Page 1

4 November 11, 2018

WINTER MARKET 2018

News

WILDFIRE

Politics

Gear

PLAYBOOK

OUTFITTED

A California blaze threatens employees of Klean Kanteen.

Keep the momentum up—and the pressure on—after the midterm elections.

Find what’s new for Fall ‘19 in camping, tools, and more.

PAGE 6

PAGE 12

PAGE 37

POWERED BY SNEWS

MAKE YOUR MARK

LOOK INSIDE FOR NEXT-LEVEL INNOVATIONS (P. 8), BETTER WAYS TO DO BUSINESS (P. 58), AND THE FUTURE OF THE OUTDOOR INDUSTRY (P. 12)

SEE YOU IN 2019! 80 days ‘til Outdoor Retailer + Snow Show

WEAR DRIER. WEAR WARMER. WEAR TOUGHER. WEAR BETTER. WALLS. The official publication of:

Artist Patrick Maxcy blends advocacy and art in Venture Out.

BOOTH 42031-UL


©WILLIAMSON-DICKIE MFG CO., LLC.

DAWN TO DUSK. TOP TO BOTTOM. DAY IN DAY OUT. WEAR BETTER. WALLS.

BOOTH 42031-UL


4 November 11, 2018

WINTER MARKET 2018

News

WILDFIRE

Politics

PLAYBOOK

Gear

OUTFITTED

A California blaze threatens employees of Klean Kanteen.

Keep the momentum up—and the pressure on—after the midterm elections.

Find what’s new for Fall ‘19 in camping, tools, and more.

PAGE 6

PAGE 12

PAGE 37

POWERED BY SNEWS

MAKE YOUR MARK

LOOK INSIDE FOR NEXT-LEVEL INNOVATIONS (P. 8), BETTER WAYS TO DO BUSINESS (P. 58), AND THE FUTURE OF THE OUTDOOR INDUSTRY (P. 12)

The official publication of:

Artist Patrick Maxcy blends advocacy and art in Venture Out.

SEE YOU IN 2019! 80 days ‘til Outdoor Retailer + Snow Show


XALPINE/PRO

“WE ARE TRAIL RUNNERS AND CLIMBERS.” “We are Wasatch Mountain Wranglers. We refuse to stop enjoying ourselves every time we hit a wall, so we designed a shoe with Salomon just for that: for running, for running into walls, and for climbing up them. Cause that’s how you take the game to new heights.”


CONTENTS

WINTER MARKET 2018

62

Surprises are always around the corner at Winter Market.

6

Wildfire Crisis

The latest fire in California has impacted the employees of Klean Kanteen, which is headquartered in the area.

2

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

Q&A

27

Industry Voices

The founder of KAVU knows how to follow his muse—and have a good time doing it; Allied Down’s creative and marketing director builds customer trust; an editor-atlarge spills the secrets of good brand content.

“We do not have a growth strategy. I believe if we do everything correctly, sales and growth will come. That mantra has always worked for me.”

FEATURE

12

Politics Playbook

The midterm elections represented a victory for the industry’s agenda—and valuable lessons for brands looking to embrace advocacy.

–Barry Bar, founder, KAVU PAGE 27

COVER PHOTO BY LOUISA ALBANESE

PHOTO BY NICK COTE

NEWS


TrueLock Fiber TM

THE PATH TO SUSTAINABILITY BEGINS WITH PRODUCTS THAT LAST.TM Color is a thirsty beast. But what if color had a conscience? And a smaller carbon footprint? What if it were cleaner, leaner, and more durable all while using less water, energy and chemistry? What if your backpack, pants, and even your shoes had the color locked in? Introducing CORDURA® TrueLock™ fiber, with color built into the fiber before it becomes fiber. Deep, durable color that goes all the way through and steps a little lighter on our planet. BECAUSE WE’D RATHER DRINK OUR WATER THAN WEAR IT. THERE’S MORE TO THIS STORY. 360° MORE. experience it at Cordura.com

© 2018 INVISTA. All rights reserved. CORDURA and the CORDURA family of marks are registered trademarks of INVISTA.


CONTENTS

NEWS

8

Cutting-Edge Wool

The adidas x Woolmark Performance Challenge crowned a winner for a brandnew use for an age-old material. Plus: Industry advocates gear up to revive the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

10

Live at the Show

A new collaboration was on display in a mural project in Venture Out.

58

Retailer Reports

What are shop owners psyched on? We caught up with two for their top show picks.

66

Thank You!

Our tribute to the people and things that helped us make The Daily.

66

SCENE

Where to find new brands, take in a presentation, play with little ones, and more.

34

Show Map

Navigate the Colorado Convention Center.

35

Stay Connected

Find all the show tools you need in the musthave mobile app.

68

Events & Education

Fill your calendar with seminars, speakers, and fun.

GEAR

37

Grab Bag

Find the accessories customers crave in these key segments.

38 Winter Camping 40 Eyewear & Headwear

Dispatches from the best little corner of the entire show.

42 Tools

16

Quitting Time

Donuts, bourbon, and bacon: Day 2’s afterparty had everything important.

22

Hero Shots

Qalo’s Strata collection wraps design around your finger; adidas’s allterrain trail runner.

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

32

Show Areas

14

Cool Central

4

LOGISTICS

44 Travel Bags

47

New Product Gallery Don’t miss this hot new gear.

55

New Exhibitors

Meet the new kids.

96

Best of Booth It’s electric.

PHOTOS BY K ALI PLAT T; COURTESY (2)

47


P OW E R E D BY

TRANSPORT® MERINO MENS TW9597 / WOMENS TW9122

MATRIX MERINO MENS TW9593 / WOMENS TW9116

• AWARD WINNING INNOVATION • SUSTAINABLE & ECO-FRIENDLY • NATURAL PERFORMANCE ENHANCING TRUSTED BY THE PROS

Official Base Layer Sponsor of the PSIA-AASI and NSP

BOOTH 42021-UL


NEWS

W H AT’S H A PPE NIN G O UT TH E R E

Klean Kanteen Employees Lose Homes in Wildfire Staff woke to news of a California fire that started on Day 1. By the end of Day 2, a whole town was gone. BY ELIZABETH MILLER

K

LEAN KANTEEN STAFFERS are reeling after a wildfire in northern California consumed most of the town of Paradise, a community just up the hill from company headquarters. At least 13 employees believed they had lost their homes in the fire, and still more went home from OR early, uncertain about what they would find. “I don’t know how much there will be to go back to,” said Sammy Pulgarin, a field marketing rep-

REI SPENDS BIG FOR OUTDOOR FOUNDATION

Company donates $1 million to OIA’s nonprofit, grant-making effort.

6

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

resentative for Klean Kanteen who lives in Chico, which had been largely spared by the fire. “It’s hard to process, being here.” Employees woke up the morning of Day 1 to the news that a 10-acre fire had been reported at 6:30 a.m. on Thursday. Then winds picked up and the blaze, called the Camp Fire, grew to 20,000 acres over the day, burning through dry grasslands. “We all woke up in good spirits, super-pumped to

RE I I S D O NATIN G $ 1 m i l l i o n to the Outdoor Foundation to help kids spend more time outdoors. Currently, fewer than 21 percent of children are active outdoors once or more per week, according to research from the Outdoor Foundation. The foundation, OIA’s philanthropic arm, is working to buck

kick things off, and then we started getting text messages from coworkers about a massive fire,” Pulgarin said. “That’s when we started feeling a bit stressed out for the folks back home.” Within two days, 90 percent of the town of Paradise, population 26,000, was gone. At least nine people died, and more remain missing. California officials reported that the fire had burned 100,000 acres as of Saturday morning, and was 20 percent contained. They counted 6,453 residences and 260 commercial buildings destroyed. The fire is now considered the most destructive in the state’s history. Its cause is still under investigation. Klean Kanteen’s headquarters sit at one of the last stoplights on the road that leads from Chico to the town of Paradise. An evacuation was ordered for parts of Chico last Thursday (it was lifted by Saturday). Rodrigo Virrueta, co-brand channel manager for Klean Kanteen, said his house in Chico was thought to be safe, but he’d encouraged his wife to leave town just in case. Others left Chico simply to escape the smoke permeating their homes. Virrueta checked the news as the show was starting up, thought little of the 10-acre fire at first, and then by 11:30 a.m. was seeing posts on social media of a giant plume of smoke. “It’s crazy,” he said. Company offices were closed through the end of the week, but expected to reopen on Monday. Firefighters worked to push the Camp Fire away from homes in Chico, and the fire had shifted away from town and the headquarters of the 14-year-old brand by Friday. All of Klean Kanteen’s displaced employees Pulgarin had heard from found places to stay with friends, family, or coworkers, rather than routing to one of many shelters open in the area. Paradise sits a 20-minute drive from Chico, higher in the mountains and surrounded by fir and ponderosa trees—beautiful, but flammable, says Cole Euell, a field marketing representative for Klean Kanteen. Where people will go and how long it’ll take to rebuild remain unclear. “There are just a lot of unanswered questions,” Euell said. Already, company employees are talking about how to fundraise to help rebuild. “I don’t know exactly how we’ll respond,” Virrueta said, “but we’ll try to do something for the community.”

that trend and in 2019 will launch the Thrive Outside community grantmaking program. REI’s donation will support those grants. O I A E xe c u t i ve D i r e c t o r A my Roberts said no single issue is more important. “We’ve got a responsibility as an industry to transform the way the next generation brings the out-

doors into their lives,” Eric Artz, REI COO said in a press release. “Time outside is transformative for our kids. It helps them grow in ways that don’t exist in a classroom or on a screen. And it lays the foundation for them to be healthier, happier, and more connected to their communities for their entire lives.” –EM

PHOTO BY U.S. FOREST SERVICE

Wildfires are ravaging California again.


NEWS

Next-Gen Wool

W

HEN NIGEL GOSSE (general manager of operations at Woolmark) and Salina Janzan (project manager) first joined up with adidas and came up with the idea for the adidas x Woolmark Performance Challenge, they imagined opening it up to a few universities and fielding a handful of presentations. But it didn’t take long for word to spread: When applications closed, 510 students from 58 institutions in the western hemisphere had submitted proposals to develop new sports and performance product applications for Australian merino wool. The prize? A three-month internship at adidas, plus €10,000. The wait came to an end Friday night at the Trend & Design Center, when adidas and Woolmark announced the final winner. For the judges, the decision was incredibly tough—the ideas spanned bonding nanofluids, 3D virtual prototyping, acupressure technology, and more. “The level of expertise and know-how of the final 10 was just mindblowing,” said Tellman Studrucker, senior design director at adidas. “Their connection to their lifestyles, beliefs, and individual pas-

sions was so refreshing,” added Julie Davies, general manager of processing innovation & education extension at Woolmark. But the panel ultimately settled on Alicia Ferreira de Sousa, a knitwear design student at L’École de la Maille de Paris, for her integration of physical, biological, and digital elements into a new merino-copper blend that can use accumulated sweat to capture energy and redistribute it to muscles during exercise. De Sousa took her inspiration from her own experience: She’s an accomplished aerobic gymnast, and she wanted to improve on the standard leotard. “My teammates and I saw a big problem, and I wanted to fix it,” she says. “I’ve always wanted to specialize in sportswear and improve the connection of the body to textiles.” Judge Amanda Parkes, the chief innovation officer at Future Tech Lab, was impressed. “Alicia was able to pull together materials science, supply chains, and high-level scientific research and interpret it all correctly,” she said. “She truly came up with a new interaction paradigm.” The ten finalists bantered like old friends, thanks to a two-day workshop that Woolmark had recently sponsored. “I don’t feel that this is a competition at all—we’ve formed a community to share knowledge for shaping the future of sports,” said Youngmi Kim, a postgrad from France. Added Amsterdam-based fashion and textiles technologies student Marlies Reukers: “With all of our different backgrounds and our whole skill set,” “we wish we could take the money and start our own company.” Everyone laughed. The second WPC is already underway— this time, with a global reach—and, as of press time, 251 applications have already poured in from 57 institutions. But de Sousa now gets to look forward: to her adidas internship, sure, but also a possible career in sportswear. “It feels like a breakthrough for me, the beginning of something big,” she says. “But when I won, the first thing I thought was, ‘Oh my god, mommy!’”

Correction: In the Day 3 Issue, we incorrectly identified the photo on page 6 as being part of the Bears Ears National Monument in Utah.

8

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND STALLS

The industry rallies to lobby for the critical environmental fund. BY KASSONDRA CLOOS

ON SEPTEMBER 30, the L and and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) expired, curbing the country’s ability to purchase and maintain sensitive lands. Congress has the authority to authorize up to $900 million each year for state and local conservation projects under LWCF, which is funded largely by fees paid for offshore drilling leases. But while industry groups have consistently fought for permanent, full authorization of the fund, Congress has so far failed to do that. But it’s not time to panic quite yet, said John Sterling, executive director of the Conservation Alliance. “We’re not in unchartered territory,” he said Friday. The good news? There’s bipartisan support for LWCF— reauthorization legislation has made it through committee in both the House and Senate. When Congress reconvenes this week, it’s likely to be one of the priorities both parties want to push through before the end of the year, Sterling said. Outdoor Industry Association has also said it plans to prioritize lobbying for LWCF reauthorization in the lame-duck session (see page 12). “If it’s reauthorized in a few weeks, [the lapse] won’t have much of an impact,” Sterling said. “But if it takes two years … if this drags on through spring, it could have a real impact.” Many attending brands are working hard behind the scenes to encourage their elected representatives to fight for LWCF, while other brands, like Fourpoints Bar, have been working to mobilize their customers. Co-founder Patrick Webber said the brand has partnered with the Colorado Outdoor Business Alliance, Conserve With Us, the Wilderness Society, and other state and local players to engage with politicians and share the importance of conservation to their business. “Conservation is so important to all of the United States, but especially to this part of the country,” Webber said (Fourpoints Bar is based in Colorado). “[LWCF] ensures access to recreation for people like us.” ENO has been sharing updates with their customers, too. “I feel like we have an engaged following,” said Amy Allison, marketing manager, who has gone to DC to lobby her state’s representatives on behalf of LWCF. “It’s important to share our voice.”

PHOTOS BY SCOT T MARTIN / HED HI MEDIA; FELIX MIT TERMEIER

Alicia Ferreira de Sousa took home the grand prize at the Woolmark Performance Challenge. BY EVELYN SPENCE


PRIMALOFT® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF PRIMALOFT, INC. ©2018 PRIMALOFT, INC.

WE JUST SET SUSTAINABILITY FORWARD We never saw recycling as the final step. Introducing PrimaLoft® Bio, the first-ever biodegradable* synthetic insulation. This textile breakthrough begins as 100% post-consumer recycled fiber and returns to nature. Another major milestone in our Relentlessly Responsible journey towards a more sustainable world. *75.9% biodegradation in 365 days under ASTM D5511 conditions.


NEWS

The Elevator Pitch

Diversity and inclusion ideas abounded at Camber’s Five Minutes, One Bold Idea event. BY MELISSA SCHAFF CJ Goulding, lead organizer for the Natural Leaders Network, challenged the notion of “seats at the table,” and instead urged redefining what the table means when it comes to inclusion, and asked why there’s one in the first place. Bethany Lebewitz, founder of Brown Girls Climb, talked about creating a pipeline to facilitate and mentor small businesses. She appealed to the audience through a case study of craft beer, and how the beer industry is intentionally creating products to serve a variety of individuals—there’s something out there for everyone. Investing in small outdoor industry businesses is not only good for the economy, but also surfaces new approaches, perspectives, and ideas that can serve different audiences that may currently be overlooked. Elyse Rylander, executive director of OUT There Adventures, spoke to the approach companies take, specifically in the areas of marketing and apparel, when it comes to gender identity. One of the ideas she brought forth was for more companies to design gender-neutral clothing in an effort to eliminate putting consumers in boxes, and welcoming identity intersectionality. The panelists discussed the importance of language with regard to moving conversations forward, and understanding the perspective of the individual or group with whom the dialogue is taking place. The consensus, however, was that these conversations must continue in order to drive change in the outdoor industry.

Five Minutes, One Bold Idea

10

THE DAILY DAY 3 / NOVEMBER 10, 2018

BIG PICTURE

The story behind the artist hard at work on the show floor. BY EVELYN SPENCE

WHEN OUTDOOR RETAILER asked G o l d e n, C o l o ra d o - b a s e d a r ti s t Patrick Maxcy to paint a live mural during Winter Market, they gave him free rein with concepts. So Maxcy took an internet hoax—a 1998 “discovery” of the Pacific Northwest Tree octopus—and ran with it. “The idea is that the octopus is protecting nature from destruction,” he said. “He’s taken the axe and the tractor keys from the enemy and he’s waving the flags of victory.” With the cephalopod are some supportive forest creatures and an Into the Wild-style abandoned bus that was inspired by the artist’s recent trips to Alaska, where he saw dilapidated vehicles everywhere. (For the finale, bumper stickers designed by passersby will be roughened up and affixed to the bus.) Maxcy, whose work is shown in eight galleries and appears on walls around the Denver metro area, has painted 11 murals in the past three months. Meaning, he usually works fast—but he’s been spending most of his time chatting with attendees. (Overheard: “You painted this while you were here?”) “I could have finished this in eight or nine hours,” he said. Maine pack company Flowfold claimed the finished product before Maxcy even laid brush to canvas—not that he’s feeling much pressure. “I’ve painted murals in Africa and Nicaragua, where it’s unbearably hot,” he said. “Here, there’s AC, I get to talk to people, and there’s free coffee. Maybe next show they’ll invite me back to paint a 40-footer.”

PHOTO BY COURTESY

O

UTDOOR RETAILER WINTER Market 2018 is all about innovation. During a Day 2 afternoon panel hosted by Camber Outdoors and moderated by Camber Outdoors Executive Director Deanne Buck, five people in the outdoor industry community brought forth ideas on how companies and individuals can include diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts in their lives. The panel, which attracted a standing-room only crowd at The Camp, was titled Five Minutes, One Bold Idea, and was structured so that each panelist had exactly five minutes to articulate an idea to the audience, followed by discussion and Q&A. Each panelist spoke on a different topic, rooted in personal experience and in alignment with their values and organization. Jen Gurecki, CEO of Coalition Snow, spoke about “putting your money where your mouth is,” and how you can support organizations and companies that actively work to further equity in the outdoor industry by voting with your dollars. Carlos Fernandez, state director at The National Conservancy of Colorado, highlighted the importance of conservation efforts, and the way in which topics can be discussed by using language that resonates with different audiences and creates a shared understanding. He challenged each person in the audience to talk with a friend, family member, or stranger over the weekend about what conservation means to them, and how it affects their day-to-day life and the natural areas around them.


COME AND LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR LATEST INNOVATIONS. BOOTH #54017-UL

TESTED FOR

UNPLUGGING

gore-tex.com

© 2018 W. L. Gore & Associates Inc. GORE-TEX, GORE®, and designs are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates


Post-Election Playbook NEWS FEATURE

Last Tuesday’s midterm elections just might have been the most closely watched in a generation. What do the results mean for the outdoor industry? BY KASSONDRA CLOOS

VARYING LEVELS OF EXCITEMENT, hope, and anxiety reached fever pitch last week as Americans went to the polls in record numbers for what many considered to be an extremely consequential election. With the fate of public lands, climate change action, tariffs, and more in the balance, the outdoor industry was highly engaged in the run-up to the vote: endorsing candidates, encouraging voter registration, and especially, sharing Outdoor Industry Association’s #VoteTheOutdoors campaign with their customers. More than 300 outdoor brands helped spread OIA’s message, reaching more than 12 million people by Election Day and garnering more than 26 million impressions. Was our voice heard? What do the results mean for the future of the industry? We consulted the experts to find out.

Did we #VoteTheOutdoors?

The Outdoor Industry Association’s endorsements ended up with an enviable record. Of the 23 representatives the organization supported on its “#VoteTheOutdoors” ticket (eight Republicans and 15 Democrats), 20 won office or retained their seats. And on five of the six state or local ballot initiatives OIA took a stance on, voters agreed with the industry’s position. “In the midterms overall, I think it’s good to see the Democrats restore some balance of power in Washington, [by taking] the House” said Amy Roberts, executive director of OIA. “We have really tried to make recreation bipartisan, and so we endorsed moderate Republicans who have been supportive of issues like recreation and climate change. Unfortunately, those are the Republicans that get targeted, and those were the seats that were lost. Overall, I still think the nation is challenged by the polarization that’s occurring in the two parties. We don’t want recreation to become either a Democratic or Republican issue.”

12

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

The Next Few Months

Outdoor Industry Association’s first priority in the upcoming lame-duck session is to lobby for permanent reauthorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund, Amy Roberts said. LWCF expired on September 30 (see more on page 8), but the outlook is good: There has been bipartisan support for such a bill in relevant House and Senate committees, Roberts said. OIA will also work with the Conservation Alliance and Outdoor Alliance to lobby for other conservation, recreation, and wilderness bills, including funding for national parks, that have a good shot of crossing the finish line before the end of the year. John Sterling, executive director of the Conservation Alliance, said Friday that there might be an initiative to roll a dozen or so such bills into one package, which could see a vote before the end of the year.

What to Expect from a Democratic House During Thursday’s OIA “Election 2018: The Aftermath” panel, Colorado Congresswoman Diana DeGette’s District Director Tom Kelly addressed what many have wondered aloud since Democrats took the House on Tuesday: Will President Trump be investigated? Yes, he said, oversight of the executive branch has been lacking, and Democrats plan to make up for lost time. But he assured that Dems won’t lose sight of the actual issues. The Affordable Care Act, Medicaid, Medicare, and stagnating wages will be priorities for them, he said. Rep. DeGette also plans to reintroduce her Wilderness Act bill in the first six months of the new session, which would provide wilderness protection for about 740,000 acres of land in Colorado. Lands she’s proposing to protect include areas around the Sewemup Mesa along the Dolores River and the Platte River Wilderness. She has sought wilderness protection for these parcels of land since 1999.


Jared Polis, Friend of the Industry, Will Lead Colorado At Outdoor Retailer, Jared Polis gave his first public address as governor-elect on Thursday. Attendees of the OIA panel discussion cheered for the OIA-endorsed incoming Colorado governor, who was introduced as a longtime friend and supporter of the outdoor industry. Polis reaffirmed his support for public lands issues in Colorado, called out Utah for its lack of similar support, and promised to stand up against policies that threaten outdoor recreation. “We don’t have to go very far to see the impact of bad public lands policy,” Polis said. “Right next door in Utah, we’ve seen, and are seeing, the consequences when local leaders don’t stand up for public lands. Here in Colorado, I will always stand up against any of those misguided policies that threaten our public lands.” The crowd immediately launched into cheers and applause.

Tariff Troubles

In spite of wins during the midterms, high tariffs remain a concern for OIA. Taxes on ski jackets and pants, for example, are around 28 percent, Roberts said, and Gore-Tex footwear is at 38 percent. “That raises the cost of goods and shows up in the price to the consumer,” Roberts said. Some brands are already feeling the impacts of an additional 10 percent tariff that’s been imposed on goods imported from China, and Roberts said the industry is concerned about the strong possibility that the administration may impose a 25 percent tariff on all goods coming in from China.  “With the election and the House flipping, there is an opportunity for additional oversight in the House on the President’s trade agenda,” said Rich Harper, manager of international trade for OIA. The Trump administration holds the keys to tariff decisions, but Harper said having industry advocates in the House will provide an opportunity for more hearings about the tariffs and tougher questions about the President’s end goal.  The key thing to watch, Harper said, will be the G-20 Summit at the end of this month, when Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping will meet in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Brand Lessons Learned

An overwhelming percentage of voters want to see companies take stances in the political realm, said Andrew Baumann, senior VP of Global Strategy Group, who also spoke at OIA’s panel on Thursday. Baumann’s company conducts polling for Democratic candidates. He said consumers want to see companies take a stand on controversial issues, with environmental issues being the most important. “Even Republican voters were OK with brands taking stances against President Trump if it was for the benefit of the customer or their communities,” Baumann said. “I think what Patagonia did around Bears Ears is the best example of a brand really understanding its customer base, its values, and its existing users of the brand,” Baumann said. If you want to engage more conservative customers without alienating them or losing their trust, word choice is key. Lori Weigel, partner at Public Opinion Strategies, which conducts polling for Republican candidates, said the words “environmentalist,” “environmental,” and “climate change” can turn off some Republican voters quickly. “The language that we use has a big impact,” she said during the panel. “There are certain words—climate change, for example—that can provoke a very, very partisan reaction. We see some of the biggest divides in all of our data on climate change. But yet, if you say, ‘Hey, do you want to reduce carbon pollution by having more solar and wind?,’ you’ll get massive support among Republican voters, including Republican primary voters.” Likewise “conservation” and “lands issues” go a lot further with consumers than “environmental” issues, Weigel said.

GOOD NEWS OUT OF WASHINGTON

PHOTO BY NICK COTE

N

EED PROOF THAT your brand’s voice—and yours—are important? Just look to Andy Payne, principal of DownTek. Earlier this year, the American Down and Feather Council heard that the Trump administration wanted to impose a 25 percent tariff on raw, unprocessed bulk down and feathers imported from China, but not on finished down-filled comforters and pillows. That would have given a competitive advantage to companies selling imported products over companies importing raw materials to produce products within the United States, like Enlightened Equipment, which manufactures its sleeping bags and jackets in Minnesota, Payne said.

So, the American Down and Feather Council went to Washington. They testified at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative and gave solid business evidence to explain why such high tariffs would hurt businesses that manufacture within the U.S. “We gave a compelling argument that they were giving China a commercial advantage over USA manufacturers,” Payne said. They argued, “‘We know that’s not what you intended, and we just want to bring it to your attention so you can reconsider your decision.’” It worked. A few weeks later, they learned the tariff would not be imposed. “We were like, ‘Open the champagne,’” Payne said.

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

13


SCENE

CA P TU RIN G TH E S H OW’S K E Y M O M E NT S

Where the Cool Things Are

3

Welcome to the most happening corners of the show floor.

1

1. Climbers get a little kooky while top-roping the boulder. 2. Panelists talked about the issues of the day. 3. Muralist Patrick Maxcy put the finishing touches on a piece he’s created over the course of the show. 4. Wheels up at Arbor Collective. 5. Strumming around the campfire at the Wanderheart Project.

14

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

2


PHOTOS BY LOUISA ALBANESE (2); NICK COTE (3)

4

5


SCENE

Booth Boogie Day 2’s afterparty showcased food, tunes, and some of that good Colorado whiskey.

1

3 1. Paul Gerbert kicks out the jams at Big Agnes. 2. Samantha Albert of Colorado’s Outdoor Rec. Office runs out of hands at Big Agnes. 3. Sizzling bacon brought the crowds at Wolverine. 4. The Daily photographer Louisa Albanese awaits a round of Colorado-made Tin Cup bourbon for the newsroom staff. 5. Voodoo donuts stacked high at Big Agnes.

16

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

2


PHOTOS BY LOUISA ALBANESE (4); JESSE ALBANESE

5

4

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

17


SHOWING OFF TH E S T O RY B E HIN D W INTE R M A R K E T

Home Stretch

Everyone is an Outdoor Retailer veteran by Day 4. EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED

You might be over the Winter Market hump by now, but there’s still plenty of Outdoor Retailering to do. Now’s the time to wander the show floor looking for exciting new brands. Head over to a panel discussion or seminar for a new perspective on the biz. Strike up a conversation with the person waiting behind you in the keg line—it might just be the beginning of a brilliant collaboration. Today is a beautiful day for discovery.

80

DAYS UNTIL THE NEXT OUTDOOR RETAILER (JANUARY 30FEBRUARY 1, 2019)

“I USUALLY FOLD BETTER, BUT I’M UNDER PRESSURE!” [OVERHEARD OUTSIDE DAKOTA GRIZZLY]

“YOU SHOULD BE PROUD OF YOUR WORK AT THE SHOW DAILY. IT HAS BEEN A MUST-READ SINCE YOU TOOK IT OVER.” [FAN LETTER FROM INDUSTRY LEADER SALLY MCCOY TO THE NEWSROOM STAFF]

“ALL PATHS LEAD TO @OUTDOORRETAILER WINTER MARKET.” @REDVANWORKSHOP 18

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

1,907

NUMBER OF REGISTERED ATTENDING RETAILERS AT WINTER MARKET


“WELL, I DO HAVE A SMALL PIECE OF QUICHE IN MY BAG.” [OVERHEARD OUTSIDE

80

PERCENT CHANCE OF SNOW IN DENVER TODAY

KÜHL]

“HUGS, SMILES, AND LIVELY CONVERSATIONS ABOUND. WE’RE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER, PEEPS. #WEAREOUTDOOR” @REALKITTYHART

“THIS DOG BARKS IN 70 DIFFERENT LANGUAGES.” [OVERHEARD OUTSIDE GLOBAL PHOTOS BY COURTESY

ACCENT TRANSLATION SERVICES]

1

NUMBER OF PEOPLE TREATED IN THE FIRST-AID OFFICE AS OF 10 A.M. SATURDAY (HE HAD A SLICED FINGER). THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

19


NEWS

Question of the

Day

“Stacy Bare. He’s dynamic, informative, openminded, and engaging. People love to talk to him, and I trust him.” Caroleigh Pierce, Klean Kanteen

“Yvon Chouinard. He’s so freaking common sense. He works with a lot of different sides, but is still very practical and well-spoken. He’s gotten to that point where he doesn’t mind saying what’s on his mind.” Jordan Olivas, Klarna

20

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

“Senior leadership in OIA. They have that non-biased perspective because they’re not a brand, but they’ve still had such an impact on this entire world.” Katie Brewer, Global Accent Translation Services

“Erin Gaines. She is the head of the KEEN Effect Team and is their outdoor advocate on the ground in DC.” Ricardo Rabago, KEEN

PHOTOS BY CASSANDR A MA JEWSKI (3); LOUISA ALBANESE

Who in the outdoor industry would you elect president?


SOME THINGS STAY HOT

LONGER Built like a battleship and marked by iconic Hammertone green, the legendary Stanley Classic Series just got bigger, stronger, and better. REDISCOVER STANLEY® AT STANLEY-PMI.COM

www.stanley-pmi.com ©2018 Stanley ® – A brand of PMI. Seattle, WA, USA 98121


HERO SHOT

DOUBLE AGENT

Light weight meets big-mile support in the adidas Outdoor Terrex Free Hiker GTX.

SEE IT AT BOOTH #42069-UL

PHOTO BY LOUISA ALBANESE

Is it a trail runner you can hike the AT in, or a supportive midcut boot with a float-away feel? Both, thanks to a light, stretchy knit upper, cushy Boost midsole, and ultragrippy outsole made from Continental tire rubber. Plus, Gore-Tex tech defies wet trails. [$250]

22

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018


2

0

Winter Sports Market Outdoor Retailer Snow Show

9

January 27-29 January 30-February 1

Outdoor Retailer Summer Market

FUTURE S H OW DAT E S

1

June 17-20

Grassroots Connect

November 1-4

Outdoor Retailer Winter Market

November 5-8

2

0

2

0

Winter Sports Market

January 26-28

Outdoor Retailer Snow Show

January 29-31

Outdoor Retailer Summer Market

June 22-25

Grassroots Connect

November 5-8

Outdoor Retailer Winter Market

November 9-12

C O LO R A D O C O N V E N T I O N C E N T E R

2

DENVER, CO

0

1

Winter Sports Market

January 24-26

Outdoor Retailer Snow Show

January 27-29

Outdoor Retailer Summer Market

June 14-17

Grassroots Connect

November 11-14

Outdoor Retailer Winter Market

November 15-18

2

0

2

2

Winter Sports Market

January 23-25

Outdoor Retailer Snow Show

January 26-28

Outdoor Retailer Summer Market Grassroots Connect Outdoor Retailer Winter Market

W W W. O U T D O O R R E TA I L E R . C O M

2

June 10-13 November 7-10 November 11-14


HERO SHOT

WRAPPED AROUND YOUR FINGER

Qalo Strata Silicone rings pack wild style. Sorry, guys/gals, I’m taken: Qalo’s flexible, durable rings stand in when backcountry travel or work makes wearing a traditional metal wedding band unsafe or unwise. And with the Strata collection’s comfy, breathable fit and two-tone designs featuring mountains, feathers, and flowers, you might just decide platinum is passé after all. [$40]

PHOTO BY LOUISA ALBANESE

SEE IT AT BOOTH #42066-UL

24

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018


buct lists.

Cotton believes that stepping out of your comfort zone shouldn’t mean wearing uncomfortable gear. That’s why we’ve developed innovative finishes that are water and wind resistant, yet breathable. More ways we’re making the great outdoors even greater.

visit us at booth 53040 ul. i

cotton does

AMERICA’S COTTON PRODUCERS AND IMPORTERS Service Marks/Trademarks of Cotton Incorporated. © 2018 Cotton Incorporated.


EVERYDAY IS A BASELAYER DAY

FOR GIRLS. BY GIRLS.


Q&A Barry Barr 5 QUESTIONS FOR…

Founder, KAVU

tinue to thrive and grow?

It’s readily apparent whether you’re in a good retailer or a bad one. Do the owners show up for work? Are the employees focused on the customers coming through the door? Good retailers aren’t worrying about the price of a camp stove on Amazon; they’re trying to sell their stove for the price they have on it. Those kinds of retailers are going to be fine. It’s not a race to the bottom with everybody worrying about price. My advice to retailers is to focus on what you have in your store, have confidence, and inspire your employees.

3. Does KAVU sell on Amazon or Walmart or any other large platforms?

This is a big year for KAVU: The Seattle-based quirky clothing and bag company turned 25 years old and shows no signs of growing up. The brand is releasing all kinds of new designs and colors, and sales projections are up. Founder Barry Barr is pleased, to say the least, that he’s managed to bootstrap a flourishing and funky brand after using his savings from a commercial fishing enterprise in Alaska to start making hats.

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

1. What’s the most valuable thing you’ve learned in KAVU's 25 years, and how do you stay true to the brand's soul? The most valuable thing I’ve learned is to plan for everything, because you just never know what’s going to happen. Don’t get comfortable, because just when you think things are going well you get smacked in the face. And don't take yourself too seriously. Our design team is awesome, leading the industry in fun prints— donuts, crazy stripes, and my personal favorite, Space Popsicles.

Soul means being real and authentic, and making decisions for the right reason and not for short-term profit or gains. Soul also means that people understand what we’re about and really comprehend our philosophy of living life to the fullest each day. That’s the KAVU way no matter what you’re doing.

2. Independent retailers dig selling KAVU because it's fresh and fun. In this rapidly changing retail landscape, how will those smaller retailers con-

KAVU sells on Amazon, but not on Walmart. It’s our job as a company to get our product out to people who do not live near a KAVU dealer. We do not have a growth strategy. I believe if we do everything correctly, sales and growth will come. That mantra has always worked for me. Our focus is 100 percent quality, 100 percent service, and 100 percent on-time delivery. It’s pretty simple. We don’t do something just because somebody tells us to do it. Every smart person I’ve met said you don’t have to be a big company to be a great company, and that stuck with me. I want to work with people who support the brand, who feel something special toward it—not people just looking for a flash in the pan. I prefer to sell to people who want to see KAVU do well.

4. You were just in Japan for Kamp KAVU. What is it, and why Japan?

It’s an event I invented in 1998 with one of my Japanese dealers. The concept comes from an end-of-summer party my parents had every year when

I was growing up. The basic premise is you get all your friends together to celebrate life over a weekend. In Japan, we have events and teach people how to live KAVU, or to make the most out of every day, no matter what you are doing. We want to spread the mentality for people to wake up, be happy, do good, work hard, live like tomorrow won’t be there and have as much fun as possible every second of every day. One of the most important things is that the events are rigged so the best athlete usually can’t win, as it's all for fun. We do fun runs, but they are poker runs; we have contests like who can kick their shoe the farthest. We play kickball, and there are obstacle courses where people watch and can laugh at each other. We teach people how to cook in Lodge Dutch ovens, and do other fun activities. In Japan the concept works because people like doing things in groups.

5. How many employees does KAVU have, and how do your keep them around?

We have 30 employees, and we have the best benefits I’ve heard of. When you work for KAVU for five years, that sixth year you get an additional four weeks of paid vacation. The goal is to use it all and have a job when you come back. Usually that totals eight weeks' vacation, five sick days, and 11 paid holidays. After you reach 10 years here, we give you $10K. However, that isn’t that much anymore. We may have to increase that to $15K or $20K. I like to say KAVU is a company of a bunch of non-professionals in the apparel manufacturing game. But we're quick learners and fast on our feet, which has allowed us to compete against some of the largest companies in the game. —Amelia Arvesen

THE DAILY PRE-SHOW EDITION

27


Q&A

Matthew Betcher 5 QUESTIONS FOR…

Creative and Marketing Director, ALLIED Feather & Down

ALLIED Feather & Down implemented their TrackMyDown program in 2015 in partnership with just five brands. Now, for fall 2019, they have more than 100 on board. The tool allows consumers to use a unique code on the hangtag of their ALLIED Feather & Down-filled jacket to find out the exact source of that down. And its rise in popularity is a testament to how consumers have changed over time. Increasingly, people want to know more about not just what they’re buying, but who they’re buying it from. We asked Matthew Betcher why supply chain transparency is important.

1. People buy jackets from brands like Eddie Bauer, The North Face, and Helly Hansen, not from ALLIED. What did it take to make ALLIED a recognizable brand?

It’s an ongoing process with many challenges. For decades, while other ingredient companies understood the need to develop themselves as brands in their own right, down remained generic. At that time, down had a bit of a target on its back as an industry with its connection to being an animal byproduct. This was one

28

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

of the real values of the Responsible Down Standard (RDS). It allowed brands to begin to develop more indepth communications. We are still in the infancy here, but I really think the way down is seen will be changing dramatically over the next few years. As we’re just starting to learn of some of the problems with microfiber pollution, people are scrambling for alternatives and looking again at those all-natural solutions.

2. Has TrackMyDown inspired any changes in the supply

The down industry in general has been in a position where it was attacked for years by animal welfare groups disseminating misinformation about down production, and synthetic insulation companies marketed against it. And because there was no traceability, nobody in the down industry could stand up and say, “That’s not true.” What has changed is that now, we can communicate to the consumer exactly how we source down in an ethical way. Now, we can leverage the RDS to talk about just how environmentally friendly, high performing, and adaptable down is. I sure don’t want to live in a world full of plastics, but it is important that all aspects of the processing are sound environmentally.

3. What have you learned about consumers’ desire for this kind of transparency?

When we launched TMD in 2015, at first, the cynic in me thought that in spite of all the work we’ve done with traceability, sometimes all the consumer wants is to see that you’ve done the work. I wasn’t sure if consumers would really want to dig into this information. But what we’ve learned is that, yes, they do want to dig in. We see an average site visit of a minute and a half, which is kind of an eternity in web time. They want to learn more about the quality, and more about the supply chain.

4. Why is it important for customers to know the “ingredient brands” that make up the clothing they buy? First, I think every piece of every product has its own story behind it, and consumers appreciate the trans-

parency it takes to tell those. I also honestly believe that singular business-to-business communications are over. Every ingredient, with the speed of digital content and social media, is consumer-facing whether they want to believe it or not. And aren’t we all consumers, as well? It’s getting to the point where when you don’t say where it is coming from, there is a serious questionability to that element. LAY'S even started a new campaign a little while back that featured the regional farmers that grew all the potatoes for their potato chips. This concept is no longer niche.

5. The wool industry has implemented traceability tools as well. Were you following their lead with TrackMyDown? What have you learned from them?

I think what the wool industry has done is impressive. Our TrackMyDown, however, was built independently from any of their tools. We definitely looked to them as a reference, as proof that the consumer was asking those questions and wanting that level of traceability. I also saw it in other areas. For a long time, ALLIED was developing a robust digital and global traceability database that followed every element from source through quality to all sources of the material— including hatchling and parent farms where possible. The difficulty in our case was that, until we had a robust standard like the Responsible Down Standard, it was not possible to build as a consumer-facing tool. We’ve found that a lot of people really want to learn more about fill power, and what distinguishes different fill powers, and more about down in general. Because not all down is created equal. —Kassondra Cloos

PHOTO BY COURTESY

chain, now that people can read up on where their down was sourced from and do their own research on animal welfare?


REPELS RAI N + SN O W

R ESI ST S SPI L L S

N AT U R AL & SY N T H ET I C F AB R I CS

ECO F RIEN D LY

highlighted with hot pink spinels... certainly one-of-a-kind

INTRODUCING NFORCE™, AN ECO-FRIENDLY AT HOME DIY LAUNDRY TREATMENT THAT TRANSFORMS YOUR EVERYDAY FABRIC INTO AN “NFORCED” FABRIC THAT REPELS AGAINST THE ELEMENTS & SPILLS.

IF YOU CAN WASH IT, YOU CAN NFORCE IT .

Learn more at NANOTEX.COM/NFORCE NForce™ is a Registered Trademark of Nanotex ©2018 Nanotex


Q&A

Norie Quintos 5 QUESTIONS FOR…

Editor-at-Large, National Geographic Travel Media, and Independent Communications Consultant

There is no question that the lines have been blurred. It used to be that journalism and advertising never mixed. But now the ethics need to be rewritten. Keep the service first—the more you put the consumer in mind, the better it will be for everyone. And keep editorial standards. That means that you’re not misleading, and that there’s adequate disclosure about who’s sponsoring the content and what the agenda is for the content. All of that needs to be as transparent as possible.

3. What’s the difference between good brand content and bad brand content?

Norie Quintos climbed the travel magazine ladder, from Caribbean Travel and Life magazine, to U.S. News & World Report, to executive editor of National Geographic Traveler. Now, she splits her time between writing as a travel journalist and consulting brands on creating native content. She’s also on the board for the Adventure Travel Conservation Fund, which works to mitigate the damaging effects of tourism by funding projects to protect vulnerable places. We asked Quintos how to find your brand story, and how to inspire customers along the way. 1. As a consultant, you help both destinations and travel companies find their stories. How do you craft a story to be effective in standing out and garnering large-scale attention?

Just like the basics of good journalism, finding the story is as important as expressing and articulating it. I firmly believe that every place has a story to tell. I would say the same thing on the brand side: Every brand is different, or should be different. If you’re not different from your com-

30

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

petitors in any way, there’s a problem there. Is there an interesting story about your founder? Maybe it’s about how the company works. I try to find those narrative threads whether I’m working on a journalistic story or a brand story. One mistake I see companies make is trying to be everything to everybody. That’s a fatal flaw, and you’ll end up as nothing to nobody.

2. For the average reader, a lot of native content may not come across as an advertisement at

Good brand content really puts the end user, the consumer, first. Bad brand content is essentially advertising where what comes first is what you’re trying to sell. Everything is about the sell, and that’s what comes across to people. I believe good brand content needs to be more about the consumer. It’s a subtle shift, but one that’s really important. In many ways, it’s achieved by letting go of some control, which I think a lot of brands have a really hard time doing.

4. Is there a difference between the adventure traveler and the outdoor adventurer? And how can brands better market to both subsets?

They’re the same customer, the adventure traveler and the gear buyer. People use gear in their travels; they don’t buy it and use it in a gym, for the most part. But the focus and the emphasis is different: experience on one, and product on the other. That’s a mistake— studies show that people are happiest when they’re spending money on experiences rather than products.

Additionally, the definition of “adventure travel” has changed quite a bit over the last 10 years. I don’t know whether the concept of “adventure” has changed equally, but adventure travel used to be risk-taking fun and exhilarating thrills. Now, more people define it as transformation, wellness, and learning something new.

5. You’re on the board for the Adventure Travel Conservation Fund (ATCF). How can we promote sustainable tourism?

We, as travelers, need to realize that some places are quite fragile and don’t have the right infrastructure. We’ve seen the role that Instagram and other social media platforms have played in overwhelming destinations with more people than they can handle. Rainbow Mountain, in Peru, for example, has so little infrastructure. As soon as pictures of it went viral, it started getting destroyed. Both the outdoor and adventure travel industries have a responsibility to try to mitigate that. The media have a responsibility, as well. Brands can help by funding conservation projects, through the ATCF, in heavily visited places that adventure travelers go throughout the world. As individuals, we should recognize that there are better ways to travel. We should make sure we’re going with responsible tour companies. We should also travel less, but stay for longer. Instead of going somewhere for just three days, stay there for two weeks. Get more involved in the communities you visit, be a part of them, and spend less time flying back and forth. Traveling changes minds, changes people. It changes not just us as travelers, but also the places we travel in. It’s hard to care about things we can’t see, touch, and feel. —Kassondra Cloos

PHOTO BY COUTESY

first glance. How can you build readers’ trust?


Visit the HI-TEC速 booth to learn more located at Booth #49004-UL

SUN PROTECTION COMFORT STRETCH

MOISTURE WICKING

EYEGLASS CLEANER

Comfortable Anywhere is our brand promise that our products are packed with state-of-the-art features, comfort and versatility. Enabling an excellent outdoor experience at an incredible value. 2018. HI-TEC速 and the HI-TEC速 logo are registered trademarks of HI-TEC速 Sports International Holdings BV

 Connect with us @hitec


OUTDOOR RETAILER SHOW AREAS

Winter Market 2018 Let the games begin: The action kicks off right in the entry hall.

Venture Out is a destination for retailers to discover and explore modern outdoor trends and better understand how the definition of “outdoor” is changing. Head to Venture Out to see some of the brands pushing the limits in the outdoor industry, or grab a latte from Generous Coffee in the community space.

INNOVATION GALLERY LOCATION: UPPER LEVEL, BOOTH 43005-UL

32

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

See all Outdoor Retailer Innovation Awards finalists on the show floor! Throughout Winter Market, those products and retail services at the forefront of the industry and selected for the final round will be on display. Stop by and take a look at the future of outdoor.

THE CAMP LOCATION: UPPER LEVEL, BOOTH 32005-UL The Camp provides elevated education on the show floor—from the latest issues stores are facing to industry trends. The Camp will

focus on the stories, products, trends, and people that help drive traffic to retailers, and will provide daily education to inspire fresh ways to think and sell outdoor products year-round. Don’t forget to grab a cup of joe from Goodhart coffee!

innovation, the Trend + Design Center anchors the supplier story at Outdoor Retailer and serves the design audience with a compelling variety of education and networking events.

TREND + DESIGN CENTER

LOCATION: UPPER LEVEL, BOOTH 380187-UL

LOCATION: UPPER LEVEL, BOOTH 53103-UL The Trend + Design Center is where the design and R&D community gathers to hear what’s next. From trend forecasting to industrial design and materials

HIGH ALTITUDE DEN

On belay? Belay on! Stop by the High Altitude Den for climbingfocused activations, a place to hang, and daily happy hours with Goodhart Coffee from 3:304:30 p.m.

PHOTOS BY OUTDOOR RETAILER

VENTURE OUT LOCATION: UPPER LEVEL


OUTDOOR RETAILER SHOW AREAS

RETAILER + REP LOUNGE LOCATION: UPPER LEVEL, BOOTH 38103-UL Need a place to chill or have a quick meeting? Come to the Retailer + Rep Lounge to hang, put your feet up, or access Wi-Fi.

MOTHER’S ROOM LOCATION: STREET LEVEL, MR112 Calling all moms ... Head to the Mother’s Room to nurse, pump, have some refreshments, or hang with your little one.

INFO DESK LOCATION: STREET LEVEL, FOYER OF THE EAST ENTRANCE (BY THE BLUE BEAR) Have a question? Just head to the Info Desk and our staff will be ready to help.

HOUSING DESK LOCATION: STREET LEVEL, NEXT TO REGISTRATION EventSphere, the official housing partner of Outdoor Retailer, will be on site at Winter Market to help with your reservations. Find the housing desk next to registration in the east entrance and be sure to book your housing for the Snow Show in January!

COAT & BAG CHECK LOCATION: STREET LEVEL, MR102 The communal tables in Venture Out are a great place for casual meetings.

THE DAILY PREVIEW

Drop your bags and jacket and hit the show floor!

What do customers want? That’s the million-dollar question. Lucky for you, The Daily gives the answer away for free every day at Outdoor Retailer. Pick up The Daily to read original reporting on gear trends from retailers and keep abreast of all the products launching at the show.

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

33


OUTDOOR RETAILER SHOW MAP

34

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018


OUTDOOR RETAILER STAY CONNECTED

MOBILE APP

Download the Outdoor Retailer Winter Market mobile app to have all the show information you need in the palm of your hand. In the mobile app, you can access: Floor plan Exhibitor list Events Education schedule Product gallery Walking map Local info And more!

Search “Outdoor Retailer” in your app store and get access to everything you need to make the most out of the show.

SHOW PLANNER

The Show Planner is an online platform for retail buyers, importers/distributors, designers, nonprofits, independent reps, and working media to help in the show-planning process. Within the Show Planner you can find these great tools: Exhibitor list Interactive floor plan Education and events schedule Matchmaking Mobile app information  Communicate with exhibitors View products

All you need to do is log in to your Show Planner and start planning your show!

MATCHMAKING

Let’s be friends! Stay connected before, during, and after the show…

Instagram Facebook Twitter YouTube

@OutdoorRetailer @OutdoorRetailer @OutdoorRetailer @OutdoorRetailerShow

The matchmaking tool is part of the Show Planner, and it brings exhibitors and retail buyers, importers/ distributors, designers, nonprofits, independent reps, and working media together before the show starts. The Show Planner enables you to search for exhibitors based on product category, location, new to the show, and other filters. Attendees can get in touch with exhibitors to find out more information or request an in-booth appointment during the show. Log in to your Show Planner and explore the exhibitors and products you’ll find at Outdoor Retailer Winter Market.

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

35


The Whole Mountain.

PHOTO BY NICOLAI BERNTSEN ON UNSPLASH

Outdoor Retailer Snow Show is where the outdoor and snow industries come together, creating an unprecedented opportunity for the outdoor marketplace.

TRADESHOW

JANUARY 30-FEBRUARY 1, 2019 DENVER, COLORADO

——————————————————————————————————————————

SIA/WWSRA ON-SNOW DEMO

FEBRUARY 4-5, 2019 COPPER MOUNTAIN, COLORADO

WWW.OUTDOORRETAILER.COM/REGISTER

REGISTER NOW


GEAR TRENDS Camping p. 38 Eyewear & Headwear p. 42 Tools p. 44 Nutrition p. 45 Travel Bags p. 46

PHOTO BY COURTESY

Trail to tarmac: The Osprey Farpoint Trek/ Fairview Trek blurs the lines between travel and hiking packs (page 46).

ALL PRICES ARE MANUFACTURER’S SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE (MSRP).

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

37


GEAR TRENDS CAMPING

Weight Conscious

As some campers look for lighter gear, others are going the opposite direction—and brands are building products to suit.

1

BY RYAN WICHELNS

Counting Ounces

“I still remember the days when customers were buying [beefy] Koflach boots,” says Lisa McKinley of in Kittery, Maine's Kittery Trading Post. “What will be the next heavy category to go extinct?” While sleeping bags and tents have been in a race to lose ounces for years, the weight-loss push lately has been moving beyond the basics, McKinley says. Consumers are starting to evaluate other categories like chairs and hammocks to see if they can lighten up—and gain an advantage.

Rough and Tumble

Winter camping gear is expensive, says Brian Mildenstein, the general manager of Iowa City’s Fin and Feather, and, “Iowans are practical. They like all the cheats. Where can I pick up an extra, cheap 5 or 10 degrees of warmth?” More casual users look for inexpensive ways to boost their gear—sleeping bag liners are popular, he says. And they’re seeking out gear that can perform in all seasons. For the same customers, rentals are a good solution. “There are lots of people who really only go in the summer but want to do a winter trip,” he says, “and rentals are often the best solution for them.” That means there’s a need for durable gear that’s capable of being used (and abused) by a crowd.

Luxe (and Large)

If shaving weight off new products is a growing trend, then so is not caring about weight at all. As the overland and car camping category grows, brands are trying to cater to those customers, creating gear that's more comfortable, with less emphasis on weight savings. Nomad Ventures, which has several locations in Southern California, serves a large overlanding crowd, and owner Bruce Damon says he sells chairs, stoves, larger tents, and other products that he likely would not stock if it weren’t for the vehicle-based group. “They might seem extravagant in some circles,” he said, “but for people who want to make things a little nicer for themselves and have the trunk space to do it, they make sense.”

2

PHOTOS BY TK

3

38

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018


1. The new X-Cover from iKamper ($TBD) allows overlanders and car campers to carry their bikes, kayaks, and other toys on top of their rooftop tent on an integrated rack. The X-Cover forgoes the soft PVC covers of many foldout rooftop tents, making it easier to open and close and keeping the two crossbars accessible. The tent comfortably sleeps up to three adults, and the canvas upper includes a window for checking out the stars. 

4

2. The Wanderr ($TBD) from O.M.E. Gear is a four-in-one item with a cart (for toting 150 pounds of coolers and other supplies from the car to camp, or across a beach), two different chair heights, and a lounger for kicking back in the sun. It also features dual cupholders, beefy all-terrain tires, and a durable aluminum frame. 3. Gear abusers, take note: The Insulated AXL Trail Boss ($200) from Big Agnes has ultratough ripstop fabric made with nano-filament thread—like the kind used on aircraft life rafts and evacuation slides. The material, plus a polycarbonate coating on the bottom, make it highly resistant to abrasion, tears, and punctures. Separate inflation and deflation valves boost efficiency. 4. With ultralight Dyneema fabric and trekking pole supports, the Wisp 1.5P Tent from Big Sky International ($TBD) is a featherweight three-season tent for minimalist backpackers. An expansion of the brand's popular Wisp 1P, the 1.5P weighs only a pound—while featuring a roomy silhouette, two doors, and two vestibules in the double-walled design. 5. Clocking in at only 4.25 ounces (a 1.45-ounce reduction over the previous version), ENO’s ultralight Helios Suspension System ($35) saves weight in your pack while maintaining superior strength and boasting a 300-pound weight rating. Crafted from a new proprietary rope, with a polyester-blend tree sling, the Helios sets up in a flash and provides a perfect hang with the brand’s Microtune Adjustment System. Measuring more than 8 feet and able to accommodate even the most awkward of hanging spaces, this techy, tree-friendly strap breaks the weight barrier for overnight hammockers.

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

5

6

6. The new Helinox Playa Chair ($199), a successor of the brand’s favorite Beach Chair, is designed for lounging comfort. With enhanced stability and durability, the Playa Chair has a lowered frame for easy entry and uniquely designed winged armrests. It offers a cup holder, a breathable mesh seat, and a lightweight, strong, foldable, and easy-to-carry design.

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

39


GEAR TRENDS EYEWEAR & HEADWEAR

Clear Eyes, Warm Heads, Can’t Lose

1

2

Playful accents and classic styles lead the pack in hats and eyewear. BY BRIGID MANDER

Pompom Power

The extravagant pompom hat is going strong on the snow and as an après-ski style statement. “Women really like the pompoms—the larger the better, for all ages,” says Ione Eischens, store manager of Lundrigan’s Clothing in Minnesota. “Wool exterior with fleece inside is popular, too.” In Jackson, Wyoming, Hoback Sports’ Don Ruzicka notes, “Big, synthetic fur ones do really well for the ladies. We have a lot of conservation-minded people here, so I don’t think our customers want real fur. Just that frizzy, fluffy look and fun colors.”

3

Heart on Your Hat

What's your hat but one more opportunity to advertise a few of your favorite things? People are decorating their lids with logos showing support for a favorite cause, ski area, or company, says Cory Okerlund of Boone’s Mountain Sports in Evergreen, Colorado.

Back to the Classics

Sunglass frames inspired by classic silhouettes from 20, 30, or more years ago haven’t gone out of style. Far from it: At Mountain Ops Outdoor Gear in Stowe, Vermont, owner Don Allen says retro shades are making a significant reappearance. “We’re seeing a comeback in traditional frames, like wire-rimmed aviators and new-age glacier glasses, with updated materials and design,” he notes.

Lens Trends

Lower price-point sunglasses ($50 to $100) with polarized lenses are a sure winner, especially if they’re combined with trendy, revamped classic frames, says Joe Pickens of Davis, California's Ken's Bike and Ski. And the coveted onequiver goggle continues to improve in both style and affordability, two things that boost sales. “Photochromatic lenses really started to kick in last year for us, especially with some cheaper options coming out,” says Pickens. “People have a lot of interest in one lens that can do it all.”

4

Quick-change lenses are still preferred by some as a cheaper and more versatile option than photochromatic, though. “People are really interested in interchangeable lenses in goggles and glasses,” says Okerlund. Across the country in Vermont, it is the same story. “We see a lot of interest in frames with easy-to-change lenses, especially the magnetic ones—the easier to change, the better,” says Allen.

40

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

Prest-O Change-O


1. Designed for cool conditions and offering a 360-degree, high-visual reflective pattern for increased visibility, BUFF’s DryFlx Multifunctional Headwear ($25) also features lightweight, thermally efficient fabric. 2. Native’s new Four Corners ($129–$149) pays homage to classic metal frames, but here the metal appears as a brow accent— which allows the sunglasses to double up as stylish and utilitarian. 3. Polarized lenses, lightweight and flexible frames for the active wearer, and a hint of design flair pulled from the wayfarer shape—it all adds up to G.Y.S.T.’s versatile SG4-16 ($69). 4. Colorful stripes and a soft pom top make the women’s Lily Beanie from Outdoor Research ($32) fun, while a unique acrylic/nylon/polyester/woolblend fabric makes sure it’s warm, wicking, and breathable.

5

5. The Chaos Giana Beanie ($50) is nothing if not luxurious: It has a large accent pompom and a blend of viscose, nylon, fine merino, alpaca, and cashmere fleece in the liner. 6. Flylow’s Colorado Pride beanie ($25) features a classic silhouette, accent pompom, and a chance to broadcast your love for Colorado (and Flylow). 7. The DropZone ($179) from Native is a quick-change goggle that allows skiers and snowboarders to switch out lenses with the click of a button. Once in, the lenses stay put, even in wipeouts.

6

7

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

41


GEAR TRENDS TOOLS

2

Cutting Edge Whether you’re looking for a boutique blade or a stylish saw, this season’s tools are both beautiful and functional.

1

BY BRIGID MANDER

Timeless Tools

Traditional, finely crafted axes that are also durable and utilitarian have been high on the outdoorsman's and -woman’s list lately. “We get a lot of people looking for long-lasting, high-quality blades,” says Andrew Jakovac, hardgoods buyer at JD High Country Outfitters in Jack-son, Wyoming. “People will pay a lot more for an axe that's unlikely to fail them in the field, and Scandinavian compa-nies have maintained that level of craft.”

Pocket Power

Small, human-powered saws that can cut a path, chop up firewood, or even make an emergency shelter are very intriguing to customers, says Andrew Schlegel of Great Miami Outfitters in Dayton, Ohio: “People like the idea of something easy to carry and easy to use in case they need it in the outdoors.” From hikers performing a bit of trail maintenance to campers making a killer campfire, these little saws are widely applicable.

The Fix is In

Fixed-blade knives are having a resurgence in popularity, says Jason Hachfeld of Sportman and Ski Haus in Kalispell, Montana. “People are really into 4- to 6-inch blades now, over the folding knife,” he says. “They want a knife that can do everything and is really strong, so they’re willing to carry the extra weight.” In fact, interest in knives has been going up overall—and high-end pocketknives are becoming more popular than multitools for everyday use, says Jakovac.

3

1. Purpose-built for slicing wood, the new Hults Bruk Sarek Splitting Axe ($169) combines the speed of an axe with the power of a maul in a century-old design, adding a hand-forged, razor-edged Swedish steel head to an American hickory handle.

3. The Ortovox Beast Shovel ($60) is now 19 percent lighter than the previous version, coming in at 20.5 ounces. Cutouts in the blade shave off weight without losing efficiency, while the shaft and handle (which was hollowed and made asymmetrical) have also been optimized for strength at lower weight. 4. Unchanged in form since 1828—but now updated with modern materials like a carbon fiber handle—the Antique from Laguiole Honoré Durand ($270) is a stylish everyday knife with a top-end Sandvik stainless steel blade for very durable, very sharp edges.

42

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

4

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

2. Low weight, compact size, and serious cutting power make the Nordic Pocket Saw ($119) a perfect campfire tool. The heat-treated, high-carbon steel chain has 33 cutting teeth—and it comes with optional organic Swedish leather handles and a protective case.


GEAR TRENDS NUTRITION

Sugar and Spice

People are snacking smarter, but one thing will never change: a craving for flavor. BY MICAH LING

1

2

Slow Sugar

Producers of energy bars are now educating customers on “good” sugar versus “bad” sugar—and the fact that good sugar is actually essential to performance. Instead of demonizing the sweet stuff, companies are preaching the benefits of low-glycemic foods (that aid in slowing digestion and create a slower burn). “People like them because they’re made of ‘real food’ and give long-lasting energy,” says Kal Pence of The Runner’s Edge in Libertyville, Illinois.

Indulge Me

A hard sweat session merits a treat—or at least, that's how consumers are choosing their energy snacks. Look for traditional post-ski or -hike rewards like the trailhead beer to make an appearance in the endurance food category. And at Tahoe Mountain Sports in Truckee, California, sweet flavors always fly off the shelves first. “Anything with chocolate and espresso is easy to sell,” says Nikki Sinatra.

3

Fine Dining, Fireside

Freeze-dried meals have come a long way since simple rice and beans: People these days want a “meal experience,” even in the wild. And that means something filling, with exotic ingredients. According to Marilyn Matthews at Mountain Sports Flagstaff, “salmon meals are our customers’ top entrée of choice.” Suzanne Mayerchak, the district manager and buyer at Walkabout Outfitter in Lexington, Virginia, adds that restaurant-style meals are very popular. “Pad Thai is by far our best seller,” she says. After a long day of adventuring, why not treat yo’self? 1. Why wait for that celebratory beer? GU Energy Labs introduces the Hoppy Trails gel ($36/24 gels), a caffeinefree energy snack that mixes hops and citrus flavors. 2. Low on the glycemic index (and in sugar content) are newcomer No Cow’s bars ($2), which get a boost from 45mg of coffee bean flour. And—as the name implies— they're dairy free.

4

3. Are plums the future of low-glycemic snacks? Fourpoints Energy Bar thinks so—and it offers the only plum-based bar on the market. New flavors include Trailhead Gingerbread and Colorado Trail Chocolate Peanut ($3). Bonus: They won’t freeze. 4. Paleo and on-the-go? LonoLife offers easy-to-pack, single-serving bone broths. A new line in K-Cups ($7/ four-pack; $18/10-pack) comes in Grass Fed Beef, Pasture Raised Chicken, and Grass Fed Thai Curry Beef. 5. Backpacker’s Pantry adds Chicken Piccata, Carrot Cake Pancakes, Red Rocks Scrambler, and Chiang Mai Coconut Curry to the menu this season ($4-$10).

5 THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

43


GEAR TRENDS TRAVEL BAGS

Tougher than Typical

2

1

Lifestyle and travel packs get burly for getting after it. BY COURTNEY HOLDEN

Heavy Duty

Casual packs put quality at the forefront this season, with numerous brands touting weatherproof exteriors and lasting fabrics. Keep an eye out for polycarbonate shells, Cordura fabric, and YKK zippers. “People are looking for longevity, not disposability,” says Jennifer Merkel, owner of Chalet Sports in Bozeman, Montana. Brands also have an eye toward more sustainable practices, such as using recycled and bluesign-approved materials.

Duffel Shuffle

Convenient, versatile, and oh-so-durable, duffels are having their day in the sun. The latest models often have backpack straps that can be easily deployed for longer hauls or stashed away to prevent tangling when checked for a flight. “A duffel is your do-everything piece,” says Esther Kopf, buyer for Pine Needle Mountaineering in Durango, Colorado. “You have people who want something to take on the airplane or use in their car.”

4

3

Jack of All Trades

A niche but influential audience of globetrotters is looking to optimize the efficiency and weight of their travel kit. The answer? Do-it-all travel bags that perform on a long trek (think Annapurna Circuit) while also protecting that laptop from the rigor of international travel (so they can post their photos of the Annapurna Circuit). 1. Osprey’s men’s Farpoint Trek and women’s Fairview Trek (both $220; 55L) deliver on organization and packing needs—including a hydration sleeve that doubles as a laptop sleeve—for standard travels, while also featuring a highly ventilated backpanel and torsoadjustable fit necessary for trail expeditions. 2. A timeless design, consciously made: That’s the essence of Fjällräven’s Nörvage Foldsack ($TBD). Look beyond the sleek silhouette to find recycled wool and recycled polyester, as well as organic cotton.

5

4. In Deuter’s Aviant Duffel Pro 90 ($140), a hardwearing TPU exterior blocks dirt and water, while mesh pockets and internal straps keep items organized. External zip pockets provide even more stow space. 5. The Cargo Hauler Duffel ($99; 40L) from Eagle Creek helps users stay organized, thanks to detachable interior dividers and interior zip pockets.

44

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

3. United By Blue’s Caravan Canvas Duffel ($148) differentiates itself with a full-open side zipper pocket that accommodates trekking poles, concert posters, and other long-and-lean items. The duffel’s handy shoulder straps stash inside the hidden pocket at the base.


A new Teflon for a new world. ®

Our changing world calls for more sustainable solutions. So we created the first-ever plant-based water repellent, with performance worthy of the Teflon® brand. We’re proud to introduce Teflon EcoElite™, the latest non-fluorinated innovation from Chemours. Learn more by visiting us at 54037-UL or at teflon.com/ordaily.

© 2018 The Chemours Company FC, LLC. Teflon®, Teflon EcoElite™ and any associated logos are trademarks or copyrights of The Chemours Company FC, LLC. Chemours™ and the Chemours Logo are trademarks of The Chemours Company.


SELL MORE FOOTWEAR IN snews YOUR SHOP W E K NOW OUTD OOR S

Introducing Boost Your Sales: Footwear, part of the SNEWS Retail College series

Our courses are designed for retailers and taught by retailers. We created a robust footwear training resource that will provide you with information to boost sales and enhance the customer experience in your store.

YOU’LL LEARN: › Backstock organization › Footwear wall design › Customer assessment › How to deal with difficult customers › Fitting skills › Boot lingo › Boot materials and features › How to close the sale

REGISTER TODAY @: SNEWSNET.COM/FOOTWEAR

SNEWS_ORAd_Nov.indd 1

10/15/18 9:04 AM


THE GALLERY H O T N E W PRO D U C T S AT W INTE R M A R K E T

EDITORS’ PICK Cotopaxi’s new

Tarak 35L Winter Pack features a streamlined ice tool carry system, configurable compression and lash points, and a removable foam framesheet and hydration sleeve. It’s made from a 210-denier nylon and Dynagin ripstop and has your back for even the most technical winter climbing trips. [$140]

EDITORS’ PICK

PHOTO BY COURTESY

#44031-UL cotopaxi.com

ALL PRICES ARE MANUFACTURER’S SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE (MSRP). BOOTH NUMBERS ARE CURRENT AS OF OCT. 31, 2018. THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

47


THE GALLERY

1 2

EDITORS’ PICK

3 48

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

4


THE GALLERY

7

5

1. The Pomona Pullover is made of Carve Designs’ new sustainable Quilted Jersey fabric with 65 percent organic cotton and 35 percent recycled polyester. The pullover features a gold half-zip and comes in two colors: The moss heather has a quilted zigzag design while the pewter heather has a quilted floral design. The top has a relaxed fit, sits below the waist, and has a rib-knit cuff at the sleeve and bottom hem. [$89]

#42055-UL carvedesigns.com

2. The Chaco Cataluna Clog offers innovative design combined with biomechanically engineered arch support and a full bamboo heel. Tactile embossed suedes and premium fullgrain waterproof leather give this style a look perfect to carry you through a day of exploring to a night out on the town. The upper features recycled textile lining and an adjustable buckle closure. [$160] #46005-UL chacos.com

6

3. A high-performance, multi-terrain hiking shoe, the Magna Trail is the first shoe to feature VIVOBAREFOOT’s new slashproof and exceptionally durable canvas. The new shoe was created with no-sew construction, featuring a tough and flexible minimal design and a neoprene ankle sock for complete 360-degree foot freedom and flexibility. The shoes come in black, cordovan, and gray. [$210] #VO610-UL vivobarefoot

.com/us

4. EDITORS’ PICK Mountain Khakis has developed SeaWool insulation and yarns made from crushed oyster shells and recycled polyester, and built 60 grams of the fill into the new Triple Direct

Jacket, which also features a lightweight baffled silhouette with retro fittings like a metal snap storm flap, rivet-reinforced hand pockets, and elastic cuffs. [$165]

#36031-UL mountainkhakis.com

5. The adidas Outdoor Windweave Insulation Jacket is designed for runs, rides, hikes, and climbs. Bodymapped hybrid construction places different levels of breathability in different sections for versatile weather protection for everyday life. The jacket also includes a durable water-repellent finish for protection in light rain, and it is packable into its own pocket. [$225]

#42069-UL adidasoutdoor.com

6. The LOWA Barina II GTX is a midcalf, cold-weather women’s boot, featuring a cozy Gore-Tex Partelana lining and lugged LOWA AL-S III outsole designed to take on snowdrifts and icy sidewalks with confidence. The embossed leather/tweed textile uppers and fleece accents make the Barina II GTX a stylish choice for daily wear as well as après-ski. [$TBD]

#36023-UL lowaboots.com

7. The Agile 2 Set Nocturne is a winterized version of Salomon’s popular Agile running vest, with a reflective treatment on the back stretch panel and on the lower front pockets (just below the flask holder) to keep you visible and safe in low-light conditions. The Agile 2 Set Nocturne is perfect for a quick run in the city. Its minimalist design efficiently carries keys, cards, and phones, and makes access to hydration easy. Comfortable and convenient, it’s great for short active sessions. [$100] #49054-

UL salomon.com

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

49


THE GALLERY

1

2

3

EDITORS’ PICK

50

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

4


THE GALLERY

7 5

1. Ecōths’ Zayden ¼-Zip is a recycled polyester pullover with jersey on the outside and an incredibly soft peached interior with a zigzag weave on the inside. Lightweight and textured to wick moisture away from the skin, the Zayden has a secure zip chest pocket and is ideal for adventure travelers and outdoorsmen. [$85] #49081-UL ecoths.com

6

2. The Outdoor Research Inception Aerogel Gloves pair Aerogel palms with a versatile, four-way stretchy softshell construction, grid fleece inside on the back of hand, and a longer-cut gauntlet. Aerogel won’t compress the way traditional insulation does, which greatly enhances warmth. That makes it an ideal application for the palm of a glove, where a user’s grip is prone to compress traditional loft insulation. [$99]

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

#43031-UL outdoorresearch.com

3. EDITORS’ PICK The new Osprey Kamber 18 (for men) and Kresta 16 (for women) deliver a great fit in a low profile designed for lift-serviced days or quick backcountry lines. Features include front-panel access to the main compartment, an extra-large front panel pocket with internal organization, and a tuckaway diagonal ski and vertical snowboard attachment, as well as an internal reservoir pocket with insulated hose sleeve. [$100] #36039-UL osprey.com

4. The Infant Frosty Stripe Beanie from Sunday Afternoons is made from ultrasoft acrylic and looks and feels hand-

knit. A fitted crown and ribbed band provide a comfortable fit. Rated UPF 50+ for sun protection, this beanie will keep little ones warm and toasty anywhere your family adventures lead. [$18] #39061-UL sundayafternoons.com

5. Ideal for knitting projects, book club reads, and tablets, the roomy Adrenaline Tote from Krimson Klover has enough room to stash all of your travel essentials. The whimsical original artwork is sure to inspire your next mountain vacation. The tote is 18.5 by 15 by 6.75 inches and features a button closure and small inside zip pocket, and is a cotton/polyester blend with faux leather trim. [$84] #42080-UL krimsonklover.com

6. A laid-back, do-it-all down pullover hoody that’s a trusty companion for any time there’s a chill in the air, the Mountain Hardwear Rhea Ridge Pullover for women features a streamlined design and highly packable, 600-fill down for premium warmth and comfort from city streets to weekend campsites. [$225] #MR207 mountainhardwear.com

7. Premium waterproof leather, rugged craftsmanship, a dual-density footbed, and Peak-to-Pavement traction elevates the new Forsake Men’s Wilson from a classic heritage design to a durable all-terrain adventurer. Features include a waterproof/breathable membrane, gusseted tongue, and compression EVA midsole. [$150]

#37018-UL forsake.com

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

51


THE GALLERY

1

1. Built to accommodate the ripping female skier who still wants thermal protection, but not the bulk, Helly Hansen introduces the Whitewall LifaLoft Jacket. Due to LifaLoft insulation, which offers a stellar warmth-to-weight ratio, the jacket remains trim as opposed to bulky, allowing better mobility and comfort when layering, hucking cliffs, or approaching your descent. Helly Hansen’s Life Pocket will keep a phone battery lasting longer, a hi-vis brim allows for better visibility during whiteouts, and the backpackspecific design offers comfort and accommodation when carrying safety gear. [$400]

#37005-UL hellyhansen.com

52

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

2. The Vasque Laplander UltraDry is a women’s winter go-to that combines form and function into a boot that keeps feet warm and dry on-trail or in town. When temperatures drop, the Laplander provides peace of mind with 400 grams of Thinsulate insulation to keep warmth in and an UltraDry waterproof membrane to lock moisture out. The boot is built on a solid foundation with ColdHold rubber in the outsole for trustworthy traction across slick surfaces. The boot’s sleek upper blends leather, suede, and knit mesh for a modern outdoor look that stands up to the elements. [$160] #44041-UL vasque.com

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

2


THE GALLERY

4

3. The gogglesoc is a stylish goggle protection sleeve (or “sock”) made from recycled plastic bottles. The stretchy microfiber cover comes in more than 50 customizable designs. The gogglesoc stays in place while your goggles are on your helmet and helps protect your lenses from the thrills and spills that come with every ski outing. [$15] #34019-UL 

3

gogglesoc.com

4. The Dakota Grizzly Shayne is a vintage ombre flannel-lined button-up for F19. The side-seam pockets and waffle knit lining make the Shayne the flannel to layer over your workwear or wear on its own. It features a thermal waffle lining that wicks the wet away, and the outer shirt keeps you warm. [$88] #46003-UL dakotagrizzly.co

NEW! LifeStraw Flex with Gravity Bag Multi-function water filter - removes lead, bacteria, parasites and chemicals

Come talk to us about our new sales organization

Booth # is 30018-UL


THE GALLERY

1

3 2

1. The new EcoVessel Bottle Brush Set helps keep bottles, spouts, and straws in tip-top condition. With its nylon bristles, cotton tip, and beechwood handle, this brush is designed for easy, effective, scratch-free cleaning. [$12]

#44028-UL ecovessel.com

2. The Oboz Women’s Sapphire 8" Insulated B-DRY is as comfortable shoveling the driveway as it is out on girls’ night. Constructed of waterproof nubuck leather with the brand’s B-DRY waterproof technology and a winterized rubber outsole, the Sapphire will keep feet dry in all winter weather conditions, while 200-gram 3M Thinsulate insulation and thermal O FIT Insoles will keep them warm when the temperature drops. [$175] #50081-UL obozfootwear.com

3. The Big Agnes Ways Gulch Vest is ideal for layering on cold days and equally stylish for strolling around town. It features a relaxed cut and 700-fill DownTek to provide warmth in all conditions. [$150] #44021-UL

bigagnes.com


NEW EXHIBITORS M E E T TH E N E W K ID S O N TH E FLO O R

2

1

1. Hyperbola

Booth: #53097-UL Founded in 2001, Hyperbola is a Taiwan-based textile supplier for fashion, function, and outdoor fabrics, integrating design and performance with technology and aesthetics. The small company of fewer than 30 employees strives to help improve the experience of dressing by offering the most advanced and trendy fabrics. Prioritizing quality control, Hyperbola commissions independent inspections before and after every stage of the manufacturing process—dyeing, printing, and coating. It doesn’t have a factory, but instead works with local mills. In 2008, Hyperbola was selected as one of the Four Textile Dragons in Taiwan. In 2013, Hyperbola was honored with the ISPO Lifestyle Apparel Gold Winner Award. Hyperbola has supplied fabrics for raincoats and ski jackets to a number of outdoor brands, including Canada Goose and Patagonia. Windproof, down, softshell, knit, double weave, and thermo control are just a few of the options Hyperbola offers to its partners.

2. ExtremeMist

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

PCS, LLC

Booth # 36054-UL The ExtremeMist PCS (Personal Cooling System) is the world’s first hands-free portable misting system. It can be installed in almost any hydration pack. Lightweight at just 16 ounces and compact, it’s a must-have piece of equipment for any outdoor enthusiast. When the temperatures climb, the ExtremeMist PCS can cool the surrounding air by up to 30 degrees Fahrenheit, keeping you refreshed on hot days. The PCS includes a variable speed and wireless remote control for fine-tuning the mist to match your activities. It also can regulate the desired mist output from a distance of up to 30 feet. On the lower speeds, water consumption is 1.5 to 2.8 cups per hour, and its rechargeable lithium-ion battery pack lasts up to 16 hours between charges.

It’s a game-changer for hikers, runners, cyclists, sideline spectators—anyone, anywhere extra cooling is desired. The PCS can also be used out of the pack for a variety of purposes. Add the optional “Quad” hose and nozzle kit to attach the PCS to tents, ATVs, lounge chairs, BBQs, tailgates, or anyplace else you can think of to provide you with cooler air. The PCS is available as a retrofit kit that can be installed in your favorite hydration backpack or as a pre-installed PCS in a proprietary pack that’s ready to go—just add water. Don’t let summer keep you trapped indoors. Keep doing the activities you love year-round with the ExtremeMist PCS.

3. Forj

Booth #39085-UL Forj possesses tape and ribbon products with unmatched strength, versatility, and ease of use. With an excellent strength-to-weight ratio, the Forj’s material—an ultrahigh thermoplastic fiber combined with a low-temperature-activated thermoplastic polymer matrix—is completely recyclable, waterproof, and reusable, with an infinite shelf life when stored in its original container. The tape can be used for many things—replacing a broken chain link or broken rivet, creating a harness, or towing equipment and gear. It can also be molded into custom grips, handles, and rivets. Right now, the tape only

3

comes in white, but the team is developing more colors and is paintable if users really want color. Forj products contain no chemicals that pose personal or environmental risks. Even though it has a solid user base, the company believes that tens of thousands have yet to discover it, due to the versatility and creativity of the product. A one-inch-wide piece of Forj tape has a tensile strength of more than 1,000 pounds, yet it weighs less than half a pound per 100 feet. According to the brand, its unique properties, unlimited physical forms, and ease of marketing combine with unlimited designer and user imagination to carve a niche market for this revolutionary tape. Forj was brought to life on Kickstarter under the name “Braeön.” It was just named an Innovation Award winner at Winter Market.

4 4. EcoVessel

Booth #44028-UL During its 2008 launch, Boulder-based EcoVessel had one simple goal in mind: replace single-use plastic with high-quality, stainless-steel bottles, built to last 100 years. Innovation and design have been part of EvoVessel’s operations since the beginning, and their TriMax insulation has been independently tested to outperform its competitors. The brand creates reliable and versatile options for both kids and adults, and they focus on engineering the best product designs for superior features, performance, and value. EcoVessel realizes that consumers demand more than performance. They partner with several organizations to support clean water and environmental causes, such as Water for People, Elkay, and most recently, Plastic Oceans—a nonprofit organization on a mission to reduce single-use plastics and mitigate plastic pollution. EcoVessel offers a lifetime warranty on every product and a customer support team. They are introducing brand-new reusable straws and an updated collection. As part of their debut, EcoVessel has launched a campaign to encourage attendees to reduce single-use plastic by bringing their own water bottles and containers. To join in on social media, use the hashtag #LeaveLessOR.

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

55


PHOTOS BY NICK COTE; COURTESY (3)

RETAILER REPORTS

58

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018


Bill Bernhard Roam ‘N Around

RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA The snow is just starting to fall in Rapid City, marking winter’s approach. That means Roam ‘N Around’s Bill Bernhard is scouting out which products he’s going to push to their limits in the cold—which is likely to drop below zero for at least a few days this season. “I try to take gear and find out: How well will this work for how cold it is?” he says. “We’ve had some fun on 25-below days on a fat bike with our gear.” The store is nearing its 12th birthday and just started offering rentals—making it

the only store in the city to do so—and a new consignment section. Both locals and out-of-towners exploring Badlands National Park stop by for camping, hiking, backpacking, and snow essentials—whether they’re buying new or just borrowing. “Consignment and rentals provide a good entry point for people trying to get into outdoor activities,” Bernhard says. “I’m excited to see what this winter brings now that more people know we have that option.”

What new gear are you most excited about so far?

1

1. Eagle Creek Cargo Hauler Duffel “I like the new redesign, the packability for storage, and the simple-to-use shoulder straps. This duffel is a 45L do-everything travel bag.”

3 2

2. Oboz Sapphire Women’s Winter Boot “I think that’s a great look. I think it’s multifunctional. You can use it in a lot of different situations, whether it’s hiking out in the snow or just walking around town getting your Christmas shopping done.” 3. Mountain Khakis Bison Boxer Briefs “We already carry Mountain Khakis, and I’m excited to see how this new line does. I think it could be one that could work well for a lot of people.”

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

59


RETAILER REPORT

Ed McAlister River Sports Outfitters KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE After 36 years running River Sports Outfitters, Founder Ed McAlister knows what resonates with customers—but he always keeps an open mind when seeing new gear and brands. Nearly 50 brands—from A to Z and from big name to up-and-coming—mix together on his shelves and in the online store. And at this show, McAlister made connections with two new partners he’s hoping to offer to his shoppers. River Sports is going strong with two storefronts, a climbing center, and six rental locations throughout the Knoxville community. Rentals have been in high demand, so much so that River Sports opened a new location in Lenoir City for paddlers and kayakers to try out new boats. “Our rental program has been a great asset,” he says. “It fits in with our mission to get people outside, whether out on the water or hiking.” When McAlister isn’t on the water or on expeditions in the Grand Canyon, he’s road biking, mountain biking, and training for his next triathlon.

1

What new gear are you most excited about so far? 1. Lolë Packable Down “It’s unique and offers different colors. That brand is going to be one that rises up.” 2. Kathmandu Connect Smart Pack 28L “This pack is the future. It has the charger capability built into it, and people always need to charge.” 3. Watson’s Men’s HEAT Long Sleeve Crew “We’re bringing them on. We like the underwear and baselayers. It’s a good price point.

2 60

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

3


OUTDOOR ELECTRONICS AT BOOTH #44065-UL


NEWS

The Best of the Best Umami-packed mushroom snacks, hideaway hammocks, cookie sheet displays— this show has it, and a whole lot more. Here are the 21 snacks, booths, gear, and more that caught our eye this Winter Market. BY THE DAILY STAFF

Honey Stinger

Kahtoola

Sticker Mule

ENO

Cacoona

Honey Stinger

Honey Stinger has performance honey for tasting, but that’s not all that’ll satisfy your sweet tooth. The brand’s newest snack bars, Organic Cracker N’ Nut Butter Snack Bars, are sandwiches made in heaven: nut butter between crackers, dunked in chocolate.

Z-Chromatic sandals. Says Dana Sawyer, sales, “It’s a trend play with a youthful approach.” Says a passerby, “Ooh, look at these colors! Ooh, look at the orange one! It’s so cute!”

Best Cocktail Ice

Kahtoola

Plaid flannel shirts, plaid flannel reps, plaid flannel slipcovers, plaid flannel tablecloths. (Next up: plaid flannel bourbon, plaid flannel dog.)

Kahtoola has been bringing giant blocks of ice to trade shows for a dozen years so people can try MICROspikes in their element—but Chris Bunch, industrial designer, isn’t worried about a wipeout. “No one has ever bit it, despite their best attempts,” he says.

Best Stickers

Best Place to Take a Nap

The folks at Sticker Mule brought 20,000 samples to Winter Market—and, when pressured to guess, they say they’ve given away 16,000. (They also make labels, buttons, magnets, and packaging, but even grown-ups know those silly things aren’t as fun as stickers.)

Part chair, part daybed, part chrysalis, Cacoona’s hanging loungers would be the perfect place to catch a few Day 4 afternoon Zzzs. Not even sales manager Gary Pepper has succumbed thus far, though. “If I took a nap in there, they’d have to start paying me modeling fees.”

Strongest Lumberjack Game

Dakota Grizzly

Sticker Mule

Cacoona

Best Rainbow Pride

Best Solution for Single-Use Plastic

The first thing you see when you pass by Chaco’s booth? The display of 21 different-colored

Luumi’s “unplastic” line of straws, baggies, and lids are a creative answer to growing landfills. Saying

Chaco

62

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

Luumi

goodbye to single-use plastic sandwich baggies forever? We’re on board.

Most Artistic

Flowfold

Maine-based Flowfold didn’t exhibit at this show, but they’ve already purchased Patrick Maxcy’s octopus mural (see page 10) to bring back to OR in January.

Best Place to Hang Out

Eagle Nest Outfitter

“What gear helps you make the most friends? The hammock,” says Martha Evans, senior account executive of Outdoor Adventure Media, who was taking a load off at ENO’s booth—which has plenty of camp chairs and slings for your chilling pleasure. “Everyone wants to get in and try it,” she said.

Most Likely to Make You Question Why You’re Here

The Wanderheart Project

“What would happen if you recharged yourself as much as you recharged your phone?” asked a sign at Wanderheart, a movement (with apparel and trips) that promotes a lifestyle of disconnecting from technology more often. We’ll get back to you once we close this issue.

PHOTOS BY NICK COTE

Sweetest Booth


Why Innovation is a part of us. It’s who we are, and it’s what we do at Wigwam. We’re not satisfied unless thinking of the “Next Big Thing.” We constantly drive to accomplish innovation through our creative process.

Each of our products has a strong benefit to the consumer that is communicated throughout our packaging and marketing materials. Our products are a result of strong creativity, voice of the customer and a trust for one another on our team. The Ultimax® and INgenius® technologies are a testament to our innovative drive.

Why now? That’s easy. Quality. Comfort. Functionality. Innovation. Value. That’s Why Wigwam, Why Now.

Visit us at OR booth #42043 and we’ll be happy to show you why Wigwam is the right choice.


NEWS

Natalie Bell

Venture Out

Portabella Jerky

Rio

Most Surprising Snack

The 16-foot-high A-frame—with its strings of lights, picnic table, and smell of fresh pine—has been a hit at Winter Market for retailers and photographers alike. Says newbie Natalie Oakes: “I think they make the new hire pick up all the wood chips.”

Says GU: The inspiration for this unique flavor comes from that celebratory cold beer many athletes enjoy at the end of a long training session or race event. Says we: It’s the perfect substitute before beer-thirty.

United By Blue

Biggest Boot

Chippewa

The largest size that Chippewa really manufactures is 16, but they have a true size 22 at their booth— manufactured correctly from the inside out. It’s what Shaquille O’Neal would wear if he, say, wanted to chop wood at a forest service cabin in Alaska.

Yummiest Display Idea

Smartwool

Using wheeled baker’s racks and silver cookie sheets to display socks and baselayers? Genius.

Best Place to Hide/Cry/Make a Difference

KEEN’s phone booth

At KEEN’s bright-yellow booth, you can pick a cause (say, rivers or national monuments), pick up the receiver, and deliver your message to DC. No comment on the deaf ears.

64

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

GU’s Hoppy Trails gel

Best Dog

Rio

Rio the 3.5-legged mini Aussie is showstoppingly cute. Literally no one didn’t want to pet this floofy fluffball.

Weirdest Snack

Portabella Jerky

Yes, it might seem weird at first. But according to Carole Opel of Savory Wild, mushrooms are packed with natural protein (10 grams per 2 ounces), B vitamins, fiber, and minerals. “They’re meaty and full of umami, and they don’t lose any nutritional value when they’re dehydrated,” she said.

Friendliest Badge-Checker Ever

Natalie Bell

Checking badges has never been so cordial. Natalie greeted attendees by name as they stepped onto the escalator.

Best Vehicle

Matador Packable Adventure Gear

The giant overlander’s name is Ollie. He gets 15 to 16 miles per gallon, but runs on biodiesel. He’s two years old. He’s been to the top of 14ers. He belongs to Matador’s founder, Chris Clearman—but sometimes the other booth jockeys get to score some #vanlife action, too.

Most Hipster

All of Venture Out

It’s true, we didn’t have enough time or employees to count all the wool blankets, weathered tees, plaid, succulents, fake campfires, and leather straps in the far left corner of the show floor, but even so, we’re absolutely sure it’s more than enough to sweep the category.

Most Hipster Part 2, Commitment Edition

Alpine Provisions

OK, maybe castile soap maker Alpine Provisions isn’t the most hipster brand here, but founder Joshua Scott Onysko’s Day 3 outfit might be: Striped onepiece coveralls, paint-spattered workboots, specs. Dude works it.

PHOTOS BY NICK COTE

Best Place to Get Cozy


THANKS TO OUR 2018 SPONSORS NOVEMBER 8 - 11 , 201 8

|

C O LO R A D O C O N V E N T I O N C E N T E R , D E N V E R , C O

TITLE SPONSORS

PLATINUM SPONSOR

GOLD SPONSORS

SILVER SPONSORS SPONSORS AS OF 10/24/18


PHOTOS BY K ALI PLAT T; LOUISA ALBANESE; NICK COTE

The Daily staff: Producing this magazine is serious business.


NEWS

From the Bottom of Our Hearts

Thanks to the many people and brands who helped us out in ways both measurable and immeasurable. BY THE DAILY STAFF

O

UTDOOR RETAILER LOOKS a little different for us here at The Daily. Instead of perusing the show floor at a leisurely pace, our reporters are sprinting along, looking for all the news that’s fit to print before deadline. Instead of enjoying a cold one at happy hour, our photographers are taking pictures of you enjoying a cold one. Instead of basking in fresh air and natural light, our editors and designers toil away in a hidden corner of the convention center. But when we see a crisp new issue come out every morning, we wouldn’t have it any other way. Many thanks to the following people, places, and things for helping us along the way.

Spotify’s “Old School Metal” playlist • My wife’s banana bread • Xanax • All the coffee • Rio The (Best) Dog (1) • Jennifer the amazing dogsitter • Honey Stinger’s new Cracker n’ Nut Butter bars • Max and Sofia • Seclusion • Brew Dr. Kombucha • Aunt Kali • Hat babysitters • Two uninterrupted nights’ sleep • Puppy snuggles • Phone chargers in unexpected places • Manageable chaos • Sour Patch Kids

(2) • Stormy Kromer hats for dogs • Oreos that are a total knockoff of thin mints • Peanut butter-filled pretzels • The charming gentleman at the front entrance who made us all smile • String cheese • Sushi • The human-size Honey Stinger hornet • The elusive “tropical cherry” sparkling water • Bacon happy hour • Kassondra’s hat (3) • Easter eggs • Comfy Sorel boots • Working reunions with old friends • The peace and quiet on the Street Level • Chocolate • Sufferfest beer (4) • Walking buddies • Mediocre burritos • The art department moonlighting in IT • Low-traffic bathrooms • Videos of my baby running around with a hula hoop • A two-yearold racquetball • Room to think • Everything that rhymes with “innovation •” The amazing RTD Light Rail (20 minutes door to door • BOOM!) • Peanut M&M’s • My Eddie Bauer cap • The dangling of a carrot (beer) at 5 p •m • Blue light-blocking glasses • Gregg's wife's yummy cookies • Cherry cough medicine • Shawnté • The light-hearted, fun-loving Daily team • My incredible colleagues here at The Daily who have busted their asses for this magazine for many years • The finish line • New beginnings.

Visit Us! Textile-Based Product Solutions

Booth 51017-UL

FABRICS THAT PERFORM. THAT’S THE CONCEPT.

2

3 1 4

not

BEST IN SHOW It’s not out yet, but come to Eartheasy Distribution's booth at 36061-UL to see the first units of the world’s most innovative headlamp.

QUAD OPTIC

USB RECHARGE

For your brand's outdoor apparel, Concept III has developed the textile innovations you need by collaborating with the world's leading mills.

100

LUMENS

LIGHT WEIGHT

Using high-performance, eco-friendly material, Dry-Tex is creating the next generation of laminated textiles, all for best-in-class outdoor apparel. In partnership with Dry-Tex, we can turn your brand’s ambitious ideas into reality. CELEBRATING

ANNIVERSARY

www.conceptiii.com

HIGHEST FUNDED HEADLAMP EVER

KNOG.COM.AU


@THESHOW

D I G INT O O U R HI G H LI G HT S O F TH E S H OW’S E V E NT S, E D U CATI O N , A N D M O R E

DAY 4, NOVEMBER 11 Vibram Sole Factor Mobile Lab 9 a.m. Booth #46080-UL

The Vibram Sole Factor Mobile Lab will be resoling shoes in the Vibram booth for $25 per pair, with all proceeds benefitting The Conservation Alliance. Stop by to get an exclusive Vibram Litebase sole for trail running before it’s available elsewhere.

Pin to Win

9 a.m. Booth #39072-UL Stop by the Maine Outdoor Brands booth to check out our Maine map and push a pin in

all the places you’ve been in our great state for a chance to win prizes from Maine Outdoor Brands.

Kathoola Inc. Lightweight Gaiters and Winter Traction Sale to Benefit The Conservation Alliance 9 a.m. Booth #49063-UL

Kahtoola will sell its INSTAgaiter Low and Mid, NANOspikes and MICROspikes with 100 percent of proceeds donated to The Conservation Alliance.

KEEN Better Takes Action T-shirt Sale to Benefit The Conservation Alliance

9 a.m. KEEN Vending Machine in the OR Lobby KEEN sells T-shirts with 100 percent of proceeds donated to The Conservation Alliance.

Toad&Co Sale to Benefit The Conservation Alliance

9 a.m. Booth #37023-UL Toad&Co will sell assorted shirts for men and women to benefit The Conservation Alliance (all day, every day, of the show while supplies last).

Farm to Feet Hiking Sock Sale to Benefit The Conservation Alliance

9 a.m. Booth #42011-UL Farm to Feet will sell its midweight hiking socks for women and men with 100 percent of proceeds donated to The Conservation Alliance (all day, every day, while supplies last).

Chill Angel Sleepwear Sale to Support Animal Friends 9 a.m. Booth #34065-UL

Luxury merino wool pajamas on sale for 50 percent off, while supplies last. Proceeds benefit the Humane Society. Sleep cozy and help animals do the same.

Mountain Khakis Wardrobe

Improvement Program (WIP)

9 a.m. Booth #36031-UL Get outfitted in the Mountain Khakis booth. MK apparel and accessories will be available for purchase and, yep, there’s even a dressing room. Get there early, while it lasts.

Gel Sale for The Conservation Alliance

9 a.m. Booth #42060-UL Show Special on Campfire S’mores Gel: One box of 24 gels for $15. All proceeds will be donated to The Conservation Alliance, while quantities last. Through our GUGives

program, GU launched the Campfire S’more Gel in 2017 to support The Conservation Alliance’s Public Lands Defense Fund. Since its launch, GU has donated $60,000. We are pleased to share that this program will continue into 2019. Visit the GU Booth to sample the gel or make a purchase to support The Conservation Alliance.

Osprey Pack Sale to Benefit Association of Outdoor Recreation and Education 9 a.m. Booth #36039-UL

Osprey is selling new Fall 2019 Transporter Flap Pack and

Tested & Proven

As a recovering Lyme disease patient, and mother of

two based in the beautiful, but tick-rich state of Maine, I do everything I can to protect our family from ticks.

I’m comforted knowing that Insect Shield technology is protecting us always while we enjoy the outdoors. Tested. Proven. Mother approved.

- Heather Hurst

Founder & President, Project Lyme

Look for Insect Shield products from these trusted brands


Transporter Roll Top Pack for $50 each to benefit Association of Outdoor Recreation and Education (AORE). AORE programs connect 1.5 million users to the outdoors annually. Available while supplies last.

PHOTO BY NICK COTE

Top Trend–One Stop Away

the whole day.

Backpack Sale

3 p.m. Booth #37055-UL Deuter will be selling XV 3 roll-top commuter packs and Guide Lite alpine touring packs for $40 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., while supplies last.

10 a.m. Booth #53097-UL

Clever x Choice Panel

Fashion and function lovers, this is an event for you to get freebies that are just one stop away. All you need to do is come visit our booth, have a nice chit-chat, and you will walk away with special gifts—ones that will surely keep the emptyhanded eyeing you for

Clever x Choice panel by Clever x Nature, Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., and Outside. Beer courtesy of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., with the purchase of a Klean Kanteen cup. Benefit Camber Outdoors.

3 p.m. Booth #39005-UL

Left to Right: Paige Harvey, Lindsay Faulding, and Erin Warren at Mile High Spirits


Product

Zone Mystery Ranch in & OUT summit packs. Packable, portable, durable.

Special Advertising Section

This latest concept from Mystery Ranch reaches a new peak in packability. A

daypack that neatly stows away into its

own pocket –delivering ultimate portability. But with the vital extra dimension of

durability –delivered by construction in ultra-lightweight CORDURA® mini-rip

fabric for tear and abrasion resistance.

So it takes climbing every bit as seriously as you do. Featherweight yet ruggedly engineered, it’s rich in features like

contoured shoulder straps and sternum

strap. Designed to give you total comfort and functionality, with a generous 19L

capacity. Yet, amazingly, stuffing down to the size of a small water bottle. The new

IN & OUT summit pack from Mystery Ranch. Total pocket power.

Learn more or buy one today at https://www.mysteryranch.com/in-and-out-pack https://www.mysteryranch.com/in-and-out-pack.

©2018 INVISTA. CORDURA® is a trademark of INVISTA for durable fabric. All other marks referenced herein are property of their respective owners.

Performance Leather Footwear Gloves Tech www.pittards.com

Booth 52030-UL

Featuring the freshest gear on the market today. Here is a sneak peek at what’s new and what’s coming from leading industry companies


MASTHEAD

snewsnet.com

outdoorretailer.com

S H O W S TA F F

STAFF PICKS

V I C E P R E S I D E N T, G R O U P S H O W D I R E C T O R

What’s the coldest temperature you’ve ever experienced, and where?

EDITORIAL

JUGGLER-IN- CHIEF

Kristin Hostetter

-40˚F, Yaak Valley, MT

Marisa Nicholson

marisa.nicholson@outdoorretailer.com SALES DIRECTOR

-30˚F, Mt. Washington summit, NH

SE NIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

khostetter@aimmedia.com

Paul Dillman

MISTRESS OF HYPHENS

paul.dillman@outdoorretailer.com

HOUSE-PROUD TOWN MOUSE

P U B L I S H E R , O U T D O O R R E TA I L E R M A G A Z I N E / T H E D A I LY S E N I O R A C C O U N T E X E C U T I V E , O U T D O O R R E TA I L E R

Elisabeth Kwak-Hefferan

Ryan Johnson

Casey Lyons

I don’t go to cold places.

ryan.johnson@outdoorretailer.com

U N D E R C OV E R A S S - K I C K E R

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Amelia Arvesen

Adam Kingston

aarvesen@aimmedia.com -28˚F, Moran, WY

2˚F, Keystone, CO

adam.kingston@outdoorretailer.com

THE ESSENTIAL TURBO ENGINE

Erme Catino, Kassondra Cloos, M.T. Elliott, Courtney Holden, Micah Ling, Cassandra Majewski, Brigid Mander, Elizabeth Miller, Evelyn Spence, Carolyn Webber Alder, Ryan Wichelns, Jenny Willden

-37˚F, Vernadsky Research Base, Antarctica

DESIGN & PHOTOGRAPHY

Dave Nielson

dave.nielson@outdoorretailer.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE -49˚F, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

Robert O’Quinn

robert.oquinn@outdoorretailer.com

Jennifer Holcomb

Mike Leister

jennifer.holcomb@outdoorretailer.com

Kenneth Doory

MARKETING DIRECTOR

Sarah Langston

sarah.langston@outdoorretailer.com

PHOTO PRINCESS

Louisa Albanese T H E D O G FAT H E R

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

SENIOR MARKETING DIRECTOR

S TAY- AT- H O M E A S T R O N AU T

G A L A C T I C V I C E R OY O F C O M P U T E R E XC E L L E N C E

-33˚F, La Brévine, Switzerland

Krista Dill

krista.dill@outdoorretailer.com

M A R K E T I N G C O M M U N I C AT I O N S S P E C I A L I S T -33˚F, Moran, WY

Nick Cote

Natalie Generalovich

natalie.generalovich@outdoorretailer.com MARKETING MANAGE R

Maxwell Frost

PRODUCTION

maxwell.frost@outdoorretailer.com

Joy Kelley

M A R K E T I N G C O M M U N I C AT I O N S S P E C I A L I S T

A D C O O R D I N AT O R

mason.tobias@outdoorretailer.com

PRE PRE S S MANAGE R

Caitlin O’Connor

PREPRESS SPECIALIST

Idania Mentana SALES

SNEWS SALE S MANAGE R

Susie von Mettenheim

303-253-6441 svonmettenheim@aimmedia.com

Mason Tobias

P U B L I C R E L AT I O N S /C O M M U N I C AT I O N S M A N A G E R

Lisa Ramsperger

Lisa.ramsperger@outdoorretailer.com C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

Raymond Kang

raymond.kang@outdoorretailer.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Marisa Lowey-Ball

marisa.lowey-ball@outdoorretailer.com PRODUCTION/ TR AFFIC MANAGE R

Laurie Stiglitz

laurie.stiglitz@outdoorretailer.com BRAND DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

Larry Harrison

larry.harrison@outdoorretailer.com Copyright 2018 © Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc.

PRESIDENT & CEO

Andrew W. Clurman S E N I O R V I C E P R E S I D E N T, CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER & TREASURER

Michael Henry

C H I E F I N N OVAT I O N O F F I C E R

R E TA I L R E L AT I O N S M A N A G E R

Joe Bustos

joe.bustos@outdoorretailer.com R E TA I L R E L AT I O N S M A N A G E R

Chris Sears

chris.sears@outdoorretailer.com S E N I O R O P E R AT I O N S D I R E C T O R

Cathy Griffith

Jonathan Dorn

cathy.griffith@emeraldexpo.com

MANAGING DIRECTOR

O P E R AT I O N S D I R E C T O R

Sharon Houghton

V I C E P R E S I D E N T, AU D I E N C E D E V E L O P M E N T

Julie Freedman

julie.freedman@outdoorretailer.com

Thomas Masterson

O P E R AT I O N S M A N A G E R /O P E N A I R D E M O

V I C E P R E S I D E N T, P R O D U C T I O N A N D M A N U FA C T U R I N G

kirsten.khoury@outdoorretailer.com

Kirsten Khoury

Barb Van Sickle

R E G I S T R AT I O N O P E R AT I O N S M A N A G E R

V I C E P R E S I D E N T, P E O P L E A N D P L A C E S

kristen.novick@emeraldexpo.com

JoAnn Thomas

AIM BOARD CHAIR

Efrem Zimbalist III

Kristen Novick

R E G I S T R AT I O N O P E R AT I O N S C O O R D I N AT O R

Kylie Sanders

kylie.sanders@emeraldexpo.com E V E N T S O P E R AT I O N S C O O R D I N AT O R

Nicole Cho

nicole.cho@outdoorretailer.com S P O N S O R S H I P S O P E R AT I O N S C O O R D I N AT O R

Bri Vivanco

bri.vivanco@outdoorretailer.com B ILLING MANAGE R

Sara Burns

sara.burns@outdoorretailer.com

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

71


BEST OF BOOTH

2018

1

1. Shades of the Nazgûl on the fullbody mannequins. 2. From certain angles, the neon bars looked like a jungle gym. 3. From other angles, they looked like the outlines of famous mountains. 4. The brand makes technical outerwear in all colors.

A Different Light BLACKYAK breaks all the rules with its brooding, neon-lit booth.

I

F THERE’S A blueprint for booths at this show, it includes a whole lotta wood, wool, cotton, mulch, and greenery. So let’s just say BLACKYAK is working from a different playbook. You could call the Seoul, South Koreabased brand’s booth flashy, but that’s only because there are actual flashing lights beckoning showgoers to examine the technical gear encased within their open, geometric frames. The rest of the booth is black walls, black floor, and black benches with red accents (a nod to the brand’s logo), all the better to showcase the light show. The angular, three-dimensional structures might look like pure industrial chic, but take another peek: They’re made to be a silhouette of the Himalayas, which continue to inspire the brand’s aesthetic, says Philip Krätzig, head of marketing. The lights blink and flash through changing colors that represent the palette for the upcoming season’s gear. The booth “screams a little bit,” says Krätzig. But the lights also evoke a techy vibe, and, “We’re a technical brand.” BLACKYAK went minimalist on its booth design to ensure product would be front and center, and a similarly styled booth the brand exhibited at ISPO earlier this year won a German Design Award for its construction. That’s just another reminder that thinking outside the box can pay off, big-time. –Kassondra Cloos

72

THE DAILY DAY 4 / NOVEMBER 11, 2018

2

3 4

PHOTOS BY NICK COTE

WINTER MARKET


OUR MISSION

DEVELOPING TIMELESS, FUNCTIONAL & SUSTAINABLE OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT.

The Arctic fox – this cunning and inquisitive little predator fascinated our founder, Åke Nordin, so much that he named his outdoor equipment company with its Swedish name – Fjällräven. The fox’s ability to survive in the extreme Arctic climate has inspired admiration in all those who spend time in these remote uplands.

In Sweden, an experienced walker or adventurer who traverses the great Scandinavian outdoors is known as “a true Arctic Fox”. And a true arctic fox was what the young Åke Nordin wanted to be when he grew up. We are the arctic fox.

fjallraven.us


BOOTH 42031-UL


OUR MISSION

DEVELOPING TIMELESS, FUNCTIONAL & SUSTAINABLE OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT.

The Arctic fox – this cunning and inquisitive little predator fascinated our founder, Åke Nordin, so much that he named his outdoor equipment company with its Swedish name – Fjällräven. The fox’s ability to survive in the extreme Arctic climate has inspired admiration in all those who spend time in these remote uplands.

In Sweden, an experienced walker or adventurer who traverses the great Scandinavian outdoors is known as “a true Arctic Fox”. And a true arctic fox was what the young Åke Nordin wanted to be when he grew up. We are the arctic fox.

BOOTH 42031-UL

fjallraven.us

Outdoor Retailer Winter Market 2018 Day 4  
Outdoor Retailer Winter Market 2018 Day 4