.

103 Avenue N.W.

45 Street N.W. West to 50 Street N.W.

103 Avenue N.W.

95 Street N.W. West to 97 Street N.W.

103 Avenue N.W.

100 Street N.W. West to 101 Street N.W.

103 Avenue N.W.

Mayfield Road N.W. West to 172 Street N.W.

102 Avenue N.W.

111 Street N.W. West to 124 Street N.W.

102 Avenue N.W.

172 Street N.W. West to 178 Street N.W.

101A Avenue N.W.

89 Street N.W. West to 92 Street N.W.

101A Avenue N.W.

99 Street N.W. West to 100A Street N.W.

101 Avenue N.W.

75 Street N.W. West to 84 Street N.W.

100A Avenue N.W.

156 Street N.W. West to 163 Street N.W.

100 Avenue N.W.

116 Street N.W. West to 121 Street N.W.

99 Avenue N.W.

101 Street N.W. West to 103 Street N.W.

99 Avenue N.W.

104 Street N.W. West to 112 Street N.W.

99 Avenue N.W.

170 Street N.W. West to 175 Street N.W.

98 Avenue N.W.

49 Street N.W. West to 50 Street N.W.

98 Avenue N.W.

103 Street N.W. West to 105 Street N.W.

98 Avenue N.W.

178 Street N.W. West to 182 Street N.W.

97A Avenue N.W.

182 Street N.W. West to 189 Street N.W.

97 Avenue N.W.

109 Street N.W. West to 111 Street N.W.

96 Avenue N.W.

105 Street N.W. West to 107 Street N.W.

96 Avenue N.W.

142 Street N.W. West to 145 Street N.W.

â&#x20AC;¢ Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 5


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways AVENUE

LIMITS

95 Avenue N.W.

75 Street N.W. West to Connors Road NW.

95 Avenue N.W.

142 Street N.W. West to 170 Street N.W.

948 Avenue N.W.

49 Street N.W. West to 75 Street N.W.

93 Avenue N.W.

48 Street N.W. West to 50 Street N.W.

93 Avenue N.W.

165 Street N.W. West to 168 Street N.W.

92 Avenue N.W.

50 Street N.W. West to Ottewell Road N.W.

92 Avenue N.W.

116 Street N.W. West to 120 Street N.W.

92 Avenue N.W.

149 Street N.W. West to 163 Street N.W.

91 Avenue N.W.

142 Street N.W. West to 149 Street N.W.

90 Avenue N.W.

170 Street N.W. West to 178 Street N.W.

89 Avenue N.W.

112 Street N.W. West to 114 Street N.W.

88 Avenue N.W.

163 Street N.W. West to 168 Street N.W.

86 Avenue N.W.

60 Street N.W. West to 75 Street N.W.

85 Avenue N.W.

56 Street N.W. West to 60 Street N.W.

84 Avenue N.W.

182 Street N.W. West to 189 Street N.W.

83 Avenue N.W.

99 Street N.W. West to 100 Street N.W.

83 Avenue N.W.

103 Street N.W. West to 109 Street N.W.

83 Avenue N.W.

112 Street N.W. West to 114 Street N.W.

83 Avenue N.W.

159 Street N.W. West to 169 Street N.W.

82 Avenue N.W.

50 Street N.W. West to 71 Street N.W.

81 Avenue N.W.

103 Street N.W. West to 109 Street N.W.

81 Avenue N.W.

175 Street N.W. West to 182 Street N.W.

80 Avenue N.W.

103 Street N.W. West to 105 Street N.W.

80 Avenue N.W.

142 Street N.W. West to 149 Street N.W.

79 Avenue N.W.

104 Street N.W. West to 105 Street N.W.

77 Avenue N.W.

184 Street N.W. West to 188 Street N.W.

76 Avenue N.W.

East City Limit West to 67 Street N.W.

76 Avenue N.W.

Girard Road N.W. West to 99 Street N.W.

76 Avenue N.W.

103 Street N.W. West to Saskatchewan Drive N.W.

76 Avenue N.W.

149 Street N.W. West to 159 Street N.W.

76 Avenue N.W.

172 Street N.W. West to 184 Street N.W.

73 Avenue N.W.

75 Street N.W. West to 83 Street N.W.

72 Avenue N.W.

67 Street N.W. West to 71 Street N.W.

72 Avenue N.W.

109 Street N.W. West to 114 Street N.W.

70 Avenue N.W.

79 Street N.W. West to 81 Street N.W.

69 Avenue N.W.

42 Street N.W. West to 43A Street N.W.

â&#x20AC;¢ Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 6


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways AVENUE

LIMITS

68 Avenue N.W.

Eleniak Road N.W. West (0 75 Street N.W.

66 Avenue N.W.

86 Street N.W. West to 99 Street N.W.

65 Avenue N.W.

109 Street N.W. West to 112 Street N.W.

64 Avenue N.W.

170 Street N.W. West to 178 Street N.W.

63 Avenue N.W.

122 Street N.W. West to 129 Street N.W.

62 Avenue N.W.

122 Street N.W. West to 129 Street N.W.

61 Avenue N.W.

86 Street N.W. West to 87A Street NW.

61 Avenue N.W.

103 Street N.W. West to 104 Street N.W.

60 Avenue N.W.

97 Street N.W. West to 99 Street N.W.

60 Avenue N.W.

143 Street N.W. West to 144 Street N.W.

58 Avenue N.W.

86 Street N.W. West to 97 Street N.W.

57 Avenue N.W.

109 Street N.W. West to 114 Street N.W.

57 Avenue N.W.

172 Street N.W. West to 189 Street N.W.

56 Avenue N.W.

105 Street N.W. West to 106 Street N.W.

56 Avenue N.W.

148 Street N.W. West to Riverbend Road N.W.

55 Avenue N.W.

50 Street N.W. West to 51 Street N.W.

55 Avenue N.W.

104 Street N.W. West to 105 Street N.W.

53 Avenue N.W.

141 Street N.W. West to Riverbend Road N.W.

52 Avenue N.W.

184 Street N.W. West to 190 Street N.W.

51 Avenue N.W.

54 Street N.W. West to Roper Road N.W.

51 Avenue N.W.

122 Street N.W. West to 124 Street N.W.

48 Avenue N.W.

122 Street N.W. West to Lansdowne Drive N.W.

47 Avenue N.W.

106 Street N.W. West to 107 Street N.W.

44 Avenue N.W.

Jackson Road N.W. West to 50 Street N.W.

43 Avenue N.W.

30 Street N.W. West to 38 Street N.W.

43A Avenue N.W.

24 Street N.W. West to 30 Street N.W.

43 Avenue N.W.

114 Street N.W. West to 116 Street N.W.

42 Avenue N.W.

106 Street N.W. West to 108 Street N.W.

42 Avenue N.W.

121 Street N.W. West to 124 Street N.W.

41 Avenue N.W.

38 Street N.W. West to 44 Street N.W.

41 Avenue N.W.

66 Street N.W. West to Millbourne Road N.W.

41 Avenue N.W.

116 Street N.W. West to 117 Street N.W.

40 Avenue N. W.

50 Street N.W. West to 62 Street N.W.

40 Avenue N.W.

106 Street N.W. West to 124 Street N.W.

39 Avenue N.W.

91 Street N.W. West to 99 Street N.W.

38 Avenue N.W.

34 Street N.W. West to 44 Street N.W.

' Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 7


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways AVENUE

LIMITS

38 Avenue N.W.

Millwoods Road East N.W. West to Millwoods Road N.W.

38 Avenue N.W.

105 Street N.W. West to 106 Street N.W.

37 Avenue N.W.

108 Street N.W. West to 117 Street N.W.

36A Avenue N.W.

Woodvale Road West N.W. West to Mil(bourne Road N.W.

36A Avenue N.W.

105 Street N.W. West to 108 Street N.W.

36 Avenue N.W.

37 Street N.W. West to 48 Street N.W.

36 Avenue N.W.

Millwoods Road N.W. West to 85 Street N.W.

35 Avenue N.W.

31A Street N.W. West to 34 Street N.W.

32A Avenue N.W.

106 Street N.W. West to 109 Street N.W.

31 Avenue N.W.

50 Street N.W. West to Youville Road East N.W.

31 Avenue N.W.

Youville Road West N.W. West to Lakewood Road N.W.

31 Avenue N.W.

97 Street N.W. West to 99 Street N.W.

31 Avenue N.W.

112 Street N.W. West to 116 Street N.W.

29A Avenue N.W.

109 Street N.W. West to 1 1 1 Street N.W.

29 Avenue N.W.

Lakewood Road N.W. West to Millwoods Road N.W.

29 Avenue N.W.

105 Street N.W. West to 109 Street N.W.

28 Avenue N.W.

48 Street N.W. West to 66 Street N.W.

28 Avenue N.W.

116 Street N.W. West to 124 Street N.W.

28 Avenue S.W.

17 Street S.W. West to 34 Street S.W.

26 Avenue N.W.

37 Street N.W. West to 48 Street N.W.

25 Avenue N.W.

105 Street N.W. West to 109 Street N.W.

25 Avenue N.W.

112 Street N.W. West to 124 Street N.W.

22 Avenue N.W.

112 Street N.W. West to Saddleback Road N.W.

21 Avenue N.W.

104 Street N.W. West to 109 Street N.W.

20 Avenue N.W.

37 Street N.W. West to 48 Street N.W.

20 Avenue N.W.

104 Street N.W. West to 105 Street N.W.

I 9A Avenue N.W.

54 Street N.W. West to 62 Street N.W.

19 Avenue N.W.

48 Street N.W. West to 54 Street N.W.

19 Avenue N.W.

62 Street N.W. West to Knottwood Road East N.W.

19 Avenue N.W.

105 Street N.W. West to III Street N.W.

18 Avenue N.W.

34 Street N.W. West to 37 Street N.W.

I6A Avenue N.W.

34 Street N.W. West to Millwoods Road East N.W.

13 Avenue N.W.

48 Street N.W. West to 54 Street N.W.

12 Avenue N.W.

110A Street N.W. West to 116 Street N.W.

12 Avenue N.W.

37 Street N.W. West to 48 Street N.W.

12 Avenue N.W.

62 Street N.W. West to Knottwood Road East N.W.

Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 8


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways AVENUE

LIMITS

11 A Avenue N.W.

54 Street N.W. West to 62 Street N.W.

11 Avenue N.W.

105 Street N.W. West to 109 Street N.W.

9 Avenue N.W.

110A Street N.W. West to 116 Street N.W.

9 Avenue N. W.

170 Street N.W. West to 182 Street N.W.

9B Avenue N.W.

116 Street N.W. West to 127 Street N.W.

Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 9


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways

2. STREETS STREET

LIMITS

17 Street N.E.

North Saskatchewan River N.E. North to 153 Avenue N.E.

17 Street N.E.

181 Avenue N.E. North to 195 Avenue N.E.

20 Street N.W.

137 Avenue N.W. North to 144 Avenue N.W.

21 Street N.W.

146 Avenue N.W. North to 151 Avenue N.W.

23 Street N.W.

139 Avenue N.W. North to 146 Avenue N.W.

24 Street N.W.

135A Avenue N.W. North to 139 Avenue N.W.

26 Street N.W.

139 Avenue N.W. North to 142 Avenue N.W.

26 Street N.W.

146 Avenue N.W. North to 151 Avenue N.W.

30 Street N.W.

38 Avenue N.W. North to 43A Avenue N.W.

31A Street N.W.

35 Avenue N.W. North to 37A Avenue N.W.

31 Street N.W.

37A Avenue N.W. North to 38 Avenue N.W.

32 Street N.W.

107 Avenue N.W. North to 111 Avenue N.W.

34 Street N.W.

106 Avenue N.W. North to 121 Avenue N.W.

36 Street N.W.

137 Avenue N.W. North to 144 Avenue N.W.

37 Street N.W.

12 Avenue N.W. North to 20 Avenue N. W.

37 Street N.W.

26 Avenue N.W. North to 36 Avenue N.W.

37 Street N.W.

132 Avenue N.W. North to 134 Avenue N.W.

38 Street N.W.

20 Avenue N.W. North to 26 Avenue N.W.

38 Street N.W.

38 Avenue N.W. North to Johns Road N.W.

38 Street N.W.

106 Avenue N.W. North to 118 Avenue N.W.

40 Street N.W.

Hermitage Road N.W. North to 139 Avenue N.W.

42 Street N.W.

137 Avenue N.W. North to 139 Avenue N.W.

42 Street N.W.

69 Avenue N.W. North to 76 Avenue N.W.

43A Street N.W.

68 Avenue N.W. North to 69 Avenue N.W.

4-4 Street N.W.

38 Avenue N.W. North to Jackson Road N.W.

45 Street N.W.

103 Avenue N.W. North to 106 Avenue N.W.

46 Street NW.

107 Avenue N.W. North to 109 Avenue N.W.

47 Street N.W.

20 Avenue N.W. North to 26 Avenue N.W.

48 Street N.W.

12 Avenue N.W. North to 20 Avenue N.W.

48 Street N.W.

26 Avenue N.W. North to 36 Avenue N.W.

48 Street N.W.

92 Avenue N.W. North to 93 Avenue NW.

48 Street NW.

106B Avenue N.W. North to 107 Avenue N.W.

49 Street N.W.

92 Avenue N.W. North to 101 Avenue N.W.

50 Street NW.

106 Avenue N.W. North to 109 Avenue N.W.

Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 10


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways STREET

LIMITS

53 Street N.W.

112 Avenue N.W. North to 118 Avenue N.W.

53 Street N.W.

141 Avenue N.W. North to 144 Avenue N.W.

54 Street N.W.

11A Avenue N.W. North to 19A Avenue N.W.

54 Street N.W.

51 Avenue N.W. North to 55 Avenue N.W.

54 Street N.W.

118 Avenue N.W. North to 123 Avenue N.W.

54 Street N.W.

139 Avenue N.W. North to 141 Avenue N.W.

54 Street N.W.

McLeod Road N.W. North to 153 Avenue N.W.

55 Street N.W.

38 Avenue N.W. North to 40 Avenue N.W.

55 Street N.W.

144 Avenue N.W. North to McLeod Road N.W.

56 Street N.W.

82 Avenue N.W. North to 90 Avenue N.W.

57 Street N.W.

19A Avenue N.W. North to 23 Avenue N.W.

57 Street N.W.

94B Avenue N.W. North to 98 Avenue N.W.

58 Street N.W.

Youville Road East N.W. North to Woodvale Road N.W.

58 Street N.W.

90 Avenue N.W. North to 94 B Avenue N.W.

58 Street N.W.

133 Avenue N.W. North to 144 Avenue N.W.

59A Street N.W.

153 Avenue N.W. North to 162 Avenue N.W.

60 Street N.W.

85 Avenue N.W. North to 86 Avenue N.W.

61 Street N.W.

121 Avenue N.W. North to 122 Avenue N.W.

62 Street N.W.

11A Avenue KW. North to 19A Avenue N.W.

62 Street N.W.

38 Avenue N.W. North to 40 Avenue N.W.

62 Street N.W.

144 Avenue N.W. North to 149 Avenue N.W.

63 Street NW.

101 Avenue NW. North to Fulton Road N.W.

63 Street N.W.

140 Avenue N.W. North to 144 Avenue N.W.

64 Street N.W.

158 Avenue N.W. North to 162 Avenue N.W.

65 Street N.W.

103A Avenue N.W. North to 109 Avenue N.W.

66 Street N.W.

112 Avenue N.W. North to 118 Avenue N.W.

67 Street N.W.

68 Avenue N.W. North to 76 Avenue N.W.

68 Street N.W.

112 Avenue N.W. North to 118 Avenue N.W.

68 Street N.W.

132 Avenue N.W. North to 134 Avenue N.W.

69 Street N.W.

140 Avenue N.W. North to 144 Avenue N.W.

71 Street N.W.

Lakewood Road N.W. North to Millbourne Road N.W.

71 Street N.W.

72 Avenue N.W. North to Girard Road N.W.

71 Street N.W.

77 Avenue N.W. North to 82 Avenue N.W.

71 Street N.W.

98 Avenue N.W. North to 101 Avenue N.W.

72 Street N.W.

129 Avenue N.W. North to 130 Avenue N.W.

72 Street N.W.

144 Avenue N.W. North to I49A Avenue N.W.

' Indicates Proposed Facility

Page I I


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways

STREET

LIMITS

73A Street N.W.

153 Avenue N.W. North to 154 Avenue N.W.

74 Street N.W.

Delwood Road N.W. North to 14-4 Avenue N.W.

76 Street N.W.

38 Avenue N.W. North to 51 Avenue N.W.

76 Street N.W.

119 Avenue N.W. North to 120 Avenue N.W.

77 Street N.W.

144 Avenue N.W. North to 149A Avenue N.W.

78 Street N.W.

154 Avenue N.W. North to 160 Avenue N.W.

79 Street N.W.

76 Avenue N.W. North to 106 Avenue N.W.

79 Street N.W.

112 Avenue N.W. North to 115 Avenue N.W.

79 Street N.W.

141 Avenue N.W. North to 144 Avenue N.W.

79 Street N.W.

Argyll Road N.W. North to 73 Avenue N.W.

80 Street N.W.

10 Avenue N.W. North to Millwoods Road N.W.

81 Street N.W.

70 Avenue N.W. North to 76 Avenue N.W.

82 Street N.W.

Lakewood Road N.W. North to Richfield Road N.W.

83 Street N.W.

Davies Road N.W. North to Wagner Road N.W.

84 Street N.W.

Jasper Avenue N.W. North to 111 Avenue N.W.

84 Street N.W.

156 Avenue N.W. North to 160 Avenue N.W.

84 Street N.W.

160 Avenue N.W. North to Approximately 163 Avenue N.W.

85 Street N.W.

Knottwood Road N.W. North to Lakewood Road N.W.

85 Street N.W.

36 Avenue N.W. North to Millwoods Road N.W.

85 Street N.W.

82 Avenue N.W. North to 90 Avenue N.W.

86 Street N.W.

51 Avenue N.W. North to 66 Avenue N.W.

87 Street N.W.

135 Avenue N.W. North to 150 Avenue N.W.

87A Street N.W.

58 Avenue N.W. North to 61 Avenue N.W.

88 Street N.W.

153 Avenue N.W. North to 156 Avenue N.W.

89 Street N.W.

76 Avenue N.W. North to 82 Avenue N.W.

89 Street N.W.

10IA Avenue N.W. North to Rowland Road N.W.

90 Street N.W.

127 Avenue N.W. North to 135 Avenue N.W.

91 Street N.W.

82 Avenue N.W. North to 88 Avenue N.W.

91 Street N.W.

167 Avenue N.W. North to 179 Avenue N.W.

92 Street N.W.

88 Avenue N.W. North to Connors Road N.W.

92 Street N.W.

100 Avenue N.W. North to 101A Avenue N.W.

92 Street N.W.

Jasper Avenue N.W. North to Norwood Blvd. N.W.

93 Street N.W.

135 Avenue N.W. North to 140 Avenue N.W.

94 Street N.W.

140 Avenue N.W. North to 150 Avenue N.W.

95 Street N.W.

165 Avenue N.W. North to 167 Avenue N.W.

95 Street N.W.

168 Avenue N.W. North to 179 Avenue N.W.

Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 12


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways STREET

LIMITS

95A Street N.W.

101 Avenue N.W. North to Jasper Avenue N.W.

96 Street N.W.

63 Avenue N.W. North to 82 Avenue N.W.

96 Street N.W.

Jasper Avenue N.W. North to Norwood Boulevard N.W.

97 Street N.W.

31 Avenue N.W. North to 63 Avenue N.W.

99 Street N.W.

Jasper Avenue N.W. North to 103A Avenue N.W.

100 Street N.W.

82 Avenue N.W. North to 83 Avenue N.W.

100 Street N.W.

155 Avenue N.W. North to 172 Avenue N.W.

100A Street N.W.

Jasper Avenue N.W. North to 102 Avenue N.W.

101 Street N.W.

127 Avenue N.W. North to 128 Avenue N.W.

101 Street N.W.

134 Avenue N.W. North to 135 Avenue N.W.

102 Street N.W.

103 Avenue N.W. North to 104 Avenue N.W.

102 Street N.W.

135 Avenue N.W. North to 137 Avenue N.W.

102 Street N.W.

McDonald Drive North to 102 Avenue N.W.

103 Street N.W.

Bellamy Hill Road N.W. North to 104 Avenue N.W.

103 Street N.W.

127 Avenue N.W. North to 129 Avenue N.W.

104 Street N.W.

20 Avenue N.W. North to 21 Avenue N.W.

104 Street N.W.

51 Avenue N.W. North to 55 Avenue N.W.

104 Street N.W.

97 Avenue N.W. North to 98 Avenue N.W.

104 Street N.W.

99 Avenue N.W. North to 104 Avenue N.W.

105 Street N.W.

11 Avenue N.W. North to 29 Avenue N.W.

105 Street N.W.

36A Avenue N.W. North to 38 Avenue N.W.

105 Street N.W.

55 Avenue N.W. North to 56 Avenue N.W.

105 Street N.W.

76 Avenue N.W. North to Saskatchewan Drive N.W.

105 Street N.W.

118 Avenue N.W. North to 122 Avenue N.W.

106 Street N.W.

29 Avenue N.W. North to Saskatchewan Drive N.W.

106 Street N.W.

96 Avenue N.W. North to 97 Avenue N.W.

107 Street N.W.

47 Avenue N.W. North to 51 Avenue N.W.

107 Street N.W.

96 Avenue N.W. North to 104 Avenue N.W.

107 Street N.W.

127 Avenue N.W. North to 132 Avenue N.W.

108 Street N.W.

36A Avenue N.W. North to 42 Avenue N.W.

108 Street N.W.

99 Avenue N.W. North to 104 Avenue N.W.

108 Street N.W.

111 Avenue N.W. North to Kingsway Avenue N.W.

108 Street N.W.

132 Avenue N.W. North to 137 Avenue N.W.

109 Street N.W.

11 Avenue N.W. North to 29 Avenue N.W.

109 Street N.W.

29A Avenue N.W. North to 32A Avenue N.W.

109 Street N.W.

57 Avenue N.W. North to 62 Avenue N.W.

' Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 13


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways

STREET

LIMITS

109 Street N.W.

158 Avenue N.W. North to 172 Avenue N.W.

110 Street N.W.

97 Avenue N.W. North to Jasper Avenue N.W.

110A Street N.W.

9 Avenue N.W. Northeast to 12 Avenue N.W.

1 1 1 Street N.W.

87 Avenue N.W. North to Saskatchewan Drive N.W.

111 Street N.W.

97 Avenue N.W. North to 104 Avenue N.W.

112 Street N.W.

Saddleback Road N.W. North to 22 Avenue N.W.

112 Street N.W.

25 Avenue N.W. North to 31 Avenue N.W.

112 Street N.W.

87 Avenue N.W. North to 89 Avenue N.W.

112 Street N.W.

99 Avenue N.W. North to 104 Avenue N.W.

112 Street N.W.

158 Avenue N.W. North to Beaumaris Road N.W.

113 Street N.W.

9 Avenue N.W. North to 12 Avenue N.W.

113 Street N.W.

31 Avenue N.W. North to 34 Avenue N.W.

113A Street N.W.

57 Avenue N.W. North to 60 Avenue N.W.

114 Street N.W.

34 Avenue N.W. North to 43 Avenue N.W.

114 Street N.W.

51 Avenue N.W. North to 57 Avenue N.W.

114 Street N.W.

87 Avenue N.W. North to 89 Avenue N.W.

115 Street N.W.

169 A Avenue N.W. North to 172 Avenue N.W.

115 Street N.W.

162 Avenue N.W. North to 167 Avenue N.W.

115 Street N.W.

Malmo Road N.W. North to 51 Avenue N.W.

116 Street N.W.

9 Avenue N.W. North to 12 Avenue N.W.

116 Street N.W.

Saddleback Road N.W. North to 31 Avenue N.W.

116 Street N.W.

41 Avenue N.W. North to 43 Avenue N.W.

116 Street N.W.

87 Avenue N.W. North to Saskatchewan Drive N.W.

116 Street N.W.

108 Avenue N.W. North to Tower Road N.W.

117 Street N.W.

37 Avenue N.W. North to 41 Avenue N.W.

117 Street N.W.

University Avenue N.W. North to 87 Avenue N.W.

117 Street N.W.

139 Avenue N.W. North to 145 Avenue N.W.

118 Street N.W.

73 Avenue N.W. North to 76 Avenue N.W.

118 Street N.W.

145 Avenue N.W. North to 152 Avenue N.W.

119 Street N.W.

87 Avenue N.W. North to Windsor Road N.W.

119 Street N.W.

132 Avenue N.W. North to 137 Avenue N.W.

120 Street N.W.

Windsor Road N.W. North to 92 Avenue N.W.

120 Street N.W.

127 Avenue N.W. North to 132 Avenue N.W.

121 Street N.W.

40 Avenue N.W. North to 42 Avenue N.W.

121 Street N.W.

100 Avenue N.W. North to 105 Avenue N.W.

121 Street N.W.

139 Avenue N.W. North to 162 Avenue N.W.

' Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 14


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways

STREET

LIMITS

122 Street N.W.

118 Avenue N.W. North to 119 Avenue NW.

123 Street N.W.

118 Avenue N.W. North to 119 Avenue N.W.

124 Street N.W.

25 Avenue N.W. North to 28 Avenue N.W.

124 Street N.W.

40 Avenue N.W. North to 42 Avenue N.W.

124 Street N.W.

Landsdowne Drive N.W. North to 51 Avenue N.W.

124 Street N.W.

118 Avenue N.W. North to Yellowhead Trail N.W.

127 Street N.W.

Stony Plain Road N.W. North to 118 Avenue N.W.

128 Street N.W.

129 Avenue N.W. North to 131 Avenue N.W.

129 Street N.W.

62 Avenue N.W. North to 63 Avenue N.W.

129 Street N.W.

155 Avenue N.W. North to 160 Avenue N.W.

131 Street N.W.

153 Avenue N.W. North to 155 Avenue N.W.

132 Street N.W.

129 Avenue N.W. North to 135 Avenue N.W.

132A Street N.W.

134 Avenue N.W. North to 135 Avenue N.W.

135 Street N.W.

107 Avenue N.W. North to 115 Avenue N.W.

135 Street N.W.

129 Avenue N.W. North to 137 Avenue N.W.

136 Street N.W.

102 Avenue N.W. North to 107 Avenue N.W.

139 Street N.W.

114 Avenue N.W. North to Dovercourt Avenue N.W.

140 Street N.W.

132 Avenue N.W. North to 135 Avenue N.W.

142 Street N.W.

Loop South of 46 Avenue N.W. North to 53 Avenue N.W.

142 Street N.W.

80 Avenue N.W. North to 87 Avenue N.W.

142 Street N.W.

Yellowhead Trail N.W. North to 126 Avenue N.W.

143 Street N.W.

49 Avenue N.W. North to 60 Avenue N.W.

143 Street N.W.

Yellowhead Trail N.W. North to 126 Avenue

144 Street N.W.

128 Avenue N.W. North to 130 Avenue N.W.

145 Street N.W.

80 Avenue N.W. North to 91 Avenue N.W.

145 Street N.W.

95 Avenue N.W. North to 96 Avenue N.W.

146 Street N.W.

91 Avenue N.W. North to 95 Avenue N.W.

146 Street N.W.

McQueen Road N.W. North to 109 Avenue N.W.

146 Street N.W.

131 Avenue N.W. North to 134 Avenue N.W.

148 Street N.W.

56 Avenue N.W. North to Riverbend Road N.W.

148 Street N.W.

128 Avenue N.W. North to 131 Avenue N.W.

149 Street N.W.

Rio Terrace Drive N.W. North to 76 Avenue N.W.

151 Street N.W.

Rio Terrace Drive N.W. North to 76 Avenue N.W.

156 Street S.W.

41 Avenue S.W. North to 28 Avenue S.W.

156 Street S.W.

20 Avenue S.W. North to Ellerslic Road S.W. (9 Avenue S.W.)

156 Street N.W

76 Avenue N.W. North to 87 Avenue N.W.

" Indicates Proposed Facility

Page IS


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways STREET

LIMITS

158 Street N.W.

100A Avenue N.W. North to Stony Plain Road N.W.

159 Street N.W.

76 Avenue N.W. North to Whitemud Drive N.W.

159 Street N.W.

Stony Plain Road N.W. North to 107 Avenue N.W.

161 Street N.W.

109 Avenue N.W. North to 110B Avenue N.W.

163 Street N.W.

107 Avenue N.W. North to 109 Avenue N.W.

163 Street N.W.

111 Avenue N.W. North to 121A Avenue N.W.

165 Street N.W.

87 Avenue N.W. North to 95 Avenue N.W.

166 Street N.W.

100 Avenue N.W. North to Stony Plain Road N.W.

166A Street N.W.

109 Avenue N.W. North to 114 Avenue N.W.

167 Street N.W.

80 Avenue N.W. North to 83 Avenue N.W.

167 Street N.W.

95 Avenue N.W. North to Stony Plain Road N.W.

167 Street N.W.

117 Avenue N.W. North to 118 Avenue N.W.

168 Street N.W.

88 Avenue N.W. North to 93 Avenue N.W.

168 Street N.W.

100 Avenue N.W. North to Stony Plain Road N.W.

169 Street N.W.

80 Avenue N.W. North to 87 Avenue N.W.

170 Street N.W.

16 Avenue N.W. North to 23 Avenue N.W.

172 Street N.W.

57 Avenue N.W. North to 76 Avenue N.W.

172 Street N.W.

95 Avenue N.W. North to 99 Avenue N.W.

172 Street N.W.

102 Avenue N.W. North to 107 Avenue N.W.

175 Street N.W.

81 Avenue N.W. North to 87 Avenue N.W.

175 Street N.W.

99 Avenue N.W. North to 102 Avenue N.W.

182 Street N.W.

81 Avenue N.W. North to 98 Avenue N.W.

184 Street N.W.

19 Avenue N.W. North to E.L. Smith Road N.W.

184 Street N.W.

Wedgewood Boulevard N.W. North to 77 Avenue N.W.

188 Street N.W.

I/-ccard Road N.W. North to 49 Avenue N.W.

188 Street N.W.

Callingwood Road N.W. North to Ormsby Road Fast N.W.

188 Street N.W.

Ormsby Road N.W. North to 77 Avenue N.W.

189 Street N.W.

57 Avenue N.W. North to Callingwood Road N.W.

189 Street N.W.

84 Avenue N.W. North to 97A Avenue N.W.

190 Street N.W.

52 Avenue N.W. North to 57 Avenue N.W.

199 Street S.W..

25 Avenue S.W. North to Quadrant Avenue

199 Steet N.W.

Whitemud Drive N.W. North to 118A Avenue N.W.

199 Street N.W.

Yellowhead Trail N.W. North Service Road North to 137 Avenue N.W.

231 Street N.W.

Yellowhead Trail N.W. North to 128 Avenue N.W.

Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 16


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways 3. NAMED ROADWAYS ROADWAY

LIMITS

Abbotsfield Road N.W.

118 Avenue N.W. Northwest to 34 Street N.W.

Airport Road N.W.

Kingsway Ave N.W.F_act., Northwest to Kingsway Ave N.W.West

Alberta Grain Terminals Rd. N.W.

133 Street N.W. Northwest to St. Albert Trail N.W.

Bcaumaris Road N.W.

153 Avenue N.W. Northwest to Castle Downs Road N.W.

Blackburn Drive N.W.

111 Street N.W. Past to Blackwood Crescent N.W.

Breckenridge Drive N.W.

207 Street N.W. West to Brennan Crescent N.W.

Buena Vista Road N.W.

Laurier Park Northwest to 142 Street N.W.

Bulyea Road N.W.

Rabbit Hill Road N.W. Northwest to Terwillegar Drive N.W.

Burton Road N.W.

Bulyea Road N.W. F-act West to Bulyea Road N.W. West

Cameron Avenue N.W.

94 Street N.W. Northwest to 101 Avenue N.W.

Carter Crest Road N.W.

Rabbit Hill Rd N.W. West Southeast to Rabbit Hill Road N.W. F-ast

Clareview Road N.W.

Victoria Trail N.W. Northeast to 135A Avenue N.W.

Confederation Park Road N.W.

Ill Street N.W. West to 114 Street N.W.

Cumberland Road N.W.

127 Street N.W. West to 135 Street N.W.

Danbury Boulevard

Donsdale Drive N.W. North to Lessard Road N.W.

Davies Road N.W.

86 Street N.W. Northeast to Wagner Road N.W.

Delwood Road N.W.

68 Street N.W. West/Southwest to 132 Avenue N.W.

Dovercourt Avenue N.W.

139 Street N.W. Northeast to St. Albert Trail N.W.

Dunluce Road N.W.

115 Street N.W. West/Southwest to 161 Avenue N.W.

Emily Murphy Park Road N.W.

116 Street N.W. West to Groat Road N.W.

Falconer Road N.W.

Rabbit Hill Road N.W. Southwest to Riverbend Road N.W.

Fort Road N.W.

115 Avenue N.W. Northeast to 82 Street N.W.

Fort Road N.W.

144 Avenue N.W. Northeast to 167 Avenue N.W.

Fort Road N.W.

167 Avenue N.W. Northeast to 18 Street N.W.

Fort Road

18 Street N.W. Northeast to 17 Street N.E.

Fulton Road N.W.

50 Street N.W. Southwest to 63 Street N.W.

Girard Road N.W.

71 Street N.W. Northeast to 76 Avenue N.W.

Gricsbach Road N.W.

97 Street N.W. Northwest to 153 Avenue N.W.

Haddow Drive N.W.

Riverbend N.W. Southwest to Hunters Close N.W.

Hayter Road N.W.

Yellowhead Trail N.W. Northeast to Meridian Street (1 Street)

Heath Road N.W.

Heath Road N.W Riverbend Road N.W south, North to Riverbend Road N.W. north

Hermitage Road N.W.

Hooke Road N.W. Northwest to 50 Street N.W.

Hewes Way N.W.

23 Avenue N.W. North to 28 Avenue N.W.

llooke Road N.W.

Hermitage Road N.W. Fast., West to Hermitage Road N.W. West

â&#x20AC;¢ Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 17


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways ROADWAY

LIMITS

Hyndman Crescent N.W.

Hermitage Road N.W. East, West to Hermitage Road N.W. West

Jackson Road N.W.

Johns Road N.W. West to 44 Avenue N.W.

Kirkness Road N.W.

144 Avenue N.W. Northeast to 151 Avenue N.W.

Knottwood Road East N.W.

12 Avenue N.W. North to 72 Street N.W.

Knottwood Road North N.W.

72 Street N.W. West to 85 Street N.W.

Knottwood Road West N.W.

87 Street N.W. North to 85 Street N.W.

Knottwood Road South N.W.

12 Avenue N.W. West to 87 Street N.W.

Lakewood Road N.W.

28 Avenue N.W. Northwest to Millwoods Road N.W.

Lakewood Road North N.W.

Millwoods Road N.W. West to 33 Avenue N.W.

Lakewood Road South N.W.

Millwoods Road N.W. West to 85 Street N.W.

Lakewood Road West N.W.

85 Street N.W. North to 33 Avenue N.W.

Lansdowne Drive N.W.

122A Street N.W. Southwest to 124 Street N.W.

Lager Boulevard N.W.

Rabbit Hill Road N.W. West to Lindsay Crescent N.W.

Malmo Road N.W.

115 Street N.W. Northeast to Si Avenue N.W.

McLeod Road N.W.

50 Street N.W. Southwest to 149 Avenue N.W.

McQueen Road N.W.

142 Street N.W. Southwest to 107 Avenue N.W.

Millbourne Road East N.W.

Millwoods Road N.W. Northeast to 38 Avenue N.W.

Millbourne Road East N.W.

38 Avenue N.W. Northwest to 76 Street N.W.

Millbourne Road West N.W.

76 Street N.W. Southwest to Millwoods Road N.W.

Millwoods Road N.W.

80 Street N.W. North to 91 Street N.W.

Millwoods Road East N.W.

I6A Avenue N.W. North to 38 Avenue N.W.

Millwoods Road South N.W.

I6A Avenue N.W. West to 80 Street N.W.

Oakes Gate N.W.

Rabbit Hill Road N.W. North to Oeming Road N.W.

Oeming Road N.W.

Oakes Gate N.W. West to Bulyea Road N.W.

Ogilvie Boulevard N.W.

Trans Alta Power Line Right-Of-Way West to Rabbit Hill Road N.W.

Ormsby Road West N.W.

188 Street N.W. West/Northwest to 188 Street N.W.

Ottewell Road N.W.

90 Avenue N.W. North to 98 Avenue N.W.

Ozema Road N.W.

73A Street N.W. Northeast to 158 Avenue N.W.

Potter Greens Drive N.W.

207 Street N.W. East/North to approx. 86 Avenue N.W.

Rabbit Hill Road N.W.

Riverbend Road N.W. Northwest to Promontory Point N.W.

Rhatigan Road East N.W.

Riverbend Road N.W. Northeast to 40 Avenue N.W.

Rhatigan Road West N.W.

Riverbend Road N.W. Southwest to Riverbend Road N.W.

Richfield Road N.W.

82 Street N.W. Northeast to 36 Avenue N.W.

Rio Terrace Drive N.W.

149 Street N.W. West to 151 Street N.W.

Riverbend Road N.W.

40 Avenue N.W. N.W. North to 148 Street N.W.

Saddleback Road N.W.

Ill Street NW. West/Northwest (0 23 Avenue N.W.

' Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 18


Appendix C: Physical Description of Collector Roadways ROADWAY

LIMITS

Saddleback Road N.W.

23 Avenue N.W. North/Northeast to Ill Street N.W.

Saskatchewan Drive N.W.

76 Avenue N.W. North to University Avenue N.W.

Saskatchewan Drive N.W.

111 Street N.W. West to 116 Street N.W.

Sherbrooke Avenue N.W.

129 Street N.W. West to St. Albert Trail N.W.

Tower Road N.W.

116 Street N.W. Northeast to Kingsway Avenue N.W.

Towne Centre Boulevard N.W.

23 Avenue N.W. South to Tomlinson Way N.W.

University Avenue N.W.

103 Street N.W. Northwest to 105 Street N.W.

Wagner Road N.W.

75 Street N.W. Southwest to 86 Street N.W.

Wanyandi Road N.W.

Callingwood Road N.W. Northwest to Wolf Willow Road N.W.

Wedgewood Boulevard N.W.

184 Street N.W. South to Welbourne Drive N.W.

Windermere Crescent N.W.

170 Street N.W. South, North to 170 Street N.W. North

Windermere Drive N.W.

9 Avenue N.W. Northeast to 170 Street N.W.

Windsor Road N.W.

119 Street N.W. Northwest to 120 Street N.W.

Winterburn Rd(215 St) NW

Yellowhead Trail N.W. North to approximately North City Limit

Wolf Willow Road N.W.

Wolf Willow Crescent N.W. West to 170 Street N.W.

Woodvale Road East N.W.

58 Street N.W. Northeast to 38 Avenue N.W.

Wood vale Road West N.W.

58 Street N.W. Northwest to 38 Avenue N.W.

Yellowhead Trail N.W. N. Service Rd

199 Street N.W. West to Winterburn Road N.W. (215 Street)

Youville Drive East N.W.

28 Avenue N.W. Northwest to 58 Street N.W.

Youville Drive West N.W.

28 Avenue N.W. Northeast to 58 Street N.W.

' Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 19


Appendix D: Physical Description of Light Rail Transit

APPENDIX "D" PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION OF LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT THE CITY OF EDMONTON TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM BY-LAW NO. 11778

' Indicates Proposed Facility

Page I


Appendix D: Physical Description of Light Rail Transit

LRT LINE 201

LIMITS

LINE 201: Northeast Section

Surface line within CNR right-of-way from Clareview Station located approximately at 139 Avenue/43 Street southwest to 105 Avenue/96 Street.

LINE 201: Downtown Section

Underground line; from 105 Avenue/96 Street southwest to Central Station at Jasper Avenue/101 Street, then west to Corona Station at Jasper Avenue/108 Street; then southwest to 110 Street, then south along 110 Street to Grandin Station at 110 Street/98 Avenue.

LINE 201: University Section

Underground Line; from Grandin Station south along 110 Street, to north bank of North Saskatchewan River; across River on Dudley B. Menzies bridge, underground from south bank of River, southwest to University Station at 89 Avenue/I13 Street.

* LINE 201: South Extension to Southgate Station

Underground from University Station, south along the west side of 114 Street, emerging from the underground alignment to a surface alignment approximately 150m south of 87 Avenue N.W., then at-grade along the west side of 114 Street/113 Street to 61 Avenue, east along the south side of 61 Avenue to 1 l 1 Street, south along 111 Street to Southgate Station at Ill Street/Whitemud Drive.

* LINE 201: South Extension to Heritage Station

From Southgate Station, south and on an at-grade alignment along 111Street to Heritage Station, located approximately at 111 Street/23 Avenue.

â&#x20AC;˘ Indicates Proposed Facility

Page 2


Appendix E: Principles of Light Rail Transit and Busway Development

APPENDIX "E" PRINCIPLES OF LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT AND BUS WAY DEVELOPMENT THE CITY OF EDMONTON TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM BY-LAW NUMBER 11778

Page I


Appendix E: Principles of Light Rail Transit and Busway Development

Light Rail Transit and Busway Development Basic Principles A. Statement of Intent The intent of this document is to articulate a set of basic principles which will guide the planning, design, construction and operation of Light Rail Transit (L.R.T.) lines, Busways and related facilities in Edmonton. The purpose of including these principles as an appendix to the Transportation System By-law is to ensure that the development of L.R_T. and busways in Edmonton is undertaken within a framework which is consistent with certain themes and objectives which transcend changes in decision making personnel and process. The inclusion of these principles in this By-law affords the public an opportunity to intervene and influence, through a statutory hearing process, in any proposed revisions to or deviations from the principles set out herein. The principles are intended to be flexible enough so as to reflect and be subject to varying sets of conditions, constraints and standards over time. It is anticipated that affected communities may ask City Council to consider site specific issues arising from the development of LRT or busways in their community. The order in which the principles are presented does not reflect any particular ranking, priority or weighting. It is recognized and accepted that the relative importance of these principles will vary depending on situations and conditions. It is further recognized and accepted that in some instances specific applications of the principles may compete with each other, in which case decisions may require certain trade offs to be made.

Page 2


Appendix E: Principles of Light Rail Transit and Busway Development

A. Statement of Principles I.

Principles of Public Consultation

The City is committed to ongoing consultation with parties who have an interest in issues relating to the planning and development of LRT and busways. It is recognized that the specific consultation processes which are undertaken must be sufficiently flexible to allow for the diversity of public views which may be expressed over time and over different segments of LRT or busway systems. The fundamental justification for public consultation is the premise that the public has a right to participate in decisions that may affect them. 2.

Principle of Personal Safety

The City is committed to the development of a Light Rail Transit and Busway System which in its design, construction and operation, meets with generally accepted principles of safety and is consistent with sound and accepted engineering standards and practices. The articulation of these principles, standards and practices must take into account the safety concerns and physical, demographic and land use environments of the communities along any given section of LRT line or Busway. 3.

Principle of Community Viability

In the design, construction and operation of the LRT or Busway system, the City of Edmonton will use its reasonable efforts to maintain or reinforce those elements which contribute to the current viability of the communities adjoining the LRT or Busway system within the bounds of practicality and feasibility. It is recognized and accepted that the elements which influence community viability may vary from community to community. 4.

Principle of Impact Mitigation

The City is committed to the practical and feasible mitigation or reduction of negative impacts on adjoining communities which may arise from the development of the LRT or Busway system. 5.

Principle of Fiscal Responsibilities

The City is committed to the development of the LRT or Busway system in a manner which is consistent with its fiscal capabilities and fiscal priorities as may be established from time to time by City Council, as agent for the citizens of Edmonton. 6.

Principle of Community Stability and Appropriate Revitalization

In its decision relating to land development, land use change and possible related demographic implications, the City will ensure adherence and consistency with the spirit, objectives and policies of the Municipal Development Plan and other planning instruments as may be adopted and amended from time to time. 7.

Principle of Growth Accommodation through Public Transit Enhancement

The City affirms its commitment to the provision of an effective public transit system as a means of accommodating the City's growing travel demands.

Page 3


Edmonton (Alta.) - 1999 - Edmonton's transportation master plan (1999-04-14)