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ORD OU TDOOR RE TAILER DAILY | POWERED BY SNE WS

NEWS OUR WAY OR THE HIGHWAY

Several industry leaders urge the Utah government to shape up on public lands—or risk losing OR.

PAGE

9

GEAR STILL MORE NEW STUFF!

The latest in apparel, ski poles, avalanche safety gear, footwear, trail snacks, tents, and much more.

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45

3 DAY

EVENTS SEE AND BE SEEN

Where to learn, schmooze, score deals, and drain a glass for a good cause today.

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JA N UA RY 1 2 , 2 017

1

Jerry Stritzke

PRESIDENT AND CEO, REI

POWER

Introducing

THE WORLD’S FINEST WORK PANTS

FOR THE NEW GENERATION OF WORKERS.

The 10 people who run this industry

The official publication of:

BOOTH 39159


©2016 WILLIAMSON-DICKIE MFG. CO.

GREATER THAN ALL OUTDOORS

GET THE GOODS AT WALLS.COM


ORD OU TDOOR RE TAILER DAILY | POWERED BY SNE WS

NEWS OUR WAY OR THE HIGHWAY

Several industry leaders urge the Utah government to shape up on public lands—or risk losing OR.

PAGE

9

GEAR STILL MORE NEW STUFF!

The latest in apparel, ski poles, avalanche safety gear, footwear, trail snacks, tents, and much more.

PAGE

45

3 DAY

EVENTS SEE AND BE SEEN

Where to learn, schmooze, score deals, and drain a glass for a good cause today.

PAGE

74

JA N UA RY 1 2 , 2 017

1

Jerry Stritzke

PRESIDENT AND CEO, REI

POWER The 10 people who run this industry

The official publication of:


E X P E R I E NC E K H O M BU AT W I N T E R O R B O O T H 29155 W k hombu . com

From the mountain trails to the city streets, Khombu’s All-Season Technology System has you covered. We worry about the weather so you don’t have to. #allseaonsallthetime


FUNCTION. FASHION. INNOVATION. from Fall to Winter

Official Aprés Ski Boot Provider to the U.S. Ski Team

since 1969


©2017 INVISTA. CORDURA® is a registered trademark of INVISTA for durable fabrics.

A 50-year love affair with adventure. As we celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the CORDURA® brand, we look back at how far we’ve come. At all the amazing products we’ve been fortunate enough to be a part of. It’s been an incredible adventure. Now who’s ready for another one?

Help us celebrate at booth #39213. Bring your stories.

cordura.com/50years


CONTENTS

Day 3

Outdoor Retailer Daily

PHOTO BY CAVEMAN COLLECTIVE

Tower of Power: Industry movers and shakers gather under this roof.

COVER

NEWS

23 The Big 10

9Flexing Our Muscles

How do the industry’s top rainmakers wield their power? For our #3, it’s making sustainability easier for everyone. For #6, it’s bridging play and politics. And #1? Let’s just say, if you want to succeed in this biz, get your gear in his store.

Led by former Black Diamond Equipment CEO Peter Metcalf, a group of industry leaders are speaking out against Utah’s public lands policies. The message: Protect our lands—or prepare for Outdoor Retailer to pack up and move out of state.

“RUE MAPP THOUGHT SHE WAS STARTING A BLOG THAT MIGHT BE READ BY A FEW FRIENDS—BUT SHE WAS STARTING A MOVEMENT.”

EVENTS

74 Parties, Speakers,

Workshops & More

Make the most of the show by filling your calendar with our roundup of top events, seminars, presentations, and happy hours.

—MARIKA HOLMGREN, FOUNDER, DO GOOD EVENTS PAGE 78

JANUARY 12, 2017 DAY 3

3


CONTENTS

Day 3

Outdoor Retailer Daily

NEWS

GEAR

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The TPP may be on its way out, but stakeholders hope to still reduce tariffs and protect the environment.

See what these three newbie exhibitors have to offer.

12

Inspiration Galore

New Kids on the Block

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Editors’ Picks

Conservation Alliance Breakfast speaker Auden Schendler fired up the crowd; Outdoor Inspiration Awards

A ski pole with sensors, anti-fog spray, and a stainless steel wine bottle: Just a few of the new products piquing our interest.

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48

Showgoers kick back at Tuesday night’s see-andbe-seen events.

Don’t miss these 25 examples of the latest and greatest winter gear.

OR Knows How to Party

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Best of Booth

There are tons of trailers on the floor, but no one is using the prop better than this winner.

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Stay Hydrated

It’s Day 3. Let’s be real: Your top workout is a classic SLC pub crawl.

59

Q&A

Meet Chuck Millsaps of Great Outdoor Provision Company, Brown People Camping’s Ambreen Tariq, and Newell Brands’ Joe Flannery.

New Product Gallery

38

LOGISTICS

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Show Info & Maps

Wonder where to fuel up on food or what the rules are for bringing your dog to the show? Turn to our collection of maps, regulations, and show information.

84

The Hot Sheet

Crush your Day 3 with our guide to the best, coolest, and most fun happenings at the show. Plus: Win free Kodiak boots!

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Opinion

Big City Mountaineers’ Bix Firer argues that the key to political unity is getting outside.

ON THE COVER

REI President and CEO Jerry Stritzke photographed for ORD by Caveman Collective.

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

59

PHOTOS BY CAVEMAN TK COLLECTIVE; COURTESY (3); DAYS 1 AND 2 COVER PHOTOS BY CAVEMAN COLLECTIVE

Trade Secrets

45


PRIMALOFT® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF PRIMALOFT, INC. ©2017 PRIMALOFT, INC.

IT BREATHES WITH YOU. PrimaLoft® Insulation Active breathes harder or softer whenever you do. This innovative insulation technology is warm for the stretch, breathable for the run and maintains 92% of its warmth when wet. Feel the new standard in active breathability at booth # 40043.


When it comes to quality, look to the Original Article. After 100 New England winters, it’s no wonder a little Yankee ingenuity would invent a whole new kind of fabric – PolarFleece ®. Warmer, lighter, and far more durable, it was a fashion icon that revolutionized what we wear when we go outside.

Quality Knits - Fuzzy Comfort Modern Performance

E RE D POW

BY

CREATE YOUR OWN CUSTOM PULLOVER! Visit us at OR Winter Market Booth #32093, or go to POLARFLEECE.COM


Our invention has been relentlessly copied since. But try as they might, they just can’t match the soft hand, quality knit, and sheer versatility of genuine PolarFleece®. In fact, once you’ve worn the original article, you’ll never go back to cheap imitations again. Choose your own color combinations.

That’s why we’re bringing back the PolarFleece® Pullover. Come by our booth and we can sew one up for you, made to order. Warm and comfortable anywhere, goes with anything. This is the fabric that started it all.

®

100% Recycled & Made in U.S.A.

©2017 Polartec, LLC. Polartec®, PolarFleece® are registered trademarks of Polartec, LLC.

Watch your pullover come to life!


Learn from the past.

ŠThe Rockport Company, LLC. All rights reserved.

Booth# 34175


NEWS

WHAT’S HAPPENING OUT THERE

Straight Outta Utah?

Peter Metcalf and Yvon Chouinard call for a boycott over the state’s “all-out assault” on protected public lands.

PHOTO BY LOUISA ALBANESE

F

OR DECADES, UTAH’S granite mountains have served as a backdrop to one of the outdoor industry’s biggest shows. But as the state fights public lands protection, it runs against the interest of hundreds of brands who put their dollars here. Now, some big names are threatening to discontinue exhibiting at Outdoor Retailer as a protest against Utah’s elected officials. Patagonia CEO and President Rose Marcario said Wednesday that 2017 would be the last time the brand exhibits at OR in Salt Lake City if Utah Gov. Gary Herbert doesn’t stop fighting against the newly created Bears Ears National Monument and the Antiquities Act, which allowed President Obama to designate that land. Patagonia delivered a copy of a letter from founder Yvon Chouinard to Herbert’s office on Wednesday, threatening to tie Patagonia’s presence here to Utah’s stance on public lands. “I think the show itself is a great place for us to talk about our initatives like 1% for the Planet and to meet buyers and partners, but we wouldn’t attend the show if we felt the governor was not protecting the Bears Ears monument and the Antiquities Act,” Marcario said, adding that the industry has a vested interest in public lands for recreation. “I think coming out with these statements is really important to get the public discourse going. It’s really important that people understand the ramifications of the actions that could be taken here.” On Tuesday, founder and former CEO of Black Diamond Peter Metcalf—who was recognized at the Outdoor Inspiration Awards Wednesday for his advocacy efforts—spoke out against Utah’s political leaders’ actions to “starve funding from federal land management” in an op-ed in The Salt Lake Tribune. On Wednesday, Utah Lieutenant Governor Spencer Cox came to the show and responded directly to the threats. During a conference with Salt Lake City media at Kühl’s booth, Cox said the state has a good working relationship with the show and OIA, and that he’s not concerned about the possibility of Outdoor Retailer leaving the state. But losing OR would cost Utah a lot: The show reportedly brings $80 million annually to Utah’s economy. He spoke with Amy Roberts, executive director of OIA, earlier in the day before holding meetings with Utah-based Kühl and Black Diamond, plus CamelBak, whose parent company, Vista Outdoor, is based here. Roberts said there has been continual concern over the years about Utah’s protection of public lands, and the OIA will continue to listen to

(From left) Utah Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox; Black Diamond CEO John Walbrecht; Tom Adams, director of Utah’s Office of Outdoor Recreation

members when considering the appropriate venue for the show while keeping it located it in a place that meets industry requirements. A joint statement from OIA and Outdoor Retailer read, “We’ve always had an open and honest relationship with the governor and the congressional delegation, but we must be clear that protection of America’s public lands, including those in Utah, are critical and any threat to their protection is a threat to the outdoor industry.” “I don’t think one person speaks for the entire industry,” Cox said. “We love Mr. Metcalf. Every six months we get one of these [op-eds] from him like clockwork, and that’s OK. That’s important, to be able to discuss his point of view. But we have a great relationship with the outdoor retailers, and we will continue to have that relationship.” He rejected Metcalf’s language, that Utah has launched an “all-out assault” on public lands. “We have these incredible outdoors and we want to protect it,” he said. “We have different ideas about how we should protect it, but that doesn’t mean it’s an ‘all-out assault.’” Kühl President Kevin Boyle, however, said that if Utah change, Kühl is serious about leaving the show.

In Utah alone, outdoor recreation drives $12 billion in annual spending and directly powers 122,000 jobs, according to the Outdoor Industry Association. But Utah’s elected officials are spending too much of that money on private interests that decimate the environment, Boyle said. Talking with Cox Wednesday only seemed to reassure him that the best way to get Utah officials’ attention is with actions that affect the state’s wallet. “They like to tell you what you want to hear, but it doesn’t matter what people think or what they say, it matters what they do,” he said. Current Black Diamond CEO John Walbrecht said his company has no plans to leave the state, whether as its headquarters or as participants in the show. “Utah is our home,” Walbrecht said. “Peter brought it here and it’s staying here. We love Peter and we know he just wants what’s best.” –Carolyn Webber and Kassondra Cloos

The News in Brief Turn to page 10 for more news.

JANUARY 12, 2017 DAY 3

9


NEWS COMMERCE

Trade Secrets

The TPP may be dead, but the fight isn’t over for those seeking to ease trade and spare the environment.

T

HE TRANS-PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP held the Outdoor Industry Association’s hopes for longlasting relief from the tariffs that hit gear when it moves around the world. President Obama’s tried to sell it as a job-growth measure for the U.S., and retailers, including Walmart, JCPenney, Gap, Michael Kors, and Dick’s Sporting Goods, sent letters to Congress urging their support and pointing to the $2.8 billion in duties on U.S. imports. However, the deal was on life support even before the election, and has been declared unfixable by the president-elect. “I think it’s dead,” says Amy Roberts, executive director of the Outdoor Industry Association. “I do think there will be an attempt to have some form of that in the future, but we’re probably one or two years off, at least.” In their vocal support for the TPP, a trade deal involving 11 Pacific Rim nations—Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, and Vietnam—that would loosen the tariffs brands pay on products manufactured abroad, OIA characterized it as an opportunity to export the industry’s social and environmental values. But the deal has long been subject to criticism, even from within the industry, over the broad but unenforceable promises it makes in that realm. “We believe that the TPP is not coming back and that is not thanks to Donald Trump, but it’s thanks to the years of internationally coordinated campaigning,” says Ilana Solomon, director of the Sierra Club’s Responsible Trade Program. “[Those campaigns] have been working for more than five years to expose the threat of this pact to workers, communities, and environments.” While OIA’s team in D.C. ramps up the emphasis of the industry’s interest in domestic manufacturing as they introduce themselves to the incoming trade team, the work continues to ease the industry’s “unnaturally high tariffs,” which can run as high as 40 percent on footwear and apparel. “With TPP on ice, we have an opportunity to focus on outdoor-specific interests,” says Rich Harper, manager of international trade for OIA. Those efforts will center around “miscellaneous trade bills” that Congress routinely passes to temporarily suspend or reduce import tariffs. OIA has used those in the past to save outdoor companies and customers more than $30 million; the last round cut footwear tariffs from 40 percent to zero. The Obama administration is reviewing one that would alleviate the 17-percent tariff on bags and backpacks and is expected to make a decision prio to the Jan. 20 inauguration.

Twenty proposals covering other outdoor gear, including footwear, are also working their way through review and Congressional approval. These miscellaneous tariff bills apply when there’s no domestic manufacturing and the loss to the U.S. treasury won’t exceed $500,000. That money could instead go into innovations, producing better products and, potentially, even lowering prices for consumers. They’re also looking to the renewal due this year of the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP), a program adopted by the U.S. and 26 industrialized nations to boost economic growth in developing countries by lowering their tariffs to increase their export markets. That program holds promise for brands interested in diversifying their manufacturing footprint in other nations. Like other trade agreements, the GSP threatens nations with lost trade privileges for failing to meet environmental or social standards— and it has been enforced in the past. “There are obviously huge benefits in big, multilateral trade agreements, and TPP would have provided that,” Harper says. “That being said, we don't want to simply wait for TPP to be revived, and we clearly have had success in the past in pursuing

“WITH TPP ON ICE, WE HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY TO FOCUS ON OUTDOORSPECIFIC INTERESTS," SAYS RICH HARPER, MANAGER OF INTERNTIONAL TRADE FOR OIA.

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

outdoor-specific initiatives. In some ways, it may be easier to get our members to rally behind those initiatives because they're clearly targeted at their priorities—but TPP had that as well.” Opponents of the TPP have long argued that its environmental components allow the continued trade of goods including shark fins, palm oil, and elephant ivory, and include generally weak language that does not require corrective action and is unlikely to be enforced. Sierra Club charges that TPP’s environmental chapter “lacks ambition” by calling for environmental protections weaker than those already in place: “This sets the bar so low for compliance that the TPP could not be used to compel meaningful action,” says Sierra Club's Solomon. “It had an environmental chapter wide in issues it covered, but in enforcement, shallow,” Solomon says. OIA maintains that the trade deal is the best we’ve seen in terms of its environmental measures, but Roberts says perhaps scrapping that deal presents a chance to press the issue. While policy languishes, power still lies with the people. Even without trade deals calling for environmental and social progress, consumer demand does, and market pressure has and may continue to move that issue forward even when trade deals disappear. —Elizabeth Miller

The News in Brief DYNAFIT FLEET STOLEN

a Dynafit representative Mike Eisenbrown woke up to an empty driveway on Wednesday morning at a VRBO in the Sugar House neighborhood just southeast of the Salt Palace. He has since filed a police report regarding the missing, unlabeled 16-foot cargo trailer and the full fleet of demo skis and boots therein, valued at $30,000. Eisenbrown said police told him the robbery may be linked to a series of similar, recent thefts in the Salt Lake City area targeting construction trailers containing commercial tools. “We’re just hopeful they’ll open it up and have no idea what to do with all the skis they find in there,” Eisenbrown says. –Corey Buhay

THE NORTH FACE PRESIDENT STEPS DOWN

a For the second Outdoor Retailer show in a row, there’s a shakeup at the upper levels of VF Corporation. Following the departure of Smartwool’s Mark Satkiewicz in August, brand

sources are confirming that The North Face President Todd Spaletto left the company last Friday after 19 years. Spaletto joined VF Corporation in 1998, eventually becoming president of The North Face in 2011. “Scott Baxter, group president of VF’s Outdoor & Action Sports Americas coalition, is managing the day-to-day responsibilities until a replacement is named,” said VF Senior Director of Corporate Communications Craig Hodges. According to Senior Director of Brand Communications, Ann Krcik, VF will begin an external search for Spaletto’s replacement in the coming weeks. Details surrounding Spaletto’s departure weren’t made public, but The North Face has experienced declining sales. The brand’s revenues fell 1 percent in the third quarter of 2016 and inventory reductions forced VF to revise its expected growth downward for the coming quarter. Spaletto could not be reached for comment. —Ryan Wichelns


NEWS INSPIRATION

Giants in Our Midst

Outdoor Inspiration Awards recognize six individuals and companies for outstanding contributions to the industry.

Kris Tompkins

T

HE MORE PEOPLE GO OUTDOORS, the better off everyone in the industry will be. That’s why last night, six individuals and companies were recognized at the Outdoor Inspiration Awards, sponsored by adidas Outdoors. “[The awards] celebrate the accomplishments and achievements of those who are going above and beyond to get people outdoors and share the outdoor experience with those who may not otherwise have an opportunity,” said Kate Lowery, director of communications and publications for Outdoor Retailer. The Outdoor Inspiration Awards named Kris Tompkins, an American conservationist and former CEO of Patagonia, Inc., winner of the Lifetime Achievement Award because of her dedication to preserving wilderness conservation areas in South America and for her initiative at Patagonia to donate a portion of their profits to environmental organizations, setting an example for the rest of the industry. Another former CEO, Peter Metcalf, won the Individual Award for continually advocating for an outdoor lifestyle and the wild places we recreate in while working for Black Diamond Equipment. Tahoe Mountain Sports took away the Retailer Award and Veterans Expeditions won in the nonprofit category. JanSport joined this year as a sponsor for the Manufacturer Award, given to KEEN for its multiyear conservation campaign Live Monumental. Lillian Rose Weihert, president of Boy Scouts of America Crew 191, won the Youth Award for instructing boy scouts in clinics on fishing and angling. —Carolyn Webber

DEFENDING OUR COMMON GROUND

The Conservation Alliance Breakfast on Day 2 was packed by 7:30 am, presumably with people eager to celebrate a successful 2016 for The Conservation Alliance: The nonprofit protected more than 5 million acres of land and successfully pushed for the designation of five new national monuments. Now, with an impending Trump administration, protecting those beloved acres and river miles has become more important than ever to help unite a politically divided country and keep environmental policy resolute. But when the main speaker, Aspen Skiing Company Sustainability VP and Protect Our Winters Board Chair Auden Schendler, bent to the microphone, the futility of conservation victories alone became apparent.

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Conserved land is vital to the recreation business, but if we can’t keep the world from getting hotter, he said, that land will wither and our industry with it. “Cutting your carbon footprint 20 percent isn’t going to solve the problem,” Schendler said. Besides, that’s easy. Uncontroversial. He paraphrased Yvon Chouinard: “If you’re not pissing people off, you’re not trying hard enough.” Instead, he called for businesses to do the crazy thing. The scary thing. The thing that will get media coverage. Boycott unsustainably sourced products, dive into the grueling but vital work of lobbying for climate change legislation, and divert time and creativity into activating consumers and representatives alike. “It’s going to be hard," he said. "It’s going to

hurt. And the solution might not come in your lifetime. But that’s what human beings do. We fight impossible battles.” We fight for a better world for the next generation, he argued, and for the quiet, wild places where we find solace. Schendler also emphasized the things that unite us: the hope found in children and the flash of beauty in the twisting shimmer of a brook trout. He called the room, by then too enraptured to wipe away tears, to throw themselves into the fight we can’t avoid, to come at it with skin under fingernails and blood in teeth if we have to. Because if anything will bring us together over the next four years, this will: the battle for our planet, our business, our children, and our common ground. —Corey Buhay

PHOTO BY JAMES Q. MARTIN

Auden Schendler moved a standing room-only crowd to tears and a chair-toppling standing ovation.


Look up frostbite on the internet. Yeah, we wouldn’t want that either.

ZIPPO HAND WARMERS. KEEP YOUR DIGITS TOASTY. ®

Rugged and reusable, these eco-friendly heaters come in a 6 and 12-hour size. It’s a take-along furnace that fits in your pocket.

STOP BY BOOTH #BR343 REALTREE AP HD ®2006 of Jordan Outdoor Enterprises, Ltd., all rights reserved.

Z IP P O O UTDO O R . C O M


SCENE

CAPTURING THE SHOW’S KEY MOMENTS

Party Hopping

From Star Trek-meets-gym-class styling at the Fashion Show to classic Nepalese food with Sherpa Adventure Gear, Day 1 celebrations kicked off the show with fun in every form. 1

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1. Urban neutrals and metallic shimmers caught eyes and camera flashes at the Extraordinary Journey Fashion Show. 2. Soft lights and buffet-style Sherpa fare made for a cozy evening at the Sherpa Adventure Gear Fund dinner. 3. Bottomless refills and stainless steel pints supporting One Percent for the Planet fueled a party atmosphere at Patagonia’s happy hour. 4. MiiR’s outthe-door cocktail party concluded that there’s no better way to fund clean drinking water than by hydrating with a mug of Moscow mule. 5. Dressed-down styles and earthy tones argue that weather-ready and runway-ready aren’t mutually exclusive.

PHOTOS BY LAUREN DANILEK

4


Come See the Latest GORE-TEX® Product Innovations. Booth #33039

THE BETTER WE CARE FOR YOU, THE LESS YOU THINK ABOUT US. NOTHING PROTECTS YOU LIKE GORE-TEX ® PRODUCTS.

GORE-TEX® PRODUCTS HEAD TO TOE Durably waterproof, windproof and breathable.

gore-tex.com/protect

© 2016 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. GORE-TEX®, GUARANTEED TO KEEP YOU DRY ®, GORE®, and designs are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.


SCENE BEST OF BOOTH

ORD

Best of Booth Winter Market

2017

Small Booth

#vanlife

The Normal Brand shows how to do portable booths right.

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1 3

1. The big barn doors slide open to expose the whole interior of the trailer. 2. Sansone said they went “shopping” in their parents’ house to decorate. 3. Product is prominently displayed inside the trailer. 4. Everything inside the trailer is designed to complement the rustic theme of their clothing.

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

4 PHOTOS BY LAUREN DANILEK

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railers and vans make the ideal small booth: They’re easy to transport, clearly define a brand’s territory, and can be built at home. But they’ve also become something of a cliché. It seems like everyone loads their camper full of product and rolls it into the Salt Palace. The Normal Brand (VO428) broke through the monotony by perfecting the use and design. “We kept it on brand,” said Conrad Sansone, one of three brothers to start The Normal Brand and to redesign this 1969 trailer. Clad in rustic, dark woods, Sansone said they wanted the van to stick to the themes of their apparel. And the knickknacks and antique-looking objects scattered amongst the T-shirts and jackets? “That’s all stuff from our parents’ house,” said Sansone, emphasizing that they’re a family business. “My mother was not the happiest.” Large sliding barn doors on the camper’s side make the whole interior visible to passers-by, and, according to Sansone, hopefully get them inside to look at product. The whole thing almost went down the tubes when the trailer was caught in a blizzard on the way to the Salt Palace last week. According to Sansone, they spent 18 hours at or below 20 miles per hour, but they slid in the garage doors just in time to step up the camper genre. —Ryan Wichelns


UN1TED A great bike pack deserves a revolutionary reservoir. And that’s why Dakine teamed up with HydraPak. Our advanced reservoirs are 100% BPA free, ultra-durable and have a lifetime Beyond™ lifetime guarantee. The #1 choice for technical hydration for over a decade.

2 L RESERVOIR BY HYDRAPAK — SEEKER 15 L BACKPACK BY DAKINE

ADVENTURE DRIVEN HYDRATION

Get the details at hydrapak.com


FITNESS

Tour de Drinks

Venture away from the Salt Palace to find nightlife beyond the happy hours. BY ORD STAFF

300 W

200 W

W Temple

Main Street

State Street

1st Ave N Salt Palace

S Temple

1. The cozy Beer Hive features more than 200 beers (their beer list is nearly seven pages long) that you can set down on an icy bar, designed to keep it cold through your last sip. Drink this Desert Edge Latter Day Stout

100 S

2. Red Rock features two of its own creations on tap, plus a selection of bottled high-alcohol creations. Drink this The award-winning Organic Zwickel Bier, a take on an unfiltered, unpasteurized medieval lager.

1 Gallivan Center

7

3. Popular Street Pub claims not to serve your typical bar food. Their pizza is homemade and burgers never frozen which, when combined with $2 microbrew pints on Tuesdays, makes it a great one-stop-shop. Drink this Squatters Hop Rising

3 2

200 S

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4. Squatters joined forces with Wasatch Brewery in Park City, so you get double the craft in a single location. Wasatch’s Devastator comes recommended to anyone looking for a creamy, caramelly double bock. Drink this Squatters Midnight Pale Ale

Broadway

6

Pioneer Park

5 Public Library

5. If you’re looking for a little more than just drinks, The Green Pig features blues nights, acoustic shows, local bands, or DJs almost every night. Drink this Moscow mule 6. Gracie’s has one of the most extensive wine selections in the list, and serves some of the most highly rated food for that mid-crawl refuel. Drink this Black Berry Basil Cocktail 7. Patrick’s is right next to the Salt Palace, but it will feel a little off the beaten path. A popular hideaway for locals, it feels like a neighborhood bar in the heart of downtown. Drink this Fernet Branca 8. If there’s a game on, Lumpy’s is the place to be, claiming to carry everything on one of their TVs. And if not, start your own sporting event around the free pool table. Drink this A shot of Jameson

2

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University

500 S

7

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KNOW THE LAWS

Salt Lake is known to have some slightly touchy laws for their libations, so just know what to expect when you hit the streets. Any beer on tap is required to be 4.0% ABV or less. Anything greater than that must be sold from the bottle. At restaurants, you’re required to order food with your alcohol (but not at bars or clubs), and don’t expect to be able to watch your server mix your drinks—that can only happen behind the “Zion Curtain.” Depending on the establishment’s license, last call is between midnight and 1 am at the latest. You can have more than one drink in front of you at a time, but no doubles or “sidecars.”

PHOTOS BY LAUREN DANILEK

It’s almost over. Celebrate another crazy week by roaming the blocks surrounding the Salt Palace for a good old-fashioned pub crawl. All these spots are within just few minutes' walk to help optimize your night and drown your hectic week.


T H E U LT I M AT E

TRAVEL & ADVENTURE UNDERWEAR

Quest 2.0 National Geographic named it the ultimate travel underwear. Now it’s even better. It’s made from ultralight, quick-drying, pindot mesh fabric for wash-and-go wearability. Featuring SAXX’s proprietary BallPark PouchTM technology.


CHRIS WARNER FOUNDER AND CEO, EARTH TREKS, INC.

MATT FEENEY CO-FOUNDER AND DIRECTOR OF ADVANCEMENT, ADAPTIVE ADVENTURES

A FORCE FOR OUTDOOR PARTICIPATION. The outdoors is for everyone—and we’re fighting to keep it that way. Because the outdoor industry thrives on inclusion, we’re joining forces to provide transformative outdoor experiences. Join OIA and be part of a powerful force for meaningful change. outdoorindustry.org


OIA INDUSTRY LUNCH: POLICY THURSDAY, JANUARY 12 | 11:30 AM – 1 PM SALON D, SLC MARRIOTT DOWNTOWN AT CITY CREEK

YOU CAN’T DO BUSINESS ON A DEAD PLANET:

A PATH FORWARD ON CLIMATE CHANGE The surprising outcome of the 2016 presidential election signals a dramatic shift for climate change policy. The next administration has pledged to defund federal climate change mitigation and will withdraw from international climate agreements. What do we do now? Join us for an important discussion about where we go from here and finding a way forward—together. Speakers from Protect Our Winters, Climate Action Campaign, CERES/BICEP and Outdoor Industry Association. OIA Industry Lunch live broadcast powered by

MAKE AN IMPACT IN WASHINGTON, D.C. JOIN US AT THE OIA CAPITOL SUMMIT IN APRIL We’re making sure the impact of our outdoor industry jobs doesn’t go unnoticed. Get a sneak peek of our impact on the U.S. economy at the OIA Capitol Summit in April.

WHY YOUR OIA MEMBERSHIP MATTERS Becoming part of OIA means collaborating to achieve real solutions in the areas of sustainable business, outdoor recreation and trade policy and participation. Join OIA at outdoorindustry.org/membership

outdoorindustry.org


I N B R I TA I N I T R A I N S O V E R 1 0 0 D AY S A Y E A R , S O W E K N O W W H A T M A K E S A G O O D R A I N B O O T. F R O M B E I N G W AT E R P R O O F ( O B V I O U S LY ! ) A N D H A N D C R A F T E D U S I N G N AT U R A L R U B B E R TO E N H A N C E D T R E A D G R I P S A N D T H E FA C T T H AT W E T E S T E V E R Y S T Y L E TO W I T H S TA N D N E G AT I V E T E M P E R AT U R E S. E V E RY R A I N Y DAY C A N N O W B E A L I T T L E B R I G H T E R .

V I E W T H E N E W C O L L E C T I O N AT B O OT H 29165W o r c o n t a c t u s a t : T: 917 676 7254 E: u sa.show r oom@∆ oule s . c om


FEATURE

the

POWER Players

Meet the 10 most influential personalities in the outdoor industry right now. These leaders are doing more than succeeding on the job. They are moving the industry forward to create new ways of doing business in a volatile world. By Doug Schnitzspahn

T

HE OUTDOOR INDUSTRY is not often portrayed as a highpower business. We like to think of it as a club where the business of building gear and slaving over spreadsheets is secondary to spending time outdoors. But industry veterans know the truth: We play in a very competitive market, one that demands real talent, innovation, and drive. And we are surrounded by leaders who wield real power, not just in our fleecy kingdom, but in the halls of government and finance. The numbers tell the story. According to the Outdoor Industry Association, the industry generates $646 billion in consumer spending and creates 6.1 million direct jobs. Those numbers also create tax revenue both nationally and statewide—a state such as Texas, not the typical paragon of “outdoor,” collects $1.9 billion in state and local tax revenue. But those OIA numbers have not had teeth on the national economic and political stage. Until now. In late 2016, President Obama signed the bipartisan-supported REC Act into law. The act includes outdoor industry revenues right

alongside extractive industries when it comes to how lawmakers and government bean counters determine both GDP and the value of public lands. By some measures, the ripple effects of outdoor industry businesses form a larger part of the economy than even Big Pharma (though that exact accounting could be debated). But the power of the outdoor industry has always been more than money. This industry influences business beyond its boundaries. Outdoor industry leaders have shown that sustainability and responsible supply chains can be a force. They have created some of the first successful B Corps, rethinking how businesses operate and to what ends. Outdoor shops pioneer retail as theater and offer programs to engage customers with the outdoors as well as their products. And even in the midst of consolidation, the industry continues to be a place where small innovators can make big inroads. These 10 people are currently the most powerful people in the industry. Some you’ll know, some you won’t, but the moves they make influence us all.

JANUARY 12, 2017 DAY 3

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THE POWER LIST

1

the KINGPIN

Jerry Stritzke

WHO IS THE most powerful entity in the outdoor industry? It’s simple. If you want to succeed in this market, get your product in REI. The Seattle-based co-op, which began in 1935 when local mountaineers wanted Austrian ice axes, has become the go-to shop for its more than 6 million members. In 2015, it racked up record annual revenues of $2.4 billion, shared $185.3 million with members in the form of dividends and rebates, and pumped $8.5 million into nonprofits. Beyond that gross cash flow, the co-op occupies a unique retail space, something like a big box with the soul of a specialty independent retailer. REI looms large over the entire industry. The nation’s largest consumer co-op’s reach is so long that President Obama tapped former CEO Sally Jewell for the job of Secretary of the Interior in 2013. That paved the way for REI to bring in a man who had the out-of-industry experience to drive REI to record growth. Prior to taking over as president and CEO of REI in 2013, Jerry Stritzke served as the president and COO at $5.1 billion-dollar-brand Coach, Inc. Before that he worked for Limited Brands, which includes Victoria’s Secret, Bath & Body Works, La Senza, and Henri Bendel. With the ability to navigate those global giants, the native Oklahoman brought REI the ability to manage its expanding reach. He came in with a policy of “edit and amplify,” meaning cut down on what the co-op offered but go deeper with what it does carry—making REI even more of a kingmaker in the industry, since brands and models it chooses get even heavier consumer exposure. “Stritzke left many wondering when he came in with ‘edit and amplify,’ but what it illustrated was that here was an executive who wanted to explore how dynamic retail could be,” says Marisa Nicholson, vice president and group show director of Outdoor Retailer. “REI defined its core brands through that experiment and has since reworked its private label, rebranded as REI Co-Op, and is curating smaller, less-known brands to create a more exciting shopping experience.” While Stritzke’s resume may be heavy on corporate glitz, his actions since he has come to REI have been to pay back the outdoor industry’s roots. The store’s #OptOutside initiative to close its stores on Black Friday 2015 and 2016 prioritized spending time in the wild with friends and family over brash consumerism. The co-op entered a multimilliondollar, multi-year partnership with the National Park Service (and former REI chief Jewell) to strengthen the parks and increase visitation. And the REI Foundation has made a $1.5 million grant to Camber Outdoors to bring more women into leadership positions in the industry. How exactly do you wield power in the outdoor industry? Do business, play hard, and most of all, do good. Jerry Stritzke is showing us all how it’s done.

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

PHOTO BY CAVEMAN COLLECTIVE

PRESIDENT AND CEO, REI


We Are Sherpa booth #14043 | sherpaadventuregear.com | #wearesherpa


2

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

the EXECUTIV E

Steve Rendle CEO, VF CORPORATION

STEVE RENDLE’S ASCENSION has only recently peaked. This month, he completed a journey that started in sales at W.L. Gore and ended in control of VF Corporation, the multi-brand gear and apparel organization with 64,000 employees, $12.4 billion in revenue, and a $1.2 billion profit in 2015. In recent years, VF has consolidated its position in the outdoor industry, selling off many lifestyle brands for a portfolio heavy in footwear, apparel, hardgoods, and, in particular, backpacks. Though Rendle took the reins of the company on January 1, much of that shift and consolidation was on his initiative. With JanSport, Eastpak, and others in its fold, VF owns the majority share (55 percent) of the worldwide backpack market. No one competes on volume. No one competes on market dominance. And Rendle’s style keeps the would-be up-and-comers at bay. Rendle has the reputation of a hardnosed, intensely competitive executive, who can still enjoy a good joke. Outdoor industry veteran Larry Harrison recalls, “Steve Rendle stopped me on the street in Salt Lake City when I first started the adidas Outdoor project. He heartily congratulated me on the position and then said, ‘Understand though, Larry, I will put every obstacle in your path.’” But it’s the obstacles in Rendle’s path that will define his early tenure as CEO. VF has exposure to market and currency fluctuations around the world, including at home, where the markets seem unsure how President-elect Trump will affect trade with Asia, the home of both manufacturing and a burgeoning outdoor market. Many product categories also appear to be reaching saturation, raising the need to develop new types of gear rather than building out existing lines. Rendle also has great expectations set upon him as the leader of a public company: VF has enjoyed tremendous growth over the past three years as gear sales and outdoor participation spiked. He has proven, however, that creative thinking is his strong suit. “Steve’s gift is vision,” says Scott McGuire, president and brand strategist at The Mountain Lab, who reported directly to Rendle when he worked at The North Face. “Not just for the brands, but how he sees the industry. He doesn’t get mired in the challenges of today. He expects his team to leapfrog them and find solutions so they can focus on two to five years out.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF VF CORPORATION

THE POWER LIST


If It’s not dIrty, you’re not doIng It rIght. prevIew the fall 2017 tIMBerland® traIl worK ColleCtIon featurIng the new ChoCorua hIKer at Booth #32112

Timberland and

are trademarks of TBL Licensing LLC. © 2016 TBL Licensing LLC. All rights reserved. USW50495


THE POWER LIST

3

the SOUL

Yvon Chouinard FOUNDER, PATAGONIA

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

YVON CHOUINARD IS the outdoor industry. After all, the famed founder of Patagonia grew his business not out of a desire to pocket profits, but instead out of dirtbag necessity. In the 1960s, he had to forge pitons in between climbing and surf trips so that he and his friends—other pioneering climbers and industry icons like Royal Robbins and Tom Frost—could put up new routes on Yosemite’s big walls. The idea of outdoor athletes creating brands was born. But as Patagonia grew and evolved, Chouinard did something that has changed not only the way outdoor industry brands can do business, but rocked the very idea of what a business can be: Patagonia invested in the very resources that nurtured it, including co-founding One Percent for the Planet, an organization that helps companies donate one percent of profits to sustainability and environmental efforts. The entire industry now feels the need to follow Chouinard’s lead to prove its heart is in the right place. “Yvon Chouinard shaped what would become my life,” says former Patagonia CEO Kris McDivitt Tompkins. “He showed me that the world was not as I saw it, but rather being chopped into pieces by ‘progress’ and ‘development.’ Yvon is a genius whose values, aesthetics, and his seeking simplicity and beauty in all things has never changed since I met him as a young girl.” In 2012, Patagonia became the first B Corp in the state of California, meaning it legally changed its corporate charter to prioritize environmental and social welfare over making profits (a growing contingent of outdoor industry brands, including Klean Kanteen and Cotopaxi, are also B

Corps). Its $20 Million & Change fund helps sustainabilityminded startups beyond the outdoor sphere turn lofty goals into functioning businesses. It pioneered supply-chain transparency programs with the Footprint Chronicles and encouraged customers to help reduce waste with its Common Threads apparel recycling initiative. Offshoot brand Patagonia Provisions is bringing the brand’s approach out of the gear industry and into food. These moves resonate with consumers—even those not interested in the outdoors. Last Black Friday, Patagonia promised to donate 100 percent of its retail and online sales to grassroots environmental organizations. Consumers, inspired by the idea of spending to support post-election advocacy, responded by plopping down a whopping $10 million, obliterating the company’s $2 million goal. “It’s about purpose first, profit second (or third),” says Mike Geraci, executive creative director at marketing agency Mercury CSC. “That’s what inspires the consumer and ultimately powers Patagonia’s profits. The fact that Yvon has pivoted to agriculture and regenerative industry should be a warning shot to the rest of the industry that they are failing in their purpose.” Even as he focuses more on Patagonia’s projects outside of the industry, Chouinard is still the single most influential thinker we have. He provides the answer to the big question that dogs so many outdoor retailer attendees: How can I make a living without selling out the wild places I care most about? Chouinard’s example proves that to do that, you simply lead without ever compromising your ethics. Success will follow.

PHOTO BY TIM DAVIS


THE POWER LIST

4

№ the ORGANIZER

Rich Hill

SPECIALTY INDEPENDENT RETAILERS are headed into uncharted waters: On one hand, they face threats from consolidation and continuously evolving online competition. On the other, they are in the driver’s seat as many big-box retailers fail and manufacturers and customers seek the perceived legitimacy of indie shops. No one in the industry understands those challenges like Rich Hill, who became president of the 62-member Grassroots Outdoor Alliance in August. That’s because Hill—who has worked for everyone from Patagonia, Marmot, and Ibex to consulting for Amazon— understands better than anyone else both the plights of independent players and the mind-set of those who want to steamroll them. As outdoor manufacturers continue to seek authenticity in the marketplace and speak to millennials who often flock to websites or retail shops with personality, the Grassroots Outdoor Alliance is on the rise as an arbiter of independent thinking. While it used to be more of a closed club, the group began to expand when it opened its Connect buying show to non-members in 2015. This year, with Hill on board, it saw the wisdom in aligning its show with Outdoor Retailer rather than making it more difficult for attendees to take in both shows. When the OR show moves dates in 2018 to mid-June and mid-November, the Connect show will take place before OR. That will make it an insider’s preview, where Grassroots Outdoor Alliance retailers will be able to get first dibs on 100 key brands. Independent retailers are the trendsetters of the industry, and by previewing brand offerings before OR, they could even prevent big buyers from determining what will be hot in the following season.  Walking the tightrope between providing what Grassroots constituents need and continually growing the industry is a tough job, but one that Hill can navigate. “Rich has worked with many great outdoor brands and understands how and why they resonate with consumers,” says KEEN President Casey Sheahan, who worked with Hill at both Kelty and Patagonia. “He is a great trend spotter, and this can only help specialty retailers stay relevant as markets and activities evolve over time.”   That means that even if they face tough competition, specialty independent retailers will be more relevant than ever when it comes to what sells. Savvy brands that want to make it in the outdoor space will need to interact with the Grassroots Outdoor Alliance. And in these turbulent times, Hill will be key in determining how the industry holds onto its soul while staying competitive.

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

PHOTO BY MICHAEL HANSON

PRESIDENT, GRASSROOTS OUTDOOR ALLIANCE


THE WORLD'S FIRST WEARABLE MULTI-TOOL Ultimate wearability meets everyday functionality. The Leatherman Tread travels everywhere you do. Roll up your sleeve and get to it with the multi-tool that’s always on. Booth #23005

www.leatherman.com/tread #alwaysontread

ALWAYS ON


THE POWER LIST

5

the MUSCLE

Kihak Sung and Rae-eun Sung

FOUNDER AND EVP, YOUNGONE CORP. THAT SHELL YOU’RE wearing, that midlayer? Chances are it was manufactured by one entity: Youngone Corporation, a South Korean company that controls the Asian garment- making industry and assembles apparel for the likes of The North Face, Patagonia, Eddie Bauer, L.L.Bean, and Jack Wolfskin, among other lifestyle brands. It also holds major investments in Scott and Outdoor Research. Its founder does not operate in isolation, either. Kihak Sung is the VP of the International Textile Manufacturers Federation and the chairman of the Korea Federation of Textiles Industries. In March 2016, family scion Rae-eun Sung was named head of Youngone Holdings, Youngone Corporation’s parent company. She is the future of the business. Kihak Sung started the company as a mom-and-pop manufacturing shop in 1974, and built it into a massive global and vertical supply chain which operates in Bangladesh, Vietnam, China, and El Salvador and is starting to move into Ethiopia. Along the way, Youngone earned a reputation for quality that allows it to charge a 20 to 30 percent premium over the competition. It has also managed global relationships expertly, strategically reshuffling factories in Bangladesh to keep garment-making in that country while shifting boot-making resources to other parts of the world. Youngone directly employs more than 78,000 staff with an annual revenue approaching $1.6 trillion. And as the Asian market and demand from North America continue to grow, Youngone has benefited, growing revenue and profitability. But both Kihak and Rae-eun keep very low profiles, as demanded by cultural norms that seek not to elevate individuals. Only a small minority of Outdoor Retailer attendees would even recognize them.

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

6

№ the HOPE

Luis Benitez DIRECTOR, COLORADO OUTDOOR RECREATION INDUSTRY OFFICE LUIS BENITEZ IS the single person best positioned to save the outdoors in the face of an incoming wave of radical politics bent on ripping it apart. Benitez earned a place in the outdoor pantheon even before Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper made him the head of the state’s new Outdoor Recreation Industry Office. After all, as a bigmountain guide, he’d helped blind climber Erik Weihenmayer stand atop Mt. Everest— which Benitez has summited six times—and he risked his guiding career when he spoke out about Chinese soldiers gunning down Tibetan refugees near Cho Oyu. He has run Outward Bound in Colorado, served as a town councilman in Eagle, Colorado, and been an important voice for the Latino community in the outdoors. “We couldn’t have found a better-suited person to represent our state’s outdoor recreation industry,” said Hickenlooper in June 2015 when he established the office in order to give some political teeth to the state’s all-important $34.5 billion outdoor recreation industry. Benitez’s pull reaches far beyond Colorado, however. He has been instrumental in both encouraging other states to create the same position as his—Utah was the first state to create an outdoor recreation office, but Washington and Montana have since followed suit—as well as lobbying for the Outdoor REC Act, which President Obama signed into law in December. That bill, which received unanimous bipartisan support, counts outdoor

recreation as a component of the GDP and puts it on a level playing field with extractive industries in the always-cash-conscious eyes of lawmakers. How to actually value outdoor recreation is a tricky question, however, but some estimates put it ahead of major industries such as pharmaceuticals, and the Outdoor Industry Association conducted a study which conservatively tags it at racking up $646 billion in annual consumer spending and directly creating 6.1 million jobs. That means Benitez will be able to champion towns like his own Eagle, which has invested heavily in new mountain bike trails and a state-of-the-art river park, in order to tap into that economy. Likewise, other once-sleepy Colorado towns are booming thanks to a focus on infrastructure for outdoor recreation. And money always talks in politics. A new Trump administration and a Republican-dominated Congress interested in making the most money it can off public lands could conceivably be swayed to preserve rather than level the outdoors when it sees just how profitable the industry can be. Benitez is well-positioned to lead that charge. “Luis is one of the senior statesmen in the outdoors right now,” says Stacy Bare, director at Sierra Club Outdoors. “His leadership extends far beyond the traditional outdoor industry and conservation. He’s a transformational leader, approachable, humble, and eminently on the level with whomever he is speaking to. Colorado is lucky to have him. I think in the years to come we’ll see Luis as a national leader—not just on the outdoor industry, but on all issues.”


7

the PROPHET

Matt Powell

SPORTS INDUSTRY ANALYST, NPD GROUP, INC.

PHOTOS BY (LEFT) CAVEMAN COLLECTIVE; COURTESY

WHEN TALKING ABOUT the “most powerful” folks in the outdoor industry, connections count for a lot— and Matt Powell might be the most connected guy here. His LinkedIn profile, with more than 9,500 connections, is in the top one percent most viewed on the social media networking site. Why does everyone want to know Powell? Simple. He’s the keeper of the most important

resource for outdoor brands and retailers: data. His employer, NPD Group, collects retail sales data— what customers are buying, when, and at what price—and assembles it into the clearest picture we have of the industry. It’s a heady amount of data, but useless without someone who can read trends in the numbers—and no one does that better than Powell. “You choose to not listen to Matt at your own peril,” says Outdoor Retailer icon Larry

Harrison. “He is a seer who reads from a computer instead of a crystal ball.” Powell spots emerging trends that inform business decisions and market directions, which ripple out from boardrooms to garment and boot factories in Asia and all the way back to the retail shops here. Brands—and NPD’s client roster reads like the outdoor industry’s Fortune 500— use Powell’s analysis to properly calibrate the essential duality of retail: supply and demand. His specialty is footwear, but he’s broadly conversant on industry trends. His analysis helps companies direct resources to the right projects, and keeps competitors from eating his clients’ lunch. Powell is best known for his popular Sneakernomics blog on Forbes, where he offers a master class on how products gain market share. “Sneakernomics is a must-read, even if you aren’t in the shoe biz,” says longtime industry vet Scott McGuire, president and brand strategist at The Mountain Lab. “It targets trends and highlights opportunities in consumer segments that can alter company business plans. These insightful reports provoke boardroom conversation as well as keeping product teams in the loop of day-to-day market occurrences.” That analysis drives strategy, but it’s hard to tell whether that’s because he has the heavy artillery of qualitative market research, or because so many insiders follow Powell that his words have become a selffulfilling prophecy. LIST CONTINUED ON PAGE 76 JANUARY 12, 2017 DAY 3

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For Independent Specialty Retailers Presented By

January 10 -12, 2017

Outdoor Retailer Winter Market • Utah Museum of Contemporary Art • Salt Lake City, Utah

HIRE: Recruiting Interviewing Selecting Hiring 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. • Lunch Provided

Well-known recruiter Jörgen Sundberg puts the cost of on boarding an employee at $240,000. And, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, the price of a bad hire is at least 30 percent of the employee’s first-year earnings. For a small company, a five-figure investment in the wrong person is a threat to the business and unfortunately we have all made a bad choice once in our careers. What we know for sure in the outdoor industry is that we are hiring employees who are passionate about the outdoors, but does this mean that they are good at retail?

TRAIN: Developing Leaders

11 a.m. – 1 p.m. • Lunch Provided

As retailers look for improvement in efficiencies, implementation and profitability, one staff position becomes increasingly important: Store Manager. In most retail companies, few roles have more impact on revenue growth, company culture, store environment and customer satisfaction. But how can a store manager be MOST EFFECTIVE? Great retail organizations recognize the Store Manager’s role as Leader. The Store Manager influences, teaches, solves problems, coaches, builds a team and represents the brand to the public. The Store Manager is responsible for meeting revenue goals.

MEASURE: Measuring Employee Success 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. • Lunch Provided

Everyday your employees are selling for you, but how do you measure their performance? What are the metrics that tell you how they are doing in customer engagement? How do you set goals to increase your business and get the buy in from each staff member? Come prepared look at your sales goals, how your employees are performing and how to get to where you want to be in your market in this class.

JO I N

U S

Register Today outdoorretailer.com/RSC


AVI-8 Black Crows bluprint Bohnam Chippewa Corbeaux Cotopaxi Deso Supply Co. Dish & Duer Doughnut Duckworth Ecoths Element Skateboards Emmons Manufacturing Company Faherty Fayettechill FELLER Fisher + Baker Flowfold

THE MODERN OUTDOOR EXPERIENCE January 10-12, 2017 • Salt Palace Convention Center Forsake, Inc. Grayers Green Goo Halley Stevensons Hamboards Iron and Resin Jeremiah Locally Grown Clothing Co. Live Life Clothing Co. Lucy Indigo Maloja MiiR Incorporated Millican Mizu, Inc. Native Shoes Ninja Suit by Airblaster OluKai OTZ Shoes Parks Project Picture Organics Poler Stuff Proof Eyewear reDEW AB Rumpl Satorisan Shwood Eyewear Speaqua Corp. Synergy Organic Clothing Tentree Teton Bros. Teva The Landmark Project The Normal Brand Threads 4 Thought Topo Designs Vuarnet Woolrich Footwear XTRATUF Zanier ZEAL Optics

List as of November 21, 2016


Thanks to Our Winter Market 2017 Sponsors

TITLE SPONSOR

PLATINUM SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSORS

SILVER SPONSORS SPONSORS AS OF 12/12/16


MARK YOUR CALENDARS

OPEN AIR DEMO

JULY 25, 2017 PINEVIEW RESERVOIR, UT

SUMMER MARKET

JULY 26-29, 2017

S A LT PA L AC E C O N V E N T I O N C E N T E R , S A LT L A K E C I T Y, U T

W W W. O U T D O O R R E TA I L E R . C O M


NEWEXHIBITORS

MEET THE NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK

Khumbu Adventure Gear 100 percent waterproof with fully taped seams and a fold-over closure

Booth 39204

Great for SUP or kayaking

Comfortable shoulder, chest, and waist straps for dayhikes

Descriptions are provided by the manufacturers and edited for style and space.

“Our company was inspired by an Everest Basecamp trek in 2011. Giving back to where we came from and showcasing Nepalese expertise is our adventure.” Side mesh pockets hold bottles or sunscreen.

Feature-rich and top-quality materials at a lower retail price ($60)

—Sabina Shakya and Prakash Bajracharya, founders

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

THE PITCH: Our Click & Go Drybag is the perfect bag for any adventure, at an affordable price. Khumbu Adventure Gear is a minuscule name in the world of outdoor gear, but as Nepalese-Americans, we take pride in producing high-quality product that not only uses the latest technology and design, but also supports the livelihoods of the people who create them. Aside from the Click & Go, we make a full line of technical apparel as well as one-of-a-kind handknit items from Nepal. Our aim is to empower women and local artisans of the Third World country we call home by showcasing their talent while giving them meaningful employment and raising their standard of living. khumbugear.com

SEE IT HERE

Tested & Proven

“.....We were probably the only team out there in the World Championships that did not come back looking like we had the measles from mosquito bites…. we slept soundly in the middle of mosquito infested jungles with nothing but the clothes with Insect Shield® we had on.....” – Jason Magness, Team Yoga Slackers

Adventure Racing World Championships 600km’s through Brazil’s Pantanal region – the world’s largest tropical wetland

Look for Insect Shield products from these trusted brands

Photo by: Alexandre Cappi

Corporate Logo

Brand Logos


INSULATED FOR MAXIMUM PERFORMANCE Staying healthy is key to performing at your best. From keeping game day meals or snacks fresh in our lunch coolers, to staying hydrated with our stainless steel, vacuum insulated hydration bottles - our products help take you to the next level.

EASY TO CLEAN MOLDED LINER

ADJUSTABLE MOLDED RUBBER HANDLE WITH CLIP

LOCKING PUSH-BUTTON LID WITH ONE HAND PUSH BUTTON OPERATION

PLEASE VISIT US AT BOOTH 30000E FOR MORE INFORMATION Thermos L.L.C. • 475 N. Martingale Road, Suite 1100 • Schaumburg, IL 60173 • 1-800-243-0745 • www.thermos.com/underarmour.aspx THERMOS is a registered trademark in over 115 countries. © 2017 Under Armour, Inc. All rights reserved. • www.underarmour.com

KEEPS COLD 12 HOURS


NEW EXHIBITORS

SEE IT HERE

Booth BR544

The Pickle Juice Company “The Pickle Juice Company is far more than just the brine from a pickle jar sitting in your fridge. We’ve created a product that addresses muscle cramping at its root, which is a neurological cause rather than the physiological symptom.”

Ingredients: dual filtered water, vinegar, salt, natural dill flavor, potassium, zinc, vitamin C, vitamin E

Shelf stable for up to two years

Testers confirm: “Yep, it tastes like pickle juice.”

Pickle Juice contains up to 10 times more electrolytes than sports drinks without any sugars, gluten, caffeine, protein or nut allergens, or artificial colors or flavors.

THE PITCH: Nearly 16 years ago, the Philadelphia Eagles defeated the Dallas Cowboys in 109-degree heat—the hottest NFL game ever played. The Eagles’ secret weapon? They fought off muscle cramps with pickle brine. Inspired by this game, we

launched The Pickle Juice Company (TPJC) the following year. TPJC is the maker of the first purpose-built sports beverage on the market that is scientifically proven to relieve muscle cramps (in just 85 seconds). Despite the familiar flavor

profile, TPJC’s products differ from jarred pickle brine. They are made with double-filtered water and a proprietary grain of vinegar. Independent research suggests this vinegar’s acid sparks a “neutrally medicated reflex” that stops muscle cramps. picklepower.com

Come Visit us at Booth #32029

on location: white mountains, nh

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

—Filip Keuppens, VP of global sales and marketing


NEW EXHIBITORS

Dog is Good

SEE IT HERE

Booth BR605

Made of super-soft pre-shrunk cotton

Decorated in the USA

“Dogs change the way we see the world. Dog is Good was founded to celebrate the unique bond people have with their dogs and to share the joy one feels when sharing life’s adventures with Dog.” –Gila Kurtz, co-founder

THE PITCH: Dog is Good reminds dog lovers how great it feels to be in the presence of Dog. Dog is Good truly inspires people to share their identities as dog lovers with the rest of the world. A leading brand for dog lovers, Dog is Good has won

Available in standard unisex sizing for men and women

numerous awards for its original designs and, in a survey conducted among pet retailers in January 2016, was selected as the brand of choice in the “gifts for the pet lover” category. Our clever and poignant product line

includes gifts, apparel, accessories, and home decor products that help the dog lover relive moments spent with their dog over and over again. We can also put together custom programs to meet the specific needs of retailers. dogisgood.com

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

Our tees evoke an immediate emotional response in dog lovers.


EDITORS’PICKS NEW GEAR THAT CAUGHT OUR EYE

2 1. Make the mountains safer. That’s

the goal of Avatech’s new Scope Pole, which lets users quickly gather digital snowpack information right from their ski pole in order to help make better decisions and manage risk in the backcountry. Sensors on the pole’s shaft are connected to the cloud through an app and the company’s Mountain Hub platform, so you can share this information in real time for the benefit of the broader mountain community. [$500] #BR418 avatech.com

1

3

2. The latest BUFF collection, ThermoNet, uses a new PrimaLoft anti-freeze (no more icy fabric around the face) technology that provides four times more insulation than standard BUFF microfiber products. The hydrophobic wicking fibers move moisture away from the skin and trap the heat, keeping you comfortable and dry no matter the weather. Made from polyester with 70 percent recycled content, ThermoNet is available in multifunctional headwear, hats, and balaclavas (pictured here). buffusa.com new BUFF. [$27-$37] #23035 buffusa.com

3. Put the good stuff in here. The new

4

Stanley Master Flask is like a vault for 8 ounces of your favorite liquid. The heavy-duty steel body is topped off with a machined steel cap, textured for an easy grip, and has an opening big enough to pour straight into (no need for a funnel). [$35] #14001 stanleypmi.com

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

4. Nearly 500 million plastic straws are introduced to landfills in the U.S. every day, but Klean Kanteen has a simple new solution: Bring your own. These sleek, reusable stainless steel drinking straws are designed to last and stay clean. The bottom is made from 18/8 stainless steel while the top is a durable, foodsafe silicone that’s flexible, but bent at the perfect angle. Toss one in your bag and tell the waiter to skip the straw. Comes in a pack of five. [$10] #3002 kleankanteen.com

ALL PRICES ARE MANUFACTURER’S SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE (MSRP).

JANUARY 12, 2017 DAY 3

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EDITORS’ PICKS 5. Attention shutterbugs!

6 5

Mountainsmith’s Tanuck 40 is a convenient, easy-to-manage and durable camera backpack, especially when paired with its Kit Cubes accessory pockets (sold separately). Designed in collaboration with photographer Chris Burkard, the massive front access and top flap make it easy to get camera gear in and out, and large zippered pockets at both points of entry make sure you won’t lose little things like cables, batteries, and SD cards. The pack also features big, closable side pockets for everything from water bottles to tripods. [$230] #16018 mountainsmith.com

6. Cleaning the fog from your goggles on

every chair is a thing of the past. Sven Can See provides safe, instant anti-fog and frost relief in all temperatures with its new Spray, Wipe n’ Go! tube. The pen-like, pocket-sized applicator is easy to tuck into a pocket. Just spray the solution into lenses and then wipe it off for clear vision for the rest of the day. The spray is nontoxic, biodegradable, and odor-free. [$11] #BR318 svencansee.com

7. When you’re working hard, less is

more. The Outdoor Research Ascendant Hoody pairs Polartec’s newest active insulation—Alpha Direct—with a highly air-permeable shell to make an incredibly versatile and breathable jacket. Alpha Direct doesn’t require an interior lining; instead of needing fabric and baffles to trap and hold the insulation, Alpha Direct uses a unique knit construction that does away with the need for an interior liner at all. That means there’s one less barrier to between you and the world, which boosts breathability. [$215] #20027 outdoorresearch.com

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PHOTOS BY COURTESY

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8. Backcountry vino, anyone? The latest addition to Hydro Flask’s line, a 25-ounce Wine Bottle, lets you take your favorite vintage anywhere. The stainless steel construction keeps the taste pure and protected from heat and light. A leakproof cap makes sure you won’t lose a drop and TempShield insulation keeps sippables the ideal temperature for hours. The Pure Pour opening delivers a drip-free flow and easy filling, plus silicone at the base creates traction on slippery surfaces and clank-free handling. [$38] #14037 hydroflask.com

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY


BOOTH# 35087

TUBBS Flex STP Bringing the quality of TUBBS to a new opening price point. ®

IAN COBLE

®

FLEX STP For new snowshoers and those looking for added comfort on their excursions, the FLEX STP offers the perfect opportunity for valueconscious buyers searching for the technical advancements of the FLEX™ Series frames at an affordable price.

TUBBSSNOWSHOES.COM HTTPS://WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/TUBBSSNOWSHOES/

HTTPS://TWITTER.COM/TUBBSSNOWSHOES

HTTPS://WWW.INSTAGRAM.COM/TUBBSSNOWSHOES/

HTTPS://WWW.YOUTUBE.COM/USER/TUBBSSNOWSHOES


THEGALLERY

HOT NEW PRODUCTS AT WINTER MARKET

1. Made with Pertex Shield AP, a stretchwaterproof membrane, the Rab Sharp Edge Jacket is designed to be a tough shell for backcountry skiing in adverse conditions. It includes a removable powder skirt, ski helmet-compatible hood, and bellowed chest pockets large enough to fit your skins. [$400] #3001 rab.equipment

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2. The Scott Backcountry Guide AP 30

is a lightweight ski pack, featuring the Alpride 2.0 airbag system and specific features designed for backcountry adventurers and snow professionals alike. The 30L pack has both diagonal and A-frame ski-carries, and includes a pocket specifically for snow safety gear. [$800] #28031 scott-sports.com

3. The new Eureka! Suite Dream 2P

tent offers campers 40 square feet of room—enough to inflate a queen-size airbed. The 17-square-foot vestibule gives you and your partner plenty of room to store gear. The design includes two ridgepoles that expand the ceiling for increased headroom. [$250] #15014 eurekatent.com

4. Naturally antimicrobial, highly

breathable, and extremely durable, Astral’s Hemp Donner is built for light hikes and trips around town. The outsoles feature Astral’s non-marking natural G Rubber, which, combined with the petroleum-free and efficiently grown hemp, makes these shoes more environmentally friendly than many others. [$100] #35077 astraldesigns.com

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5. The North Face’s Women’s Flight

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Series Warp Tank is an athleteinspired crop tank offering a balance of protection and ventilation thanks to engineered knits that help regulate body temperature in changing conditions. The warp knit (threads run vertically rather than horizontally) also provides an athletic, fitted silhouette and stitch-free construction. [$100] #35051 thenorthface.com

Descriptions are provided by the manufacturers and edited for style and space.

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ALL PRICES ARE MANUFACTURER’S SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE (MSRP).

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

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Wear More.Wash More. Wash Less

®

Polygiene Odor Control Technology

”Aside from assisting athletes to smell better, Polygiene also endeavours to help minimize the environmental impact of outdoor enthusiasts. The company’s tag line Wear More Wash Less addresses the fact that washing and drying clothing account for over half of an item’s ecological footprint.” – BackcountrySkiingCanada.com, October 2016

GOOD FOR THE PLANET · GOOD FOR THE CONSUMER · GOOD FOR YOUR BRAND Polygiene Odor Control Technology is a durable, effective and sustainable textile treatment that uses naturally occurring silver salt to stop the growth of odor-causing bacteria. The result? You can ski more and wash less.

AN INNOVATIVE INGREDIENT Polygiene is an industry-leading odor control technology that adds value to your brand. Market studies have shown that consumers would choose apparel featuring Polygiene over apparel without it. The treatment is embedded into the textile for permanent performance and easy care, which makes it last the lifetime of the garment.

GARMENTS Even during the most intense activities, Polygiene-treated apparel manages moisture while stopping the growth of odor-causing bacteria.

# wearmorewashless polygiene.com

PROTECTIVE GEAR Protective gear such as helmets and armor with Polygiene prolongs the life of the gear and keeps it odor-free.

GLOVES Polygiene glove treatments stop odor-causing bacteria from growing, keeping gloves fresh, clean and easy to care for.

FOOTWEAR Polygiene-treated socks and footwear stop stinky feet in their tracks, allowing you to stay fresh, comfortable and in pursuit of your passions.

T E S T T E A M S W E AT I N G I N S E N J A , N O R W A Y

“But the one major drawback to synthetics – the unshakable, insufferable remnants of an active human – may have been nullified with the addition of the Polygiene treatment.” —Gear Junkie by Alex Kurt, January 2016


NEW PRODUCT GALLERY

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Jacket uses a proprietary three-layer waterproof/ breathable membrane with a matte finished design for high performance with high style. The Typhoon also features a thin mesh panel at the rear for even better breathability during highoutput activities. [$350] #38205 northsails.com

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

2. The ENO Ignitor TopQuilt

with DownTek water-repellent down is designed to make four-season hammock camping comfortable. Sustainably sourced down, a zipper-free design, convertible footbox, and a soft nylon taffeta lining ensure all-night warmth. On the outside, a nylon ripstop shell with a DWR finish repels moisture and keeps stains at bay. [$230] #15008 eaglesnestoutfittersinc.com

3. Headsweats’ new

Destination Trucker Hats are made with soft stretch mesh and the brand’s proprietary Eventure fabric. The design is a lightweight 5-Panel trucker style that dries quickly, is breathable, and comes in several styles that highlight iconic locations (like Monument Valley, pictured). [$25] #36169 headsweats.com

4. The Hoka One One Speedgoat 2 was inspired by ultrarunning king Karl Meltzer. This updated version of the company’s popular shoe provides an improved fit and increased stability and durability. Built on a new last, the wider midsole creates a more stable platform for the foot and offers a wider toebox for comfort. A Vibram outsole with 5mm lugs means it will stand fast on tough terrain. [$140] #34149 hokaoneone.com

5. The La Sportiva Asteroid

PrimaLoft jacket uses body-mapped PrimaLoft Silver active insulation for optimal thermal regulation to keep you warm without overheating. The clean design and quick access pockets make this piece versatile and perfect for everyday aroundtown use and playing in the mountains. [$250] #5027 lasportiva.com

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

1. The North Sails Typhoon


TRACTION BY DAY KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY Doctors recommend Icebug footwear to prevent slips and falls. Our patented BUGrip® system, featuring 14 to 19 super durable carbide studs, works on all surfaces, from dry asphalt to sheer ice. Each steel stud grips the ground independently, offering proven stability from both front-to-back and side-to-side forces, something no other traction system can claim. Stop by our booth today to see our complete line of traction footwear.

Outdoor Retailer booth 21009

www.icebug.com/us • 855.201.7694

DOCTOR RECOMMENDED

NEW 2017

SAFE GRIP. FREE MIND.

DETOUR BUGrip GTX • MSRP $229.95


NEW PRODUCT GALLERY 1. The Rhone Bulldog Tank is built with polyester

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and spandex treated with new GoldFusion technology. Rhone infused gold particles into the fabric to create a softer, fasterdrying, longer-lasting and odor-neutralizing activewear garment. It also features flat-lock seams to prevent chafing and an ultralight performance feel. [$54] #BR447 rhone.com

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2. Mountain Hardwear’s Dynama Lined Pant adds a soft knit lining for warmth to an already popular series of go-everywhere bottoms. With a slim silhouette, these are ideal for travel or play when the temperature drops, or for staying active. [$85] #26027 mountainhardwear.com 3. The Wolverine Vortex features Vibram Arctic Grip for a rock-solid bite on wet ice, an antifatigue footbed for comfort, and a Boa lacing system for a custom fit that’s easy to adjust on the fly. The waterproof/breathable membrane and 600g of Thinsulate Ultra insulation keep it warm and dry on the inside. [$200] #32167 wolverine.com

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4. The Callins Hooded Top from Craghoppers is a polyester knit-looking fleece, giving it both comfort and style as a versatile sweater that works well on the trail and in town. It also features a comfortable oversized hood. [$60] #20039 craghoppers.com

PHOTOS BY COURTESY

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creora® Fresh is odor neutralizing spandex engineered to stay fresh all day long. Visit us at “Outdoor

Retailer Show” 10-12 January 2017 Booth #39209 for more information on creora® elastane contact:

www.creora.com creora® is registered trade mark of the Hyosung Corporation for its brand of premium spandex.

Ria Stern ria.stern@us.hyosung.com Tel: 917-886-5631


NEW PRODUCT GALLERY 2 1. The Xero Shoes Prio is a lightweight (just

15 ounces per pair for men’s 9), multiuse performance shoe. The Prio features a comfortably wide toebox and Xero-Drop sole for a natural fit. The dual chevron tread provides great traction and the flexible 5.5mm rubber outsole allows for natural foot movement. [$90] #34166 xeroshoes.com

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2. The Dare 2b Men’s Free Rein Pant is a more relaxed and looser-fitting snow pant that features a waterproof/breathable four-way stretch fabric with a textured look, a DWR finish, taped seams, a warm and soft lining inside the upper legs, high-loft polyester insulation, and built-in snow gaiters. [$130] #20037 dare2b.com

3. Honey Stinger adds Wildflower Honey to the gluten-free waffle roster they launched last year. Certified organic honey is sandwiched between two thin waffles to help satisfy and power you. [$24/box of 16 waffles or $1.50/ single waffle] #30049E honeystinger.com

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4. The Patagonia Hyperpuff Hoody is the brand’s warmest synthetic insulated hoody. It uses stretchy, high-loft insulation wrapped in a lightweight, weather-resistant Pertex Quantum shell and lining. Engineered patterning provides maximum articulation for unhindered movement so the whole garment stretches to accommodate a full range of motion without losing heat. [$299] #15027 patagonia.com

FIBERS

TM

PERFORMANCE INSPIRED BY NATURE

DISCOVER THE NEW STANDARD IN FIBER TECHNOLOGY AlloFibers, a yarn technology inspired by benefits found in the natural world. Revolutionized on the basis of L.I.T® techonology, offers a platform to create gears across usage for base layer, insulation, and weather protection. It’s sustainable, functional, technical and lifestyle. One of the most advance fibers available today. Booth #41051 WWW.ALLOFIBERS.COM


NEW PRODUCT GALLERY

Textile-Based Product Solutions

STILL WITHIN YOUR GRASP

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You have one more day to feel the latest textile innovations.

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5. The Gordini Aerie Mitt features

a durable woven-nylon shell with goatskin trim, palm, and fingers. DownTek 700-fill down keeps your digits warm while a Hydrowick lining and waterproof/breathable Aquabloc insert keeps you dry inside and out. A gauntlet cinch closure keeps snow out, pre-curved construction boosts dexterity, and a handy nosewipe keeps your nose clean. [$100] #32055 gordini.com

7. The Merrell Agility Summit Flex

trail runner uses an EVA midsole for agility and stability on uneven terrain, and a molded TPU heel counter for security during quick descents and sharp turns—all designed to cushion and protect on your longest runs on technical terrain. It’s built with a fabric, mesh, and TPU upper and an integrated gaiter. [$170] #32127 merrell.com

6. Bright colors, a funky design, and a

slight cat-eye flare on the corners make the Sunski Makanis a stylish option for the slopes. These polarized shades, for both men and women, feature handpolished frames and Sunski’s flexible comfort fit. [$55] #BR415 sunskis.com

BOOTH 41051

LinkIn with SNEWS

Follow us to stay on top of industry news: bitly.com/snewslinkedin

JANUARY 12, 2017 DAY 3

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Miss us at OR? No problem. Contact us at info@conceptiii.com


NEW PRODUCT GALLERY 2 4

1. For the female ski tourer, the Arc’teryx Airah Jacket

is a single versatile piece that combines waterproof/ breathable protection with lightweight, air-permeable insulation. The Gore-Tex shell and Polartec Alpha work together to prevent both overheating and chilling in cold conditions during high aerobic activity. The jacket compresses down to approximately ²/³ the size of the equivalent shell and insulated midlayer as separate pieces. [$599] #1019 arcteryx.com

2. The Aergonlite 2 Lady Vertical Pole is LEKI’s first

women’s pole featuring the Trigger Vertical system, which uses an elastic band in the grip that enables changing hand position without having to click out of the grip. The two-section aluminum poles pack down to 90cm and extend to 135cm for a wide range of versatility for backcountry touring. They also include LEKI’s new backcountry basket designed to operate touring bindings and boot buckles without flipping your pole over to use the grips. [$129] #30019E leki.com

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3. The Avalanche Rhys Insulated Shirt offers an urban

look with a sleek and soft woven exterior and a luxurious, high-loft fleece on the inside. The shirt jacket features 60g of polyester insulation and a full-length zipper. [$90] #32029 avalanchewear.com PHOTOS BY COURTESY

4. The Walls Outdoor Goods Blizzard Pruf Pant 833 features durable cotton fabric and a sturdy construction, built with a comfort waistband and gusseted crotch for mobility. The relaxed cut and durability make them ideal for kicking around camp or working hard in the dirt. [$39] #39159 walls.com

A Complete Range of On-The-Go Outdoor Traction Products. CHAINSEN PRO | CHAINSEN LIGHT | CHAINSEN CITY

www.camp-usa.com/snowline

North American Distribution by CAMP USA Inc. - BOOTH #1039


US MATERIALS

US MANUFAC T URING

RE

100% AMERICAN

Photo Jay Beyer

EXPL

US WORKERS

BOOTH 32182

ULTRALIGHT

Snow Sports Collection LYCRA® is a trademark of INVISTA

FEATURING COMFORT COMPRESSION USING LYCRA® FIBER

Minimize foot fatigue using the leading elastic fiber.

ULTRALIGHT CONSTRUCTION

Advanced knitting technology to minimize sock weight and ensure a close fit.

SEAMLESS TOE CLOSURE

Perfectly flat toe closure to eliminate bulk and reduce blisters. M’s Wilson Merino Wool

W’s Jackson Friction Free Nylon

MULTIPLE STYLES FOR M’S & W’S

Visit our booth to see entire selection of ski socks.

www.farmtofeet.com


Q&A

5 Questions for…

Chuck Millsaps

President, Great Outdoor Provision Company (North Carolina/Virginia) a collection of standup hikers who wanted to lead hikes. It was very surprising, the number of people who came on board. It showed us that there was a need out there.

PHOTO BY CAVEMAN COLLECTIVE

Great Outdoor Provision Company, with nine stores in North Carolina and Virginia, has made involvement in its local communities a cornerstone of its business. The chain started programs to get more people outside—to an overwhelming response—and it uses its marketing dollars to support local organizations rather than placing ads. On top of that, the instore experience is so important to the business that they’ve opted to steer clear of e-commerce entirely. Chuck Millsaps, who has been with the company for more than 30 years, explains how all of these choices make a successful, respected retailer. 1. HOW DO YOU HELP GET FIRST-TIME HIKERS OUTSIDE? a We started the GetHiking! Program somewhat loosely three or four years ago. In 2012, we were fortunate to be selected by The North Face to serve as a kind of expedition crew for an endurance run on the Mountains to Sea Trail [which runs through the whole state]. Through that event, we discovered a large group of people who are

interested in hiking but not sure where to start. We tried to figure out how we could lower those barriers of entry, so to speak, so we held a town hall meeting at our store here in Raleigh, and invited a local guidebook author to come speak. We asked him to talk about his top 10 hikes in the state, and had a terrific response to it. So we set up some hiking organizations using Meetup as a logistical tool, and soon we had

2. IT’S EASY FOR A FIRST-TIME HIKER TO BE INTIMIDATED BY SOMEONE WHO HAS THRU-HIKED A LONG TRAIL. WHAT DO YOU DO TO INCLUDE AND ENCOURAGE NEW OUTDOOR ENTHUSIASTS WHO COME TO YOUR SHOP FOR HELP? a We’ve launched initiatives aimed at getting people outside. We funded the printing for a North Carolina state parks passport, for example. There are 40 state parks, and this passport has a page and photo for each, and you get a stamp when you visit. Folks come in looking for ideas, and the passport is one of the tools we’ll start with. It’s like a librarian trying to help a kid who likes mysteries. She might say, “Well, have you read Nancy Drew? If not, here’s where you should start.” Our staff has taken that kind of approach over the years, and this passport became an opportunity to engage the whole family. We offered incentives for visiting parks when we first launched it. Within a couple weeks, we had families who’d visited all 40. 3. WHAT’S THE BUSINESS BENEFIT OF BEING SO INVOLVED LOCALLY? a We’ve shifted from the traditional media marketing approach to an organic, kind of grassroots approach. The experience in store with the expert staff that we can provide is why we all got into this business, and that’s what we want to keep vibrant, so we don’t have an e-commerce platform. We took that traditional marketing budget, where you’re spending 2 to 3 percent of your sales in marketing, but we spend those funds more directly to support causes like the Mountains to Sea Trail. We’ll donate a certain percentage of sales to the local land trust, for example, or sponsor races, and use our marketing dollars there. We’ll come in before and after the

Watch Chuck! Millsaps was featured in SNEWS’ Innovation Project video series. Go to snewsnet.com/theinnovation-project to hear him speak about his store’s challenges and successes.

events take place and tell stories that bring the conversation back to our company and its desire to be a resource for our community.

4. HOW DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE THAT SHIFT? a It takes a lot of energy, and we’re so fortunate to have folks in specific retail stores and here in the Raleigh office who make sure we tell those stories on our blog. It’s fortunate that we made that shift before it was in vogue—we dipped our toe in it probably in 1992. That was the first time we dedicated a day to benefit the local land trust. When you look back, over the past 20 years, hundreds of thousands of dollars that go into local missions or local land trusts have allowed us to build relationships that really matter to our customers. 5. WHERE DO YOU SUGGEST NEW RETAILERS GET STARTED IF THEY WANT THEIR SHOPS TO BE AS INVOLVED WITH THE LOCAL COMMUNITY AS GREAT OUTDOOR PROVISION CO.? a It’s funny, because we get so inspired by that very group—those brand-new retailers that come out and have a passion for their particular interest. It’s humbling to see what someone with that type of passion can bring to a particular issue. We try our best to stay in touch with that passion, because we always learn something ourselves. If one is initiating a brick-andmortar shop in a community, they find out whether there’s some kind of “shop local” organization in the community that brings together independent shops. We were fortunate to help start such a group in Raleigh. We gather with folks once a month and explain what it means to buy local and how it benefits the local economy, and we look for ways to give back. Finding other likeminded local independents is the first step. It’s hard to pioneer out there on your own. –Kassondra Cloos JANUARY 12, 2017 DAY 3

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Q&A

5 Questions for…

Ambreen Tariq Founder, Brown People Camping

what it is about the outdoors that’s so impactful on our lives? Ultimately we can grow our community of outdoor lovers, people who are willing to integrate the outdoors into their lives and protect it for future generations.

2. WHAT MAKES INSTAGRAM THE RIGHT PLATFORM TO ENCOURAGE DIVERSITY? a Instagram is extremely powerful. There are a million ways to take a photo of a tree, and they all show a different perspective of how someone could look at it. There’s a kinship when you share that photo. We can connect on this level, that we find this particular thing beautiful. People of color and people who identify as minorities in the outdoors have reached out to thank me for sharing my stories. Some have even said that following my account helped them not feel as alone in the outdoors community. I am a total stranger, but simply by sharing an image and a story, I can have such an intimate connection with someone. That’s so profound and moving.

For Ambreen Tariq, being an American and loving the outdoors are one and the same. Soon after immigrating to Minnesota from India at age 8, she and her family started exploring their new home through hiking and camping. “It was very important in developing my own sense of self here,” she says. Only as an adult did Tariq, who works for the Department of Labor, grow increasingly bothered by the fact that she and her family were often the only people of color out there. So, Tariq launched an Instagram account (@BrownPeopleCamping) to push the conversation about increasing diversity in the outdoors. Now, she has 3,500 followers and counting. 1. WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO START BROWN PEOPLE CAMPING? a Around the Centennial of the National Park Service last summer, the conversation about diversity in the outdoors started coming up more and more. It inspired me

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that people were talking about it so openly. So in August I thought, hey, why don’t I do this? I want to join the national conversation and share my experience. A big goal of mine is to get the momentum going: Can we all share our stories, and talk about

3. HAS THE CURRENT POLITICAL CLIMATE INFLUENCED YOUR CAMPAIGN? a Absolutely. When you go outdoors, you meet people with a lot of different politics, especially in this political climate where we’re talking about Muslims as “other.” I’m Muslim, and it’s something I’ve dealt with my whole life. But being outdoors, that all just stops and you’re having a moment, cutting out all that noise. There are so many negative political voices trying to make me feel less American, and I like to push back on that. Talking about public lands and the role they have played in my life is a proud part of my identity, and I like to share that. This is our land, our taxes go to it, and it’s just as much a part of our heritage. I want to encourage other immigrants to go out there and find that rich, empowering connection to American land.

4. WHY DO YOU THINK THE OUTDOORS HAS BEEN TRADITIONALLY SEEN AS A PLACE FOR WHITE PEOPLE? a It’s an expensive hobby when you’re brand-new to a culture like this. I was exposed to it at a young age, but most people don’t have that to fall back on. Parks are often in rural places, and you have to set aside time and money to get there. A lot of people I know don’t feel comfortable in the outdoors community because they can’t identify with the people around them. Another aspect is the extreme caricature of what it means to be an outdoor enthusiast. People say, it’s not really camping unless you’re doing it for days in the backcountry. But the outdoors is whatever you want it to be. If you want to glamp, glamp. If you want to go in an RV, fine. 5. WHAT DOES THE OUTDOOR INDUSTRY NEED TO DO TO BE MORE INCLUSIVE? a I would beg brands to rethink the way they approach their advertising campaigns and think about diversity. There’s consistency in the way that people are used to model outdoor gear: Often, they are young, thin, white people enjoying extreme adventures. It’s very hard to regularly find people I identify with in advertising campaigns. I would push companies to make it not just a diversity campaign—make it normative. Diversity should be a regular part of your visuals. People need to see themselves in the outdoors to want to be outdoors. It’s not just trying to attract customers of color. It’s acknowledging that diversity is important, period. And if we don’t grow, these hobbies will dwindle. The writing is on the wall: People of color are a growing segment of the American population. Everybody has a role to play, from retailers to brands to consumers to politicians, to think about what it means to make people feel comfortable in the outdoors. —Elisabeth Kwak-Hefferan

PHOTO COURTESY OF AMBREEN TARIQ

Tariq at Utah’s Arches National Park


BOOTH 155-401

COTTON UNITES Cotton meet wool. Wool meet cotton. Now that’s a naturally smart match.

AMERICA’S COTTON PRODUCERS AND IMPORTERS. Service Marks/Trademarks of Cotton Incorporated. © 2017 Cotton Incorporated.


Q&A

5 Questions for…

Joe Flannery

SVP Newell Brands, General Manager Technical Apparel

Joe Flannery calls himself “insanely fortunate” to have landed the owner of several sporting goods companies as his university-sponsored mentor when he was a college freshman. That led him an internship at Jelco Ventures (part owners of Rossignol, Look, Bell, and others) at age 18, which he used as a springboard into gigs with Nike, adidas International, The North Face, and heli ski company Canadian Mountain Holidays, before becoming Marmot’s first-ever general manager in 2016. The luck continues: Last fall, Flannery, 46, took on a new role, overseeing all business aspects for both Marmot and sister brand ExOfficio. 1. WHAT LESSONS FROM THE CANADIAN MOUNTAIN HOLIDAYS JOB DID YOU TAKE TO MARMOT? a I call that my sabbatical. My time at CMH was a radically different experience. The first day on the job, I was handed a toilet bowl brush and told, “Everyone in the company is expected to clean the toilets, including the president.” It’s really important to check your ego at

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the door and make sure everyone understands the leader of the company is willing to do anything to provide the best service. Also, the company experienced one of the largest avalanches in British Columbia’s history during my watch. When you’re dealing with life-and-death situations on a daily basis, it really puts life and work into perspective.

3. WHERE DO YOU SEE THE INDUSTRY GOING? WHAT’S MARMOT DOING TO ADAPT? a The industry is seeing significant headwinds. The currency and foreign exchange headwinds make our products in key markets around the world significantly more expensive than they were last year. There’s an excess inventory glut that exists in North America, Europe, and Asia. The immediate challenge is global warming. We are potentially seeing the extinction of our winters. Outdoor business brands need to evolve beyond just making insulated shells and rain jackets. At the end of the day, we’re farmers and the bounty of our crop is dependent on the weather. The patterns in the weather have not been very favorable for our industry. Marmot is using this time to invest in innovation launches in core categories. And I continue to believe that there is incredible opportunity for our industry. People around the world are leading more and more stressful lives, and the outdoors is the antidote. Oxygen is our fuel. 4. NEWELL BRANDS ACQUIRED MARMOT’S PARENT COMPANY LAST SPRING. HOW DO YOU REMAIN A

FINANCIAL ASSET RATHER THAN A LIABILITY FOR LARGE, MULTIBRAND COMPANY? a I’m blown away by the strategic plans put forth by Newell Brands. As an example, there is a massive innovation center that has been developed in Kalamazoo, Michigan. It’s filled with designers, color and trend experts, and it has a huge factory line and modeling shop. Leveraging the resources of those centers of excellence is something that I very much look forward to. As far as multiline softgoods apparel brands, Marmot’s market share in the U.S. is number four. The top three are multiple times larger than we are. Many of them are making precarious distribution decisions because they have to grow the size of a Marmot every year to hit their targets. I do think that some of the industry’s growth rates in the past 10 years are so significant that they are leading to the saturation of certain brands, and that’s not sustainable. We have an opportunity to still be special. 5. CAN WE EXPECT ANY MORE TV ADS THIS YEAR, À LA YOUR HEADLINE-GRABBING SUPER BOWL COMMERCIAL IN 2016? a No: 2016 was the apex of a fiveyear brand awareness push. TV was the primary vehicle to reach a broader audience to tell the Marmot message. Our focus in ‘17 is shifting to driving consumers to buy our products with our key retailers. Specialty outdoor retailers are our focus, and we will be overinvesting in marketing and visual support in this channel. Marmot’s Fall In Love with The Outside Road Tour, produced by RootsRated, is an example of how we intend to increase this engagement. The Super Bowl ad was an aboveand-beyond investment made by our former parent company, Jarden Corporation. We have measured brand awareness, and that has increased quite substantially. “The core and the more” continue to grow. —Elisabeth Kwak-Hefferan

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOE FLANNERY

2. WHAT’S THE “CORE AND MORE” CONCEPT, AND HOW DOES MARMOT EMBRACE BOTH TYPES OF CONSUMERS? a It’s having your teams revolve around understanding those core consumers—I call them archetypes. Having experiential research with those archetypes is imperative to bringing exceptional product to market. That said, those archetypes influence communities of people who are not hardcore athletes. That’s the “more.” The core are leaders, and the more are the people who look up to those leaders but might not be using the products with the same intentions. If you’re too precious and only express that you’re providing solutions for the core, then you’re exclusive.


NEWS

Question of the

Day

Former Black Diamond CEO Peter Metcalf recently suggested the show ought to leave the state over land protection issues. What do you think?

“It’s hard. Moving the show doesn’t address the problem head on. Instead, we can use the dollars the show generates to advocate for change.” –Nate Trednnick, Shine United

“It’s unfortunate that the public lands portion of his passion is getting overshadowed by the movement of OR, which I think is secondary in his op-ed. I think the industry coming together to support the places that we recreate should be our number-one priority.” –Serena Gordon, The Conservation Alliance

“Peter is a real leader. We should leverage the funds generated from OR to create positive change. Makes me think: What can I do as an individual to stand up in my own way?” –Don Bushey, Wilderness Exchange Unlimited

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PHOTOS BY LOUISA ALBANESE

“Pulling out of Utah would be a radical move. I think there are other ways we can stand up for public lands, like the way OIA brings pressure to bear.” –Debra J. Cobb, Textile Technology and Trend Reports


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Outdoors Together

We must protect wild spaces as venues for tranformation. BY BIX FIRER, COLORADO PROGRAM MANAGER FOR BIG CITY MOUNTAINEERS

A

MERICA IS MORE divided today than it has been in a generation. Recent research shows that political polarization and animosity have increased markedly—by as much as 20 or 30 percent, according to one Pew Research poll. Hidden from the headlines, however, is a silver lining for the industry: Americans voted overwhelmingly in support of parks on Election Day. In fact, according to The Trust for Public Land, of the 86 park, conservation, and restoration measures that appeared on ballots across the country, 68 passed. The lesson in this great accomplishment is that Americans of all political stripes, economic backgrounds, and geographies care about their connection to the outdoors. What’s more, when we support experiences for diverse audiences in the outdoors, we can begin to close difficult divisions, open dialogues, and work toward equity.

Bix Firer (front row, second from right) and students from Envrionmental Learning for Kids atop a summit in Colorado’s Flat Tops Wilderness.

The outdoor industry is a special place. We are a community that inherently understands the importance of outdoor experiences and natural places. We know that exposure to the natural world has consistently and clinically been linked to a reduced chance of depression and anxiety and that people who spend time in natural spaces have a greater sense of unity with others. Now it’s time to take the next step: We must consciously turn to these outdoor spaces for solidarity. At Big City Mountaineers, we’ve seen these transformations occur time and again in our students

and our mentors. We’ve seen young leaders emerge, full of compassion and courage, and watched established community volunteers leave with new perspectives and appreciation for communities they never knew. Now, more than ever before, we must invest in opportunities that unite. We’ve already seen some amazing outcomes from our BCM expeditions: Police and young people of color sharing experiences together in the Olympics walk away with empathy for one another, and students returning to their communities gain leadership roles in community organizing and environmental justice. Put simply, our goal is to assist youth in meeting their potential. In the process, we see something else magical happen: BCM mentors begin to turn to the teens—and their unique life experiences— for an expanded perspective on the world. As one of our mentors put it, “I’m always surprised by what I learn and how I’m impacted by my BCM expedition experiences, especially by a few powerful words from a 13-year-old.” BCM expeditions bring together communities and individuals that wouldn’t otherwise have a chance to connect. Community leaders—both established and future—head home ready to effect change. Shared experiences in the outdoors can help to heal divisions in our country, but they won’t happen without advocacy and support from those of us who understand their impact. It’s time to invest in experiences that bring together people in nature. It’s time to  invest in a healthier future for all.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BIG CITY MOUNTAINEERS

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OUTDOOR RETAILER SHOW INFO

Winter Market 2017 Attendance Guidelines

Only qualified members of the trade are invited to attend.

Open to retailers and reps only, the Retailer+Rep Lounge offers a respite from all the goings-on below.

Trade Show Hours

Children at Outdoor Retailer

Tuesday, Jan. 10 - Thursday, Jan. 12 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Exhibit Hall

Salt Palace Convention Center 100 South West Temple Salt Lake City, Utah 84101

Parking

Underground parking is available for $14 per day. The entrances are located at 200 South/200 West and 300 West/90 South. Additional parking is located at City Creek Mall.

No Photos

Unauthorized photography is not permitted. Call 801-534-4705 to report any violations.

Children are welcome on the show floor during show hours only. All children must be registered as guests with Outdoor Retailer and they must be accompanied by an adult at all times. Childcare is not provided. Children under the age of 16 are not allowed on the show floor during move-in and/or move-out.

First Aid and Mothers’ Room Medical staff will be located near MR 150 (located under the triple escalator) to treat minor health problems. Mothers needing privacy can also visit the First Aid room.

Dogs at Outdoor Retailer

Express)

We encourage you to use the awardwinning facility Camp Bark-a-Lot (campbarkalot.com) for your pooch. If you are planning to bring your pup to the show (service dogs are allowed without restrictions), please be sure to follow these simple rules: a Register your dog at the registration counter at the East Entrance. a Sign a waiver agreeing to the rules and requirements. a Make sure to walk your dog outside regularly to avoid any accidents. a If an accident does occur, please notify Show Management immediately in MR 257 or call 801-534-4705.

Registration Hours

Shuttle Service

Registration

Now there are more registration locations to serve you: FULL REGISTRATION East Entrance (across from the Marriott City Creek) BADGE PRINTING ONLY (APPROVED, PREREGISTERED) West Entrance (across from Vivint Arena) North Entrance (near the Radisson) South Entrance (across from Holiday Inn

Tuesday, Jan. 10 ..........8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 11 ....8 a.m. – 6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 12 ........8 a.m. – 4 p.m.

ISPO Online Lounge

Located on the upper concourse of the South Lobby Online Lounge is open daily before and during the show.

a Shuttles will run to and from select hotels and the Salt Palace Convention Center every 15 minutes (from downtown and airport areas) to 30 to 40 minutes (from Sandy) from 7:30 to 11 a.m. a Shuttles will pick up and drop off at the both the West and East Entrances.

FROM HOTELS Show Management Office

Tuesday, Jan. 10 - Thursday, Jan. 12 ............................................7:30 – 11 a.m.

Located in MR 257

FROM SALT PALACE

Press Room

Tuesday, Jan. 10 .............4 – 8:30 p.m.* Wednesday, Jan. 11 ..3:30 – 8:30 p.m.* Thursday, Jan. 12 ...........3:30 – 7 p.m.

Located in MR 254 C

Retailer+Rep Lounge Located in MR 254 B

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

*Service from Industry Party and Inspiration Awards until 8:30 p.m.


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73

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Discover the F17 collection Outdoor Retailer booth: 29173W


OUTDOOR RETAILER SOCIAL MEDIA

Stay Connected to the Digital Conversation TWITTER

@OutdoorRetailer

YOUTUBE

@OutdoorRetailerShow

20,000 135,000 FOLLOWERS

VIEWS

INSTAGRAM

@OutdoorRetailer

FACEBOOK

@OutdoorRetailer

24,000 26,000 FOLLOWERS

FOLLOWERS

OUTDOOR RETAILER brings together thousands of people for a week of gear, education, and entertainment in Salt Lake City. And in today’s digital world, the show’s buzz and reach isn’t limited to the confines of the Salt Palace. Thousands more join the event and stay connected year-round virtually, following the Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube feeds from Outdoor Retailer, exhibitors, and media. So ready those hashtags and make sure your brand’s voice is part of the conversation:

#ORShow – share show happenings #WeAreOutdoor – share your outdoor adventures #ORFirst – share first-time experiences at the show #ORNewbie – share new-attendee experiences with a selfie #NewatOR – share new gear you see on the show floor #SinceReno – industry insider since Reno #BadAssador – Outdoor Retailer and Rep ambassadors #ORDaily – share what you read in the show’s only official news publication GET SOCIAL @ VENTURE OUT Relay the story of Outdoor Retailer’s fastest-growing neighborhood and the hippest new styles of the season. a Visit the Information Desk for help and charging stations near the Salt Palace’s East Entrance, at the top of the ramp just beyond the triple escalator. a Check out the digital editions of the O.R. Daily, available online every show morning at snewsnet.com/ordaily. a Download the Outdoor Retailer Mobile App. Find the most up-to-date exhibitor listings, sync your calendar, navigate the show floor, and post photos. Visit your app store and search for Outdoor Retailer. Download prior to arriving at the show to start planning your precious time.

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY


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OUTDOOR RETAILER MAPS

WHERE AM I?

1

Winter Market Tradeshow

2

MEDIA PREVIEW

8

VENTURE OUT

January 10-12, 2017 Salt Lake City, Utah

3

OU@OR EDUCATION

9

OUTDOOR INSPIRATION AWARDS

All Mountain Demo

4

RETAILER SKILLS COURSE

10

FASHION SHOW/INDUSTRY PARTY

5

THE CAMP

11

TREND + DESIGN CENTER

6

THE CAFÉ ON THE MEZZ

12

GREENBIKE BIKE SHARE LOCATIONS

January 9, 2017 Solitude, Utah

SALT PALACE

7

BADGE PICK-UP AREAS (located at all entrances)

DOWNTOWN MARRIOTT & CITY CREEK CENTER Monday, January 9 @ 5:00 P.M.

As of October 31, 2016

Note: This map is not to scale

VIVINT SMART HOME ARENA

WEST ENTRANCE

7

RADISSON

6

8 5

NORTH ENTRANCE

7 12 11

ABRAVANEL HALL

1 SALT PALACE CONVENTION CENTER

SOUTH ENTRANCE

12

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

7

4

9

UTAH MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART

7 10

EAST ENTRANCE

2 3 MARRIOTT

CITY CREEK CENTER


SHINHAN (ffd@shinhanind.co.kr) Booth#. 255-107

Extreme comfort The most technically advanced air permeable, waterproof and breathable fabric. Super light and soft handfeel, beyond PTFE but Eco friendly! Incomparable waterproofness with the other existing Nano membrane laminated fabric : 10000mmH2O after 20 washes. Air permeability : 0.3~0.5 cfm Breathability : 30,000~40,000gram/sqm/day Perfect seam sealed performance.


EDUCATION

Schedule as of 12/08/16. For the most up-to-date schedule, check out the app or visit outdoorindustry.org.

DAY 3, THURSDAY, JANUARY 12 @ MARRIOTT DOWNTOWN AT CITY CREEK

9:30 – 10:30 AM

OUTDOOR RECREATION & CULTURAL RELEVANCY: 4 CASE STUDIES PRESENTERS: MICHAEL DAVIS, LET’S MOVE OUTSIDE PROGRAM, SEATTLE; TAIMUR AHMAD, THE WILDERNESS SOCIETY; MICHELLE PIÑON, LATINO OUTDOORS; GRACE ANDERSON, THE SIERRA CLUB’S INSPIRING CONNECTIONS OUTDOORS MODERATOR: CHRISTIAN BECKWITH, SHIFT The future earnings of the outdoor industry and the future stewardship of our public lands are interrelated: both depend on the cultivation of new constituencies for success. No demographics are riper for cultivation than communities of color. This panel discussion features four alumni of SHIFT’s Emerging Leaders Program who present case studies on ways they’ve successfully leveraged outdoor recreation to engage a culturally relevant next generation of conservationist and customer.

11 AM – 12 PM

FALL 2017 ACTIVE TRENDS: WHAT’S NEXT FOR THE ACTIVE LIFESTYLE PRESENTERS: NINA ESTEVES & MARLA ROSEN, THE DONNEGER GROUP Health and wellness continues to be a growing movement with apparel playing a key role. Join The Doneger Group for a look at concept trends in activewear, including sociocultural influences and design inspiration. This session will also break down what’s new and next for the active lifestyle in color, fabric, print & pattern.

11:30 AM – 1 PM

11 AM – 1 PM

RETAILER SKILLS COURSE: MEASURE AND EVALUATE EMPLOYEES PRODUCTIVITY

Daily lunch provided for registered attendees | Held in the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art Auditorium adjacent to the Salt Palace Every day your employees are selling for you. How do you measure their performance? This session will help you identify key team performance metrics. How are they executing on your consumer engagement goals? Session work will focus on goal setting to increase business and promote buy-in with each of your team members. Come prepared look at your sales goals and how your current employees are performing. Learn how to get to where you want to be and meet your business goals.

OIA INDUSTRY LUNCH: YOU CAN’T DO BUSINESS ON A DEAD PLANET: A PATH FORWARD ON CLIMATE CHANGE ★ PRESENTERS: OUTDOOR INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION, PROTECT OUR WINTERS, CLIMATE ACTION CAMPAIGN & CLIMATE REALITY PROJECT The surprising outcome of the 2016 presidential election signals a dramatic shift for climate change policy. The next administration has pledged to defund federal climate change mitigation and will withdraw from international climate agreements. What do we do now? Join for an important discussion about where we go from here and finding a way forward, together.

★ Powered by

– Live webcast available: Go to outdoorindustry.org/brandlive to register.


@THESHOW

DIG INTO OUR HIGHLIGHTS OF WINTER MARKET’S EVENTS, EDUCATION AND MORE

Events

THOUGHT LEADER KEYNOTE & BREAKFAST WITH PATAGONIA CEO AND PRESIDENT, ROSE MARCARIO 7 - 9 am Marriott Downtown at City Creek Camber Outdoors will host a Thought Leader Keynote & Breakfast with Rose Marcario, CEO and president of Patagonia. Rose will share Patagonia’s philosophy around how workplace culture drives inclusion and innovation. Registration is requested, but not required. MICROBAN’S FRESH BAR EXPERIENCE 9 am - 5 pm #155-406 Join the Microban“Fresh Bar” experience—smell materials treated with Microban antimicrobial and odor capture technologies versus nontreated materials, while supplies last. KLYMIT V SEAT GIVEAWAY 9 am #19009 Starting at 9 am, the first 150 dealers and friends to the Klymit booth will receive a FREE Klymit inflatable V Seat. GEAR AID TENACIOUS TAPE PATCH REPAIRS 9 am - 12 pm #28027 Does your favorite jacket have a tear? Is your gear showing signs of wear? Don’t ditch it, let’s fix it! All OR attendees are invited to stop by the Gear Aid booth for a Patch Repair during the show. Our experts will help revive your tried and true gear with our timetested, peel and stick Tenacious Tape. Give it a try and you’ll never go back to that gooey, sticky, silver stuff again. FREE SAKROOTS TOTE! 11 am - 3 pm

#39155 Visit Sakroots to receive a complimentary Sakroots tote. *Buyers only, while supplies last FREE MAPLE BACON CREAMEES! 11 am - 6 pm #32150 Darn Tough brings a taste of Vermont to Utah—get a delicious (and free!) Maple Bacon Creamee. Available every day or until the goodness is gone. #IGotMyCreameePulled

Sales and Charities EXOFFICIO UNDERWEAR SALE BENEFITS THE ATCF 9 am - 6 pm #12027 Pick up a pair of the all-new, men’s SolCool underwear or women’s sport-mesh. All proceeds support the Adventure Travel Trade Association’s Adventure Travel Conservation Fund. $10-$15. SOL SURVIVAL KIT SALE TO SUPPORT AMERICAN HIKING SOCIETY 9 am #5019 SOL Traverse’s tin survival kit has you covered in four of the main survival areas: water (purification tablet & storage), shelter, fire, and signaling. On sale for only $10, which is 50 percent off! All proceeds benefit American Hiking Society. Stop by the Adventure Medical Kits booth #5019 while supplies last! HIKING BOOT SALE TO SUPPORT AMERICAN HIKING SOCIETY 3 pm #32143 Top-selling Hi-Tec Logan hiking boots are 50 percent off. Swing by Hi-Tec Sports and score women’s and men’s hiking boots for only $40. All proceeds benefit American Hiking Society. While supplies last. CAMBER FUNDRAISER– MERINO WOOL

ACCESSORY SALE 9 am - 6 pm #23013 Daily fundraiser to benefit Camber Outdoors (formerly Outdoor Industries Women’s Coalition). For the entire show we will be selling merino wool socks ($10) and scarves ($20). Stop by to shop and support a great organization. PERSONALIZED MARKET TOTES FROM MOUNTAIN KHAKIS! 9 am - 6 pm #21001 Customized embroidery on the spot. Early availability on this limited-edition “Teton” style available only at Outdoor Retailer. $40 (includes embroidery). On sale throughout the show (but hustle, while supplies last). Benefits Camber Outdoors. GREAT DEALS ON MOUNTAIN KHAKIS IN THE BOOTH! 9 am - 6 pm #21001 Pack light, shop Mountain Khakis at the show, and upgrade your Outdoor Retailer wardrobe. Apparel for guys and gals. Throughout the show (but hustle, while supplies last). Benefits Camber Outdoors. GARMONT SHOE SALE FOR THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 6 pm #32142W Garmont is selling its Dragontail shoe to benefit The Conservation Alliance. ICEBREAKER SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 6 pm #32075 Icebreaker is selling its men’s and women’s Oasis Crewe to benefit The Conservation Alliance. TOAD&CO SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 6 pm #30051E Toad&Co is selling assorted styles for men and women to benefit The Conservation Alliance.

LA SPORTIVA HOODY SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 6 pm #5027 La Sportiva is selling its men’s Bishop Hoody and women’s Buttermilk Hoody to benefit The Conservation Alliance. RUFFWEAR SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 6 pm #32067 Ruffwear is selling its Hydro Plane Flying Disc to benefit The Conservation Alliance. SAXX UNDERWEAR SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 6 pm #36191 SAXX Underwear is selling assorted styles of men’s briefs and boxer briefs to benefit The Conservation Alliance. IBEX OUTDOOR CLOTHING SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 6 pm #8000 Ibex is selling its classic Woolies 1 Crew to benefit The Conservation Alliance. FARM TO FEET SOCK SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 6 pm #32182 Farm to Feet is selling its Bend Midweight Hiking Sock to benefit The Conservation Alliance. CAMELBAK TRAVEL MUG SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 6 pm #16027 CamelBak is selling its Forge double-walled, vacuum-insulated steel vessel that keeps 16 oz. of coffee or tea piping hot for six hours, with an impact cap that prevents dents or cracks if you drop it. All proceeds benefit The Conservation Alliance. EAGLE CREEK SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 6 pm #24017 Eagle Creek is selling its Cargo Hauler Duffel to

benefit The Conservation Alliance. KLEAN KANTEEN CUSTOM TUMBLER SALE FOR THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 6 pm #3009 Klean Kanteen is selling its custom Conservation Alliance 8-oz. Insulated Tumbler to benefit The Conservation Alliance. BLACK DIAMOND EQUIPMENT SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE 9 am - 6 pm #6009 Black Diamond is selling its Iota headlamp to benefit The Conservation Alliance. ENO HAMMOCK SALE TO BENEFIT THE CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL 9 am - 5 pm #15008 ENO is selling Special Edition DoubleNest Hammock and Atlas Strap Combos to benefit the Continental Divide Trail. Combo discounted to $60 while supplies last. FJÄLLRÄVEN DUFFEL NO. 6 SALE 9 am - 12 pm #28049 Support Leave No Trace by picking up your Fjällräven Duffel No. 6. made with heavy duty G-1000 material. Swing by the Leave No Trace booth located next to BACKPACKER to get yours while supplies last. MSRP is $200 but you can get yours for $50. 100 percent of proceeds will support the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics. COFFEE THAT GIVES 9 am -4 pm #VO440 Join us daily for a pour over of Counter Culture Coffee from 9 am to 4 pm. Free pour with your purchase of our NEW MiiR 8-oz .vacuum insulated tumbler $10. BYOC pick-me-up pour for $1. (Disposable cups will NOT be provided.) All proceeds will support health by funding a clean water project. *Cash only. Tumblers available while supplies last.

SOCIAL MEDIA RANKINGS (FACEBOOK LIKES) BRANDS UNDER ARMOUR

5,522,244 THE NORTH FACE

4,791,916 ROXY

3,232,511 SPERRY

2,017,911 NEW BALANCE

1,587,885 JANSPORT

1,583,161 MERRELL

1,479,606 COLUMBIA

1,304,304 PATAGONIA

862,896 L.L.BEAN

739,060 RETAILERS BASS PRO SHOPS

3,202,334 REI

1,687,584 SIERRA TRADING POST

856,418 BACKCOUNTRY

718,920 MOOSEJAW

235,997 OUTDOOR RESEARCH

208,449

FIELD & STREAM SHOP

129,598 ORVIS

116,268 CAMPMOR

85,039 EVO

80,910 JANUARY 12, 2017 DAY 3

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THE POWER LIST CONTINUED FROM PAGE 33

8

â„–

the A R BITER

Jill Dumain

CEO, BLUESIGN TECHNOLOGIES AG

PHOTO BY COURTESY

I

F YOU WANT to be an authentic brand and a leading voice in the outdoor industry right now, you have to have your sustainability bona fides, and they must be monitored, tracked, traceable, and most of all, certified so consumers won’t label your company a greenwasher. Reputations stick. No one knows that better than Jill Dumain, and no one in the industry has been as effective at keeping to the strict guidelines necessary to ensure a company is doing good when it comes to environmental manufacturing. Her reach grew substantially on January 1 when she became the CEO of bluesign technologies, a Swiss company that implements the


THE POWER LIST

toughest, most comprehensive environmental certification on the planet. Jill Dumain spent seven years as Patagonia’s director of environmental strategy, a role in which she oversaw the brand’s rise to prominence for its company-wide commitment to using the best textiles and apparel manufacturing processes possible. Under her leadership, Patagonia launched pioneering initiatives such as The Common Threads Recycling Program,  letting consumers return spent clothing items like baselayers to the company to be recycled into new apparel, and The Footprint Chronicles, which allowed customers to actually track the entire supply chain of a garment. These programs put power in the hands of purchasers, giving them the ability to choose real green companies and shun those that don’t allow for the same level of transparency. Dumain’s work helping to build Patagonia’s reputation began when she first started at the company in 1989, working for decades in textiles and bringing in materials the rest of the industry was quick to adopt, such as organic cotton and wool. “With her expertise in sustainable textiles, she brought to Patagonia the invaluable perspective of objective science,” says Rick Ridgeway, Patagonia’s VP of public engagement. “That perspective will serve her well at bluesign, and more importantly, it will help bluesign realize its potential to assist the global apparel industry to

reduce its environmental footprint.” To meet the bluesign standard, a manufacturer’s fabrics and apparel manufacturing process must pass through a gauntlet of qualifications beyond simply using green fabrics to prove it is indeed friendly to the environment. It must use less energy to produce apparel and fabrics, lower the toxic air emissions of manufacturing, prove workers are safe, lower water pollution, and avoid chemicals that could harm consumers, among a long list of other criteria. Some outdoor industry companies have shied away from bluesign since it is so stringent. Look for that to change with an industry stalwart like Dumain at the helm and a new partnership with Outdoor Industry Association (OIA) just announced at the OR Show. “Jill is both pragmatic and aspirational, and, in her new role, she has an opportunity to broaden the work and leadership of the outdoor industry in addressing the impacts of chemistry used in producing apparel,” say Amy Roberts, executive director of OIA. “Bluesign will benefit from the trust she has built with both textile mills and brands in the outdoor industry, and I believe she will help drive reduced impacts to the environment and innovation in the way our industry produces apparel. Many folks in the industry thought it was a perfect fit when the announcement was made.”

Rob Aselt ine

“Her perspective will help bluesign realize its potential to assist the global apparel industry in reducing its environmental footprint,” says Rick Ridgeway, Patagonia’s VP of public engagement.

#

gearhack DRAWING TODAY 11AM get your business card in the drawing at WIGWAM BOOTH #19019 for a chance to win ONE OF TWO GREAT PRIZE PACKS.

BACKPACKING GEAR | BACKCOUNTRY GEAR MUST BE PRESENT TO WIN

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THE POWER LIST

9

№ the BELIEV ER

Rue Mapp

FOUNDER, OUTDOOR AFRO

Come see the new

CONNECT Gaiters at Kahtoola’s booth

Booth # 8011

F

“When Rue Mapp started Outdoor Afro, she had no idea what it would turn into: She thought she was starting a blog that might be read by a few friends—but she was starting a movement.”

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

PHOTOS BY CAVEMAN COLLECTIVE; COURTESY

From Prototype to Product

OR DECADES, THE outdoor industry has been seeking ways to make the outdoors more diverse and more relevant to people outside the predictable circle of shiny white faces. One hurdle, however, has been that those same white faces can struggle to speak authentically to the diverse communities they’re trying to include. Such populations want people who look like them to make the pitch. Oakland, California native Rue Mapp has built an African-American community simply through her dedication. Back in 2009, she started the blog Outdoor Afro as an expression of her own love of exploring wild places as a woman of color. Now, she speaks to a massive community of 60 leaders and 18,000 members in 28 states: African-Americans and others who get out camping, hiking, kayaking, and even just walking in parks across the nation. “When Rue Mapp started Outdoor Afro, she had no idea what it would turn into: She thought she was starting a blog that might be read by a few friends—but she was starting a movement,” says Marika Holmgren, founder of Do Good Events, who works with the Goldman Environmental Prize and has collaborated with Outdoor Afro over the years. Outdoor Afro has become so successful because it speaks directly to and from the African-American experience in nature. Mapp sees “outdoors” in places beyond big, iconic wilderness areas—her programs engage in urban National Park Service units like Golden Gate National Recreation Area in San Francisco. Outdoor Afro members hiked a portion of the Appalachian Trail to honor Harriet Tubman. And she has hosted a healing hike in California to deal with the death of Eric Garner at the hands of Staten Island police, showing the outdoors can help African-Americans by rooting to the universal power of the natural world to bring solace. “Rue Mapp has helped tens of thousands of African-American consumers to create a direct relationship with the natural world,” says James Edward Mills, author of The Adventure Gap: Changing the Face of the Outdoors. “Specialty retailers and manufacturers owe Rue a real debt of gratitude for exposing their products and services to a growing market that’s only going to get bigger.” The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that by 2044, minorities in the nation will become the majority. If the outdoor industry wants to include more diverse customers, it should seek to empower more leaders like Mapp, who can authentically rally the voices and experiences of those populations.


10

THE POWER LIST

the DE ALMAKER

Nathan Pund

MANAGING DIRECTOR, LAZARD

A

S THE OUTDOOR industry evolves in the business marketplace, consolidation and acquisitions continue to be a way of life. It’s just the natural cycle of American business. In the outdoor industry, it works like this: Begin with an idea hatched in the back of a van, scratch up the cash to buy a booth in the pavilions at OR Summer Market, catch fire, grow. Then the choice gets tough: Stick it out but fight to compete without pocketfuls of capital, or sell. And while some may see that as the demise of small brands, like any nasty financial or legal transaction, doing it the right way when it has to happen is critical. If you are going to sell or acquire a brand, Nathan Pund is the man you want brokering the deal. The Dartmouth Tuck School of Business grad and former lieutenant in the U.S. Navy currently works as the managing director specializing in global clients in the outdoor, active lifestyle, and tactical sectors for Lazard, a publicly traded investment bank and financial services shop that manages $186.5 billion in assets. Working in finance over the past two decades in the outdoor space, Pund, who has served on the boards of both Leave No Trace and The Conservation Alliance, has brokered some of the most important transactions in the industry. His first big deal was Columbia’s acquisition of Mountain Hardwear in 2003, a tricky move in Pund’s opinion since for the deal to be a success, consumers and investors had to have confidence that Mountain Hardwear, a brand that defined core outdoor, could hold on to its authenticity in the portfolio of a big

company. Pund made sure the deal was more than simply $36 million in cash trading hands and kept Columbia happy with its first major move in the five years after it went public. More deals followed. Pund was there when luggage giant Samsonite, looking to make inroads in the burgeoning outdoor space, bought High Sierra for $110 million in 2012. He brokered the $270 million sale of Costa Eyewear to Essilor in 2014. And he handled the complex sale of longtime industry stalwart Black Diamond to Kanders and Co. None of these moves made people who see the outdoor space as losing its soul happy, but having someone like Pund there who has a passion for the industry helped ensure there was a deeper understanding in making them work. And his financial work runs far deeper than acquisitions. “Nathan is one of those people who don’t often show up in headlines unless some major deal has gone down,” says Scott McGuire, current president and brand strategist at The Mountain Lab, who has worked for brands ranging from KEEN to The North Face. “For most of my career, I’ve seen Nathan’s fingerprints on some of the most influential transactions in the industry. If there is a complicated M&A to accomplish or a smart partnering in brand investment to be found, dig in and you’ll likely find Nathan as one of the connectors making it happen.”

LIVE THE DREAM. JOIN OUR TEAM. Apply online at thenorthface.com/careers

Photo: Tim Kemple

Booth #3009AE

honeystinger.com JANUARY 12, 2017 DAY 3

79

NEW! Photo: Riley Seebeck

Stop by to sample the best tasting sports nutrition on the block!


SCENE SNACKS

Today’s Specials

2 3

Graze from the show floor.

1

You can always count on the show floor smorgasbord to take the hurt off your per diem. Consider this menu next time you find your step count soaring past your calorie intake between meetings—or when you want to save budget for an after-hours splurge. 1. K’ul Chocolate (BR542) Stamina Superfood bar 2. GU Energy Labs (#130) Salty’s Caramel Stroopwafel 3. Honey Stinger (#30049E) Peanut Butter N’ Honey Energy Bar 4. The Pickle Juice Company (BR544) Pickle Juice Sport 5. CLIF Bar & Company (#12019) Salted Watermelon BLOKS Energy Chews 6. SmartyPants Vitamins (BR546) All-In-One Gummies 7. Navitas Naturals (BR717) Coconut Hemp Superfood + Pumpkin Seeds 8. Jelly Belly (#36177) Sport Beans 9. Carabiner Coffee Company (in the High Altitude Den) The Skooch Medium Roast 10. Sweetwood Cattle Company (#8051) Original Beef Jerky 11. Preferred Wholesale, Inc. (BR541) Iowa Smokehouse Smoked Beef Sticks

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7

5

6

8

9 11

What got us through this issue: Ska Brewing, the unofficial beer sponsor of OR Daily (their tasty brews ended every manic day); our yellow-shirt newsies; interns (Hadley, Katherine, Nick) who rose to every challenge with enthusiasm

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OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

PHOTOS BY TK PHOTOS BY CAVEMAN COLLECTIVE

10


Product

Zone

Featuring the freshest gear on the market today. Here is a sneak peek at what’s new and what’s coming from leading industry companies

Special Advertising Section

Baffin’s Ultralite boots are the evolution of winter footwear, featured here is style Sage in Black/Red. Waterproof and weighing under 2lbs, these boots feature a body-heat mouldable removable lining system, and Baffin’s proprietary AirGrip and Polar Rubber midsole/outsole combination to keep you sure-footed regardless of the elements.

www.baffin.com Dickies PRO™ Workwear

New outerwear combines state of the art CORDURA® fabric technologY with Dickies® performance workwear. Designed to protect against the elements to keep you going until the job is done, no task is too tough for your Dickies PRO™ Workwear. This groundbreaking line of work clothes – a Bomber Jacket, Field Coat and Stretch Ripstop Work Pant – are made with military-grade fiber technology. Specifically we’re talking our new state of the art, patent pending CORDURA® T420 HT fiber that creates a strong and exceptionally durable fabric that’s six times more abrasion resistant*. And as if that weren’t enough to get you through your workday… how about adding reinforced stress points, enhanced pockets for specific tools and double knees to accommodate knee pads. This is one serious pairing of innovative performance fabric and super functional work ready design. To learn more about Dickies workwear, visit dickies.com. *Based on 2016 Dickies testing with a comparable 8 oz. 59% cotton/39% polyester/2% Spandex blend.

Come see us to learn more! CORDURA® brand booth #39213.

BOOTH #18043

BOOTH #18043


Heritage Bags

by Emmons Mfg. Co.

GORE® INVISIBLE FIT TECHNOLOGY WATERPROOF, WINDPROOF AND BREATHABLE WITH THE FIT AND FEEL OF YOUR FAVORITE ROAD RUNNING SHOE.

AMERICAN MADE

gore-tex.com

Special Advertising Section

www.emmonsmfgco.com

BOOTH VO2098

GORE-TEX® ACTIVE PRODUCTS WITH SHAKEDRY™ PRODUCT TECHNOLOGY THE LIGHTEST, MOST BREATHABLE GORE-TEX® PRODUCTS WITH DURABLE WATER REPELLENCY.

gore-tex.com/shakedry

© 2016 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. GORE-TEX®, GUARANTEED TO KEEP YOU DRY®, GORE®, and designs are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.

since 1969

© 2016 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. GORE-TEX®, GUARANTEED TO KEEP YOU DRY®, GORE®, SHAKEDRY™ and designs are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.

since 1969

humangear, inc.

real gear for real humans Come see us at booth BR633 and check out the new gear for 2017.

K-VENT

K-VENT

BOOTH 29155W

BOOTH 29155W

KHOMBU.COM

KHOMBU.COM

www.humangear.com/casq


MASTHEAD

snewsnet.com

VP, GROUP SHOW DIRECTOR

EDITORIAL

marisa.nicholson@ outdoorretailer.com SALES DIRECTOR

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Kristin Hostetter

khostetter@aimmedia.com 617-921-5126 EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Casey Lyons DEPUTY EDITOR

Elisabeth Elisabeth KwakKwak-Hefferan Hefferan ASSISTANT EDITOR

Kassondra Cloos kcloos@aimmedia.com CONTRIBUTORS

Corey Buhay, Erme Catino, M.T. Elliott, Elizabeth Miller, Doug Schnitzspahn, Carolyn Webber, Ryan Wichelns

Krista Dill

krista.dill@ outdoorretailer.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Paul Dillman

paul.dillman@ outdoorretailer.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE & PUBLISHER/OUTDOOR RETAILER MAGAZINE

Ryan Johnson

ryan.johnson@ outdoorretailer.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Dave Nielson

INTERN INTERNS

DESIGN ARTDESIGN DIRECTOR

robert.oquinn@ outdoorretailer.com MARKETING DIRECTOR

Mike ART Leister ASSISTANT DIRECTOR Giovanni Corrado Leone ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR

margie.lelvis@ outdoorretailer.com SENIOR MARKETING DIRECTOR

Mike Leister ART DIRECTOR

Giovanni Corrado Leone PHOTO EDITOR PHOTO EDITOR Genny Fullerton Genny Fullerton

Andrew Bydlon, Louisa Albanese, Louisa LaurenAlbanese, Danilek Lauren Danilek

Robert O’Quinn

Jennifer Holcomb

kate.lowery@ outdoorretailer.com

AD COORDINATOR AD COORDINATOR

GRAPHIC DESIGNER DESIGNER GRAPHIC

Jackie Medina Medina Jackie

SALES AND MARKETING SALES AND MARKETING NATIONAL SALES DIRECTOR.

NATIONAL SALES DIRECTOR, TRADE GROUP TRADE GROUP

Eric Henderson Eric Henderson

ehenderson@aimmedia.com ehenderson@aimmedia.com 307-690-2984 307-690-2984 ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE

Katie Schoeben Katie Schoeben

kschoeben@aimmedia.com kschoeben@aimmedia.com 831-325-3695 831-325-3695 SALES MANAGER SALES MANAGER

Gregg Thayer Gregg Thayer

gthayer@aimmedia.com gthayer@aimmedia.com 303-817-7138 303-817-7138 SALES ASSISTANTS SALES ASSISTANTS

Jennifer Hall Jennifer Hall

jhall@aimmedia.com jhall@aimmedia.com 303-253-6419 303-253-6419

Beth Prehn Beth Prehn

bprehn@aimmedia.com bprehn@aimmedia.com 303-253-6317 303-253-6317

FOR THE NEW GENERATION OF WORKERS.

SENIOR ART DIRECTOR

Raymond Kang raymond.kang@ outdoorretailer.com PRODUCTION/ TRAFFIC MANAGER

Laurie Stiglitz

SPECIAL 25% OFF SHOW

Cathy Griffith

insoles-sorbothane.com 800.838.3906

laurie.stiglitz@ outdoorretailer.com DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS cathy.griffith@ emeraldexpo.com OPERATIONS DIRECTOR

Julie Freedman

MADE IN USA

PRESIDENT & CEO PRESIDENT & CEO

Andrew W. Clurman Andrew W. Clurman CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, Brian Sellstrom TREASURER & CFO

Michael EXECUTIVE VICEHenry PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, Patricia B. Fox OPERATIONS

The New

Kristen Novick

BRICK BOTTLE OPENER

kristen.novick@ emeraldexpo.com BRAND DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

Larry Harrison

larry.harrison@ outdoorretailer.com RETAIL RELATIONS MANAGER

Joe Bustos

Introducing

Patricia B. Fox SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, DIGITAL & DATA SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, Jonathan Dorn DIGITAL & DATA Jonathan Dorn VICE PRESIDENT, SALES & MARKETING VICE PRESIDENT, Allen Crolius SALES & MARKETING acrolius@aimmedia.com Allen P. Crolius

THE WORLD’S FINEST

Kimberly Aguilar

WORK PANTS

kimberly.aguilar@ outdoorretailer.com OPERATIONS MANAGER

Jamie Kelley

jamie.kelley@ outdoorretailer.com EVENTS OPERATIONS

FOR THE NEW GENERATION OF WORKERS.

Nicole Lessley

nicole.lessley@ outdoorretailer.com SPONSORSHIP OPERATIONS

Kristen Hartman kristen.hartman@ outdoorretailer.com BILLING MANAGER

Sara Burns

sara.burns@ outdoorretailer.com

BOOTH 39159

BOOTH # 30169W

julie.freedman@ outdoorretailer.com REGISTRATION OPERATIONS MANAGER

©2016 WILLIAMSON-DICKIE MFG. CO.

CHAIRMAN & CEO CHAIRMAN & CEO

WORK PANTS

Kate Lowery

joe.bustos@ outdoorretailer.com RETAIL CONCIERGE

Efrem Zimbalist III Efrem Zimbalist III

THE WORLD’S FINEST

ONE OF A KIND! SORBOTHANE ® IS THE DIFFERENCE

Sarah Langston

PREPRESS MANAGER PREPRESS MANAGER

Caitlin O’Connor O’Connor Caitlin

Introducing

jennifer.holcomb@ outdoorretailer.com MARKETING COORDINATOR

GROUP PRODUCTION DIRECTOR GROUP PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Joy Kelley Joy Kelley

www.rrog.com

rrog.com

1.800.342.4654

Margie Lelvis

sarah.langston@ outdoorretailer.com DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS

Barb Van Sickle Barb Van Sickle

View the full line:

BOOTH 39159

Special Advertising Section

PHOTOGRAPHERS PHOTOGRAPHERS Andrew Bydlon,

See the full line at booth BR523

Marisa Nicholson

dave.nielson@ outdoorretailer.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Nick Carpenter Katherine Allred, Hadley Dorn

New for 2017!

outdoorretailer.com

©2016 WILLIAMSON-DICKIE MFG. CO.

OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

Red Rock Outdoor Gear

®


TO DO TODAY

The Hot Sheet

Sponsored by

YOUR ONE-PAGE GUIDE TO THE BEST PARTIES, EVENTS, AND SWAG OF DAY 3 SELL WELL

Employees are on the front lines of every sale—are yours really bringing it home for you? Find out how to measure employee performance and customer engagement in today's lunchtime seminar from OR, GOA, and OIA. 11 am to 1 pm, UMOCA (adjacent to Salt Palace) TILTING TABLES

Rose Marcario, CEO and president of Patagonia, is the Camber Outdoors Thought-Leader Keynote speaker. Rose will share Patagonia’s philosophy around how workplace culture drives inclusion and innovation. 7 to 9 am at the Marriott Downtown City Creek, Salon F-I JOURNALIST APPROVED

Monday night at OR's Media Preview, 100 journalists voted Hydra-Light International's PL-500 lantern as the coolest new product. Check it out at booth #704.

THE 1-HOUR INTERN CHALLENGE Release your inner child at 3M’s take on a classic “Ball-In-Hole” game at booth #37051. Twist foosball-style handles to tilt the whole table back and forth, steering a water droplet across a surface of the brand’s PFC-free Water Repellent Scotchguard, weaving around obstacles to reach the other side. It's addictive. TASTE THE MOUNTAINS

The Himalayan Kitchen dishes out Nepali and Indian cuisine at the far western end of the Salt Palace (in row 1000). À la carte items start at $2 and meals are up to $11. Pro tip: Dig into a plate of chicken saag, chana masala, basmati rice, and naan with the $9 lunch special, served from 11 am to 3 pm.

THE YEAR IN GEAR

CAFFEINE

OR printed up a handy pocket-size reference guide that outlines all the industry shows— from regional rep shows to the big ones here and abroad. Pick up your copy at the registration desk.

Grab some Carabiner Coffee and kick up your feet at The High Altitude Den.

OVERHEARD @ OR

“Free coffee, puppies, and there’s beer later? These people really know how to do it.” @BOGS Boots (#36170)

84

OUTDOOR RETAILER DAILY

HEADS-UP CONTEST! Eagle eyes: We've Photoshopped someone's head off in this issue. Find it and email the page number to us at snewsedit@aimmedia .com. You could win a Kodiak Boots prize package.

Did you bring a reusable water bottle with you today? (Prove it.)

45%

said yes

We asked 281 showgoers.

PHOTOS BY COURTESY; LOUISA ALBANESE (4); LAUREN DANILEK

BREAKFAST DU JOUR


WRANGELL GREY CAMO GLOVE

GORDINI.COM


- OUR MISSION -

DEVELOPING TIMELESS, FUNCTIONAL & SUSTAINABLE OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT. BOOTH# 24001

fjallraven.us


BOOTH 39159


- OUR MISSION -

DEVELOPING - OUR MISSION - TIMELESS, FUNCTIONAL & SUSTAINABLE OUTDOOR DEVELOPING TIMELESS, FUNCTIONAL & EQUIPMENT. BOOTH# 24001 SUSTAINABLE OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT.

fjallraven.us

fjallraven.us

BOOTH# 24001

BOOTH 39159

Outdoor Retailer Daily_Day 3 WINTER 2017  

Active Interest Media-Boulder

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