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OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE 2016 SIA SNOW SHOW

Taking the Lead

OUTGOING, INCOMING PRESIDENTS TACKLE THE FUTURE OF SIA (P. 26)

PUBLISHED BY ACTIVE INTEREST MEDIA FRIDAY, JANUARY 29, 2016

Fresh Take

Downhill Consumer Intelligence Project unlocks new answers to old questions on how to grow snow sports. (p.16)

Green Unity

Show kicks off with a special guest, who issues a call to come together on climate change. (p. 6)

Kids’ Choice Brands offer more options, grown-up features for the younger set. (p. 38)

QUESTION OF THE DAY

“This year is awesome. El Niño’s been a blessing.”

—Brian Green, VonZipper, on the effect of the weather on business this year. (p. 59)

GET SOCIAL

Stay in touch on Facebook, Instagram & Twitter during the Snow Show, Industry + Intelligence and On-Snow Demo: #SIA16, #SIAintel


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UP FRONT | IN THE ISSUE

4

Show News

8

Say Cheese!

Contents 6

Climate change; the changing consumer; brands doing good; backcountry safety, and CRAFT @ SIA.

Snowboarding News

16

Paradigm Shift

CONTRIBUTORS Kailee Bradstreet, Eugene Buchanan, Krista Crabtree, Connor W. Davis, Greg Ditrinco, Jordan Gaines, Ben Gavelda, Courtney Holden, Christina McGuire, Peter Oliver, Crystal Sagan, Eric Smith, Michael Sudmeier, Morgan Tilton, Bevin Wallace, Dave Zook

TransWorld's daily Show update.

What you can learn from SIA's landmark Downhill Consumer Intelligence Project.

ADVERTISING SALES Sharon Burson, Andy Hawk

26 Looking Forward

ADVERTISING COORDINATOR/ EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Lori Ostrow

Outgoing and incoming SIA presidents talk about where association has been, and where it's going.

GROUP PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Barb Van Sickle

28 Industry Leaders

2016 Women to Watch and Retailers of the Year.

32

Market Overview

34

New Exhibitors

38

Junior Hardgoods

PRODUCTION Caitlin O’Connor PREPRESS TECHNICIAN Idania Mentana

Weather drives industry sales trends. Again.

Read the digital version of the Snow Show Preview at snewsnet.com or snowsports.org.

Say hello to the Show's newcomers.

Youth gear brands aim to hook the next generation of skiers and riders. 36

40

Women's Snowboard Gear

As the women's market continues to develop, gear gets more tech.

The power of partnerships. Powered by SAM.

44

Craft Beer Guide

It's time for a cold one; here's where to get it.

Exhibitor List 48 Wish List 50 Photo Finish

COVER PHOTO BY ALTON RICHARDSON

46

More pics from the aisles. 52

Snow Show Preview is part of Active Interest Media’s Outdoor Group Kent Ebersole, Vice President, General Manager Allen Crolius, Vice President of Sales and Marketing

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42 Alpine Rentals

52

Show News

Sizing the market; digital strategies; and food, food, food.

Events 59 Question of the Day 60 Heard in the Aisles 56

42

EDITOR Lindsay Konzak ART DIRECTOR Jackie McCaffrey Bradley

Snapshots from the Show floor.

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PUBLISHER Andy Hawk

Active Interest Media 5720 Flatiron Parkway, Boulder, CO 80301 EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Efrem Zimbalist III PRESIDENT & CEO Andrew W. Clurman EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT & CFO Brian J. Sellstrom EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS Patricia B. Fox SVP, DIGITAL & DATA Jonathan Dorn VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE Craig Rucker VICE PRESIDENT, CONTROLLER Joseph Cohen VICE PRESIDENT, RESEARCH Kristy Kaus Copyright 2016 by Snow Show Preview

SIAsnowshow.com DAY 2 | SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016

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AT THE SHOW | SHOW NEWS

Open Hearts, Open Hands Craft Case Study: BRANDS ACROSS THE SNOW SHOW FLOOR ARE SUPPORTING AND RAISING AWARENESS OF A HOST of causes, from underprivileged youth to the preservation of wild places. Launched just 16 days ago, Kushi-riki, sister company to CandyGrind and CG Habitats, is the new kid on the block, but its promise to donate 100 percent of sales to children in need is sure to make a splash. The brand’s inaugural collection includes boys’ and girls’ mittens, gloves and beanies made with the same craftsmanship CandyGrind has honed for 10 years. Proceeds will go toward housing and educating Ugandan orphans and refugees. “We want this to explode. We can add more product to the line, but we want to open up more orphanages wherever they’re needed,” says Brandi Paik, cofounder of Kushi-riki and vice president of CG Habitats. With its characteristic passion for the environment, Patagonia is bringing awareness to wildland preservation through its recent film “Jumbo Wild” and partnership with Wildsight. The goal: save British Columbia’s Jumbo Glacier—and the grizzly corridor, watershed and pristine backcountry terrain it houses—from development into a resort. “There’s no lack of resorts, but there is a lack of this incredible land that needs to be protected,” says Corey Simpson, PR and communications coordinator. Other brands partner with organizations within the snow sports industry itself. Chaos Hats has worked with SOS Outreach—a non-profit that uses adventure sports to foster selfconfidence, leadership skills and positive decision-making in underserved youth—for more than eight years. Sync, POC and Smith are all collaborating with the High Fives Foundation, an organization that supports mountain athletes by raising injuryprevention awareness and helping those who have suffered lifealtering injuries. Sync President and CEO Phil Shettig says it’s a way to give back to the snow sports community. “Whether they’re in a sit ski, kneeboard or kicking out of a World Cup downhill start, they’re our people,” he says. —Courtney Holden

The Rising Tide of Millennials AS BABY BOOMERS BEGIN PHASING OUT OF THE SKI/SNOWBOARD INDUSTRY AND MILLENNIALS rise up to take their place, it’s clear that our industry is facing a crossroads. Nate Fristoe, director of operations for market research organization RRC Associates, shed some light on the Millennial consumer in Wednesday’s Industry + Intelligence seminar, “An Exploration of the Evolving Snow Sports Consumer.” So who exactly makes up this enigmatic generation? Hint: It’s broader than the handle-bar-mustached, skinny-jeansporting stereotype. In fact, Millennials, who range from 18 to 35 years old, make up 24.5 percent of the total U.S. population. They’re an ethnically diverse group of optimists, Fristoe says, who overall are struggling financially, but maintain their entrepreneurial spirit. Deal-shoppers who desire authenticity, they’re highly connected digitally, yet still value personal interactions. When Fristoe’s RRC Associates asked more than 2,000 Millennials pointed questions about their skiing/snowboarding habits and perceptions, it found some cause for concern. “There’s the idea of skiing and snowboarding as being effortful, not an everyday activity. ‘I have to plan this out and execute a complicated trip, even if I live nearby,’” Fristoe says. “It’s (perceived as) a hassle.” Happily, 100 percent of Millennial parents who engage with snow sports plan to introduce their children to the activities; however, only 67 percent of non-skiers/riders will show their kids the slopes. This latter group is concerned that our wintery pastimes are dangerous, expensive and cold (read: uncomfortable). Non-skiers and riders dwell on the expense factor, with 82 percent of this segment calling snow sports “less affordable”—and it’s not just sticker shock at the ticket window (although that does factor in). “It’s the cost, in addition to the lift ticket, of lodging and getting there,” Fristoe says. “And it’s the time cost, too.” That said, Fristoe didn’t preach a gospel of doom and gloom. Instead, he encourages the industry to be proactive. Messaging needs to address safety concerns; ticket bundles or half-day passes could counteract high-cost perceptions; and ski resorts need to offer a range of off-mountain activities, especially tasty dining options. “The Millennial thing is happening. It’s a steamroller,” Fristoe says. “This is about us changing and being responsive to change, us being proactive and knowing we can’t have that same business model. We need to evolve.” —C.H.

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Rodin Ltd.

IT’S A BOARD...IT’S A SKI...IT’S A RODIN! STROLL THROUGH THE WARES OF THE SIX brands exhibiting in the third year of CRAFT @ SIA in the Show floor’s far corner and you’ll face a decision as difficult as one at a craft brewery: What to sample first? From Revision Skis and Snoplanks to Coalition Snow, DOWP Group, Franco SnowShapes and Fairweather Ski Works, it’s as crafty a cubicle as you’ll find on the floor. Case in point: Rodin Ltd., a South Lake Tahoe-based company pioneering a ski/snowboard combo that features a splitboard binding with a tech-binding-compatible toepiece, allowing you to use it as a snowboard or ski. “Each length comes in three different sidecuts,” says owner Rick Bulan (below), a snowboarding ski patroller at Sierra at Tahoe. “If you’re more of a skier, you can get the one with more sidecut so it works as skis better; if you’re more of a snowboarder, you can get less.” Regardless, he says, the CRAFT @ SIA booth is the place to be for brands like his. “Not a lot of us can spring for a 10x10 booth and build it out,” he says. “This is a nice little affordable package for guys like us, without all the extraneous costs.” He adds that craft brands like his and his fellow exhibitors’ are gaining consumer awareness, which is exactly why he’s at the Snow Show. “I didn’t come here thinking I’m going to make a $1 million in sales,” he says. “It’s all about relationships and building awareness, which goes a long way.” —Eugene Buchanan

PHOTOS BY JULIE ELLISON

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AT THE SHOW | SHOW NEWS

Changing the Conversation EPA ADMINISTRATOR: REFOCUS THE CLIMATE CHANGE DIALOGUE McCarthy painted a picture of hope for the industry (and the world), but that’s only if corporations and governments on the macro level and individuals on the micro level begin to make some serious changes. And those changes will only come about, she argues, if conversation around climate change is normalized. “It just exists,” she says. “You don’t have that same connotation when you talk about cigarettes and cancer. Why are we feeling weird about it, like we can’t bring it up in a normal conversation?” One way to frame the conversation without coming across as an extremist is to use an economic lens. People argue that shifting away from fossil fuels will cost jobs, but there are plenty of career opportunities in renewable energy—and right now there’s a dearth of workers to fill open positions, especially in solar. More relevant to the Show, she points to the $67 billion the winter-recreation industry adds to the U.S. economy each year, as well as the 900,000 jobs it provides—money and jobs that are threatened by the prospect of less snow and shorter seasons. “When somebody is saying to you, ‘We can’t take action on climate change; it’s going to cost jobs and hurt the economy,’ will you please stand up and say it’s

Avalanche Fatalities Third Highest on Record KNOW BEFORE YOU GO CAMPAIGN AIMS TO RAISE AWARENESS EVERY YEAR, JANUARY, FEBRUARY AND MARCH HAVE THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF U.S. AVALANCHE fatalities, a trend that goes back to 1951, according to the Colorado Avalanche Information Center (CAIC). But there’s been a spike in the monthly death toll this January. “This is the third worst month on record for avalanche fatalities, and we’re not done yet,” says Tim Bennet, executive director of the American Institute for Avalanche Research and Education (AIARE), of the 11 fatalities that have entered the U.S. Avalanche Accidents Reports this month alone. AIARE (which runs the Backcountry Experience in Booth 3657) has been the spearhead of a North American collaboration of snow sports industry professionals called, The Avalanche Project (previously known as Project Zero). The organization’s goal has been to establish a single cohesive educational program to teach avalanche awareness and mitigate loss of life in the backcountry for everyone from snowmobilers and snowshoers to backcountry tourers and ski patrollers. That program, Know Before You Go, has five objectives: Get the gear, training, forecast and picture, and get out of harm’s way. The program launched its namesake film last November, which reached more than 1 million people on Facebook and has since been watched by nearly 10,000 people in Colorado and Utah, including middle school students, ski area employees, retailers, brands and manufacturers. “In Hawaii, kids learn about the riptides. Why not do that here with avalanche safety?” says Aaron Carlson, executive director of Friends of CAIC (Colorado Avalanche Information Center) at the Backcountry Experience booth’s opening event Thursday morning. The Friends of CAIC initiative collects donations to compensate the pool of 40 certified instructors across the Centennial State, who have been vetted and trained by AIARE to teach the Know Before You Go program across the state (request a free presentation at avalanche.state.co.us.). Nationwide, 400 AIARE instructors are qualified to teach the program, as well. “The Avalanche Project was founded on trying to work together on one message,” says Bennet—which ultimately, they hope, makes a greater impact. —Morgan Tilton

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 2 SIAsnowshow.com

hurting already?” she says. Referencing recent studies that declare 2015 the warmest year on record, she points to the way the snow sports industry is already adjusting its focus in response to the changing weather trends. In the future, she hopes the government will learn from our experience. “The snow sports industry knows a lot more about adaptation than we do on the issues you care about, like how to keep snow in the mountains,” she says. “I think it would be fascinating to see if there are ways in which we could get together and share information.” Her recommendation for how our industry can move the climate change conversation forward: Harness the power of young people. With so many high school and college students passionate about natural resources, there’s a clear opportunity for snow sports companies to tap into an issue we all care about, create a bond and potentially earn customers in the process. “Young people are feeling firsthand that the world is changing, and they want to do something about it,” McCarthy says. “You give them a platform for that. You give them a voice.” —Courtney Holden

The Datebook

TODAY’S NOT-TO-MISS EVENTS How to Reduce Sales Friction Among Millennial Snow Sport Consumers, Room 207, 9 a.m. For the full seminar schedule, check out page 56.

Inside the Female Mind, Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657), 2 p.m.

Understand how leading pros tackle the backcountry, featuring panelists Lynsey Dyer, KT Miller and Pip Hunt.

SIA SnowSports Awards: Retailers of the Year, Show Floor Entrance, 5 p.m. This year, we're celebrating eight retailers.

Girafficorn Happy Hour, Booth 450, 5 p.m.

Catch up with athletes and the women at SheJumps.

Athlete Appearances: Mikaela Shiffrin, Atomic (Booth 3923), 5 p.m.; Glen Plake, Screamer (Booth 730), 10 a.m., and LEKI (Booth 3120), 4-6 p.m. Check out page 56 for your guide to where to catch your favorite athletes this week.

Saturday: Rental Roundtable - Practical Magic: The 5-Minute Rental Fit, Rental World/Backshop (Booth 4501), 9:30 a.m. Hear from Jack Rafferty of Masterfit; Shaun Cattanach of Burton; Chuck Diggers, rental manager from Brian Head, Utah; and a representative from Head.

PHOTO BY ALTON RICHARDSON

CLIMATE CHANGE IS REAL, SO LET’S STOP DEbating the matter and work toward fixing it. That message resonated throughout U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy’s opening morning keynote address to the snow-sports industry. “I don’t want to talk partisan politics. I don’t want to question the science. I simply want to look at what the world is doing, how it’s changing, and how we figure out whether we like the direction it’s heading—and if we don’t, what we do about it,” she says.


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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 2 SIAsnowshow.com

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PHOTOS BY JULIE ELLISON AND ALTON RICHARDSON

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Art with a Purpose TO SAY KATHLEEN GASPERINI IS A WOMAN WITH A CAUSE IS AN UNderstatement. First of all, look at her feat of simply running a nonprofit, Boarding for Breast Cancer (B4BC), for 20 years. Under this umbrella, she continuously stokes the fire on a sometimes-overlooked topic: breast cancer awareness for the under-30 crowd. And she does so in a way that’s true to board-sports culture, with a series of happenings decked to the nines in music, art and the love of sport. Boarding for Breast Cancer started in 1996 with a festival marking the end of the snowboarding season at Sierra at Tahoe. Supported by the resort, all lift tickets and event sales were donated to the organization. It was a way to bring likeminded enthusiasts together for a cause and celebrate snowboarding, music and life. After a handful of years, and with a swell of energy and support, Gasperini took the concept to SIA. She set up shop at the Show, expanded her fundraising efforts and fostered long-standing relationships with brands, companies and resorts.

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 2 SIAsnowshow.com

A SAMPLING OF THE ICONIC ARTWORK FROM THE BOARDING FOR BREAST CANCER (B4BC) ANNIVERSARY EXHIBIT CAN BE FOUND AT THE SESSIONS AT SIA BOOTH ON THE SHOW FLOOR THIS WEEK. FOUNDER KATHLEEN GASPERINI IS AT LEFT.

PHOTO BY JULIE ELLISON (3, TOP)

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AT THE SHOW | SHOW NEWS

Now, after an eight-year hiatus from the Snow Show floor, Gasperini returns to reintroduce her nonprofit to the mature—and somewhat altered—face of snow sports. She’s stoked to meet new faces and expand B4BC’s outreach opportunities. “This is the first time (in awhile) we’ll have an opportunity to talk to our winter cause-marketing partners and to reintroduce Boarding for Breast Cancer to a whole new crop of brands and retailers that don't know who we are,” Gasperini says. Simultaneously, and to celebrate its birthday milestone, Boarding for Breast Cancer is co-hosting an art exhibition at the X Games in Aspen with Nemo Design. This showcase kicks off a series that coincides with an online auction. The exhibit will then travel to the snowboard and music festival at Sierra at Tahoe and then to BeCore in Los Angeles. The display includes a sampling of iconic snowboard images from legends like Jeff Curtes, Mark Gallup and Mark Fawcett. In addition to the photography, subsequent events will include things like boards, graphics and other art mediums. “We want to show the Andy Warhol-ness of snowboarding,” Gasperini says. Proceeds from the auction will help expand B4BC’s outreach programs and specifically fund its young survivors’ retreats, which are centered on snowboarding and surfing. “I am excited to see people of my generation getting their kids involved,” says Gasperini when asked what the 20-year anniversary signifies to her. “Snowboarding and breast cancer is the oddest pair in the world, but hopefully it inspires people to go for their own cause—to step up where there’s a hole.” —Christina Shepherd McGuire

Check out the auction’s iconic works and bid now (b4bcxgames. auction-bid.org), or stop by The Sessions at SIA (Booth 4563) to view a sampling of the larger exhibition.

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 2 SIAsnowshow.com

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Gen Z and Their Own Personal Brand

GEN X. MILLENNIALS. AND NOW GEN Z. WHO ARE THEY? WHAT ARE THEIR VALUES? AND HOW CAN WE MEET THEIR NEEDS? WELL, FIRST WE HAVE TO DECIPHER THEIR BRAND. DON’T SCOFF. C’MON, deep down everybody’s got one. And this generation of kids born from approximately 1996 to 2009 is defined by childhood experiences. Maybe they’ve seen their parents struggle through the recession, or their friend’s dad go off to war, but they’ve also experienced global Internet connectivity at their fingertips and the first African American president. So let’s break it down. According to Issa Sawabini (below), partner at Fuse, an agency specializing in teen, young adult and Millennial marketing, Gen Z’s brand is one of cautious optimism. “They have the belief that they can change the world, but that it’s also not the rosy place it once was,” says Sawabini. In his Industry + Intelligence seminar on Wednesday, Sawabini spoke about the more conservative Gen Z'ers—in their spending habits, yes, but also in their behavior. Arguably, one could say this conservatism creates more balanced individuals. Couple this conservatism with the experience of having the world at their fingertips, and you have the driving factor for this generation’s optimistic outlook. While Millennials (digital natives) grew up in a world of computers, Gen Z’ers can’t remember a time without constant connection. But amid all the noise, this accessibility gives members of Gen Z greater access to the world and also allows them to greater influence their place in it. Sawabini recognizes the effect of the recession on this generation and deems it a “key driver of the entrepreneurial spirit.” They see the people around them becoming high-level entrepreneurs, proving that they can also do something amazing themselves. He explains that Gen Z realizes they don’t need to rely on getting that typical corporate job. “They don’t need to work for GE or Apple to change the world. They can be the next Apple,” he says. So what does this cautious optimism mean to you, the company trying to make waves with the next generation of enthusiasts? Sawabini praises Gen Z's authenticity. Make sure your brand or shop unveils its true self by accurately portraying your mission and by being deliberate in your actions. Sawabini also suggests mirroring your audience from a behavioral perspective and creating a journey for your consumer through your storytelling and your product lines. Above all else, “There should be no tactic that you have that doesn’t touch and connect to digital,” Sawabini says. So jump in with both feet and utilize it all— mobile, social media, content marketing and SEO. Extend your marketing efforts by creating your own channels across multiple emerging platforms. To sum it up, the first step is acknowledging the things that you, as a brand, hold dear and that influence your actions. Demonstrate that you empathize with the kids. Because although only 16% of Gen Z’ers now hold full-time jobs, in just 10 short years, they will be the next crop of influential consumers. Remember—their money’s just as green as the next guy’s, and by 2025 they will be holding it. —C.S.M.


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PHOTOS COURTESY OF EAGLECREST SKI AREA; LIBERTY MOUNTAIN RESORT; SEVEN SPRINGS RESORT; SHAWNEE MOUNTAIN; SUNDOWN MOUNTAIN RESORT; WELCH VILLAGE; WHITETAIL; WORLD SNOWBOARD DAY; WILLI'S SKI AND BOARD SHOP

FEATURE | RESEARCH

Paradigm Shift

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 2 SIAsnowshow.com

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FEATURE | RESEARCH

Around 2008, snowboarding hit its participation peak. Then it started to decline over the next several years. Newspapers and magazines outside of the industry picked up on the trend, and ran with it. But while visits were down, rather than speculate, SIA Research Director Kelly Davis wanted to dig more deeply into the numbers that were drawing the attention. What she found was that the primary drop in participation was among 18- to 24-year-old males. “We started to find out that the message they were getting about snowboarding was not resonating with them, and that brands were having trouble engaging with them at a time when that group, particularly, was under economic distress.” Another factor: The drought in California, which started in the midst of the decline. Davis learned that 1 in 4 snowboarders lives in a state bordered by the Pacific Ocean. Naturally, if there’s no snow, participation will fall. “It was like the perfect storm,” she says. The comparatively new sport of snowboarding had gone from a peak of a little under 8.2 million snowboarders to a lull of about 7.4 million. The numbers have climbed back to 7.6 million in the most recent season and visits have stabilized. “Is that a dying fad? No, but it’s at the point that snowboarding companies had to really start focusing on business, that it wasn’t going to be as easy for them as it had been,” Davis says. Getting some real answers on what was happening with snowboarding when the decline occurred was one of the drivers behind the Downhill Consumer Intelligence Project (DCIP). The idea started with snowboarding, but SIA quickly expanded the research

to downhill skiing. SIA’s collaborative approach with more than 25 organizations has resulted in a treasure trove of data, including interviews with 75,000 consumers, which is far beyond any previous data set collected by SIA. "The standard participation research could tell us what was happening, but it couldn’t tell us why it was happening," says Bob Gundram, president of C3 Worldwide. "The value of the deeper level of information coming out of the DCIP are answers to why trends are occurring." One of the tools to expect as a result of the DCIP is a dashboard that allows you to filter for age, gender, geography, income and other factors and view that consumer profile’s intent to buy equipment and accessories in the next year. “The insights that have come out have been amazing, but given the speed of change and how we connect constantly and how trends develop and mature overnight, it’s really important for us to continue doing consumer research,” Davis says. “That’s one of the major findings of the DCIP. We’ve got to make a concerted effort – a concerted and absolutely deliberate effort to understand our consumer on a 24-7-365 basis. No more waiting 10 years. It’s just not tenable. We can’t do it anymore, or we’re going to lose, and that’s as simple as it gets.” An important partner in the research has been the National Ski Areas Association (NSAA). NSAA’s researchers, including Nate Fristoe, managing director of RRC Associates, spoke Wednesday during Industry + Intelligence about some of the findings. “It’s not likely we address it and hit it out of the park year one,” Fristoe says. “I’ve been in this industry for 16 years, and I can tell you one of the failings of the industry is sometimes we repeat past efforts. … It doesn’t mean we shouldn’t do it again, but we shouldn’t do it exactly the same way we did back then.” To Fristoe, the research should help the industry avoid past mistakes. Davis agrees. “We’ve got to break the paradigms,” she says. Gundram says suppliers, retailers and resorts all have a stake in bringing more people into the market. "The collaborative ap-

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SINCE 2009, AN ESTIMATED 600,000 SNOW ROOKIES HAVE TAKEN PART IN LEARN TO SKI AND SNOWBOARD MONTH, IN WHICH RESORTS AND RETAILERS OFFER DEALS AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS TO DRAW IN BEGINNERS.

World’s Largest Lesson

More than 160 ski and snowboard venues hosted a Guinness Book of World Records event on Jan. 8 in pursuit of four records as part of Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month in January: world’s largest multivenue ski lesson, world’s largest snowboard lesson, single-venue ski lesson and single-venue snowboard lesson. Targeted at true beginners, the world record attempt drew thousands throughout the U.S. The event was set not only to kick-off the annual Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month, but also to draw more attention to the initiative. Mary Jo Tarallo, executive director of Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month, says more than 600,000 people have been introduced to skiing and snowboarding thanks to partners participating in the Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month over the past seven years. Brands are also supporting the various programs organized in the month of January. RAMP donated a pair of skis or snowboard for one lucky winner participating in the world’s largest lesson event. For the #FirstDayFaces contest, new last year, newcomers to the sport take a photo and use the hashtag #FirstDayFaces. Brands and retailers are providing prizes for weekly drawings, including PolarMax, Zeal Optics, Seirus, skis.com and snowboards.com. Head, The North Face and Burton have donated prizes for the Bring a Friend Challenge. Tarallo is seeing growing collaboration between retailers, resorts and suppliers, all of whom have a stake in growing the sport. “The industry needs to refocus on how they approach newcomers on their own terms,” Tarallo says. Learn more about Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month and related programs at learntoskiandsnowboard.org.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CAMELBACK MOUNTAIN

WE'VE GOT TO MAKE A CONCERTED AND ABSOLUTELY DELIBERATE EFFORT TO UNDERSTAND OUR CONSUMER ON A 24-7-365 BASIS.


FEATURE | RESEARCH proach we took with the DCIP helps all of us better understand our consumers," he says. "That higher level of understanding means we can provide more engaging experiences and products to consumers, and sell skiing and snowboarding to a new audience."

WHERE TO START

The industry has actually seen what Davis calls “unbelievable stability” over the past 40 years – no great decreases in participation. The problem: There have not been any great increases either. “Whatever we’ve been doing has probably contributed to the stability of our industry, which is good,” she says. “We haven’t declined, but none of those programs really ever tipped the needle up. We never saw anything have that kind of an impact.” The first phase of the DCIP project was released last year. SIA examined five studies conducted during four decades of research on the topic of growing the sport. According

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE THINGS THAT REALLY INVITE OUT-OF-THE-BOX SOLUTIONS FOR PROXIMITY AND EXPENSE?

SIA'S WINTER TRAILS INTRODUCES THE NORDIC SIDE OF SNOW SPORTS TO NEW PARTICIPANTS. CROSS COUNTRY SKIING AND SNOWSHOEING ARE OFTEN SEEN AS AN EASIER ENTRY POINT TO THE MARKET. SNOWSHOEING IN PARTICULAR HAD A GOOD 2014-15: SALES OF SNOWSHOES WERE UP 5%.

to Davis, some of the most prolific barriers over the past 40 years to participation in snow sports have not changed: proximity to the resorts and expense. “What do we do about that?” Davis asks. “What are some of the things that really invite out-of-the-box solutions for those two problems?” What’s more, the latest DCIP-driven research has uncovered other potential challenges for the industry. “Where can we have the maximum effect in terms of moving the bar? There are only so many levers to pull,” Fristoe says. The goal of the DCIP is to answer that question and work with the industry to build better marketing and communications campaigns and products and, ultimately, to sell more. The second phase of the research was completed in fall 2015 and homed in on social trends and behavior and their potential impacts on the industry. For example, in Label Networks research conducted for SIA, 10,000 13- to 25-yearolds were asked about their attitudes on the sports of snowboarding and skiing: 12.6%

said they participate in snow sports, with 9.1 % snowboarding and 7.6% skiing. Those that don’t snowboard used words like afraid, too extreme, dangerous and cold in their answers as to why not. Difficult also popped up. Despite this, opportunity exists in this age group, per the research, as many also said the words learn, watch, try and fun. And 35.2% said they wanted to learn to snowboard, and 22.9% want to learn to ski. Another insight from the research: Action sports may no longer be considered edgy, the way they once may have been. “Action sports are mainstream to a 15-year-old today. From their point of view, snowboard has always been in the Olympics, and skateboarding was something that their parents often did back in the day,” the research found. After separating out 18- to 25-year-olds from the group, Davis was surprised to find that the No. 3 reason that some in that age group didn’t snowboard was climate change. “It was the first time we’d ever seen climate change given as a reason why people aren’t participating,” Davis says. Gundram was also surprised by that result. "They said that they didn't want to invest time and money to learn to snowboard if it was going to stop snowing in the near future,"

BURTON'S IN-SCHOOL SNOWBOARDING PROGRAM IS ONE WAY IT IS ENGAGING KIDS OFF THE MOUNTAIN. SHOWN, A RECENT SESSION AT KINGS BEACH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IN KINGS BEACH, CALIF.

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 2 SIAsnowshow.com

Burton has started reaching out to kids away from the mountains. Burton’s PE snowboarding program introduces kids to the sport in the schools and teaches the basics of balance, core strength and agility through the use of Riglet Boards, Hover Covers and Riglet Reel tow cables, which kids use to pull their friends. The program also involves balance boards, interactive games and activities. With 75 physical education sessions under Burton’s belt across six countries since 2013 (most of that since 2014), the PE program is starting to take on a life of its own. Burton’s partner resorts have joined the fun. “It’s a great tool for them because they can use it as a feeder system to their children’s snowboard schools,” says Jeff Boliba, vice president of global resorts. Mt. Hood Meadows Ski Resorts in Oregon adopted the program two years ago; the resort goes into elementary schools and runs physical education for the day. The resort has also taken the program to festivals and other events in the off-season. Then, the resort offers free or discounted season passes to the kids. Mountain Creek Resort in New Jersey runs PE programs and then connects participants with an offer to come to the mountain. “That to me is connecting the dots and really making it happen,” Boliba says. “It’s one thing to go to a school and do it, but if you can then give those kids an experience that gets them up on the mountain, you’re totally taking it to the next level.”

PHOTOS (FROM TOP) COURTESY OF WINTER TRAILS; BURTON

Sliding Into Snowboarding


FEATURE | RESEARCH

WE'RE ALL STRUGGLING WITH THE SAME QUESTION. NOBODY'S GOT THE SILVER BULLET YET, BUT IN OUR CASE THERE ARE THINGS THAT APPEAR TO BE WORKING.

Learning on the Trail

Participation of the Nordic variety has been growing for the past several years. To support that growth, Winter Trails (above) offers children and adults new to snow sports the chance to try out snowshoeing and cross country skiing for free. This year, the program expanded from a set day to the entire month of January. “One of our goals was to give more flexibility,” says Reese Brown, SIA’s Nordic director. The move also provided an opportunity for participating sites to get more creative with their programming; some locations are holding events all month long. More than 100 events were planned in January at alpine resorts, Nordic centers, state parks, National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service land. It’s estimated that 11,000 new participants take part in the Winter Trails program each year.

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he says. "That seems a little overblown, but considering the drought the Pacific experienced up until this season, I can see how a 15-year-old might think the snow was gone for good," he says. "And if we hit them with a message targeting the facts about climate and snow, maybe we can engage them and convince them to give snowboarding a try." Not surprisingly, there are significant generational differences. The newest generation – what many call Gen Z – and its predecessors, the Millennials, each require different approaches than Gen X or the Baby Boomers. For example, say goodbye to the rebellious messaging of years’ past with snowboard marketing. “If you find out that message doesn’t resonate with that group, because you will find that out if you look at the DCIP, you’re going to discontinue marketing that kind of a message. We’ve seen that actually happening,” Davis says. Another potential application: If you find out you’ve been marketing to 35-year-olds, and suddenly realize most participants are under 30, that should change the way you merchandise. In fact, it may even change how you communicate with your target audience. “We know that that group, based upon this research, is constantly connected,” Davis says. “Ten percent of them sleep with their phones. They sleep with it in their hands.”

WHAT ARE WE SELLING?

With a wealth of data now at the industry’s fingertips, Davis encourages stakeholders to think differently to answer the question of what the industry is selling. She’s worked with a group with representation from golf, tennis, soccer, football and other sports who want to grow participation. “We’re all struggling with the same question,” she says. “Nobody’s cracked that. No-

PHOTOS (FROM TOP) COURTESY OF WORLD SNOWBOARD DAY; WELCH VILLAGE; WINTER TRAILS

SIA SUPPORTED THIS YEAR'S WORLD SNOWBOARD DAY ON DEC. 20, 2015 (LEFT, IN SERBIA). THE 2015 EVENT WAS MADE EVEN GREATER THIS YEAR WITH THE ADDITION OF NORTH AMERICAN AMBASSADOR PRO SNOWBOARDER ROB KINGWILL, WHO DROVE HIS OWN EVENT THAT DAY IN JACKSON HOLE, WYO. "I LOVE THE IDEA OF BRINGING THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY OF SNOWBOARDERS TOGETHER TO CELEBRATE AND SHARE OUR AMAZING SPORT," KINGWILL SAYS.


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FEATURE | RESEARCH

body’s got the silver bullet yet, but in our case there are things that appear to be working.” For example, the Burton Riglet and terrain-based learning programs appear to have moved the needle for the 17 and under crowd in snowboarding, Davis says. The age group grew 16% in the 2014-15 season. Davis asks: How can we give more kids the taste of participation in snow sports without having to spend a lot of money or travel long distances – two of the biggest hurdles to growing participation? She notes there were 13 million sledders last season. Take a YouTube video with a kid on a saucer going down a hill, giggling and running back up the hill again. “That’s exactly the same kind of excitement that all of us are chasing.” And that shows in the qualitative results from the latest research. When SIA asked why people loved skiing, they used words like freedom, love, adrenaline and thrills. “What do we need to do as an industry to make sure that anybody that goes out and plays in snow is thinking, if I can throw this snowball, maybe I should start skiing?" But newer or casual participants may be discouraged by messaging that skiers and snowboarders have to huck a cliff to be any good. “We’re missing that group,” Davis says. The truth is, Davis says, today’s equipment makes learning skiing or snowboarding easier than it ever has been. “All of our disciplines are learnable, fun sports,” she says. “We've got to reconnect to that idea. I've said over and over, we're not selling skis, we're selling a drug."

Dig into the Downhill Consumer Intelligence Project, and download tools to apply the results to your business, at Snowsports. org/DCIP.

PHOTO COURTESY OF LIBERTY MOUNTAIN RESORT

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Winter Divas

Willi’s Ski and Board Shop in Pennsylvania started Winter Divas about six years ago, a ladies-only ski and snowboard club. “Women are responsible for the bulk of the buying and traveling decisions so we figured it was important to both our business and the industry as a whole to have more communication with them,” the shop's Winter Divas coordinator Kjerstin Klein says. The Winter Divas participate in six to eight on-snow events each year. Events have included skiing with the ski patrol, learning the ropes of a terrain park, watching snowmaking, skiing with hardgoods managers and ensuring proper gear setup, and a softgoods day where the women learn about what’s coming next. Food and drink make the cut, too; chefs at a local resort show the ladies how to make something from their menus and pair it with the perfect drink. The group’s signature event is a race-inspired day called Ski Your Tiara Off! The ladies get race training and then run the NASTAR course. “It all helps to boost enthusiasm, build understanding and create a foundation for a strong relationship that goes beyond the purchasing

WINTER DIVAS FROM WILLI'S SKI AND BOARD SHOP

of clothing and equipment,” Klein says. “The relationship becomes two-way.” At any given event, up to 70 women participate, ranging in age from 18 to 80-plus. Klein says the shop has seen multiple benefits from the initiative, including increased member loyalty. “We help to solve problems that

may have kept some of these women from the slopes,” Klein says. “They are excited and enthusiastic and provide an amazing, impossible-to-buy, word-of-mouth advertising.” Interested in starting your own Winter Divas program? Klein is up for the challenge. Contact Willi’s for more information.


SPOTLIGHT | SIA LEADERSHIP

Looking Forward

SIA’S INCOMING, OUTGOING PRESIDENTS CHAT ABOUT WHAT’S NEXT What better way to learn about SIA’s leadership transition than with a glimpse inside a conversation between our outgoing and incoming presidents? David Ingemie and Nick Sargent asked each other the questions on all of our minds. Nick Sargent: David, you’ve been involved in snow sports for over 45 years now. How has the industry evolved during your time at SIA? David Ingemie: I’ve had a great run helping to lead an industry that represents one of my greatest passions. I saw the godfathers of snowboarding introduce a new snow sport to the world, technology reinvent the way consumers explore snow sports, and six Massachusetts ski areas within a 10-mile radius of the house I grew up in disappear. It’s a dynamic business, which makes it exciting. The thrill of seeing the innovation unveiled at each year’s SIA Snow Show never wears off, and I look forward to witnessing how the industry will continue to progress under new leadership in the coming years.

DI: Nick, what are your top priorities moving forward as president? NS: Building the community and keeping participants

eager to stay involved is imperative. My top priority is to continue to introduce the best and most innovative brands and products to the connoisseurs of snow sports, while simultaneously growing the participation and passion that

is key to the future. Another priority will be keeping snow talk going year-round. It’s important to keep our incredibly close-knit and passionate community of participants, retailers, vendors, executives and enthusiasts sharing ideas all 365 days of the year.

DI: You said it, not me! But, now that you mention it, I’ll

NS: What is your greatest advice that you can provide to the SIA team as you leave your legacy behind?

DI: What do you see as the most significant issues facing the industry and what is your plan to address them?

DI: My greatest piece of advice is to continue to keep the

NS: The biggest issue we’ve always faced is growing the

snow sports industry fun and with an eye to the future! Despite some of our innate challenges, like weather and the ever-evolving landscape, the industry needs to work together to market our best attributes, such as the familyfriendly nature, encouraging consumers to get outside, and promoting adventure and wellness. And, I also look forward to seeing SIA’s most valuable resources, like our research and data pool, continue to flourish.

NS: Everyone is curious to hear, David, what’s next for you? DI: I’ll be putting my downtime to use by spending more

time doing what drew me into the industry many years ago – the sports themselves! I’m hoping to get in many more days on the hill – as many as possible with my grandkids – and perhaps do some instructing again. As for the business side of the industry, I’ll still be involved, not only working with SIA on an archiving project, but also with brands on a consulting basis. This business is too fun to completely move on from! NS: You’ll also finally have the time to try and clock more

hours on your road bike than I do.

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probably have a little more time to dig into the wine cellar, too. And book a few more weekend hunting trips. Now I’m really making you jealous, Nick. But, back to the important stuff with an important question for you.

participation. The incredible thing about our industry is the passion and sense of community that coincide with snow sport enthusiasts, and we never want to see that dwindle. Each season brings something new, whether it be ground-breaking equipment, big brand takeovers or climate change. It is important that we at SIA encourage the community to embrace these changes, offer solutions, and continue to grow as an industry while adapting to the modernization of our sports.

DI: Where do you see SIA 10, 20 years down the road? NS: Well, it’s great to be starting on such solid ground, so

thank you for that, David. We will be flexible and continually transform ourselves to meet the evolving needs of a changing industry. A first step in this direction was announcing SIA’s plans to reinvent the Snow Show and shift future event dates to December in an effort to better align with the industry’s buying season. Down the road, SIA will continue bringing business to the snow sports retailers, keeping our industry informed with the best research available, and expanding the lifestyle in new and innovative ways. I look forward to my role in leading that progression.


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SPOTLIGHT | INDUSTRY LEADERS

Women to Watch

With the Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalition (OIWC), SIA is proud to recognize the 2016 Women to Watch, outstanding leaders working for brands, reps, retailers, resorts and non-profits.

Julia Blumenfeld

Marketing/Communications Manager, HEAD/Tyrolia Years with current job: 2.5 years in my current position; 5 years with HEAD/Tyrolia Number of years in snow sports industry: 5 years with HEAD/Tyrolia Average days on-snow: 30-35

What is your favorite part of your job? Although HEAD is a large global ski manufacturer, we have a tight-knit team here in Boulder. I enjoy seeing the direct impact of my work within the company; this gives me a prideful sense of ownership. Additionally, the success of HEAD/Tyrolia here in the U.S. over the past several years is something I’m proud to be a part of.

What are 5 things people may not know about you?

1. I am a 10th Mountain Division descendant. In 1941, my grandfather Arnold Kirbach enlisted in the U.S. Army as an infantryman in the 10th Mountain Division teaching skiing and rock climbing at Camp Hale in Colorado. After he and my grandmother married, they moved to Mendon, Vt., where they raised a family and he continued to ski into his late 80s, teaching skiing at Pico Mountain. In 2003, he was inducted into the Vermont Ski Hall of Fame. 2. I am a weekly volunteer at the Humane Society of Boulder Valley. Every Wednesday evening, I exercise and socialize shelter dogs. 3. Before I was transferred to Boulder with HEAD/Tyrolia, I raced competitively in J80, J35 and Classic Yacht sailing regattas throughout the spring, summer and fall on Long Island Sound. 4. I love road cycling and for the past three consecutive years have completed the challenging 120-mile Triple Bypass Ride from Evergreen to Avon. 5. I’ll be changing my last name soon. I met my future husband at work – proof that snow sports truly brings people together. Thanks to the support of our supervisors and colleagues over the years, Andrew Couperthwait, HEAD/Tyrolia’s U.S. alpine product manager, and I are getting married this June in Connecticut. We’re looking forward to the celebration!

Advice for young women getting their start in the industry?

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When looking at the ski industry, it’s hard not to notice the disproportionate ratio of women to men, but don’t let the boys’ club intimidate you! Women have taken on a more influential role in the industry every year. Hard work, passion, a positive attitude and a willingness to learn will help you increase your confidence and succeed. The OIWC is also an excellent organization to join so you can network with other women in the outdoor, snow sports, run and bike industries. Congratulations to the 2016 OIWC-SIA Women to Watch: Stephanie Bennett, K2 Sports; Julia Blumenfeld, Head/Tyrolia; Wendy Carey, Seirus Innovation; Donna Carpenter, Burton; Katie Hawkins, Marmot; Annelise Loevlie, Icelantic Skis; Kirsten Lynch, Vail Resorts; Kathy McGuire, K2 Sports; Amy Ohran, Boreal Ridge Corp.; Linda Rodney, Giro; Claire Smallwood, SheJumps; Kim Walker, Outdoor Divas


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SPOTLIGHT | AWARD WINNERS

Retailer of the Year

Each year, SIA honors outstanding retailers in the snow sports industry. These are the industry proponents who rise above and beyond to build relationships, engage customers and support brands, all the while promoting passion and growth in snow sports. Snow Show Daily spoke with some of the winners. Celebrate the Retailer of the Year Awards today at 6 p.m. at the Show entrance by the bridge.

New England Retailer of the Year

Colorado Ski Shop Diane Jaber, Co-Owner

Years in business: 22 Locations: West Springfield, Mass.; Enfield, Conn.; and West Dover, Vt. Favorite thing about the snow sports industry: Winter sports are what we are passionate about, and because of that, it’s good to share them with our customer. Why you like going to SIA: It’s just great to go to see everyone together in such a great venue.

What’s the main thing that sets apart Colorado Ski Shop from its competitors?

FIX A SHAPE

We really pride ourselves on putting the customer on the right product. If the kids want the freeride stuff, we get them the freeride stuff. If a customer doesn’t need a $500 boot, we don’t provide them with a $500 boot. We really put them in the equipment they need to do what they want to do. TM

What does Colorado Ski Shop do to acquire returning customers?

Ergonomic innovation.

Our staff is the best staff in the whole wide world. They’re trained, they know the answers people are looking for, and that’s what brings our customers back. They’re going to see someone they can trust and that can deliver them that same service.

YKK patent, Eider original application.

What has Colorado Ski Shop done to deal with a slow start to winter in New England?

For years, our team of expert pattern makers puzzled over a design dilemma: how to engineer a highly protective jacket, creating a comfortable cocoon around the chin and face, without limiting the movement of the head? Ahhh…that’s how.

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We’ve been focusing a bit more on the Internet. We do a lot of business there, and that helps us survive in years like this. Out west, the season is great, so that helps us with online sales.

What kind of approach are you taking toward customer service? We train our staff really well, because they’re the first people you see in our shop, and if they don’t know what to do, it can all go downhill from there. We consider our employees family. They’re a great group of people. —Connor W. Davis This year’s Retailers of the Year: Alpine Ski Shop, Sterling, Va.; Aspen Ski & Board Co., Lewis Center, Ohio; Buchika’s Ski & Board, Salem, N.H.; Cole Sport, Park City, Utah; Colorado Ski Shop, Springfield, Mass.; evo, Seattle, Wash.; Freestyle, Charlottesville, Va.; Neptune Diving & Ski, Nashville, Tenn.


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MARKET SPOTLIGHT | OVERVIEW

Industry Sales Grow in 2014-15 WEATHER DRIVES REGIONAL DIFFERENCES IN PERFORMANCE OVERALL SNOW SPORTS INDUSTRY SALES WERE $4.5 billion during the 2014-15 season, up 2 percent from the 2013-14 season. The data presented by SIA in its annual Snow Sports Market Intelligence Report is based on point of sale systems of more than 1,200 snow sports retailers nationwide. Kelly Davis, SIA’s research director, spoke Wednesday during SIA’s Industry + Intelligence about trends in hardgoods and softgoods. Outerwear, including insulated, shell, soft shell and fleece tops and bottoms, was one of the strongest categories last year, up 9% to $1.8 billion. Other bright spots during the season were apparel accessories, including handwear, base layers, snow boots and headwear – up 5% to $556 million. However, equipment fell 7% to $839 million, and accessories fell 3% to $331 million, including racks, goggles, helmets and snowshoes. Digital cameras continued to boom, up 10% – doubling sales in the past four seasons. As always, trends vary regionally:

WEST REGION

The West is the industry’s largest retail region. Sales in the West were $924 million, down 7% in dollars sold, in large part due to the drought in California and the Pacific Northwest, which had higher-than-average temperatures. Utah had below-average conditions in February.

MIDWEST

Sales were up slightly in the Midwest region, 1% to $407 million. The center of the country can thank lake-effect snowfall, cold temperatures and low gas prices for bolstering the market. Snowboard equipment sales in particular grew, up 7% to $27 million.

NORTHEAST

SOUTH

Sales in the South were down from a high. The 201314 season was unusually cold in the South, leading to a blockbuster season. In 2014-15, the region still saw strong sales, $365 million, down just 6% despite the comparison against a tough year. —Lindsay Konzak

DOWNHILL PARTICIPANTS

Sales in the Northeast – which was hit by above-average snowfall last year – fell 2% to $655 million. The unusual snowfall drove apparel sales up, but equipment sales remained down.

Weathering Change

Per the SIA Snow Sports Market Intelligence Report, weather explains three-quarters of the variance in snow sports participation and sales year-to-year. This season, the East saw up to 70-degree temperatures up until Christmas, delaying opening day for several resorts. And the West has enjoyed a taste of the forecast El Niño powder, driving Californians back out onto the slopes. In the 2014-15 season, weather patterns were the reverse. They included heavy snow in the Northeast, colder-than-average temps in the Mid-Atlantic and South, drought in California, and warmer-than-average temperatures in the Pacific Northwest. All of which equals extreme ups and downs in the market. For example, according to the National Ski Areas Association (NSAA), resort visits in the Pacific Northwest were down more than 30% in the 2014-15 season.

Snowboard Participation Stabilizes SNOWFALL WAS DOWN DOUBLE-DIGITS IN KEY SNOWBOARD REGIONS IN 2014-15 SNOWBOARD SALES FELL 5% IN DOLLARS TO $114.5 MILLION AND 10% in units to 404,268 in the 2014-15 season, continuing a trend from the 2008-2009 season. Binding sales fell 5%. Boot sales were the healthiest in the category, down just 1%. All data is according to The NPD Group in the SIA Snow Sports Market Intelligence Report. The culprit: snowfall. A quarter of snowboarders live in a state that borders the Pacific Ocean (most in California), which has been in a drought for several seasons. Still, last year, most regions experienced less snow. According to the 2014-15 NSAA Kottke Preliminary Report (as quoted by SIA), snowfall was down 47% in the Pacific Southwest and the Pacific Northwest. In fact, 39.8% of resort visits in the Pacific Southwest are by snowboarders. Snowfall fell 37% in the Midwest, 31% in the Rocky Mountains and 19% in the Southeast. In the East, snowfall was roughly flat with the pre-

LIVE IN A STATE BY THE PACIFIC OCEAN

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 2 SIAsnowshow.com

vious year, up just 1% despite the epic images that came out of the region. The good news: That trend may reverse this year, with deep powder gracing the mountains of the West. And the NSAA Kottke End of Season Report for 2014-15 indicated that the percentage of resort visits from snowboarders stabilized in 2014-15 at 26.7%. This in spite of falling participation over the past five seasons, including the number of participants and the percentage of resort visits by snowboarders. Overall, the number of snowboarders in 2014-15 was 7.6 million, which was up from 7.3 million the previous season. The most significant growth was in the 17-and-under age group for boys and girls. However, the 18- to 24-year-old category has shrunk in recent years, down 12% from 2013-14 and 23% from 2010-11. By sales channel, sales of snowboard equipment were weakest in specialty shops, down 8% in dollars and 15% in units sold, and strongest in chain stores (10% increase in dollars sold). Online sales were down slightly, 1% in dollars sold. —L.K.

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TOP TRENDS | NEW EXHIBITORS

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FAIRWEATHER SKI WORKS TREES TO SKIS

CORBEAUX CLOTHING TAKING FLIGHT

A decade of testing outdoor gear around the globe as sponsored skiers and ski mountaineers gave Adam Moszynski and Darcy Conover plenty of expertise to start an apparel company, but one faraway adventure in particular provided the inspiration. On the couple's honeymoon in Tanzania, they decided to donate the clothing and equipment from their Mount Kilimanjaro expedition to the guides and porters who had aided them. When the couple returned home to Aspen, Colo., they launched Corbeaux Clothing, whose purpose is twofold – make top-notch base layers for a variety of outdoor pursuits and collect donated gear to pass along to needy guide companies the world over. "We thought base layers was the one niche that we could enter and do something unique. Most of the companies that are making base layers are using wool," Moszynski says. "And we also wanted to try to help people at the same time." The company's base layers, such as the Jackpot Pant, are made in the U.S. with environmentally friendly materials like bamboo. At the Snow Show, it is debuting the updated Shandoka 1Z, a one-piece base layer with a hood and three-quarters length bottoms that don’t bunch when worn with boots. Corbeaux is French for ravens, a powerful symbol in mountain cultures – and a fitting one for a company reaching new heights with functional products and philanthropic outreach. PICK OF THE DAY: See Corbeaux Clothing's new Shandoka 1Z and learn about the company's gear donation program at booth #4307.

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The Alaskan backcountry provides almost everything Fairweather Ski Works needs for its handcrafted skis and splitboards – incomparable beauty for inspiring unique designs, epic terrain for testing finished goods, and, most importantly, an abundance of trees that gives the company's products their character and soul. Haines, Alaska-based Fairweather Ski Works, whose owners are husband and wife Graham Kraft and Lindsay Johnson, was forged during off-piste adventures throughout South Central and Southeastern Alaska, where the duo realized the old-growth trees that had blown over could be harvested and transformed into skis. Kraft began custom-making skis in 2008 and decided to turn it into a business a few years later. With the help of a woodworker and an engineer, the company produces close to 100 pairs of skis each year, each featuring a wood core made from downed birch and spruce trees, graphics by Alaskan artists, and a "distinctive, handcrafted feel to them," Kraft says. "I started the company because of an obsession with backcountry skiing in Alaska and northern Canada," Kraft says. "Building a unique and beautiful product from the wilderness that we live for is a rewarding experience, and we enjoy sharing that with others." Fairweather Ski Works manufactures one splitboard and five ski models, and while the company's products maintain an old-school look thanks to locally harvested and sustainable wood for the core, they also include modern materials such as metal edges. The company describes its RippinSki as "notable for its remarkable skiability, forgiving flex pattern and easy-turning shape." Kraft says the company also has "a pretty open ski shop where folks can come and get their hands dirty and experience the process of trees to skis." PICK OF THE DAY: Stop by CRAFT @ SIA in booth #4469 to see the RippinSki and learn more about the company's emphasis on sustainability.

NATIVE EYEWEAR BACKCOUNTRY VISION

After two years away from the goggle business, Denver-based Native Eyewear has returned to the market by focusing on the fast-growing number of backcountry skiers and splitboarders who are bypassing resorts to skin up a mountain and find their own lines. "As we see that audience grow, we want to be that Jones Snowboards of goggles," says John Sanchez, general manager of Native Eyewear and vice president of product development for Costa Sunglasses. "We don't want to live with all the other goggle brands in the goggle space. We want to live in the functional area where splitboards are and be the goggle you think of with the backcountry." Native Eyewear debuts its 2016-17 line at the Snow Show. The all-new goggles feature the company's Super Anti‐ Fog Coating, which delays condensation by eight minutes, as well as a snow-specific lens. Goggles also come with a low-light lens. Sanchez says the company has no interest in being the biggest goggle brand but instead seeks to be a "locals-only brand" that targets the "non-lift-line" skiers, splitboarders and other backcountry explorers. With fewer options than many companies, so as not to overwhelm customers, Native Eyewear is focused on delivering the best anti-fogging mechanisms, fit and foam, Sanchez says. "We're trying to position ourselves as the backcountry goggle brand," he says. "We want to be the core, Colorado, mountain-inspired, functional goggle brand." PICK OF THE DAY: See what Native Eyewear has on tap for its return to the goggle market at booth #2542.

SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 2 SIAsnowshow.com

TK CAPTION


THE BEST MOUNTAINS. ONE SEASON PASS. PRICED EXCLUSIVELY FOR SIA ATTENDEES ONLY AVAILABLE AT BOOTH #458

Get your exclusive SIA Epic Pass at booth #458 for over 60% off the standard price of an Epic Pass! Plus, $10 of your purchase goes to the SnowSports Future Fund – providing outreach tools that introduce youth to snowsports.

SIA $

PASS

319

ADULT *

Unlimited, unrestricted skiing or riding for the 2015/16 winter season to Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Park City, Heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood, Afton Alps, Mt. Brighton and Arapahoe Basin starting February 1, 2016. NO BLACKOUT DATES.

* SIA Epic Pass only available to show attendees, exhibitors and buyers with valid show credentials. Must be present to purchase. Adult passes only. SIA Epic Pass valid for the remainder of the 2015/16 ski season, starting February 1, 2016. Does not include summer 2016 or international partner resort access. © 2016 Vail Resorts Management Company. Trademarks are the property of their respective owners.


TOP TRENDS | NEW EXHIBITORS

More New Recruits 1. HOVLAND SNOWSKATES

Look for this icon in our reviews!

4. D’CURVE

Hovland Snowskates wants riders to skate the slopes – sans bindings – with its allmountain snowskates that shred not only the biggest mountains, but also the smallest hills. Stop by the Hovland Snowskates booth to see the Ram, designed for park and freeriding, and the Buckshot, at home freeriding and in powder.

Fresh out of field-testing in Vail, Colo., and Sun Valley, Idaho, D’Curve is launching its first line of ski goggles – the Lhotse and Nuptse – at this year’s Show, with a focus on greater mountain vision and performance. The Denver-based company is also showing off sunglasses, helmets and apparel.

2. BRIDGEDALE

5. SOS (SPORTSWEAR OF SWEDEN)

Bridgedale, a technical sock manufacturer, shows off its Vertige Light socks (literally meaning “close to the edge”) at its booth on the Show floor. The socks are lightweight and over-the-calf, featuring a precision fit and MerinoFusion SKI technology, designed for alpine performance.

3. SIOEYE

Forget snapshots shared on social media. The Sioeye Iris4G is a live-streaming camera that goes beyond your typical action camera with embedded GPS, barometer, gyro and magnetic sensors. That means skiers and riders can share not only what they see – but what they feel in real time. If your fans miss it? Don’t worry, there’s instant replay. Testdrive the tech in the Sioeye booth.

SOS (Sportswear of Sweden) is an apparel brand that blends technical outerwear with fashion. With Scandinavian roots, SOS aims to inject its designs with an edge, adding touches of fur and zippers, as well as unique patterns, while also integrating top technology and practical features (like a goggle wipe) to keep wearers moving on the mountain.

6. SNOWGLIDERS

Snow Gliders combines the stability, traction and control of snowshoes with the speed of skis. Climb with skins and cleats, and take advantage of adjustable braking control on your descent. —Lindsay Konzak

For a complete listing of new exhibitors, see page 46. Watch for additional coverage of new exhibitors in tomorrow’s Snow Show Daily.

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TOP TRENDS | JUNIOR HARDGOODS

Junior Gear Goes Big YOUTH GEAR MANUFACTURERS AIM TO HOOK THE NEXT GENERATION FROM DAY ONE AND BEYOND LAST YEAR, COMPANIES FOCUSED ON GEAR designed to make learning easier. This season, they seem to be convinced it worked: The defining trend in junior hardgoods for 2016-17 is equipment for kids who rip, from new skis inspired by today’s hottest pros to a legitimate expert binding designed especially for junior boots. Not to fear, brands aren’t forgetting about beginners. Here’s what’s happening in junior hardgoods on the Snow Show floor this week.

FOLLOWING THE PROS

Naming a ski after a particularly influential pro skier? It’s a trend, for sure, and the folks at Faction are on it, debuting the Candide 3.0 Jr. all-mountain powder ski at this year’s Show. The goal with Faction’s youth line is to “create junior skis with the same advances in technology as adult skis,” says Jessi Ambrogi-Yanson, North American marketing and team manager, “namely wider widths and construction technologies.” The ski is named after French freeskier and Faction athlete Candide Thovex, who’s as

IT'S EASIER TO EXPLORE AND PROGRESS AT SKIING WHEN YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TOOLS. well-known for his surreal POV cuts as he is for his numerous X Games and U.S. Open podiums. His namesake ski boasts a poplar ash core and flat camber with a 79-mm waist width for all-terrain rippers. Line Skis’ new junior entry at this year’s Show features another recognizable name: The Tom Wallisch Shorty. Wallisch, a two-time X Games gold medalist who has proved that small-town guys can make the ranks, joined Line in 2014. The Shorty, like the Tom Wallisch Pro men’s ski that is debuting at the Show, as well, is an aspen-core powder ski with a beefy 85-mm waist. Graphics from the Tom Wallisch Pro skis are also featured on the kid's version to give youth skiers a connection to the freestyle skier.

enough float or versatility to charge through the terrain where they are spending their time,” says Andy Hytjan, Armada’s hardgoods development manager. “It’s easier to explore and progress at skiing when you have the right tools; the new ARV 84 and ARW 84 are perfect for this.” K2’s Poacher Jr. reflects increased investment in the brand’s commitment to higher quality junior products. The aspen-core Poacher Jr. is a fully rockered intermediate-level ski with a 75-mm waist and extended tip rise for added versatility and ease of use in a variety of snow conditions. It uses the same technology and graphics as the men’s Poacher, also debuting at the show. “We’re seeing graphics from adult skis being used on junior-sized skis so youth skiers have a connection to pros,” says K2 PR Manager Alex Hunt. What good are rippin’ new junior skis without a binding to complete the setup? Enter Marker, which is unveiling its Marker Free 8 binding at this year’s Show. The new binding is made especially for junior boots lugs, usually from Mondo point 21 and below, and boasts a 100-mm brake, ideal for groms skiing on junior big-mountain wood-core skis. The Free 8 serves up the kind of power transmission you won’t find in an entry-level kids’ binding. “Junior gear continues to sell well, with all-mountain and big-mountain junior skis maintaining and increasing in popularity,” says MarkerVölkl Brand Manager Geoff Curtis.

LURING NEW LEARNERS

With Rossignol’s debut of the Alltrack and Tecnica’s delivery of the Mach 1 at last year’s Show—both high-performance junior boots modeled after their adult counterparts— we’re now seeing a return to true entry-level ski boots. Elan Skis brought its U Flex junior line to the Show

PICK OF THE DAY Named for skiing superstar Candide Thovex, the Candide 3.0 Jr. all-mountain powder ski from Faction boasts a poplar ash core and flat camber with a 79-mm waist width, perfect for any terrain. Check it out in Faction’s booth, #4145.

last year, with 25 percent more flex in both the skis and the boots. This year, Salomon’s 2016-17 entries, the Team T3 and the T3 RT Girly, have thin shells and oversized pivots for easy flex and forgiveness. Ideal entry-level boots. And Head brings two new junior boots to the show, the Z1 and the Z2. “The idea is to try to make the sport more accessible, easier to learn,” says Head’s Andrew Couperthwait. An entirely new boot design for Head, the Z1 and Z2 feature a new shell, the Hi-Top, which has a higher tongue profile and asymmetrical lateral support to help encourage a more upright stance. That, combined with a better flex system, keeps young learners more balanced and in control. Says Couperthwait: “We want to make lifetime enthusiasts out of our junior skiers.” —Samantha Berman

▲ ARMADA ARV 84

▲ K2 POACHER JR

▼ LINE TOM WALLISCH PRO SHORTY

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▲ SALOMON J2 T2

Over at Armada Skis, two new junior products fit the trend. Look for the boys’ ARV 84 and the girls’ ARW 84 all-mountain skis at the show. These freestyle twin tips feature Armada’s new Pop-Lite Core—also debuting in its adult skis here at the Show—a hybrid of heavier and lighter woods that gives the skis significant energy while also keeping the weight down. And with a waist width of 84 mm, the ARV and ARW can bash through all kinds of terrain, from crud to pow. “Narrow skis didn’t give kids

▲ HEAD Z2 JUNIOR

MAKING TECH COUNT

▲ MARKER FREE 8 JUNIOR


CONQUER YOUR MOUNTAIN The ALL NEW Tecnica Cochise

Introducing the all new Tecnica Cochise. The first walk mode boot to offer uncompromised downhill performance has been completely redesigned for 2017. Two years of intense R&D focusing on every aspect of the boot’s fit, function, and performance has culminated in a boot that can conquer whatever your mountain can throw at it.


TOP TRENDS | WOMEN'S SNOWBOARD

Women’s Gear Makes Strides

▲ ARBOR SWOON

SPLITBOARDS, SURF SHAPES, MIXED PROFILES: WOMEN’S BOARDS GET MORE TECH THE PLAYFUL-YET-TECHNICAL INGENUITY OF 2016-17 SNOWBOARDING gear has a serious (albeit, stoked) undertone in the women’s category. Females comprise 38 percent of all snowboarders, and more than ever, brands are taking the ladies’ niche seriously. “As the women's market continues to grow and develop people are realizing that the level of women's riding has improved, and therefore, so must the gear,” says Ana Van Pelt, Niche Snowboards creative director. While 2014-15 sales in gals’ snowboard gear took a 4 percent dip—about $2 million less in dollars sold than in 2013-14, according to SIA’s Snow Sports Market Intelligence Report—all snowboard equipment sales across ages and genders were down by the same percentage. A shortfall of snow in the West was largely to blame.

mountain freestyle Airheart with the new Spoon Nose and Tail: beveled edges to help improve glide and decrease catch. Nitro welcomes the cambered Silje Norendal Pro Model and the Mercy with Cam-Out Camber (early rise on the nose and tail). A handful of boards aim to perfect the science of combo profiles with a hair more camber for stability including GNU’s Ladies Choice line (by 2014 slopestyle gold medalist Jamie Anderson) and the Klassy, by former pro Kaitlyn Farrington. For extra grip, Niche’s freestyle Minx features traction bumps, two wave-points along each edge. In women’s boots, K2 fires up the Estate with heat-reflective lining—the Spaceheater—to keep feet toasty. “Even our top-level pros said that they have the performance they need but still get cold toes,” Waldron says of the K2 Alliance. The high-end pair is luxe with a softer outer and mid flex. “We want to detach ‘high-end’ from ‘high stiffness.’ The idea being a luxury car, not a fast car,” he says. Similarly, Nitro surrounds the interior of the Faint TLS boots with the heat-mirroring Therminator Shield, plus the new Cloud 9 Liner, D30 shock absorption and Vibram icetrek outsoles. Also in splitboards, Nitro releases the Volta with Flat-Out Rocker and Jones updates the Solution with Boltless Bridge, a 3D-reinforced zone with a thicker wood core, so that splitboard clips are screwable (versus a thru-bolt). It’s cleaner and eliminates holes in the base, says Seth Lightcap, Jones global marketing director and team manager. “Our pre-book order for women’s splitboards have grown every year, and we’re producing more than ever.” He also notes an increase in backcountry clinics—one tool that’s helped women acquire more avalanche awareness and safety skills to supplement the passion for exploration and powder they already have. —Morgan Tilton ▼ NICHE MINX

Even so, brand representatives recognized a longer-term upward trend of women’s product sales—including Van Pelt, who vocalized the current scarcity of high-end, aggressive or uniquely shaped snowboards for women compared with the men’s category. The good news? Ladies’-specific designs are expanding in every direction. Rounding out its ladies’ line, Arbor adds its inaugural lady-centric splitboard: the Swoon with a reclined System Rocker, meaning there’s slightly less rocker in the tail than in the nose for better ski-to-snow contact while skinning up. “We’re trying to show the industry that we take women’s snowboarding really seriously and are very proud to offer the Swoon. There’s not a huge market for splitboards—it’s a more saturated market now, and (a splitboard) is not an annual purchase,” says Matt Patti, Arbor brand manager. K2 also bridges the gap between the surf-esce quiver and all-mountain board with the Wildheart: a wider, surfy board with traditional all-terrain rocker (flat between the feet; rocker in the tip and tail). “You can’t ride a short, wide powderboard on mixed terrain and bumpy snow. This board holds onto the essence and beauty of surfy style, but is built into a daily driver,” says Hunter Waldron, K2 global brand director. Wildheart’s development was triggered by K2’s Women’s Alliance, a 12-years-running collective of female riders that shares feedback on product design. Some shredders are calling for more camber, too. In response, Jones debuts the all-

▼ K2 WILDHEART

PEOPLE ARE REALIZING THE LEVEL OF WOMEN'S RIDING HAS IMPROVED, AND THEREFORE, SO MUST THE GEAR.

Booming Market

▲ NITRO FAINT

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▲ NITRO MERCY

Q: What trends are you noticing in women’s snowboard gear? JP: We have seen a bunch of girls getting into snowboarding, recently. There’s a strong presence of really good female athletes that pushed forward last year, and it’s getting girls excited about getting into the sport instead of doing it as a full-time hobby. Because of that, higher-performance, higher-quality products have been trending more than price points.

▲ JONES AIRHEART

JP Pardy, Owner, Recess Ride Shop, Boone, N.C.

▲ K2 ESTATE


TOP TRENDS | ALPINE RENTAL

POWERED BY

Power of Partnerships BRANDS WORK WITH OPERATORS TO BOLSTER RENTAL PROGRAM SUCCESS

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▼ ROSSIGNOL EXPERIENCE RTL (XPRESS)

Sit in on the Power Panel Rental Industry Roundtable for the secrets to rental fits (Rental World/Backshop #4501) Saturday at 9:30 a.m. an extended relationship, rather than a one-time deal. A “partner” is more likely to renew purchase agreements. “It’s a lot easier if you bring something else to the table,” says Head’s Mike Poole, than just product. In recent years, limited-sole-length boot-binding systems from Head, Rossignol, Dalbello, and Elan have been big news in the fleet-rental market. These systems require a major commitment to a trio of products and put the buyer and seller into a partnership. With Dalbello now under the Völkl/Marker umbrella, such alliances will keep partnerships top of mind for both operators and suppliers. Second, manufacturers recognize that rental is an important portal. Make a good first impression, and a firsttime skier is more likely to convert, and ultimately become a brand-buying enthusiast. Head’s Andrew Couperthwait calls rental “your front line of exposure to consumers.”

RENTAL UPGRADE

Suppliers continue to upgrade the performance, quality and look of even entry-level rental gear. K2’s Adam Ruscitto describes the step up to the Iconic (for men) and Luv (for women) from the basic fleet-rental Strike as a chance to “start using some brand power.” And Völkl’s Geoff Curtis says that higher-performing gear, even at a slight premium in Völkl’s case, establishes a positive brand identity. That’s why performance rental gear typically has a strong link to in-line products. Examples: Nordica is producing an 85-mm-waisted rental version of its popular NRGY ski. Salomon’s Chris McKearin reports that “we’re seeing a lot more interest in the Quest Access (boot),” which taps into a retail line. K2 has

▲ VÖLKL RTM

▲ K2 LUV

▲ HEAD NATURAL INSTINCT

▼ ELAN EXPLORE

“PARTNERSHIP” IS THE BUZZWORD THAT DEfines rental for the 2016-17 season. Equipment suppliers are taking extra steps to support their customers and bolster the success of their rental programs. Head introduced a rental “camp” at the Midwestern Ski Areas Association summer show last fall. This all-day seminar covered topics from metrics for measuring profits, to fleet maintenance and rental software. The company plans to expand the program to other regions and add half-day executive-only sessions. Tecnica (among others) customizes its rental products for clients, as it has done with the Aspen Skiing Company, imprinting boots with the resort’s logo. For resort customers, Rossignol promotes its 39 Experience Centers, working with ski-area operators in the rental, demo and instructional process. Elan has expanded its free-ski-for-beginners program to 11 areas. Why go to such lengths? First, a partnership implies

▲ NORDICA CRUISE

SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 2 SIAsnowshow.com

▲ ELAN EXPLORE

been seeing strong interest in the Iconic and Luv skis. Ditto for Head with its Monster 78 and Monster 83 skis. That interest is only going to increase. A recent SIA/ SAM rental survey showed what Curtis calls “a very healthy high-end/demo rental market” in North America.

NEW PRODUCT INTROS

There are some new products of note in the rental world. Head is introducing a new, high-performance AdvantEdge boot model with a cuff design intended, according to Couperthwait, “to produce edge pressure with less forward flex.” That means easier skiing with less fatigue. Nordica is resurrecting its Speedmachine category with a 110 flex (90 flex for women) model that features “in-line architecture spec’d for rental,” says Nordica’s Scott Russo. Alpina’s new Elite 100R boot is listed as having a 103mm last, but comes with a width-control adjustment at the second buckle to make the boot wider or narrower. Dalbello is introducing a Vibram-like Grip Walk sole, providing easier, safer walking when not on skis. And with growing interest in AT equipment and an increase in boots with varying sole specs, Salomon is debuting a demo version of the Warden MNC 13 binding that is adaptable to different boot-sole specs. Völkl is slipping an RTM 7.6 rental model (76-mm waist) between its RTM 7.4 and RTM 8.0, a move aimed primarily at Eastern operations looking for a little more waist width.

NICHES: TBL AND KIDS

Rossignol is an official Terrain-Based Learning sponsor; Elan has designed a ski for the program—a 130-cm model with a slightly turned-up tail and two inches of early rise to make pressuring the tip easy at very slow speeds. In kids’ rental, Elan is expanding its U-Flex ski offering with an increased-size run through 130cm. The ski, paired with an Alpina-made, Elan-branded boot, flexes like an accordion, according to Bill Irwin, to assure the proper flex of the ski. Völkl also comes in with a nice upgrade option in the RTM Jr in a rental version. —Peter Oliver

▲ ROSSIGNOL PURE RENTAL

▲ HEAD ADVANTEDGE 95


A SMOOTH TOUCH IN A HARSH WORLD

POWER AND COMFORT ARE NO LONGER MUTUALLY EXCLUSIVE. An entirely new era in ski design, Dynastar’s unique POWERDRIVE technology works like the chassis of a race car, effectively absorbing changes in terrain and unlocking the skis’ natural flex to deliver smooth, dynamic power with ground-breaking control and edge grip. Conception AGENCE

3-MATERIAL SIDEWALL: VISCO: ACTIVE SUSPENSION TITANAL: POWER BOOSTER ABS: POWER TRANSMISSION

POWERDRIVE TECHNOLOGY


SPOTLIGHT | BEER

Time for a Cold One

KICK BACK AND RELAX AFTER A LONG DAY AT THE SNOW SHOW WITH THIS GUIDE TO WHERE TO FIND A CRAFT BREW IN DENVER. BY LINDSAY KONZAK Ale House at Amato’s

Pedal IPA and the Summit Sunrise Red Rye IPA, how can you not stop by for a drink?

MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.6

Epic Brewing Company

2501 16th St.; 303-433-9734 alehousedenver.com

3001 Walnut St.; 720-539-7410 epicbrewing.com

Owned by Colorado craft beer mainstays Breckenridge Brewery and Wynkoop Brewing Company, the Ale House at Amato’s also features beers from other Colorado breweries, as well as a menu of traditional pub fare.

MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.8

Founded in Utah as the state’s first brewery since prohibition to brew exclusively high-alcohol-content beer, Epic shares the beer love in a taproom in downtown Denver.

Breckenridge Colorado Craft

Falling Rock Taphouse

2220 Blake St.; 303-297-3644; breckbrewcocraft.com

1919 Blake St.; 303-293-8338 fallingrocktaphouse.com

MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.4

MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.3

Denver Beer Co.

In the heart of LoDo, only a half block south of Coors Field, this taphouse has more than 75 beers on tap and more than 130 bottled beers available.

MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.5

Great Divide Brewing Co.

1695 Platte St.; 303-433-2739; denverbeerco.com Denver Beer Company’s no-frills warehouse-style headquarters and attitude makes it one of the city’s best breweries. And with selections like the Graham Cracker Porter, the Incredible

These Brews are Golden

On the way up or down I-70 for the Demo, stop in the foothills town of Golden for a tour or sampling of beer – there’s plenty to go around. (But don’t drink and drive!) Coors Ford Street, Golden Take a tour of the Coors plant, a mainstay in the town and popular with tourists. It’s not exactly craft beer, but the tour’s worth it if you have the time. Bonus: Free beer at the end.

2201 Arapahoe St.; 303-296-9460; greatdivide.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.1

Great Divide hopped onto the craft beer scene before there was much of a scene at all. Great Divide offers tours and food trucks daily, and, of course, its handcrafted selection of 16 taps of seasonal and year-round beers.

Hops & Pie

3920 Tennyson St.; 303-477-7000; hopsandpie.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 4.3

Beer and fresh-from-scratch pizza with unusual toppings? Yes, please. And apparently

Cannonball Creek Brewing Company 393 Washington Ave., Golden Founded by two brewers who previously called the popular Mountain Sun Brewery home, this taphouse keeps 6-12 rotating beers on at all times. Barrels & Bottles Brewery 600 12th St. #160, Golden Taste-test Barrels & Bottles’s brews, or partake in a selection of other breweries’ beer – from inside and out of Colorado. Golden City Brewery 920 12th St., Golden For more than 20 years, the Golden City Brewery has been serving up its drafts in a converted machine shop, including its Legendary Red Ale and Evolution India Pale Ale.

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RENEGADE BREWING CO.

PHOTOS (FROM TOP) COURTESY OF ALE HOUSE AT AMATO’S; VISIT DENVER; RENEGADE BREWING CO.

Breckenridge Brewery is a gathering place for lovers of good beer and good food in the Ballpark Neighborhood near Coors Field.


Out-of-the-Ordinary Drinking Holes

Get a taste of the old country or venture to the top of Denver with this selection of spots to grab a beer, glass of wine or unique cocktail. Katie Mullen’s 1550 Court Place; 303-300-9883 katiemullens.com

MILES FROM THE SHOW: 0.4

An Irish pub through and through, Katie Mullen’s not only has a nice mix of Irish pub fare to soak up the drinks, it also offers the best selection of Irish beers on draft on the 16th Street Mall. Pints Pub 221 W. 13th Ave.; 303-534-7543 pintspub.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 0.6

With its signature red telephone booth out front, Pints Pub is a traditional British brew pub that serves up authentic traditional British cask-conditioned, or live ales, rarely found in the U.S. Pints Pub also offers a large selection of single malt whiskey. Cheers! Peaks Lounge 650 15th St. (27th floor of the Hyatt); 800-233-1234 denverregency.hyatt.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 0

A little closer to “home,” Peaks Lounge is on the 27th floor of the Hyatt Regency, right across the street from the Convention Center. This bar offers the best views of downtown Denver and, in addition to a broad selection of wines, beer and liquors, features cocktails made from Colorado-sourced spirits. Hops & Pie doesn’t repeat beers, so there’s always something new to try in its rotating 20beer selection. Uber on over to this joint.

Renegade Brewing Co.

925 W. 9th Ave.; 720-401-4089; renegadebrewing.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1

Renegade claims to have “offensively delicious” beer, originally crafted in 2011 and now a fixture in the Denver beer scene. You can’t go wrong with a Depravity Imperial Peanut Butter Cup Milk Stout, a Hiatus Cold Coffee-Infused Oatmeal Ale or a Contrarian Imperial Pilsner.

Vine Street Pub & Brewery

1700 Vine St.; 303-388-2337; mountainsunpub.com PHOTO COURTESY OF VISIT DENVER

MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.9

Vine Street Pub & Brewery, part of the Mountain Sun brewing operation, not only offers a selection of its own beer, including the popular Java Porter and the FYIPA, but also top beers from other craft breweries. Oh, and the food’s pretty good, too. Try the Basil Blue Cheeseburger or the S.O.B. Burger for a bit of a kick. Or just kick back with a burrito.

Wynkoop Brewing Company

1634 18th St.; 303-297-2700; wynkoop.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1

Founded by Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper in 1988, Wynkoop Brewing Company is probably the most iconic brewery in downtown Denver. It’s now a community staple through its great beers, surplus of pool tables and comforting pub food.


& AT THE SHOW | WHO WHERE

Find booth numbers and Show layout at SIAsnowshow.com/floorplan. Download the SIA Snow Show App at SIAsnowshow.com/showapp.

Exhibitors

MORE THAN 900 BRANDS ON DISPLAY AT THE SHOW (AS OF 1.14.16; SUBJECT TO CHANGE) Company

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Company

Company

Company

Company

686 ............................................... 3365 10th Mountain Division Foundation, Inc.............................16 2XU................................................. 1148 4F.................................................. 530 540 Snowboards.......................... 3378 Abom, Inc....................................1965A ACADEMY Snowboard Co..........2070 Adaptive Spirit...................................19 Advanced Racking Systems........3442 Adventure SnowSports............. 562 Agent Outerwear....................... 435 AION............................................... 3075 Airblaster....................................... 2670 Airhole Facemasks....................... 2071 Aksels............................................. 2551 All Resort Furnishings.................2400 Aloha Products LLC.................. 1270 Alpaca Imports............................. 1330 Alpina Sports Corp....................... 2703 Alp-n-Rock LLC.............................. 1321 Amerex Group................................ 609 American Express OPEN.........3100 American Institute for Avalanche Research and Education (AIARE).................... 3657 anon............................................... 1561 Apex Sports Group LLC...............4311 Arbor.............................................. 1365 Arcade Belt Co.............................. 2371 Arctix.............................................. 2717 Armada.......................................... 4350 Artesania, Inc................................ 2138 ARVA............................................... 3412 AscentCRM.................................... 3305 Ascente Ski Company.............. 4345 Ashbury Eyewear......................... 3176 Astis 2516 Athalon Sportgear, Inc................4114 Atomic USA, Inc................. 3923, 4123 Auclair Sports, Inc........................ 1324 AWSM LLC.................................... 973 Backcountry Access, Inc..............3942 Backcountry Experience............. 3657 BbTALKIN.................................. 4663 Bearpaw Apparel....................... 840 Becker Glove International LLC.....................1273 Belong Designs............................. 1170 Bench............................................. 1042 Bent Metal Binding Works......... 2871 Bergans of Norway........................ 721 Bern Unlimited, Inc...................... 3480 Besso Imports........................... 1507 Big Agnes, Inc................................ 1671 Billabong USA........................... 2361 Black Crows Skis......................1965BC Blackstrap....................................1965B Blanc Noir.................................. 1311 Blizzard.......................................... 3701 Blossom Skis................................. 4345 Blue Acorn..................................... 1076 Board Retailers Association......... 669 Bollé ................................................. 552 Bomber Alpine Snowboard Outfitters.............................. 2115 BONFIRE........................................ 2671 Booster Strap................................ 3411 Boot Doc........................................ 3335 Boulder Gear................................ 2724 Braven........................................ 4561 Brekka............................................ 1051 Bridgedale North America..................... 2448 Briko USA....................................... 4111 Bronto Software, Inc................... 1075 Buff, Inc.......................................... 3148 BULA............................................... 1051 Burton Snowboards.................... 1665 C3.................................................... 3357

C4 Belts.......................................... 1370 CAM Commerce Solutions........... 434 CandyGrind................................... 1569 CAPiTA Snowboarding................3357 Captuer Headwear...................... 3674 Caravan Skis............................. 4445 Carver Skateboards.................1974 Celerant Technology Corporation................................ 434 Celtek............................................. 3370 CenterStone Technologies, Inc.....................1736 CEP Compression Sportswear...4310 Cerevo, Inc................................. 3973 Chaos............................................. 2423 Chapplicator LLC...................... 2937 Choucas Hats.............................. 703 Cirque Mountain Apparel...........2540 COAL Headwear........................... 3357 Coalition Snow.......................... 4469 Colmar........................................... 1317 Colorado Original Outdoor Products................................... 2817 Colorado Ski Country USA..........1739 Colour Wear.................................. 2071 Copper Mountain Resort............2215 Corbeaux................................... 4307 CP Sports North America...........3444 CRAFT @ SIA.................................. 4469 Craghoppers................................. 1124 crazeeHeads, inc.......................... 1123 Crescent Moon Snowshoes.......3117 CTR (Chaos Thermal Regulation)............................... 2423 Dainese USA Inc........................... 2117 DAKINE........................................... 2557 Dalbello Sports LLC..................... 4118 Dale of Norway, Inc....................... 711 Dare2b................................ 1117, 1124 Darn Tough Vermont.................. 2200 Db Equipment........................... 2780 DC Shoes, Inc................................ 1673 DCURVE...................................... 1571 Deeluxe....................................... 1965D Demon United.............................. 1667 Descente North America, Inc.....1711 Deuter USA................................... 2814 Deviation Ski & Snowboard Works........................................ 3621 Dinosaurs Will Die Snowboards............................. 1970 DIOMI............................................... 601 DMOS......................................... 3075 Donek Snowboards................. 2115 Double Diamond Sportswear....2134 DOWP a snowboard group........4469 DPS SKIS........................................ 3509 Dragon Alliance............................ 2565 Drop MFG...................................... 2645 DryGuy........................................... 3138 Dynastar Skis................................ 3708 Eider................................................ 1039 Eisbär Sportmodeu Gmbh....................................... 718 Elan Blanc...................................... 1930 Elan Skis......................................... 2703 Electric............................................ 2957 Elm Company............................ 3971 EMU Australia............................. 741 Endurance Enterprises, Inc........1800 Envy Snow Sports..................... 4448 Erik Sports-WhiteWoods.............3501 Erin Snow...................................... 1527 Eurosock International............... 1145 Everest Designs........................ 2140 Exel Sports.................................... 2916 E-Z UP International, Inc............. 4443 Faction Skis................................... 4145 Fairweather Ski Works............ 4469 Falke USA....................................... 3138

Farm to Feet.................................. 4039 Fast Strap...................................... 3417 Fat-ypus Skis................................. 4245 Fera International Corp.............. 1111 Fischer Skis US.............................. 4411 FITS ............................................... 2416 Fix Binding Co........................... 2476 Flow Sports, Inc............................ 2961 Flux Binding Systems.................. 1475 FlyLow Gear.................................. 3112 Fox River Mills, Inc........................ 2517 Franco SnowShapes.................... 4469 Freezy Freakies......................... 2274 Freyja.Ca.......................................... 733 Friends of Colorado Avalanche Information Center (CAIC)............................ 3657 Full Tilt Boots................................ 3723 G3 Genuine Guide Gear, Inc......3306 Garmin USA.................................. 4362 Geographical Norway............. 1748 Gilson Boards............................... 1369 Giro Sport Design........................ 3649 GloveTacts................................. 2533 GNU ............................................... 2871 GO PUCK....................................... 4563 Goal Zero....................................... 3521 Goggle Grip................................... 2935 GoGlove..................................... 3975 Goldbergh..................................... 1415 Goldwin America, Inc.................... 535 GOODE Ski Technologies........... 3320 GoPro............................................. 4357 Gordini USA, Inc........................... 2645 GoScope........................................ 4361 Grabber, Inc.................................. 3405 Gramicci.................................... 1769 Grassroots California.................. 1073 Grenade, Inc................................. 1473 Hand Out Gloves.......................... 1173 Hatley USA...................................... 833 HEAD Wintersports..................... 2924 Heat Factory USA, Inc.................. 1700 Helly Hansen................................. 1720 HESTRA GLOVES LLC................... 2120 Hey Sport....................................... 4345 High Fives Non-Profit Foundation................................. 872 High Sierra.................................... 3633 Hippie Board............................. 1169 Holden........................................... 3478 Holmenkol.US............................... 4401 Homeschool Outerwear............. 3374 Honey Stinger............................... 1670 Horizon Agency, Inc..................... 2700 Hot Chillys..................................... 3330 Hotfingers Gloves........................ 1703 Hotronic......................................... 3335 Hovland Snowskates............... 3675 HOWL............................................. 2375 Humanity Snow............................ 3472 i.N.i. Cooperative............................ 765 Icelandic Design........................... 2242 Icelantic Skis.................................. 3309 Icepeak........................................... 1034 IFA Prowear..................................... 615 ImedgeBoards LLC................... 4243 Impact Canopies USA.................. 4314 Implus LLC..................................... 3138 Incase......................................... 4661 Indigo Ski USA LLC................... 3414 Industry + Intelligence Live........... 679 International Avalanche Nest-Egg Fund (IAN)................2475 International Skiing History Association (ISHA)........................21 Itasca Footwear by C.O. Lynch Enterprises..................... 737 JAIL JAM.......................................... 1315 JASEBOARDS USA, Inc..............2276 Jonathan Paul Eyewear................. 451 Joshua Tree Skin Care................. 1701 Jupa Sports................................ 1505 K2 Skis............................................ 3949 K2 Snowboarding........................ 3957 Kamik......................................... 1048 Kapan Kent Co, Inc..................... 600 Karakoram.................................... 3068 Karbon........................................... 1730 Kari Traa........................................ 2238 KASK America, Inc........................ 3342 Kastle USA..................................... 4101

KEL52.......................................... 4657 KGB SPORT................................... 3800 Khombu........................................... 715 Killtec NA Inc................................. 2111 Kiss My Face LLC.......................... 1400 Kitten Factory LLC........................ 4237 KJUS North America, Inc............... 403 KneeBinding, Inc.......................... 3511 Kombi Ltd., Inc.............................. 2930 Komperdell................................... 2920 Krimson Klover............................. 1536 Kuhl Clothing................................ 2413 KULKEA.......................................... 2529 KUUsport Mfg. Ltd....................... 4109 Kwik Tek, Inc................................. 3514 La Sportiva N.A., Inc..................... 3630 LACROIX SKIS..........................1965L LandYachtz.................................... 1669 Lange Ski Boots............................ 3708 Laundromat.................................... 524 L-Bow Mittens................................. 727 Le Bent......................................... 457 Learn to Ski and Snowboard Month............................................24 LEKI USA, Inc................................. 3120 Level USA....................................... 2360 Lib Tech.......................................... 2871 Liberty Mountain......................... 2421 Liberty Skis.................................... 3725 Linda Richards, Inc.................. 1122 Line Skis......................................... 3523 Little Blue House by Hatley.......... 833 Loki LLC...................................... 1278 Look Bindings............................... 3708 Lorpen North America, Inc......... 1334 Lost Horizons Imports.................. 725 Lucky Bums, Inc........................... 2710 LUHTA USA Ltd............................. 1034 M. Miller........................................... 818 Mad Bomber Company.............. 1332 Mammut Sports Group NA........3517 Manzella Products....................... 3447 Marhar Snowboards................... 2373 Marker USA........................ 4417, 4420 Marmot Mountain LLC................ 1339 MasterFit Enterprises.................. 3644 MDXONE........................................ 2275 Meier Skis...................................... 3317 Mervin Manufacturing............ 2871 Message Factory, Inc................... 4301 Mitchie’s Matchings....................... 513 Mons Royale USA......................... 3945 Montana Sport North America, Inc............................. 3639 Moon Boot.................................... 3601 Mortali, Inc.................................. 974 MOTOTV Networks.................. 2143 Mountain Collective....................... 565 Mountain Uniforms..................... 1534 MTN Approach............................. 2359 MyPakage...................................... 3375 National Ski & Snowboard Retailers Association (NSSRA)..................................... 4308 National Ski Areas Association (NSAA).......................23 Native Eyewear........................ 2542 NEFF ............................................... 3661 Neve Designs................................ 3718 Never Summer Industries.......... 1359 NeverWet.................................... 641 Newland.................................... 1909 Niche Snowboards...................... 1977 Nidecker North America.......................... 3070, 3167 Nightmare....................................... 971 Nike Vision.................................... 2565 NIKITA............................................ 2671 NILS ............................................... 1742 Nitro Snowboards....................... 1978 Nordbron..................................... 701 Nordic Center............................... 3115 Nordica USA....................... 3603, 3704 Northern Lites Snowshoes.....3622 NPD - Sports and Leisure Trends......................................... 437 NuDown, Inc................................. 2133 Oakley, Inc..................................... 1345 One Way Sport USA..................... 3118 OneBall.......................................... 2876 O’Neill............................................. 1557 Onewheel.................................... 665

Optic Nerve................................... 3347 ORAGE........................................... 1750 Ortovox USA Inc........................... 2814 OSBE Helmets.............................. 4315 Outdoor Designs.......................... 2421 Outdoor Gear, Inc........................ 2724 Outdoor Industries Women's Coalition (OIWC)........................ 548 Outdoor Survival Canada........... 2716 Outdoor Tech............................... 4161 Ovan........................................... 2362 Owner Operator............................ 869 Pajar Canada................................ 1523 Parajumpers................................. 1515 Patagonia, Inc............................... 1857 Pepper’s Polarized Eyewear.......2445 Phunkshun Wear LLC.................... 762 Picture Organic Clothing...........1965P Pinnacle Designs.......................... 2714 PISTIL.............................................. 2229 Pit Viper........................................... 448 Planks Clothing America, Inc............................. 4037 POC ............................................... 3350 point6 LLC..................................... 1530 Point-of-Rental Software............4404 POLARMAX.................................... 2334 PolarPro......................................... 4559 Polartec LLC.............................. 1257 Popticals.................................... 1375 POW Gloves.................................. 3477 Powder Point Sports..................... 740 Pret Inc........................................... 3937 Pretty Great LLC............... 2578, 2671 Protect Our Winters (POW)........2324 PSIA-AASI......................................... 153 Public Snowboards...................... 1478 Pulse................................................. 757 Purnell......................................... 540 Quiksilver, Inc............................... 1678 Radical! Gloves............................. 1271 Rain Retail........................................ 430 Rawik.............................................. 2724 Recco Systems Ltd.........................UL1 Red Bull Racing Eyewear........1269 Redfeather Snowshoes............... 3605 Regina Imports LLC..................... 1511 Remind Insoles............................. 2272 Rental World - Backshop............ 4501 reusch SnowSports..................... 2136 Revision Skis............................. 4469 Revo Sunglasses........................... 2146 Ride Snowboards.............. 3965, 4171 Riot Skis..................................... 4446 Ripclear.......................................... 2650 Roces USA, Inc.......................... 4305 Rocky Mountain Sunscreen.......2554 Rocky Mountain Underground.... 3326 Rodin Ltd....................................... 4469 Rome Snowboard Design Syndicate.................................... 965 Rossignol............................ 3614, 3714 Rossignol Apparel........................ 3818 ROXA Sports.................................. 4107 Roxy ............................................... 1678 Ruffolo Enterprises, Inc............... 2553 Rukka............................................. 1034 Ruroc Ltd..................................... 431 Saga Outerwear............................. 962 Saint Bernard’s........................... 769 Salomon Snowboards................. 2178 Salomon USA..................... 3830, 4130 Sandbox......................................... 2270 SAXX Underwear Co.................... 3377 SCARPA North America, Inc.......3109 Schure Sports U.S.A., Inc............. 1730 Scott Sports........................ 2940, 3147 Screamer, Inc.................................. 730 SeatRack.................................... 4437 Sector 9.......................................... 1062 Sego Skis........................................ 4449 Seirus Innovation......................... 2630 SESSIONS....................................... 2578 SH+................................................ 453 SheJumps........................................ 450 Sherpani...................................... 539 Shred Optics................................. 3961 SIA Sourcing Seminar Area........ S423 SIMS Apparel............................. 1769 Sioeye, Inc................................. 4462 SKEA, LTD...................................... 2411 Skhoop........................................... 1430

Ski and Snowboard Mechanics Workshops............................... 4210 Ski Kare, Inc................................... 3505 Ski Sundries and Supplies..........2124 SkiA Designs.................................. 4405 Skida............................................... 2000 SkiMetrix, Ltd................................ 3411 Slant Skis................................... 4244 Slide On......................................... 3411 SLOKKER SPORTS NORTH AMERICA.................4339 Slope Ropes............................... 2142 Slytech Protection........................ 3961 SmartWool Corporation............... 957 SMITH....................... 2850, 2950, 3048 Smokin’ Snowboards.................. 1175 Sno Skins, Inc.................................. 915 Snoogee Boards.......................... 970 SnoPlanks...................................... 2374 Snow Angel................................... 1939 Snow Dragons.............................. 2724 Snow Gliders LLC...................... 4469 Snow Show Daily............................ 441 Snowboarders and Skiers for Christ..................................... 772 Snowjam Canada, Inc.................. 3378 SnowStoppers.............................. 2938 SOLE........................................... 3939 SOS Outreach....................................22 Soul Poles...................................... 3418 SP United USA, Inc.......................4557 Spacecraft..................................... 2269 Spark R&D..................................... 2470 SplitPea Sound.......................... 4659 Sport Design Sweden................. 622 Sport Obermeyer Ltd.................. 1803 Sportcaster Company, Inc............ 757 Sportlast USA............................ 1331 Sports Accessories America, Inc............................. 2720 Sportswear of Sweden (SOS)... 1508 Sportube........................................ 2701 Spy.................................................. 2651 Spyder Active Sports, Inc.............. 903 Spyderco........................................ 4147 STANCE....................................... 3475 Stepchild Snowboards................1478 Stockli Outdoor Sports................3323 Strafe Outerwear......................... 3215 SubQ Designs............................ 4239 Sun Bum LLC................................ 2477 Sun Valley Ski Tools, Inc..............3944 Suncountry Sales and Distributing LLC..................... 543 Sunice............................................... 744 Sunrise......................................... 616 Superdry...................................... 569 Superfeet Worldwide, Inc...........2520 Swany............................................. 1703 Sweet Protection.......................... 3946 Sweet Turns.................................. 2534 Swix Sport USA, Inc......................3102 SYNC............................................... 2948 Tecnica USA....................... 3601, 3701 Ternua............................................ 1334 Terramar Sports, Inc................... 2644 The Chill Foundation........................25 The Interior Plain Project.......3972 The Sessions @ SIA...................... 4565 The Soze Group (TSG).................4407 ThermaCELL Heated Products................................ 3135 ThirtyTwo...................................... 2265 Thorlo, Inc..................................... 1520 Thule, Inc....................................... 3302 Tiki Toss......................................... 2447 TOBE Outerwear........................ 545 TOKO.............................................. 3102 Transpack...................................... 2935 Trespass USA................................ 1030 Turbine.......................................... 4365 Turtle Fur....................................... 1125 Under Armour................................ 749 Uniform Gallery............................ 4400 Union Binding Company............ 3357 United States of America Snowboard & Freeski Assoc (USASA)...............................20 US Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame..................................17 USRA - Rep Associations..................18 UVEX Sports, Inc........................... 2910

Be our Sales Representative Grab the opportunity now Colorado

Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky & Illinois

Meet us at booth # 1505

California, Nevada

Texas

Toll Free 1-800-363-1898 • www.jupa.ca

New exhibitors are bolded

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 2 SIAsnowshow.com


Company

Company

Company

Company

Company

Company

Vail Resorts Inc / Epic Pass........... 458 Vans................................................ 2865 Vapur............................................ 662 Vauhti Wax Technologies....... 4343 VEMO Sports LLC......................... 4301 Vigo Imports............................... 621 VillageHouse................................... 639 Volcom........................................... 3665 Volkl ............................................... 4323 VonZipper...................................... 3165 Voormi........................................... 4369 Vuarnet........................................1965V Watson’s Bodywear....................... 837 WAXD Laces.................................. 1174 Whitedot Skis US...................... 4440 WI-ME SNOWBOARDS................ 2478 Wintersteiger, Inc......................... 3335 Wolfie Furs Canada....................... 825 Woolpower................................ 2156 WSI Sports..................................... 1313 X22 Snowboarding................... 1374 XS Helmets.................................... 3647 XSories........................................... 4655 Yaktrax........................................... 3138 YodelTECH................................. 4658 YRC Freight...................................... 619 Yukon Charlies............................. 3514 Zanheadgear................................ 1069 ZANIER Sports Inc......................1965Z Zarges Inc...................................... 3136 ZDAR Boot USA............................ 1503 Zeal Optics.................................... 2161 Zensah......................................... 643 Zion Snowboards..................... 3574

Beijing Huafu Manufacturing Ltd.............. S324 CBF Labels Inc............................... S522 CHANGZHOU GAODA SPORTINGS CO., LTD........... S321 Concept III Textiles International............................ S418 drirelease.................................. S318 DTS, Inc.......................................... S320 DURAFLEX..................................... S415 Erictex Fashion Co Ltd................. S114 Global Merino............................... S414 Guangzhou Hangbao . Group Co Ltd........................... S124 Guangzhou Yijia Optical Technique Co Ltd................. S223 Hebei Joyful I&E Trade Co., Ltd................................... S221 Jiangyin Diamond . Tools Co Ltd........................... S123 Jining Glove and Sewing Product Col Ltd........................ S120 Jining Jianhua Zhongxing Ski Products Co. Ltd............ S121 Maxland Sportswear Industrial Co Ltd...................... S520 Paltex Company Ltd................ S519 Roaly Merchandises Inc.............. S313 Shenzhen Pengyifa Industrial Co Ltd...................... S421 Shenzhen Reanson Products Co. LTD..................... S220 Shifan Racewear, Inc................... S118 Solis Fabric Technology Co Ltd........................................ S115 Suzhou Zhongbo Textile Garment Co. Ltd.................. S218 Sympatex Technologies, Inc...... S420 TEXLAND & NEXKO . CO. LTD................................... S620 Toray International America, Inc............................. S417 Union Line Textile Co Ltd........................... S515 Vertical Source, Inc...................... S422 Welltern Enterprise Co. Ltd....................................... S517 Xiamen Evergreen Industrial Corp..................... S323

YKK (USA), Inc................................ S521 Zhaoqing Bohan Sports Co., LTD........................ S224

BENT METAL Black Crows Black Diamond Equipment Blizzard Skis Bolle Sunglasses & Goggles Boot Doc Burton Snowboards Capita snowboards Caravan Skis Dalbello Ski Boots DC Snowboards/Boots/ . Outerwear Deviation Skis & . Snowboards Dinosaurs Will Die DPS Skis Dragon Dynafit Dynastar Skis Elan Electric Faction Skis First Degree Fischer Skis XC Fisher Ski Fitovers Eyewear Fix bindings Flow Snowboarding Flux Snowboard Bindings Full Tilt Boots G3 Gilson Boards LLC Giro Goggles Giro Snow Helmets GNU GO PUCK Goode Carbon Ski Products GoPro Cameras Head Winter Sports: Alpine Skis, . Ski Boots, Bindings Hotronic Hovland Snowskates Icelantic Skis Jonathan Paul Eyewear Jones Snowboards Julbo Optics K2 Skis, Boots, Helmets, . Goggles, Poles and Accessories K2 Snowboarding

Kastle Skis La Sportiva Landyachtz Snowboards Lange Ski Boots LIB TECH Liberty Skis LINE Skis Look Bindings Marhar Snowboards Marker Ski Bindings, . Helmets & Goggles Meier Skis MOMENT SKI Morrow Snowboards Native Eyewear Never Summer Snowboards Niche Snowboards Nike Goggles Nitro Snowboards Nordica accessories Nordica Boots Nordica Skis Northern Lites Snowshoes Now Bindings Oakley ON3P Skis Outdoor Technology POC Helmets, . Goggles & Armor Pret Helmets Ride Snowboards Rocky Mountain Underground Rome Snowboards Rossignol Alpine, Nordic, . Snowboard ROXY SNOWBOARDS Salewa Footwear Salomon Alpine Salomon Goggles Salomon Helmets Salomon Nordic Sandbox Helmets Scarpa Scott Boots

Scott Sports-Hardgoods/ . Softgoods Sego Skis Signal Snowboards SIMS Snowboards Skia Slant Skis Slash Snowboards Smith Smokin Snowboards Spy Optic Start Wax and Poles Stepchild Snowboards STOCKLI OUTDOOR SPORTS Superfeet Worldwide Swix Alpine: Ski Tuning . Equipment, Ski Poles Swix Sport USA SWIX Wax, Tuning and . Poles, UT/WY Technine Tecnica Ski Boots Toko Wax, Tuning and . Ski Care Products Triple 8 Tyrolia: Alpine and Alpine . Touring Ski Bindings Union bindings UVEX UVEX Winter/Bike Helmets, . Goggles and Sunglasses Vans Voile Manufacturing Volkl USA Von Zipper Sunglasses . and Goggles Whitedot Skis Wintersteiger Yeah for it Distributions! . (Bataleon, Lobster, Switchback) Yes Snowboards Yukon Charlie's Zeal Optics

3M Thinsulate Insulation.................................. S126 AMATERRACE, Inc........................ S315 Aparso (Fujian) Sportswear Co Ltd........................................ S117

CRAFT

All CRAFT exhibitors can be found at booth #4469 Coalition Snow DOWP a snowboard group Fairweather Ski Works Franco SnowShapes Revision Skis Rodin Ltd Snow Gliders LLC

ON-SNOW DEMO* 32 ThirtyTwo Snowboard . Boots & Outerwear 4FRNT Skis Adidas Snowboarding Alpina Anon Apex Ski Boots Arbor Collective . (Snowboards and Skateboards) Armada Skis Atomic Atomic Nordic Atomic USA Alpine

F E E L

*In conjunction with the Western Winter Sports Representatives Association (WWSRA) Rocky Mountain Demo, and in partnership with Cross Country Ski Areas Association (CCSAA)

T H E

N A T U R E

THE NE SK I CL W AM FOR AL P L SK IS !

COME AND SEE US AT BOOTH #3639

SIA DENVER SHOW BOOTH #4305

MONTANA-INTERNATIONAL.COM


AT THE SHOW | PRODUCT PICKS

Wish List TAP TECHNOLOGY GoGlove, Booth 3975

To never have bare hands on the ski lift again? We’d be thrilled. GoGlove gets us that much closer to the goal of managing our playlists without inviting frostbite or dropping our phones. The Kickstarterlaunched Polartec fleece glove liner is a wearable wireless remote that controls music played through an Android or iOS phone. A magnet in the glove liner’s thumb activates Bluetooth controls via pushable sensors in the index, middle and ring fingers including single and double taps. Each sensor is configurable to the wearer’s action of choice through a smartphone app— even GoPro and camera actions can be triggered. Plus, the waterproof liner functions beneath an exterior glove or mitten, operates for six months on a coin cell battery, and is washable (just remove the remote).

KID-FRIENDLY

Slope Ropes, Booth 2142

Lap after lap, skiing with the kids just got a whole lot easier with this debut learn-to-ski aid: Slope Ropes. The simple (yet groundbreaking) newbie-skier device is a new-fashioned hulahoop: one long green rope is connected by yellow handles on either end—one for the kid’s waist and the other for the parent steering. No harness. No leash. Handle in hand, parents can provide gentle guidance through turns, speed checks and pulls on the flats. The rope rests at the child’s waist, with the goal of not introducing bad posture backaches—for the parent or the kid—and the Ropes are playfully colorful, in yellow-green or red-blue combos.

Purnell French Terry Tunic, Booth 540

48

Cozy, comfortable and perfect for low-key days around the ski lodge, Purnell’s French Terry Tunic carries an unassuming style that’s mature yet playful. Made with mid-weight stretch terry knit that’s enzyme-washed and silicone-softened, the loose-fitting piece can be worn over funky leggings for a look-at-me vibe or toned down when paired with your favorite pair of skinny jeans. A hidden ripstop-nylon pocket on the lower right side offers a practical place to stash keys, lipstick or a cell phone. “We add those little details, but only the ones that make sense,” says Brita Womack, president and co-founder.

SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 2 SIAsnowshow.com

GOING GREEN

Phunkshun Wear, Booth 762

Denver-based Phunkshun Wear now uses Repreve recycled fabric throughout its extensive line of facemasks and balaclavas. “It’s a process that’s cool to think about,” says Phunkshun CEO Jason Badgley. “For every facemask, an average of 10 plastic water bottles are kept out of landfills.” All products are made in the USA, and the company donates a percentage of sales to the High Fives Foundation in support of injured athletes and injury prevention.

PHOTOS BY JULIE ELLISON

STYLE WITH SENSE


“It’s an absolute weapon!” -BACKCOUNTRY MAGAZINE

RANGER 108 Ti The Ranger 108 Ti is a new breed of freeride ski that is smooth and confident at speed, yet nimble and surfy when you need it to be. Achieved by a patented 5-axis milling of the core, full carbon nose and a progressive shape and rocker profile, the Ranger 108 Ti is the perfect choice for the adventurous skier. SIDECUT: 140-108-130 / RADIUS: 19m/182cm / WEIGHT: 1850g/182cm / LENGTHS: 174, 182, 188 SKI: BOOT: POLE:

Ranger 108 Ti Ranger 12 VACUUM FULL FIT Backside Vario

fischersports.com


AT THE SHOW | IMAGES

▲ THE OAKLEY CREW GATHERS FOR A GROUP PHOTO AS DAY 1 OF THE SHOW BEGINS.

▲ LINDA RODNEY, NORTH AMERICAN SALES MANAGER FOR GIRO, GETS SALES REPS REVVED UP FOR DAY 1 OF THE SHOW.

▲ GREEN WITH ENVY? MERVIN MANUFACTURING SPORTS ONESIES TO CELEBRATE ITS ZERO HAZARDOUS WASTE INITIATIVE.

50

SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 2 SIAsnowshow.com

▲ MMMMM... DONUTS. FRYING 'EM UP AT THE BOLLÈ BOOTH.

PHOTOS BY JULIE ELLISON AND ALTON RICHARDSON

▲ DANIEL SANNER ON THE ADVENTURE SNOW SPORTS SIMULATOR.


DENVER WAREHOUSE SOLUTION SIA’s Members-Only warehouse makes move out easy and ensures a smooth, worry-free entrance back into next year’s Show and includes these year-round benefits: SIA SHOW MOVE-OUT

• No Minimum Storage Weight • Close to the Convention Center

FEBRUARY - DECEMBER

• Additional Discounts for Pre-Payment • Easily Accessible throughout the year

PRE-SHOW PREP

• 1-Month Free Storage

SIA SHOW MOVE-IN

• 10% Discount on 2017 Show Drayage* • First on the Floor = More Set Up Time • Guarantee of no missed target day/time move-in penalties* * Applies to crates stored in SIA Denver Warehouse for at least 8 months prior to the 2017 Snow Show

Contact Your SIA Regional Sales & Marketing Manager: Dave Wray Western Region DWray@Snowsports.org 503-708-1947

partner. resource. advocate.

Reddy Kennedy Central & Rockies Region RKennedy@Snowsports.org 303-579-7623

Ed Wray Eastern Region EWray@Snowsports.org 401-743-8089

Tom Davis Supporting/all Regions TDavis@Snowsports.org 540-336-0803

Member-owned and industry-inspired SnowSports Industries America (SIA) is the national, non-profit trade association that represents core and on the rise suppliers of snow sports equipment, apparel and accessories. Since 1954, our mission has been to work with the industry to get more people on snow, more often to ensure the sustainability and growth of the business of snow in North America.

PR


AT THE SHOW | SHOW NEWS

AVALANCHE NEAR-VICTIM MAKES TRIP TO SNOW SHOW TO THANK BCA

Be Bold in Digital Storytelling

NO ONE WAS HAPPIER THURSDAY MORNING TO SHOW UP AT THE BACKCOUNTRY ACCESS BOOTH — or any booth at the Show, for that matter — than Smith field service rep A.J. Appezzato. By his own account, he was just happy to be there at all. Appezzato (left) made the journey to thank the company firsthand for saving his life. It was a BCA Float 30 airbag, he says, that prevented him from dying in an avalanche on Colorado’s Berthoud Pass on Saturday, Jan. 23, and adding to 10 avalanche deaths in 10 days across the western U.S. “I wanted to thank them for making this product. It definitely saved my life,” says split-boarder Appezzato, who was properly equipped and trained, and has spent two years working on a Search and Rescue team. “It felt like I was getting a bear hug from a big uncle that was getting tighter and tighter, and then after I pulled the cord I could feel the hug getting looser as I rose to the surface. I’ll always wear one from now on.” Even though the bag suffered an 18-inch gash as he was swept through some trees, the extra volume kept him on the surface as designed. And BCA welcomed the news with open arms as its mission is to save lives in the backcountry. “It’s always inspiring when we hear of a life being saved by one of our products,” says BCA director of sales Steve Christie, adding that sales of its airbag systems are up 15 percent this year. “But be careful out there and get educated. Backcountry users need to take a step back right now in several western regions and give the snowpack time to heal.” —Eugene Buchanan

“THERE ARE VERY FEW THINGS THAT I CREATE content for that’s as easy as snow sports—it’s the most beautiful canvas,” says Damian Rintelmann, senior vice president of digital strategy at IMRE—a digital, advertising, social and public relations company. He was speaking at an I+I Live seminar on Thursday. The snow sports industry revolves almost entirely around an uncontrollable factor—the weather—which means mapping out a consistent, year-round digital storyline across Web and social media channels becomes a significant challenge. Rintelmann’s presentation, “Learning the New Digital Playbook,” dove into effective approaches for digital sharing. According to IMRE, people cram nearly 31.5 hours into a conventional 24-hour day by multitasking. “Generation Z communicates through emojis. You have to think in episodic or storytelling ways that aren’t natural to marketers,” says Rintelmann, referencing consumers born from 1990 to 2010. “A kid can’t purchase much right now but is influencing purchases. They can’t drive the economy, but they can drive the app economy.” Before creating a digital plan, brands need to consider and define these five pillars: Know your audience, leverage new content models, use honest and intriguing headlines, make the message mobile-friendly (see above: multitasking), and evoke emotion. Next, like a novelist, brands should determine the model for which to tell their stories. One example is the TV studio model, which incorporates traditional story arches throughout the year and, in some cases, multiple stories simultaneously shared. Another model is editorial: Have a journalist tell the story in her own voice. After selecting a story model, map out quarterly plans— perhaps even 12 months in advance. Consider the big picture: how the brand’s story should be shared from point A to point B. Lastly, be bold, he says. “Experimentation is risky, but the best breakthrough moments have been through really bold ways.” —Morgan Tilton

▲ SOLE AND CHRIS DAVENPORT PRESENT A CHECK TO PROTECT OUR WINTERS, THANKS TO SALES OF SIGNATURE CHRIS DAVENPORT FOOTBEDS.

▲ SAMPLING THE SHOW'S NEW FOOD OPTIONS.

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SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 2 SIAsnowshow.com

PHOTOS BY (FROM LEFT) ALTON RICHARDSON (2); JULIE ELLISON

I Owe You One


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AT THE SHOW | SHOW NEWS

Size Matters

LIKE ROUTE FINDING IN THE BACKCOUNTRY, triangulation is key to determining the size of the snow sports industry. So says SIA Research Director Kelly Davis at Wednesday’s “Sizing the Market” seminar during Industry + Intelligence. Co-hosted by Nate Fristoe (right), managing director of market research firm RRC Associates, which annually compiles resort participation numbers for the National Ski Areas Association (NSAA), the talk centered on making sense of snow sports participation numbers so that those in the industry can better understand the size of the pie. According to Davis, that number most recently clocked in at 12.6 million ski and snowboard participants who hit the slopes a minimum of two times per year. Of that, 11.7 million are skiers and 7.7 million are snowboarders, “with about a 30 percent crossover between the two.” Throw in Nordic and snowshoeing, and the number grows to 30 million. SIA, she adds, makes its estimates from a suppliers’ perspective, combining retail and wholesale sales data with participation numbers from the Physical Activity Council, which conducts 30,000 annual interviews from seven major sports’ governing bodies; the NSAA, whose numbers come from RRC data; and the National Sporting Goods Associa-

“No American skier's autobiography is ever likely to equal Warren Miller's in its wealth of reflection, detailed action, and anecdote. When you personally meet the sport's movers and shakers of the past 75 years in the pages of this book, it's because Warren knew them all through his movie-making and friendships. History is enriched.“ –John Fry

tion, which bases its estimates on 35,000 surveys filled out for 54 different sports. “Triangulation is the key to all these data sources,” she says. “So is understanding each study’s objective and method. They all use different metrics for different audiences.” These different estimates, she says, echo a similar trend. “The wholesale data matches what we’re seeing in retail and participation numbers, as well as resort visits,” she says. “The patterns are matching up.” While sales are growing, she says, the participation base has held steady over the past few decades. And while Millennials represent about 43 percent of this figure, a good percentage compared with sports such as golf, the industry is slowly losing them. “We need to focus on retaining them, as well as converting newcomers into participants,” she says, adding that the industry is only winning over 17 percent of newcomers to the sport. The fun factor can be pretty low for first-timers.” Still, the good news is that the 18-and-under category is growing the fastest, meaning it’s likely they’ll spend money in the industry their entire lives. And you can triangulate that data all the way to the snow bank. —Eugene Buchanan

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On-sale date: Sept. 1, 2016, Publisher: Warren Miller Company, Hardcover, $29.95, 512 pages, 100-plus rarely seen photos Promoted in conjunction with the fall 2016 Warren Miller Film Tour, in national ski and outdoor publications, and in other multi-platform media. For ordering and other information, contact Andy Bigford (AndyBigford@gmail.com)

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‘SIZING THE MARKET’ SEMINAR SHOWS PARTICIPATION NUMBERS ADD UP


Jan. 28 - 31, 2016 Sourcing Snow at the SIA Snow Show The only exclusively snow sourcing Show. Colorado Convention Center, Denver, CO Find the exhibitor list, targeted seminars and more information at SIAsnowshow.com/sourcingsnow

SIA Research offers an incredible range of reports and data designed to give you industry insights that will help you make smart decisions to grow your business. Take a look at some of the reports we offer.

• Downhill Consumer Intelligence Project (DCIP) An in-depth look into today’s snow sports consumers and a road map to help stimulate future growth in participation and sales.

• SIA Snow Sports Data Produced by The NPD Group – Sports and Leisure Trends. Comprehensive reports on retail sales, brand share margins and regional sales results.

• Snow Sports Insiders Snow sports participants share their opinions through this online panel.

• Growing Snow Sports Revisited A view of the past decade of progress and efforts to grow snow sports participation.

Ready to grow your business in 2016?

• Executive Market Summary

SIA has the tools to help you succeed.

• Cost of Doing Business + Compensation Study

When our industry thrives, we thrive. That’s why SIA is committed to helping retailers achieve their business goals. Our tools are fine tuned and focused to help those in the Snow Sports industry. If you’re looking for a consumer marketing guide, a planner to guide you through the year, or a place to connect with your colleagues, you’ve come to the right place. We’re glad you’re here.

You’ll find exclusive retailer resources including our • • • • •

Retailer to Consumer Marketing Guide Merchandising Tools & Tips 5% Growth Project SIA Snow Source Blog Industry + Intelligence 365 Seminars, Webinars & White Papers

Six reports each season presenting the “Big Picture” of the industry.

• Participant Study Counts and demographics for snow sport participants, by discipline.

• Sales & Orders Surveys Unit and dollar pre-season orders for next season delivery. Comparative performance and compensation information.

• Uniform & Rental Surveys Reveals buyer planned purchases, leads and contact information.

• Snowsports Consumer Profiles Reports designed to help you better understand your consumer by generation.

Learn how SIA can benefit your business.

Visit us online at Snowsports.org/retailertools

Visit snowsports.org/research or email us at Research@snowsports.org for more information on these and other SIA Research products. Your year-round Partner. Resource. Advocate.


AT THE SHOW | CALENDAR

Events

WHAT’S HAPPENING AT THE 2016 SIA SNOW SHOW

Daily Events Every day, all day | Booth 679 | SIA

I + I Live: Connect, recharge, socialize and push social media updates live with free wi-fi. Seminars throughout Show.

Every day, all day | Booth 3115 | SIA

Nordic Center: Come preview apparel, equipment, accessories and technologies specific to cross country and snowshoe.

Every day, all day | Sourcing Snow | SIA

Sourcing Snow: More than 50 raw material leaders showcase their services. Join seminars on sourcing, production & design.

10-11 AM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657)

Panel: Media & Retail Role in Changing Backcountry Culture Hosted by Eric Henderson 10:30-11:30 AM | Room 207 Best Practices in Retail Training for Maximum Sales: Knowledgeable sales associates are retail’s greatest asset. When properly trained they can enhance the shopping experience and make the difference between a sale and a customer last forever. It’s time to put aside old thinking that training is a cost and focus on the massive ROI associated with a balanced investment. Presented by Simon Turner, Myagi

10:30-11:30 AM | I+I Live (Booth 679)

Discounted Epic Pass Sales: SIA and Vail Resorts are partnering to offer attendees an exclusive Epic Pass for $319 per adult. Unlimited/unrestricted skiing benefits start Feb. 1, 2016.

Social, Mobile, & Digital for Independently Owned Companies: The privately owned and operated company is being pulled in two directions - first by the national big-box store, and the pure-play ecommerce giants are also stealing market share. This session will discuss strategies to take back your turf. Presented by David Lively, Grey Suit Retail

Every day, all day | Booth 548 | OIWC

11 AM-12 PM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657)

Every day, all day | Booth 458 | SIA/Vail Resorts

Women’s Lounge: Check out examples of how to best merchandise women’s hardgoods and softgoods for your store. Or stop by just to relax in a comfortable seating area and network away from the bustling floor.

7-9:30 AM | Room 103

Donut Dunking Christian Fellowship: Lively fellowship and discussion in the context of skiing and snowboarding.

9 AM-6 PM | Booth 1148 | 2XU

2XU Compression Sock Challenge: Each day, 2XU will be giving away 100 pairs of Elite Alpine X-Lock compression socks ($60 MSRP) free to anyone who does the sock challenge at its booth. While supplies last each day. Note: 9AM-1PM on Sunday

10-11 AM and 3-4 PM | Booth 730

Poster Signing: Glen Plake, U.S. Ski Hall of Fame Inductee will be signing posters in the Screamer booth Thurs., Jan. 28, 10 - 11 am and 3 - 4 pm, and Fri., Jan. 29, 10 - 11 am and 3 - 4 pm.

Friday, January 29, 2016

7:30-9 AM | Mile High Ballroom 1

Protect Our Winters Breakfast: Burritos & Bloodies: POW presents a speaker on the critical topic of climate change and the industry. Doors open at 7:30, and presentation starts at 8.

9-10:30 AM | Rental World/Backshop (Booth 4501)

Breakfast & Preview - for Rental/Backshop/Uniform Buyers Only: Eat, Fuel-Up and One-Stop Shop for the Latest Innovations, Tech & Style

9-10 AM | Room 207

How to Reduce Sales Friction Among Millennial Snow Sport Consumers: While Millennials - the largest generation with over 90 million in the U.S. - are typically big fans of snow sports, they are less inclined to purchase snow sport equipment. The sharing economy has led many to borrow or rent items. This session shares best practices to attract more Millennial shoppers. Presented by Chris Faught, Affirm Inc.; Luke Jacobson, Moment Skis

9-10 AM | I+I Live (Booth 679) How is the # and . Affecting Our Ski World? Hear Where Technology Meets Marketing: This first-of-its-kind session is a live learning session using firstchair.ski to showcase how easy it is to create, manage and promote dedicated customer-generating microsites. Takeaways will include how to stand out on the Internet; how to make the most of your branded microsite; and an ideation session to create unique promotional opportunities for your brand. Presented by Lora Ledermann, Scream Agency; Rob Rozicki, Dot Ski 10-11 AM | Sourcing Snow

Pipe Dream to Production: Protect Yourself and Avoid the Slough [Patents]: Patents are a reality whether you are developing a backcountry binding in your garage or working on the next breathable waterproof membrane with a six-figure budget. Patents can protect your new product and disrupt best intentions. Spending time early in product development to understand the landscape will help you pick a safe line and keep the stoke alive longer. Presented by Merchant & Gould

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Open Q&A with AIARE: Stop into the booth to learn more about the current and future state of avalanche education in the U.S. and how you can get involved.

12-1 PM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657) Proceed with Caution: Skiing Around the World Presented by Brody Levin

12-1 PM | Room 207

Essential Questions for Choosing the Right eCommerce Technologies and Service Providers: Brands and retailers have an overwhelming number of options when it comes to software and service vendors. Choosing the best vendors for your needs means asking the right questions and making sure your expectations are appropriately set. Learn the questions that other retailers wish they had asked, the questions to ask any ecommerce vendor, and ways to test the tech that you’re considering. Presented by Justin Poole, Blue Acorn

12-1 PM | I+I Live (Booth 679)

Skiers or snowboarders? What Site Search Analytics Reveal About Your Customers: Site search offers a rare window into the minds of snow lovers, and analytics on search behavior can be invaluable for optimizing conversion rates, shaping merchandising strategy, guiding SEO, and more. Presented by Andrew Graham, Swiftype

12-1 PM | Sourcing Snow Pipe Dream to Production: Your Idea is Legit and it Deserves Protection [Trademarks]: Trademarks can last forever, transfer from one product to the next, and help the consumer find you and distinguish your product from those of your competitors. But using a name without proper clearance can result in trademark infringement and unfair competition. Adopting a name that is generic or not protectable can leave you exposed to imitators. Avoid the trademark face plant with search and registration strategies. Presented by Merchant & Gould 1:30-2:30 PM | Room 207

United States Marine Corps Ski System Requirement: USMC has a requirement to replace its current antiquated ski system with modern commercially available ski equipment. The number required can range from 2,648 systems to 8,000 systems, to include an annual sustainment quantity. Based on the Berry Amendment and Buy America Act mandates, the USMC is seeking domestic manufacturing of ski system components currently only manufactured in foreign countries (item needs based on USMC requirement). Includes: leather ski boot, binding, skis, skins (full and kicker), adjustable ski poles, full-length gaiter, over boot, ski-wax kit and ski-system repair kit. Presented by Capt. Ryan Moore and Don Thorne, USMC

1:30-2:30 PM | I+I Live (Booth 679) Branded Content: How to Remain Authentic & Sell-Out at the Same Time: Done right, branded content can help companies become authentic storytellers, connect to audiences at scale and build brand loyalty. This panel will dive into how unique partnerships with content producers and media companies can revolutionize brands’ content marketing and distribution strategies. Presented by Todd Jones, Teton Gravity Research 2-3 PM | Sourcing Snow

Working Capital Strategies: Grow on the Snow: US Bank and LSQ Funding Group will host an open forum on how to best obtain working capital in a growth environment. Commercial

SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016 | DAY 2 SIAsnowshow.com

bankers will be on hand to answer all lending and growth strategy questions. Presented by Jake Lasko and Karen Wojko, US Bank; Travis Peacock, LSQ Funding Group

2-3 PM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657) Panel - Inside the Female Mind Presented by Louise Lintilhac

3-4 PM | Room 207

Basic Choices - Film: A safety awareness education film that highlights the safe decisions every mountain action sport athlete can make to enjoy a lifetime of activities in the mountains and on the snow. This presentation is touring around North America to thousands to promote safety cognizance for our youth. Presented by Roy Tuscany, High Fives Foundation

3-4 PM | I+I Live (Booth 679)

Increase Sales For Your Business With Google AdWords: In this presentation, learn how to make Google AdWords increase sales cost-effectively. This is a more advanced presentation, so you should have at least some experience with AdWords. Learn how to target your campaigns effectively, refine them so that your spend is most efficient, and measure and analyze so you can improve them. Presented by Jason Ford and Tyler Mandroian, C1 Partners

5-6 PM | Booth 3965 | Ride Snowboards Sketchy Tank Poster Signing: Sketchy Tank will be signing oneoff posters of his graphic featured on the RIDE Burnout board. 5-6 PM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657)

Big Mountains, Big Line, Big Consequence Presented by Chris Davenport 5-6 PM | Booth 4101 | Kästle Happy Hour Keg with Kästle

5-6 PM | Booth 2651 | SPY

Happy Hour with Darrell Mathes: Join SPY for a drink celebrating Darrell Mathes as the brand’s new snowboarding team captain.

5-6 PM | Booth 450

Girafficorn Happy Hour: Located near the OIWC in the Women’s Lounge, catch up and have a beer with professional female athletes and the women at SheJumps, a nonprofit dedicated to increasing participation of women and girls in outdoor activities.

5-7 PM | Booth 1857 | Patagonia Patagonia Happy Hour - Keep Jumbo Wild!: Add your voice to the campaign to protect the Jumbo Valley in British Columbia. Learn more, take action and drink beer! $5 Miir pint cup sales benefit Wildsight. 5-7 PM | Booth 1148 | 2XU Beer and Cheer at 2XU: 2XU would like to invite SIA guests to join them for a cold glass of Boulder Beer Mojo IPA beer. 6-11:30 PM | Red Rocks Amphitheater

Icelantic’s Winter on the Rocks: Come celebrate snow sports, music and lifestyle at Red Rocks Amphitheater. Come listen to Adventure Club and Big Grams (big boi + phantogram).

6-7 PM | Show Floor Entrance

SIA SnowSports Awards: Retailers of the Year: Each year SIA recognizes specialty retailers in the U.S. and Canada who have excelled in fostering relationships, moving product and setting their shops apart from the competition, while pushing forward the passion and growth of snow sports. Come celebrate the winners with us! 6-8 PM | Booth 3335 | Wintersteiger Wintersteiger Austria Bier Party: Join us for our annual party.

7-10 PM | Ogden Theatre

TransWorld Snowboarding Riders’ Poll Awards Show: The stars of our sport gather to honor the year’s best. Awards include Video of the Year, Men’s and Women’s Rider of the Year, The Legend Award, and the TransWorld Snowboarding Readers Choice Award.

Saturday, January 30, 2016 7-9 AM | Mile High Ballroom 1

OIWC Keynote & Awards Ceremony: Bacon, Bloody Marys & Inspiration: Join OIWC for bacon and bloody marys, and inspira-


tion at the annual Keynote & Leadership Awards Presentation featuring Mark Satkiewicz, president and GM of SmartWool. Mark will focus on how greater leadership diversity and workplace inclusion played a role in SmartWool’s growth. Also, OIWC will present Kelly Davis, SIA Research director, with the Pioneering Woman Award, and Kerry O’Flaherty, founder and owner of KerryO Sales, with the First Ascent Award. Open to all attendees.

9-10 AM | I+I Live (Booth 679)

Mobile: Should You Really Care?: Too many companies push mobile for the wrong reasons and in the wrong ways. The question you need to ask is how will mobile truly help drive your business? This session will explore trends, both inside the industry and out, and will help you identify your true mobile needs, if they even exist. Presented by Jason King, Accella

9:30-10:30 AM | Rental World/Backshop (Booth 4501)

Power Panel: Rental Industry Roundtable: Bootfitting experts and rental gurus demonstrate the tools, techniques and talk that ensures renters get the best fit possible.

SYMPATEX.COM

#SIA16

10-11 AM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657) Backcountry Magazine - Biff America Book Signing

10 AM | Booth 4123 | Atomic

Doc DesRoches Award: SIA and the U.S. Ski Team recognize an SIA member and Team supplier for its promotion of the Team’s brand and athletes. This year’s winner is Atomic. After the presentation, World Cup alpine ski racer Mikaela Shiffrin will sign autographs.

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10:30-11:30 AM | I+I Live (Booth 679) SEO Best Practices for 2016 - Improve Visibility and Stay Protected from Google Penalties: The way Google and other search engines evaluate sites and rank them is the result of more than 200 different factors; it is critical that brands and retailers understand how they can position themselves to be the best option. Presented by Chris Rodgers, Colorado SEO Pros 11 AM-12 PM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657) Open Q&A with AIARE: Stop into the booth to learn more about the current and future state of avalanche education in the U.S. and how you can get involved. 12-1 PM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657) Reflections on Big Mountain Avalanche Risk and the Benefits of Fear Presented by Greg Hill 12-1 PM | I+I Live (Booth 679) Are Your Customers Listening To You? How to Develop Messaging that Engages Your Customers: Walk through how to clarify your target customers, develop an effective buyer persona profile, and create a profile of your business. This session will then use the profiles to build a concise Positioning Statement and a Messaging Platform for your business. Presented by Dan Smink and Ian Lancaster, C1 Partners 1-1:30 PM | Booth 4657 | KEL52 Raffle Event: Enter our drawing for your chance to win a POWR wireless helmet audio kit. There will be 10 lucky winners. 1:30-2:30 PM | I+I Live (Booth 679) Boom, Bust and B2B: Wholesale eCommerce Is Booming & Brands Holding Out Are Going Bust: This presentation will focus on how brands can use online wholesale solutions to increase sales with current customers, as well as effectively acquire new ones. Presented by Heath Wells, NuORDER 2-3 PM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657)

How Retail Employees Can Become Your Brand Advocates Presented by Verde PR

5-6 PM | Show Floor Entrance Passing the Torch Industry Celebration: Celebrate a career in snow that has lasted more than 50 years and toast to the future. Join the industry as David Ingemie passes the torch to new SIA President Nick Sargent. 5-6 PM | Backcountry Experience (Booth 3657) A Backcountry Mental Checklist Presented by Jeremy Jones

Monday, February 1, 2016 9 AM-4 PM | Copper Mountain Resort

On-Snow Demo/Ski-Ride Fest & Nordic Demo: Test gear and accessories previewed at the Snow Show.

8 PM | Copper Mountain Resort Incline Bar & Grill

Elan’s 70th Anniversary Party: Live music (80s band The Goonies), raffle prizes and signature drinks. The brand will release its Ripstick ski. Glen Plake will announce the winner of the prototype tester video contest. RSVP: email copperparty@elan.si. Or stop by the tent at the Demo to get drink tickets.

Tuesday, February 2, 2016 9 AM-4 PM | Copper Mountain Resort

On-Snow Demo/Ski-Ride Fest & Nordic Demo

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QUESTION OF | AT THE SHOW THE DAY

PHOTOS BY JULIE ELLISON

How is this year’s weather affecting your business?

“It has been in peaks and troughs definitely. In Europe it’s been very, very important. The Alps got hit and straightaway sales went through the roof.”

—Matt Rees, RuRoc, Gloucester, UK

“Business is always better when it snows a lot. We service Wolf Creek, and they have 283 inches as of today. So it’s very good. The snowier years promote retail spending.”

“So far, so good— much better than last year. We definitely rely heavily on the snow, so it’s a good year.”

—Joelle Rogers, Backcountry.com, Park City, Utah

“The snow does affect our sales, but overall we had a good 2015, and the first quarter of 2016 looks very promising.”

—Travis Smith, Farm to Feet, Mount Airy, N.C.

“Everybody probably bought a lot slimmer this year after four years of no snow, but this year is awesome. El Niño’s been a blessing.”

—Brian Green, VonZipper, Irvine, Calif.

—Joel Condren and Paige Miller, 8200 Mountain Sports, South Fork, Colo.

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SIAsnowshow.com DAY 3 | SNOW SHOW DAILY 2016


IN AT THE SHOW | HEARD THE AISLES

FROM THE SOCIAL MEDIA FILES

GETTING TIPSY

"@siasnowsports come and smell the flowers. Literally! #SIA16"

"We thought it would be funny if the name had something to do with 'getting bent,' which is getting drunk in Australia. But then we also thought it should sound French. So, we went with Le Bent."

—SheJumps, @shejumps

“More than 900,000 people work in jobs that are supported by winter recreation. When we #ActOnClimate we protect our livelihoods. #SIA16”

—Jarka Duba, Le Bent

HARD-FOOTED

“These carpets haven’t really gotten any softer over the years, have they?”

—One Show floor walker to another

NEWCOMERS

“As far as I know, we are the newest SIA member… we joined this morning. We have a lot of partners at the Snow Snow, and we wanted to take a more active role.” —Matt Nakari, regional sales director, Centric Software

—Gina McCarthy (EPA Administrator), SIA's opening keynote speaker, @GinaEPA

TASTY

“Dude, have a burrito. It’ll help get you through the Show.”

“It is official...the first creamee has been pulled! #SIA16 #darntough”

—Darn Tough Vermont, @DarnTough

—Eric Henderson of Backbone Media, handing out breakfast goodies from a cooler outside the Show Thursday morning

WHAT REALLY MATTERS

“It’s game time at Sancho’s tonight...I have my air hockey title to defend from last year.”

—Drew Simmons, Pale Morning Media

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SIA Snow Show Day2 2016  

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