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The Mobile Issue 2018

ISSUE 75 2018 Philippines Indonesia Malaysia Singapore Hong Kong Thailand

www.adobomagazine.com

PHP 220 IDR 100k MYR 15 SGD 10 HKD 60 THB 250

A medium which refuses to be ephemeral. Mobile made its way subtly into humans’ lives and inch by inch, made other mediums fade into oblivion, albeit unintentionally. From something to your everything, the mobile is intrusive, pervasive, strong in its will to demand attention. The world in your hands, though an exaggeration, is mobile’s reality. It’s your bridge-builder, map, shopping cart, campaigner. Brands and agencies know its power—and how to stretch it. Then as it continues to transcends boundaries, we know, for sure, it is here to stay.


ISSUE 75 / MOBILE

Editor’s Note

T

he mobile phone is the lifeline of a modern person. From lazing away afternoons on YouTube to getting real-time traffic updates, the mobile phone has grown from luxury to necessity. The mobile has leapt from being the product sold to a platform where to advertise. With the population having a huge chunk of digital natives, the mobile world is swiftly outdoing itself. Many people have compromised privacy for access to artificial intelligence and virtual connections. Because of this, we, at the forefront of the creative community have the greater opportunity of taking control of the narrative. From being interruptive and irksome, advertising has also groomed itself to suit the mobile platform. The hotbeds of creativity leave a trail of breadcrumbs that keeps the world watching. By touching viewers’ emotions and burning hours into production, advertisers have made it possible for the audience to opt not to press skip buttons.

We keep an eye out for the brilliant, vivid and fresh. This issue of adobo carries the Creative Rankings, a rundown of the top talents who made visionary ads that garnered both local and international awards. The adobo Creative Rankings is not merely a prize to covet. More importantly, it is a celebration of the floursh of the creative industry. It is a validation that creatives are relevant and indispensable—now more than never. The victors who come out of the list shall remain the guardians of the ad industry and adobo will hoist their torch in every corner of the world where they are recognized. Swipe right to ignite!

ANGEL V. GUERRERO Founder, Publisher & Editor-in-Chief


ANGEL V. GUERRERO Founder, President and Editor-in-Chief

EDITORIAL

LEO MARVIN BALANTE Content Editor NEVICSHKY CALMA Associate Content Editor

NIÑA ANGELICA VENUS Editorial Coordinator

JM MARTINADA Social Media Manager

JASON INCOCENCIO Digital Editor

HARRIET ICAY Senior Content Writer

JYRMIE EISENHEART LADIERO Digital Writer

C R E AT I V E S

SAM MACAISA Head of Art

VNITA SOHAL JERICHO LOUISE CLEMENTE Graphic Designers

SEBASTIAN LLAMANZARES JR. Senior Multimedia Artist

JETHER DANE GUADALUPE Designer

SALES & MARKETING

THEA ESTRELLA Senior Account Manager

BENG RAGON Marketing Services Specialist

CHRISTINE ANNE SANGALANG Marketing Associate

EVENTS

PIE YAP Events Manager

MAY DARLEN ROSALDO Project Coordinator

ADMIN & FINANCE

ELLEN MACANAS Finance Consultant

QUEENY EVE DADO HR & Admin Supervisor

ELSA GALAMGAM MUIKO CAMILLE BOSO MICHELLE DIZON Finance Officers

MICHAEL BARCELON ALAN AGCAOILI Liaison Officers

ROSALINDA ZAFRA HR & Admin Officer

INTERNS: Anna Tomboc, Neil Conche & Zenrik Diaz adobo Creative Hub, Unit 102 Ground Floor Building 2, OPVI Center, 2295 Pasong Tamo Extension, Makati City 1231, Philippines TEL: +63 2.845.02.18 info@adobomagazine.com / www.adobomagazine.com

adobo magazine is published bi-monthly by Sanserif Inc. © 2018 Sanserif Inc. All rights reserved. Printed on recycled paper. No part of the magazine may be reproduced or transmitted by any means without prior permission of the publisher. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication, the publisher and the editor assume no responsibility for errors of omissions or any circumstance of reliance of information in this publication. The opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily represent the views of the publisher and the editor. Advertisements are the sole responsibility of the advertisers.


The Cover

COVER ART

Chico Castillo

For this issue of adobo magazine, artist Chico Castillo reimagines what the future holds for mobile. The surprise of his creation is the familiar elements of today's industrial scene with the promise of a different functionality tomorrow. The future does not have to be sophisticated to be worth looking forward to.


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Contributors

MARK TUNGATE

IBBA RASUL-BERNARDO

FARROKH MADON

Paris-based author of AdLand: A Global History of Advertising.

Chief Executive Officer and CoFounder of Sari Software Solutions and resident gadget geek.

J Walter Thompson’s Singapore's Chief Creative Officer. His portfolio of clients include Visa, HP, Republic of Singapore Navy, Heineken, BMW, HSBC and Discovery Channel.

KAT GOMEZ LIMCHOC

DAN ROBINS

CHRISTA ESCUDERO

Executive creative director of BlackPencil Manila. She has been an advertising creative for twenty year and also known as the author of Book of 40.

Head of Programmatic in Spotify Asia Pacific. He is a media, data and technology specialist with a background in direct response digital marketing.

A writer by passion and profession. When she’s not writing, she’s reading about pop culture, current events, technology and human profiles.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Beng Ragon Bong Osorio Nicai de Guzman Joanna Parungao

NADZ RUIZ

Proud Iska, proud OrCom, writer at heart, advertising person by profession. Currently, Nadz is a Social Media Analyst at Publicis JimenezBasic.

CONTRIBUTING ARTIST

Karl Louis Elzingre

COVER ART

Chico Castillo PHOTOGRAPHERS

Marl Castro Calvin Cardenas


ISSUE 75 / MOBILE

Inside

UPFRONT Infographics

DIGITAL Opinion

FESTIVALS Coverage

THE WORK Deconstructing Creativity

08

14

28

118 Dead Whale

Anatomy of the

Gallery

Mobile Man

Intelligence 10

Ibba Rasul-Bernardo

20

The Mobile and

adobo Design Awards Asia 2018

34

adobo Design

Social Media's

Digital Vanguards of

Value to

Cannes Lions 2018

42

adobo Cup 11

Business

Gallery

50

adobo Tambuli 2018

Norde Innovation

68

Creative Rankings 2017

24

Series 2018

Bang for the Buck 122 Palau Pledge

Opinion 126 Mark Tungate

Raw

Then and Now 134 The Evolution of Mobile Phones

Creative Review 136 J Walter Thompson Singapore's Farrokh Madon

Exhibit 142 BoyP and his bonsai

130 Terence Eduarte

Center

COVERSTORY 145 Coming Home

DESIGN Design Thinking 150 TIRADA: 50 Years of Philippine Printmaking 154 Bob Greenberg: 10

PEOPLE Centerfold

BUSINESS Special Feaure

LIFE Spaces

166 Pepe Diokno

186 Martin Sorell Exits WPP

202 Nobody Flagship Store

Trendspotting 168 New Forms of Transit

Profile

Principles of Design

170 Piyush Pandey

Work Space

172 Jerrold Tarog

156 Facebook Philippines

Arts & Craft 160 History of Philippine Graphic Design

Creative Corner 176 Tony Sarmiento III

Roundtable 178 Joint Industry GMM

Flipside 182 Denis Cedric Ty 183 Jia Salindong-Du

Essentials 184 Jilson Tiu

The Firm 188 The Huddle Room

Brand Marketing 192 Spotify

Mediaspace 198 Zenith Advertising

Art & Culture 206 National Museum of Natural History

Book Review 210 Frenemies by Ken Auletta

Watering Hole 212 The Podium Corner Market

Eye On 214 Mongolia


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UPFRONT Data driven content with quantifiable facts and figures.

INFOGRAPHICS 08 Anatomy of the New Mobile Man

INTELLIGENCE 10 Social Media’s Value to Business


UPFRONT / INFOG R AP H IC S

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eBay’s HeadGaze

Lets you control apps by moving your head. With a quick tilt of the head, people are able to move a cursor on the screen and swipe, open apps, and tap on icons. Different movements correspond to different actions in a demonstration app. R-9 Smart Glasses

Extra-wide-field-of-view for enterprise design and visualization, gaming and entertainment, and extended reality development.

Skully Fenix AR augmented-reality helmet

The first motorcycle helmet to integrate a rear view camera (180-degree), heads-up display, in helmet turn-by-turn navigation, connected audio and smart voice controls.

Measure emotions and cognitive processes in the brain by assessing your emotional state based on signals from the front of your brain.

Proof – Alcohol Tracking Wearable Device

Can discretely analyze your BAC (Blood Alcohol Content) levels through your skin. Proof can tell you if you’re too drunk to drive.

L’Oreal UV Sense Patch

Battery-free wearable that measures UV exposure that is small enough to fit on your thumbnail.

Motiv Ring

Measures steps, sleep, resting, and active heart rate. Lasts about three days on a charge. Syncs via Bluetooth to your phone. Waterproof

Razor Turbo Jetts

Electric heel wheels that gives an ordinary pair of sneakers an electric-powered boost.

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IMEC EEG headset (Prototype)


UPFRONT / INTELLI GE N C E

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Hashtag Business Goals Hootsuite Social Media Barometer Report. |

ILLUSTRATION Jericho

ADDITIONAL TEXT Nevicshky

Calma

Louise Clemente

Back in 2009, you may remember adding all your friends on Facebook— then freshly replacing Friendster — with a simple goal, to tell them “What’s on your mind,” share pictures from menial daily trips to your grand travels, and connect with them through messages. Fast forward to 2018, this tool transcends the personal realm and now touches— or invades even— almost all aspects of every person’s life, family, organization, and business. Enterprises in the Asia Pacific Region know fully well the necessity of using social media to leverage their business. Especially so, the region is home to the most number of avid social media users. More than 1.7 billion users are using Facebook, Twitter, WeChat, LinkedIn and other social networks, to connect, discover and share experiences. The Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand are among the top 10 countries in terms of time spent on social. In the Social Media Barometer Report released by Hootsuite, the leader in social media management trusted by more than 16 million customers and employees, it was analyzed if this immensity in number also translates in to the business value of social media. SOCIAL MEDIA IS CRITICAL TO BUSINESS

Now indispensable to business, social media goes beyond marketing as it drives value in the business. Analyzing data from more than 9,000 responses across 19 countries, the Socia Media Barometer Report Research reveals that 90% of the respondents see that social media serves a critical platform for global businesses to maintain competitive advantage, with social media expected to grow continuously. “Our social media barometer report confirms what we’ve been hearing from customers large and small; that social media has become a critical channel for

delivering a consistent customer experience across a business,” says Penny Wilson, CMO, Hootsuite. Breaking it down, the report shows the wide range of functions social media takes across a business organization. 92% of organisations are using social to build brand awareness, 78% to manage their brand reputation, 78% for building and managing an engaged community, 66% to increase lead conversions and sales, 56% to gain market and customer insights, 49% for delivering customer service, 33% to attract job applicants and 25% to identify crisis and manage communications THE STRUGGLE IS REAL

Although the impact of social media cannot be ignored, the ways and means on how to maximize its potential still remains a murky area for many executives. The Report shows, 54% of executives struggle to understand and interpret social data, and 52% strive to stay on top of key social media trends. Although there is no shortage of metrics and tools to measure social media success, 61 percent of respondents in Asia Pacific still find this a challenge. Specifically on the question of social ROI, 53 percent of APAC respondents said their organisations do not measure ROI. While this number is lower than what other regions report, it is still a missed opportunity for brands across APAC. The problem lies in the way organizations handle social media. At present, the marketing team does not have the sole responsibility for it. There must be group synergy when it comes to taking it to achieve business goals. As Philip Agnew, Product Marketing Manager, Brandwatch puts it, “Social is no longer confined to the marketing team, but is rapidly evolving into a vital tool that departments across organisations

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WORDS Hootsuite


UPFRONT / INTELLI GE N C E

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depend on to discover key insights. In fact, 80% of our users at Brandwatch say they share insights with others in their organisations, and 87% say it helps them meet core business objectives. To aptly meet the needs of your consumers today, you need to listen, react and learn from all of your consumer comments online. If you don’t, you’re providing your competitors with a simple opportunity to get ahead.” However, this is easier said than done. The report shows that 39% of companies in the region don’t have a global social strategy and struggle to coordinate efforts across teams. LEVERAGING SOCIAL

Any business aspiring to stay ahead of the competition has to step up its social media solutions. First way to do that would be to overcome the measurement challenge. An organization must choose metrics that align with its specific business objectives. The key is collecting the right data that leads to making informed decisions. The second practice businesses must have is empowering social teams. Organisations need to ensure they have the right balance of skill between creative thinkers, data analysts, customer services executives and sales people. Teams across the business also need

access to regular training, guidelines and data, if social is to help drive broader business objectives. Intertwined with that is the third step which is encouraging collaboration across departments. Organizations should develop the right processes and governance structures. Roles of everyone involved in social media must be clear-cut in order to drive the social agenda forward and impact the bottom line. Organizations should also appoint internal leaders who can coordinate communications with different departments and champion the benefits of a truly social organization. The last key to gaining social media success is leveraging new opportunities. The report shows that businesses must explore and go beyond social media advertising, which as of now, comprises the bulk of their social. For example, chatbots, which enable businesses to provide instant responses to customers’ question online. More than half of those surveyed know this advancement, but do not see their companies taking advantage of it. However, this can have an impact on their customers service needs. Most of the respondents say that in the next coming months, social media will be more significant to their organization as they go for their #BusinessGoals.


ISSUE 75 / MOBILE

DIGITAL The creative, business, and social implications of technology

OPINION 14 Ibba Rasul-Bernardo: Add to Cart

DIGITAL GALLERY 20 The Mobile and Digital Vanguards of Cannes Lions 2018

DIGITAL PLAYGROUND 24 Norde Innovation Center


DIGITAL / OPINION

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IBBA RASUL-BERNARDO

Add to Cart:

Ibrahim ‘Ibba’ Rasul - Bernardo has

Amazon is here and no one knows it.

entrepreneur since he was 22, he’s the

been working with marginalized and underprivileged groups by giving them access to relevant technology. An IT founder and CEO of Sari Software

Ibba Bernardo Vnita Sohal

WORDS AND SHOPPING

Solutions. Ibba also wears other hats as

ILLUSTRATION

a technology and motorcycle journalist, entrepreneur and IT lecturer and is currently the founder of IAM360, a Virtual Reality startup based out of Hong Kong.

I

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’m an addict. Phew, that feels good to get off my rotund chest. I have a secret, more of an open secret. I love technology, specifically gadgets. That’s not completely true, I love gadgets and toys. There. I’ve said it. Ok fine, I love gadgets, toys, bags and motorcycles. The primary reason I’ve setup more than 26 Otterbox stores, 3 BEOPlay (Bang and Olufsen Mobile), Mission Workshop, a KTM motorcycle dealership, and my VR company is to hear the magic words “Dealers Price.” The primary reason I am part of a TV show on Ride PH, became a contributor to Games Master, T3 and editor-atlarge at Top Bikes is to feed my gadget and toy obsession. Writing and covering products allows me to touch and caress shiny and blingy doodads. I get first dibs on the products we bring in at dealers’ price. I even get to fly to China regularly and visit cool tech factories and—you guessed it—I get more toys. I remember begging relatives and friends, keeping track of their flights to the Philippines so I could hassle them by making them my own personal gadget mule. Then, I discovered the wonders of freight forwarding. The only downside was it took two long miserable months before my orders would arrive. I would have to go to my special supplier to pick them up. It was like Christmas, I assume ‘coz I’m Muslim. Except, there was a point where I felt them judging me by my orders. Yes, my orders did reveal embarrassing details about my life. I buy way too many Legos and action figures. Their knowing stares made me feel like I was a deviant.

My Chart of Shame


DIGITAL / OPINION

So how does it work? Here are 6 rules you gotta keep in mind.

1. Anything above 200 USD has a huge tax. It usually isn’t worth it.

2. If ordering multiple items, make sure to break them up into groups of orders that are less than 200 USD.

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16

3. Don’t buy things that are bulky. Air freight will be too expensive.

4. Only buy items that are “Fulfilled by Amazon” or else your item will get stuck for months in Philippine postal service limbo.

Lazada filled some of my needs, but just for a short time. It was not fast enough, it was not cheap enough and the quality and authenticity of the items were questionable. Facebook, OLX, and all the other retailers were OK, but there was so much friction: is the seller trustworthy payment via bank deposit, where do we meet up and so on and so forth. At the end, it usually was not worth the headache and effort. So, why have I wasted my life? Because all the businesses I set up are no longer necessary to feed my hunger. Amazon delivers straight to my condo usually in just four days! Up untill the writing of this article. I have spent 8000 PHP on Lazada and other local online platforms and I’ve spent nearly 8000 USD on Amazon. Admittedly a large chunk of that is for “work” but so were some of my Lazada purchases. How can local retailers and online platforms compete when Amazon is cheaper, faster and offers a wider selection? Maybe, just maybe, by providing better customer service and support. But if we as distributors and dealers can’t, this may be another reason setting up businesses in retail may have been a waste of time... Oh well “add to cart.”

5. Sadly and thankfully (coz this is why I can still afford food), not all items ship to the Philippines. There are 30 million that do though.

6. The sweet spot is usually for orders around 170 USD about the size of a shoe box and you’ll pay less than 1000 PHP for shipping with ZERO tax. Plus it will get to you faster than almost any other local e-com platform. I’ve got Prime so it gets to me in around 4 to 6 days.


ADVERTORIAL

PAYMAYA TAKES HOLIDAY MADNESS TO THE NEXT LEVEL WITH ‘PAYMAYA PA MORE!’ P10 MILLION RAFFLE PROMO

P

ayMaya is ringing in the holiday cheer — whether it’s shopping online or at the mall, sending money to loved ones, buying load, or even paying for bills — with the launch of its “PayMaya Pa More!” promo, where account holders stand a chance to win as much as P10 million in the grand raffle draw and a myriad of other prizes and cashbacks every day. With PayMaya, you will get more from every cashless transaction from November 8 to December 31 because you get raffle entries for a chance to win P10,000 every day or as much as P10 million in the grand raffle draw. PayMaya Philippines launches its

HERE’S HOW YOU CAN EARN RAFFLE ENTRIES:

• Upgrade your PayMaya account • Send money to friends or family • Shop online or in-store using your PayMaya virtual or physical card • Purchase telco load, gaming pins, or prepaid cable TV credits at the in-app shop • Pay your bills • Pay using PayMaya QR at partner merchants Each account holder who completes four out of the six ways to earn raffle entries within the month will get an additional 100 entries in the raffle! Users can transact using the PayMaya app, PayMaya in Messenger or through PayMayapowered physical cards to earn raffle entries. “Our customers deserve more so we’re giving each PayMaya account holder more than a million reasons–10 million reasons, in fact– to enjoy the holiday season. It’s been another breakout year for PayMaya and the digital payments space as a whole, and we do expect even more Filipinos to hop on and embrace the benefits and convenience of going ‘cashless’ with PayMaya,” said Paolo Azzola, COO and Managing Director at PayMaya Philippines.

ADDITIONAL REWARDS FROM LAZADA AND ZALORA

PayMaya Pa More promo where backto-

Users who purchased using their virtual or physical PayMaya cards at Lazada got an additional 50% off their purchases (maximum of P300) on November 11, with no minimum spend. Shoppers who are into fashion deals also received an additional 20% off at Zalora for a minimum purchase of P1,000 using their PayMaya cards on the same day. “PayMaya is always looking for ways to give better rewards than your credit card or cash this holiday season and beyond… It’s definitely going to be a merry Christmas for all PayMaya users nationwide,” added Raymund Villanueva, Vice President and Head of Growth and Marketing at PayMaya Philippines. PayMaya is the digital payments arm of Voyager Innovations, the leading technology company in the Philippines backed by PLDT, KKR, and Tencent. To stay updated on the latest promos and discounts from PayMaya, visit stories.paymaya.com/promos or follow @PayMayaOfficial on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

amazing prizes await loyal PayMaya

back discounts, cashbacks, and users. By using the PayMaya app to pay for the things you love online, you already stand a chance to win P10,000 every day, from November 8 to December 31, and a whopping P10 Million in the grand draw! In this photo: (L to R) Kenneth Palacios, VP and Business Head for Wallets, PayMaya, and Raymund Villanueva, VP and Head of Growth & Marketing, PayMaya.


IPG’s cookbook WORDS

Nina Venus

F

rom a la carte to a five-course meal, IPG Mediabrands bursts as the fastest growing agency in the Philippine Market. Even at three years young in the country, IPG MB serves concoctions to its clients that both delight and inspire. True to its philosophy “dynamic by design,” the agency delivers client needs a la minute through their intimate understanding of high-value audiences and use of marketing sciences to fuel investment. This has brought them to new heights as IPG stringed a chain of awards in the 4A’s Agency of the Year Awards; they were awarded for Overall Media Excellence, Best in Media Creativity, Best in Management of Business, and Agency of the Year, a sizeable accolade for their short stretch in the market. However, the journey to being number one is not a yellow brick road for IPG. Rather, they pave new routes to the top. The guys figured out the chemistry of translating data and bold thinking.

GAME-ON

The team is known to never back down from a challenge. Where they have a chance to make an impact, they work their magic to crunch down data and garnish it with creativity. “We are a Culture of Champions, we never say nay. We have the smarts and the grit to overcome challenges and win,” braved their Business Unit Director Angelyn Soh, who was named as one of Campaign Asia’s Women to Watch last year. Building on the backbones of industry stalwarts, IPG Mediabrands is one of the few agencies that can keep surprising their clients as they take on more projects with them. Familiarity with the clients’ palette is definitey a trick under their sleeves.

GOING BEYOND THE POT

Although their headquarters is a place where creatives can make ideas happen, IPG partners are not confined by office cubicles and walls. They make ideas happen anywhere. “IPG Mediabrands encourages us to pursue our passions. We have work flexibility, compressed work weeks, and work from home, enabling us to take care of our families better and nurture ourselves. We come back to work fueled and inspired to do more.” Jennie Bayani, Insights Director. Even their CEO Venus Navalta–who was presented with a Women Leadership Award, and CEO of the Year at the 2018 CMO Awards– had simple dreams of being a housewife and good mother. She considered career a secondary priority but it did not stop her from rising to prominence. Under her guidance, the agency is cutting the mustard with clientele like Johnson & Johnson, Coca-Cola, Del Monte, Reckitt Benckiser, Mead Johnson, Western Union, Equal in 9 countries, and PT Mayora. In fact, in 2017, IPG MB slammed RECMA’s South East Asia record for growth, achieving the highest number of points attained for the period 2015-2017, propelling it to number one in the country. “We see ourselves as a modern marketing communications company with foundational media strength combined with advanced specialisation in analytics, data, digital, technology, cultural branding, and precision marketing. We celebrate our AOY win as a nod from the industry to continue in this direction,” shares Navalta. Needless to say, IPG Mediabrands has more dishes simmering in their pots. Marketing sciences has never been this delectable.


ADVERTORIAL


DIGITAL / G A LLERY

Breaking the Mold: THE MOBILE AND DIGITAL VANGUARDS OF CANNES LIONS 2018 Today’s world is not just mobile-first any more — it is the norm. Here are some of the most ground-breaking work in Mobile and Digital from this year’s Cannes Lions.

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WORDS Nadz

MY LINE, POWERED BY GOOGLE BY MULLENLOWE SSP3 BOGOTA FOR THE COLOMBIA MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS & TECHNOLOGY This year’s Innovation Grand Prix went to “My Line, Powered by Google” by MullenLowe SSP3 Bogota, a landline phone number that people who have no access to the Internet or smartphones can call to get answers from Google Assistant. While the industry has been making technological leaps, there are still those who are left with no access to these latest developments, like those in Colombia’s farflung areas. People in these areas can call 6000913 to basically do a Google search over the phone. This innovative merging together of two generations of tech has led to a more inclusive use of technology. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJPV2MZCFNU

Ruiz


CORRUPTION DETECTOR, RECLAMEAQUI BY GREY BRASIL Can smartphones change the course of an election? This is what Grey Brazil’s “Corruption Detector” app for ReclameAQUI is setting out to do in its home country. The face recognition app lets voters check if politicians have been implicated in corruption scandals. Voters can scan the faces of politicians on TV, screens, photos, billboards, posters, and in person. When they see a purple bar across the candidate’s face, it means he/she has a corruption record, and voters can even dig through an extensive background check available on the app. Come election time, it can even help voters look and vote for corruption-free candidates. 21 MOBI L E ISSU E

https://vimeo.com/268984928

JFK UNSILENCED, ROTHCO (ACCENTURE) FOR THE TIMES, LONDON What if John F. Kennedy lived and was able to deliver the “Trade Mart Speech”? Rothco’s Creative Data Grand Prix-winning “JFK Unsilenced” speech for The Times showed us what could be by writing the world’s first AI audio speech made completely out of data. After feeding 831 JFK speeches into AI and advanced sound engineering, the Trade Mart Speech came alive in the former US President’s own voice. His speech was made to be inspiring then and more so today as it touched on freedom, power, wisdom, and restraint. https://youtu.be/fOiDO8BWzfk


DIGITAL / G A LLERY

PROJECT REVOICE, BWM DENTSU SYDNEY FOR ALS ASSOCIATION BWM Dentsu Sydney and its collaborators made use of breakthrough voice cloning technology to create a program to digitally recreate any voice to help people living with Motor Neurone Disease (ALS) speak with their own voice instead of artificial “computer” ones. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dcg0rKG5WlU

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SNAPTIVITY, R/GA LONDON FOR SNAPTIVITY In a highly connected and shared world over social and digital media, spontaneity and personalization are key. Snaptivity can turn any stadium event into a live photo feed using robotic cameras and IoT networks. The cameras are triggered in moments of passion, despair, hope, and victory. The app then delivers the photos to fans who can see their actual reactions to history-making moments during the match. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7LMl-1WYWDY


SAMSUNG SMARTSUIT, CHEIL WORLDWIDE FOR SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS Cheil and Samsung’s “Samsung Smartsuit” is out to push wearables forward. During the preparations for the recently concluded 2018 Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea, Samsung Netherlands and Cheil Amsterdam collaborated to create tailorfit SmartSuits for two top Dutch short track racers to help improve their training. The suit had five integrated sensors that transmit data over a wireless connection to an app on the coach’s Samsung Galaxy S8 smartphone. The data gathered helped the coach and the athletes adjust their training regimen. 23 MOBI L E ISSU E

https://youtu.be/AhMniFqyREI https://youtu.be/HGPnTdpTFTc

SELFIESTIX, COLENSO BBDO FOR PEDIGREE People love selfies. They love dogs. They love taking selfies with their dogs. But most of the time, their dogs are not so cooperative in posing for the camera. Enter Colenso BBDO and Pedigree’s Selfiestix, a special mount holding the brand’s DentaSTIX product to be placed on top of the owner’s smartphone that will help attract the dogs’ attention. https://vimeo.com/254605619


DIGITAL / PLAYG RO UN D

The Limit Does Not Exist Norde International Distributors opens its doors to show groundbreaking technology that create, innovate, and elevate.

PHOTOS

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WORDS Harriet Icay Vnita Sohal and Jericho Clemente


L

eading graphic design and digital solutions provider, Norde International Distributors, has long subscribed to the belief “Driven to create value.” since its inception in 2005. Norde, as it has been more commonly known, has been representing multinational brands and companies in the world such as HP, Stratsys, AXYZ, and Pantone, among others, offering topnotch and revolutionary equipment from 3D Solutions, Digital Offset Printers, Direct-To-Garment Solutions, Finishing Solutions, and Large-Format Printers that help brands, ad agencies, and entrepreneurs turn creative ideas into life within just a couple of minutes. According to Denis Ty, Business Unit Manager of Norde, empowering people and changing mindsets are two of their key achievements in the business. Norde empowers and changes mindsets through offering technologies that produces personalized products, timeconserving and efficient, and sustainable. Off note, with Norde’s technologies, brands were able to engage with their consumers in a more personal way by offering customized and personalized packaging. Before, making customized packaging takes days or weeks, but with Norde, this can be a thing of the past as producing a customized packaging can now be done in a few minutes or hours. “We’ve helped brands to engage and communicate with their audience or their consumers in a more personal way. If before, you only have a standard packaging for a product, now you can actually put a name or a message there that can actually resonate and connect with the consumer,” said Ty. Norde also helps its clients maximize the production process by cutting lead time and costs, allowing a lot of companies in different industries to be more effective and efficient. “We have technologies that can actually empower and enable designers to make designs and creative outputs that they have never thought of before or that would take them 10 months or 1 month to do in a day or week.” Ty also boasts of the sustainability of their technologies. “We have environmental solutions that serve as a good alternative and also a good future technology for the traditional one. For example, we have this latest technology that uses water-based solutions that are very sustainable to the users and to the environment. We also have 3D printing technologies that really unleashes the creativity and materializes what the designer or whatever the user envisions.” However, Ty understands that to this day, many Filipinos, especially entrepreneurs, are still unaware of this technology. With this in mind, Norde, in an effort to help the Filipino market be abreast with these

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Personalized packaging not only fosters better engagement with audiences but also empowers designers to be more creative


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Norde’s fabrication laboratories can be set-up anywhere, encouraging once-abstract ideas to come to life

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“SO WE HAVE TECHNOLOGIES THAT CAN ACTUALLY EMPOWER AND ENABLE DESIGNERS TO MAKE DESIGNS AND CREATIVE OUTPUTS THAT THEY HAVE NEVER THOUGHT OF BEFORE OR THAT WOULD TAKE THEM 10 MONTHS OR 1 MONTH TO DO IN A DAY OR WEEK.”

technological development and evolutions, partnered with DTI to educate Filipino entrepreneurs of their offerings. “One of the challenges or one of things the Philippines is quite delayed or backward is in terms of our product packaging, particularly locally-made products, especially for SMEs. In other countries, or our other Southeast Asian neighbors, they have good packaging not just because of the design or not just because of the business but because the technology is available. It’s expensive to make packaging. They’re just limited to having stickers, having labels, like that.” Just recently, Norde partnered with the DTI to inform Filipinos of various digital technologies. Dubbed as Pack! Pinas, the MSME Packaging Roadshow is a nationwide initiative to push innovative packaging and branding for micro, small, and medium enterprise (MSME) products. During the free event, Norde helped MSMEs learn the latest market trends and emerging opportunities in product enhancement, as well as packaging solutions. Norde also introduced Latex technology where we can actually empower SME’s and make their packaging cheaper and make it more accessible to them. It was also an opportune time for entrepreneurs to build their network and market their products. In addition, Norde is also partnering with Laguna Food Processors Association to provide affordable highquality digital printing services. Aside from partnering

with the government and NGOs, Norde also partners with world-renowned designers and photographers like Happy Andrada and photographer Shaira Luna. Last year, they were tapped to showcase Norde’s cutting-edge technology with customized printed fabrics at a fashion exhibition aptly called, TRANSCENDENCE. Shaira Luna captured the movement of dancers through a photoshoot which were then turned into nature-inspired digital patterns by Happy Andrada and her team. Finally, the patterns were digitally printed on different fabric materials ranging from chiffon, tulle, organza, up to the more complicated ones like duchess, piña fabric, and spandex. Currently, Norde is working with DepEd, CHED, and DTI in making makerspaces and innovation spaces in schools. Makerspaces are collaborative spaces which allows people to make, learn, and explore using a variety of tools including 3D printers and laser cutters, among others. “This is something exciting. We are establishing fabrication laboratories or fab labs and makerspaces or innovation spaces. We actually set them up in different schools – public or private. These technologies, when we make them accessible to students, they learn about this technology so their minds could also be shifted to, ‘Oh we can actually do this.’” Aside from schools, Norde is also looking into penetrating advertising agencies to integrate makerspaces in their organizations, which will also help train their creative team. “I think there’s a very big opportunity for advertising agencies to incorporate the innovation centers or makerspaces inside the organization. The business model is actually an effective way to empower brands and ad agencies in bringing ideas to life.” “Imagine if they can play with these things. They can actually create what they have in mind immediately. It’s very exciting, the progress and innovation that they can do for these companies but for the economy of the Philippines.”


ISSUE 75 / MOBILE

FESTIVALS On-location coverage creative awards and events.

COVERAGE 28 adobo Design Awards Asia 2018 34 adobo Design Series 2018 42 adobo Cup 2018 50 adobo-Tambuli Asia Pacific Conference 2018 68 adobo Creative Rankings 2017


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adobo Design Awards Asia 2018 DESIGN SOLUTIONS IN A CONNECTED WORLD

Organized by

Co-presented by

Sponsored by

In partnership with DESIGN CENTER OF THE PHILIPPINES ANIMATION COUNCIL OF THE PHILIPPINES, INC.

Supported by

Event Partners

Official Venue

Official Registration Partner

Media Partner


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Creativity flows through the gallery

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displaying the design entries.

Lim and Thaidumrong as they carefully examine each of the entries.

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or its 2018 installment, the adobo Design Awards Asia (aDAA) progressed with the theme, “Design Solutions in a Connected World,” as it continues to establish itself as one of Asia’s most important creative awards shows, highlighting the best designs and designers in the region. This year, GREYnJ United’s Chief Creative Officer, Jureeporn Thaidumrong, acted as jury president, overseeing a panel of industry notables and luminaries in judging the entries across 19 Professional Categories and an Open Category. Thaidumrong was joined by industry heavyweights such as Kinetic Singapore’s CoFounder & Creative Director, Pann Lim; AKQA’s Shanghai’s Executive Creative Director, Eric Cruz; J. Walter Thompson Philippines’ Chief Creative Officer, Dave Ferrer; Plus 63 Design Philippines’ Founder, Dan Matutina; Design Center of the Philippines’ Executive Director, Rhea Matute; McCann Worldgroup Philippines’ Executive Creative Director, Joe Dy; ‘Tabi Po’ author, Mervin Malonzo; One Zero Design Co.’s Founder, Arts Serrano; De La Salle College of St. Benilde’s Dean, Gerry Torres; Team Manila’s Co-Founder, Jowee Alviar; and Meganon Comics’ Co-Founder, Tepai Pascual. Judges oversaw more than 200 entries between March 20 and 21, 2018 at the BGC Arts Center. While the judging process was no easy feat, it was exhilarating to see inspired designs flourish through different categories. Jureeporn Thaidumrong, Pann Lim, and Eric Cruz contributed their global perspective during the entire judging process. Some light banter ensued where everyone shared their position on current trends: from matters affecting some design principles to wide-encompassing technological developments that could dictate the future of advertising. In addition to the usual criteria of excellence in design craftsmanship, other important points of discussion included the entries’ adherence to the theme without sacrificing their design capabilities, as well as placing emphasis on designs that exhibit an impact on society, businesses or the public sector. Open to all creative enthusiasts, professionals, freelancers, and students, the competition has lived up to its promise to highlight state-of-theart works in print, publishing, advertising and bring out the best of the best in the industry.


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Meet the jury: Mervin Malonzo, Tepai Pascual, Arts Serrano, Dave Ferrer, Dan Matutina, Rhea Matute, Eric Cruz, Jowee Alviar, Pann Lim, and Jureeporn Thaidumrong, Jury President (middle) at the NutriAsia Del Monte Lobby, Maybank

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Performing Arts Theater, BGC Arts Center

“WHEN YOU PUT YOUR WORK OUT THERE, YOU GET TO INFLUENCE OTHER PEOPLE, NOT JUST WITHIN THE COUNTRY. THAT IDEA SHOULD BE SEEDED TO ALL DESIGNERS.”

Professional Categories for this year included: Press & Poster, Packaging Design, Outdoor, Product Design, Corporate/Branding Identity, Book Design, Magazine & Newspaper Design, Film Advertising, Film/Video Craft, Graphic Design, Production Design, Illustration, Wearable Design, Typography, Digital/Interactive Design, Photography, Mobile, Photography, and Environmental/Spatial Design. The Open Category welcomed entries from students and amateurs of all design disciplines, showcasing their most creatively effective design solutions.

The event was presented by adobo magazine, the country’s premier advertising and brand communications publication, co-presented by Jollibee, and sponsored by Globe. It has the full support of D&AD, the world’s toughest and most prestigious design award-giving body.


AWARDS NIGHT

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t the Grand Awards Night ceremony on April 25 at the BGC Arts Center, adobo magazine unveiled the winning entries of the adobo Design Awards Asia 2018 (aDAA) chosen from over 200 entries across Asia. Originally launched in 2007, the adobo Design Awards Asia aims to champion the best designs and recognize the talents behind the work. With its partnership with D&AD—the most prestigious awards-giving body in design—in 2016 and 2017, it has established itself as one of the key awards shows not only in the Philippines but also in the whole Asia. “I believe that the Philippines has a lot of talented people and artists and creatives. I would love to see more of the outstanding and brave and [courageous creatives to] not follow anyone but follow [their] own thing,” Head of Jury and Grey Advertising Thailand’s Chief Creative Officer, Jureeporn Thaidumrong said. “For me, the most important thing is finding the insight — the human insight first — and then we come up with the idea solution and [the] design solution.”

Dentsu Jayme Syfu was the big winner, catching three Gold Awards for Dead Whale. Also presented with the Lucille Tenazas Award was Extra Mile Productions for Know Your North. Celebrating these victories was made possible by the aDAA wine sponsor: Pebble Lane and cocktail sponsor: Marille.


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TITLE The Last Tattooed Women in Tanudan COMPANY The Extra Mile Productions AWARDS Best In Show - For Purpose, Bronze, Gold,

Lucille Tenazas’ Design Excellence Award, Short Film, Silver, Video/Film Craft (Cinematography), Video/Film Craft (Direction), Video/Film Craft (Editing), Video/Film Craft (Sound Design)

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TITLE 100 Days of Secrets ENTRANT Terence Eduarte AWARD Gold, Illustration

TITLE Dead Whale AGENCY Dentsu Jayme Syfu AWARD Best In Show - For Good, Environmental/

Spatial, Gold, Outdoor, Production Design

Dentsu Jayme Syfu bagged three Golds for their “Dead Whale” campaign for Greenpeace under the following categories: Environmental/ Spatial, Outdoor, and Production Design. ‘Who Will Take Care of Me’, a campaign created by TBWA\ Santiago Mangada Puno for Hero Foundation Inc., won a Gold under the Film Advertising Category. The campaign is an animated online video which aims to create awareness about the plight of the heroic soldiers’ children. Terence Eduarte, NuWorks Associate Creative Director and illustrator, won a Gold in the Illustration Category for his entry that featured illustrations of 100 different strangers in exchange for their secrets. The Extra Mile Productions’ “The Last Tattooed Women in Tanudan,” made for Victory Liner’s Know Your North series, won Gold under the Short Film and Best in Show-For Purpose categories. The Extra Mile Productions’ entry depicts the revival of the Kalinga tattoo culture amidst the challenges of modernity and social stigma. “Baybayin New,” a self-initiated project by TeamManila Graphic Design Studio also won a Gold in the Applied Typography category. PETCH’s “The House That Fried Chicken Built,” a campy 80’s inspired video campaign for Max’s, won two Golds under the following categories: Video/Film Craft (Production Design) and Video/Film Craft (Use of Music). The commercial went viral, generating more than one million views just two days after its release.


TITLE Who Will Take Care of Me AGENCY TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno AWARD Gold, Illustration (Illustration),

Video/Film Craft (Animation)

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The winner of Globe Telecom’s Best Mobile App Design is J. Walter Thompson’s ‘Voice Your Care’ for Johnson & Johnson Philippines - Bactidol. J. Walter Thompson also won the award last year in aDAA 2017 with their ‘Rinse the Hate’ entry. Lastly, the Lucille Tenazas Award was also presented to The Extra Mile Productions for ‘The Last Tattooed Women in Tanudan (Know Your North)’. The adobo Design Awards Asia 2018: Grand Awards Night was co-presented by Jollibee and sponsored by Globe and Pebble Lane. The event was held in partnership with the DTI - Design Center of the Philippines, CDAP (Communication Design Association of the Philippines), Animation Council of the Philippines Inc., Game Developers Association of the Philippines, with support of the British Council Philippines. The official Registration Partner is TVCXpress Manila. Event partners are Team Executive Decision, PwC, Pebble Lane, Create Cebu, Marille, Homonym and IMMRSV Asia.

TITLE Voice Your Care AGENCY J Walter Thompson AWARD Globe Telecom’s Best Mobile App Design

TITLE Baybayin New ENTRANT TeamManila Graphic Design Studio AWARDS Gold, Typography (Applied Typography)


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adobo Design Series 2018 A compilation of inspiring design talks by the adobo Design Awards Asia 2018 jury Words Jyrmie Eisenheart Ladiero | Nicai De Guzman


The Future of Design AKQA Shanghai Executive Creative Director Eric Cruz goes through his journey as a graphic designer to give a prophecy on the future of the craft.

Eric Cruz,Executive Creative Director of AKQA Shanghai

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ric Cruz, Executive Creative Director of AKQA Shanghai, started his session with a question: “I used to be a graphic designer — but what am I today?” Born in San Juan, Manila, Cruz moved to Apple Valley, California at the age of 12, and relocated to Madrid, Spain in 1987. Unsure of what he wanted to do and with his parents discouraging him from pursuing art, he found inspiration in the creative director for Bloomingdales at the time, an AsianAmerican man who dabbled in advertising, designed restaurant interiors as well as suits and ties. From Madrid, Cruz made his way to Hampton, Virginia, where he did get to study Fine Arts. After that, he switched to Illustration, but eventually ended up in Graphic Design. Being in this creative field which incorporates technology, art, and strategic thinking, Cruz said, “Graphic design could do so many things. It opened up a whole new world for me.” When Macintosh was released and the Internet was first commercially launched in 1996, Cruz realized that these digital tools introduced new ways of expressing, designing, and creativity. With the Internet continuously reinventing the world, different studios came up and designers became in-demand. Cruz had a chance to work in Studio Archetype, an Architectural Visualization studio, and also for Clement Mok who was the first user experience and user architect for Steve Jobs. Mok founded his own company and Cruz joined him and learned web designing. He then moved to Portland, Oregon and joined Wieden+Kennedy. “There was a lot of exploration and experimentation that was happening in the visual field and what Wieden+Kennedy became known for is this brain foray in rethinking and redefining what advertising is,” he said.

Eventually, there was a huge movement where people began to define advertising through graphic design. Cruz shares, “If you study design, you are simply the person who makes stuff look pretty; if you study art direction and advertising, you guys are the ones who come up with the ideas that’s going to change the world.” Going back to the question he prompted when he started his session, Cruz said, “I think as people and as a community, we need to think about design within a much bigger context of what we’re playing with today. It is not simply about asking someone to create a piece of illustration or typography or do a title to a movie. We have the power to basically redefine and reinvent the future that is going to be soon happening in front of our eyes.”


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The Evolution of Philippine Design Visual Research of Philippine Imagery by Team Manila’s Jowee Alviar

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Jowee Alviar, Co-founder & Creative Director of Team Manila

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owee Alviar has always been fascinated by history. During his time at CalArts, he studied the History of Graphic Design, saying that the Philippine graphic design styles are a mix of different things – American media, Spanish influence, love for Japanese culture, to name a few. But whatever happened to indigenous Filipino designs? A study of some of the pre-colonial art forms can give insight into the country’s earliest designs. There’s the Pintados, the local tribal tattoo culture, as well as the indigenous script, Baybayin. Before colonization, the most popular symbols were related to nature, such as the sun, spirits, and animals. When the Spaniards came and converted Filipinos to Christianity, the recurring patterns in designs evolved into diamonds, and geometric shapes. At the turn of the 19th century, packaging of products by companies also revealed the country’s situation. Cigarette packaging used illustrations of nature and images of national heroes such as Jose Rizal. Back in the day, the Manila Carnival, a precursor to the Binibining Pilipinas, had posters promoting a province which would even have their own queen, and elements their province is known for. Theaters and vaudevilles were also a form of entertainment in the Old Manila. These theaters, such as the Manila Grand Opera House, would come out with regular posters with loud, crazy typography and layouts. Alviar also showed the covers of products like Katialis and match boxes which depicted life in the provinces, featuring farmers and carabaos. After the war, graphic illustrators had a lot of options for employment. From drawing advertising materials, they can also illustrate for magazine or comics. In fact, some of our National Artists such as Fernando Amorsolo started out as illustrators for magazines like Liwayway, Alviar said. The streets of Manila is another overlooked venue to study Philippine art, according to Alviar. The dying art of hand drawn movie poster billboards, signages of tarot card readings in front of Quiapo, and shirts with inscriptions of anting-antings are just some or the urban art that will soon be part of the country’s narrative. “Hopefully we turn this to something we can pass on to our students. Hopefully there will be more materials talking about the rich history of graphic designs.,” Alviar says.


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t a time where radio is seen as a thing of the past, Joe Dy, McCann Worldgroup Philippines’ Executive Creative Director, talked about how to leverage this channel. “The right words assembled in the right way can do more than tell stories. You can create a totally different experience,” said Dy. More than entertainment, radio advertisements can create a physical experience as well. It is based on the understanding that human experience—from one’s online and offline travels to social interactions, group affiliations, and thought processes—is a vast medium for advertising that can and should be approached strategically. Dy presented an example of this, a radio advertisement by Ogilvy & Mather Group London for Dove entitled “Blinking”. This made listeners increasingly aware of their bodies, turning ordinary body actions and behavior they never gave a second thought to into something that was impossible to ignore, demonstrating how easily young girls can be influenced by the messages they are exposed to every day. Dy continued to tackle other radio elements such as the human voice. “The voice is actually capable of doing so many things depending on the choices you make,” he said. “It can show you different perspectives just by (using a) different voice and a different delivery.” To illustrate this further, Dy presented another radio advertisement entitled “Jun Jun,” created by J. Walter Thompson Manila for Kythe Foundation in the Philippines. In radio advertising, different sounds connote different meanings, leading the consumer to associate the commercial and the product it advertises with a variety of corresponding feelings. “Sound effects can also be the center of your idea, not just the augmentation of your script,” Dy said. Dy also discussed how advertisers can play with space and distance when recording for a radio advertisement. To demonstrate, he played a radio advertisement for the audience entitled “Shutter Chance,” created by Dentsu Japan for EOS Kiss Digital Camera. The product is communicated through the narration which has characters speaking with increasing quickness as the audio travels from the right speaker to the left. Each character

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Joey Dy, Executive Creative Director of McCann Worldroup Philippines

describes a photograph they tried to take, leaving the impression that the subject of the photo was moving very fast and could only be captured thanks to the camera’s fast start-up time. “The counterpart of silence is white space, a negative space, and you get to play with this when you do radio,” Dy explained. He showed more examples like “Press,” created by McCann WorldGroup Philippines for the Philippine Cancer Society to show how one can take advantage of silence in radio. Before finalizing a radio advertisement, one should know the right commercial length to communicate the message properly and to adequately explain the product. Driving his point, Dy allowed the audience to listen to BBDO Oslo’s radio advertisement, “Shortest” — as implied by its name, the world’s shortest radio ad according to the Guinness World Records. In an era where we are constantly bombarded by sounds, it is not so hard to consider the potential of the radio landscape. Sounds have the power to affect a consumer’s emotion, buying habits, and memory recall, proving how important it is to understand how radio makes an audience feel.

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McCann Worldgroup Philippines Executive Creative Director Joe Dy talks how to tell stories on radio and audio


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Shaping Stories and Finding Your Visual Voice Always the wild card, Dan Matutina shares the method behind the wildness

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Dan Matutina, Founding Partner of Plus63 Design Philipines & The Hydra Design Group

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an Matutina, founding partner of Plus63 Design Co. and recipient of the Art Directors Club Young Guns Award, started his story as a designer in Tacloban, his hometown. There, he was constantly seeing colorful and visually stimulating images such as the Pintados and the patterns of woven fabrics. In the province, they only had one channel and it showed foreign cartoons. When they got cable, he started watching more animations, including Samurai Jack. Though equally interested in science, he chose to study Fine Arts. This exposed him further to more works of art, including those of HR Ocampo and Ang Kiukok. “When you’re young, it is best to exhaust all the different styles,” he said. Today, Matutina runs his own independent studio. Plus63 Design Co. creates branding, media, graphic design for local brands and consultation jobs for conferences abroad. Matutina shared the process he uses with his team when they get a project or a brief from a client. It all starts with research: brief and learning more about the topic. Next comes idea generation, which includes brainstorming and sketching. “Ideas is the soul of your work,” he said. The last one is execution – the illustration of work. He showed sample creations, including personal projects like Versus Hearts, portraits of heroes and villains shown as different sides of a heart. The main idea is that heroes and villains love each other because they wouldn’t be able to exist without each other. Other work executions Matutina showed are illustrations for websites, moving images, and print. His illustrations for web include the Google Doodle for Independence Day and his different iterations for the search results for Philippines – a beach with a flag of the country standing proudly. For print, he presented his sketches for a smart home publication by Samsung, in which they tasked four different illustrators about four different topics. He also drew the images for Qualcomm, the partner of Formula One. Despite his many successes, Matutina admitted that finding one’s visual voice can be challenging. First, one has to find their own style. Next is to evolve their own style slowly. After that, they have to be able to schedule work between different time zones for clients abroad. Finally, the consideration if being an illustrator is a viable career. “Eventually, if you have a really good portfolio, clients may find value in your work,” he said.


Old Soul, New Ideas Architect Arts Serrano talks designing life back into Escolta Architect Arts Serrano, Founder One Zero Design Co.

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Architect Arts Serrano named his firm “Escolta” as a reminder of persistent reinvention and constant curiosity. Working in the heritage district of Escolta made Serrano see things in a new light. He started as a freelance architect, joining competitions where his work can be exposed. In 2015, Serrano and another friend came up with their proposal to design the Clark Green City that follows its natural landscape. Their strategy was to come up with a plan that solves the current problems of Metro Manila, including a high-speed transit system that plies through Bulacan, Monumento, and SLEX, as well as the implementation of a bus rapid transit system to shuttle people around the city more efficiently. They didn’t win. Yet it wouldn’t be long before they joined another competition: the Metrobank Art and Design Excellence contest. “We played around designing everything around a community. We designed the central space to be a common area for everyone,” he narrated. They still didn’t bring home an award, but it would seem like third time’s the charm for Serrano and his partner. The winning pitch: the BCDA project, a public housing project created in partnership with Pag-Ibig Housing. The brief was to design public housing for around 12,000 people in a space of 25 hectares. According to Serrano, Filipinos love communities so they developed everything into pods where people can converge. Two years later, Serrano and his newly minted architectural firm One / Zero, took an office space in the First United Building along Calle Escolta. They started occupying the office space in November 2016, their studio being an example of adaptive reuse of heritage spaces. “It resonated a more modern translation of an old space and the possibilities it can offer’s a great way of introducing the place to younger generations,” he said. They were also tasked to design a nine-squaremeter block on the ground floor of the First United

Building to be used as a bazaar space. This was how HUB: Make Lab was born. The block was delineated to have selling spaces enough for 20 to 30 groups. Creative professionals as well as small entrepreneurs could rent the spaces. Serrano and his team then developed a program to follow, wherein all sellers would have a visual connection to everyone. They could choose materials such as wood, fabric, metal – anything that connects you to the person right across you. “It is the fluidity in design and architecture that makes the place interesting because it is a very collaborative project. The design itself does not come from us — we just had them onboard the program designed for them,” Serrano shared. “What struck me when I went to Escolta were the things that weren’t there. It presented a lot of possibilities, and I think as designers, that’s our role — to kind of have a say in how we can define that,” Serrano added. He said that the overarching goal of everyone in Escolta, despite having their own practices, is to bring more people and educate them about the almost forgotten heritage district.


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Transitioning Hobbies into Careers Comic book illustrator and art director Tepai Pascual on turning passion to career

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Tepai Pascual, Art Director/Illustrator Co-founder of Meganon Comics

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omic book illustrator and art director Tepai Pascual described the creative community as a place where “we create 24/7, we think 24/7, even if we’re not in our work stations, in our offices, we think.” Pascual was a senior in the University of the Philippines Diliman when she decided to be a comic book artist. “We do not have an industry. We have a community but it is small. That time, the last thing I wanted to be in was advertising,” she said. She spent around seven years learning the ropes and honing her craft. “Advertising helped me to sharpen my craft in terms of idea building and art direction so it helped me through my comics survival mode and a bit of marketing,” Pascual added. Despite working long hours, she made time for doing comic books. “I suggest you do your own thing. Maybe you like food, or theater, film, arts and crafts. There are tons of things you can do outside your job. Probably some of it you already like or some of it you want to try,” Pascual advised the crowd in times of burnout. For a time, she did freelance storyboards for TV and film directors. One of the projects she did was Erik Matti’s Metro Manila Film Festival entry, Seklusyon. Getting over that fear of failure is essential. Back in 2008, when Komikon was still being held in Bahay ng Alumni inside UP Diliman, Pascual had to photocopy just 30 copies of one of her earlier works, Mark 9 Verse 47. The first version of Maktan 1521 was just 20 pages long and in black in white. She later tried offset printing but it was difficult because printing businesses require artists to print at least 500 copies. After some years, she found the courage to submit Maktan 1521 to publisher Visprint, the same publishing house of Manix Abrera’s Kikomachine, Budjette Tan’s Trese, and Carlo Vergara’s Zsazsa ZaturnNah. After some months and a bit of a mixup with the publishing house, Pascual officially got published and since then, she made it her crusade to give other comic book illustrators like her a chance. “Some of us may be doing it for 10, 20 years and we look for something new just to excite us more because we’re kind of having a boring life every once in a while. Our daily life becomes a cycle,” she said. “Finding some inspiration, knowing what you want to do, learning how to do it, taking risks and opportunities. So maybe stepping out of your comfort zone is worth it.”


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KAPAMILYA UNITED WINS ADOBO CUP 2018 AMID RAINS

PHOTOS

WORDS Jason Inocencio Vnita Sohal | Christine Sangalang


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SNAPSHOTS

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ot even a monsoon can dampen people’s love for football. With tropical depression Domeng wailing away and with rain threatening to make the field at McKinley Hill Stadium unplayable, football-lovers in the advertising, media, and creative industries were unfazed. With 20 teams participating, and with the FIFA World Cup mere days away from commencing, it was the turn of these Filipinos to show off their football skills at the 11th adobo Cup in June 2018. This year’s tournament proved it would take more than raindrops to stop these passionate players. All marveled at how every team remained in the competition until it ended at around 10 in the evening despite the rain hardly abating all day long. The challenge was worth it for ABS-CBN. After ABS-CBN FC won the coveted Dobo Trophy last year, sister team Kapamilya United took the win in 2018, topping Team Labor Of Love (LOL) in the Finals. Kapamilya United’s Mark Rivera emerged as the Most Valuable Player and teammate Jay Golarta was named as the Best Goalkeeper. As the top scorer, Kim David of NuWorks United earned the Golden Boot award. Kalai de Jesus of Forza Havas was recognized as the Best Female Player of the tournament. Forza Havas’ Santi Villanueva bagged the title Best Defender while Tristan Tongson of LOL won Best Midfielder. In spite of the rain, the spirits of McCann United remained high, earning them the award Best in Team Spirit. With their sharp black and gold look, Publicis One was awarded Best in Uniform. But they are just more than the outfit -Publicis One also placed third in the tournament. Ogilvy United FC was granted the Pandikdik Award. Forza Havas grabbed the adobo Platito over second placers BBDO Guerrero United and third placers TBWA Yakalz. Gatorade, the official event partner, ensured that the players stayed hydrated for the duration of the day-long tournament, while official medic partner Lifeline 16911 Medical Inc. addressed any injuries that crept up. Event partners Hill Stadium, Heineken, Cadbury “Chewy, Crunchy, Chocolatey,” Chivas, Jollibee, CAN Sports, and Team Executive Decisions all made the 11th adobo Cup a success, through the rain.


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Venue: McKinley Hill Stadium Taking competition from client pitches to football game, creatives from different agencies hustled until they crushed their opposition in the field. Despite the downpour, they went home hoisting their trophies and more importantly, their rewarding smiles. The adobo Football Cup served as a medium for players to channel their energies to a venue without walls.


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SPECIAL AWARDS MVP, Mark Rivera (Kapamilya United)

Golden Boot, Kim David (NuWorks United)

Best Midfielder, Tristan Tonagson (LoL)

Best Female Player, Kalai de Jesus (Forza Havas)

Best Goalkeeper, Jay Galarrita (Kapamilya United)

Pandikdik Award, Ogilvy United FC

Best Defender, Santi Villanueva (Forza Havas)

Best Uniform, Publicis One Best Team Spirit, McCann United


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Venue: McKinley Hill Stadium

WINNERS Platito Cup, 3rd Place, TBWA\ Yakalz

3rd Place, Publicis One

Platito Cup, 2nd Place, BBDO Guerrero United

Champion, Kapamilya United

Platito Cup, 1st Place, Forza Havas

2nd Place, LOL


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Flores, Jollibee Foods Corporation, Global Brand Marketing Officer; and Chris Manguera, MYNT, Global Brand Chief Marketing Officer. Bridging their brands to audiences was the Client Panel, composed of Margot Torres, EVP and Deputy Managing Director of McDonald’s Philippines; Paolo Mercado, SVP Marketing, Communication & Innovation of Nestlé Philippines; Lester Estrada, Country Marketing Director for P&G Philippines; and Gina Lorenzana, Vice President, Personal Care, Unilever Philippines. They discussed an ad industry in crisis and whether the agency of the past will be the agency of the future. Its counterpart, the Agency Panel composed of Chris Foster, President of Y&R Asia; Merle Jayme, Chairmom and Chief Creative Officer of Dentsu Jayme Syfu; Rupen Desai of Edelman; and Pat Baron, Chief Creative Officer of McCann Australia, provided insight on the question, “How can we humanize data?” The adobo-Tambuli Conference 2018, held at the Marquis Events Place, was organized by adobo magazine and University of Asia and the Pacific and sponsored by Unilever, Dove, Grab for Business, and McDonald’s. Other partners also include PhotoMan, Red Chili 360 Marketing Inc., ANC, and BusinessMirror.

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ata is becoming more and more ubiquitous in any and all industries. In the marketing communications and advertising space, creative and effective campaigns for good are almost always data driven. Yet, data means nothing if it does not fuel something. Data and tech must elevate the human experience and ultimately bring good to the world. Data must inspire brands to strengthen human relationships, one’s life satisfaction and sense of well-being. On its fourth year, the adobo Tambuli Asia Pacific Conference took place on June 5, 2018 at the Marquis Events Place in Bonifacio Global City. With the theme “Data + Brands + Humanity #BeHuman,” the conference brought together a stellar roster of speakers from the creative industry across Asia Pacific. The Keynote Speaker for this conference was Malcolm Poynton, Global Chief Creative Officer of Cheil Worldwide, and this year’s Overall Executive Jury Chair for the Asia Pacific Tambuli Awards. Also expounding on the theme were Yasuharu Sasaki, Head of Digital Creative Center of Dentsu; Rupen Desai, Vice Chairman of Edelman APAC; Gino Borromeo, Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer of McCann Worldgroup Philippines; Francis


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Channeling Data and Creativity Advertising creatives bounce on data, humanity and measuring what matters. WORDS

Nina Angelica Venus

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ata is the backbone of credibility. The commonplace commercial would not pass by without the words, “According to,” “An increase in percentage,” and “One out of 10.” During the Tambuli’s Agency Panel, adobo magazine assembled a panel of four seasoned industry stalwarts to bounce off opinions about companies aspiring and claiming to be datadriven and whether data sparks creativity. McCann Australia’s Pat Baron started with the firm statement that there is no false dichotomy between the two. “I think when you get the right people and get the right measure, you augment them together.” Merlee Jayme of Dentsu Jayme Syfu continued the discussion by painting the landscape of where the two stand. “There was a time wherein data and creativity would clash but I guess today we’ve learned to embrace it. There’s a nice combination or understanding data that you (can) put creativity (into).” Y&R Asia’s Chris Foster demonstrated this in the way people hail Transport Network Vehicle Services (TNVS); users open the app, an algorithm pairs passengers with drivers, and they get to their destinations in one piece. The greatest inhibitor in humanity’s progress is the incessant need to keep pitting data and creativity against each other. “It is a metaphor for how we take data and creativity,” he commented. The application is data enabled but it still needs human intervention. Cooperation exists “to get the most human experience in the most efficient way,” as Foster puts it. In fact, Foster echoes Tim Cooke’s sentiment of not fearing machines that think like humans. “I fear humans thinking like machines,” he laments, it is about asking the right questions and measuring what matters. The fear that machines will take over humans’ decision-making skills is not irrational at all;

machines are getting more sophisticated by the minute but it was human’s competitive nature that made data and technology happen in the first place. While it is undeniable that data gets more concrete results, human judgement is not always based on logic. Rupen Desai believes that this is the strength of humanity. “I think it will be very difficult for any algorithm to actually codify irrational behavior,” he said. The way people make decisions is not always systematic; as Desai puts it, data can never respond the same way people do. Desai muses, “About 85 percent of all decisions we do are irrational. How can any data codify the irrational, impulsive and emotional way (we decide)?” This idea was expounded on by Jayme who shared her experience in the Amazon’s unveiling of the 2017 version of Alexa. “The Future of Alexa is the eye and not the voice.” If Alexa can only offer to turn off the lights, she still needs convincing to buy Alexa. With all the data of the voice of Alexa, it cannot predict bodily sickness or perceive dangerous situations on its own. “Losing human judgment completely means

From left to right: Moderator Country Head of Google Philippines: Ken Lingan. Panelists: CEO of McCann Australia: Pat Baron, Vice Chairman of APAC: Rupen Desai, Chairmom and Chief Creative Officer of Dentsu Jayme Syfu: Merlee Jayme, and Y&R President: Chris Foster


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there is no room for mistakes in data but that is where we learn patience and there is value in making mistakes,” Jayme continued. Humans make all the difference between blindly following data and creating the future. People create connections where data do not make sense. Data can feed everything and answer all the questions except for why. “Data can’t ask why. That’s not (something) data will tell you,” Jayme shared. Jayme proceeded to narrate how Whirlpool had data of the high absence rate of children in a school and a similar number of children who do not have clean clothes. She said that by itself, it did not make sense; but people will be the ones to figure out that the children could not go to school because they had no clean clothes. Hence, Whirlpool installed washing machines in the school to solve the problem. The above is a classic example of how data is better led by creativity. How you use it is what makes the difference, Foster says. “If you take articial intelligence, combine it with Human understanding. Creative transformation is what makes sense of all of that,” he continues.

At which point, he imparted James Webb Young’s the five-step formula for producing ideas: (1) Gather information and index them; (2) Take the queue cards and pair them up; (3) Forget absolutely everything and do something else; (4) Return and the patterns emerge, lightbulbs go on and most importantly; (5) Test your ideas by sharing it with other people. Gearing towards the future, creatives are already equipped with the skills they need. Since clients vary, Baron noted that agencies would be bringing the skillsets that brands need to partner with. Desai also emphasized that the essential skills he uses are the ones he never learned in school. “There are five skills: resilience, the ability to fail, get better, learn quickly and fail again.” These are necessary for the children to have a better future, he said. Stressing the necessity of balancing data and creativity, Baron affirmed that one would not be the death of the other. “Creativity is an attitude. When you bring that attitude to your workplace and your looking forward and you’re adapting over time. I think you’ll see it in their work.”

McCann Australia’s Pat Baron, Vice Chairman for APAC Rupen Desai, Merlee Jayme of Dentsu Jayme Syfu, and Y&R Asia’s Chris Foster discuss data science and its impact on advertising.


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Agency, Marketing Amidst Disruption WORDS

Nevicshky Calma

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n this fast-paced world now driven by technology and digitalization, there is an inevitable drive to hit targets in less time, and with less effort. This then disrupts the traditional medium and the workflow of agencies and clients, vis-a-vis, their target audience. The client panel at the adobo’s Tambuli delved into these ripples now threatening their relationship with agencies, or if taken in another light, presents opportunities. The marketers explore options, and by doing so, shake the status quo. Paolo Mercado, Senior Vice President of Marketing, Nestlé Philippines, sees the freelance platform as the manifestation of this disruption. Although Nestlé, having master services agreements with global ad agency partners, prevents from diving into this realm, Mercado believes this has been the trend for other clients, mentioning the wide range of choices and the convenience provided by Behance, UpWork, and the like. For McDonald’s, their Executive Vice President and Deputy Managing Director Margot Torres says their advertising agency rises up to the challenge brought about by changes. Bearing the mantra “progress over perfection,” they put customer experience as priority. Thus, the need to go beyond television was born. To make this happen, McDonald’s changed


adobo magazine President and CEO Angel Guerrero facilitates the adobo Tambuli client panel, comprised of Unilever Philippines’ Gina Lorenzana, Nestlé Philippines’ Paolo Mercado, Margot Torre s of McDonald’s and Lester Estrada of Procter & Gamble Philippines.

their working dynamic with Leo Burnett. Torres elaborates, “We communicated to them that stop giving us a 30-second storyboard everytime we give you a brief. You can come up with a solution that is just a creative idea, then we change our processes. To be more practical, we changed the briefing process. It starts with a marketing brief and a marketing insight, it is translated to communication strategy, and a consumer insight from the agency. That brief is now issued to all the agency partners. That becomes the basis of their creative response.” Echoing the same sentiment, Lester Estrada, Country Marketing Director , Procter & Gamble Philippines, sees how the world of optimization demands flexibility from agencies. “A lot of our campaigns are not TV commercials, where we want to know whether it works or not. Maybe one week, we will know if it works or not. Because of that I’ve seen a lot of brand teams who meet their agencies every week, so almost like offspeeding, and then change from there. That level of ambidextrousness, I would say, and agility is something we’re demanding more from our agency.” The thrust now is either into consolidation or division. Gina Lorenzana, Global Vice President, Fabric Sensations, Unilever Philippines, shares how their company has consolidated the work. “[As] you work with

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so many agencies and the jobs become [smaller], you do not get access to necessarily all the top talents within the teams. So by consolidating them into fewer agencies, and then making sure that the small brands also work with those agencies, then the [client benefits] by getting access to the top talents within the agencies. The benefit [for] the agency is you get to see more transparency in terms of the revenue.” But some companies look inward and take it upon themselves to produce and orchestrate marketing measures. Nestlè, for one, has a cross-functional team consisting of different experts, each with their own fortè. Nestlé even handles its own production management, which saves them 30 percent of the cost. The double-edged sword of having startups also comes into play. Margot Torres shares that, if startups step into the realm of big agencies or clients, some tend to fall into culture shock, with the different setup the latter has. Thus, they only stay for a while but then leave, and then talents are lost. Gina sees this fragmentation as a door to opportunities. As an example, she cites their partnership with WPP in Singapore that works with various startups. “They basically put together to basically unlock the next generation of creativity. It is basically multiple creatives in multiple media. If startups remain independent, they will continue to have their startup mentality and add more value.” But amid the change in structure, in workflow, and the medium, the truth remains: clients seek creativity from agencies. Mercado enthuses, “Nestlé is a 153-year-old company. Our corporate culture and our management culture is really built on efficiency. we master efficiency. The one thing that is difficult for us is to have a creative culture within our organization. Because creativity is chaotic, inefficient… There is a desire for us to involve disruptors, creative people, to add value to our business by giving us a perspective that we do not have. But the problem with mega agencies is that they emulate our structure. They like to look like us. The moment that you look like us, behave like us, they will stop adding value.” Now the challenge is stay authentic and creative in order to have value to the client. Estrada highlights, “When you get disrupted, you stick to what you do best. That is still creative power. That is what I want to see more from agencies.”


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Why coloring outside the lines matter We were taught to always color inside the lines, but Cheil Worldwide’s Malcolm Poynton tells us how coloring outside can help make the world a better place. WORDS

Harriet Icay

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Malcolm Poynton, Global Chief Creative Officer of Cheil Worldwide Network

n the fourth year of adobo-Tambuli Asia Pacific conference, which upholds the theme, “Data + Brands + Humanity #BeHuman,” creative leaders from all over the world talked about how data, technology, and creativity defy the impossible and spark change for the greater good. Cheil Worldwide’s Global Chief Creative Officer Malcolm Poynton graced the event with his insightful talk entitled “Why Coloring Outside the Lines Matter.” During his session, Poynton opined how coloring outside the lines can create something that can change the world and improve the lives of people. Poynton reiterated how going beyond the boundaries allow brands to know the power of creativity and inspire change in people. “Data tells us to color inside the lines,humanity enables us to color outside the lines.” He also pointed out the essentiality of having a good grasp on the purpose of a brand. According to Poynton, many brands do not know what it means to be a “brand.” “Defining the brand enables you to color outside the lines.” “Sometimes we get caught up so much in what we’re doing with brands, we kind of forget what they’re there for,” Poynton remarked. Brands should know their “Why?,” “How?,” and “What?” to utilize data and achieve things that exceed expectations. “Data will always give you the lines to color but unless you know what your brand is,you will not develop the creativity needed to color outside of them.” Poynton cited Samsung as a brand that colors outside the line by creating human-driven innovations that defy barriers to progress. One fine example of such is the development of Dytective, a test for tablet and PC that detects the risk of dyslexia in early phases. Dyslexia is the most common learning disorder in the world, affecting about 10 percent of children. Indeed, data is becoming more and more omnipresent. Over the years, the marketing and creative sphere latched onto data in crafting campaigns. But data is nothing if it does not galvanize change, uplift human experience, and produce a positive impact on society.


Humanizing data to deliver bigger and better value to customers WORDS

Jyrmie Eishenheart Ladiero

Chris Manguera, Chief Marketing Officer of MYNT

LISTENING TO DATA

This is about data and external trends that may drive growth and scale. Moreover, this can also be about finding an existing platform where business men could potentially embed themselves to deliver their services.

CONTEXTUALIZING DATA

Contextualization not only helps to comprehend the data in the best possible manner but it also helps in gathering and storing data in ordered groups and sequences. Manguera discussed the relation of contextualizing data to GCash – an internationally acclaimed micropayment service, which transforms a mobile phone into a virtual wallet for safe, secure and hassle-free mobile-money transactions.  It can be used to buy prepaid load, pay bills, send money, make donations, shop online, and even purchase goods without the need to bring any cash. Recently, GCash partnered with Facebook Messenger as the platform for the payment app. GCash users will now be able to easily send and receive money, buy load, and pay bills with the push of a button, removing the need to travel to local stores, Bayad Centers or money transfer offices. MAXIMIZING DATA

This is “looking at different data points across the whole organization and seeing how we can provide ultimate value to customers” according to Manguera. User expectations have changed drastically — in large part due to services that are driven by data, whether location, social graph, or utilizing information to give us contextual help and recommendations. We are a long, long way from a traditional linear interaction with a product or service. Journeys are now a collection of moments occurring across devices and platforms. Data gives us the chance to design across all of these experiences. To conclude the session, “Humanizing data is driving value to humans,” Manguera said. “Let’s transform the data that we get and return it to them and multiply it in terms of value.”

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or an increasing number of companies today, a major challenge is to identify the key customer messages from an everincreasing complexity of multiple customer data sources and then look to develop these messages into an overall customer story. To address this, MYNT Chief Marketing Officer Chris Manguera talked about maximizing data and humanizing it to deliver valued services to the customers. Technology has been a pivotal and successful enabler of financial inclusion. However, even with each technical evolution, sets of technical, cost, competition, capacity and access challenges persist. Manguera raised the question: “How can we take advantage of a technology or a device that each Filipino would most likely have and deliver better or more value in terms of services?” MYNT looks at the advantages, disadvantages and challenges that fasten on the existing and evolving technologies, bearer services, access platforms and user devices for mobile financial services to deliver services beyond the traditional needs. As a FinTech startup, MYNT is currently partnered with Globe Telecom, the Ayala Corporation, and Ant Financial. Its five key services include payments, remittance, loans, business solutions and platforms. “Our core business model is providing services to the Filipinos,” Manguera said. “We believe that data helps us deliver better services to [Filipinos].” For Manguera, humanizing data means getting the data from the customers and using that to deliver bigger and better value back to them. He then presented the three parts of humanizing data:


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Why brands need to think more ‘human’ In this day and age where a lot of stimuli fight for consumers’ attention, it is critical for brands to go back to their ‘why?’ and think more ‘human’. WORDS

Harriet Icay

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Rupen Desai, Vice Chairman of APAC

delman’s Vice Chairman for APAC Rupen Desai answers the question, “Is data the new rocket fuel for brand purpose?” Desai opens his talk with a striking fact that should alarm the current advertising industry, “74 percent of people today do not care if your brand they use today just disappear. And we may feel very important when we make it, but nobody is actually going to watch them,” he remarked. This rings true especially the majority of consumers skip online video advertising as soon as the “Skip Ad” button pops out. So how can brands stay relevant amidst this challenge? Desai says it is all about being and thinking more ‘human’. “We need to start thinking more as human beings. We’ve been feeding ourselves with self-importance for the last 50, 60, hundred plus years. But maybe it is that most consumers do not care about brands.” Another looming threat for the advertising industry is the change in how people think and consume media. He says that people now live in continuous partial attention because they play multiple concurrent roles at the same time. “The problem for us is not how media consumption has changed, it is the wiring inside [our minds] has changed. The amount of information that is coming into our brains is now five, 10, 15, 20 thousand more species of stimuli and our brands are extremely finding out difficult to actually process it.” Given this situation, Desai says that brands ergo should go back to their ‘Why’ – their purpose. “In this day and age, the only thing that has helped all brands is something called purpose,” he opined. Quoting Simon Sinek, Desai says, “People do not buy what you do, they buy why you do it.” Fortunately, brands are starting to marry data and purpose and leverage them. More and more brands are beginning to find their ‘Why?’. According to a study by Jim Stengel, brands with purpose grow 400 percent more than brands without purpose. Indeed, brands with purpose help them communicate with consumers better. To answer the fundamental question, Desai revealed that indeed, data is undisputedly the necessary rocket fuel for brand purpose. It can create a genuine impact on a community, spur change, and make the world a better place. “If we get this right [marrying data and brand purpose], we can solve a lot more real problems that brands are claiming to solve but stop a bit short than they can.”


Making digital creativity ubiquitous WORDS

Jason Inocencio

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Yasuharu Sasaki, Executive Creative Director and Head of the Digital Creative Center of Dentsu Tokyo

in ‘Second Life Toys.’ By presenting toys that would “donate” limbs or pieces for use of other toys, awareness of organ donations and organ transplants was increased in Japan by Dentsu Tokyo and Green Ribbon Campaign. In the case of ‘Ton-Ton Voice Sumo,’ Sasaki showed that Digital Creativity can as an example of creativity for healthcare. Citing the winner of a Silver in UX/UI at The One Show 2017 and a Bronze Lion in Pharma at the 2016 Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, Sasaki demonstrated how this game helped senior citizens exercise their vocal chords and recover throat function. Voice therapists joined forces with Dentsu Tokyo on behalf of client Generic Health Services Facility Hitorizawa to reinvent the Japanese sport of sumo wrestling. In closing, Sasaki bared that Digital Creativity can inspire people’s way of lives. “With Digital, get closer to people, move people emotionally and physically,” he said. “Use your Digital Creativity ubiquitously and create the future.” The adobo-Tambuli Conference 2018, held at the Marquis Events Place, was organized by adobo magazine and University of Asia and the Pacific and sponsored by Unilever, Dove, Grab for Business, and McDonald’s. Other partners also include PhotoMan, Red Chili 360 Marketing Inc., ANC, and BusinessMirror.  

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asaki spoke on “Making digital creativity ubiquitous.” “Digital is a new behavior standard that has been brought about by the progress of technology and media,” he shared. “Digital creativity means to move these people to a new standard, not just limited to technology. Digital creativity has the big potential to make ideas ubiquitous.” Sasaki noted that digital creativity can be used for certain purposes, namely for education, for business, for social issues, for life, and for healthcare. For each of these purposes, he presented case studies of campaigns that Dentsu Tokyo has championed in recent years. For education, the Bronze Lions winner in Mobile and PR at the 2017 Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, ‘Glicode’ was his example. The app was created to educate Japanese children on the basics of coding using candy from Ezaki Glico, a candy company. So popular was ‘Glicode’ that no less than the Japanese government was encouraging its use in schools and an English version has been in the works for use outside the country. To promote electric vehicles in Japan, a team in Dentsu believed advertising was not enough. So as an example of Creativity for Business, they came up with the winner of the Innovation Grand Prix at the 2017 Spikes Asia Festival of Creativity, ‘Smile Lock Outlet.’ Effectively creating a new business model, the campaign saw Dentsu and client Toyota develop a small IOT module to attach to existing outlets around Tokyo. The result saw the Toyota iRoad finding outlets for charging all over the city. As an example of creativity for social issues, the case of INDUSTRIAL JP was presented by Sasaki. A project designed to turn small factories into a record label, images and sounds are taken from the high tech factories that support technology in Japan and are transformed by talented artists into music videos. By designing a new music label, Dentsu Tokyo connected young people with small factories. Noting that creativity can also inspire social innovation and discussion among people, Sasaki cited a three-time winner of Bronze Spikes in Direct, PR, and Promo at the 2016 Spikes Asia Festival of Creativity


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In the Social Media Capital of the World, it Pays to be Human In the adobo Tambuli Asia Pacific, we learn how a brand like Jollibee uplifts humanity and brings joy to Filipinos with their purpose-driven campaigns WORDS

Harriet Icay & JM Martinada

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ino Borromeo, the Chief Strategy Officer of McCann Worldgroup Philippines and Francis Flores, the Global Chief Marketing Officer of Jollibee Foods Corporation joined together in the adobo Tambuli Asia Pacific conference and discussed how it pays to be human in the social media capital of the world. “The Filipinos are a great combination of highly social and highly emotional,” says Borromeo. Filipinos’ individualism is at 32 percent, dictating that we are highly social and we keep our community close to us - hence the term “Feelipinos.” Data showed that we are the country that ranks the highest when it comes to being emotional. For instance, the Facebook reaction meter allows us to express our emotions, whether it is to assign a like or a heart, or feel angry, surprised, sad, or amused about a post. This emotion-based reaction meter really shows that we humanize our feelings on social media. In the study, the Philippines emerged as the most emotional country, while Japan was ranked as the least emotional nation. To add, “The Philippines ranked as number 1 on top sharers of posts on social media, because sometimes we want to get an opinion from other people, sometimes we are interested on a particular topic and we want to be involved, sometimes we just want to start a conversation, or maybe just want to look cool. But whatever that reason is, it is a human reason.” Today, according to the-soon-to-be-released study by Borrromeo called “The Truth about Global Brands,” 77 percent of the people around the world “believe that social media is defining us.” From here on, this is a massive opportunity for brands to redefine as well as to shape the world through social media with the presence of humanity. On the other hand, Francis Flores shared how Jollibee, a brand that has been bringing joy to Filipinos for 40 years now, has applied some insights that resulted to powerful brand stories that really relate to the Filipino people, such as the Kwentong Jollibee.

Francis E. Flores, Global Chief Marketing Officer of Jollibee Foods Corp. and Gino Borromeo, Chief Strategy Officer of McCann Worldgroup Philippines

The first lesson he shared is that the brand should be guided by a human purpose. “You have to ask yourselves, ‘What meaningful role does your brand play in the lives of people?’.” Indeed, a brand seething with purpose has a massive opportunity to uplift humanity. “In the case of Jollibee, our brand purpose for the past 40 years is how to bring joy to Filipinos.” Second lesson, according to Flores, is to understand the pulse of the people. “We always believe – together with our partner agency McCann – that powerful brand stories are powerful truths well told.” Citing one of their most popular campaigns, Kwentong Jollibee, Flores said that their consumer understanding not only included FGD and field work they also utilized social media to gain the pulse on their consumer’s interests. Flores shared that they also latched onto hugot – words or statements about usually sentimental or emotional experiences – because they noticed that these deeply resonate with their consumers. “Every time we come up with a campaign, we always have a hugot session.” Third lesson is: be human with the creative process. “You have to go back to recognizing a very basic human need that you need to apply with the teams – the need to have fun. One thing we learned is that creativity is intelligence having fun.” Flores opined that when a team is having fun, amazing work will definitely come. Lastly, Flores shared how bravery and intuition lead to extraordinary campaigns. Intuition is about having the confidence to make bold decisions without solely relying on market data. According to Flores, this basic human instinct leads to bravery. “Only teams who are confident enough to rely on intuition to make bold decision are the teams that really show bravery.”


Asia-Pacific Tambuli Awards 2018 names BWM Dentsu Australia as Agency of the Year, Network of the Year goes to Dentsu Aegis Network Jason Inocencio Caliber King Photography

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n the strength of ‘Disappearing Person Alerts,’ BWM Dentsu Australia won Agency of the Year honors while Dentsu Aegis Network earned the coveted Network of the Year award at the 2018 Asia-Pacific Tambuli Awards held at Shangri-la at The Fort. With a theme of “Creativity + Human Good + Results,” another of the special awards handed out went to Seven Sundays from ABS-CBN Star Cinema which won the Cinema for Good honors. Singular honors were given to Paolo Mercado, Senior VicePresident and Director for Marketing Communication

and Innovation at Nestlé Philippines who was named Chief Marketing Communication Officer of the Year. Six Grand Prix awards were given by the Overall Executive Jury for the Asia-Pacific Tambuli Awards. For Innovation, Creative cluster, the Grand Prix went to ‘Making Immunization Into a Tradition’ by McCann Worldgroup India for the Ministry of Public Health of Afghanistan. It also won a Silver in Health and Wellness, Humanity & Culture cluster. Dentsu Jayme Syfu was awarded a Grand Prix in Outdoor, Media & Digital cluster, for client Greenpeace Philippines in the form of ‘Dead


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Whale.’ The same campaign won Gold in Best Brand Idea for Good, Creative cluster; Craft, Creative cluster; and Care for the Environment, Humanity & Culture cluster or a total of three Golds. Cheil Worldwide India won a Grand Prix in Tambuli Origins, Creative cluster, for ‘Samsung Technical School – Seema Nagar’ for client Samsung India Electronics Pvt. Ltd. In Public Relations, Creative cluster, the same campaign won a Gold while earning a Bronze in Advocacy, Humanity & Culture cluster, and another Bronze for Video Screen, Media & Digital cluster. ‘Power Struggle’ by McCann Melbourne for client AGL earned a Grand Prix in Care for the Environment, Humanity & Culture cluster. McCann Healthcare Worldwide Japan, Inc.’s ‘Washable Book’ for client ANGFA was given a Grand Prix for Health and Wellness, Humanity and Culture cluster. The campaign also won a Silver in Print, Media & Digital cluster. In Responsible Citizenship, Humanity & Culture cluster, BWM Dentsu won a Grand Prix for ‘Disappearing Person Alerts’ for client Queensland Police. A Gold was earned by the same campaign in Youth Brand, Humanity & Culture cluster; a Silver in Mobile, Media & Digital cluster; another Silver in Social Media, Media & Digital cluster; and a Bronze in Best Brand Idea for Good, Creative cluster. The Philippines earned a total of 10 Gold Tambuli Awards followed by three Gold Tambuli Awards each going to India and Australia. Malcolm Poynton, Global Chief Creative Officer of Cheil Worldwide, served as Overall Executive Jury chair. The other members of the Overall Executive Jury were Dentsu Tokyo Chief Creative Officer Yasuharu Sasaki; CLC Chair Asia Pacific and Chief Creative Officer of McCann Australia Pat Baron; Edelman Asia Pacific, Middle East & Africa Executive Vice Chairman Rupen Desai; Coca-Cola Philippines President and General Manager Winn Everhart; Y&R Asia Chief Executive Officer Chris Foster; BBDO Guerrero Creative Chairman David Guerrero; TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno Chief Creative Officer Melvin Mangada; Samsung Philippines Senior Vice-President Kevin Lee; Google Philippines Country Head Ken Lingan; Unilever Philippines Vice-President for Marketing Gina Lorenzana; Colgate Palmolive Inc. Corporate Vice-President and General Manager Arvind Sachdev; and McDonald’s Philippines Executive Vice-President and Deputy Managing Director Margot Torres. The Victorian Government in Australia was also named Advertiser of the Year while John Miller, the Senior Vice-President for Africa, Asia, and Oceania for Nestlé, returned to where he achieved great success as head of Nestlé Philippines to receive the Lifetime Achievement Award.

GRAND PRIX

AWARD Innovation Grand Prix TITLE Making Immunization Into a Tradition AGENCY McCann Worldgroup India CLIENT Ministry of Public Health Afghanistan

AWARD Outdoor Grand Prix TITLE Dead Whale AGENCY Dentsu Jayme Syfu CLIENT Greenpeace Philippines


AWARD Health & Wellness Grand Prix TITLE Washable Book AGENCY McCann Healthcare Worldwide Japan CLIENT ANGFA

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AWARD Tambuli Origins Grand Prix TITLE Samsung Technical School – Seema Nagar AGENCY Cheil Worldwide CLIENT Samsung India Electronics


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AWARD Responsible Citizenship Grand Prix TITLE Disappearing Person Alerts AGENCY BWM Dentsu CLIENT Queensland Police

AWARD Care for the Environment Grand Prix TITLE Power Struggle AGENCY McCann Melbourne CLIENT AGL


MINT COLLEGE HAS A NEW CAMPUS We are ready to welcome future MINT College students at our new location at Silver City, Pasig! Since 2010, McKinley Hill, Taguig served as a prime location for this institution. As our community grows in number over the years, we are happy to share this huge milestone with you. Our Silver City campus is located at Silver City 1A Bldg., Ortigas Ave., Pasig City and will fully operate next school year 2019-2020.

VISIT www.mintcollege.com IG: mint_instagram

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CALL (02) 551-9650


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01 Nestle’s special awardees, Mr. John Miller (Senior Vice President, Africa, Asia and Oceania, Nestle & 2018 APAC Tambuli Awards Lifetime Achievement Awardee) and Mr. Paolo Mercado (Senior Vice President and Director, Marketing Communication and Innovation, Nestle Philippines & 2018 APAC Tambuli Awards Chief Marketing Communication Officer of the Year) with Mr. Jayjay Calero (Chairman, Tambuli Advisory Board) 02 Cheil Worldwide representatives with Mr. Kevin Lee, President of Samsung Electronics Philippines 03 Mr. Arvind Sachdev, Corporate Vice President & GM of Colgate-Palmolive, Inc. 04 Mrs. Carmencita Esteban, Chairman & CEO of Philippine Survey and Research Center (PSRC) 05 Ms. Margot Torres, Managing Director, McDonald’s Philippines 06 Mr. March Ventosa (COO of SkyCable), Mr. David Guerrero (Creative Chairman, BBDO Guerrero), and Mr. Manny Ayala 07 Mr. Yasuharu Sasaki (Head of Digital Creative & Executive Creative Director, Dentsu Inc. Japan), Ms. Angel Guerrero (Founder, President & Editor-in-chief, adobo Magazine), Mr. Kim Shaw (Publisher, Editor of Campaign Brief Asia), Mr. Malcolm Poynton (Global Chief Creative Officer, Cheil Worldwide UK, and 2018 APAC Tambuli Awards Overall Executive Jury Chairman), Ms. Merlee Jayme (Chairmom & Chief Creative Officer, Dentsu Jayme Syfu), and Dr. Jerry Kliatchko 08 Mr. Kenneth Lingan (Country Head, Google Philippines) 09 Mr. March Ventosa, Ms. Merlee Jayme, and Ms. Gina Lorenzana (Global Vice President Fabric Sensations, Unilever) 10 Tambuli jury members 11 Jollibee Foods Corporation team headed by Mr. Francis Flores (Brand Chief Marketing Officer) 12 Mr. Winn Everheart (President and General Manager, Coca-Cola Philippines) and team 13 Mr. Malcolm Poynton 14 Dentsu Aegis Network, 2018 APAC Tambuli Awards Network of the Year

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RANKINGS


C

reativity is limitless. Every year, advertising agencies, marketers, and key suppliers outdo themselves and go beyond their expectations, targets, and their previous year’s achievements. In 2017, their never-ending drive for excellence resulted to campaigns that did not only leverage brands or worthy causes, but also, gunned for them metals and distinctions from around the globe. That is the core of “Creative Rankings” by adobo which has been a witness to their quest. adobo collaborated with PwC Isla Lipana for the auditing and tabulation of points to ensure we come up with the 2017 index of creative talent which stirred the industry. The rankings are based on the performance of advertising agencies, creatives, marketers, and production houses across 13 of the most prestigious local, regional and global award-giving bodies.

CREATIVE RANKINGS PROCESS: 1. The adobo Creative Rankings consolidated lists of awards received by each advertising agency from selected international and local advertising awards, as summarized by adobo and provided to PwC Isla Lipana. adobo has identified the following award-giving bodies to be included in the 2017 rankings: • International: Cannes, D&AD, Clio, One Show, London International Awards New York Festival, AdFest and Spikes Asia • Philippines: Kidlat Awards, Tambuli Awards, Boomerang Awards, Araw Values, and adobo Design Awards Asia 2. The rankings are based solely on performances of agencies over the past year. The list of awards submitted by all agencies are duly reviewed by adobo and verified by each respective agency’s authorized representative.

3. As each advertising award-giving body carries a certain degree of prestige, adobo assigned and placed equivalent points for each recognition, as shown in the table below. 4. PwC Isla Lipana made a tally of all the awards given to each advertising agency. For score tabulation purposes, minor awards and categories including Craft entries were given 30% of the indicated score set for the different awards. 5. The total number of awards counted and accumulated for each agency was multiplied by the equivalent points in the table. Accordingly, an agency which won a greater number of international awards is expected to amass more points. The counted awards only include credits earned by the agency and not the credits from its creatives. 6. The equivalent points tabulated in (5) are added together to arrive at the total points earned by each agency from all categories mentioned, awards (Gold, Silver, Bronze, Finalist/shortlisted) and award-giving bodies. The total points were used to determine the final rankings. 7. Creatives are ranked separately from their respective agencies, following the same tabulation process and equivalent points. Credits for creatives do not count for the agency rankings. Talents are listed with the company they belong to at the time the awards were given. The information reflects the data submitted by the agencies relevant to the festivals in 2017. An external auditing firm, PwC Philippines Isla Lipana & Co; tabulated and ranked the individuals and companies according to their scores. The magazine disclaims any liability in connection with the publication of this information. For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/

2017 POINT SYSTEM

SHOW

SHORTLIST

BRONZE

SILVER

GOLD

GRAND PRIX

CANNES LIONS

180

300

350

450

550 600 (Titanium)

D&AD

180

300

350

450

600

CLIO

160

250

300

350

450

THE ONE SHOW

160

250

300

350

450

LIA

140

200

250

300

350

NEW YORK FESTIVALS

140

200

250

300

350

SPIKES ASIA

80

160

200

250

300

ADFEST

160

200

200

250

300

KIDLAT

40

60

80

150

250

BOOMERANGS

10

20

40

60

100

TAMBULI

10

20

40

60

100

ADOBO DESIGN AWARDS ASIA

10

20

40

60

100

ARAW VALUES

4

10

20

30

50


a d o b o

70

C R E A T I V E

Chief Creative Officer Melvin Mangada TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

10,880 points Melvin Mangada is a constant in the adobo Creative Rankings, landing at the top for a record five times. Mangada started his career fresh out of college as the industry’s first director-level Advertising Creative at Ace Saatchi & Saatchi. He then teamed up with Jimmy Santiago and Tong Puno to put up TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno, where he is now the Chief Creative Officer & Managing Partner. A frequent Jury President, his work has been recognized by the world’s most prestigious creative festivals such as Cannes Lions, D&AD, and Clio. A mark of excellence, Mangada became the first Hall of Fame awardee of the 4A’s (Association of Accredited Advertising Agencies). He worked with and earned the trust of the country’s largest brands like Alaska, Boysen, Oishi Snacks and Del Monte.

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

71

2 0 1 7

2

#

Raul Castro

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

3

#

Merlee Jayme Dentsu Jayme Syfu

Chief Creative Officer 1

Melvin Mangada

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

10,880

2

Raul Castro

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

7,910

3

Merlee Jayme

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

4,890

4

Raoul Panes

Leo Burnett Manila

1,550

5

David Guerrero

BBDO Guerrero

1,280

6

Dave Ferrer

J. Walter Thompson Manila

1,220

7

Badong Abesamis

Y&R Philippines

1,070

8

Marcus Rebeschini

Y&R Philippines

550

9

Leigh Reyes

MullenLowe Philippines

270

10

Shen Guan Tan

Y&R Philippines

230

11

Ong Kien Hoe

Y&R Philippines

140

12

Tony Sarmiento III

Havas Ortega

90

13

Joey Ong

ASPAC

80

Juan Ariel Comia

PC&V

60

Third Domingo

IDEASXMACHINA

60

Teeny Gonzales

Seven A.D.

30

14 15

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


72

a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7

Executive Creative Director Melvin Mangada TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

10,880 points Melvin Mangada is a constant in the adobo Creative Rankings, landing at the top for a record five times. Mangada started his career fresh out of college as the industry’s first director-level Advertising Creative at Ace Saatchi & Saatchi. He then teamed up with Jimmy Santiago and Tong Puno to put up TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno, where he is now the Chief Creative Officer & Managing Partner. A frequent Jury President, his work has been recognized by the world’s most prestigious creative festivals such as Cannes Lions, D&AD, and Clio. A mark of excellence, Mangada became the first Hall of Fame awardee of the 4A’s (Association of Accredited Advertising Agencies). He worked with and earned the trust of the country’s largest brands like Alaska, Boysen, Oishi Snacks and Del Monte.


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

73

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

Joe Dy

McCann World Group Philippines

Brandie Tan

J. Walter Thompson / Publicis JimenezBasic

Executive Creative Director 1

Melvin Mangada

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

10,880

2

Joe Dy

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

7,910

3

Brandie Tan

J. Walter Thompson Manila / Publicis JimenezBasic

3,250

4

Trixie Diyco

Publicis JimenezBasic

2,460

5

Gary Amante

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,790

6

Rey Tiempo

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,740

7

Louie Sotto

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,300

8

Dale Lopez

BBDO Guerrero

1,280

9

Jerry Hizon

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,260

10

Herbert Hernandez

Y&R Philippines

930

11

Greg Martin III

Ace Saatchi & Saatchi Manila

600

12

Eugene Demata

DDB Philippines

410

13

Abi Aquino

MullenLowe Philippines

270

14

Jenny Nadong

Y&R Philippines

230

15

Kat Limchoc

Leo Burnett Manila

220

16

Michael Sicam

Ogilvy & Mather Philippines

210

17

Andrew Petch

Ace Saatchi & Saatchi Manila

150

18

Patrick Miciano

DDB Philippines

100

19

Tony Sarmiento III

Havas Ortega

90

20

Jimmo Garcia

DDB Philippines

70

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

74

C R E A T I V E

Creative Director Maan Bautista McCann Worldgroup Philippines

7,770 points Maan Bautista kickstarted her journey in the industry as a Creative Management trainee in 2005, until she worked her way up the ladder at J. Walter Thompson Worldwide from being a copywriter to an Associate Creative Director. As McCann Worlgroup Philippines’ Creative Director, she handles Nestlé brands mostly such as Chuckie, Nescafé and Coffee-Mate. When she’s not crafting campaigns, Maan is reading a book at a coffee shop, exploring places around the globe, or learning how to swim.

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

2

75

2 0 1 7

2

#

3

#

Chino Jayme TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

#

Nolan Fabular

Bryan Siy

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Creative Director 1

Maan Bautista

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

7,770

Chino Jayme

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

5,020

Nolan Fabular

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

5,020

3

Bryan Siy

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,970

4

Joey David-Tiempo

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,770

5

Ram Mendoza

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,620

Ryan Rubillar

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,620

Alnair Langkay

Publicis JimenezBasic

2,080

Bia Famularcano

Publicis JimenezBasic

2,080

7

Biboy Royong

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,920

8

Rachel Villanueva

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,310

Gary Amante

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,230

Rey Tiempo

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,230

10

Paolo Morato

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

970

11

Mela Advincula

Leo Burnett Manila

940

12

John Ed De Vera

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

910

13

Allan Almeda

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

880

14

Lorenzo Cruz

J. Walter Thompson Manila

830

2

6

9

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

76

C R E A T I V E

Art Director John Ed De Vera TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,840 points John Ed De Vera has a penchant for experimenting with different media. He explores lettering, papercutting, and everything new in design. His over 100,000 followers on Instagram can attest to his creative firepower. His love for innovation made him climb up the ranks at TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno from being an Art Director in 2008 to its Creative Director at present.

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

77

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

Nolan Fabular TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Marielle Nones Publicis JimenezBasic

Art Director 1

John Ed De Vera

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,840

2

Nolan Fabular

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,620

3

Marielle Nones

Publicis JimenezBasic

2,220

4

Biboy Royong

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,820

5

Gary Amante

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,700

6

Jeff Thomas

Publicis JimenezBasic

1,610

7

Dale Lopez

BBDO Guerrero

1,280

8

Sandy Salurio

Y&R Philippines

1,010

9

Blane Rosales

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

970

10

Mela Advincula

Leo Burnett Manila

940

11

Spiro Barroga

Leo Burnett Manila

940

12

Alyssa Babasa

J. Walter Thompson Manila

830

13

Sara Sarmiento

Leo Burnett Manila

810

14

Ali Silao

BBDO Guerrero

720

15

Cesca Veneracion

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

590

16

Benci Vidanes

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

530

17

Judith Katigbak

Y&R Philippines

420

18

Pamela Manalac

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

390

19

Boyet Custodio

J. Walter Thompson Manila

360

20

Melvin Mangada

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

350

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

78

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7

Copywriter Fran Palines McCann Worldgroup Philippines

6,490 points Fran Palines is an industry stalwart who started as a copywriter at BBDO Guerrero in 2010 and later joined McCann Worldgroup Philippines. She launched two stellar radio campaigns, one for Fully Booked (LIVES) and another for NestlĂŠ Philippines Maggi (DIM DADS), which scored metals in the local and international arena. Her sought-after talent attracted collaborations with Johnson & Johnson, Ayala, BPI, NestlĂŠ KitKat, Coca-Cola, and Philippine Airlines.


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

79

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

Maan Bautista McCann Worldgroup Philippines

Ram Mendoza TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Copywriter 1

Fran Palines

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

6,490

2

Maan Bautista

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

4,890

3

Ram Mendoza

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,840

4

Bryan Siy

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,720

5

Rey Tiempo

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,700

6

Leslie Cua

J. Walter Thompson Manila

1,600

7

Paula Molina

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

1,480

8

Raoul Panes

Leo Burnett Manila

1,440

9

Sofia Tawasil

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

1,370

10

Rachel Villanueva

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,310

11

Therese Liboro

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,290

12

David Guerrero

BBDO Guerrero

1,280

13

Albert Millar

J. Walter Thompson Manila

1,130

14

Louie Sotto

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,070

15

Soleil Badenhop

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

990

16

Allan Almeda

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

960

17

Kina Jauregui

Leo Burnett Manila

940

Lorenzo Cruz

J. Walter Thompson Manila

830

Meggie MaĂąago

J. Walter Thompson Manila

830

Michelle Guerrero

J. Walter Thompson Manila

830

19

Ryan Caidic

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

720

20

Clara Roxas

Y&R Philippines

660

18

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


80

a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7

Digital Creative Romar Quiroz TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,710 points Romar Quiroz is a digital imaging and special effects artist. Affectionately known as “Momay,” he has more than twenty years of experience in the advertising industry. His inspiration is Wes Craven’s character, Freddy Krueger.

Positions that fall under this category are: Digital Copywriter, Digital Art Director, Innovations Director, Final Artist, Final Art Supervisor, Senior Final Art and Graphic Artist, Digital Illustrator, Digital Graphic Artist, Web Designer, UX/UI Designer, 3D Artist, Digital Designer, Visualizer, Photo Imaging, Digital Imagist, Illustrator, Graphic Artist, Artist, Animator, Photographer, Head of Final Art Studio.


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

81

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

Luigi Villamar TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Tom Perdigon TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Ronie Villanueva

Gary Amante Dentsu Jayme Syfu

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

Digital Creative 1

Romar Quiroz

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,710

Luigi Villamar

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,370

Tom Perdigon

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,370

Dennis Mallari

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,230

Gary Amante

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,230

Ronie Villanueva

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,230

Pedro Chuidian

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

970

Ruben Hamahiga dela Cruz

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

970

Wayne Dayauon

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

970

Chelsea Ortega

J. Walter Thompson Manila

830

Carlos Averion

Y&R Philippines

640

Pepper Hernandez

Y&R Philippines

640

7

Val Medina

J. Walter Thompson Manila

520

8

Bianca Marjalino

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

390

9

John Ed De Vera

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

370

10

Biboy Royong

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

320

2

3

4

5 6

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

82

C R E A T I V E

Digital Producer Maki Tabili Dentsu Jayme Syfu

740 points Maki Tabili is the creative technologist of Dentsu Jayme Syfu. He has a Multimedia Arts degree from the De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde. When he is not in his gaming chair, Maki fulfills his cat dad duties to Saturn, Neptune, Pulsar, Ceres, Vesta and Eclipse.

Positions that fall under are: Technology Director, Social Media Content Producer, Technologist, Digital Producer, Community Manager Creative Technology Unit Head Community Manager Creative Technology Unit Head Content Manager Developer Chief Technologist Programmer Social Intelligence Senior Web Specialist, Production Content Specialist Channel Editor Social Media Specialist Creative Technologist.

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

83

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

Dominique de Leon Dentsu Jayme Syfu

JR Ignacio

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

Digital Producer 1

Maki Tabili

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

740

2

Dominique de Leon

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

700

3

JR Ignacio

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

610

4

Archie Gelonga

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

530

5

Blue Endaya

BBDO Guerrero

400

6

Enif Ruedas

DDB Philippines

110

7

Jarmaine Sotto

Leo Burnett Manila

100

Alexa Aguirre

DDB Philippines

80

Cristina Raposa

Publicis JimenezBasic

80

Danni Tan

DDB Philippines

80

Donna Sta. Ana

DDB Philippines

80

Pauline Funa

DDB Philippines

80

Tina Gerolaga

DDB Philippines

80

9

Tahnee Gonzales

MullenLowe Philippines

70

10

Raffy Bariso

MullenLowe Philippines

50

11

Anika Castillo

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

40

Axel Raymundo

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

40

Cyrille Sio

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

40

Andrea del Rosario

NuWorks Interactive Labs

30

8

12

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

84

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7

Digital Manager Tabbi Tomas Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,550 points Tabbi Tomas has an advertising degree from the De La Salle University. Currently, she is the Social Media Director of Dentsu Jayme Syfu where she has taken part in bringing in some of the agency’s biggest brands and biggest awards: Jollibee and Love Yourself’s #staynegatHIVe campaign. She has also worked on the winning pitch for Coca-Cola and was part of the team that brought home the Gold Cannes Lions for Greenpeace’s Dead Whale.

Positions that fall under are: Digital Strategist, Digital Director, Digital Planner, Digital Media Manager, Social Media Project Manager, Social Command Director, Social Command Specialist, Digital Solutions, Head Social Engagement Specialist, Community Director, Digital Strategy Manager, Chief Digital Officer, Head of Digital, Head of Social Media and Analytics, Social and Content Director, Social media management director


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

85

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

Roshan Nandwani BBDO Guerrero

Paul Reyes

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

Digital Manager 1

Tabbi Tomas

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,550

2

Roshan Nandwani

BBDO Guerrero

1,080

3

Paul Reyes

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

970

4

Anna Bigornia

BBDO Guerrero

520

5

Acee Vitangcol

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

350

6

Dane Mangahas

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

320

Cheska Arabani

Ace Saatchi & Saatchi Manila

140

Dovie Raquel

Ace Saatchi & Saatchi Manila

140

Gen Wang-Lizares

Ace Saatchi & Saatchi Manila

140

Joem Segovia

Ace Saatchi & Saatchi Manila

140

Patricia Lee

Ace Saatchi & Saatchi Manila

140

Carlo Dionisio

Leo Burnett Manila

100

Christine Regala

BBDO Guerrero

100

Jheric Delos Angeles

BBDO Guerrero

100

Anne Vitug

Publicis JimenezBasic

80

Chino Testado

DDB Philippines

80

Eric Pena

DDB Philippines

80

Ian Ong

DDB Philippines

80

10

Raffy Bariso

MullenLowe Philippines

60

11

Erica Garcia

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

40

Chelsea Lopez

Voyager Innovations Inc. - VYGR Digital Agency

20

Jason Chamberlain

Voyager Innovations Inc. - VYGR Digital Agency

20

7

8

9

12

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

86

C R E A T I V E

Editor Kiko De Dios TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

5,180 points Kiko De Dios, fondly called “Kiko,� graduated with a degree in Multimedia Arts & Design at the Mapua Institute of Technology. He worked up video masterpieces for different brands like Alaska, Ayala Malls, and Bench.

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

87

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

Vince Belen

#

How’s Everything (TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno)

Matthew Cruz

How’s Everything (TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno)

Editor 1

Kiko De Dios

How’s Everything? (TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno)

5,180

2

Vince Belen

How’s Everything? (TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno)

5,110

3

Matthew Cruz

How’s Everything? (TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno)

4,540

4

Bien Theodore Felix

Film Pabrika

1,610

5

Cris Cantos

Film Pabrika

1,590

Berto Abenido

Greenroom, Inc.

970

Erin Hipolito

Greenroom, Inc.

970

Jaymar Carinan

Greenroom, Inc.

970

Leslie Tan

Upprgrnd

970

Wayne Dayauon

Upprgrnd

970

7

Rutherford Celino

Flare Manila

860

8

Mel de Vera

Optima Digital

770

9

King Santos

PostManila

550

10

Boogs San Juan

Tower of Doom

530

11

Raya Querijero

Provill

470

12

Natalia Burgos

Flare Manila

380

EJ David

DDB Philippines

250

Kevin Gabon

How’s Everything? (TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno)

250

Wacky Tirona

Edit Cube

250

6

15

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

88

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7

Director Emilie Batard TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

5,000 points Emilie Batard is a Manila-based creative. She joined TBWA in 2013 as one of the original film directors in the production department. With a background in journalism, Emilie has engaged in many projects from producing documentaries, viral videos, commercial content, digital & analog photography, live reporting, and hand drawings. Emilie brings a clever witty angle to any work she does, capturing audiences through her charisma and definition.


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

89

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

Nolan Fabular

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Kevin Gabon

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Director 1

Emilie Batard

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

5,000

2

Nolan Fabular

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,750

3

Kevin Gabon

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,370

4

Joel Limchoc

Film Pabrika

2,050

5

Paolo Villaluna

Filmex

1,410

6

Lyle Sacris

Film Pabrika

620

7

Adrian Calumpang

Provill

470

8

Jose Ticsay

Underground Logic

390

Hann Marcelino

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

350

Pao Pangan

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

350

10

Jelise Chung

Straight Shooters

310

11

Henry Frejas

Filmex

290

12

Mark Querubin

88 Storey Films

260

13

Carlo Directo

Film Pabrika

250

EJ David

DDB Philippines

250

14

Derrik Yaw

Graph Studio Malaysia

240

15

Nolan Bernardino

Happy House Manila

220

Carl Graham

Flare Manila

140

Mark Meily

Filmex

140

Jessel Monteverde

Abracadabra

120

JT Pandy

How’s Everything

120

Stephen Ngo

Film Pabrika

120

9

16

17

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

90

C R E A T I V E

Director of Photography Vince Belen TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,350 points Vince Belen is a creative, actor, musician and editor in one. He started as an editor at TBWA\ Santiago Mangada Puno. Before that, he was an intern of TEN17P, and participated in the making of renowned indie film, “Dagitab.” In college, he composed #NoFilter for the film Ms. Edited. If he’s not busy in the creative world, he hits the gym or the beach.

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

91

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

Kevin Gabon

How’s Everything? / TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Berhil Cruz

Publicis JimenezBasic

Director of Photography 1

Vince Belen

How’s Everything? / TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,350

2

Kevin Gabon

How’s Everything? / TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,340

3

Berhil Cruz

Publicis JimenezBasic

1,900

4

Ruben Hamahiga dela Cruz

Etnikolor

970

5

Leslie Garchitorena

Provill

540

6

Pao Pangan

How’s Everything?

350

7

Dindo Martinez

Filmex

290

8

Ike Arellana

88 Storey Films

260

9

Malay Javier

How’s Everything?

220

10

Ian Guevara

Flare Manila

140

11

Ricardo Buhay lll

Straight Shooters

130

Pao Orendain

Filmex

80

Richard Somes

Film Pabrika

80

Larry Manda

Film Pabrika

70

Arvin Viola

Filmex

60

JA Tadeña

88 Storey Films

60

Sol Galang

Straight Shooters

40

Mycko David

Pixeleyes Multimedia

30

Rody Lacap

Film Pabrika

20

Zecharias Sycip

Film Pabrika

20

Carlos Mauricio

Manila Man

10

12

13

14

15

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

92

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

Account Manager Bambi Reyes & Ramon Garcia McCann Worldgroup Philippines

7,450 points

7,450 points

Bambi Reyes is the business group director at McCann. She oversees clients like NestlĂŠ, Ritemed, and Bank of the Philippine Islands. Bambi has eight years of experience in the industry, working for agencies like Campaigns and Grey, Ogilvy & Mather, and McCann Worldgroup Philippines.

Ramon Garcia is the Vice President and Managing Partner for McCann Erickson, Ramon currently oversees the NestlĂŠ account. Previously, he had oversight of all major Filipino accounts- United Laboratories, San Miguel Brewery, Globe Telecom, Petron Fuels, Jollibee Foods Corp., and several other accounts. In his 15 years at the agency, he has handled accounts across multiple consumer categories.

2 0 1 7


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

93

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

Miele Dungo

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Portia Catuira

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Account Manager Bambi Reyes

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

7,450

Ramon Garcia

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

7,450

2

Miele Dungo

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

5,220

3

Portia Catuira

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,870

4

Marishka David

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,370

Camille Datu-Jimenez

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

4,150

Chot Aldeguer

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

4,150

6

Jhenice Alana

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

2,480

7

Katie Santos

Publicis JimenezBasic

2,100

8

Raffy Parcon

Publicis JimenezBasic

2,060

9

Eric Nolasco

Publicis JimenezBasic

1,590

10

Raymond Arrastia

Leo Burnett Manila

1,550

11

Donny Dingcong

Leo Burnett Manila

1,400

Chello Caliwan

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,230

Elyse Chan-Bella

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,230

Golda Roldan

J. Walter Thompson Manila

1,160

Pat Cui

J. Walter Thompson Manila

1,160

14

Julia Pronstroller-Gallardo

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,030

15

Judy Buenviaje Medina

Leo Burnett Manila

1,000

16

Shayne Garcia

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

980

1

5

12

13

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


94

a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7

Planner Eileen Borromeo McCann Worldgroup Philippines

6,490 points Eileen Borromeo boasts of a wide range of experience in planning, from being with GMA New Media, Ogilvy, Bartle Bogle Hegarty, BBDO Guerrero, Harrison Communications Inc., and now with McCann Worldgroup as Head of Planning for NestlĂŠ. A creative mind matched with a good heart, Eileen also volunteers for UNHCR, PETA, World Vision Philippines and CARA Welfare Philippines.


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

95

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

CJ Jimenez

Publicis JimenezBasic

Diday Alcudia Dentsu Jayme Syfu

Planner 1

Eileen Borromeo

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

6,490

2

CJ Jimenez

Publicis JimenezBasic

2,150

3

Diday Alcudia

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

1,680

4

Adrian Quintana

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

1,130

5

Pepper Feraren

BBDO Guerrero

620

6

Carmen Antunez

Ace Saatchi & Saatchi Manila

590

Angela Thakur

Y&R Philippines

480

Cristina Buenaventura

BBDO Guerrero

480

8

Pam Garcia

J. Walter Thompson Manila

390

9

Mel Garrovillo

Ace Saatchi & Saatchi Manila

340

10

Iya Forbes

J. Walter Thompson Manila

320

11

Jason Cruz

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

310

12

Natalie Sumpaico

BBDO Guerrero

240

Loren Bade

Ace Saatchi & Saatchi Manila

180

Tom Eugenio

Keyframe, Inc.

180

Gino Borromeo

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

150

Martin Sarmenta

Ace Saatchi & Saatchi Manila

150

Vicky Malong

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

150

Jessa Bartolabac

Publicis JimenezBasic

100

Joy Santos

Leo Burnett Manila

100

7

13

14

15

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

96

C R E A T I V E

Broadcast Producer Sunny Lucero TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

10,060 points Sunny Lucero is TBWA’s Broadcast Producer. When she is not producing award-winning ads, Sunny spends time collecting bearbricks and traveling.

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7


a d o b o

C R E a Ad To I bV oE

CR RA EN AK TI IN VG ES R2 A0 N1 K7 I N G S

2

#

2

#

97

2 0 1 7

3

#

3

#

Denise JoseDenise Jose Maan Dela Cruz Maan Dela Cruz

Broadcast Broadcast Producer Producer 1

1

Sunny Lucero

Sunny Lucero

10,060

10,060

2

2

Denise Jose

Denise Jose

9,490

9,490

3

3

8,990

8,990

4

4

Jho Moya

Jho Moya

8,640

8,640

5

5

Mavic Martin

Mavic Martin

5,640

5,640

6

6

Datu Gallaga

Datu Gallaga

2,410

2,410

Ana Fe Manuel

Ana Fe Manuel

1,990

1,990

7

7Concon Limbo-Deray Concon Limbo-Deray 1,250

1,250

8

8

Maan Dela Cruz Maan Dela Cruz

Butch Garcia

Butch Garcia

970

970

970

970

9

9Jeng Gambol-Floresca Jeng Gambol-Floresca 780

780

10

10 Anj Dela Calzada Anj Dela Calzada

760

760

11

11

Charlie Saure

Charlie Saure

620

620

12

12

David Wright

David Wright

520

520

13

13 Julie Anne Lopez Julie Anne Lopez

440

440

14

14

430

430

15

15 Toffee de GuzmanToffee de Guzman

390

390

16

Lizanne 16 Padilla-Alcazaren Lizanne Padilla-Alcazaren 370

370

17

17

350

Franny Omampo Franny Omampo

Carlo Perlas

Butch Tayao

Carlo Perlas

Butch Tayao

350

For the full list of theFor adobo the full Creative list ofRankings the adobo2017, Creative go toRankings adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/ 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativeranking


a d o b o

98

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7

Print Producer Dennis Carlos TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,450 points Dennis Carlos is TBWA’s print producer, making his mark with the 2013 Nuvali Fish Feed project, 2014 Hana Water Billboard and 2015 Boysen Countless Colors. When out of the office, Dennis burns his time playing basketball and mountain-biking.


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

99

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

Sheila Villanueva Dentsu Jayme Syfu

Charlie Saure Dentsu Jayme Syfu

Print Producer 1

Dennis Carlos

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

4,450

2

Sheila Villanueva

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

970

3

Charlie Saure

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

550

4

Al Salvador

BBDO Guerrero

240

5

Nicole Calaustro

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

220

6

Ces Raquel

Publicis JimenezBasic

160

7

Cookai Talusan

Ogilvy & Mather Philippines

80

Kristine Talusan

Ogilvy & Mather Philippines

70

Rommel Francia

ASPAC

70

Abi Ramos

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

60

Bianca Bunagan

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

60

10

Rene Infante

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

40

11

Dennis Obien

Ace Saatchi & Saatchi Manila

10

8

9

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


100

a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7

Marketer Bonifacio P. Ilagan Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses and Martial Law

5,020 points Bonifacio P. Ilagan is a former political detainee during the Martial Law era. Today, he is a notable playwright, director, and fighter against tyranny and fascism.


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

101

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

Gina Lopez

ABS-CBN Foundation Inc.

Nicole Sun Fully Booked

Marketer 1

Bonifacio P. Ilagan

CARMMA

5,020

2

Gina Lopez

ABS-CBN Foundation Inc.

4,370

3

Nicole Sun

Fully Booked

4,010

4

Jayel Ladioray

Nestlé Philippines

2,710

5

Geetha Balakrsishna

Nestlé Philippines

2,480

Carla Braganza

Globe Telecom

2,060

Charly Atienza

Globe Telecom

2,060

Veca Keeler

Globe Telecom

2,060

Jenifer Sario-Perey

Yamaha Motor Philippines

1,230

Christina Lao

McDonald’s Philippines

1,000

Margot Torres

McDonald’s Philippines

1,000

9

Angelica Pago

Greenpeace Philippines

970

10

Benedict Go

Xenon Bulbs

820

11

Ria Gatmaitan

Johnson & Johnson

730

12

Paul Junio

Love Yourself Foundation

660

13

Ed Martinez

Smart Communications

510

14

Robert Sicam

Intelligent Skin Care, Inc. (Belo)

500

15

Arnel Reneido

Caltex Platinum with Techron

420

16

Nerrisa T. Esguerra

NEDA

390

6

7 8

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

102

C R E A T I V E

Production House How’s Everything?

7,390 points How’s Everything? is TBWA\SMP’s production house. It was initially established in 2014 to provide for clients that cannot accommodate production giants. Despite the challenge of financial constraints, How’s Everything? continues to be TBWA’s pride bringing awards for campaigns like How to Survive a Break Up, Feels, Snapchat Bug and Correcting History.

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

2

103

2 0 1 7

3

#

#

Filmex

Etnikolor

Production House 1

How’s Everything? / TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

7,390

2

Filmex

1,640

3

Etnikolor

970

4

Film Pabrika

860

Straight Shooters

530

Tower of Doom

530

6

Provill

470

7

Underground Logic

390

Flare Manila

240

Graph Studio Malaysia

240

9

Abracadabra

170

10

Big Boy Productions

150

5

8

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

104

C R E A T I V E

Post Production House How’s Everything?

5,290 points How’s Everything? is TBWA\SMP’s production house. It was initially established in 2014 to provide for clients that cannot accommodate production giants. Despite the challenge of financial constraints, How’s Everything? continues to be TBWA’s pride bringing awards for campaigns like How to Survive a Break Up, Feels, Snapchat Bug and Correcting History.

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

105

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

Film Pabrika

Optima Digital

Post Production House 1

How’s Everything? / TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

5,290

2

Film Pabrika

2,250

3

Optima Digital

1,040

Greenroom, Inc.

970

Upprgrnd

970

5

Tower of Doom

530

6

Flare Manila/ BBDO Guerrero

520

7

Underground Logic

390

8

Edit Cube

350

9

Block 12 Post

310

10

Graph Studio Malaysia

240

4

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

106

C R E A T I V E

Sound Production House Hit Productions

8,690 points Hit Productions is a multi-awarded audio production house with several metals from campaigns created for clients like Unilever, Coca Cola, NestlĂŠ and P&G. Aside from its work in advertising, Hit Productions has also dubbed hundreds of feature films and TV episodes since 2015.

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

107

2 0 1 7

2

#

How’s Everything?

3

#

Loudbox Studios

Sound Production House 1

Hit Productions

8,690

2

How’s Everything? / TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

5,230

3

Loudbox Studios

5,170

4

SounDesign Manila

1,090

5

Like A Boss Studio Malaysia

240

6

Viva Communications

140

Big Sync

40

Wonder Collab Studio

40

Pixeleyes Multimedia

30

Cutting Edge

10

Manila Man

10

Primetime Creatives

10

7 8

9

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

108

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7

Advertiser

The Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses to Malacañang or CARMMA

5,020 points The Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses to Malacañang or CARMMA is envisioned as a campaign network encompassing martial law victims, civil libertarians, peace & freedom advocates and militant groups which have their roots in the anti-Marcos/antidictatorship movement of the late 70s and early 80s that resulted in the historic 1986 EDSA People Power Uprising that toppled the dictator and led to the exile of the entire Marcos family. CARMMA aims to torpedo the VP aspiration of Bongbong Marcos through public information and mass actions that will hound Marcos wherever he goes — all the time trying to ensure maximum tri- and new media exposure.


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

109

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

ABS-CBN Foundation

Fully Booked

Advertiser 1

Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses to Malacañang (CARMMA)

5,020

2

ABS-CBN Foundation

4,370

3

Fully Booked

4,010

4

Nestlé Philippines

2,580

5

Globe Telecom

2,070

6

Yamaha Motor Philippines

1,110

7

McDonald’s Philippines

990

8

Greenpeace Philippines

990

9

Johnson & Johnson

920

10

Xenon

820

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

110

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7

Campaign Correcting History

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno ADVERTISER The Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses to Malacañang or CARMMA AGENCY

122,800 points Correcting History On Sept. 1972, The Marcos dictatorship declared martial law, igniting country’s bloodiest era. A generation later, Millennials would support VP frontrunner Marcos Jr. Many were ignorant about martial law because textbooks were never revised. CARMMA, a community of martial law survivors, disguised themselves as reporters to reveal the truth to Millenials. A video was aired and polls taken after showed Marcos’ numbers dropping, eventually leading to one of the closest vice presidential races, which he lost. Soon after, a new curriculum that included martial law as early as grade 2 was announced.


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

111

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

Dirty Watercolor

Lives

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno advertiser ABS-CBN Foundation Inc.

agency

agency

McCann Worldgroup Philippines advertiser Fully Booked

Campaign 1

Correcting History

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses to Malacañang (CARMMA)

122,800

2

Dirty Watercolor

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

ABS-CBN Foundation Inc.

87,400

3

Lives

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

Fully Booked

66,950

4

Rogue One Mask

Publicis JimenezBasic

Globe

40,770

5

Dim Dads

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

Nestlè / Maggi Magic Sarap

38,960

6

Dead Whale

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

Greenpeace Philippines

32,010

7

Headlight Road Signs

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

Yamaha Motor Philippines

23,130

8

The Boy Who Loves to Study

Leo Burnett Manila

McDonald’s Philippines

17,120

9

Clairvoyance

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

Xenon Bulbs

13,120

10

#staynegatHIVe

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

Love Yourself Foundation

12,090

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

112

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

Agency TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

10,680 points TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno The original disruption agency is known for its creative or out-of-the box applications to campaigns— often applied to causes close to their heart— whether its environmental preservation, clean air/water, or humane treatment of native cats and dogs.

2 0 1 7


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

2

113

2 0 1 7

3

#

#

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

Agency 1

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

10,680

2

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

7,910

3

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

4,720

4

Publicis JimenezBasic

2,690

5

Leo Burnett Manila

1,860

6

BBDO Guerrero

1,280

J. Walter Thompson Manila

1,280

7

Y&R Philippines

1,070

8

Ace Saatchi & Saatchi Manila

800

9

Ogilvy & Mather Philippines

790

10

DDB Philippines

650

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


a d o b o

114

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

2 0 1 7

Young Creatives Ram Mendoza & Vince Belen TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

9,460 points

9,460 points

Ram Mendoza has a decorated shelf with trophies from Cannes, LIA, One Show, Adfest and Spikes. Still hungry to spark creativity, Ram is now on a pause from advertising and is currently studying in London Film School.

Vince Belen is a creative, actor, musician and editor in one. He started as an editor at TBWA\ Santiago Mangada Puno. Before that, he was an intern of TEN17P, and participated in the making of renowned indie film, “Dagitab.” In college, he composed #NoFilter for the film Ms. Edited. If he’s not busy in the creative world, he hits the gym or the beach.


a d o b o

C R E A T I V E

R A N K I N G S

115

2 0 1 7

2

3

#

#

Kevin Gabon

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Kiko De Dios

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Young Creatives Ram Mendoza

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Creative Director

9,460

Vince Belen

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Director of Photography

9,460

2

Kevin Gabon

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Editor

8,960

3

Kiko De Dios

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Editor

5,180

4

Matthew Cruz

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Editor

4,540

5

Nikko Pascua

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Art Director

4,450

6

Leslie Cua

J. Walter Thompson Manila

Copywriter

1,600

7

Paula Molina

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

Copywriter

1,480

8

Sofia Tawasil

McCann Worldgroup Philippines

Copywriter

1,370

9

Therese Liboro

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

Copywriter

1,290

10

Albert Millar

J. Walter Thompson Manila

Copywriter

1,130

11

Ryan Caidic

TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno

Copywriter

1,020

12

Soleil Badenhop

Dentsu Jayme Syfu

Copywriter

990

1

THE ADOBO CREATIVE RANKINGS IS A JOINT EFFORT OF:

For the full list of the adobo Creative Rankings 2017, go to adobomagazine.com/creativerankings2017/


www.pwc.com/ph www.pwc.com/ph

To build trusted To build trusted relationships relationships and work with and work with clients to create clients to create the value they’re the value they’re looking for looking for

Building Building trust, trust, making making an an impact impact Solving Solving business business and and societal societal challenges challenges At PwC, our purpose is to build trust in society and solve At PwC, our purpose We’re is to build trust in important problems. a network ofsociety firms inand 158solve important problems. We’re a people network of firms in 158 countries with over 250,000 who are committed to countries with over 250,000 people who are committed to delivering quality in assurance, advisory and tax services. delivering quality assurance, advisory services.us Find out more andin tell us what matters toand youtax by visiting Find out more and tell us what matters to you by visiting us at www.pwc.com. at www.pwc.com.

© 2018 Isla Lipana & Co. All rights reserved. PwC refers to the Philippine member firm, and may sometimes refer to the PwC network. Each member firm is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details. © 2018 Isla Lipana & Co. All rights reserved. PwC refers to the Philippine member firm, and may sometimes refer to the PwC network. Each member firm is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.


ISSUE 75 / MOBILE

THE WORK The creative industry’s inner workings revealed.

DECONSTRUCTING CREATIVITY 118 Dead Whale

BANG FOR THE BUCK 122 Palau Pledge

OPINION 126 Mark Tungate: Cars are no longer stars RAW 130 Terence Eduarte THEN AND NOW 134 Evolution of Mobile Phones

CREATIVE REVIEW 136 ADFEST 2018 Campaigns by Farrokh Madon EXHIBIT 142 BoyP and his Bonsai


THE WORK / D ECO N S T R UC T IN G C R E AT IVIT Y

A Whale of an Idea A “Dead Whale” brings a wave of awareness for the fight against plastic pollution in the oceans WORDS Nadz

MOBI L E ISSU E

118

TITLE ‘Dead Whale’ AGENCY Dentsu Jayme Syfu CLIENT Greenpeace Philippines

Ruiz

WITH REPORTING BY Jason

Inocencio


Behind the Campaign The “Dead Whale” idea was conceived late 2016, when the Dentsu Jayme Syfu team came across the dead whale incident in Davao. “Late last year, we thought of the 'dead whale' project after hearing news about a dead whale spotted on a beach here in the Philippines,” shared Dentsu Jayme Syfu Chairmom and Chief Creative Officer Merlee Jayme. “As we did more research, we found out that there were more unreported cases of beached whales in the Philippines alone. It was perfect timing when we met with Greenpeace about their ASEAN effort against ocean pollution.” “We showed them our 'whale of an idea' and they loved it instantly,” she continues. “The only difficulty was the short deadline to make it to ASEAN week. To make it happen, there were a lot of selfless people who helped the team non-stop.” Asked whose idea it was to create the installation, Jayme noted, “The team led by our Creative Director Biboy Royong created the idea and designed it completely made of plastic trash.” As for the actual process of creating the whale away from prying eyes, Jayme bares that they had a limited window to work with. “We only had five days to actually work on it,” she relays. “We had nine carpenters and

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Background On the morning of May 11, 2017, locals woke up to the sight of a massive dead blue whale washed ashore on the beach of Naic, Cavite. The whale was bleeding and spewing out its innards as it laid in a gruesome heap on the beach. But upon closer inspection, the whale was entirely made of plastic waste. Blue, black, grey, and white garbage bags and sacks made up the whale’s body, with black, white, red strings and straws for the skin and red-colored plastics and nets for the bloody sections. The innards coming out of the whale’s mouth were more plastic wastes - bags, containers, bottles, sachets, and more. The “Dead Whale” quickly became the talk of social media and the Internet, even reaching news programs of both local and international media networks. It was finally revealed that the plastic sculpture was the work of environmental group Greenpeace Philippines, in partnership with creative agency Dentsu Jayme Syfu. This “dead whale” signified real cases of whales and other sea creatures dying from plastic pollution all over the world. In the first quarter of 2016, more than 30 dead sperm whales were found on the shores of Europe. In late 2016, another one was found in the Philippines in Samal, Davao. The problem continues to persist today. The death of this particular whale in Naic, Cavite was timely as the Philippines hosted the 2017 ASEAN Summit from May 8 to 12. Greenpeace Philippines and Dentsu Jayme Syfu took the opportunity to send a loud and clear message to ASEAN leaders to take concrete measures against plastic pollution and environmental degradation.


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craftsmen working on it, between shifts. We adjusted some details of the design based on their pace. We made sure the plastic whale would convince people that it was a real dead whale – in size and texture. We created this from a hidden warehouse near the beach. Greenpeace helped us secure a place and the permit for the beach. It had to be a relevant place where pollution was really a current problem. In the early morning before sunrise, this was carefully put on the shore. People in the area were really shocked when they woke up.” “We mounted it on the shores of Naic, Cavite, a beach connected to Manila Bay near where the ASEAN meeting venue was held. Greenpeace wanted it on that specific date to make an impact on the ASEAN leaders. It truly did. Besides the social media impressions, TV news coverage both local and international, it even landed the front page,” Jayme added. Upon mounting, it didn't take long for the news of this “dead whale” to spread like wildfire online. “It was unveiled at 6:00 AM of May 11,” Jayme chronicled. “A few hours later, it shocked the internet. It reached over 100 countries online while media oufits kept on coming to Naic, Cavite that day to cover the “dead” whale. The campaign has won more than just media mileage. The “Dead Whale” has also a Gold Lion in Cannes and a roster of accolades from the New York Festivals, One Show, ADFEST, Spikes, the Asia-Pacific Tambuli Awards, the Kidlat Awards, and the adobo Design Awards. But more than the awards, the team celebrated the fact that the campaign had made its mark on audiences around the world. Greenpeace Philippines Media Campaigner Angelica Pago said, “This is a new milestone for communications work not just for NGOs like us but also for the movement, ‘Break Free from Plastics,’ of

different organizations seeking to end plastic pollution.” She added, “Greenpeace has long been working on the campaign against plastics but for a time, we laid low on our efforts to focus on other work. But when we were approached by Dentsu Jayme Syfu with this idea, it was an opportune time because we were just restarting our work on plastics. We immediately grabbed the opportunity to work with them, and we believe it was a very fruitful partnership not just for the agency but also for Greenpeace and other organizations that are taking up the fight against single-use plastics.

CREDITS Advertiser: Greenpeace Philippines Agency: Dentsu Jayme Syfu Chief Creative Officer: Merlee Jayme Creative Director: Biboy Royong/Paolo Morato Art Director: Blane Rosales/ Biboy Royong Copywriter: Soleil Badenhop Account Manager: Jam de Guzman/ Chinkey Llave/Shayne Garcia Account Executive: Julia Pronstroller-Gallardo Digital Manager: Tabbi Tomas/Paul Reyes Digital Creative: Wayne Dayauon/ Ruben Hamahiga dela Cruz/ Pedro Chuidian Production House: Etnikolor Director of Photography: Ruben Hamahiga dela Cruz Broadcast Producer: Butch Garcia/Lester Parulan/JP Campos Editor: Erin Hipolito/Jaymar Carinan/Berto Abenido/Leslie Tan Print Producer: Sheila Villanueva Post-Production House: Upprgrnd Sound Production House: Hit Productions Marketer: Angelica Pago

AWARDS SUMMARY

2017 SPIK ES ASI A

2018 NEW YOR K’S A ME AWA RDS

2018 CA NNES LION

• • • • •

• • • •

• •

Gold Spike in Media Silver Spike in Outdoor Silver Spike in PR Bronze Spike in Direct

Bronze APAC Effie Awards Best of Show APAC Platinum Award APAC

2018 A DFEST

Gold Media Lotus ADFEST Effectiveness Lotus ADFEST

2018 A DOBO DESIGN AWA RDS ASI A

• • •

Gold aDAA in Environmental/Spatial Gold aDAA in Outdoor Gold aDAA in Production Design

Grand Prix Tambuli for Gold Tambuli in Best Brand Idea for Good

2018 NEW YOR K A DV ERTISING FESTI VA LS

Gold Tambuli in Craft

Outdoor, Media & Digital

• • •

• •

Silver Lion for Design Lions

Green Award APAC

Bronze Spike in Design

2018 ASI A PACIFIC TA MBULI AWA RDS

Gold Lion for Outdoor Lions

Gold Tambuli in Care for the Environment, Humanity & Culture

Third Prize in Best Use of Media: Public Service Outdoor

2018 K IDL AT AWA RDS

Gold Kidlat in Outdoor


ADVERTORIAL

Game-changing convenience from the RWM Mobile Companion By Mary Jane Dejada

R The updated Mobile Companion is designed to enhance the overall customer experience at RWM - JAY PADUA

RWM Director for Digital Channels

esorts World Manila (RWM), the Philippines’ first integrated resort, is bringing the concept of seamless integration to your fingertips with its latest updates on the RWM Mobile Companion app, which can be downloaded for free on the AppStore and GooglePlay. Along with a newlyenhanced RWM website, the RWM Mobile Companion will give users a host of benefits. Serving as a personal pocket concierge with its easy-to-navigate interface, they can discover the latest RWM promotions, dining spots, Newport Performing Arts Theater (NPAT) shows, shuttle services schedules, Newport Mall merchants, and movie screenings at Newport Cinemas. The RWM Mobile Companion allows users to purchase their Newport Cinemas movie tickets, including for the newlyrenovated Ultra Cinema 1, directly through the app. With just a few taps, they will receive a booking confirmation and QR code that serves as their virtual ticket allowing them to proceed straight to the cinema entrance where it will simply be scanned by an usher. Guests can also purchase their Newport Cinema tickets

through the RWM website or through blockbusterseats. com, which also powers online bookings for other Megaworld Lifestyle Mall cinemas such as Uptown Cinemas, Lucky Chinatown Cinemas, Venice Cineplex, and Southwoods Cinemas. “The updated Mobile Companion is designed to enhance the overall customer experience at RWM,” says RWM Director for Digital Channels Jay Padua. “Aside from the convenience of early reservations and cashless payments, moviegoers no longer have to line up at the box office when they watch at Newport Cinemas – all they need to do is pay, scan, and watch.” The updates and upgrades to Ultra Cinema 1 guarantee the most luxurious movie viewing experience possible. Having once been named as one of the most beautiful cinemas in the world by the online magazine Architecture and Design, Ultra Cinema 1 features personal butler service, free-flowing popcorn and soda fountain drinks, and semi-enclosed leather reclining seats equipped with usb ports and LED lamps for viewing privacy and convenience. RWM Mobile Companion app users also get priority updates and special deals

on RWM events, such as Run With Me 2018 – RWM’s annual celebrity charity fun run which will be held on August 26. Interested runners who register directly through the app can avail of a 20% discount on joining fees for all race categories for the entire registration period. Run With Me began in 2016 as an employee fun run for RWM and its partners. It has since been expanded to include members of the public and now has partner charities: YesPinoy Foundation, HERO Foundation, Empowering Brilliant Minds Foundation, EPCALM Adult Leukemia Foundation of the Philippines, and RightStart Foundation. The special discount is exclusive for RWM Mobile Companion registrants only. Regular registration rates will apply for registrations coursed through www.runwithme.ph or select Olympic Village branches in Metro Manila until August 17. Experience the convenience of the RWM Mobile Companion app for the latest offers and special events in the integrated lifestyle hub. For more information, visit www. rwmanila.com or call the Tourist/Visitor Hotline at (632) 908-8833.


THE WORK / BA NG F OR T H E BUC K

A Pledge of, for, and by Palau’s Children The hope behind the campaign is to preserve the vital incoming economic value of tourism and create a better understanding of the small changes that tourists can do to help preserve the environment. WORDS Jyrmie

Eisenheart Ladiero

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TITLE ‘Palau Pledge’ AGENCY Host/Havas CLIENT Palau Legacy Project

Background In the stunningly beautiful Micronesian nation of Palau, tourists have been responsible for a wide range of environmental problems, from polluting and damaging its famous coral reefs to poaching its tropical wildlife. It was a daunting problem distilled into one question: Can you continue to welcome tourists while simultaneously protecting your nation from them? The answer, created in partnership with Australian agency Host/Havas, was the “Palau Pledge,” which requires all the island nation’s visitors to sign—right in their passports—an agreement not to damage or exploit the natural resources. The idea was the brainchild of Laura Clarke, and three other marketers and Palau residents, including Nanae

Singeo, Jennifer Koskelin-Gibbons and Nicolle Fagan, who realized something had to be done to protect the ancient culture. Both written by and addressed to the children of Palau, the pledge is poetic and powerful in its simplicity: Children of Palau, I take this Pledge, To preserve and protect your beautiful and unique island home. I vow to tread lightly, act kindly, and explore mindfully. I shall not take what is not given. I shall not harm what does not harm me. The only footprints I shall leave are those that will wash away.


The Brief In 2015, new tourist routes created a huge upsurge in tourist numbers to Palau. As this happened, the Palau Legacy Project saw first-hand that the infrastructure was not set up to handle that bulk of visitors as drinking water was limited and sanitation ill-equipped for such numbers. Tourism made up of 85% of the country’s GDP, so it was important to maintain the industry, but it needed to be more sustainable. So, the Palau Legacy Project approached Host/ Havas to help them change the behavior of the 160,000 annual tourists to the island nation. Host/Havas Executive Creative Director Seamus Higgins was the lead on the project. He claims the success of the Palau Pledge comes back to the unusual nature of the brief. “It is something that doesn’t really fit within the normal realms of advertising, but that is because it was not a normal brief at all – it was a genuine problem that needed solving with creative thinking.”

Results This initiative that is changing immigration policy goes on to win three Grand Prix at Cannes Lions, including the coveted Titanium title. It also took out the sought-after Black Pencil at D&AD, as well as a slate of other gongs at global and local award shows this year. The initiative has been backed by activists and celebrities, from Leonardo DiCaprio to The Rolling Stones, and recently received $60,000 in funding from the Australian Government to back the next stage in its development. It has also put recently merged Host/Havas on the map and helped them be named out Agency of the Year at AWARD Awards this year.

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Pioneering Solution With this unusual brief in hand, Host/Havas set to work researching their target market of tourists, primarily from China, South Korea, and Japan. It became clear that there were vastly different cultural approaches to travelling among these nations. But the team realized that the common ground was to appeal to tourists’ humanity: “Our starting point was that we need to change people’s behavior. To do that we had to make a genuine human connection with them,” explains Higgins, “We had to make sure that whatever we did, every single tourist would be forced to make that connection.” They came up with the concept of ‘for those who follow;’ by asking visitors to do something for Palau’s children, they ensured the emotional, human cut-through they wanted. Higgins explains, “Suddenly it became very human. Nobody could deny wanting to leave a better world for our children. That’s shared in every single culture.” They set about looking at elements of institutional architecture that could be used. They considered using the nation’s currency, as was leveraging the name of the country itself, but eventually the act of passing through customs won out. It would ensure that no tourist could enter Palau without encountering the campaign.

Host/Havas ECD Seamus Higgins said winning the D&AD Black Pencil was a career milestone, having had the award as his computer screensaver for the last 10 years. But beyond winning metal, the creative said he is most proud of the positive environmental impact The Palau Pledge has driven. “The awards are amazing and it is the industry's way of recognizing the quality of our work, but the real opportunity is to work on a brief that makes a genuine difference,” Higgins said. “All the problems The Palau Pledge addresses are critical to the survival of future generations of Palau and we can see, at least anecdotally, we are really shifting behaviors.” Host/Havas knew the vow had to be powerful to attract attention, especially with no media budget to fall back on if its PR strategy did not cut through. This is why the pledge - poetic and powerful in its simplicity – was written by and addressed to the children of Palau.


THE WORK / OPINION

CREDITS

INFLIGHT FILM PRODUCTION Production Company: Yukfoo

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PALAU LEGACY PROJECT

Director: ROYGBIV (Evan Viera and Tommy Wooh)

Chairperson: First Lady of Palau, Debbie Remengesau

Producer and Creative Director: Alan Dickson

Co-founder: Laura Clarke, Nicolle Fagan, Jennifer

Animation Producer: Amy Neave

Koskelin Gibbons, & Nanae Singeo

DOP: Andy Commis

Stategist: Vaughn Allen

Drone Footage: Chris Lansell – Flying Dragon

HOST/HAVAS

CONCEPT FILM

Executive Creative Directors: Seamus Higgins & Stu Turner

Production Company: The Pool Collective

Creative Directors: Paul Bootlis & Gustavo Vampre

Director and Photographer: Danny Eastwood

Digital Creative Director: Josh Bryer

Camera Operator: Oliver Quirk

Senior Art Directors: Gustavo Vampre & Stu Alexander Senior Copy Writers: Paul Bootlis & Daniel Fryer

PHOTOGRAPHY

Head of Design: Darren Cole

Production Company: The Pool Collective

Senior Designer: Nic Adamovich

Executive Producer: Cameron Gray

Digital Designer: Dylan Reid

Photographer: Sean Izzard

Designers: Michael Macgregor & Serlina Wong

Camera Assist: Sarah England

Senior Finished Artist/Designer: Pip Snelling

National Geographic: Enric Sala

Client Business Director: Alex Ball Account Manager: Maggie de Goede

MUSIC/SOUND

Social Director: Mark McKissock

Sound Studio: Song Zu

Senior Digital Strategist: Shea Warnes

Sound Designer: Abigail Sie

TV & Video Editor: Beau Simmons

Composer: Jed Kurzel

Senior Broadcast Producer: Ros Payne Senior Print Producer: Thea Clausen

RED AGENCY

Senior Digital Producer: Andrew Sambell

Head of Consumer: Adam Freedman

Digital Producer: Megan Evans

Senior Account Managers: Katie Lettice & Jackie Holt

UX & Design Director: Adam Shutler

Senior Account Executive: Andrea Philip & Caroline Jeffery

UX: Rhys Hobbs

Account Executive: Sarah Dillon & Madeline Mullins

AWARDS SUMMARY

CA NNES LIONS 2018

• • • •

Grand Prix in Titanium Grand Prix in Sustainable Development Goals Grand Prix in Direct Gold in Brand Experience and Activation


THE WORK / OPINION


MARK TUNGATE

Cars are no longer stars

Mark Tungate is the editorial director of the Epica Awards and the author of

The Escape Industry: How Iconic and Innovative Brands Built the Travel Business (Kogan Page).

Thanks to innovations in urban mobility, car ownership feels so last century, argues Mark Tungate. Tungate

A

ILLUSTRATION Vnita

Sohal

round the time of writing, millions of French people are climbing into their cars and hitting the road for their annual mass migration to sunnier climes. Vacation season is a national event, with cautionary traffic updates on the radio and images of gridlock on TV, just as the subsequent return – or rentrée – is more significant than the actual new year. The packed roads and shimmering ribbons of automotive steel do not concern me, because I would never travel that way. I have not owned a car for years. I am a train person. In fact, I believe a long journey by train is one of the last civilized experiences in a world that has begun to seriously lack them. But while I can understand the practicality of using a car to get from point A to a distant point B – particularly if you have a big family and lots of luggage – car ownership in the city is beyond me. Cars are costly to run and and add to the ambient pollution. There is nowhere to park and there are plenty of other ways of getting around town. These days, I’m so unused to driving that I would probably be a danger behind the wheel. As a friend of mine recently put it: “Every time I drive a car, it has been two years since the last time.” So, no. In the city, I take the subway – or the metro, or the tube – which is good for reading and people watching. Occasionally a bus. When I am feeling wealthy, a taxi or an Uber. There are a number of other options, too: for a connoisseur of urban transit, this is a golden age. Take bicycles, for instance. When I was younger, you had to buy a bike and chain it up somewhere when you were not using it – until someone inevitably

snipped through the chain. But now, every major city has a bike-sharing scheme that enables you to scoot around on two wheels with relative ease. Other innovations are coming. In Los Angeles, a new service called Bird has seen flocks of dockless electric scooters appearing on the streets. Users download the Bird app, which indicates the location of the nearest parked scooter. When they find it, they unlock it with the app and whizz off. On arrival, they simply lock the scooter again. A ride costs $1 plus 15 cents a minute. Bird is the brainchild of Travis VanderZanden, the former COO of Lyft, not to mention VP of global driver growth at Uber. He’s currently battling with the Los Angeles city authorities, who claim his scooters are hazardous for pedestrians and dangerous for riders. Meanwhile, he has secured US$150 million in funding. Want to bet on who’s going to win? Los Angeles is actually an interesting indicator for the future of urban mobility. For years, the city was famous for being almost impossible to get around if you did not own a car. The situation even inspired Ray Bradbury’s short story, The Pedestrian, in which walking is a suspicious activity. But Uber has changed all that. Car ownership is no longer obligatory. As far back as 2014, an article in The New York Times reported: “Untethered from their vehicles, Angelenos are suddenly free to drink, party and walk places.” Back here in Paris, dockless rental bikes have been popping up on sidewalks in an echo of the Bird model. Not everyone is enamoured of them – the apps are apparently a bit glitchy – but it shows that the door for disruptive transit schemes is now truly open.

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WORDS Mark


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One well-known Paris scheme was the Autolib model, under which customers could pick up an electric car from one docking station and leave it at another. That service has since been abandoned as impractical – but Renault has stepped in to promise a dockless fleet of “free-floating” cars, also along the lines of Bird. Once driverless cars become common, it’s not too much of a stretch to imagine fleets of “robot taxis” shuttling us around town. No doubt they will have builtin entertainment (and therefore advertising) systems too. So where does that leave private car ownership? Plummeting, according to certain reports. Indeed some believe car ownership will drop by as much as 30% between now and 2030. Others say that the irrational aspects of car ownership – status, fashion, perceived convenience – will keep sales afloat. The fact is that most automotive giants are considering participation in some kind of ride-sharing scheme, or putting in place systems that will allow consumers to lease rather than buy cars. I’m sure that, in the near future, some people will still want to own a car. But I’m equally sure that I would not be among them.

CAR OWNERSHIP IN THE CITY IS BEYOND ME. CARS ARE COSTLY TO RUN AND MAINTAIN AND ADD TO THE AMBIENT POLLUTION


THE WORK / R AW

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Trading Secrets with Terence Eduarte Young creative Terence Eduarte manifests and defines creativity through his body of work– both professional and personal.

PHOTO Andrew

Escudero Cardona

W

hat is creativity? That’s a question that causes people, especially creatives, to scratch their heads in apparent uncertainty. Indeed, creativity is a term too broad, a concept that can be perceived in more ways than one. For illustrator, creative director, and up and coming young creative Terence Eduarte, however, all it takes to answer the mind-boggling question is to look at creativity in two ways -- in the professional and the personal setting.

"CREATIVITY OUTSIDE ADVERTISING IS SOMETHING THAT FULFILLS YOU. IT MAY BE MUSIC, ART, PHOTOGRAPHY, OR ANYTHING —WHATEVER TYPE OF WORK YOU PRODUCE, IT’S SOMETHING THAT YOU’RE PROUD OF.

PROFESSIONAL For one, creativity for Eduarte -- through the lens of a professional -- is the ability to connect to one’s chosen audience. Eduarte has been dabbling on creatives since his early days. He took up advertising in the University of Santo Tomas during his college days, and upon graduation, took on a graphic designer job. A year after, he entered the advertising industry and has been in it ever since. He started his advertising stint in TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno as an art director, developing campaigns for various clients including Smart Communications, Del Monte, KFC, and Bench. One of his memorable works with the agency is the Hugot Series, a video campaign for Smart Communications featuring a series of two-minute videos chronicling the integral roles smartphones have served in the lives of millennials, as a way for the brand to reconnect with the young market. The campaign has been lauded for its simplicity and its ingenious understanding of the needs of the millennials. With that, it brought recognition to the agency -- Eduarte included -- when it garnered a Film Merit during the One Show 2017, among other awards. After almost three years, he left the agency to pursue a freelance illustration and visual artist stint. With this, he has worked closely with various brands such as Walmart, WIRED Magazine, Stylist Magazine

UK and Newsweek Magazine, and had his individual works had been seen by the eyes of the world. It was not long when he came back to the advertising industry, joining the creative roster of NuWorks Interactive Labs as its associate creative director and Head of Design. Through the agency, he has produced work for clients like Jollibee, Burger King, Unilever, and Nestle. Eduarte shares a particular way of doing creative masterpieces at NuWorks. The creatives in the agency are divided into two: the Core Team, who is in charge of coming up with campaigns for their clients; and the Reactors, who are the specialists that serve as the support group for the whole creative team. Designers, editors, and the like comprise the latter. “It’s exciting because we are not just boxed into one or a few brands,” Eduarte shares. “That enables us to work on every brand the company is handling.” That is one certain way of fostering creativity in a professional setting for Eduarte, which involves coming up with ways to establish a connection with consumers. “You don’t necessarily have to connect with yourself when doing creative work for clients,” Terence notes. “There will be times that you do stuff that you do not necessarily relate to, but are still viable concepts for your campaigns.”

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WORDS Christa


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Eduarte's project 100 Days of Secrets gave people an avenue to practice empathy

PERSONAL That is where Eduarte points out the personal aspect of creativity -- the method of connecting with yourself through your work. “Creativity outside advertising is something that fulfills you,” Eduarte imparts. “It may be music, art, photography, or anything—whatever type of work you produce, it is something that you are proud of.” One Google of Terence Eduarte leads to an overwhelming amount of results pointing to a single thing: his 100 Days of Secrets project. Inspired from the 100-Day Project by globally renowned artist Elle Luna in which one commits to doing a particular thing every day for 100 days, 100 Days of Secrets put Eduarte’s illustration skills to a test as he created portraits for strangers in exchange for their secrets.

“I did not have a full-time job when I came up with the project, so I was looking for something to occupy myself,” Eduarte recounts. He then came across Luna’s project and thought of doing portraits of people for 100 days. However, doing portraits would entail receiving a lot of requests, so he had to come up with something to filter them out. “That is when I thought, why not do portraits for people in exchange of their secrets?” Eduarte certainly did not expect where 100 Days of Secrets ended, which came to the point of getting featured in global publications like HuffPost, Metro UK, Creative Boom, and Design Taxi, as well as getting exhibited in ASPACE Philippines late last year. “I first thought it was just light and silly, because I initially did it with friends who shared shallow


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Freelancing has allowed Eduarte to collaborate with brands and cultivate his love for painting

and funny secrets. Then it got recognized, and more people submitted their own,” he shares. “I felt that there was actually something special about the project when I received secrets from people in other countries like Japan and China -- some of them even submitted through their own language.” With the passage of time and the growing reputation of the project came an onslaught of messages from strangers who have revealed to Eduarte something they have not shared with other people. “Some secrets were so heavy that I got drained emotionally,” he says. “For instance, I received suicidal thoughts and other very dark experiences, and I did not know what to say. I was afraid I might say something that would make it worse.”

Yet Eduarte came through, with the idea that 100 Days of Secrets had provided people an avenue for reprieve and a chance to practice empathy. It even helped him in more ways than one. In an interview with ASPACE, he reveals how, every day for 100 days, his perspective changed through each secret he received and how he allowed it to affect him. There are more things to come for the budding young creative. While he’s translating industry solutions into creative work, he is cultivating his love for painting, which has already gained traction in the community. He is also working on his new illustration project Shift, and is constantly collaborating with groups in and out of the country.


THE WORK / THEN & N OW

Mobile, No boundaries Time hop the mobile era from two-way radios to Android phones WORDS Beng

Ragon

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M

illennials and the Generation Z will find it hard to imagine a connected life without mobile data. But those who experienced early mobile phones known as Zero Generation will know. Those days may be gone, but they paved the way to the mobile technology we are used to today — limitless. Unraveling the story between the then and now of mobile technology offers an interesting glimpse of how fast this concept of mobility has dominated the world, our personal and private lives included.   From two-way radios to multifunctional gadgets, the mobile phone has evolved to be the most indispensable technology ever invented in the last 20 years. With a handy phone, the need to respond to the many demands of today’s unstoppable mobile race became inevitable. Mobile features are insanely evolving at a pace that prompts users to be more agile, smarter and highly creative. Who would have thought that a sleek and lightweight smartphone that you can easily slip inside your sling bag has originated from a 1.5-kilogram device? Back

in 1973, Motorola engineer Martin Cooper, dubbed as the father of cellular phones, made the first call in public from that heavyweight cellular phone. Fast forward to this social media generation, a mere cellphone has become everyone’s super gadget that allows one to do more than just say hello. From a single press to countless navigations, mobile phones have transcended from a chunky piece of invention to a savvy piece of commodity. Let’s do a “time hop” and revisit key milestones that have shaped our ever-evolving mobile lifestyle. In 1983, Motorola launched the first-ever commercial portable phone DynaTAC 8000X retailed at a staggering price of USD4,000. It was a handheld phone weighing less than a kilo but with prominent bulky features. Capable of 30-minute talk time and 8-hour battery life, this first commercial cellular phone can store up to 30 contacts, which at that time was a huge deal. Just when we thought nothing could get smarter than that, the concept of cellphone meets computer propelled the birth of the proverbial smartphone. It was in 1993 when Bellsouth and IBM announced their creation of


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the Simon personal communicator phone, the world’s very first smart phone. With so much personality, Simon impressed with its features like a pager, an e-mail, a stylus, a complete keypad and a calendar. As 2000 ushered in, camera phones came into play as one of the most amazing breakthroughs in smartphone evolution. Nokia 7650 and the Sanyo SPC-5300 became the faces of the first phones with built-in cameras commercially released in 2002. In 2003, the world came to know the first integrated phone via the sleek and savvy BlackBerry viewed as the ever-reliable business phone. This device amazingly integrates email, texting, web browser and the BlackBerry Messenger service. In 2007, the whole world became so excited when Apple launched its very first iPhone deemed far more revolutionary and exceptional from the rest. It has the sophistication of three products combined into one handheld device: a mobile phone, an iPod and a wireless communication device. With the popularity of mobile photography, camera phones have evolved with sophisticated features with up to 12 megapixels and the ability to

shoot in wide angle and telephoto. The functionalities that were once limited to DSLR cameras are now readily accessible through dual-camera phones. Advanced functionalities are integrated like video capabilities, touchscreen and built-in software for image editing and retouching. Other interesting features include low-light functionality, super-fast autofocus, and background blurring of a scene. Face and voice recognition features are among the most advanced methods to secure authentication for mobile phones. From selfie to animoji, the level of fun with smartphones has leveled up with animated emojis that respond to facial expressions. Another proof of how immensely mobile phone features are evolving is the introduction of 4K videos. This functionality offers higher image definition and larger projection designed for digital cinema because it has 4,000 pixels horizontal resolution. Mobile payments through Touchpay have also been widely embraced because of its convenience and practicality of paying cashless.


THE WORK / CREAT IVE RE VIE W

FARROKH MADON

For the Creative Review of selected campaigns from the ADFEST 2018, adobo tapped J. Walter Thompson Singapore's Farrokh Madon to share his insights: These days, it’s almost as if our minds are on rollerblades 24/7. Our minds are constantly racing from our emails to WhatsApp to Facebook, Instagram and the gazillion attractions of the Internet. For a brand’s message to stick, we have to catch attention from the very first second to the very end. If not, our minds go meandering around cyberspace a lot faster than a space rocket. Keeping this in mind here are my thoughts on the work showcased here.

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TITLE: ‘Chop-Chop 2.0' AGENCY: Amber China CLIENT: Ammeloo

Eye-catching visuals meet good Art Direction to create stopping power. They would make a difference at point-of-sale in a department store.

TITLE: 'Pedigree Selfiestix' AGENCY: Colenso BBDO, Auckland CLIENT: Pedigree

Cute. 100% mobile friendly. Woof. Woof.


TITLE: ‘COGY Wheelchair’ AGENCY: TBWA\HAKUHODO, Japan CLIENT: COGY / TESS

TITLE: ‘Green Light Run’ AGENCY: TBWA\HAKUHODO Inc., Japan CLIENT: Pure Boost / Adidas

One of the best examples of a big insight meeting big data to make a ginormous impact. Wish I had done it. It’s the best piece of work here by a mile.

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Long form content is a temptation for Creatives liberated from the 30/15 secs confines of TV. But staring at a small mobile screen is not fun. You need to engage from the start. Unfortunately, this film does not. The unique aspect of why this pedal wheelchair is better than a motorized one, is hidden until after 1 minute in this 2 minute 23 seconds film. Sorry.


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TITLE: ‘Hahon Hohaho Hie’ AGENCY: Beacon/Leo Burnett Tokyo CLIENT: McDonald's Japan

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Refreshing approach to create talk value through a hard to pronounce name. Proves that a good idea is agnostic of media channels.

TITLE: ‘Love Thy Neighbor’ AGENCY: TBWA\Santiago Mangada Puno CLIENT: Kapisanan ng mga Brodkaster ng Pilipinas

I love this film. It gets you from the get go until the surprising revelation in the end. There is no debate over length of content when the idea is great. Lovely way to get across a message of racial harmony. Two thumbs up to the Creative team.


TITLE: ‘Made Possible by Melbourne’ AGENCY: McCann Melbourne CLIENT: University of Melbourne

TITLE: ‘Now or Never’ AGENCY: FP7/CAI, Egypt CLIENT: Orange

Oldies singing about World Cup goals before they kick the bucket. Now that has got to score. Good fun.

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Showcasing great inventions is a brief that would make a Creative drool. The executions though, from what the video shows, seem like a mixed bag. Some hits. Some misses. Like the one about Clearing Contaminated Water could have been communicated more impactfully. A more attention-grabbing headline was surely possible here. Some others, like Moving Objects with your Mind, seemed to have an interactive angle. That was much better and definitely engaging.


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TITLE: ‘Syn Mun Kong Fit: Thank you Thailand’ AGENCY: Rabbit's Tale Co., Ltd CLIENT: Syn Mun Kong Health Insurance

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Lower insurance premiums for healthier individuals is a good offering. The film is not too shabby too. Though it could have been a bit shorter.

TITLE: ‘Sumo Girls 82’ AGENCY: Dentsu Inc., Japan CLIENT: The 101st Kanazawa High School Sumo Wrestling Tournament

Beautifully art directed. In today’s mobile world, the idea could have made for some very shareable GIFs.


ADVERTORIAL

ASEAN HONORS COMPANIES BEST IN CORPORATE GOVERNANCE GLOBE TELECOM JOINS TOP 50 COMPANIES FROM SIX PARTICIPATING COUNTRIES

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is committed to pushing forward the business frontier through corporations with a structure patterned to solid government policies. Companies adopting corporate governance best practices prove to be sustainable, protected from financial crises, and attractive to foreign investors. To measure this, the Asian Development Bank in partnership with the ASEAN Capital Markets Forum have jointly developed the ASEAN Corporate Governance Scorecard, an instrument for the assessment and ranking of publiclylisted companies (PLCs) among participating countries, namely: Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. It is based on publicly available information and benchmarked against international best practices. This common methodology provides foreign investors and external fund managers comparable information to form part of their investment decision-making process. The scorecard is also aligned with the corporate governance principles by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) This 2018, the ACMF recognized 50 PLCs at the ASEAN Corporate Governance Awards ceremony on November 21, 2018 in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Globe Telecom made it to the top 50 — a testament to the company’s commitment

to good governance principles to create shared value for all stakeholders. “The key is finding the equilibrium between governance and business. We believe that finding the right balance is the crux to sustainability and shareholder value,” said Marisalve Ciocson-Co, Globe Senior Vice-President for Law and Compliance, Chief Compliance Officer and Assistant Corporate Secretary. Assessment of listed firms under ACGS underwent a rigorous two-stage process: local assessment conducted by domestic ranking body (DRB) assessing and ranking their respective Philippine listed firms, as well as a peer review by other DRBs assessing listed companies from other countries. This is then followed by a series of dialogues and discussions among DRBs and the ACGS working group to reconcile differences and discrepancies in assessments and scores. Globe has been consistently named as one of the top listed firms in ASEAN since the 2015 ACGS run. ACGS compliance is spearheaded by Globe Corporate and Legal Services Group and Globe Chief Compliance Officer CiocsonCo. Other companies recognized in the Top 50 were Singapore Telecommunications Limited (Singtel), Ayala Corporation, Ayala Land, Inc., and Manila Water Company, Inc.

Globe SVP for Law and Compliance, Chief Compliance Officer and Assistant Corporate Secretary Marisalve Ciocson-Co (3rd to the right) receives the award for Globe at the 2nd ASEAN Corporate Governance Awards Ceremony at Kuala Lumpur Convention Center in Malaysia


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BoyP's creativity has translated into creations that stay in his garden and win gold trophies.


BoyP’s Newfound Love Advertising mogul BoyP moves from advertising to bonsai-making. R. Osorio

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WORDS Bong

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hen swamped with the demands of advertising, Angelito Pangilinan or BoyP to the ad community, has a therapy, the combination called travel + photography. It is a passion he shared to the world through his blog www.boyplakwatsa. com, which became a go-to reference for many of his friends planning their getaways. But that was then. Boy, having retired as Chairman of Dentsu Aegis Network, has almost forsaken his travel blog and is pre-occupied with bonsai. His language has shifted from market shares, TARPS and GRPs to shohin, mame, shari, nebari and other Japanese words related to bonsai. The only link, it seems, is that his last post as an adman was at the huge agency born out of Japan. Today, he has a collection of nearly 200 trees in pots. He guarantees, any young tree, including fruit-bearing ones can be potted and made small. His collection includes sampalok and guava trees alongside his many bantigues. His green thumb also produced flowering bonsais like the “21 jewels” bougainvillas, melendres, and bluebell.


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One of his crafts won Gold and Best in Show during the recent Cavite Bonsai Club Competition

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I became a witness of his passion for bonsai, when I visited him in his Tagaytay retirement home, a.k.a. his bonsai haven. The sprawling garden has large bonsais surrounding the pool. The highlight of the tour is the roof deck of his bar which he transformed into a bonsai exhibit of sorts, with the potted trees on top of exhibit-standard tables spread on turf. All of these shouting only one undeniable truth—he is a full-fledged bonsai aficionado. His creativity is now translated to his crafts in pots. BoyP’s day now revolves around wiring and unwiring some trees, potting new materials and re-potting older ones. Like advertising, bonsai is not easy business. He explains, caring for bonsai is not limited to watering morning and afternoon. Instead, there is science to it. He mastered all the do’s and don’t’s and the schedule this type of hobby demands – when to spray fish emulsion, sea-salt on bantigues, or pesticides – all written on a white board within his bonsai “headquarters.” He showed me a meter that measures moisture and pH levels of the potting medium which I just learned is river sand. He is not alone in this journey. He has his bonsai artist and groomer Ninio Agana—who made sure their creations are not only lovely, but also healthy. Bonsai is not relatively new to BoyP. He started his bonsai collection 12 years ago when he established his Tagaytay retirement home. But travel took a higher priority then. On his retirement, bonsai came with a vengeance, and now takes up almost all his time. But this is not only a hobby for himself. When I visited BoyP, the officers of the Cavite Bonsai Club were in his place discussing final details about their show and competition at a mall in Cavite. The exhibit features 84 trees from the different members of the club, including large banyan trees in pots, tamarind, tugas, argao, bluebell and even banana. Each bonsai being an art in itself. From the realms of advertising, to travel and photography, and now bonsai-making, BoyP has one means—creativity. And like he always did, he is ready to share the fruits of his creativity, in pots, this time.

Angelito Pangilinan, affectionately known as BoyP, merges science and art to bonsai-making.


Coming Home Joanna Parungao Karl Louis Elzingre

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By the end of the cul-de-sac in a quiet village a few kilometers away from the city, there stands a house of steel, glass and concrete. But, there is more than what meets the eye.


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he house is situated near the end of cul-de-sac in a quiet village a few kilometers away from the city. It is made of steel, glass and concrete. Sturdy, streamlined and modern, it is in a pricier neighborhood, but it is convenient for their small family with its three bedrooms and one-and-a-half bath. Even before Lisa Reyes opens her eyes at 6:30 in the morning, the artificial intelligence system that has been set up as the central hub of their home has started already begun work. Lisa had gotten married just past the tail end of her twenties and now has a quirky little kindergartener to take care of, with another one on the way, due in about three more months. Her husband, who works as a sociologist, commutes to work everyday. He is

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currently on an ethnographic research trip to Romblon. She heads to the kitchen where the coffeemaker has started to burble, sidestepping one of the two automated vacuum cleaners roaming the house. She lets out a little laugh when her cat Malfoy pounces on one of the poor hardworking things. The screen on the refrigerator noted that they are running low on eggs and the chicken tenders her daughter is particularly fond of. The milk is also about to go bad. Her husband Jaime is the only one who still drinks the stuff. She and her daughter prefer almond milk. Lisa takes out a couple of eggs and some vegetables to make an omelet. The rice cooker greets her and chirps, “Very good” when she sets it to work. On her way to the kitchen, the A.I that runs the house, dubbed Martha due to Jaime’s strange addiction to watching reruns of Martha Stewart’s shows, has already pulled back the blinds in the living room, opening the space up to the small garden. The sprinkler system installed in the garden had also been activated; in her daughter’s room, an alarm waits to be triggered at 7:30 to wake the child up. The coffeemaker states that the pot is ready. Lisa can only have 200 mg of caffeine per day due to her pregnancy, so she usually just abstains from the stuff. Today, however she has several meetings and needs the boost. Alyssa comes into the kitchen a full five minutes before she is set to wake up. Lisa asks Martha to cancel the alarm in Alyssa’s room and gives her good morning kiss just as she settles herself in one of the taller chairs in the marble-topped kitchen island where the family usually eats their meals.


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“Daddy’s coming back today, isn’t he?” Alyssa mumbles with a yawn. “He’ll be back by the time you get home,” Lisa assures her daughter with a smile. She pours herself a cup of coffee and takes a sip before garnishing the omelet and rice with a dash of dried seaweed for flavor. She fixes a glass of orange juice for Alyssa before sitting down to her own breakfast. At around 8:45a.m, the kindergarten’s electric bus is on their driveway to pick Alyssa up. There is a young teacher on board to mind the kids, but no driver is necessary. The electric vehicle is hooked up to the country’s automated vehicle grid, which has oversight on unmanned vehicles to prevent collision. The students’ addresses have been programmed into the school’s fleet of vehicles and a route calculated to ensure the most optimal arrangement for all parties. Lisa walks her daughter down the driveway and waves back when the child grins and waves at her from inside the bus. Inside the house Malfoy is sunning himself by the reinforced floor-to-ceiling glass panels that serve as the walls of the living room. Lisa walks back to the kitchen to tidy up and asks Martha to lower the temperature a bit since it was starting to feel a bit hot. She has a meeting at 10:00 AM with one of her patients. Lisa goes to one of the three bedrooms of the house, which she and Jaime use as an office of sorts. She logs into the hospital server through her computer and pulls up her files. For her patients who had opted to stay with her instead of being referred to another physician, she had asked that they wear a health band that would keep track of their activity level as well as bodily functions. The band fed the information to the hospital server that she could access to help in her diagnoses. She had kept only a handful of patients in her roster but

made herself available for consultations with the other physicians she had referred them to if they requested it. Lisa is an internist, specializing in bariatric surgery. Usually she saw her patients at her clinic in the hospital. But since her second pregnancy is a bit more complicated than the first, her obstetrician had suggested she telecommute. Her first patient for the day is Anne who had initially weighed over 600 lbs. Anne is now down to 550 lbs. Lisa had asked Anne to undergo several test as well and she went over those results along with the information generated by the band. Though the 25- year-old was now at a weight that made her a good candidate for bariatric surgery, Lisa wanted Anne to lose a bit more, just to make the procedure even safer. She


COVERSTORY

would discuss this course of action with her patient before deciding on the best option. Lisa herself had met her husband at her heaviest, at almost 90 lbs overweight. They had met each other through a mutual friend in graduate school. When he had learned of her specialization, he had commented that it was interesting she was studying to, in essence, cure obesity when she herself was overweight. She had wanted to say that it wasn’t obesity per se that she wanted to cure the diseases that came along with the condition, if allowed to run rampant, but at that moment, all she had been able to do was gape, sputter a little, glare at their mutual friend and just walk away. Jaime had gone after her while apologizing profusely and saying that he was just really very, very stupid with words.

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Lisa had lost the weight over time but would never really be the tall and skinny type since her frame was not made that way. However, she was certainly a fan of nutrition and exercise and recommended the slow, sure and steady way to weight loss to all her patients. At around 2:00 PM, and with only one more meeting at 4:45p.m left to go, Lisa begins to wonder where Jaime is. He is due back today and should have been home already. She checks her phone sure enough a message appears, stating that he had been delayed and would be coming back tomorrow morning instead. When Alyssa arrives from school at 3:00 PM to discover that her father had still not arrived, she frowns in obvious disappointment. Lisa pats her head and explains that daddy is very sorry. “He promises to give you a call later and to read you a bedtime story.” After dinner and all the necessary bedtime ablutions, Lisa sends Jaime a text to say it was OK to call. They use a tablet to answer Jaime’s call so they could see him better. Alyssa laughs at her father’s giant head on the screen. Lisa listens to her husband’s voice and her child’s soft breathing. As soon as her daughter falls asleep, she takes the tablet to the room she shares with Jaime and smiles at him. “I miss you,” she tells him fondly, noting his disheveled hair and the glasses sitting askew on the bridge of his nose. He grins and returns the sentiment. “Me too. Can’t wait to get back home to my girls.” “Martha included?” she asks teasingly. “Definitely,” he says with a nod. “I’ve had to turn the AC on and off here with a remote. No regulator.” He shows her his hand. “My index finger is starting to feel the strain.” She traces the image on the tablet with a finger and laughs. “You poor baby. Come back home safe. See you tomorrow.” “See you tomorrow,” he replies with a soft smile.


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DESIGN Functional creativity.

DESIGN THINKING 150 Tirada: 50 Years of Phlippine Printmaking 154 Bob Greenberg: 10 Principles of Design WORKSPACE 156 Facebook Philippines ARTS & CRAFT 160 History of Philippine Graphics Design


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Strike!

The Printmakers Association of the Philippines celebrates its 50th year with exhibit “TIRADA: 50 Years of Philippine Printmaking 1968-2018” WORDS Nadz

Ruiz


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irada in the local vernacular means a “strike.” On its 50th year as an organization, the Printmakers Association of the Philippines (PAP) held a “Tirada” of their own — an exhibition of printmaking work at the Cultural Center of the Philippines from May 19 to July 15, 2018. Now sporting the name of Association of Pinoyprintmakers (AP), the group organized the “TIRADA: 50 Years of Philippine Printmaking 19682018” exhibition as a tour back in time through the evolution of printmaking from its founding in 1968. The exhibit further features works from 140 Filipino artists like former PAP presidents Raul Isidro, Virgilio Aviado, Ambie Abaño and current president Benjamin Torrado Cabrera. Works by National Artists BenCab, Ang Kiukok, Arturo Luz, Vicente Manansala, and Jose Joya were also on display as well as those by the next generation of printmaking talents like Jun Jun Sta. Ana, Mars Bugaoan, Yas Doctor, and

“(TIRADA) ALSO MEANS EFFORT AND LABOR, A DECISIVE ACTION. IT IS A FITTING TERM FOR THIS COMMEMORATION AS AP LOOKS BACK AT ITS HISTORY AND ITS PIONEERS; REVISITS ITS ARCHIVES AND THE LINEAGES OF PRACTICE; AND REFLECTS ON THE ISSUES THAT CONFRONT THE PRACTICE OF PRINTMAKING.” Henrielle Pagkaliwangan. The massive collection of 50 years worth of print work was curated expertly by Dr. Patrick Flores, the curator of the University of the Philippines’ Vargas Museum as well as many other exhibitions held in the country and abroad. “Tirada” is also a common term among printmakers which means “to pull off or pull out a piece of work in a series of multiples.” Dr. Flores

Virgilio Aviado, one of the country’s leading visual artists, created “The Boxer” in 1969.


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summed up in a statement, “(Tirada) also means effort and labor, a decisive action. It is a fitting term for this commemoration as AP looks back at its history and its pioneers; revisits its archives and the lineages of practice; and reflects on the issues that confront the practice of printmaking.” Printmaking in the Philippines traces its history way back to Spanish colonial times. The religious orders printed prayer books and other images of saints, Jesus Christ, and the Virgin Mary to give out to the public. Early maps of the Philippines were also a product of printmaking. It has since evolved into a versatile art form that has been used by many artists both in the pursuit of craft and creative expression as well as to make a commentary on social and cultural issues. The exhibit also reflects upon printmaking itself especially its place in Filipino society. “This exhibition is built around a range of concerns: the aesthetic integrity and intelligence of the work of the print and the status of the printmaker as an artist; the validity of appropriation within the artistic system of the print; the capacity of the print to respond to socio-political reality; the selfconsciousness of the print as a medium; the place of the print in art history; and the process by which print plays out in the ecology of the popular,” Flores said.

With the exhibition, the organization further aims to show the craft and artistry involved in printmaking, and to lift printmaking beyond the common belief that it is a minor art form. The AP pressed, “we… believe in the analogue process of printmaking. In the process of the art of print making, the artist alone is responsible for the painstaking road to the process, from designing, to inking, and finally to printing. Without following the flow of this process, it does not belong to the category of fine printmaking. It is the feel, the touch, and the smell of printers’ ink, petroleum, and the paper that fascinates us. A printmaker must experience the process of editioning in order for him/ her to be called a true blue-blood printmaker.

IT IS THE FEEL, THE TOUCH, AND THE SMELL OF PRINTERS’ INK, PETROLEUM, AND THE PAPER THAT FASCINATES US. A PRINTMAKER MUST EXPERIENCE THE PROCESS OF EDITIONING IN ORDER FOR HIM/HER TO BE CALLED A TRUE BLUE-BLOOD PRINTMAKER.”

“Imperial Tomb”, a masterpiece of Philippine National Artist for visual arts, Arturo Luz.

Doloricon Neil Manguuma rubbercut AP 2014YE8S1515


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Design + Technology Through The Years R/GA’s Bob Greenberg curates innovate works in the “selects” Exhibition at Cooper Hewitt in New York.

R/GA’s Bob Greenberg Curates Innovative Works in the “Selects“ Exhibition at Cooper Hewitt in New York.

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s guest curator of the “Select” series exhibition in Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, Bob Greenberg, founder of the international design innovation company R/GA engages his singular creative eye to uncover compelling design lineages and make thematic connections with the museum’s expansive collection of 210,000 objects. In view from February 23 through September 9, 2018, “Bob Greenberg Selects” is the 16th installation in the series on which designers, artists, architects and public figures are invited to guest curate an exhibition. For this presentation, Greenberg brings together 42 innovative works from Cooper Hewitt’s holdings to explore creativity in the age of technology. For “Bob Greenberg Selects: Connected by Design,” opening February 23 at New York’s Cooper Hewitt, advertising pioneer Bob Greenberg curates 42 items from the museum’s collection that reveal the relationship between design and technology over the last 65 years.

“A 2013 National Design Award winner for Communication, Bob is a true original – revered in his field as an iconoclastic thinker with a prescient understanding of the creative and strategic possibilities of interactive design,” said Caroline Baumann, director of Cooper Hewitt. “An enthusiastic collector of industrial design, “Bob plunged into Cooper Hewitt’s important holdings of wired and wireless tools and pulled forth a fascinating visual narrative of technology’s seismic impact on design. And as per Bob’s way, the installation will be an immersive, interactive experience involving animation, audio and video.” The exhibition illustrates how technology has propelled design innovations in form, style and function over the past 65 years. The collection of pivotal multidisciplinary objects explores how design and technology have augmented and revolutionized modern human life.  It is presented in four groupings: “Connected Devices” focuses on groundbreaking communications tools, ranging from the Henry Dreyfuss-designed


“DESIGN HAS ALWAYS BEEN A POWERFUL FORCE FOR INNOVATION AND PROGRESS, BUT NEVER HAS IT BEEN MORE IMPORTANT THAN IT IS TODAY.”

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Model 500 telephone (1953) and the early fax machine Qwip 2100 (1976-78) to the first–generation iPhone (2002) and Google Glass (2013); “Disruptive Innovations” shows objects that have been industry game changers, such as the Edison Voicewriter Dictaphone (1963) the Sony TV8-301 Portable Television (1959) and the MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer (2012); while “Measurement and Calculation” features a historical range of calculators, watches and thermostats, addressing themes on computation and notation in design. German industrial designer Dieter Rams’ ten principles for good design have inspired Greenberg throughout his career, and in the curation of his new show at the Cooper Hewitt. Greenberg presents 11 objects that he considers best embody these principles including usefulness, honesty and unobtrusiveness. “Design has always been a powerful force for innovation and progress, but never has it been more important than it is today,” said Greenberg. “I am honored to partner with Cooper Hewitt to explore the intersection of human achievements, technological advancement and design thinking as seen through the evolution of objects from the atomic age through the connected age.” The exhibit’s interior architecture was designed by AD100 architect Toshiko Mori, who previously collaborated with Greenberg to design his Connected Home in upstate New York. Architect Toshiko Mori serves as exhibition designer and has envisioned a “room within a room” in the gallery. The former ornate drawing room of the Carnegie Mansion has been transformed to create a modern and neutral white background, facilitating intimate observation of the objects on view. The viewing is complemented by a streamline OLED lighting installation by Kaneka OLED, the first time it will be employed in an American cultural institution. In place of traditional museum labels, visitors are encouraged to download and use an interactive app developed by R/GA. A “scan and learn” component used the image recognition software Clarifai, which allows users to take a picture of an object and discover exploratory and related materials. The exhibition contains a video commentary on design by Greenberg, a video commentary his own 10 Principles of Design with objects included in the exhibition and drawing connections between them.  

1. Brown HLD4 Hair Dryer (1970), now part of Cooper Hewitt’s Product Design and Decorative Arts Department 2. Dieter Rams Ten Principles for Good Design served as Greenberg’s inspiration 3. Ducati’s 12199 Panigale Superleggera embodies the combination of technology, engineering, manufacturing and aesthetics


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Facebook Philippines opens the doors to its freshly-unveiled headquarters to adobo magazine and shares an overarching global company philosophy of a journey that is one percent finished. WORDS Christa

Escudero & Leo Balante

PHOTOS Vnita

Sohal and Jericho Clemente


Employees can take time off from work

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ith the Philippines’ undeniable presence on the web, Facebook found it necessary to set up a headquarters in the country that is, of course, dubbed as the social media capital of the world. Country director John Rubio shared, Facebook Philippines first started in a small shared service office in Bonifacio Global City in 2016, but as the team grew, they had to relocate to a more permanent, appropriate space. Hence, earlier this year, Facebook Philippines eventually settled into a bigger office still within the vast expanse of the growing business district. Like the quirky cool offices common in Silicon Valley, the new Facebook Philippines space features divider-free work areas to facilitate open collaboration among team members. One look and one could quickly spot that there’s a diverse array of employeecentric spaces surrounding the office from recreation room with hoops, air hockey and a treadmill, a micro kitchen full of snacks and drinks, and relaxation areas where workers can unwind and take breaks— uninterrupted. All these are housed within high ceilings and glass windows that allow natural light to seep through. Inspirational posters made by Filipino artists, embodying company and employee values also abound the duplex that fosters productivity and human connection. What separates Facebook Philippines from other global headquarters, and perhaps other workspaces in the country, is how it incorporates a local feel to its features and its interiors. For one, a mural by artist Kris Abrigo at the office lobby, brings life to the office combining themes from Philippine craft and culture. Of note, it keeps a makeshift karaoke room—a staple

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1. A jeepney’s facade that bears Facebook’s logo is seen upon entering the space. 2. Facebook Philippines’ Microkitchen features a minimalist approach in design.


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“We need to continually improve the product in entertainment activities in the country, and of and come up with new features that are aligned course, a hit among Facebook Philippines employees. with how people use the internet, mobile, and other Hidden behind a movable shelf, the karaoke room innovations in tech,” Rubio adds. is designed to make it seem like the interior of a Building the Facebook headquarters in the moving MRT, which aims to depict the daily life of the Philippines is a move rooted in the company’s Filipino. mission to build and connect communities. The social The office also houses conference rooms named network has served greatly in bridging Filipinos to after popular Filipino slang: Petmalu, HM Po, Saan people that matter to them, Banda, Sa Kanto, Walang particularly small-to-medium Forever and May Forever, “WE LOVE HELPING BUILD enterprises that aim to expand among others. COMMUNITIES THROUGH OUR their market. “We love Aside from adding PLATFORMS, FROM PERSONAL helping build communities local flavor to their space, THINGS LIKE GARDENING CLUBS, through our platforms, from Facebook Philippines has TO SOMETHING LARGER THAN personal things like gardening also integrated elements OURSELVES LIKE SAVING THE clubs, to something larger from the global brand itself. PHILIPPINES SEAS.” than ourselves like saving Their ceilings and floors, the Philippine seas,” Rubio says. “These groups and for example, have an unfinished, industrial look, communities have all our support.” which represents an internal quote in the company: Facebook investing in the Philippine community “The journey is only one percent finished.” has made it apparent how the company recognizes “That saying is a reminder that no matter what we the country’s relevance in the world’s social have accomplished, there is still so much to be done,” Rubio explains. For the company, even when they have framework. Through their new Philippine headquarters, there would be more reasons to gathered billions of users in each of their multiple hit ‘like.’ assets like Facebook and Instagram, the work is far from over.


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1. Rooms are named after popular Filipino phrases. 2. Colorful mural by Filipino artist Chris Abrigo is seen upon entering the lobby. 3. The Facebook wall is filled with messages and shout-outs from visitors. 4. Facebook Philippines’ has a hidden karaoke room designed to look like an MRT cabin. 5. Motivational posters are seen across walls.

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A History of Philippine Graphic Design Team Manila Co-Founder Jowee Alviar shares his research on Philippine Imagery WORDS Nadz

Ruiz

PHOTOS Vnita

Sohal


Jowee Alviar is Team Manila’s Co-Founder who proudly shares his collection of design works throughout Philippines’ rich history.

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omegrown graphic design studio and lifestyle and clothing brand Team Manila has become one of the premier design outfits in the Philippines. The brand was first popularly known for its clothes and accessories that showcase Filipino culture and pop culture, places, history, and most of all, Pinoy pride. Eventually, Team Manila’s founders also established a graphic design studio collaborating with many different brands, businesses, individuals, and institutions in the country to work on different design projects and products. While Team Manila is now known to be one of the stalwarts of Filipino design, co-founder Jowee Alviar owes their work to the country’s rich history of graphic design. Philippine graphic design styles of today are heavily influenced by American and Western styles, Spanish history, Asian and Japanese culture, and other foreign styles. Alviar wanted to dig deeper to know what Filipino design really is. Quoting Philippine National Hero Jose Rizal, Alviar said, “He who does not know where he came from will never reach his destination. We need to know our history. What are the images in our history that came from the Philippines or talks about the Philippines?” During his stay in California Institute of the Arts or CalArts, one of the top art schools in the world, Alviar undertook a research study on Philippine imagery to further understand where Filipino design came from and how it evolved throughout the centuries. Alviar started his research looking at the Pintados and the pre-colonial Filipinos’ craftsmanship of gold jewelry. The Baybayin, which came from Sanskrit, an

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“WE LOVE HELPING BUILD COMMUNITIES THROUGH OUR PLATFORMS, FROM PERSONAL THINGS LIKE GARDENING CLUBS, TO SOMETHING LARGER THAN OURSELVES LIKE SAVING THE PHILIPPINES SEAS.”

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The Sulu-like font–a typeface seen on most Philippine cultural materials.

Eastern form of lettering, is an early form of design, which today can be thought of as typography. The famous copper plate of Laguna bears the Baybayin script, one of the few artifacts showcasing this form of writing that survived time and the elements. When the Spaniards came and propagated Christianity, the people whom they reached also changed the way they designed their patterns. The early Filipinos created patterns with symbols of the sun, spirit animals like the bayawak, snakes, frogs, and other pagan icons. With the Spanish influence, these patterns evolved into crosses, diamonds, and other geometric shapes. Still, some of these early patterns and designs still exist today. According to Alviar, mountain tribes such as the Bontoc were able to preserve their culture and icons, because the Spanish missionaries found it hard to reach their location. Even the Katipunan, the secret revolutionary group that sought independence from the Spaniards, also made use of iconography inspired by Freemasonry symbols. Fast forward to the turn of the 19th century, Alviar looked into how companies and businesses designed the packaging of their products. He said that these designs also heavily influenced contemporary and modern Filipino graphic design. Cigarette manufacturers La Campana, Balita, Tatlong Diwata, and Kayamanan used

illustrations of nature and even the image of hero Jose Rizal. In fact, many Filipino businesses have used Rizal’s image in their packaging. Other products like Katialis and match boxes produced packaging that depicted culture and life in the provinces with illustrations of carabaos, farmers, fields, fiestas, and tinikling dancers. Alviar observed that these designs were a mix of typography and patterns influenced by European styles. That said, their context is uniquely Filipino. Promotional materials for events were already prevalent in the early 1900s. During the World Exposition Fair at St. Louis which was meant to showcase the “cultures” of different countries, Americans brought Filipino natives along with native huts and materials. The promotional brochures depicted Filipinos as dark-skinned savages. In the Philippines, the Manila Carnival, an early beauty pageant show used posters to promote the different competing provinces and their pavilions, queens, and other elements they are known for. Theaters in the old district of Manila like the Manila Grand Opera House loved creating posters with loud typography, layouts, and design elements. In the 1920s, as air and sea travel became more accessible, there also sprung travel and tourism


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1. Philippine Sweepstakes stubs throughout the years. 2. Matchbox designs from different places.

promotional materials. Travel brochures by airlines and hotels showcased beautiful illustrations of Philippine sceneries and landmarks. “These are the things that we seldom see, but this is part of our continuous creation of visuals talking about the Philippines,” Alviar enthused. He also noticed a certain typeface that was consistent with Philippine cultural materials. “This is a Sulu-like (font) with shapes of Sarimanok that we see in different materials,” he stressed. After the war, National Artists like Fernando Amorsolo and Malang started out as illustrators for magazines. Amorsolo did illustrations and covers for Liwayway Magazine. He even created satirical comic strips with writer Lope K. Santos. On the other hand, Malang was an illustrator who loved drawing the streets of Manila. Alviar further went on to stress that Philippine art is everywhere, even along Manila streets. Aside from the Art Deco architecture seen along Avenida Rizal and Escolta, Quiapo is full of hand drawn movie poster billboards, signages of tarot card readings, and shirts with drawings of anting-antings. These are all part of the Filipino narrative, Alviar said.


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Jowee Alviar is Team Manila’s Co-Founder who proudly shares his collection of design works throughout Philippines’ rich history.

The Philippines even with its many influences, has its own history and brand of graphic design. Alviar has high hopes for the young generation of Filipino graphic designers today. “Hopefully we turn this to something we can pass on to our students. Hopefully there will be more materials talking about the rich history of graphic designs,” he said.


ISSUE 75 / MOBILE

PEOPLE Profiles on creative industry, brand, and media personalities.

CENTERFOLD 164 Pepe Diokno TRENDSPOTTING 166 New Forms of Transit PROFILE 168 Piyush Pandey 170 Jerrold Tarog

CREATIVE CORNER 174 Tony Sarmiento III

FLIPSIDE 180 Denis Ragon-Ty 181 Jia Salindong-Du

ROUNDTABLE 176 Joint Industry GMM

ESSENTIALS 182 Jilson Tiu


"An idea starts off like a germ. It’s really a small particle. As I live my life and go through different things, I attach those things to this germ. I see connections and other things and put them together and they will grow into something that will become a film."

Pepe Diokno

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His international award-winning debut film Engkwentro, which tells the story of two brothers in the middle of warring gangs, was screened abroad and won awards at the 2009 Venice Film Festival. Engkwentro’s success secured a screening spot for his first film, Above the Clouds, at the 27th Tokyo International Film Festival. At the age of 23, he received the prestigious Dangal ng Ani Award from the National Commission for Culture and Arts for his contribution to Philippine Cinema and UK’s Phaidon Press recognized his brilliance as it included him in Take 100: the Future of Film—a book on the 100 Most Exceptional Emerging Filmmakers of the world—which even further cements his standing as one of the Philippine cinema’s best living directors.

From these ideas-turned-to-films, Diokno has made his career as a risky, experimental filmmaker working within the confines of Filipino indie films system. His films manage to be both indie blockbusters and objects of cult appeal, making him an admired figure in local cinema. Each of his film may have started as one small particle— but even his smallest movies are big on ideas. Diokno’s movies require this thick quotient of reality to support his looping plots, which accelerate in shifting time signatures, consume themselves in recursive intrigue and advance formidable and enchanting problems of interpretation.

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words

Jyrmie Eisenheart Ladiero & Nevicshky Calma art direction Vnita Sohal photography by Shampoo Padilla


PEOPLE / TREND SPOT T IN G

with al City ly, b o l G cio end Bonifa and eco-fri d n u ent, ll aro y stro , time effici the metro. e h t s ves a ter. Mobile gestion in creati o n f o p ick sco to traffic co rou k g c a i r t s lec ion join leek e e the solut azine s g e a h t m b – adobo e of choice ters might o d i r c r ic s o thei electr

Barry Barrera Director Fifty Three Ten

Timothy Vargas Co-Founder Electric Kick Scooter Philippines

Alfredo Torres Technical Support Electric Kick Scooter Philippines


John Park Distributor WEPED

Rommel Lubguban Creative Director Storm Studio PH

Tonsy Salvador Subject Matter Expert Video-Sharing Platform

Harriet Icay Jericho Clemente photography by Marl Castro shoot assistant Jojo Llamanzares words

art


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The Humble Adman Ogilvy India’s Piyush Pandey changed India’s advertising industry forever through simplicity and humility. WORDS

T

he Cannes Lions’ Lifetime Achievement Award, the Lion of St. Mark is given to the advertising industry’s brightest stars, a testament to these individuals’ creative triumphs and their efforts in pushing the industry forward. This year, the award was given to two brothers — Piyush Pandey, Executive Chairman & Creative Director of Ogilvy South Asia and Prasoon Pandey, Film Director. While the award in itself is already one of the highest honors bestowed on a member of the industry, the brothers hold another distinction - they are the first Asians to be given the Lion of St. Mark in the eight years of its existence. No doubt, Piyush and Prasoon have made illustrious careers for themselves in India’s ad land. Piyush in particular has helped Ogilvy India

Nadz Ruiz

win over 47 Cannes Lions and over 800 awards in total. His ads for Fevicol, Sunlight Detergent, Luna Moped, Cadbury, and Dairy Milk have become classics and earned household-name status for the brands. In 2016, he was the first professional from the advertising and communications industry to ever receive the Padma Shri, an honor bestowed by the President of India to outstanding citizens. Through all these showers of accolades, Piyush himself espoused simplicity, respect, and humility. According to Piyush, it is humility that made his ads resonate with the Indian audience. When he started in Ogilvy India in the 1980s, Indian advertising was heavily influenced by Western styles and aesthetics. Piyush could have written brilliant


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world and if I have to communicate in it, I have to taglines that would impress global audiences, but he respect other cultures — it is as simple as that.” went for simpler, more down-to-earth words, ones When his ads had to be translated into another that would be understood instantly by any Indian Indian language, he spends a lot of time with a colleague consumer. Lines like “Chal meri Luna” for Luna who speaks that language and learns what the cultural mopeds came from a childhood phrase, “Chal mere and linguistic nuances are for that particular audience. ghode (Let’s step on it),” and “Dum laga ke haisha” He also made it a point to consult with colleagues for Fevicol is a common statement said by people to from different Indian cultures when making ads, encourage collective action. This kind of humility, especially those targeted to specific regions. Being according to Piyush, is what makes an ad successful. humble in asking for help and taking time to learn and The love for Hindi blossomed early for Piyush. understand different cultures is valuable to Piyush. He grew up with Hindi literature and music around He has worked with the Bharatiya Janata Party of him. In an interview with Verve India, he summed up India, Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe of Sri his philosophy on Hindi: “Hindi was what we spoke Lanka, and with India’s Polio Eradication program with at home. Hindi was what we emoted in. So Hindi Amitabh Bachchan, one of the country’s most acclaimed comes most naturally to me, just as I’m sure Bengali actors and himself a former politician. Working with comes naturally to Bengalis and so on. It’s just that these individuals and groups, Piyush had to understand some people choose to leave their own language how to communicate with people from different ethnic behind, and that is the biggest mistake they make.” and cultural backgrounds and professions. Piyush’s Piyush began his career at a time when TV was humility and belief in becoming widespread and multiculturalism helped popular among the masses him produce outstanding and as such, shows and "LOOK AT INDIA–IT'S NOT A work for these groups. ads were being written COUNTRY; IT'S A CONTINENT Since his start as in Hindi. He, along with AND IT IS SO MULTICULTURAL a humble accounts Ogilvy India, led the charge THAT IF WE DO NOT LEARN executive in Ogilvy India for advertising messages TO HAVE SOME HUMILITY, and six years later as a expressed in Hindi and WE WILL NOT EXIST" copywriter, he has risen local sensibilities. to become the agency’s More than the use National Creative Director in 1994 and inducted into of Hindi, Piyush expressed humility in his respect Ogilvy’s Worldwide Board in 2006. He is today the for multiculturalism. Growing up with eight siblings Chairman & Creative Director of Ogilvy South Asia. and their parents, Piyush learned that each and every He became the first Asian to be Jury President of individual has their own personality. His sister, Ila, the Cannes Film Festival in 2004. In 2012, he received loves to sing, and she went on to become a popular the CLIO Lifetime Achievement Award, the first for singer. His brother, Prasoon, practices debating. He any Asian, and the Lifetime Achievement Award by the would also later on become a successful ad man and Advertising Agencies Association of India (AAAI). The film director, and would win the Lion of St. Mark Economic Times gave Piyush the title of Most Influential along with his brother. Piyush’s other sisters had Man in Indian Advertising for nine consecutive years. their own interests. He himself played cricket, and And so Piyush continues on with his work even after would become a professional player. Before falling in receiving lifetime achievement awards. While holding love with advertising, he was also a professional tea the top position at Ogilvy India, he has also appeared taster, a testament to the man’s varied interests. in movies and authored his memoir, “Pandeymonium: Living with diverse individuals made Piyush Piyush Pandey on Advertising”. He has come a long understand what dealing with people from different way from a noisy home in Rajasthan and a professional cultures meant. India, with its more than a billion cricket career to being an account executive turned citizens and numerous regions, has diverse cultures. copywriter and today, the Lion of St. Mark Awardee. In his memoir, “Pandeymonium,” he described how His humility and innate respect for diverse cultures has multiculturalism is integral to his work. He said, “look changed the Indian advertising industry forever and set at India — it’s not a country; it’s a continent and it is the example for future ad men and women to come. so multicultural that if we do not learn to have some humility we will not exist. If I have to live in today’s


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From Pitch Fork to Film Reel Through filmmaking, Jerrold Tarog presents stories that stand out against tradition. WORDS

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Christa Escudero

n an article, the Home School Legal Defense Association has dubbed storytelling as “the single most important tradition humans participate in.” The act has brought numerous significant effects in our daily lives, playing a vital role of entertaining audiences, educating people, preserving cultures and instilling moral values. Jerrold Tarog is one such storyteller. A filmmaker in the Philippines, Tarog is known for being the director behind the sleeper hit Heneral Luna, the story of Philippine historical figure Antonio Luna during the Philippine-American War, which has broken box office records as the highest grossing Philippine historical

film of all time. Its sequel Goyo: Ang Batang Heneral, narrates the subsequent role of another Philippine historical figure, Gregorio del Pilar, during the same war. It has been dubbed to be the biggest Philippine film in history in terms of budget and production. These stories, among Tarog’s other ones, manifest the role of storytelling as an important life tradition. Ironically, however, Tarog’s stories and the manner he tells them does not actually conform with long-standing traditions. In an industry full of norms, he and his stories do not fit in the mold of the conventional, but actually break it.


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“I was just reading about Antonio Luna on Part One Wikipedia,” he laughingly reveals. “I don’t remember Tarog graduated, interestingly, with a music if it was Wikipedia or a book, but he definitely was composition degree in college. In those years, he would very interesting. There was no hero portrayed into go to the film center beside his building to watch films film like him, because in Philippine films, heroes are during class breaks. From this mode of recreation and usually portrayed as saints. But Luna, he’s so flawed. the film units he took in the end spurred the idea of He believed and did a lot of things I agree with, how similar creating films is to composing music. but there was also an attitude I disagree with. I got “They are the same time-based art form— fascinated with that, so I thought it okay to present this the same way you compose a piece of music complex character, even with the risks it presented.” and structure the emotions around it is the  It was indeed a risky endeavor. In a film industry same way as you do in a film,” he notes. like that in the Philippines, where creative freedom He dove into the film industry as soon as he and breakthrough visions are clamped down and graduated, creating musical scores for a living and films compromised for the sake of commercial appeal, it is as a hobby. He would borrow the camera of his boss deemed impossible to find producers that are willing back then and craft short films with his friends until to take unbelievable chances. But he found them, and he created something “sensible enough, something he came through. With 80 million-peso budget (almost that isn’t embarrassing to show to people anymore.” 1.5 million US dollars), Tarog proceeded to turn this  In 2007, he released his first full feature, precarious idea into film Confessional, which he also and release it to the public. directed, wrote, edited,  As expected, Luna scored and starred in. “I JUST WANT TO FIND AND performed poorly during It was not only a nonSHARE MORE STORIES THAT its first-week run at the embarrassment–it was HAVE MEANING FOR ME -cinemas. However, things a critically acclaimed THOSE THAT RAISE QUESTIONS, took a different turn and masterpiece that got THOSE THAT MAKE US THINK ticket sales suddenly awarded in numerous local ABOUT OUR HUMANITY, surged, even when most and international festivals. THOSE THAT CONNECT theaters have stopped “I was of course TO A LOT OF PEOPLE.” screening the film. On its happy, and also third week, it surpassed surprised,” Tarog shares. the previous record of the highest grossing Philippine “I was just having fun with it, but then I also really historical film of 160 million-peso (around 3 million wanted to get into filmmaking. So it was kind of a US dollars). On its final run, it had earned more than validation—I guess I was doing something right.” 200 million-peso (almost 3.7 million US dollars). It was a validation well-deserved. With only a music  An independent film attracting a huge mainstream composition degree on hand and no connections to audience came as a shock for Tarog and his team, but the film industry, Tarog had to put in extra effort to it was positive word of mouth that led Luna to this make a mark, adjusting to the cultural differences outstanding feat. More than its commercial success, of working as a musician and as a filmmaker, as well the film had stirred conversations and changed how as forcing himself to learn every aspect of making a Filipinos perceived their history and their heroes. film on his own. Eventually, Tarog had successfully  With that comes Tarog’s even riskier idea: A trilogy built his portfolio, creating various films that also of Philippines’ unsung heroes -- a cinematic universe garnered their own awards and nominations. with heroes that actually lived and existed. Following And then came Heneral Luna. Luna is Goyo, and following Goyo is the story of former Philippine president Manuel Quezon. Tarog aims to tie Part Two up these tales and show to the audiences the complexity If there is one thing to be noted about Tarog, of the country’s history -- that it’s not a mere matter of it’s how randomly he can come up with stories portraying someone as a villain or as a hero, but as a to craft into film. That is exactly what happened combination of admirable traits and inherent flaws. when he came up with the idea behind Luna.


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“I wish to create a more rounded point of view of where we came from, and to present the idea that we need to acknowledge our failures,” Tarog explains. “Our heroes became heroes because we got used to looking at them through only their triumphs and victories, when actually, they were all built around a series of failures. For us who grew in the culture of hero worship, it would be nice to be frank and tell everyone that we all failed at some point in our history. Once we acknowledge that, I think we can be more honest in our conversations about where we can go from here.”   Part Three and Beyond  Tarog’s mark in the Philippine film industry has finally been established through his innovative historical epics. However, his tendency to break conventions has already gone beyond that.  Confessional, for one, brought something fresh to independent filmmaking, when it strayed away from common tropes like poverty and sex and presented a take on corruption that is light in atmosphere but insightful in theme. His coming-of-age film, Senior Year, takes authenticity to the next level when he got real-life high school students to tell a lighthearted and nostalgic story of students navigating the last few months of high school. His award-winning film Sana Dati (If Only) presents a different romance film that breaks the notions of the usual love story shown in the mainstream. Finally, his psychological thriller Bliss, which controversially received an initial X rating from the country’s movie review and classification board for its allegedly crude themes, pushes the boundaries of Philippine film and proves that it can indeed be at par with Hollywood standards.

It can be deemed with his filmography that Tarog is an experimental filmmaker -- one that doesn’t settle in one place, but one that continues to move and test limits, including his own and that of the world he moves in. But for him, he is simply a storyteller, one that has a lot of stories to tell.  “Early on, I felt that my life serves no purpose if I don’t create films, because I felt that I had something to say. That feeling is still there, but now what I’m doing just gets harder and harder. But then, I guess I just go back to the idea that I want to say something through my movies, and that people hopefully will be affected the same way I was by the movies that I saw when I was starting out,” he intimates.  That said, there is much to look forward to from Tarog and his future stories. Reports have announced that he is working on adapting into film a comic series on Philippine mythology. He has also expressed his interest in creating a science fiction film, another anti-love story,  and more other narratives that are still biding their time, considering the current political climate in the country.  Still, the limit seems boundless. In fact, limits should be boundless for this storyteller that is breaking and will continue to break traditions.  “I was once itching to get into the industry and tell the stories I want to tell. I’ve done it already, and I acknowledge how lucky I am for that,” Tarog closes. “With that, I just want to find and share more stories that have meaning for me -- those that raise questions, those that make us think about our humanity, those that connect to a lot of people.”


PEOPLE / CREATIVE C ORN E R

TONY

SARMIENTO III Chief Creative Officer and the degenerate packrat of Havas Ortega PHOTOS Niña Venus

1.

Artworks. Most frames are collaborations between

Alodia and Jay Tablante and Raffy Tesoro, who also shot my adobo centerfold ten years ago. 2.

Darth Vader Helmet. I’m a self-professed Ironman fan so I’m drawn to Tony Stark and Vader. This helmet sculpture was signed by Brian Muir.

3.

The Work. This is the first book I got published in. This is from BBDO Guerrero. The funny thing about this book is that when we did posters for ABS-CBN Bantay Usok Foundation, it got us the Catholic Media Awards and the next year I did FHM and it got us into trouble.

4.

Matrioshka. This never ends, fascinating nesting dolls; I have a ninja matrioshka here. They gave me this because I once went onstage as a luchador.

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Film Cameras. There is something nostalgic about looking back at these things. I like to see what’s been done and what we can do differently.

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Vinyl. I can play music whenever I feel the need to; I have Sinatra here. On those special days where we feel really pissed, we would just get out and do a dig.

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Laptop. I use this one for office work and I use an

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iPad for drawing. I can work anywhere thanks to a $40 Microsoft flip keyboard and a 20-cent stand. 8.

Notebooks. I’m a scribbler. I still use pen

and paper for doodling. I have endless notebooks for writing ideas down. PROFILE Tony Sarmiento III is the Tony Stark of Havas Media Ortega. Having worked in Ogilvy One, Publicis, BBDO Guerrero, Tony is an esteemed creative with a string of local and international awards under his belt. He is known as the most ethnically Filipino creaive director in the industry. Apart from being the "advertising supplier" of Havas, Tony is also the man behind #sneaksnwatches on Instagram.

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Agency of the Future We discuss with creative industry leaders where the industry is heading with the disruption of technology. PHOTOS Jojo

Llamanzares

MODERATOR Angel Guerrero, President, CEO & Editor-in-Chief, adobo magazine PANEL Raymond Arrastia, CEO of Publicis One Jos Ortega, Chairman and CEO of Havas Ortega Donald Lim, CEO of Dentsu Aegis Network Philippines Jeff Saez, President and CEO of NuWorks Interactive Labs Charly Atienza, Head of Consumer Marketing Services of Globe Telecom Carlo Ople, Vice-President for Digital Strategy and Consumer Disruptive Business of PLDT Paolo Mercado, Senior Vice President for Marketing, Communication & Innovation of Nestle Philippines. LOCATION Maybank Performing Arts Theater, BGC Arts Center


Firms are besieged in the face of digital disruption. The conversation needs to begin with the ad agency since this is a decisive moment for the future of the industry. We have seen traditional ad agencies shifting in ad spend. With many start-up tech companies, advertising can also benefit from their lean and agile transformation of many industries. Currently, what is the model like for your agency? RAYMOND ARRASTIA:

President, CEO & Editor-in-Chief, adobo magazine

JOS ORTEGA:

Donald Lim, CEO of Dentsu Aegis Network Philippines

We began some time in 2012. We began primarily as a media agency but it was already a hybrid within the media network. We already have digital and several other services inside. It’s a creative model. We took up the leap seven years ago while everybody was still under specialist mode. We took up that early on and it’s paying off. But then again, another transformation happened. We are probably version 3 by now and I’m looking forward to share you some of those ideas. DONALD LIM:

What was laid out in front of me was the Dentsu Aegis’ operating model and it’s a very interesting model because in our system, we have 2 creative agencies. So we have Dentsu Jayme Syfu and ASPAC. We have 3 media agencies. We have out-of-home which is digital/ performance. So in essence, sometimes they pitch against each other or they are forced to collaborate. What I like about the model is that it’s customer-centered. How we execute it is a bit different in a sense that if you have seven agencies, and one misses by 0.01%, all of us do not hit our goals. It’s a challenge on my side because I have to make sure that everyone hits their targets as a way of looking out for your younger brother. You have to help whoever is not performing. We have to change in fact our culture of driving towards goals, targets and brands all the while playing the roles as ad agencies and media agencies. You push whatever it takes and sometimes it means sacrificing for a bigger whole. It’s really forcing everyone to collaborate because you cannot allow one of your agencies to fail and everyone is working for that also.

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Angel Guerrero,

At Publicis One, we put clients at the center of everything. We use all the resources that we have in the country to deliver the needs of the client. In principle, we actually have multiple agencies in the market. It is actually three creative agencies, two media agencies, and a digital agency as independent free standing. We have not integrated the company as Publicis One because the consumer path is so different today as it was many years ago. Before, it was linear: TV, print, and merchandising. Today with advent of mobile phones, I cannot even draw the path to purchase. It’s just a convoluted process and this model is actually aimed at helping deliver what is needed. It is aimed at offering services in order to communicate and touch the consumer better.


PEOPLE / ROUNDTA BL E

The stewardship and familiarity with your clients also shape the brand by putting it in a really distinct position. How do you consolidate all the different resources and make it consistent with the brand and your agency?

Charly Atienza, Head of Consumer

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RAYMOND ARRASTIA:

Marketing Services of

The key in any relationship is courting and it should be present when we move forward. You just supplement it with talent to fill the gap in the relationship. You can bring a talent that actually will build and strengthen the team in that particular space. At the end of the day, it’s brand knowledge, consumer information and the most important, the people who were exposed on the business. There will be instances that there might be a better fit and there’s a new talent brought in because they’re better suited to deliver; there can be a shift from one account to another. It is really movement within the system in terms of account handling, but the basic way of business is the same, with the availability of more skills, more resources to deliver the work.

Globe Telecom

Agencies who are able to remain at the forefront of creativity should be flexible and agile enough to keep up with technology. What is the impact of tech companies collaborating with agencies?

Jeff Saez, President and CEO of NuWorks Interactive Labs

JEFF SAEZ:

Digital transformation. I guess the sexy thing you mentioned (AI, machine learning) are still not yet here in the Philippines but it is only a matter of time. That excites us because we will get there. The talent is ready; there are developers, coders, who can do the job. But in our space, the willingness to invest in that space is not yet happening. The trigger has not been pulled yet. Because the country is still at an early age in terms of digital maturity, there’s still space for social, content, e-commerce stuff. We are still beginning but there is a lot opportunity for everybody. No one has really dominated the industry yet so that is a good opportunity for everybody. CHARLY ATIENZA:

Personally with Globe, the relationship and the work has improved for as long as we stayed partners. There is a level of trust and comfort that only comes with time. Through all the campaigns that I’ve seen without partner agencies, clients should hold themselves accountable when the material is actually not where it is supposed to be. It’s the ability to make a call, move on and scrap an idea; I think most clients are a little afraid to do that. The ability to try new things together and make mistakes as you go along is very important for the relationship and for the success of communications that you have put out as a brand.

Raymond Arrastia, CEO of Publicis One


PAOLO MERCADO:

for Marketing, Communication & Innovation of Nestlé Philippines.

Carlo Ople, VicePresident for Digital Strategy and Consumer Disruptive Business of PLDT.

Jos Ortega, Chairman and CEO of Havas Ortega

From left to right: Ken Lingan, Margot Torres, Jos Ortega, Chay Mondejar-Saputil, Jeff Saez

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Paolo Mercado, Senior Vice President

My perspective is on both sides of the fence. I have worked on the Publicis side for more than 10 years, managing the agency here in the Philippines and being part of the global team for Publicis on the Nestlé account for about 4 years. Then I moved over to the global side of Nestlé and worked the local side of Nestlé in China and Philippines. First of all, relationships; these big global relationships are really personality driven and it will be very interesting to watch how things evolve. Global master service agreements are really personal friendship-driven and those can go anytime. The second one is an internal debate; it bounces around with our global teams dealing with one-stop-shop agency where all the expertise are there versus shopping for different expertise. Going for a one-stop-shop is indicative of the lack of confidence of the marketer; that makes us dependent on a one-stop-shop to do all the thinking for us. Personally, I’m against that. It’s not a question of trying to threaten your business; it’s a question of our own survival. Companies like Nestlé need to recognize that creativity must come from within the client: creativity in thinking, strategy, really deep understanding of the consumer. If these skills are not insourced, we won’t know how to orchestrate ourselves. We will spell the death of our own organization. Frankly, it is there because companies like Nestlé are under tremendous pressure because our business model is actually aging. The cost pressure on us, not only locally, but globally is tremendous."


PEOPLE / FLIPSID E

Denis Cedric Ty BUSINES UNIT MANAGER, NORDE INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTORS

DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE IN THE COMPANY.

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My team and I are responsible for all marketing communications, campaigns and activities.  We lead the integration and execution of local marketing campaigns for some of the world’s biggest technology brands in 3D printing, digital fabrication, commercial and industrial printing and more.  Our technologies have very practical and wide applications in various industries that can be a game-changer for their businesses. I consider myself a technology evangelist. I seek to understand the business windows of our customers and find the right technology that would help them level up their business.  WHAT CHANGES IN THE INDUSTRY HAVE YOU SEEN FROM WHEN YOU STARTED AS COMPARED TO NOW?

Businesses have been shifting from the traditional or manual processes to integrating digital solutions that streamlines their production processes and cuts down on costs and lead times. We have seen some business owners replace multiple traditional machines and processes with a single digital machine. Imagine what 3D printing can do. Futurists actually say there will be a time where ports and factories will have 3D printers that can print anything from digital files sent online without the need to ship any physical materials. With these digital solutions, companies are not just able to simplify their production but also empower their brands, marketers, designers and creatives with innovative output that showcases different applications. Moreover, I have also seen how we are starting to transform the education system in the Philippines with our makerspace or FabLab solutions. Schools are now shifting from the conventional classroom lectures to more experiential and hands-on learning. They use different digital technologies along with creativity and critical thinking to solve real-life problems. We are helping institutions who want to shape and develop minds to be more innovative, collaborative and output based. 

WHAT’S A NORMAL DAY IN THE OFFICE LIKE FOR YOU?

When I’m in the office a normal day would be… meetings, emails, planning, solving problems, presentations, mentoring and more meetings. But I spend almost half of my time outside of the office. Whenever I am outside of the office, I meet with various people from different companies in very diverse industries such as advertising, education, aerospace, interior design, automotive, architecture, labels & packaging, manufacturing, fashion, sign & display, wood working and much more. I find different and innovative possibilities of collaboration for us to grow together. IF YOU HAVEN’T BEEN PART OF THIS INDUSTRY, WHERE WOULD YOU HAVE VENTURED INTO?

Advertising or Music. I am a frustrated rockstar. WHAT ARE YOUR GUILTY PLEASURES?

Aside from eating more than what is expected- pigging out, I love going to gigs, concerts, and discovering new music.


Jia Salindong-Du COUNTRY MANAGER, TURNER TV

DESCRIBE YOUR ROLE IN THE COMPANY.

As Turner’s Country Manager in the Philippines, I scale up its local Kids and Entertainment business. This includes leading the development of content opportunities, creating greater experiences, and expanding the fanbase for brands like Cartoon Network and Warner TV. It also includes supporting ad-sales, and operating in tandem with our regional consumer products and licensing teams. Since Turner owns and operates several awardwinning brands throughout the region, I am working to make these brands work together in a unified brand. We already have plans to ensure quality content creation and distribution as well as how Turner can keep up with the changing Philippine media landscape. WHAT CHANGES IN THE INDUSTRY HAVE YOU SEEN FROM WHEN YOU STARTED AS COMPARED TO NOW?

WHAT'S A NORMAL DAY IN THE OFFICE LIKE FOR YOU?

I start off with planning my day and prioritizing key projects and engagements. I usually hold off on any meeting until 10a.m so that I can read some news, industry articles, and attend to unread emails from the day before. Then, I will have discussions with our sales, marketing and business development teams on ongoing projects, issues to resolve and talk about upcoming opportunities. I also have conference meetings with our regional team. Lunch breaks are spent with my team; we always watch the latest shows to keep ourselves updated and in touch. Afternoons are frequently spent with client meetings.

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IF YOU HAVEN'T BEEN PART OF THIS INDUSTRY, WHERE WOULD YOU HAVE VENTURED INTO?

I’d be working for the Philippine government. I’d be honored to serve as many Filipinos as I can using my time, talents, and resources. It’s no coincidence that I’ve spent my entire career here in the country because I want to give back and become a good citizen in my own simple way – by paying taxes, voting every election, teaching in school, volunteering for community work and many other things. Warner TV recently launched a campaign called #BeyondTheHoop and provided assistance to young basketball fans. And Cartoon Network runs inschool coding initiatives that equip students with useful life schools. These kinds of programs are enormously satisfying personally and professionally. WHAT ARE YOUR GUILTY PLEASURES?

TV. I love binging on teen drama series! Ever since I was in college, I’ve been watching the latest shows with the juiciest issues and latest trends. The first ever show I got hooked on was The O.C., then One Tree Hill and Gossip Girl. I am a huge Chuck and Blair fan. Right now, I’m watching the latest season of Riverdale and have also just started with Sabrina the Teenage Witch. There’s something about the coming-of-age stories that keep on resonating with me. It’s interesting to relate myself to these characters and watch how they go through life with the wisdom I have now. It must come with age!

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As the TV and advertising industries are changing rapidly, success is no longer measured solely by television ratings. With platform expansion, shifting viewer patterns and an abundance of varying content, we also measure and capture data across all screens and experiences. Although perceived as a fight for attention, we’re also fighting for hearts and minds. It’s not about time, it’s about engagement. In an environment of nearinfinite choice, consumers are turning to content that engage, is emotionally resonant, and enables them to forge social bonds. While reach still has value, the pendulum is clearly swinging towards engagement. It is worth noting, that our research shows that despite how connected we all are, people increasingly feel detached and socially isolated – a culture of detachment. Storytelling brings people together and creates a sense of belonging. It is this that fosters fan engagement.


PEOPLE / ESSENTIAL S

JILSON TIU 3

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STREET PHOTOGRAPHER AND PHOTO JOURNALIST

} 13

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8

1.

2.

Lens Hood. Most of the time, I carry this when I roam around, it keeps the front element of my lens dry so I can shoot under distressed weather.

Passport. Personal Legitimate

Tamron 70-200mm G2 2.8. I always carry this

so I can get up close without being noticed and ensure that the scene happened even without my presence. It's heavy, but it's worth the weight.

Phone, OnePlus 5T. This is my second camera,

whenever I see something interesting that should be captured immediately, I pull out my phone and shoot it. Also, this is where I edit most of my photos for social media and on the go assignments. A personal computer in my pocket. 3.

8.

9.

In-ear Sony earphones. Music influences

my mood and the color I produce. When I listen to good music as I walk the streets, it usually results in seeing great scenes. 10-11. LPE6N Canon Batteries and Charger.

I carry two of these for when I'm out.

ID for local and abroad. 4-6. Power Bank and Dash Charging brick and

12. Canon 50mm 1.4. My lens after the sun

sets and the light is not enough.Â

cord. My lifesaver during emergencies.

13. 7. Pen and Notebook. To write down stories, ideas

and things I don't want to forget, especially daily schedules for future shoots and coverages.

Canon 5D MK IV + 16-35mm 2.8 II. I

usually equip the 16-35 wide angle lens so that when something happens in front of me, I'm ready, no matter how close the scene is.


ISSUE 75 / MOBILE

BUSINESS Focus on brands and media.

SPEACIAL FEATURE 184 Martin Sorell Leaving WPP THE FIRM 186 The Huddle Room

BRAND MARKETING 190 Spotify MEDIASCAPE 196 Zenith Research: Mobile Ad Spend


BUSINESS / SPECIA L F E AT URE

The Big Exit Legendary advertising giant, Martin Sorrell exits WPP after 33 years. WORDS

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Nevicshky Calma

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drastic — but not surprising— move for 73-year old advertising giant, Martin Sorrell. After over three decades in the world’s biggest advertising agency, Sorrell stepped down as the chief executive officer of WPP, after the board’s investigation linked to his alleged “personal misconduct”. WPP released a statement in April confirming that “Sir Martin Sorrell has stepped down as Chief Executive Officer of WPP with immediate effect,” and that “Roberto Quarta, Chairman of WPP, becomes Executive Chairman until the appointment of a new Chief Executive Officer.” Wunderman CEO Mark Read and Andrew Scott, who is WPP’s corporate development director and chief operating officer for Europe, will take the chief operating officer role. Sorrell’s personal PR firm, Project Associated also issued a statement, relaying his message: “Obviously I am sad to leave WPP after 33 years… It has been a passion, focus and source of energy for so long. However, I believe it is in the best interests of the business if I step down now. I leave the Company in very good hands, as the Board knows.”


SILENCE INTO SUSPICIONS After Sorrell stepped down, WPP has been silent about the exit. A spokesman for WPP said: “WPP has been advised that it cannot disclose details of the allegations against Sir Martin Sorrell because it is prohibited by data protection law from giving such details. Sir Martin chose to resign at the conclusion of the investigation by independent legal counsel.” Shareholders of this turnover of £15.3billion company were left clueless, agitated at best, especially because of the executive pay that Sorrell will still receive. Sorrell amassed a fortune in the world’s largest marketing force, being paid £13.9m in 2017, £48.1m in 2016m and £70.4m in 2015.  WPP confirmed, he is set to receive further payments related to 1.6m shares in a number of award plans that will vest over the next five years, estimated at about £19m. Pirc, a consultancy firm that advises shareholders on how they should vote at AGMs, and Glass Lewis posed questions on the sudden exit, warning shareholders that they must demand transparency as to the details of the same. Bluechip answers demanded answers, but to no avail.

SORRELL’S LEGACY IN WPP Sorrell, after being the finance director for the advertising agency Saatchi &Saatchi, acquired this small company making wire baskets called Wire and Plastic Products way back 1985. This company steered the wheel to becoming the global advertising empire, after a series of acquisitions, including J. Walter Thompson Group in 1987 and the Ogilvy Group in 1989. In his farewell statement, he recounted his contributions to WPP, “We put the focus on Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Africa and the Middle East and Central Eastern Europe, the home of the next billion consumers. We embarked on the early development of digital capabilities; and the evolution of a firm-wide integrated client and country-centered approach. Our holding company was recognized as the world’s best and most effective through the Cannes Lions and Effie Awards year after year after year… We pioneered Atticus Awards for original written thinking… the WPP Fellowship Awards to recognize promising talent… the Partnership and Practice Awards for client endorsed integrated market and case studies. Our Stream digital conferences have attracted the best in the digital business for more than a decade. Our Annual Sustainability and Pro Bono Reports highlight the unique social, environmental and public policy work that we do day in, day out across the globe.” Today, WPP employs more than 200, 000 staff in 400 advertising businesses in offices in 112 countries. S4 CAPITAL Sorrell’s contract with WPP had no non-compete clause, allowing him to establish his own firm only weeks after leaving his former empire. He acquired a small listed vehicle— — renamed S4 Capital, referring to four generations of the Sorrell family. The advertising mogul invested £40m for this company. His act of shelling out from his own pocket, and his reputation attracted £11m more from institutional investors and a further commitment, albeit non-binding, for another £150m to fuel an acquisition spree. While detractors say his comeback in the twilight years of his business career is not a wise move, his friends and experts say, his age won’t matter because his advertising prowess and connections to every major player in the world will harness all potential possible for his new endeavor. Sorrell is giving himself a five-year window to build the business of S4 Capital and probably, before he turns 79, will make his exit from the industry.

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“PERSONAL MISCONDUCT” 2017 saw the beginning of the end of Sorrell’s stint at WPP. The board of the advertising giant launched an investigation into allegations of “personal misconduct”, mishandling of company assets, and supposed “abusive” behavior towards employees. A whistleblower revealed that Sorrell was seen entering a brothel in Mayfair at 50a Shepherd Market in June 2017. Sorrell strenuously denied the prostitute allegations, which first appeared in the Wall Street Journal. Other than this, Sorrell was accused of maltreating subordinates, including verbal abuse and immense workload, always expecting them to take on his pace, working all day and night. According to the Financial Times, one incident that triggered the whistleblower in coming out in the open was the firing of Sorrell’s driver who served him and his family for 15 years. The driver was sacked because he asked if he can rest, after 12 hours of straight work. The Financial Times reported, his termination was ‘met with shock and sadness across the executive suite’. Also, the British business tycoon was also allegedly “blurring” the lines between corporate and personal expenses. Sorrell denies all allegations. Weeks after his retirement, his spokesman specifically denied the visit to a prostitute, saying “As regards the allegations which have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Sir Martin strenuously denies them. He will be making no further comment at this time.”


BUSINESS / THE FIR M

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Thrive at five:

Bayanihan in the digital age Five partners behind independent agency The Huddle Room show how unity in diversity propels success. WORDS Beng

Ragon

I

t all started with a huddle of five multiplied by 5,000 and more ideas that are making waves in the digital world. Friends before partners, the dynamic five behind the Filipino independent agency The Huddle Room continue to inspire the spirit of bayanihan to deliver excellent work year after year. Such inspiration has created a strong culture of collaboration and helping each other to achieve a common goal: disrupt the status quo. Through its five years of doing business, the Huddle Room succeeded in transforming itself from a mere media consultancy group to a leading full-service and digital communications agency. How this success came about can be traced back to a bayanihan of five composed of friends and managing partners Dimples Cruz, Julia Garcia, Reena Robles, Patricia Dizon, and Eugene Manalo. Bayanihan is a Filipino term that refers to unity and cooperation in a community to achieve a shared goal. Five years ago, they shared a common vision: to build a fully owned and independent local agency at the height of big multinational firms dominating the industry. “We just wanted to keep it small but profitable,” shares Dimples Cruz, managing partner and chairman of The Huddle Room. The first huddle actually happened in a small room with a long table and red chairs back in 2013. “When you huddle, that’s where great ideas come from,” says Julia Garcia.

Trusting in each other’s individual strengths helps them bring out the best of what they bring to the table. When asked what personal trait became a contributing factor to the success of the firm, each has the most interesting answers. Reena Robles for one is said to be the most passionate. “I take to heart everything that I do,” she enthuses. She talks about cultivating the culture of continuous learning in The Huddle Room where everyone is encouraged to bring forth new ideas and find new ways of doing things. Patricia Dizon, on the other hand, prioritizes teamwork and always thinks about what will benefit others. “I am people-centric,” she says. “All parts are of equal importance and the next big idea can come from anyone.” “We never quit until we achieve something,” stresses Julia after citing resiliency as one of her core strengths, which is also reflective of the agency’s strong quality as a thriving creative business. Dimples admits that she is a dreamer and shares that The Huddle Room has always been part of that dream. To complete the big picture, Eugene Manalo comes in as the fighter. “I fight for ideas,” he explains. Since then, growing big has been unstoppable. From a table of five to a full floor of 50 and more, The Huddle Room has evolved to be on top of its game especially in the digital race. It has maintained its competitive edge as one of the frontrunners in the digital business

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through numerous award-winning online campaigns. “We are evolving as digital advertising people,” says Eugene. “We are, and maybe ahead of the industry in terms of measuring the impact of online platforms like influential marketing and social media. We keep pushing ourselves to come up with innovative ideas to wow the digital world.” From 2013 to date, the agency has achieved an impressive growth of +389% in brands through organic and new business wins. Only three years into this venture, The Huddle Room became the first Philippine agency to win the Global Native Advertising Awards (Gold) Best Use of Print for National Bookstore and Best Omni Channel Strategy for Belo Baby (Silver). For 2018, The Huddle Room was shortlisted for the Global Native Agency of the Year in this year’s edition of Global Native Awards along with three others in the shortlist. Julia also cited collaborating closely with tech giants like Facebook and Google through continuous learning to keep up with their changing platforms. “We work closely with these big tech companies and we have been recognized for the impact of our online campaigns.” enthuses Julia. On the same year, The Huddle Room also bagged the 2016 Campaign SEA Best Experiential Marketing (Silver), On to 2017, the agency continued to make a mark globally and regionally with big wins like Campaign SEA Best Experiential Marketing (Silver) and Campaign SEA Philippine Independent Agency (Bronze) together with two other finalists in Best New Business Development Team in SEA and Digital Agency in the Philippines. The Huddle Room also reaped two Bronzes in Global Native Awards in Berlin for Best Use of Influencer (National Book Store) and Best in Programmatic for Systane. Locally, The Huddle Room also made a strong initial showing by being a finalist for six categories in the 21st Campaign Agency of the Year (AOY) Awards in 2017: Best in Digital Creative and Effectiveness, Best in Digital Media Excellence, Best in Media Creativity, Best in Media Business Management, Best in Activation Execution, and Best in Activation Effectiveness. Number five indeed plays a significant role for the agency. This year, The Huddle Room made its five-year mark in the business with a yearlong celebration starting March 1 as its foundation day. Fuelled by five friends with diverse strengths and skills, all of them agreed what made the business thrive in five words: integrity, humility, adaptability, resilience and relentlessness.

At three years, The Huddle Room is already stringing international awards through an impressisve business growth

The Huddle Room's success is built on the vision of its five managing partners

Julia Garcia and Eugene Manalo

The Huddle Room enlivens the Bayanihan culture by encouraging everyone to bring new ideas


BUSINESS / BRA ND MAR K E T IN G

A New Wave of Persuasion Spotify is harnessing individual music listening through programmatic technologies. WORDS Dan

Robins Louise Clemente

ARTWORK Jericho

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mere buzzword five years ago, programmatic has grown to become a significant force in today’s advertising ecosystem. Programmatic spending has reached $25 billion in 2017 and is projected to surpass $43 billion by 2020, when programmatic penetration of the digital ad market will be 63 percent . The merits of programmatic technologies lie in its ability to effectively tap into real-time consumer data and develop more targeted digital advertising campaigns. Programmatic advertising enables businesses to better understand how consumers interact with their products or services through deep data and insights, and subsequently makes it easier to deliver ads to the right audience at the right time and place. Thus far, programmatic display advertising has been the dominant trade channel in Asia, alongside Video-onDemand and Social. However, there is another form of programmatic to watch out for: programmatic audio. THE POWER OF MUSIC – AND DIGITAL AUDIO

Today’s consumers are not just watching videos on YouTube or binge-watching shows on Netflix, they are plugged into their favourite playlists or podcasts as well. Digital audio streaming is on the rise thanks to the explosion of mobile and accessible, quality content. According to the Global Music Report 2018 by the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, music streaming revenues grew by 38.2 percent . Nearly 80 percent

of music listeners used an online streaming service from October 2016 to 2017, with 60 percent of music streamers listening on mobile, compared to 40 percent of TV and movie streamers. Audio when combined with mobile is particularly powerful - giving advertisers the power to reach users in screenless moments when they are on the go. As music listening is so uniquely individual, emotional and, now, addressable thanks to streaming, it can uncover deeper insights compared to the video content, where there is less of an emotional connection. There is a playlist to represent each moment of our lives. Hence, music streaming is opening more avenues for marketers and enabling them to truly connect with consumers more intimately. The music streaming ad revenue opportunity is worth $1.5 billion today, and is expected to reach at least $7 billion by 2030 . TUNING INTO THE POTENTIAL OF PROGRAMMATIC AUDIO

As 80% of music streaming listening is done through headphones, the result is a uniquely 1:1 ads experience which can capture the attention of the listener. Couple this with rich data and advertisers are able to create an intimate, highly relevant message for their potential customers. In addition, programmatic audio is inherently automated, making it easier for marketers to incorporate them into their omni-channel marketing strategies. Brands are able to target consumers based on their demographics, listening habits and even their moods.


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A person who is listening to a workout playlist can be greeted with ads on fitness gear and not fast food - a far more relevant experience. In Asia, there is no cookie-cutter strategy for marketing or advertising because of the sheer diversity in the region. However, rich data fueled by local audience insights is paving the way towards hyper-targeted personalised marketing. Given the strong emotional bond audiences often form with their favourite music content, marketers have the opportunity to leverage on-demand music streaming platforms to deliver advertisements that connect better with audiences and seamlessly blend into the overall music experience. Still, not all platforms are built the same and it’s important for marketers to be aware of the industry issues that blights the ecosystem - for example, ad fraud and invalid traffic. Advertising on the right platform, one that actively monitors its environment to reduce or eliminate the influx of bot traffic, will set the benchmarks that will give future campaigns a significant edge in intelligence and cutting-edge engagement.

"BRANDS ARE ABLE TO TARGET CONSUMERS BASED ON THEIR DEMOGRAPHICS, LISTENING HABITS AND EVEN THEIR MOODS." Understanding people through music has become a key part of Spotify’s data mission. With over 180 million active users across 65 markets and ubiquity across devices, there is potential to use incredibly large and rich datasets to truly take the advantage programmatic technology affords to serve the right message to the right person, at the right time. As consumers are increasingly pressing ‘play’ across the world, the potential gains to be reaped from programmatic audio, music in particular, are huge. Audio opens new doors in engaging with audiences in a more intimate and personalised manner, and there is no better time than now for marketers to tune in.


BUSINESS / M ED IAS PAC E

Zenith Advertising Within the next two years, mobile share of advertising is projected to increase by 30%

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xpect more ads on your mobile phone by 2020! Zenith’s Advertising Expenditure Forecasts reports that Mobile advertising will account for 30.5% of global advertising expenditure in 2020, up from 19.2% in 2017. The bucks will also be in this platform, with expenditure on mobile advertising seen to amount to US$187 billion in 2020, more than twice the US$88 billion spent on desktop advertising, and just US$5billionn behind the US$192billion spent on television advertising. At the current rate of growth, mobile advertising will comfortably overtake television in 2021. As internet users switch from desktop to mobile devices – and new users go straight to mobile – online advertising is making the same switch. Advertising on mobile devices is rising at a meteoric rate, and is taking market share from most of other media. Mobile adspend grew by 35% in 2017, and we expect it to grow at an average rate of 21% a year to 2020. However, brands that are shifting budgets to mobile advertising may be affecting their ability to

win new customers and expand their market share. Zenith’s Touchpoints ROI Tracker research* shows that traditional mass media are more effective at driving recall among new or light buyers, therefore having a strong understanding of acquisition channels and retention channels is key. According to Touchpoints ROI Tracker, television ads are most effective at driving recall among potential customers, while mobile ads are least effective. Potential customers are 53% as likely to recall television ads as existing customers, but for mobile ads this falls to 41%. Targeting mobile ads at existing customers can certainly help brands achieve shortterm performance targets, especially because mobile is increasingly tying together the whole consumer journey. However, mobile is currently less effective at creating long-term awareness among potential customers than traditional media, so brands with a heavy mobile presence should consider investing more in traditional mass media to compensate for this.

AVERAGE ANNUAL GROWTH RATE BY MEDIUM 2017–2020 (%)

21.5

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CINEMA

OUTDOOR

TELEVISION

RADIO

-4.5 -5.3 -6.4

2.6 1.3 1.1 DESKTOP INTERNET

NEWSPAPERS

MAGAZINES


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SHARE OF GLOBAL ADSPEND BY MEDIUM (%) CINEMA 0.7

RADIO 6.2

CINEMA 1.0 OUTDOOR 6.8

RADIO 5.6 OUTDOOR 6.5

TELEVISION 31.3

TELEVISION 34

2017

MAGAZINES 5.1

MAGAZINES 3.7

2020 NEWSPAPER 7.1

NEWSPAPER 9.5

MOBILE INTERNET 19.2

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DESKTOP INTERNET 18.5

MOBILE INTERNET 30.5

DESKTOP INTERNET 14.3

DEMAND IN CHINA DRIVES RAPID CINEMA GROWTH

ASIA PACIFIC FUELS GLOBAL EXPANSION

Most of the traditional media are still growing despite the inexorable rise of mobile advertising, but generally at very low rates. We forecast television and radio to grow by 1% a year between 2017 and 2020, while out-of-home advertising grows by 3% a year. Cinema, however, is growing at 16% a year, thanks to investment in new screens, successful movie franchises, and better international marketing. The main driver, though, is surging demand in China, where ticket sales increased 22% in 2017. China overtook the US to become the world’s biggest cinema advertising market in 2017, worth US$1.2bn, and by 2020 we expect it to reach US$2.8bn. Print advertising continues to shrink together with circulations: between 2017 and 2020 we forecast newspaper adspend to shrink by an average of 5% a year, while magazine adspend shrinks by 6%. This refers only to advertising within print titles, though – publishers’ online revenues are counted within the desktop and mobile internet totals, so their overall performance is not as bad as the print figures suggest. Research organisations in some markets – such as the Advertising Association/WARC in the UK – provide combined print and digital ad revenue figures for publishers, generally showing that the digital revenues soften but do not reverse the decline in print.

Asia Pacific is by far the biggest contributor to global adspend growth. Between 2017 and 2020 it will contribute 43% of all the new ad dollars added to the market – US$32.1bn out of the US$75.1bn total. Six of the ten markets that will contribute the most to global growth are in Asia Pacific: China (which by itself will account for 22% of global growth), India (which will contribute 5%), Indonesia (4%), Japan (3%), the Philippines (3%) and South Korea (2%). We forecast that Asia Pacific will account for 33.8% of global adspend in 2020, up from 32.6% in 2017. North America, currently the largest advertising region, is falling behind in growth. We expect it to contribute 27% of new ad dollars between 2017 and 2020, while its share of global adspend slips from 37.1% to 36.0%. “Dynamic markets in Asia Pacific are leading the way in global adspend growth, growing at 5%6% a year,” said Jonathan Barnard, Zenith’s Head of Forecasting and Director of Global Intelligence. “By the middle of the next decade it will be the biggest advertising region in the world.” “The mobile device in our pockets is becoming the gateway to our media world, but its brand-building capabilities are still in question – simply applying old practices to new technology may not translate to brand growth,” said Vittorio Bonori, Zenith’s Global Brand President. “Having a clear understanding of how the entire ecosystem of paid, owned and earned media works together to drive return on investment is vital.” *Touchpoints ROI Tracker is Publicis Media’s brand contact measurement and planning tool, based on more than 1,000,000 consumer interviews since 2004.

GLOBAL ADSPEND GROWTH REMAINS STEADY

We forecast global advertising expenditure to grow 4.5% this year. That’s fractionally behind the 4.6% growth we forecast in March, but that’s primarily because we have upped our figures for 2017, providing a tougher comparison. We now estimate that global adspend grew 4.2% in 2017, compared to our previous estimate of 4.0%. We forecast 4.2% growth for 2019 and 4.3% growth for 2020, so growth will remain comfortably within the 4%-5% range it has stayed within since 2011.


ISSUE 75 / MOBILE

LIFE

Lifestyle features that interest the creative industry

SPACES 202 Nobody Flagship Store

BOOK REVIEW 210 Frenemies

ART & CULTURE 206 National Museum of Natural History

WATERING HOLE 212 Corner Market EYE ON 214 Mongolia


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Somewhere for a Bunch of Nobodies Nobody is no longer anonymous with their new flagship store in Cubao X. WORDS Niña

Angelica Venus Escudero

PHOTO Christa


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ucked in the artists’ haven Cubao X, Somewhere1109 brought a shelter to the bunch of nobodies making their name in the clothing industry. The Nobody flagship store is a well-curated space where urban art meets poetry. Their clothing racks are lined up with consignments from Bulacan and Cebu and everyone who walks in their store can buy something under a hundred pesos. Be it collectibles or doormats, what they dubbed as burner products support the bigger projects that the nobodies want to roll out. Taking example of their Just Logos line, one of the owners explained that the reason why they thrive was their simple marketing strategy: honesty. “Just Logos is a burner product. People bought that honesty when they saw the collection,” said Kyle who preferred to stay a nobody. Bringing the streets indoors, the Nobody’s flagship store is a place where people from all walks of life come together. “Nobody is for everyone, regardless of your field” The philosophy behind the brand, says Kyle, "is giving credit to the people who work behind the scenes.” “Anybody can be a nobody, without restrictions,” he adds. At times, Somewhere1109 has been mistaken for an art gallery. Nobody even has a running joke that they have a strategic location next to a bar in a way to lure drunken people and buy something. “(In the future,) we will invite artists if they want to put up a show. Gusto naming makita na very diverse tong spot na to,” comments Kyle. However, the future does not have to wait to see the works of artists on their wearable canvasses. Together with Finn, Lari and Zei, Kyle found himself in a team with an acquired taste for collaborations. This is one of the reasons why they do not commit to prices on the same level as mass-production brands. “Namamahalan sila (consumers) kasi actually now, nakakatuwa yung pantheon ngayon for local brands. Today we collaborate.” Kyle explains the pride of nobody. “The people who make this happen, we want to pay them right,” adds Lari. This narrative is what they keep telling consumers. Consumers, on their part, do not just transact when they buy a shirt. They support a local artist; they become a part of the idea and the philosophy behind a shirt. The four co-owners of the hub are all about stripping down the formalities and infecting people with raw honesty. “Nung nagcollab kami, andami naming natutunan sa kanila,” tells Kyle. Their mutual relationship and fair treatment to atists earned them a respectable spot as an independent company. To put the cherry on top, who would not support a brand that worked with the team behind the micro-satellite Diwata-1? It does not happen often that four misfits can get the approval of the government. To put simply, Nobody cooperates with the government “Astig di ba?”

Their clothing racks are lined up with collaborations from different artists

Like rodents, Nobody claims to be at their best when working underground


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Nobody clothing is rising above the surface through brutal honesty, raw talent and keeping everything to the bare necessities


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A Showcase of Natural History A look inside the Philippines’ National Museum of Natural History.

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The Musuem is built around the Tree of Life, a structural marvel of Architect Dominique Garcia.

Escudero | PHOTOS Calvin Cardenas

he Philippines boasts of being rich in a lot of things, like art, culture, and natural resources. Through the country’s National Museum, the best of its art and its culture has been showcased through the National Museum of Fine Arts (NMFA) and the National Museum for Anthropology (NMA), respectively. It was only a matter of time that the country built a venue for it to present the best of its natural environment. With that, the Philippines went abuzz with excitement when news announced the opening the third part of its National Museum complex: the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), which is meant to house the country’s collection of unique flora and fauna, The country had been waiting for the establishment of a Natural History museum for long, as it already had been mandated by law. Called the National Museum Act of 1998, the statute declared the Agrifina Circle in Rizal Park, Manila as the permanent and executive site of the National Museum Complex, where three civic buildings called the Old Congress Building, the Department of Finance building and the Department of Tourism building were. The Department of Finance building was repurposed to become the NMA in 1998. In 2000, the Old Congress Building was converted into the NMFA. The Department of Tourism building was then expected to house the NMNH. Yet of course, with an endeavor this big, encountering challenges and shortcomings was expected. As shared by Curator I, Zoology Division officer-in-charge and NMNH project team leader Marivene M. Santos, there were matters that must be resolved in terms of the design, structural retrofitting, contractors, and finances. Thankfully, all of these were addressed with the teamwork of the Museum’s Board of Trustees under the chairmanship of Ramon del Rosario, the museum directors Jeremy R. Barns and Ana Maria Theresa P. Labrador, Ph.D., and acting assistant director Angel P. Bautista. In the end, they were able to convince

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From water to air, Lolong found a permanent home at the National Museum of Natural History's Ayala Hall

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The first and most important scientific map of the Philippine Archipelago. Drawn by the Jesuit Father Pedro Murillo Velarde published in Manila in 1734.

big donors to finance the construction of the NMNH, particularly the iconic Tree of Life structure designed by architect Dominique Galicia. Erecting the Tree of Life was a big challenge for Mrs. Santos and the team. “According to its original plan, to have a double helix DNA as columns proved to be structurally impossible because it cannot support the dome. They changed the concept to bamboo but was still projected to be structurally impossible,” she shares. “Now it became a simple classy massive column, which is sturdy and structurally fitted to hold the whole dome.” There were still challenges confronted by the team upon the process of consultation and conceptualization of the content and exhibitions inside the NMNH. “Hired consultants wanted the exhibition to be presented in a ‘theme park’ concept. The museum staff, on the other hand, battled to display real natural history specimens to present information scientifically accurate at the same time keeping it interesting and aesthetically pleasing,” Mrs. Santos adds. “It came to a point where our staff had to visit the factory that prepares the replicas of marine animals, like the whale shark, dolphins, manta rays,

"THE PEOPLE NEED TO WATCH OUT FOR THE SPERM WHALE BONE, THE BENHAM RISE BANK EXHIBITION, AND SEVERAL OTHER PLANS IN THE WORKS, WHICH WE DARE NOT DIVULGE FOR NOW."

The National Museum of Natural History is nested on what used to be the headquarters of the Department of Tourism.

napoleon wrasse and tunas, and reject it several times until the correct anatomical structures of the organisms were achieved.” Eventually, the NMNH was completed and opened to the public on May this year, right on time for International Museum Day. Since then, it had already attracted more than 20,000 visitors. Upon entering, visitors are immediately greeted by the Tree of Life, which also serves as the alpha-omega of the exhibits in the museum. The iconic structure contains an elevator, which visitors can use to direct themselves to the topmost level 5, which Mrs. Santos and the team deemed as the appropriate start of the museum tour. From there, visitors can use a bridge to reach four


Display of the country's diverse marine life preserves.

Taxidermied specimens of local animals are on display such as the Spot Billed Pelican which went extinct in the 1960s.

galleries featuring the Philippine Biodiversity, Geology of the Philippines, Minerals and Energy Resources and the Life through Time. They may then use the ramp going down level 4 where another four galleries can be viewed: Mossy, Montane and Pine Forests; Lowland Evergreen Rainforests; Ultramafic and Limestone Karst Forests; and Freshwater Wetlands. After that, visitors can move down to level 3 and check out the Mangrove and Marine Realm galleries. Finally, on level 2, visitors can see the exhibitions focused on natural inheritance, featuring special videos of the new flora and fauna discoveries and the three Philippine sites chosen as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. “In essence, the idea of starting the tour from level 5 hails on the theme ‘From Ridge to Reef’ or can be said as from the mountains down the sea,” Mrs. Santos imparts. There is also a temporary exhibit honoring the early naturalists of the Philippines and their history, as well as a special exhibit on climate change and its harrowing effects on the country and its natural environment. The NMNH takes pride in each gallery and its own way of showcasing the country’s zoological, botanical,

and geological treasures. However, as Mrs. Santos divulges, museum goers seem to already have their favorites, two of which are the remains of the famous Lolong, the largest saltwater crocodile to be held in captivity; and the Philippine Eagle Gemma and Tinuy-an. All in all, the NMNH has proven to be a worthy site to represent the Philippines’ natural resources. There is still a lot in store for the museum, as the National Museum staff continues to work on researching and studying the country’s rich biodiversity. “The people need to watch out for the sperm whale bone, the Benham Rise Bank exhibition, and several other plans in the works, which we dare not to divulge for now,” Mrs. Santos reveals. For news on latest installations and other announcements related to the NMNH, the National Museum of the Philippines can be followed on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/nationalmuseumofthephilippines/), Twitter (@ natmuseumph), and Instagram (@natmuseumph).

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Madmen in Besiege Ken Auletta takes on the position of the disrupted advertising industry. Jericho Louise Clemente

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he world watched at the sight of Jon Mandel's testimony to the Association of National Advertisers in 2015. His years of experience being the CEO of Mediacom made him more than a credible whistle-blower against agencies and executives who once considered him their successor. In his introduction, Auletta strains the reason why it was paramount that advertising not be a sidekick to other industries’ limelight: Trying to understand the media without understanding advertising and marketing, its fuel supply, is like trying to understand the auto industry without regard to fuel costs. This reasoning was echoed by the Booklist’s review of The Epic Disruption of Ad Business and Everything Else. “However distant, even repugnant, the advertising and marketing business might seem to the average consumer, it is the fuel that drives a First World economy, Auletta argues. . . . Astute, colorful, fully informed. . . . an important if utterly disquieting book.”

What was once believed as a decaying industry is now being interrupted. Auletta expertly untangles the web of corruption in the advertising industry with statements from Irwin Gottlieb, Richard Tobaccowala, Randall Rothenberg, Caroline Everson, Les Moonves, Beth Comstock, Anne Finucane, and Bob Greenberg. These personalities made Auletta’s storytelling vivid and brilliant according to Kirkus. “In this well-researched, personality-packed account, [Ken Auletta] examines the baffling choices facing advertisers (hundreds of media channels, billions of smartphones, etc.) and the technological threats to agencies, from ad blockers to targeted, computerized ad- buying. . . . [A] lively narrative, which delves into the major agencies and most corners of the business. . . . A bright, informative take on an industry in turmoil.” From a comfortable throne at the penthouse of Madison Avenue’s buildings, advertisers now find themselves working with companies they consider both competitors and collaborators. Martin Sorrell, who recently left WPP after three decades, coined the term Frenemies to describe companies that both compete and cooperate. Companies like Facebook, Amazon

and Google are neither villified nor glorified. The chairman of the American Association of Advertising Agencies kudosed Auletta for his masterful telling of the industry’s landscape, “Frenemies really goes deep in examining the complexities of our industry from multiple points of view. You feel like you have a ringside seat in an industry that is going through enormous disruption. Well done!” How advertising manipulates emotions is up to consumer psychology. Throughout history, the most disruptive ads are the ones that did not mention the product, effectively making it “the real thing.” Whoever creates disruption takes control of the narrative as proven by the likes of the Hilltop commercial for Coca-cola. As much as people disdain advertising, Rishad Tobaccowala disproves that advertising is already obsolete by likening themselves to a universally despised specie, “People say agencies are dinosaurs. We are not dinosaurs. We are cockroaches. Everybody hates us. Nobody likes to see us. But cockroaches have outlived everyone.” The precise reason for the stronghold of advertising is its adaptability to different platforms. From lithography, print, radio to television, advertisers jumped on board new mediums without completely abandoning old ships. Advertising disrupts wherever people’s attention is. The development of interruption-free platforms like Netflix, YouTube, ad-skipping DVRs, and ad blockers gave birth to doubts whether consumers are becoming frenemies themselves. New York Times noted this telling hint in their review by Stuart Elliott “The easier it becomes for the public to zip, zap through and avoid interruptive ads — through innovative technology like ad blockers and streaming video — the madder, and more anxious, the mad men (and women) grow.” The future of advertising is where the lines between the content and the commercial meet. Frenemies is a celebration of the endless realm of creativity. Referencing the Emmy-winning television show Madmen, the book is one that will not sit on the shelf to gather dust. As American lawyer Tim Wu puts it, “For any Madmen fan who wants to know what happened next, Ken Auletta’s book is an entertaining, insightful and occasionally terrifying dive into the heart of 21st century advertising. Auletta is the Bob Woodward of the media industries; his access to the inside story is unparalleled, and his story-telling is a treat.”

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Around the World in One Corner Bask in the different fares offered in what is called the country’s first-ever indoor farmer’s market-cum-food hall, The Corner Market. WORDS

Leo Balante |

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Calvin Cardenas

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nspired largely by unique gastronomic adventures offered by famed food destinations of La Boqueria in Barcelona, The Torvehallerne Market in Copenhagen, and the Queen Victoria Market in Melbourne, Relish Group opens its doors to The Corner Market, the country’s firstever indoor farmer’s market and food hall, at the Podium, situated right at the heart of Pasig. The vast expanse of its whimsically-designed space covers 1,200 square meters, of unique variety of gustatory delights from its wide range of offerings from fresh produce to savory meals to dessert courtesy of its rich lineup of 17 different merchants. This expertly-curated mix of merchants presents a wide range of cuisines from all over the world, while

maintaining its strong focus on local, emerging brands and concept restaurants. Sari Salo by Myron’s dishes up homegrown hits like inasal sisig and Angus beef tapa, while Inari by Hamaru serves modern takes on Japanese eats. Ca Phe Saigon offers heirloom Vietnamese recipes and a vertical basil garden where you can pick your own leaves to add to your pho. This Asian “exploration” continues with are Char, with Chinese comfort food favorites and the best char siu in town, and Easy Tiger, Thai food with a strong commitment to authentic ingredients. Little Kaya is here as well, with its famous dolsot bibimbap. On the other side of the globe, authentic Mexican tacos are here for the taking from La Taqueria del Chupacabra, or make it Mediterranean with Sultan’s

A new hub for the office workers located at the revamped dining food hall at “The Podium,” the Corner Market, architecturally made by Denise De Castro and DDC Architectural Studios.


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menu of shawarma, kebabs, and moussaka. Birdhouse, on the other hand, gives a new twist to chicken cravings. Pizza Morena’s signature mozzarella, mascarpone, and parmesan pie answer anyone’s pizza cravings, while Barcelon de Calderon’s personalsized paellas are perfect for a leisurely lunch. For dessert and coffee servings, Stockwell’s third wave coffee will pair well with The Rabbit Hole MNL’s pastries and cakes like their bestselling ube frozen brazo. For next-to-gourmet sundae, Sundays by Merry Moo has handmade soft-serve ice cream in flavored waffle cones. Unique to The Corner Market are vendors like Catch of The Day by Cold Storage and The Meat Depot, where customers can choose their own kind of seafood or cut

of meat and have it cooked on the spot for an elevated dining experience. Fresh produce, flowers, and graband-go salads are also available from Gusto, where everything is sourced from their family farm in Rizal.

1. Ca Phe Saigon 2. Stockwell Cafe, 3. Sundays by Merry Moo

Catch the latest news and updates by following The Corner Market on Instagram, @cornermarketph, and liking our official Facebook page, @cornermarketph.


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The Edge of the World The Executive Creative Director of Blackpencil Manila, of the production house of Leo Burnett Manila uncovers traces of her family's origins in a unique, eye-opening #Monggolonggo trip WORDS Kat

Gomez-Limchoc

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have always told my teams to be mindful about filling their creative wells, so that they have constant sources of inspiration and insight from which to draw from. I encourage them to read, to go to museums, exhibits, and all kinds of performances. But most of all, I encourage them to travel. I love a brainstorm session where somebody will share an idea sparked by something they had seen while on an adventure. And so, I plan the year with my own big and small travel breaks. This year’s major trip was especially epic. There is a family legend on my mother’s side that our descendants came from Mongolia. And so, my mom, sister and I decided to go on what we called the #Mongolonggo trip, the concept being of proud Ilonggos discovering another motherland. Our trip started in the capital of UlaanBaatar, and from there we drove into the Gobi desert, covering 1,800 kilometers by land. Everyday, we experienced something awesome. We watched a nomad family herding about a hundred horses on verdant steppes as far as the eye could see. We chanced upon a rare lavender bloom covering the edge of the desert with stripes of purple. We saw the largest sand dune in the Gobi, snow in a gorge in Eagle Valley despite it being the height of summer, ancient temples and artifacts by Karakorum, the ancient capital that Chinggis (the proper way to call Genghis we learned) had built.


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Plunging into the Monggolian culture was not difficult with generous locals accommodating us into their camp

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2 We were invited to immerse ourselves in a nomad family’s camp, welcomed by their homemade cheese and vodka. We rode their horses, the same semi-wild breed that the Mongolian warriors used to create the largest empire in history. I was thrilled when the locals complimented the way I rode (maybe that was the Mongolian in me?) I loved seeing again how people, no matter how seemingly different, have so many more things in common. Throughout the trip, I bonded with the locals over Mongolian hip hop which I really enjoyed, and we made friends by sharing our stash of Philippine dried mangoes which everybody absolutely loved. I saw firsthand that when people are so connected with nature, then all that is in it is respected and taken care of. One of the highlights of the trip was when we rescued a dying horse. With the guidance of our guide and our drivers, 12 tourists from five

countries worked together to quickly gather grass from the hills and to hand-feed a malnourished horse until she could stand and eat on her own. I went home overflowing with stories, inspired by the extraordinary land and the culture I had experienced. And as I returned to the heart of Makati, I knew that what I had learned at the edge of the world would find its way here.

"SOMEBODY WILL SHARE AN IDEA SPARKED BY SOMETHING THEY HAD SEEN WHILE ON AN ADVENTURE."


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