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Chester CountyPRESS

www.chestercounty.com

Covering Avon Grove, Chadds Ford, Kennett Square, Oxford, & Unionville Areas

Volume 154, No. 30

INSIDE

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Kennett Square Borough Council considers expanding scope of project By Steven Hoffman Staff Writer

At the July 20 borough council meeting, Kennett Square Borough Manager Joseph Scalise outlined Town Tours and Village Walks returns details about a multi-faceted project that would see virtually...7B significant enhancements to Birch Street and would add to the network of public trails in the region. Essentially, Kennett Square Borough is considering expanding the scope of a project to achieve several goals at one time, rather than having separate projects that are planned and funded individually in the coming years. Scalise explained that the borough had already secured funding for the Avon Grove Charter grads Birch Street project that would bring streetscape honored...5B improvements to an area of town that has already undergone a lot of redevelopment in recent years. The borough received $500,000 in Chester County Community Revitalization Program funding for Birch

Street improvements, and the borough also allocated $210,000 in the 2020 budget for the project. Now, borough officials are considering a larger project that would require collaboration with neighboring Kennett Township on an initiative that would advance connectivity and accessibility in the area by adding two Kennett Greenway Connectors— the creation of a trail along Birch Street and the construction of a railroad underpass, known as the Magnolia Underpass, in Kennett Township. These two connectors would provide local residents with additional access to the Kennett Greenway. The Kennett Greenway is comprised of 14 miles of continuous, accessible trails that stretch across five municipalities in two states—Pennsylvania and Delaware. It includes more than 1,500 acres of open space, including more than 10 parks and preserves. The larger project now

being considered by Kennett Square Borough officials not only provides connection points to the Kennett Greenway, this initiative would help connect borough residents to everyday destinations, including schools, shops, restaurants, and historical and cultural assets. It would also enhance the community while preserving natural resources. The funding that has been lined up for the Birch Street improvements could be utilized as matching funds for the larger project, Scalise said, explaining that Kennett Square Borough and Kennett Township would seek additional state funding for the project. The borough manager said that utilizing the funding that is already in place to secure additional state funding would help maximize the return on investment. Undertaking all the elements of the project at one time rather than doing them separately could also save the borough money. Continued on Page 2A

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Celebrating Kennett’s graduates

Photo by Chris Barber

A graduate bumps elbows with Superintendent Dr. Dusty Blakey at the commencement for Kennett High School’s Class of 2020 last Saturday. The event, which honored this year’s graduates, took place at the middle school campus. Please see Page 1B for the story and photos.

Is change in policing possible? Oxford Borough Police Chief Sam Iacono talks about the importance of effective community policing By Betsy Brewer Brantner Contributing Writer

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Bringing police and community together is not always an easy task. Oxford Borough Police Chief Sam Iacono has been a police officer for 34 years. The current clash of police and community on the national level has been of grave concern to Iacono and Oxford Mayor Phil Harris. As a result of their concern, both have particiCourtesy photo Oxford Borough Police Chief Sam Iacono and Mayor pated in a program titled, Phil Harris both participated in a program titled, “Crucial Conversations That Lead to Real Change.” “Crucial Conversations That Lead to Real Change.”

The program, which was held at Willowdale Chapel in West Grove, was organized by churches Allen AME, Shiloh Presbyterian, Oxford Methodist and Willowdale Chapel. The purpose of the group is to discuss violence and systemic racial and economic inequities. The group will work together to make changes. Both Iacono and Mayor Harris believe change is not something a legislative body can do. As Mayor Harris said previously, “This is a human condition and by

asking questions, discussing our stories, and coming out of our collective bubbles, we are hopeful that we can find a new path.” Iacono added, “We have joined in this conversation and I believe we are finding common ground. More importantly, the more programs like this that the community and police have, the more I see real change is possible. “The real challenge at this time is for people to listen, really listen, and hear what each other is saying. Most people don’t listen. Instead, Continued on Page 4A

COVID Summer: Parents teaching their children the hard lessons of the pandemic By Richard L. Gaw Staff Writer As the coronavirus flipped its calendar from March to April in the United States, reports began circulating that large-scale parties were being held on Spring Break beaches that were drawing hundreds of college-age revelers. It was all supported by photographs that showed

wall-to-wall, body-to-body frivolity – a collection of young adults who seemed to laugh in the face of the common-sense restrictions that a global pandemic had forced upon them. They were not practicing social distancing. They were not wearing masks. On the contrary, their devilmay-care attitude celebrated the last strains of restless youth, and no one, least of

all the medical experts who warned them of the potential health consequences of their actions, was going to stop them from having a great time. The parties rolled on, and as several states began to loosen their restrictions, beaches and bars became the new epicenters for the virus, and young people became its newest victims. Perhaps the most brazen

act of social defiance of young people has been the new phenomenon known as a COVID-19 party, which is based on inviting a few of the unlucky ones who had contracted the virus to frolic with those who had not tested positive. The first one to contract a positive test wins the competition, which usually comes in the form of cash. Since Memorial Day

weekend, the rates of infection among adults 20 to 40 have skyrocketed in the United States, particularly among those in states like Florida, Texas, South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia – and Pennsylvania. In its July 17 report, the Pennsylvania Department of Health (DOH) confirmed that there were 1,032 additional positive cases of Continued on Page 2A

And the bands play on: The Kennett Flash is keeping the music alive By Richard L. Gaw Staff Writer In the five years that Andrew Miller has served as the executive director of the Kennett Flash, he has spearheaded a membership program, hired a full-time assistant, and given the venue’s concert calendar a new lease on life by bringing in not only the top names in local music but nationally known performers, as well as open-mic nights, comedy

revues, children’s programming and a Master Class series. For nearly everyone who stepped on The Flash’s stage and for many of those who attended shows, their comments were an echo of one another. This place is a true listening room at its best. Then in March, the world caved in. Ironically, as the COVID19 pandemic was beginning its scorched-earth assault on

theaters and concert halls throughout Pennsylvania, Miller was about to meet with The Flash’s Board of Directors to discuss the 11-year-old venue’s biggest project yet: To explore the possibility of moving to a larger, dedicated arts space – one that would provide the same intimacy of the Sycamore Alley location but offer upgraded amenities. Due to the stay-at-home restrictions that governed

Pennsylvania in the early days of the pandemic, the meeting never happened, and soon, the worst fears of any music venue director had become real for Miller. He had to postpone some shows, reschedule others and outright cancel a few more – effectively shutting off an income source that pays for 70 percent of The Flash’s expenses. Suddenly, the big umbrella of The Flash’s mission statement -- to enhance the

quality of life for people of all ages, achieved through arts experiences for audiences, performing artists and students – was not large enough to protect it from an oncoming storm. To make matters even more stressful, Su Spina, who was hired in 2019 to assist Miller in every phase of operations, had left her position, finding more secure work outside of the arts. “The initial reaction from Continued on Page 3A


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CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020

Chester County Press

Local News Kennett Square Borough... Continued from Page 1A

“This is probably a lot cheaper in the long run,” Scalise said. Birch Street needs a complete roadway reconstruction as well as streetscape improvements like sidewalks, street lighting, and traffic-calming measures. A Kennett Greenway connection in the area would provide a safe route for borough high school students and for local residents to walk to amenities. Meanwhile, the Magnolia Underpass would address the fact that the East Penn Railroad is a physical barrier in the community that divides Kennett Square Borough and Kennett Township’s open space investments. Some residents use the railroad as a walking path to everyday destinations, which has long been a concern for local officials. The creation of the Magnolia

COVID-19... Continued from Page 1A

COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 99,478. The report also stated that the department is seeing significant increases in the number of COVID-19 cases among younger age groups, particularly 19 to 24-year-olds, who now account for 45 percent of the total case count. In an advisory sent by Health Secretary Dr. Rachel Levine last week to healthcare facilities and

Underpass will mean that they won’t have to do that any longer. An underpass will help safely connect residents to New Garden Shopping Center and several trails and other amenities in the borough and the township. Because the borough and the township are collaborating on the project, they will have a better opportunity to qualify for more grant funding. Scalise said that if Kennett Square Borough and Kennett Township officials opt to pursue the project, they would be seeking funding through the Commonwealth Financing Authority Multimodal Transportation Fund. This Fund provides grants to improve public transportation assets that enhance communities, pedestrian safety and transit revitalization. The borough could seek a grant of $1,953,085 with a match of $1,260,000. This includes the $500,000 Chester County Community

Revitalization Program grant that the borough already has, as well as $210,000 allocated for the project in the 2020 budget. Kennett Township could contribute $300,000 for the Magnolia Underpass, which would be sufficient to be a 30 percent match for a $1 million state grant. Additionally, the Square Roots Collective has offered up to $250,000 to account for any funding shortfalls for the project. Scalise outlined the next steps if borough officials are interested in pursuing the project. He explained that, at a future meeting, council would need to consider a resolution authorizing an application for the state grant funding. The submission of the grant application is due by Sept. 30. Kennett Township’s Board of Supervisors would need to consider a resolution supporting the joint project between the two municipalities. Officials from both municipalities would need to sign and approve a for-

mal cooperation agreement if they were awarded the state grants. In other business at the council meeting, borough council unanimously voted to change the borough manager evaluation process. Council member LaToya Myers made the point that they should move the evaluation cycle to November or December so that it aligns better with the regulations regarding the approval of borough manager contracts in Pennsylvania—they need to be approved to coincide with the borough council reorganization meetings that take place after elections every other year. Additionally, Kennett Square Borough Council wants the Personnel Committee to handle discussions about the evaluations with the borough manager, rather than having the council president or council vice president handle this duty. One of the presentations during the meeting was a report about the audit that

professionals, she wrote that the DOH is seeing increasing numbers of cases of COVID-19 that are not part of a known outbreak. Specifically, she wrote, these cases have been associated with travel to other affected parts of the country and social gatherings or social settings – such as parties, restaurants and bars. The recent demographic shift in the continuing sweep of COVID-19 is enough to worry anyone, and while the younger pop-

ulation is less susceptible to develop severe symptoms and possibly die, there is the growing fear that this population could infect other people, especially the vulnerable older generations. In short, these numbers tell a tale that has its roots in the false perception of invincibility, and for the parents of these young people, the numbers have led to several table meetings with their high school- and college-age children.

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Winden Rowe, a personal counselor and trauma specialist who lives in New Garden Township, is the single mother of two teenage sons. William, the oldest, is headed to a small college in Maine in the fall, and Reid, the youngest, is about to enter his Senior year at Kennett High School. “We had a family moment when this all started,” she said. “We were definitely scared, confused and daunted by this, like everybody else was. I found myself standing in my kitchen, giving them a lecture about appropriate pandemic practices, as if I had any clue about what I was talking about. Nobody has been through this before, and I certainly have no clue.” She had a serious reason to be concerned. “I explained to them, ‘Here is how this works. My father has Parkinson’s Disease, and if he contracts the virus, his chances of surviving are significantly low.’” Rowe is not alone. Jamie Kleman lives with her husband and two children in Landenberg. Their daughter Abby is about to enter her Junior year in college in Washington, D.C., and their son Will is preparing for his Senior year at Kennett High School. Even more concerning is that her par-

was completed on the borough’s financial statements for 2019. Deborah Bacon, a principal with Zelenkofske Axelrod, led the presentation. She explained that the audit revealed no deficiencies or findings with regard to the borough’s financial records for 2019. This indicates a clean bill of health for the borough’s financial reporting. noted that Bacon Zelenkofske Axelrod added a paragraph to the audit report that explained that the audit report provided a snapshot of the borough’s finances as of Dec. 31, 2019, and does not take into account at all the impact of COVID-19. She said that auditors have been inserting this language into their audit reports since the pandemic started so that it is clear that the auditing work addressed the financial statements as of Dec. 31, 2019. In his report to council, Scalise informed council that the parking

garage expansion project is nearing the point where a certificate of occupancy can be secured. Borough officials are also working on a crisis communication plan that will provide valuable and updated information to borough residents about the coronavirus pandemic and other issues of importance. Council vice president Rosa Moore reminded residents to sign up for alerts from the Swift 911 messaging system. Council member Doug Doerfler said that they hope to be able to communicate with residents through methods that people can access on their mobile phones since phones are omnipresent these days. Borough officials are also hoping to encourage community ambassadors to share important information with their friends and neighbors. To contact Staff Writer Steven Hoffman, email editor@chestercounty.com.

Courtesy images

The recent increase in COVID-19 among young people has forced parents to rethink how they impart advice and counsel to their children.

Protecting children from the potential dangers of COVID-19 has come with also having to navigate through a complex myriad of messages, parents are saying.

ents live a few hours away in Maryland and are both vulnerable to the virus. When the pandemic first arrived in March, Kleman said the family went on lockdown, but even as the statewide restrictions shifted, county by county and region by region of Pennsylvania, “We still had to talk with them,” she said. “We told them that we all have to be extra careful during our trips to see my parents. We told them that while we get that their age group feels that they will

be okay if they are infected, the concern is not just for them, but for my parents, who are both at high risk.” Word of the spike in COVID-19 among young people – and its potentially devastating effect on others through exposure -- has caught the attention of the country’s top infectious disease expert. Speaking before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in late June, Dr. Anthony Fauci warned that young Continued on Page 6B


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

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Chester County Press

Local News Kennett Flash... Continued from Page 1A

the Board was that we needed to shut The Flash down, to allow for everyone to quarantine and preserve the cash reserves that we have, with the thought that we would be allowed to reopen in May or June, at which time we would see what changes would need to be made,� Miller said. “At that time, we had 50 shows on our calendar, over $20,000 in pledged tickets sales and a membership program that over the last eight months had generated another $20,000 in revenue. “I felt a complete shutdown would send the wrong message to our audience, performers, agents and the community. It was crucial for The Flash to reimagine its presence in the community at this very uncertain time.� The Kennett Flash was far from the lone wolf in the wilderness. Similar venues across the U.S. have been experiencing up to a 90 percent loss in revenue due to COVID-19, and many of them will not reopen their doors again until 2021, if they are lucky enough to survive at all. Impact on local economy

The Kennett Flash has over $15,000 raised from memberships, while also schedule that includes

The Kennett Flash’s Executive Director Andrew Miller, right, with Grammy Awardwinning bassist Tony Levin, who has performed with King Crimson and Peter Gabriel, among other prominent musicians.

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Since it began in 2009, The Kennett Flash has played host to a number of prominent performers.

Stones on Aug. 8 ($18 suggested donation). To make a donation to and attend live streamed concerts from The Kennett Flash, and to make your contribution to The Kennett Flash Emergency Fund, visit

www.kennettflash.org. To learn more about Save Our Stages, visit www. saveourstages.com. To contact Staff Writer Richard L. Gaw, email rgaw@chestercounty.com.

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Meanwhile, The Flash has received federal assistance from the Payroll Protection Program; grants from the Philadelphia Cultural Alliance and the Pennsylvania Council of the Arts; over $12,000 from The Kennett Flash Emergency Fund; and over $3,000 in new memberships. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because of these revenue streams, we have been able to bring in over $50,000, which has essentially covered The Flashâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expenses over the past four months,â&#x20AC;? Miller said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While this income stream flow has kept the venue afloat during the pandemic, it will require a concerted and continual effort to simply keep basic fixed expenses covered for the foreseeable future. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s month to month, and we have to continually work to produce revenue to cover our expenses, so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a question of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Where do we go from here, at a time when our industry is facing an existential crisis the like of which it has never seen before?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? While the near future of performance venues like the Kennett Flash will likely unfold in accordance with a rulebook of guidelines and regulations dictated by the still-unknown course and longevity of the world pandemic, Miller said that the intimate listening room he manages will most likely not be offering live, audience-attended performances as they once did until June 2021 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an estimation that Miller said is an optimistic one. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of us in this industry are of the mindset that we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to do shows with audiences, indoors,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We could now sell ten tickets per show, but it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make sense, because it puts a lot of people at risk. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d rather have a very successful live stream lineup and generate donations from that. Some artists are charging for live stream concerts, but I would rather give it away for free and let audiences pay what they want. This way, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still generating

much-needed revenue, and it still allows large audiences to enjoy the performances. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Flash will continue to produce arts programming content safely, while continuing to fundraise and urge our community to reach out to local and national outlets and lawmakers -- like Save Our Stages -- and fight for continued arts funding during these uncertain times. It simply comes down to a matter of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;If we arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t funded now, we might not have the ability to come back when this is all over.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Upcoming live streamed shows at The Kennett Flash include Dr. Harmonica & Rocket 88 on July 31 ($18 suggested donation); Virtual Open Mic with Angelee on Aug. 2 ($5 suggested donation); and Dead Flowers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a Tribute to the Rolling

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said that the turnout has been outstanding; audiences range from several hundred to nearly 1,000, depending on the performer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Certainly, we want to generate income through this method, but in a larger respect, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about producing quality content and continuing to deliver on a promise to provide arts and music for the community,â&#x20AC;? Miller said. As he navigates The Kennett Flash through the ever-changing tableau of CDC guidelines and government policies, Miller has sought refuge in The Flashâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s membership in the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA), a 3,000-member consortium that connects independent venue managers with each other, including those from the Uptown! Knauer Performing Arts Center in West Chester, the Grand in Wilmington and the Sellersville Theater. Lately, Miller and his colleagues have all had to absorb some very harsh realities stemming from the coronavirus. A recent survey of 2,000 independent music venues conducted by NIVA concluded that 90 percent of independent venues report that they will close permanently in a few months without federal funding. Despite the gloomy forecast, Miller sees visible signs of support coming nationally and locally. Last week, Texas Republican Sen. John Cornyn and Minnesota Democrat Sen. Amy Klobuchar introduced the Save Our Stages Act, which if passed will contribute $10 billion to help small venues make it through the next six months. Grants can total up to $12 million per venue or 45 percent of the venuesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; operating costs in 2019, whichever is less. The funding may be used to pay for rent, utilities, mortgages, maintenance, personal protective equipment (PPE), administrative costs, taxes and expenses that would allow venues to meet CDC-recommended COVID-19 safety guidelines.

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Their closings have also impacted local economies, as detailed in a study that estimated that for every dollar spent at an independent performance venue like The Flash, $12 was spent at neighboring restaurants, hotels and retail shops. On June 26, Miller saw a potential light at the end of the proverbial tunnel, when Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf ushered the last of the municipalities stuck in the Yellow Phase of Reopening into The Green Phase, which gave permission to performance venues to operate at 50 percent of full capacity. Miller created a new hybrid model for The Flash that would encourage social distancing. He cut out The Flashâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s limited food menu and concession sales. He initiated a mandatory mask-wearing rule for all attendees. He planned to limit the performances to no more than one hour. He installed a Plexiglass safety wall at the edge of the stage that would protect the audience from any projected droplets from the performers that could come off the stage. It was a short-lived plan, however. Citing the lack of masks being worn, out-of-state travel and visitors and a lack of a nationwide commitment to social distancing, Wolf and Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine signed new orders for targeted mitigation efforts that began on July 16, in response to the recent rise in COVID-19 cases in the state. According to the order, indoor events and gatherings of more than 25 persons are prohibited. Like many other music venue directors, Miller has hit upon an idea that has continued to pack The Flash for live shows â&#x20AC;&#x201C; virtually, of course. Beginning in June, The Flash began live streaming concerts from its stage to its Facebook page and website, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. While each concert is essentially free to the viewer, donations are encouraged. So far, Miller

Courtesy photos

Throughout the pandemic, received several grants and local contributions and new continuing a performance livestreamed concerts.

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CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020

Chester County Press

Local News Community policing... Continued from Page 1A

they are thinking about their response and not hearing what is important to people. They are missing valuable information. If we don’t listen to where people are coming from, and what their perspective is, what their past experiences with the police are, we can’t move forward.” Iacono continued, “Unfortunately, sometimes the only common ground we have is fear. We fear each other. And that is no foundation for a trusting relationship. We have to have trust. And I understand that trusting anyone, even your family, is not an easy thing to do. So I would say, my number-one goal is building trust between the police and the community, which is impossible without community policing.” Iacono started his career at Wildwood, N.J. for a season. After that, he was hired full-time in West Chester Borough, where he worked for 32 years. During that time, he was a patrol officer, a community policing officer, he performed undercover work for the detectives, was in charge of the accident division where he reconstructed accidents, and went through the ranks from corporal to lieutenant. Before he left there, he was in charge of training and personal standards, which meant his job was to constantly review the department to ensure that they are following the best practices in police work. That includes following

required programs to secure accreditation. Accreditation is governed by the state of Pennsylvania and is regulated by PLEAC. “It is worth noting that each state in this country operates through their own standards of practice. Every state is different,” Iacono explained. “To be employed as a police officer in the state of Pennsylvania, an individual must successfully complete a certified Act 120 program and pass the MPOETC state certification exam.” Iacono is not a newcomer to Oxford. He has lived in the Oxford area for 27 years and although he admits he never really thought of becoming a chief of police, he realized he did want to do something for his community. When the police chief position opened up, he applied. He has been working in Oxford Borough for two years. In that time a new police policy manual has been approved. New purchases include body cameras, less lethal weapons, new car cameras, and a firearm with an attached flashlight and the training required for those new purchases is ongoing. “Training never stops,” Iacono said. “We will constantly be monitoring the body and car cameras whether a complaint is filed or not, to ensure we are using best practices and, if not, more training will happen.” The Oxford Borough Police Department has implemented or updated practices as a result of

the continual monitoring. The chokehold has been abandoned, use-of-force training occurs every two years or more often, and most importantly if an officer doesn’t perform as is required by the state of Pennsylvania, they will lose their certification. As part of that certification, police officers are required to perform minimum firearm training and follow strict guidelines on how to handle someone when they are arrested. Departments must also constantly work with the local district attorney’s office and are kept abreast of changing state laws. Iacono said, “I think a standard state policy for policing would benefit everyone.” Besides the local district justice, the local district attorney, and state regulations Iacono feels it is important to stay connected to the many layers of law enforcement. Iacono was quick to point out that an incident like the one that led to the death of George Floyd should never happen. “It is horrible. It is 100 percent wrong,” he said. “We are here to protect the public. It is okay to disagree with a law enforcement officer, but for everyone’s safety it should be in court. But that being said, an arrest is never a pretty sight. Even justified force to save the lives of others doesn’t look good. When an officer has to use non-lethal force, even if it is legal, it doesn’t look good. As long as the threat to someone else is active, we

have to stop that. We get a split second to make a decision. There is no one-size fits all. You can’t plan for what will happen, because every situation is different,” Iacono said. “Our job is to train our officers and to provide them with as much training as possible to de-escalate a situation, but at the same time to protect others surrounding the altercation, including us.” He added, “I think we need more training, not less. I’m not sure defunding is the answer, because we want all of our officers to be trained, not just some. However, I do think we need to re-think what kind of situations we send an officer into. I don’t think we need to send them out on codes enforcement issues. I don’t think we need to send them to a school for your typical fist fight, unless weapons are involved. I think sometimes when we send an officer into a situation it may escalate it.” Police coverage is often the biggest piece of a municipal budget so Iacono feels using them only as needed to protect and serve is a wise decision—and a fiscally responsible one. “I don’t think we should expect social workers to go into dangerous situations, but I do think police and social workers and medical personnel can work in tandem to prevent violent altercations,” Iacono explained. “Domestic situations are some of the most dangerous situations police are involved in, and when we see a red flag we should work with other agencies. If someone sees a problem

developing in a family, we should encourage them to seek counseling before it gets violent.” Iacono said he is learning from attending the program, “Crucial Conversations That Lead to Real Change.” That program is continuing. “The best thing we can take out of that is that we can’t take away from someone else’s experience. We can’t understand or put our self in someone else’s experience. Those that grew up in an inner city have a different perspective than those that haven’t. We simply can’t dismiss another person’s feelings,” he said. “And hear what people are saying. Don’t take it personally and start thinking of your reply. Hear what they are saying. Look at it in general terms. If you hear something you may not agree with you need to listen. You have to look at the bigger picture and look at it from their point of view.” The police chief continued, “That is very difficult to do in the middle of policing situations. We have to train so it becomes second nature. No matter how long you have done this job, and sometimes because you have been on the job for so long, training must be updated. We have to think outside the box and not like a police officer sometimes. Dialogue is very important. That develops trust. We have to think of why someone is doing what they are doing. And we certainly have to ask ourselves if our response is justified. Anytime someone gets

arrested, pepper-sprayed, put in handcuffs, it is not a pretty sight.” Although Iacono said it is easier said than done, it is important to know when there is an incident and an officer shows up saying you are under arrest, it is not the time and place to escalate the situation. “Save it for court,” Iacono said. “When everyone calms down and talks about it, it is a much better outcome.” Iacono said that the actions of bad cops make it very difficult for good cops. “All it takes is one bad apple and they destroy the trust in all police officers,” Iacono said. “Our goal is to get through a situation where no one gets hurt. We all want to go home to our families and loved ones, including non-police personnel. I know I can only speak from my perspective. I know people wonder why we don’t let a drunk person just walk home. If we see a drunk person walking in traffic, it is our responsibility to make sure he is safe too. When we go to a domestic and see signs of physical abuse, it is our duty to arrest the abuser. If we do something, or don’t do something, we are held accountable. “I welcome input from the community. We have to have community involvement and I want to listen. There is no way to protect and serve without the input of those people we work for. I can be contacted at 610-998-0032.I welcome questions from everyone, and I really do welcome questions from parents and children.”


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

5A

Chester County Press

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Opinion Editorial

The symbol This past Sunday afternoon, the Chester County Press reporter went looking for a symbol. He was responding to an email he had received a few days before, from a man who shared his grief, his sorrow and his rage over seeing the symbol prominently displayed at a home near where he lives in southern Chester County. Worse still, he wrote, the symbol was being flown within minutes of one of the most prominent historically Black universities in the United States, which he worried could possibly lead to confrontation between the university and the homeowner. As he drove, the reporter recalled some of the content the email contained, and how its emotion seem to leap from the laptop computer he read it on and into his conscience. It was the language of our American history, though not the pretty parts about the mountains majesty and the pursuit of happiness, and the biggest fallacy of

all – the belief that all men are created equal. Rather, it was the gospel of repetition – the latest entry in the repeated testimony of African-American citizens that has accounted for centuries of inequality. “Just to share this last point and why this is so personal for me -- with an element of venom I am trying to keep in check,” the email read. “I just found out within the hour that one of the reasons my 12-year-old stepdaughter was crying as much as she was late last night is because she probably saw the Confederate flag and didn’t want to tell my fiance, her mother or myself. She is a girl of color and loves this area and Chester County so much from all of us moving out here from Center City Philadelphia four years ago, and now we’re having to work a little harder for this not to scar her. “Until this flag comes down we have to change our movement here in our own neighborhood so she doesn’t see this.” The homeowners in the homes on the country roads

that the reporter drove on his way to the symbol were very generous in their acknowledgement of the country they lived in. American flags flew at tilted angles as if they were bowing in quiet respect. The reporter lost count of their number, but no matter; he was caught up in what the definition of this flag had come to mean for him throughout his life. He remembered how his father honored the family’s American flag; he kept it neatly folded into a triangle and placed it in a wooden box until it was time again to unfurl it beside the front door on Memorial Day, Veteran’s Day, Independence Day and any other occasion he thought was pertinent. It never touched the ground. To the reporter’s father, the American flag was the fabric of what it meant to be an American citizen. The reporter eventually arrived at the symbol. There it was, not flying proudly like the flags he had just passed but crumpled and bunched as if battered by a summer wind, with just the protruding two intersecting

blue stripes on a red background showing. This was a conscious decision, he thought, on the part of the individual who had raised it, but one that the homeowner – and every homeowner like him or her -- has the right to make. In accordance with the freedoms associated with being an American, no laws were being broken. And yet, for any American to make that conscious decision to fly the Confederate flag is to also acknowledge the irreversible repercussions of what, for many, it stands for. It is a conscious decision that welcomes the opening of a massive wound, one that digs deep into the some of the ugliest chapters in the book that tells the history of America. It is a conscious decision that wraps itself in the story of what began in 1619, when the first Africans arrived in the shores of Virginia, to become either slaves or indentured servants. It is a conscious decision that has bound the homeowner to the pages of a 400-year odyssey that has been splayed

with images of shackles, human backs the color of the Earth whipped into servitude, the police waiting on the other side of the Edmund Pettus Bridge with billy clubs, tear-gassing and hoses, heads drenched with milkshakes at lunch counters, Bull Connor’s dogs, Emmett Till, four girls in a Birmingham church, Colored Only, the second-floor balcony at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis and, most recently, torches in Charlottesville, and the murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, among countless other African-American men and women who have been killed at the reckless hands of law enforcement. Isn’t it ironic, the reporter thought, that one of the greatest freedoms given to the citizens of this country allows this citizen the freedom to fly a symbol so firmly entrenched in racial history and tension. And yet, while we may not agree with that right, we must at least respect it. The reporter wondered what would eventually hap-

pen to the symbol. Will the homeowner continue to raise it, thus exercising his or her constitutional rights as an American? Would he or she simply and somehow acquire good taste and take it down? This homeowner, being given the right to fly this flag, has the right to choose. The Chester County Press reporter remembered how his father would take the time to fold the family’s American flag properly before placing it back in the wooden box, with the delicacy of a surgeon. The reporter would watch his father work meticulously. The colors in the box all seemed to blend together to form an imperfect tapestry, but one that needed to be cared for and protected. Whether it is in keeping with our beliefs, that homeowner who flies the Confederate flag has that same right to treat his or her flag with the same sense of decorum. The reporter then drove back home, past all of the American flags.

Letters to the Editor

Avondale Borough residents were shut out of the process of filling council vacancy Letter to the Editor: Last Tuesday, the Avondale Borough Council held their monthly meeting via Zoom. It was only held on Zoom after several borough residents complained that an in-person meeting could not be done safely. Previously, it had been scheduled to be held in the borough building which would not have allowed for social distancing. Some of the council members had their video turned on, and a few did not, including council president Bill Shore. During the meeting, the borough council announced that a council member was resigning as she had moved out of the borough. This item was not on the meeting agenda. Furthermore, they voted to appoint Dottie Howell to the open council position. Again, this was not on the agenda. It also violates Sunshine Laws. From the PA website: The Pennsylvania

Sunshine Act, 65 Pa.C.S. §§ 701-716, requires agencies to deliberate and take official action on agency business in an open and public meeting. It requires that meetings have prior notice and that the public can attend, participate, and comment before an agency takes that official action. Avondale Borough residents were not given the opportunity to participate in appointing a new council member. Furthermore, Bill Shore was not entirely honest about the process. The borough solicitor gently encouraged the council to advertise the opening, but they declined. It was obvious based on their action that several council members (the three who voted to appoint former Mayor Howell) had discussed this prior to the meeting. Ms. Howell could be heard in the background of Mr. Shore’s zoom. It’s interesting that Ms. Howell chose to resign as mayor four months ago, but

now wants to serve in this capacity. While I had sent an email thanking her for her two decades of service, it makes no sense that now she wants to serve again unless it is to block someone else from holding the spot. Again, none of this was on the meeting agenda, nor was the open position advertised. This is what Avondale Borough council has done for decades. They recycle the same cast of characters in the various council positions. They sit back and say

“No one wants to volunteer.” But after witnessing them appoint a council member without following due process, it’s obvious that they do not give borough residents an opportunity to participate. Nor do they want residents to participate in the process. Those who have tried are repeatedly met with hostility. One new borough resident attended her first council meeting (pre-pandemic) and the council president asked her, ”Why are you here?” This violation of the

Sunshine Act has been reported to the Pennsylvania Attorney General. My guess is that council will begrudgingly withdraw Ms. Howell’s appointment and open up the position. However, the outcome will be the same. Several borough residents will submit letters of interest, but those letters will not be honestly considered. They’ll claim that former mayor Howell has the experience to serve on the council, but Ms. Howell has also made it clear that she’s

no longer interested in serving the borough. It’s time for them to step aside and let those who truly wish to revitalize the borough work toward doing so. Remember next November, as several borough council seats will be on the ballot. Let’s just hope that the financial damage they do to the borough between now and then by spending down the reserves is not so much that the borough can’t recover. Lisa Lightner Avondale Borough

Confederate flags need to come down Letter to the Editor: There is a house near Lincoln University that is flying a Confederate flag. I believe this is a new flag, as I think I would have seen this earlier as I travel past the house daily, and sometimes several times a day.

I am disgusted and beyond at this and not because I “would” have to see this daily, but more so the closeness of the Confederate flag to Lincoln University. The thought that students, parents, and others coming from north and south to Lincoln would have to see this while going to the old-

est historically black college in the country is beyond a sensible thought. The owner of the property should take the Confederate flag down, regardless of whether he lives there or not. When I think of the history of Lincoln University, and that time of its formation in the 1850s, and

other incidents that took place during this time in this area, like the Parker Sisters and the Christiana tragedies, it is unbearable to think that the Confederate flag and what it symbolizes should be displayed in 2020. Todd Pride

Groups take legal action to protect voters’ rights Voters are fighting back against the Trump campaign’s illegal attempt to make it difficult for Pennsylvanians to vote by mail and to have those ballots counted during the pandemic. The American Civil Liberties Union, ACLU of

Pennsylvania, Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, Public Interest Law Center, and WilmerHale took legal action on behalf of the NAACP Pennsylvania State Conference, Common Cause Pennsylvania, the League of Women Voters of

Chester County Press Publisher - Randall S. Lieberman

Steve Hoffman..................................Managing Editor Richard L. Gaw..................................Associate Editor Brenda Butt.........................................Office Manager Tricia Hoadley...........................................Art Director Alan E. Turn...............................Advertising Director Teri Turns................................Advertising Executive Helen E. Warren......................Advertising Executive Amy Lieberman.............Marketing/Public Relations The Chester County Press (USPS 416-500) is published every Wednesday by: AD PRO, Inc., 144 South Jennersville Rd, West Grove, PA 19390 Mailing Address: PO Box 150, Kelton, PA 19346 Phone: 610-869-5553 FAX 610-869-9628 E-mail (editor): editor@chestercounty.com HOURS: Monday- Friday 8am - 4pm, no weekend hours

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NO REFUNDS AFTER RECEIPT OF SUBSCRIPTION PAYMENT Current and previous week's issues are $1.00 each. Older issues are $1.50 each. Periodicals postage paid at Oxford, PA 19363. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Chester County Press, P.O. Box 150, Kelton, PA 19346.

Pennsylvania, and several individual voters. They moved to intervene as defendants in a recent lawsuit brought by the Trump presidential campaign and the Republican Party. The Trump campaign lawsuit, filed June 29, is attempting, among other things, to block voters in Pennsylvania from depositing their mail ballots in drop boxes instead of mailboxes, a secure and streamlined process often used by states that conduct all-mail elections. “The only reason the Trump campaign is trying to limit the use of mail voting is to make it more difficult for Pennsylvanians to vote. Drop boxes are a safe and efficient option for people who want to participate in our democracy, particularly in the midst of a highly contagious and deadly pandemic,” said Sarah Brannon, managing director of the ACLU’s Voting Rights

Project. The campaign is attempting to limit “Pennsylvanians’ constitutionally protected right to vote by preventing the use of ballot drop-off locations,” the filing charges. “A limit on the use of mail-in ballots would place unlawful and unwarranted restrictions on the time, place, and manner of voting in the November 3 elections.” Further, it would “primarily affect people of color and medically vulnerable individuals who experience disproportionately higher rates of infection, illness, and death due to the pandemic and face grave risks to their health and the health of their communities if they vote in person.” “Our democracy works when all voters can exercise their fundamental right and cast a ballot that counts,” said Kenneth Huston, president of the NAACP Pennsylvania State Conference.

“Accessing the ballot box is particularly challenging for many Pennsylvanians during the COVID-19 pandemic. Reducing access to the vote-by-mail process risks disenfranchising eligible voters. The NAACP has stood with Pennsylvania voters who seek to vote safely and will continue to do so here.” “Election officials in some counties have tried to make it easier for people to vote in the middle of a pandemic, and the Trump campaign is cynically trying to undercut that effort,” said Reggie Shuford, executive director of the ACLU of Pennsylvania. “No matter who people want to vote for, there should be as few hurdles as possible to exercise that right.” “The opportunity for all Pennsylvanians to vote by mail proved to be a literal lifeline in this primary. Over 1.5 million Pennsylvanians

were able to cast their ballot from home, and drop boxes were a critical part of the vote-by-mail process. Voters cannot be forced to choose between their ability to vote and their health. We will continue to fight so they are never forced to make that choice and to make sure vote by mail is not turned into a partisan football,” said Suzanne Almeida, interim executive director of Common Cause Pennsylvania. “Due to the ongoing global pandemic, voters must have reliable access to vote-bymail options. As our leaders consider changes to the voting process in Pennsylvania, the League is asking to step in to ensure that the voices and needs of Pennsylvania voters are represented,” said Terrie Griffin, co- president of the League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania. The case was filed in U.S. District Court, Western District of Pennsylvania.


6A

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020

â&#x20AC;¢ PUBLIC NOTICE â&#x20AC;¢ PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION OF PENNSYLVANIA This notice contains information about proposed amendments to the Constitution of Pennsylvania, based on joint resolutions of the General Assembly of Pennsylvania. 7KH*HQHUDO$VVHPEO\RI3HQQV\OYDQLDÃ&#x20AC;UVWSURSRVHGWKHVH amendments during the 2019-2020 session of the legislature. If a majority of the Senators and Representatives elected at the upcoming November 3, 2020 General Election approve any of the proposed amendments for a second time during the 2021-2022 session, the approved proposed amendment(s) will be published again and submitted to the voters of Pennsylvania as a ballot question(s), as required by Article XI, Section 1 of the Constitution. If a ballot question is approved by a majority of the people voting on it, the amendment will become law. This public notice is part of the process of amending the Constitution of Pennsylvania. The Secretary of the Commonwealth is required to publish a copy of the joint resolutions proposing the amendments. The text of the joint resolutions is included below this notice. Words that appear in bold print are the changes to the words of the Constitution that are proposed by the General Assembly. If the amendment is approved, the words underlined would be added to the Constitution and the words in [brackets] would be deleted. If you need help reading this advertisement or need the text of the proposed amendments in an alternative format, call or write the Pennsylvania Department of State, Bureau of Elections and Notaries, 5RRP1RUWK2Î&#x20AC;FH%XLOGLQJ+DUULVEXUJ3$ (option 3), ra-elections@pa.gov. Kathy Boockvar Secretary of the Commonwealth

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2020 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1 Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, further providing for Lieutenant Governor. The General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania hereby resolves as follows: Section 1. The following amendment to the Constitution of Pennsylvania is proposed in accordance with Article XI: That section 4 of Article IV be amended to read: § 4. Lieutenant Governor. [A Lieutenant Governor shall be chosen jointly with the Governor by the casting by each voter of a single vote applicable to both RÍ¿FHVIRUWKHVDPHWHUPDQGVXEMHFWWRWKHVDPHSURYLVLRQV as the Governor; he] (DFKFDQGLGDWHIRU*RYHUQRUKDYLQJEHHQ QRPLQDWHGXQGHUWKHODZVRIWKLV&RPPRQZHDOWKVKDOOVXEMHFW WRWKHDSSURYDORIWKHSROLWLFDOSDUW\RUSROLWLFDOERG\LIDQ\ QRPLQDWLQJVXFKFDQGLGDWHVHOHFWDFDQGLGDWHIRU/LHXWHQDQW *RYHUQRUZLWKLQVXFKWLPHEHIRUHWKHJXEHUQDWRULDOJHQHUDO HOHFWLRQDVWKH*HQHUDO$VVHPEO\VKDOOSUHVFULEHE\ODZ$ SHUVRQPD\QRWVHHNHOHFWLRQWRERWKRÍ¿FHVVLPXOWDQHRXVO\7KH Lieutenant Governor shall be President of the Senate. As such, [he] the Lieutenant Governor may vote in case of a tie on any question H[FHSWWKHÃ&#x20AC;QDOSDVVDJHRIDELOORUMRLQWUHVROXWLRQWKHDGRSWLRQRI a conference report or the concurrence in amendments made by the +RXVHRI5HSUHVHQWDWLYHV 6HFWLRQ D 8SRQWKHÃ&#x20AC;UVWSDVVDJHE\WKH*HQHUDO$VVHPEO\ of this proposed constitutional amendment, the Secretary of the Commonwealth shall proceed immediately to comply with the advertising requirements of section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and shall transmit the required advertisements to two newspapers in every county in which such newspapers DUHSXEOLVKHGLQVXÎ&#x20AC;FLHQWWLPHDIWHUSDVVDJHRIWKLVSURSRVHG constitutional amendment. (b) Upon the second passage by the General Assembly of this proposed constitutional amendment, the Secretary of the Commonwealth shall proceed immediately to comply with the advertising requirements of section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and shall transmit the required advertisements to two newspapers in every county in which such newspapers are published LQVXÎ&#x20AC;FLHQWWLPHDIWHUSDVVDJHRIWKLVSURSRVHGFRQVWLWXWLRQDO amendment. The Secretary of the Commonwealth shall submit this SURSRVHGFRQVWLWXWLRQDODPHQGPHQWWRWKHTXDOLÃ&#x20AC;HGHOHFWRUVRIWKLV &RPPRQZHDOWKDWWKHÃ&#x20AC;UVWSULPDU\JHQHUDORUPXQLFLSDOHOHFWLRQ which meets the requirements of and is in conformance with section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and which occurs at least three months after the proposed constitutional amendment is passed by the General Assembly.

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2020 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 Proposing separate and distinct amendments to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, further providing for tenure of justices, judges and justices of the peace; and further providing for absentee voting. The General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania hereby resolves as follows: Section 1. The following separate and distinct amendments to the Constitution of Pennsylvania are proposed in accordance with Article XI: (1) That section 15(b) of Article V be amended to read: § 15. Tenure of justices, judges and justices of the peace. *** (b) A justice or judge elected under section 13(a), appointed XQGHUVHFWLRQ G RUUHWDLQHGXQGHUWKLVVHFWLRQ E PD\Ã&#x20AC;OH DGHFODUDWLRQRIFDQGLGDF\IRUUHWHQWLRQHOHFWLRQZLWKWKHRÎ&#x20AC;FHU of the Commonwealth who under law shall have supervision RYHUHOHFWLRQVRQRUEHIRUHWKHÃ&#x20AC;UVW0RQGD\RI-DQXDU\RIWKH \HDUSUHFHGLQJWKH\HDULQZKLFKKLVWHUPRIRÎ&#x20AC;FHH[SLUHV,IQR GHFODUDWLRQLVÃ&#x20AC;OHGDYDFDQF\VKDOOH[LVWXSRQWKHH[SLUDWLRQRIWKH WHUPRIRÎ&#x20AC;FHRIVXFKMXVWLFHRUMXGJHWREHÃ&#x20AC;OOHGE\HOHFWLRQXQGHU section 13(a) or by appointment under section 13(d) if applicable. If DMXVWLFHRUMXGJHÃ&#x20AC;OHVDGHFODUDWLRQKLVQDPHVKDOOEHVXEPLWWHGWR the electors without party designation, [on a separate judicial ballot RULQDVHSDUDWHFROXPQRQYRWLQJPDFKLQHV@ at the municipal HOHFWLRQLPPHGLDWHO\SUHFHGLQJWKHH[SLUDWLRQRIWKHWHUPRIRÎ&#x20AC;FH of the justice or judge, to determine only the question whether KHVKDOOEHUHWDLQHGLQRÎ&#x20AC;FH,IDPDMRULW\LVDJDLQVWUHWHQWLRQD YDFDQF\VKDOOH[LVWXSRQWKHH[SLUDWLRQRIKLVWHUPRIRÎ&#x20AC;FHWREH Ã&#x20AC;OOHGE\DSSRLQWPHQWXQGHUVHFWLRQ E RUXQGHUVHFWLRQ G LI applicable. If a majority favors retention, the justice or judge shall VHUYHIRUWKHUHJXODUWHUPRIRÎ&#x20AC;FHSURYLGHGKHUHLQXQOHVVVRRQHU removed or retired. At the expiration of each term a justice or judge shall be eligible for retention as provided herein, subject only to the retirement provisions of this article. (2) That section 14 of Article VII be amended to read: § 14. Absentee voting. (a) The Legislature shall, by general law, provide a manner in which, DQGWKHWLPHDQGSODFHDWZKLFKTXDOLÃ&#x20AC;HGHOHFWRUV>ZKRPD\RQ WKHRFFXUUHQFHRIDQ\HOHFWLRQEHDEVHQWIURPWKHPXQLFLSDOLW\ RIWKHLUUHVLGHQFHEHFDXVHWKHLUGXWLHVRFFXSDWLRQRUEXVLQHVV UHTXLUHWKHPWREHHOVHZKHUHRUZKRRQWKHRFFXUUHQFHRIDQ\ HOHFWLRQDUHXQDEOHWRDWWHQGDWWKHLUSURSHUSROOLQJSODFHVEHFDXVH of illness or physical disability or who will not attend a polling place because of the observance of a religious holiday or who FDQQRWYRWHEHFDXVHRIHOHFWLRQGD\GXWLHVLQWKHFDVHRIDFRXQW\ HPSOR\HH@ may vote, and for the return and canvass of their votes in the election district in which they respectively reside. A law under WKLVVXEVHFWLRQPD\QRWUHTXLUHDTXDOLÃ&#x20AC;HGHOHFWRUWRSK\VLFDOO\ appear at a designated polling place on the day of the election. > E )RUSXUSRVHVRIWKLVVHFWLRQ´PXQLFLSDOLW\µPHDQVDFLW\ ERURXJKLQFRUSRUDWHGWRZQWRZQVKLSRUDQ\VLPLODUJHQHUDO SXUSRVHXQLWRIJRYHUQPHQWZKLFKPD\EHFUHDWHGE\WKH *HQHUDO$VVHPEO\@ 6HFWLRQ D 8SRQWKHÃ&#x20AC;UVWSDVVDJHE\WKH*HQHUDO$VVHPEO\RI these proposed constitutional amendments, the Secretary of the Commonwealth shall proceed immediately to comply with the advertising requirements of section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and shall transmit the required advertisements to two newspapers in every county in which such newspapers DUHSXEOLVKHGLQVXÎ&#x20AC;FLHQWWLPHDIWHUSDVVDJHRIWKHVHSURSRVHG constitutional amendments. (b) Upon the second passage by the General Assembly of these proposed constitutional amendments, the Secretary of the Commonwealth shall proceed immediately to comply with the advertising requirements of section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and shall transmit the required advertisements to two newspapers in every county in which VXFKQHZVSDSHUVDUHSXEOLVKHGLQVXÎ&#x20AC;FLHQWWLPHDIWHUSDVVDJHRI these proposed constitutional amendments. The Secretary of the Commonwealth shall: (1) Submit the proposed constitutional amendment under VHFWLRQ  RIWKLVUHVROXWLRQWRWKHTXDOLÃ&#x20AC;HGHOHFWRUVRIWKLV &RPPRQZHDOWKDVDVHSDUDWHEDOORWTXHVWLRQDWWKHÃ&#x20AC;UVWSULPDU\ general or municipal election which meets the requirements of and is in conformance with section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and which occurs at least three months after the proposed constitutional amendment is passed by the General Assembly. (2) Submit the proposed constitutional amendment under VHFWLRQ  RIWKLVUHVROXWLRQWRWKHTXDOLÃ&#x20AC;HGHOHFWRUVRIWKLV &RPPRQZHDOWKDVDVHSDUDWHEDOORWTXHVWLRQDWWKHÃ&#x20AC;UVWSULPDU\ general or municipal election which meets the requirements of and is in conformance with section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and which occurs at least three months after the proposed constitutional amendment is passed by the General Assembly.

PAID FOR WITH PENNSYLVANIA TAXPAYER DOLLARS. THIS ADVERTISEMENT IS FUNDED IN WHOLE BY THE GENERAL FUND.


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

â&#x20AC;˘ PUBLIC NOTICE â&#x20AC;˘ PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION OF PENNSYLVANIA This notice contains information about proposed amendments to the Constitution of Pennsylvania, based on joint resolutions of the General Assembly of Pennsylvania. 7KH*HQHUDO$VVHPEO\RI3HQQV\OYDQLDĂ&#x20AC;UVWSURSRVHGWKHVHDPHQGPHQWV during the 2019-2020 session of the legislature. If a majority of the Senators and Representatives elected at the upcoming November 3, 2020 General Election approve any of the proposed amendments for a second time during the 20212022 session, the approved proposed amendment(s) will be published again and submitted to the voters of Pennsylvania as a ballot question(s), as required by Article XI, Section 1 of the Constitution. If a ballot question is approved by a majority of the people voting on it, the amendment will become law. This public notice is part of the process of amending the Constitution of Pennsylvania. The Secretary of the Commonwealth is required to publish a copy of the joint resolutions proposing the amendments. The text of the joint resolutions is included below this notice. Words that appear in bold print are the changes to the words of the Constitution that are proposed by the General Assembly. If the amendment is approved, the words underlined would be added to the Constitution and the words in [brackets] would be deleted. If you need help reading this advertisement or need the text of the proposed amendments in an alternative format, call or write the Pennsylvania Department of State, Bureau of Elections and Notaries, Room 210 North 2Î&#x20AC;FH%XLOGLQJ+DUULVEXUJ3$ RSWLRQ  ra-elections@pa.gov.

QHZVSDSHUVDUHSXEOLVKHGLQVXÎ&#x20AC;FLHQWWLPHDIWHUSDVVDJHRIWKHVHSURSRVHG constitutional amendments. (b) Upon the second passage by the General Assembly of these proposed constitutional amendments, the Secretary of the Commonwealth shall proceed immediately to comply with the advertising requirements of section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and shall transmit the required advertisements to two newspapers in every county in which such newspapers DUHSXEOLVKHGLQVXÎ&#x20AC;FLHQWWLPHDIWHUSDVVDJHRIWKHVHSURSRVHGFRQVWLWXWLRQDO amendments. The Secretary of the Commonwealth shall submit the proposed FRQVWLWXWLRQDODPHQGPHQWVXQGHUVHFWLRQRIWKLVUHVROXWLRQWRWKHTXDOLĂ&#x20AC;HG electors of this Commonwealth as a single ballot question as provided under VXEVHFWLRQ F DWWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWSULPDU\JHQHUDORUPXQLFLSDOHOHFWLRQZKLFKPHHWV the requirements of and is in conformance with section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and which occurs at least three months after the proposed constitutional amendments are passed by the General Assembly. (c) The Secretary of the Commonwealth shall place these proposed constitutional amendments on the ballot as a single ballot question in the following form: Shall sections 2, 3, 4, 11 and 12 of Article V of the Pennsylvania Constitution be amended to require that judges and justices of the Supreme Court, the Superior Court and the Commonwealth Court be elected from judicial districts established by the General Assembly which must be compact, contiguous and nearly equal in population as practicable and to require that all justices, judges and justices of the peace to be residents of their judicial districts for one year preceding election or appointment and during service?

Kathy Boockvar Secretary of the Commonwealth JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2020 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2020 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3 Proposing integrated amendments to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, organizing the Judiciary into representative districts and further providing for residency requirements. The General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania hereby resolves as follows: Section 1. The following integrated amendments to the Constitution of Pennsylvania are proposed in accordance with Article XI: (1) That section 2 of Article V be amended to read: § 2. Supreme Court. The Supreme Court (a) shall be the highest court of the Commonwealth and in this court shall be reposed the supreme judicial power of the Commonwealth;

Proposing separate and distinct amendments to the Constitution of Pennsylvania, in declaration of rights, providing for prohibition against denial or abridgment of equality of rights because of race and ethnicity; in legislation, further providing for action on concurrent orders and resolutions; and, in the executive, providing for disaster emergency declaration and management. The General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania hereby resolves as follows: Section 1. The following separate and distinct amendments to the Constitution of Pennsylvania are proposed in accordance with Article XI: (1) That Article I of the Constitution of Pennsylvania be amended by adding a section to read: § 29. Prohibition against denial or abridgment of equality of rights because of race and ethnicity.

(b) shall consist of seven justices, to be elected from seven judicial districts which shall be established by law, one of whom shall be the Chief Justice; and

Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania because of the race or ethnicity of the individual.

(c) shall have such jurisdiction as shall be provided by law.

(1.1) That section 9 of Article III be amended to read:

(2) That section 3 of Article V be amended to read:

§ 9. Action on concurrent orders and resolutions.

§ 3. Superior Court.

(YHU\RUGHUUHVROXWLRQRUYRWHWRZKLFKWKHFRQFXUUHQFHRIERWK+RXVHV may be necessary, except on the [question of adjournment] questions of adjournment or termination or extension of a disaster emergency declaration as declared by an executive order or proclamation, or portion of a disaster emergency declaration as declared by an executive order or proclamation, VKDOOEHSUHVHQWHGWRWKH*RYHUQRUDQGEHIRUHLWVKDOOWDNHHÍżHFWEHDSSURYHG E\KLPRUEHLQJGLVDSSURYHGVKDOOEHUHSDVVHGE\WZRWKLUGVRIERWK+RXVHV according to the rules and limitations prescribed in case of a bill.

The Superior Court shall be a statewide court, and shall consist of the number of judges, which shall be not less than seven judges, to be elected from judicial districts which shall be established by law, and have such jurisdiction as shall be provided by this Constitution or by the General Assembly. One of its judges shall be the president judge. (3) That section 4 of Article V be amended to read: § 4. Commonwealth Court. The Commonwealth Court shall be a statewide court, and shall consist of the number of judges, to be elected from judicial districts which shall be established by law, and have such jurisdiction as shall be provided by law. One of its judges shall be the president judge. (4) That section 11 of Article V be amended to read: § 11. Judicial districts; boundaries. [The number and boundaries of judicial districts shall be changed by the General Assembly only with the advice and consent of the Supreme Court.] (a) The number of judges and justices of the Supreme Court, the Superior Court and the Commonwealth Court elected from each judicial district shall provide every resident of the Commonwealth with approximately equal representation on a court. Each judicial district shall be composed of compact and contiguous territory as nearly equal in population as practicable. Each judicial district shall elect one judge or justice. Unless absolutely necessary, no county, city, incorporated town, borough, township or ward may be divided in forming a judicial district. (b) The General Assembly shall, by law, establish: (1) The judicial districts from which justices of the Supreme Court and the judges of the Superior Court and the Commonwealth Court are elected. (2) A transition to an appellate court judiciary elected from judicial districts.  7KHHÍžHFWRIVHWMXGLFLDOGLVWULFWVXSRQHOLJLELOLW\WRVHHNUHWHQWLRQ election. (4) The order in which judicial districts shall elect justices of the Supreme Court and judges of the Superior Court and the Commonwealth Court. (5) The decennial realignment of the appellate judicial districts based on the Federal decennial census, beginning in 2021 and occurring each ten years thereafter. (c) Except as provided under subsection (b) and section 7(b), the number and boundaries of all other judicial districts shall be established by the General Assembly by law, with the advice and consent of the Supreme Court. (5) That section 12 of Article V be amended to read: Â&#x2020;4XDOLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQVRIMXVWLFHVMXGJHVDQGMXVWLFHVRIWKHSHDFH (a) Justices, judges and justices of the peace shall be citizens of the &RPPRQZHDOWK-XVWLFHVDQGMXGJHVH[FHSWWKHMXGJHVRIWKHWUDÎ&#x20AC;FFRXUWLQ the City of Philadelphia, shall be members of the bar of the Supreme Court. Justices [and judges of statewide courts, for a period of one year preceding WKHLUHOHFWLRQRUDSSRLQWPHQWDQGGXULQJWKHLUFRQWLQXDQFHLQRÍżFHVKDOO reside within the Commonwealth. Other], judges and justices of the peace, for a period of one year preceding their election or appointment and during WKHLUFRQWLQXDQFHLQRÎ&#x20AC;FHVKDOOUHVLGHZLWKLQWKHLUUHVSHFWLYHGLVWULFWVH[FHSW as provided in this article for temporary assignments. (b) Justices of the peace shall be members of the bar of the Supreme Court or shall complete a course of training and instruction in the duties of their UHVSHFWLYHRÎ&#x20AC;FHVDQGSDVVDQH[DPLQDWLRQSULRUWRDVVXPLQJRÎ&#x20AC;FH6XFK courses and examinations shall be as provided by law. 6HFWLRQ D 8SRQWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWSDVVDJHE\WKH*HQHUDO$VVHPEO\RIWKHVH proposed constitutional amendments, the Secretary of the Commonwealth shall proceed immediately to comply with the advertising requirements of section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and shall transmit the required advertisements to two newspapers in every county in which such

(2) That Article IV be amended by adding a section to read: § 20. Disaster emergency declaration and management. (a) A disaster emergency declaration may be declared by executive order RUSURFODPDWLRQRIWKH*RYHUQRUXSRQĂ&#x20AC;QGLQJWKDWDGLVDVWHUKDVRFFXUUHG or that the occurrence or threat of a disaster is imminent that threatens the health, safety or welfare of this Commonwealth. (b) Each disaster emergency declaration issued by the Governor under subsection (a) shall indicate the nature, each area threatened and the conditions of the disaster, including whether the disaster is a natural disaster, military emergency, public health emergency, technological disaster RURWKHUJHQHUDOHPHUJHQF\DVGHĂ&#x20AC;QHGE\VWDWXWH7KH*HQHUDO$VVHPEO\ shall, by statute, provide for the manner in which each type of disaster enumerated under this subsection shall be managed. F $GLVDVWHUHPHUJHQF\GHFODUDWLRQXQGHUVXEVHFWLRQ D VKDOOEHLQHÍžHFW for no more than twenty-one (21) days, unless otherwise extended in whole or part by concurrent resolution of the General Assembly. (d) Upon the expiration of a disaster emergency declaration under subsection (a), the Governor may not issue a new disaster emergency declaration based upon the same or substantially similar facts and circumstances without the passage of a concurrent resolution of the General Assembly expressly approving the new disaster emergency declaration. 6HFWLRQ D 8SRQWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWSDVVDJHE\WKH*HQHUDO$VVHPEO\RIWKHVH proposed constitutional amendments, the Secretary of the Commonwealth shall proceed immediately to comply with the advertising requirements of section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and shall transmit the required advertisements to two newspapers in every county in which such QHZVSDSHUVDUHSXEOLVKHGLQVXÎ&#x20AC;FLHQWWLPHDIWHUSDVVDJHRIWKHVHSURSRVHG constitutional amendments. (b) Upon the second passage by the General Assembly of these proposed constitutional amendments, the secretary of the commonwealth shall proceed immediately to comply with the advertising requirements of section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and shall transmit the required advertisements to two newspapers in every county in which such newspapers DUHSXEOLVKHGLQVXÎ&#x20AC;FLHQWWLPHDIWHUSDVVDJHRIWKHVHSURSRVHGFRQVWLWXWLRQDO amendments. the Secretary of the Commonwealth shall: (1) submit the proposed constitutional amendment under section 1(1) RIWKLVUHVROXWLRQWRWKHTXDOLĂ&#x20AC;HGHOHFWRUVRIWKLV&RPPRQZHDOWKDVD VHSDUDWHEDOORWTXHVWLRQDWWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWSULPDU\JHQHUDORUPXQLFLSDOHOHFWLRQ which meets the requirements of and is in conformance with section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and which occurs at least three months after the proposed constitutional amendment is passed by the General Assembly. (1.1) Submit the proposed constitutional amendment under section 1(1.1) RIWKLVUHVROXWLRQWRWKHTXDOLĂ&#x20AC;HGHOHFWRUVRIWKLV&RPPRQZHDOWKDVD VHSDUDWHEDOORWTXHVWLRQDWWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWSULPDU\JHQHUDORUPXQLFLSDOHOHFWLRQ which meets the requirements of and is in conformance with section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and which occurs at least three months after the proposed constitutional amendment is passed by the General Assembly. (2) submit the proposed constitutional amendment under section 1(2) RIWKLVUHVROXWLRQWRWKHTXDOLĂ&#x20AC;HGHOHFWRUVRIWKLV&RPPRQZHDOWKDVD VHSDUDWHEDOORWTXHVWLRQDWWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWSULPDU\JHQHUDORUPXQLFLSDOHOHFWLRQ which meets the requirements of and is in conformance with section 1 of Article XI of the Constitution of Pennsylvania and which occurs at least three months after the proposed constitutional amendment is passed by the General Assembly.

PAID FOR WITH PENNSYLVANIA TAXPAYER DOLLARS. THIS ADVERTISEMENT IS FUNDED IN WHOLE BY THE GENERAL FUND.

7A


8A

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020


Chester County Press

In the Spotlight

Section

B

WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020

Kennett honors the Class of 2020 A reimagined commencement for Kennett High School’s Senior class took place this past Saturday By Chris Barber Contributing Writer Dr. Dusty Blakey could not have imagined when he took the reins as superintendent of the Kennett Consolidated School District in January what was in store in the next few months: A pandemic swept the nation, and the district was faced with closing schools and halting all related activities for the remainder of the school year. The traditional graduation ceremony for Seniors at Kennett High School could not take place as scheduled. With all that in mind, however, Blakey was determined that the members of the Class of 2020 -- even though they would miss spring events, prom and sports -- would be able to celebrate their graduation in some manner. Blakey, the administration, and the Kennett School Board set about to design a commencement that was safe and ceremonial. it was obvious at the graduation ceremony on Saturday, July 25 that they succeeded. It wasn’t an easy task, however. Senior Class advisor Peg Hughes said she and her colleagues designed seven models and worked up until the last week to finalize details. The planning resulted in a two-part event featuring drive-through ceremonies at the Kennett Middle

School with identical speeches and programs at each one. They chose the middle school because of the sprawling real estate surrounding it and the ample parking in front of the building. True, the students would miss out on the traditional procession down Kennett High School’s elegant front staircase, but the middle school offered the best location to ensure the safety of everyone involved. In the end, the toneddown extravaganza was almost flawless in how it was executed. “I thought it was awesome. Given the circumstances, it turned out well,” Blakey said as he watched the cars exit after the first ceremony. He also said he was pleased at how the planners had managed the safety of the event, and how the screens in the parking lot enabled everyone to see what was going on. The graduation was divided into two sessions: one at 8 a.m. and the other at 10 a.m. to minimize crowd size. Families came in their cars, one student per car, and they parked in the lot facing one of two giant screens that displayed the events. When the time came for the recitation of the graduates and the distribution of the diploma cases, they lined up in the driveway, the students got out, and they had their moment to pose in front of the tem-

Photos by Chris Barber

Senior Class Advisor Peg Hughes presents the Advisor’s Cup to Mary Tuley.

porary stage brought in for the occasion. Assistant high school principal Eileen Rudisill, who read the names of each student as they walked by, explained that she had established a system to sync the cars, the students and the announcement of names. It helped, she said, to have known most of the students personally when she saw them. The drivers for their part

Families whose cars had slide open roofs shot pictures from the top.

Class of 2014 graduate Emily Matthias welcomes the graduates to the alumni association.

came through in an orderly manner. They all had a chance in front of the dais to take a picture of their son or daughter – sans face mask for a moment – and then proceed. Some families whose cars had open roofs stood and took pictures from there. A few even brought their family dog. Two or three shot off confetti blowers. During the 8 a.m. ceremony, members of the

Hockessin Fire Company were present with their antique truck to honor graduate Sean Perrone, the son of assistant chief Robert Perrone. Upon receipt of their certificates, the graduates walked the path in front of the school to bump elbows with school board president Joe Meola, superintendent Blakey and assistant superintendent Michael Barber. High School principal

Jeremy Hritz, who served as master of ceremonies, told the audience in his greeting that the ceremonies were somewhat abbreviated from the traditional program as a result of the circumstances. Still, there were the student speeches, a taped musical interlude, the invocation, and Pledge of Allegiance. The theme for the day was “resilience.” Continued on Page 3B

A family member shoots a picture of the graduate after popping a confetti blast.

Mary Tuley: “We had to finish the journey alone.”

Olivia Beldyk was one of the speakers for the Class of 2020.


2B

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020

Chester County Press

Obituaries MICHAEL A. KAFFENBERGER Michael Alan Kaffenberger, age 39, of Wilmington, Del., passed away on July 15 at his residence. Born on September 7, 1980 in Wilmington, he is the son of Hartmut A. and Elke D. Kaffenberger of Chadds Ford. Michael attended Tower Hill School in Wilmington and then Unionville High School, graduating in 1999. He continued his education at the University of Pittsburgh, earning a bachelor of arts degree in communications. He entered into a career in finance and banking, working in Philadelphia and Wilmington. In his free time, Michael enjoyed hiking in national parks, traveling, skiing, and deep-sea diving. He could

be found riding his terrain motor cycle, or working out at the YMCA. Lastly, he loved all animals, particularly his family’s golden retrievers. In addition to his parents, Michael is survived by his brother, Mark Kaffenberger (and his wife Guenevere) of Danbury, CT. All services will be scheduled at a later date and will be for close family. Contributions may be made in Michael’s name to the Kennett Square Presbyterian Church Memorial Fund, 211 S. Broad Street, Kennett Square, PA 19348, or the Delaware Humane Association, 701 A Street, Wilmington, DE 19801. Arrangements are being handled by the Kuzo Funeral Home in Kennett Square. Please visit Michael’s online memorial by going to www.kuzoandfoulkfh.com.

CLIFFORD B. OWENS Clifford B. Owens passed away peacefully at his home in New London Township on July 14 at the age of 95. He was preceded in death by his parents, Clifford B. Owens and Priscilla Hinchman Owens Dudley of Haddonfield N.J. and his wife, Shirley Nash Owens. He is survived by his brother, Sgt. Major, Richard E. Dudley, USMC retired, Jacksonville, NC, daughter Barbara O. Ledezma of Rockwall, TX, grandson Vincent A. Ledezma of Greensboro, NC, nieces Sherry Latoz and Ginger Tuton, both of Jacksonville, NC, Cindy Blankenship of Oregon City, OR, nephew Scott Dudley of Ramstein, Germany and numerous great-nieces and great-nephews. He was born in Camden, NJ and graduated from Haddonfield Memorial High School in 1942. Clifford joined the U.S. Marine Corps in March 1943, serving with honor until his discharge in November 1945. He was a member of the Mitchell B-25 bomber squadron in the South Pacific on Emirau Island, also known as Emira, in the Bismarck Archipelago. As a turret gunner, he flew 35 missions over Rabaul and Kavieng, and was honorably discharged at the rank of E4 Sergeant. He earned the Air Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross. In 1947, he and his wife moved to New London Township where he resided and farmed for the rest of this life, first as a dairy farmer, and then raising hogs, sheep and goats. In the early 1990s, he was appointed to the New London Township planning commission and was elected to the Board of Supervisors in 1996. He served in both capacities until 2001. Clifford was honored by the Kennett Square American Legion Post 491 in August 2005 for his service with honor and distinction in the Pacific Theatre in World War II. He was a talented artist and was good at making wood carvings of birds, waterfowl, horses and small animals. Many local residents commissioned specialty carvings and his work has found its way across the country from Maine to California. Services will be private.

CHURCH DIRECTORY AVONDALE Avondale Presbyterian Church 420 Pennsylvania Avenue 610.268.2919 www.avondalepc.org St. Gabriel of the Sorrowful Mother 8910 Gap Newport Pike 610.268.0296 www.stgabrielavondalepa.org

Unionville Presbyterian Church 815 Wollaston Road 610.347.2327 www.unionvillepresbyterianchurch.org

KENNETT SQUARE

WEST GROVE and SURROUNDING AREAS

Willowdale Chapel 675 Unionville Road 610.444.2670 www.willowdalechapel.org

Bethel AME Church 300 E. Linden Street 610.444.2974 www.bethelameckennsq.org Bible Evangelical Church of Kennett Square 500 E. Cypress Street 610.467.1081 www.bibleevangelicalchurch.org Episcopal Church of the Advent 401 N. Union Street 610.444.4624 www.adventks.org First Baptist Church of Kennett Square 415 W. State Street 610.444.5320 www.firstbaptistkennettsquare.com Greater Works Ministries 553 Rosedale Road 610.444.5581 www.gwministries.net Kennett Square Missionary Church 408 Bayard Road 610.444.0867 www.kennettsquarebaptist.com Kennett Square Presbyterian Church 211 S. Broad Street 610.444.5255 www.pcks.org New Garden Memorial U.A.M.E 309 E. Linden Street 610.444.3357 www.uamechurch.org Second Baptist Church of Kennett Square 132 S. Willow Street 610.444.0885 St. Patrick Catholic Church 212 Meredith Street 610.444.4364 www.stpatrickkennettsquare.org

Assumption BVM Church 300 State Road 610.869.2722 www.assumptionbvmwestgrove.org Avon Grove Church of the Nazarene 240 State Road 610.869.9500 www.avongrove.church West Grove Presbyterian Church 139 W. Evergreen Street 610.869.9458 www.westgrovepres.org West Grove United Methodist Church 300 N. Guernsey Road 610.869.9334 www.westgroveumc.org Willowdale Chapel – Jennersville 111 Vineyard Way, Jennrsville 610.444.2670 www.willowdalechapel.org Landenberg United Methodist Church 205 Penn Green Road, Landenberg 610.274.8384 www.landenbergchurch.com Christian Life Center 125 Saginaw Road, New London 610.869.2140 www.CLCFamily.church New London United Methodist Church 1010 State Road, New London 610.869.8129 www.umc.org

Continued on Page 3B

CONSTANCE SALLIE TAYLOR Constance Sallie (Reichard) Taylor, a resident of Chadds Ford, passed away on July 18. She was 94. She passed at home with her daughter Cindy at her side, listening to music and stories of wonderful family times, and following a day-long visit by her four children and other family members. Constance was born in Allentown on New Year’s Eve 1925 to the late Lulu Lillian (Lichtenwalner) and George Washington Reichard. She had one brother, George Edgar, who died last year, and a half-sister, the late Elizabeth Brown. Connie had two great loves in life: her family and music. She graduated in 1947 from West Chester State Teachers College with a degree in Music Education. Her instrument was the piano. Her first teaching job was a newly-created one – to introduce a music curriculum to rural schools in the Allentown countryside. Connie married Frederick Taylor of Chadds Ford in June 1949, moved to West Chester and continued teaching for a time. She became involved in church music at Brandywine Baptist Church in Chadds Ford, then was organist and choir director for many years at Bethlehem Methodist Church in Thornton. She was a Soroptimist member and enjoyed bowling. She and Fred started their family in 1951 when Frederick Harper Taylor, Jr., was born and the family grew to include four children. She gave up teaching to focus on her children. Connie encouraged her husband during his work at Ford Motor Co. in Chester, then in his new business, Taylor’s Service Center in Chadds Ford, which they purchased in 1964 and is still family-owned and operated today. Fred died on Dec. 22, 1995. In her later years, Connie frequently stayed with her daughter and her husband and their son in Landenberg and wintered with her daughter in Southern California, where Connie made new and beloved friends. Connie is survived by her children Fred Jr. (Beth); Cathy (Robert); Cindy (Larry) and David (Helen). She has eight living grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Connie lost a beloved grandchild earlier this year, David Jr. The family is immeasurably grateful to Dr. Jean Stretton and nurse Mary Warrener, R.N., of West Chester, Home Helpers, Holisticare Hospice, Nancy and Jim Bonsall, the Brodoway family, and violinist Andrew Voghts for helping this gentle, musical soul pass peacefully forward. In lieu of flowers, the family requests support for Community Hospices of America Foundation c/o Holisticare Hospice, 685 Kromer Ave., Berwyn, PA 19312. Donations may be made online at chafoundation. net/contribute-online. Please indicate Holisticare Hospice so the funds can be applied to those patients. Services were held on July 24 at Brandywine Baptist Church. Funeral arrangements are being handled by Kuzo Funeral Home, Kennett Square. Constance will be laid to rest next to her husband at Brandywine Baptist Church Cemetery.

Obituary submissions The Chester County Press publishes obituaries, free of charge, for those with a connection to southern Chester County. Obituaries appear on the Wednesday after they are received, space permitting. They also are posted on www.chestercounty.com. Photos should be sent as .jpg attachments to the obituary text. To submit an obituary to the Chester County Press, email the information to: editor@chestercounty.com.

Alleluia Those who seek the Lord lack no good thing. Psalm 34:10 The Chester County Press features a dedicated church/religious page that can help you advertise your house of worship and/or business. The page is updated weekly with new scripture. Only $10 Weekly for this space. We are offering a special discount of 25% off each and every help wanted/ classified advertisement to any business that advertises on the PRESS church page.

For more information or to place an ad, contact Brenda Butt at 610-869-5553 ext. 10

St. Michael Lutheran Church 109 E. Doe Run Road, Unionville 610.347.1696 www.stmichaelpa.com Compliments of

Lions Club of Oxford

Sponsored by

Foulk Funeral Home Kuzo Funeral of West Grove, Inc. Home, Inc. 610.869.2685

Curtis S. Greer, Supervisor

610.444.4116

Catherine Kelly, Supervisor

Cleveland Funeral Home 610.268.2166

Keely W. Griffin, Supervisor

Family Owned and Operated | Funeral & Cremation Services Life Celebrations | Privately Owned Crematory | Pre Planning www.kuzoandfoulkfh.com

HERR FOODS, INC. NOTTHINGHAM, PA

932-9330 ENCOURAGES YOU TO ATTEND THE CHURCH OF YOUR CHOICE

P.O. Box 270 Oxford, PA 19363 Meets First and Third Thursday at 6:30p.m. Nottingham Inn, Nottingham, PA

Landenberg Church United Methodist All Are Welcome 205 Penn Green Rd. In Historic Downtown Landenberg Landenberg, PA 19350

610-274-8384 Services Every Sunday • 9:00 am


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

3B

Chester County Press

Local News Oxford United Methodist Church gives thanks for Philadelphia Foundation grant The Oxford United Methodist Church was awarded a grant of $4,184 from the Clyde P. and Katherine B. Alexander Memorial Fund of The Philadelphia Foundation to support the mission and ministries of the church. The announcement of the grant was made by Pedro A. Ramos, president and CEO of the Foundation. This grant helps support

the church’s missions and outreach programs in the community such as hosting a GED class for La Comunidad Hispana (LCH) and American Red Cross blood drives. The church has also recently joined with Allen AME Church in Oxford, Willowdale Chapel in Jennersville, and other local churches/organizations to encourage conversations

on adopting best practices for promoting unity in the local area. As part of the United Methodist Church, Oxford supports missionaries and missions around the world. Founded in 1851, the Oxford United Methodist Church makes it their mission to be “Praising. Caring. Serving. Sharing.” Currently, worship service

Kennett Graduation...

their class to the graduates of the 1940s who turned into the greatest generation. “We spent half the year in a different kind of war,” she said. Jordan Reidenberg, speaking from his wheelchair and accompanied by his service dog, Jolly, talked about learning to deal with challenges. “I’ve been dealing with challenges for as long as I can remember,” he said. Jillian Rowan said, “This was not the ending we envisioned, but the unexpected did not dismantle high hopes.” Emily Matthias, representing the Class of 2014, welcomed the graduates into the alumni association. She reiterated the irony

of comparing her distress when her graduation was delayed a day for rain to the current graduates facing the overwhelming disappointments brought on by the COVID-19 Pandemic. Hughes presented the Advisor’s Cup to Class President Tuley for service to school and community. Hritz presented the Rupert Cup, the school’s highest honor, to Gemma Morrison. In his closing words, Hritz announced that the class members had collectively received $7.4 million in scholarship money for the future. He told them, “The Class of 2020 is not about what’s missed, but what’s ahead. You will be problem-solvers.”

Continued from Page 1B

Milady Lagunas delivered the invocation in English and Spanish. She compared the students’ journey through high school to climbing a flight of stairs with that last step being the toughest. Class President Mary Tuley said, “We had a journey to the finish that we had to complete alone,” referring to the last four months of school closing. Olivia Beldyk referred to their Senior year as, “The class that experienced the most snow days without snow..” She added, “We grew in unique ways.” Emily Taylor compared

Obituaries

is being held on Zoom and Facebook at 10:55 am on Sunday morning. Limited “in-person” attendance is available at an 8:30 a.m. casual service and at 10:55 a.m. The church also offers virtual Bible study on Monday at 1:30 p.m. and a prayer time at 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. The church is located at 18

Addison Street in Oxford. For more information about the church, please call 610-932-9698 or visit www. oxfordpaumc.org. Founded in 1918, the Philadelphia Foundation strengthens the economic, social and civic vitality of Greater Philadelphia. The Philadelphia Foundation grows effective philanthropic investment, connects

individuals and institutions across sectors and geography, and advances civic initiatives through partnerships and collaboration. A publicly supported foundation, the Philadelphia Foundation manages more than 900 charitable funds established by its donors and makes over 1,000 grants and scholarship awards each year. To learn more, visit philafound.org.

Continued from Page 2B

DOROTHY HERMAN Dorothy Herman, a resident of Oxford, passed away peacefully on July 20 at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. She was 63. She was the loving and devoted wife of Richard Kevin Herman for more than 40 years. Dorothy was the daughter of the late Leo and Agnes Barbacovey. Dorothy was born on Dec. 16, 1956 in Hamorton, Pa. She graduated from Unionville High School in 1974. She worked for Wawa, Inc. from 1976 to 1986, where she met Rich, the love of her life, before resigning to stay at home with her children. Dorothy homeschooled her four children for most of their lives and instilled in them a love of nature, history, and the Lord. When her children were older, she worked for The Friends Home in Kennett Square for 20 years. She had a passion for the Lord and was a member of Andrews Bridge Christian Church. She loved baking with her children and grandchildren, enjoyed having tea with her sisters, and family trips to the beach. Having grown up on the Longwood Gardens property, it held a very special place in her heart, which she passed on to her children. In addition to her husband, she is survived by her two daughters, Kristine (Sarah) Herman and Erin (Shaun) Hartley; two sons, Mark (Laura) Herman and Adam (Jaime) Herman; and two beautiful granddaughters. She is preceded in death by her parents, her in-laws, and a brother-in-law. Services and internment will be private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Lighthouse Youth Center at 245 Commerce St. Oxford PA, 19363. Arrangements are being handled by the Edward L. Collins, Jr. Funeral Home, Inc. Oxford. Online condolences may be made at www.elcollinsfuneralhome.com.

Photo by Chris Barber

A relative shoots celebratory confetti as his graduate passes by.

Virtual Livestock Auction Sale opens Friday, July 31 at noon and begins closing August 1 at noon Animals that will potentially be offered • Market Beef Steers •Market Dairy Steers •Market Hogs •Market Lambs •Market Meat Goats •Meat Rabbit Trios • Broiler (Chicken) Pairs • Meat Duck Pairs This is your opportunity to support local 4-H youth and to purchase some of Cecil County 4-H’s finest hand raised animals.

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN! For more information call 410-392-3440 or go to auction@cecilcountyfair.org


4B

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020

Chester County Press

Local News Legals Estate Notice and Claim

From the office of the creditor comes the living man, Philip Alexander Carlton Jr. and Crystal Lynette Carlton, heirs and Beneficiaries of the Estate/Trust BARBARA JEAN JOHNSON and BARBARA JEAN CARLTON the decedent set forth below. There is a claim and lien on all variations, derivatives, open and closed contracts and reversionary interest thereto and of the titles BARBARA JEAN JOHNSON and BARBARA JEAN CARLTON and after acquired property in the amount of $800,000,000,000.00 USD/XDR eight hundred billion and accepted for value. All Power of Attorneys are revoked. All debts of the BARBRA JEAN JOHNSON Trusts/Estates are hereafter settled. Any parties with a valid claim greater, request and make known to their attorneys. All other persons indebted to decedent are to make payment without delay to the Administrator named below. This residuary clause is a codicil and amendment to the Last Will and Testament of Philip Alexander Carlton Jr. Estate, Date 08\10\2017. Estate of BARBARA JEAN JOHNSON, deceased, late of Chester County, Pennsylvania. Administrator: Philip A. Carlton, 409 E 12 Street Chester Pennsylvania Republic. 7p-15-3t

ADVERTISEMENT FOR GRANT OF LETTERS

ESTATE OF Lorna Binder, LATE OF West Goshen Township, Chester County LETTERS Testamentary on the above Estate have been granted to the undersigned, who request all persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent to make known the same and all persons indebted to the decedent to make payment without delay to Ira D. Binder, 227 Cullen Rd, Oxford, PA 19363 or Attorney: : Ira D. Binder, 227 Cullen Rd, Oxford, PA 19363 7p-29-3t

ESTATE NOTICE

ESTATE OF OPAL LEORA ORTEGA, DECEASED. Late of Oxford Borough, Chester County, PA, LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION on the above Estate have been granted to the undersigned, who request all persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent to make known the same and all persons indebted to the decedent to make payment without delay to GEORGE S. ORTEGA, JR., ADMINISTRATOR, 705 Lincoln St., Oxford, PA 19363, Or to his Attorney: JANNA M. PELLETIER, 535 N. Church St., Ste. 309 West Chester, PA 19380 7p-29-3t

NOTICE OF DISSOULTION

Pursuant to the requirements of section 1975 of the Pennsylvania Business Corporation Law of 1988, notice is hereby given that JAMES L. LARSON, D.D.S. & ASSOCIATES, a professional corporation, is currently in the process of voluntarily dissolving. Mark N. Suprenant, Esquire, 885 Empress Road, P.O. Box 1816, West Chester, PA 19382 7p-29-1t

INCORPORATION NOTICE

Synergy Gymnastics, Inc. has been incorporated under the provisions of the Pennsylvania Business Corporation Law of 1988. Andrew L. Miller & Assocs., Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004 7p-29-1t

INCORPORATION NOTICE

Ed’s Automotive Service Inc. has been incorporated under the provisions of the Pennsylvania Business Corporation Law of 1988. 7p-29-1t

PUBLIC NOTICE

AT&T proposes to construct a new 33’ metal utility pole and install a topmounted antenna at 37.7’ near 751 E. Lancaster Avenue, Downingtown, PA (20201247). Interested parties may contact Scott Horn (856-809-1202) (1012 Industrial Dr., West Berlin, NJ 08091) with comments regarding potential effects on historic properties. 7p-29-1t

ESTATE NOTICE

ESTATE OF Corinne Rhodes, late of Oxford Borough, Chester County, Deceased. Letters of Administration on the estate of the above named Deborah Cozzone having been granted to the undersigned, all persons having claims or demands against the estate of the said decedent are requested to make known the same and all persons indebted to the said decedent to make payment without delay to: Deborah Cozzone, Administrator, c/o Attorney: Winifred Moran Sebastian, Esquire, 208 E. Locust Street, P.O. Box 381,Oxford, PA 19363 Phone: 610-932-3838 7p-29-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writs directed to Sheriff Fredda L. Maddox, the herein-described real estate will be sold at public sale in the Chester County Justice Center at 201 W Market Street, 3rd Floor, Room 3300, West Chester, Pennsylvania, as announced

Dutton graduates from Foxcroft School West Grove resident Olivia Dutton was among 36 students from four countries, eight states, and the District of Columbia to graduate from Foxcroft School on May 29. A superb horsewoman, Dutton received Foxcroft’s coveted Miss Charlotte’s Trophy (named for the School’s founder) for her horsemanship, riding skills, and successes in the show ring, as well as for being a leader and a mentor within the Foxcroft riding program. Dutton also participated in the School’s Exceptional Proficiency program, allowing her

to compete year-round, including on the gold medal-winning team at the 2018 FEI North American Young Rider Championships. She was an active leader outside the show ring, as well, serving as a head of the Athletic Association, assistant manager of the Fox spirit team, and a member of the Soggie Cheerios singing group. She is the daughter of Phillip and Edwina “Evie” Dutton of West Grove and will attend the University of Kentucky next fall. Foxcroft’s Class of 2020 is an impressive group that includes two National Merit Commended students, seven AP Scholars, and

eight members of the Cum Laude Society. Collectively, the Class of 2020 received 143 offers of admission from 95 colleges and universities, including Cornell, Columbia, University of Washington, UC San Diego, UNC-Chapel Hill, Texas A&M, and University of Virginia. They were also offered a total of $1.9 million in merit scholarships. The Class also stood out athletically with a Division III lacrosse recruit, five Exceptional Proficiency participants for riding, and a host of all-conference honorees. Foxcroft School was founded in 1914 and is a

college-preparatory boarding and day school for girls in grades 9-12 with a mission of helping every girl explore her unique voice and develop the skills, confidence, and courage to share it with the world. Foxcroft School offers 75 courses, including 16 AP classes, and a STEM program that inspires girls to pursue studies in fields where women are underrepresented. The school fields athletic teams in 11 sports and has a nationally known riding program. For more information about the school, visit the website at www.foxcroft. org, or call 540-687-5555.

on Thursday, August 20th, 2020 at 11AM. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file with the Prothonotary and in the Sheriff’s Office, both located in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 W Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, Schedules of Distribution on Monday, September 21st, 2020. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedules unless exceptions are filed in the Sheriff’s Office within ten (10) days thereafter.

end of a 20 foot radius intersection curve joining the said Northeasterly side of the Kennett Pike with the northwesterly side of Byron Road (50 feet wide); Thence from said point of beginning by the said Northeasterly side of Kennett Pike Keeping Parallel to and 30 feet Northeasterly of the center line thereof the following two courses and distances (1) North 38 degrees 58 minutes, 50 seconds west 144.99 feet to a point of curve of a curve to the right having a radius of 1033.22; (2) in a northwesterly direction by said curve to the right an arc distance of 97.28 feet to a point, thence by line of lands now or formerly of Sarah P. Ogden a/k/a Sara R. Ogden, unmarried the following two courses and distances; (1) North 87 degrees 23 minutes 30 seconds East 292.33 feet to a point; (2) North 23 degrees, 14 minutes, 30 seconds west, 80.00 feet to a point; thence by lot No. 2 the following two courses and distances; (I) North 66 degrees 45 minutes 30 seconds East, 37.07 feet to a point; (2) South 50 degrees 56 minutes, 2 seconds East 271.22 feet to a point in the aforementioned northwesterly side of Byron road; Thence thereby the following two courses and distances (1) in a Southwesterly direction by an arc of a curve to the left having a radius of 380 feet; an arc distance of 60 feet to a

point of tangency; (2) South 53 degrees, I Minute, 10 seconds west, 328.42 feet to a point of curve of a 20 foot radius intersection curve to the right; Thence in a southwesterly and northwesterly direction by said curve to the right an arc distance of 31.42 feet to the place of beginning. Being No. 1 Lot on said plan.

(21) days from the date of sale by 4PM. FREDDA L. MADDOX, SHERIFF 7p-29-3t

SALE NO. 20-8-330 Writ of Execution No. 2018-12403 DEBT $386,920.13 All that certain lot or piece of ground with the building and improvements thereon erected, situate in the Township of Kennett, County of Chester and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. described in accordance with a plan of property of James H. Perry and Ethelyn A. Perry (deceased), made by Howard L. Robertson, civil engineer and surveyor, Wilmington, Delaware dated November 30, 1985 as follows: BEGINNING at a point in the Northeasterly side of the Kennett Pike, said point of Beginning being the Northeasterly

Tax ID: 62-2-48.3 PLAINTIFF: The Bank of New York Mellon FKA The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the certificate holders of the CWABS, Inc., Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-26 VS DEFENDANT: Victoria Perry Robinson and Michael Robinson SALE ADDRESS: 1 Byron Court, Chadds Ford, PA, 19317 PLANTIFF ATTORNEY: Parker McCay PA, 856-596-8900 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. Payment must be paid in cash, certified check, or money order made payable to the purchaser or “Sheriff of Chester County”. The balance must be made payable to “Sheriff of Chester County” within twenty-one

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

5B

Chester County Press

Local News Avon Grove Charter School honors the Class of 2020 The Avon Grove Charter School Senior Class of 2020 officially marked the end of their high school journey on July 13 with a special outdoor Commencement ceremony at the Christian Life Center. While observing state regulations on social distancing and allowing only a limited number of guests, the graduates were treated to a “traditional” graduation and the opportunity to celebrate this momentous milestone. Class of 2020 student speaker Maggie Degler delivered an eloquent commencement speech detailing her journey at Avon Grove Charter School. Scholarships were awarded to the following graduates: AGCS Art Scholarship - Emily McDermott & Happy Jalluri

AGCS Athletics Scholarship - Jacob Kerstetter AGCS Character Scholarship - Allie McKinnney & Joey DiJoesph - AGCS PTO Scholarship - Maggie Degler - AGCS Community Service Scholarship – Halle Tarasiewicz - Rachel Carson Conservation Scholarship – Jordan Cross - The Weiner Group Scholarship – Nick King & Kendall Ludwig - AGCS Leader of the Pack Scholarship – Jemma Raner AGCS Micro Farm Scholarship – Gail Santucci - Logan Hugh Kammerer Memorial Scholarship – Kayla Taylor Prior to Head of School Kristen Bishop’s conferral of degree speech, each graduate was individually called to the podium to receive the diploma.

Courtesy photos

The Avon Grove Charter School honored the Class of 2020 during a commencement ceremony on July 13.

House acts to give Pennsylvanians voice in emergencies Bill would give voters option to change declaration procedures, prohibit racial discrimination After months of taking action to carry the voices of Pennsylvanians concerning the governor’s response to COVID-19, the State House voted to give the people of Pennsylvania the opportunity to decide for themselves how they wish to be governed during times of emergency.

Senate Bill 1166 would amend the constitution to limit an emergency declaration by the governor to 21 days, unless otherwise extended in whole or in part by a majority vote of the General Assembly. The legislation would also provide constitutional protections against racial

Lawmakers want answers about failures of Pennsylvania’s Unemployment Compensation program House Republicans from Chester, Delaware and Montgomery counties joined other lawmakers in the southeast region in demanding an investigation into the failures of Pennsylvania’s Unemployment Compensation program. Reps. Stephen Barrar (R-Chester/ Delaware), Tim Hennessey (R-Chester/ Montgomery), John Lawrence (R-Chester/ Lancaster), and Chris Quinn (R-Delaware) echoed the sentiments expressed by House members from Bucks County who demanded that the House Government Oversight Committee examine the disastrous response the unemployment system has had to Pennsylvania citizens forced out of work during COVID-19 mitigation efforts. “Our offices have been inundated with phone calls, emails and visits from thousands of constituents, many of whom have applied for unemployment compensation and have yet to collect benefits or have their claims resolved,”

they said. “Dating back to March when the statewide shutdown began, Pennsylvania residents have been at the mercy of an outdated and obsolete Pennsylvania Unemployment Compensation System whose online application service has repeatedly crashed, leaving applicants frustrated and unable to file their claims. Constituents have also called with concerns about identity theft after receiving claim checks for which they had not applied. They also expressed concern about the impact the fraudulent disbursements could have on their 2020 tax return.” “Despite the General Assembly designating funds in the budget for system improvements and additional staff to handle claims, the number of unresolved cases continues to be staggering. We urge the Government Oversight Committee to examine these failures and determine what changes are necessary to ensure that Pennsylvania citizens will receive the service and responsiveness they need and deserve.”

discrimination. “Time is of the essence to get these two important issues before the people of Pennsylvania,” Majority Leader Kerry Benninghoff (R-Centre/ Mifflin) said. “Amending our state Constitution is not something we should take lightly; however, we believe doing so is necessary. Our communities

should decide for themselves how they wish to be governed.” While current law states emergency declarations can last up to 90 days, a recent court ruling blocked the Legislature’s ability to end emergency declarations without the consent of the governor. “We believe the power of our Commonwealth

truly rests with the people. Pennsylvania is not a dictatorship, and the voters should ultimately decide,” Speaker of the House Bryan Cutler (R-Lancaster) said. “We are a co-equal branch of government and have tried at every turn to work with the administration, including asking to join a multi-branch, bipartisan task force to manage

Classifieds

this crisis. The governor turned us down, deciding instead to go it alone for months on end.” The constitutional amendment now advances to the Senate for further consideration. It must pass both chambers of the General Assembly in consecutive sessions before it can be placed on the ballot for voters to consider.


6B

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020

Chester County Press

Local News COVID-19... Continued from Page 2A

people are not immune to the negative effects of a coronavirus infection, and need to be more cautious regarding their exposure to the virus, not just for their own health, but for the health of others they could inadvertently infect. “What we do have is a lack of appreciation,” Fauci said. “You have a dual responsibility. You have a responsibility to yourself, because I think thinking that young people have no deleterious consequences is not true.” ‘Remain in our bubble’ Ellen Catanzaro lives in Kennett Township with her husband and two daughters. Last weekend, they transported their oldest daughter Maggie to graduate school at The Ohio State University, while their younger daughter Claire is preparing to start her junior year at the University of Delaware. When Pennsylvania entered it first shutdown phase this spring, the Catanzaro family formed its own protective shield and did not allow anyone else in their home. “We began to have the same conversations everyone is having – that the coronavirus is something that could kill us -- and

that we have to remain in our bubble,” Catanzaro said. “In fact, Claire did not leave during the first wave of quarantine. When Maggie would return from seeing her boyfriend, she would have to distance herself from the rest of the family. “Eventually, her boyfriend became part of our bubble, and when we got to a certain point, we figured that he was now part of our bubble, but the truth is that he also has another bubble – his family.” Catanzaro admits that the safety and precautionary roadmap of the coronavirus is sometimes a conundrum to sift through, decipher and ultimately pass along to her daughters. Not only have regulations flipped back and forth, she said, the virus has become a politically-driven tangle of mixed messages that are delivered daily. “It has all become very blurred, as opposed to when we all had to stay at home,” she said. “I think everyone is trying to do the right thing, but many of the messages are mixed, and if you are one who listens to the messages, they can be quite confusing. How do you teach your children if you’re not sure what you should be telling them? “It opens us all up to danger, because once you’ve opened up the

floodgates, how do you rein everyone back in?” While parents throughout Chester County have set into motion precautionary measures for their children in preparation for the summer, there is another huge – and still unknown – hurdle waiting for them in about a month: Whether or not the school(s) their children attend will reopen in the fall. Early last week, Gov. Tom Wolf placed new restrictions on restaurants, bars and businesses in the state in an effort to tamper down the recent climb of new COVID-19 cases that have been occurring in the state. Later in the week, Wolf said he would consider “pulling the plug” on school reopenings if the recent uptick of cases continues to rise. It’s the latest gut punch to local school districts who were forced to redefine themselves this spring in the wake of a pandemic, as well as to parents who had to rearrange their work and

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life schedules around their children’s academic needs. After being forced to close their doors in the spring, the immediate future of schools remains a mystery, and is now being solved by its key stakeholders who are spending their summer holding virtual town halls and Zoom meetings with concerned parents. Kennett Square resident Suzanne Gaffney and her husband Chris are the parents of their daughter Faith and son Hayden, and like many other parents, Suzanne has spent sizable chunks of her summer wondering what the “Big Picture” scenario will look like in the Unionville-Chadds Ford School District come fall. She belongs to two social media groups made up of parents of children who attend schools in the district. It’s a back-and-forth online argument of Yays and Nays; some parents are in favor of reopening and some are in favor of maintaining remote learning. “I think a lot of the concern for many parents is in the waiting and in the not knowing,” she said. “For now, I’m standing on the sidelines, because the comments [on social media]

are coming in so fast and furious that I have had to distance myself from it. I am going to take a break from the information. “If I don’t, I will remain in a stop-and-start conversation with other parents, my children, and none of it is normal.” ‘Teaching our children to be independent thinkers’

them fall in the 18-14-age group. As they live through the worst global pandemic in over 100 years, she said that they have told her that in the beginning, they were not taking masking and social distancing very seriously, but all that has, for the most part, changed. “Now, the kids who had been going to parties are now telling me that they’re avoiding those situations,” she said. “They’re getting to the point where they’re realizing that it’s going to take all of us to make this stop. “A colleague of mine once taught me that one of the rules of parenting is to not insulate one’s children from unhappiness,” Rowe added. “She said, ‘Teach your children resilience and how to do the hard things, and to learn how to make the right decision even though it’s not always the easiest decision. Let them learn the different adversities that they face, the challenges and the emotions that come, and how to regulate and modulate their way through that.’”

As Chester County parents scramble to find the sure things in the mysterious and potentially harmful unknowns of a global pandemic, the easiest steps have been the ones that have entered their place in the modernday mantra: Wash your hands frequently, wear a mask and practice social distancing. “Whether it’s the pandemic or choosing to make good choices, it’s about Chris and me teaching our children to be independent thinkers,” Gaffney said. “It’s no different than the other pressures they have. This is just one other thing they have to do, no matter what anyone else is doing.” Rowe said that among To contact Staff Writer the people she counsels in Richard L. Gaw, email her practice, a number of rgaw@chestercounty.com.


WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

7B

Chester County Press

Local News Virtual Town Tours and Village Walks series now taking place Explore architecture, artistry, and personal expression in Chester County’s 26th annual Town Tours and Village Walks Program Now in its 26th year, Chester County’s annual Town Tours and Village Walks program is a tradition that many local residents and visitors look forward to each summer. This year, the program has been transitioned to a completely virtual experience due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The new Virtual Summer Series is designed to highlight Chester County’s rich cultural heritage, while continuing to protect the health and safety of everyone. The virtual program will feature six “Live at Five” programs on Thursdays

throughout July and August. The first program took place on July 16, highlighting art and architecture in Phoenixville. The programs will take place virtually through Zoom, a free video-conferencing software for use with computers, tablets and cell phones. Additional programs include Historic Sugartown, Hibernia Mansion (July 30), the Village of Yellow Springs (Aug. 6), Historic West Chester (Aug. 13), and a special preview of Kennett Square’s Occupation Day (Aug. 27). All programs are free

to attend, but sign-up is Visitors Bureau. visit https://chescoplan- Karen Marshall, Heritage required. For more informa- ning.org/HisResources/ Preservation Coordinator, at The Chester County tion about the program, TownTours.cfm or contact kmarshall@chesco.org. Planning Commission is supporting the 2020 Town Tours and Village Walks, and thanks this year’s sponsors and volunteers who have worked diligently to make these virtual tours possible. Sponsors include the Chester County Board of Commissioners, Chester County Planning Commission, Chester County Historic Preservation Network, the Chester County Historical Society, and the Chester Courtesy photo County Conference and The new Virtual Summer Series is designed to highlight Chester County’s rich

Calendar of Events

Aug. 1 7th annual Eli’s Ride for a Cure On Saturday, Aug. 1, the 7th annual Eli’s Ride for a Cure will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The event is hosted by the Eli Seth Matthews Leukemia Foundation. All motorcycles are welcome to ride for a cure against childhood cancer. Participants will meet at Hannum’s HarleyDavidson in Chadds Ford. Kick stands are up at 10 a.m. Each rider and passenger will receive Eli’s memorial patch if it is his or her first ride in the event. There is also a

2020 rocker patch for this years ride. The cost per rider is $20 and the cost for each passenger is $10. This year, participants will drop the money in a container and take a patch. The participants will ride to the Nemours Alfred I. DuPont Hospital for Children, where riders can dismount from the bike, but must stay by it. Participants will not enter the hospital. A donation will be made to the hospital’s Music and Arts Department. The riders will then travel to North East, Md. to pay respects to Eli Seth Matthews, who passed away from childhood cancer.

Participants are asked to bring new Hot Wheels cars that can be distributed to children at the hospital. The rain date for the event is Aug. 8.

Aug. 16 Underground Railroad Bus Tour The Kennett Underground Railroad Center is hosting two-hour tours starting at 1:30 at the Brandywine Valley Tourism Information Center, 300 Greenwood Road, Kennett Square. Private group tours can be arranged by request. For additional information, email info@kennettundergroundrr.org.

cultural heritage, while continuing to protect the health and safety of everyone.

Sappey announces over $22K for local environmental education grants State Rep. Christina Sappey (D-Chester County) announced that two environmental education grants from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection have been approved for Stroud Water Research Center. The two grants total $22,748. More than $19,000 of that funding will be utilized for Stroud Water Research Center’s Girls-in-STEM Watershed Education pro-

gram. The other $3,000 will be used by Stroud Water Research Center for the Brandywine Watershed Discovery Day Camp 2020. This camp is intended for under-served youths. “I’m very excited about this funding for Stroud Water Research,” Sappey said. “These programs focus on watershed environmental science, technology, engineering, and math, providing enrichment for students entering grades four through six. They will

also encourage aspiring future female environmental leaders.” Sappey said that the grants will engage youth in environmental justice, climate change, and water quality improvement, expand their understanding of these issues in Pennsylvania and provide people with skills to take responsible action to protect Pennsylvania’s environment. For more information, contact Sappey’s office at 484-200-8264.

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8B

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2020

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*Cannotbecombinedwithanyotheroffer.Previoussalesexcluded.Goodatinitialpresentationonly.Discountscannotbecombinedwithanyotheroffer.Additionalworkisextraandoptional.Financingavailableforqualifiedbuyers.

NO PRICE QUOTES WILL BE GIVEN VIA PHONE. 13 Mount Pleasant Drive Aston, Pennsylvania 19014.

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Chester County Press 07-29-2020 Edition  

Chester County Press 07-29-2020 Edition