Page 1

SIA

SNOW SHOW DAILY

DAY 1

PUBLISHED BY ACTIVE INTEREST MEDIA JANUARY 26, 2017

THE FUTURE OF WINTER

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE 2017 SIA SNOW SHOW

CLIMATE CHANGE, TECHNOLOGY AND SHIFTING DEMOGRAPHICS ARE CHANGING THE FACE OF WINTER SPORTS. HOW WILL THE INDUSTRY RESPOND? P. 12

A New Approach

Exhibitors, retailers welcomed with a new layout, renewed focus on community. (p. 4)

Fresh Faces

An introduction to the newest exhibitors gracing the Snow Show floor. (p. 20)

Off-Piste Gear

Brands ramp up offerings to meet growing demand in the backcountry. (p. 28-32)

Hands On

Classic styling meets future performance in ‘17-’18 glove lines. (p. 44)

Dining Guide

Where you can grab a bite in the Mile High City. (p. 50)


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IN THE ISSUE | UP FRONT

WELCOME TO THE 2017 SNOW SHOW! This has been a big year for SIA: new location, new team and new mission. We are ushering an association and an industry with incredible heritage, passion and opportunity into its next chapter. I am honored to serve as SIA’s president and take the role very seriously. Since taking the reins this time last year, I have had the chance to meet with many of you face-to-face, and talk with many, many more. I have heard, firsthand, the issues that we face as an industry, as well as the colorful stories about why we are in the business in the first place. And there is no doubt that it’s the passion that always shines through. The passion for winter sports. The passion for snow. The passion for the industry. We are so fortunate to be part of something with such drive and determination. And one that represents immense opportunity. The past few years, we as an industry have been faced with some pretty significant challenges – changing consumer habits, shifting retail landscape, consolidation, an increasingly disparate buy-sell cycle between hard and soft goods – and then layer in the unpredictable weather. These challenges have tested our fortitude, and have shown us some of the chinks in our armor. An astute Greek philosopher once said “the only constant is change.” Change is inevitable and will always be upon us. As a collective, the best thing we can do is to anticipate change and respond as a well-prepared, united group. This is our chance. This is our industry. We all need to

seize the opportunity to work together for the good of the industry. We are making changes at SIA to shepherd in this new perspective, and it’s summed up in our new mission: “Help the winter sports industry thrive.” Everything that we do moving forward will be held against this filter – starting with this Show and extending to research, education, advocacy and participation. We are here to serve the members, and the industry as a whole. We are going to do it with great care and respect, while utilizing new strategy and tactics. This is our pledge to you. And now the call to action! Another wise man once said: “Ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country.” What can you do for the betterment of the industry? When you find yourself ready to point fingers at what is broken, instead ask: “What can I do to help fix it?” The first astronaut didn’t get to the moon by himself; it took the teamwork of many. Join us in making this industry even greater than it is today! Start at the Town Hall, Saturday, Jan. 28, at 5 p.m. at the Bridge. Looking forward to connecting with you all,

▲ JEFF COURTER LINES UP SKIS JUST RIGHT FOR ROSSIGNOL.

▲ KATIE COUNTS GIVES EACH KILLTEC PIECE A ONCE OVER TO PUT THE BRAND'S BEST FACE FORWARD ON OPENING DAY OF THE SHOW.

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SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

BAILEY LARUE

Nick Sargent, President, SIA


UP FRONT | IN THE ISSUE

Powder Day.

CONTENTS 2 WELCOME LETTER 4 SHOW NEWS

The new face of the Snow Show; Nick Sargent talking growth with the Colorado governor; and events you can't miss.

10 SOURCING SNOW

Exhibitors raise the bar on performance and eco-friendliness.

12 THE FUTURE OF WINTER

How the industry responds to challenges will determine what's next.

Top Trends 28 Splitboards 30 Backcountry Skis & Boots 32 Backcountry Accessories 34 Women's Snowboards 36 Women's Ski Boots 38 Alpine Bindings 40 Snowboard Bindings 42 Ski Poles 44 Gloves 46 Backpacks

18 MARKET TRENDS

How the West was won in the 2015-16 season: snow. Lots of it.

20 NEW EXHIBITORS

A look at some of the fresh faces gracing the floor this year.

24 GEAR PREVIEW

50 DINING GUIDE

Where to eat in the Mile High City.

52 EXHIBITOR LIST 55 WISH LIST

Our picks for gear and accessories.

What to expect in hardgoods and softgoods at this year's Snow Show.

56 EVENT CALENDAR

48 SNOWBOARD RENTAL

58 SHOW NEWS

Brands aim to serve all skill levels.

I+I sessions cover new talent, growing your business & making your story stick.

SNOW SHOW DAILY PUBLISHER Andy Hawk EDITOR Lindsay Konzak ART DIRECTORS Jackie McCaffrey Bradley, Eleanor Williamson PHOTOGRAPHERS Bailey LaRue, Madison Rahhal CONTRIBUTORS Eugene Buchanan, Krista Crabtree, M.T. Elliott, Ben Gavelda, Courtney Holden, Brigid Mander, Elizabeth Miller, Peter Oliver, Helen Olsson, Eric Smith, Michael Sudmeier, Morgan Tilton, Bevin Wallace, Dave Zook ADVERTISING SALES Sharon Burson, Andy Hawk ADVERTISING COORDINATOR/EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Lori Ostrow GROUP PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Barb Van Sickle PRODUCTION Caitlin O’Connor PREPRESS TECHNICIAN Idania Mentana Read the digital version of the Snow Show Daily at snewsnet.com or snowsports.org. SNOW SHOW DAILY IS PART OF ACTIVE INTEREST MEDIA’S OUTDOOR GROUP Allen Crolius, Vice President of Sales and Marketing ACTIVE INTEREST MEDIA 5720 Flatiron Parkway, Boulder, CO 80301 EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN Efrem Zimbalist III PRESIDENT & CEO Andrew W. Clurman SVP, TREASURER, AND CFO Michael Henry EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS Patricia B. Fox SVP, DIGITAL & DATA Jonathan Dorn VICE PRESIDENT, CONTROLLER Joseph Cohen VICE PRESIDENT, RESEARCH Kristy Kaus Copyright 2017 by Snow Show Daily

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AT THE SHOW | SHOW NEWS

COME TOGETHER Show updates inspired by the community of snow. By Helen Olsson

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▲ SIA RESEARCH DIRECTOR KELLY DAVIS GIVES THE CROWD WHAT THEY WANT: THE LATEST MARKET TRENDS IN THE SNOW SPORTS INDUSTRY. FOR A CLOSER LOOK AT THE DATA, SEE PAGE 18.

▲ LOOK FOR SEVERAL NEW CHANGES AS THE SNOW SHOW KICKS OFF TODAY, INCLUDING AN UPDATED LAYOUT AND MORE PLACES TO KICK BACK.

THE DATE BOOK

Today's Not-to-Miss Events High Fives Foundation Presents Grant Korgan, Mile High Ballroom, Opening Breakfast and Keynote, 8-9 a.m. Cappuccino Meet and Greet, Nordic Center, 10:30 a.m. Doc DesRoches Award, Stockli, Booth #3230, Noon SIA Happy Hour with Spyder and USSA, The Bridge, 5 p.m. ▲ SOULMOTION SNOWBOARDS'S AARON LEBOWITZ AND ALEXANDER LEFTERI ARE EMBRACING THE NEW VIBE OF THIS YEAR'S SNOW SHOW.

SIA is intent on tapping into the camaraderie and culture of winter sports. “We want to see the industry revitalize, rejuvenate and thrive,” said Todd Walton, director of communications and marketing for SIA. “What we’re really trying to do is break down the barriers, to be inclusive,” he said. “That’s the new vibe of SIA.” That philosophical change resonates with the folks at Soulmotion. “It’s not important for us to sell 10,000 boards. We’re here for the vibe," Lebowitz said. "The coffee, the beer, the town hall meeting."

SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

Save the Date: SIA Town Hall at The Bridge, Saturday, Jan. 28, 5 p.m. View the full schedule on page 56.

BAILEY LARUE AND MADISON RAHHAL

A bare-footed Mike Basich, snowboarder and founder of 241 Clothing, was at the Show yesterday setting up his custom 2012 Fuso 4WD truck in Trail Gate. “I use it for chasing storms,” said Basich, a first-time exhibitor. He finds the changes to this year’s Show setup inspirational because they transcend business. “It’s about sharing our passion,” he said. Under new leadership, SIA is changing the way it does things, starting with the Snow Show. Over the next four days, Show-goers will notice more meeting spaces for connecting, more happy hours with earlier start times for collaborating over a microbrew, a dedicated space for luxury brands called Winter LUXE and a Town Hall-style meeting hosted by SIA President Nick Sargent. The brand-new Trail Gate space is one of the most notable changes. Situated at the front of the hall, Trail Gate is filled with companies that epitomize a community-based mindset. Tiny houses from Outdoor Research and Weston Snowboards sit next to Dean Cummings’s H20 Guides Astar helicopter and a mega-van from Oskar Blues. Trail Gate is also home to nontraditional exhibitors including Wolfgang Man & Beast, purveyor of dog leashes and collars. “People wouldn’t think of a dog-leash company being at SIA,” said Wolfgang Sales Director Bill O’Sullivan. But plenty of skiers and riders have dogs. The company has collaborated on leashes with skier Julian Carr and Ken Block, rally car driver and co-founder of DC Shoes. “We’re bringing all these people together,” O'Sullivan said. Mason Davey, co-owner of Weston Snowboards, was setting up his mobile showroom yesterday. “Our brand is about building community. SIA created Trail Gate to build a sense of community. It was a nobrainer,” he said. SIA also invited Soulmotion Snowboards to park its bus in Trail Gate, where it sat yesterday dripping snowmelt from a Wyoming storm. Co-founder Aaron Lebowitz thinks the industry has grown stale, but he sees SIA’s efforts as a revitalization centered around community. “It’s why we are all here; why we spend eight hours a day on the mountain,” said Lebowitz. “Lifestyle is driving the change.”


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AT THE SHOW | SHOW NEWS

GETTING TO GROWTH SIA president and Colorado governor talk about the importance of partnerships. By Bevin Wallace

▲ SIA PRESIDENT NICK SARGENT, COLORADO GOV. JOHN HICKENLOOPER AND MODERATOR LUIS BENITEZ TALK BUSINESS AT WEDNESDAY'S PANEL.

On Wednesday, Nick Sargent addressed what he called a “cool, passion-filled room” during his first keynote lunch as president of SIA. After welcoming industry VIPs, SIA members and his staff to this year’s Show and thanking everyone who took the time to “talk, listen and share” during his yearlong listening campaign, Sargent reminded the audience to have a good time. “That’s what this industry is all about,” he said. He then introduced Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, who thanked SIA for a “tremendous run of success” in Denver and announced that Denver just signed another 10-year agreement to host the Snow Show. In a discussion that moved from a sharp increase in online sales to the importance of experience to millennials to “topophilia” or love of place, the themes that resonated most prominently were the need to adapt and the importance of working together. “It’s our responsibility to adjust and adapt,” Sargent said. “We have to embrace the changes around us. To evolve as an industry, we have to keep driving forward. The internet is not going away. “Listening is the key to solving most problems. When the industry unifies, we can move mountains. We have to work together as a group.” The governor agreed: “The best things happen when we align our self-interests. Kids spend seven to 10 hours a day looking at screens, which is, by any measure you can think of, bad for them. My self-interest aligns with yours. The state is trying to encourage kids to get physically fit and involved with winter sports.” He then mentioned that snow sports companies and their sponsored athletes could be instrumental in facilitating this. “The more this collaboration happens, the more people create new experiences with a new place, it creates a rising tide that lifts all ships.” “The snow sports industry’s long-term success is based on emotional connections,” added Hickenlooper. Sargent agreed: “We need to build on good experiences. It’s our job to be good stewards of fun.”

READY TO ROLL Brand reps unpacked and moved in on Wednesday, ready to show off their goods to the Snow Show community.

▲ ALLISON VANKEMPEN FROM KRIMSON KLOVER TAKES A RIDE.

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SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

▲ COMING THROUGH! ALPINA'S JASON STADLER IS ON THE MOVE.

▲ ROSSIGNOL'S LANCE VIOLA AND TOM LEBSACK PAL AROUND.

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AT THE SHOW | SOURCING SNOW

EVER BETTER

Sourcing Snow lineup raises the bar on performance and eco-friendliness. By Elizabeth Miller

For the first time, ExFty will set up shop at Sourcing Snow, among about 30 companies looking to get some fresh eyes on their products. “We’re hoping to tap into some new customers here,” says Ciaran McDonnell, owner of Ex Fty. “We’ve brought along representations of current products we’ve manufactured in the past and hopefully that sparks conversations.” ExFty engineers seamless garments, and their “NoSo” baselayers boast a flatter and ultimately stronger seam. Manufacturing them as a seamless tube allows garment yarns to rest closer to the body so they’re warmer and can better wick moisture. YKK picks up the low-profile notion, too, carrying the lightweight and waveless systems all the way to the zippers. Knits have bested woven fabrics for technology innovations in recent years, according to McDonnell, and they’re now dominating the market for next-to-skin garments thanks to higher-performing yarns. In that vein, a new, super-high denier stretch fabric in Toray International America’s Airtastic line allows skipping the coatings and relying on the fabric alone to be downproof and prevent feathers from leaking out.

That reduced chemical use is just one of several eco moves afoot this year. Toray also releases a fabric 30 percent made of petroleum-free polyester sourced from waste molasses from sugar-cane production; the goal is to reach 100 percent in the next four years. The other chemistry on its way out is the historic formula for durable water repellent, and 3M is launching its next-generation perfluorinated compound-free DWR. The crux in that transition has been matching oil-stain repellency with water repellency, but Michael Hayes, technical service specialist for 3M brand Scotchguard, says maybe that’s a misdirection. “We focused mostly on the DWR performance because that’s the principal purpose,” he says. It’ll rebuff some oil, but mostly, people worry about whether rain and snow jackets will repel water, and thus, so did 3M. 3M is also chatting up their synthetic down material, a loose-fill fiber that performs like 600-fill down—700-fill power is on the way—mimicking the warmth, compressibility and hand-feel of feathers at a fraction of the price. “There’s really no other time and place that supplier manufacturers can get in and talk to the majority of the snow sports industry and even crossover into the outdoor industry because there is that big crossover market,” Todd Walton, communications and marketing director for SIA, says of Sourcing Snow.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 3M THINSULATE PUFF; TORAY INTERNATIONAL AMERICA'S NEW AIRTASTIC LINE, WHICH LETS BRANDS RELY ON THE FABRIC RATHER THAN COATINGS; EXFTY'S SEAMLESS GARMENTS, WHICH ARE FLATTER AND STRONGER.

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SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

FROM LEFT: ELIZABETH MILLER; COURTESY OF EXFTY; 3M

The pursuit of ever-lighter, tougher, drier gear is the never-stopexploring problem for the industry, and the exhibitors at Sourcing Snow have secrets so cutting-edge they’re burgeoning on tell-youhave-to-kill-you. But we pried a few details out about the latest innovations and what they predict for the next generation of over-achieving outdoor gear.


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FEATURE | THE FUTURE OF WINTER SERIES

VAIL MOUNTAIN RESORT, COLORADO

THE FUTURE OF WINTER

The snow sports industry is at a tipping point. But it’s not alone. Other industries are facing similar challenges: online competition, big-box challengers, the demands of a new generation and attracting new customers. The list goes on. What makes snow sports different is the addition of weather – a variable that you can respond to but, unless you’re God, can’t be controlled. “We’re a weather-dependent, seasonal industry. We’re sensitive to when the Pacific Northwest is getting two feet of snow a week or, similarly, when the Northeast suffers

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SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

from a mild and dry winter,” SIA President Nick Sargent says. And thanks to climate change, we can expect to see greater swings in weather and, with it, greater unpredictability in the industry. “The climate really dictates our industry and really makes or breaks a season,” Sargent says. Some companies are thriving in this fast-changing

and unpredictable landscape, and others will fade when they fail to adapt. That’s true whether you’re selling skis or power tools. “Status quo is not going to provide a viable future,” says Sargent. “If you’re in this industry and you are comfortable with status quo, it’s going to be a long tough road.” It’s all to say that winter looks different now than it did even 10 years ago. And with an increasing pace of change, it will certainly look different in another decade. But despite the challenges in front of us, Sargent sees opportunity in the business of snow. “There’s enough to go around,

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Industry leaders: How we respond to the opportunities in front of us will define what's next. By Lindsay Konzak


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FEATURE | THE FUTURE OF WINTER SERIES

CLIMATE CHANGE

Weather explains 75% of the variance year to year in participation and sales, according to SIA research. Global warming is spurring changes in weather patterns, with 8 of the top 10 warmest years on record occurring since 1998, according to the EPA. And extreme temperatures are becoming more common along with more intense short-term episodes such as “extreme” one-day precipitation events. Climate change and the unpredictability that comes with it is one of the biggest threats to the future of winter. “The snow sports industry is the canary in the coal mine of climate – meaning we die first,” says SIA Board Chairman Bob Gundram, CEO of C3, distributor of Capita Snowboards, Coal and Union Binding Company. “There’s a boatload of scientific evidence that the globe is warming and that each progressive year is the warmest on-record,” says SIA Research Director Kelly Davis. “It’s something I think everybody in winter sports has their eye on.” When more than a third of all snow sport sales happen between Black Friday and Dec. 31, a 70-degree Christmas like we saw in some states this year can spell disaster, she adds.

COPPER MOUNTAIN RESORT, COLORADO

That we haven't lost any participants considering the conditions last winter is a good thing. Do we want more? Yes. We're always looking. Like most in this industry, Rex Wehrman, vice president of North America for Faction Skis, tracks the ups and downs closely. “We all know that snow drives sales and reorders, and you can tell this year with a late winter across North America that the re-orders are down,” he says. “As soon as it started snowing, the re-orders started piling in. On the other hand, last winter when the East Coast got very little snow, the sell-through wasn't good in the shops and that was reflected in pre-season orders that started being placed last February. So the changing snow is really a challenge for the industry.” Climate change is also having an effect on participation. Davis remembers a research survey result from a 15-year-old in California saying he didn’t want to snowboard “because it’s never going to snow again.” “I kept thinking, ‘Listen kid, it’s going to snow again. I promise.’ But if you were 11 the last time you saw snow, I can understand,” Davis says. “I can empathize with that kid. That was an awful long time to go without much snow at all.” Gundram says the industry needs to be a loud voice in the discussion about working toward sustainability and fighting climate change. “We will need to keep our eyes on

problems brought on by climate change in the future, including prolonged droughts, later starts to winter, warmer winters that bring less snow and more variability in winter weather overall.”

PARTICIPATION

Growing participation in snow sports will fuel the future of winter. But in 40 years of snow sports participation data, there’s never been a big spike, according to SIA research. It’s remained stable. “That we haven’t lost any participants even considering the conditions last winter is probably a good thing,” Davis says. “But do we want more participants? Yes. We’re always looking for them.” Bringing new skiers and snowboarders in and retaining those we already have is a perennial challenge. “It’s a huge buzz conversation these days, and rightly so,” Sargent says. Proximity and expense are the two primary reasons for not partaking. Brent Sandor, vice president of marketing for Westlife Distribution, parent of 686, says affordability is indeed a top concern. “We can’t go the route of golf and become elitest and austere,” he says. “It simply won’t foster growth.” “Skiing is becoming more affluent, with lift tickets, travel and accommodation going up,” Faction’s Wehrman says. “This doesn't leave a lot of room for tourists to spend money on skis. … It's a challenge to keep pricing competitive and keep skiing accessible without devaluing the product.” The industry must reach beyond its core to grow, meaning bringing in participants of all ages and backgrounds. Baby boomers led the evolution of skiing back in the 50s and 60s, with a new generation inspiring snowboarding in the 80s and 90s. We’re now in a new era, where snowboarding has settled in and baby boomers are skiing less. “We really have to get ourselves in a position to create participation and growth opportunities,” Sargent says. “We can’t just wait for someone else to do it. We have the data. We can use it to get rid of the stigma that getting involved with snow sports is costly.” Part of growing is expanding how the industry defines “snow sports,” some of which don’t require a lift ticket. Sargent himself remembers getting started on-snow on a

11.6M DOWNHILL SKIERS

7.6M 4.6M SNOWBOARDERS

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SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

CROSS COUNTRY

COURTESY OF COPPER MOUNTAIN

and we’re still all in this together,” he says. “I see a bright future for this industry and this sport. We just have to be smarter in how we mature and grow as an industry.” Snow Show Daily spoke with SIA and industry leaders about what will shape the future of winter and, with it, their businesses. Three challenges rose to the top:


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FEATURE | THE FUTURE OF WINTER SERIES

TECHNOLOGY + SNOW

When you think future, you think technology. And in snow sports, technology is redefining how customers shop and buy, as well as the experience on-snow itself. On the former, a fifth of sales are now made online. “We are challenged with the traditional model of brick and mortar and local and specialty retailers that aren’t putting themselves in a position to compete with Amazon, online specialty retail or even some resorts,” Sargent says. It’s not necessarily about moving sales online so much as it is about doing more than just selling a product at the

This article is the introduction to a Snow Show Daily series on the Future of Winter, digging deeper into the challenges and opportunities facing the snow sports industry. Look for more in Days 2-4: Day 2: Climate Change Day 3: Growing Participation; Beyond Traditional Snow Sports Day 4: New Resort Models

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SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

MT. BRIGHTON, MICHIGAN

retail level. Sandor says the new generation wants experiences. “We need to ensure we are creating an environment where snowboard and ski experiences are a part of their yearly cycle.” (Read how retailers and brands are connecting with customers online and off in tomorrow’s Snow Show Daily feature, "Close Ties.") Beyond the transaction, technology has become inextricably linked with the snow experience, whether that’s keeping someone safe in the backcountry or providing a platform to show off park tricks. Throw in augmented reality (Pokémon Go, anyone?) and the experience is transformed. Companies like GogglePal here at the Show are banking on it with new applications that allow you to track your stats and connect with friends, all in the corner of your eye. “That could bring potentially a huge number of people into the sport,” Davis says. “Because who knows? Maybe it’s cross country skiing, maybe it’s downhill – maybe it’s a game you play while sessioning on a snowboard like grab the coins. How cool would that be?” And platforms like YouTube are bringing those experiences on the hill to the masses. Take 360-degree video. “You put the headset on and you’re immersed in the experience,” Davis says. “How can that change the way we even watch the Winter Olympics? Imagine putting a visor on and experiencing the downhill course.” “All of a sudden we’re starting to redefine the way these activities are seen, shared and sought after,” Sargent says. “Creating more of that romantic feel and experience that alpine sports had back in the 50s and 60s, helping get more people out and involved in the sport.”

All of a sudden we're starting to redefine the way these activities are seen, shared and sought after. THE CURE

The future of winter is about taking what we know about technology, climate, participation and more and evolving to meet those challenges head-on to build a healthier industry that benefits all. “It’s really simple,” says Sargent. “What are we trying to cure? We’re trying to cure fun. We all got into this business for the fun of it. It’s the passion, it’s the emotion, those raw feelings that we get to work with and play with every day.” The industry is the gateway to that fun. “You can decide what kind of fun you want to create with that consumer,” he says. “Yes, we have challenges. Every industry has challenges. But we have opportunity, as well. That's what gets me out of bed every morning. When I look in the mirror, I don't see myself like, I've got to solve the data issue today. I get out of bed and I'm like, damn, we get to solve fun.” SIA hopes to play a critical role in addressing these challenges and keeping the future of winter alive. “Our role is to really be a steward of the industry, but also push conversations and solution-based discussions and decisions focused on future growth for the entire industry,” Sargent says.

JACK AFFLECK

red plastic sled, his gateway to first a snowboard and then a lifetime in the industry. “Any activity that takes place in the snow helps drive growth,” he says. “For these retailers that are extending their categories and their buy into tubing and sledding and snowshoes and cross-country fat bikes and AT, I think they’re very smart, and they’re looking at the bigger picture.” Davis agrees. “The challenges are expense and proximity to the resort, so if you’ve got a flow park in your back yard, you’ve solved this problem. And one of the things we’re finding is that when a participant is doing that, they are also increasing the number of times they visit a resort. That’s sort of a revelation. It’s good for everybody.” Winter brands must embrace the idea that the person buying the lift ticket is not the only person using the gear, Sargent says. Think about the person who is snow-blowing their driveway, sledding with their kids, standing around watching their kids participate in a sport. Or even walking around after a snowstorm. “You put on your puffy. You put on your hat and your scarf and your gloves,” Sargent says. “That could be the same outfit that person's going to use when they go on their ski trip once a year.” That also means not pigeon-holing a snow sports enthusiast into one category, Sandor says. “Many consumers no longer identify themselves solely as a skier or snowboarder, regardless of how passionate they are about snow,” he says. “The consumer is becoming more diverse, and most brands will need to follow that and create products that speak to this consumer.”


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TOP TRENDS | MARKET TRENDS

WEATHERED

The West benefited from snow's comeback, while the remaining regions experienced a dry spell. By Lindsay Konzak Thanks to the weather, snow sports industry sales were mostly flat in 2015-16, according to SIA's 2016 Snow Sports Intelligence Report. Retailers sold $4.7 billion in gear, accessories and apparel, down 0.2% from 2014-15. That breaks down into $1.6 billion in equipment, $1.8 billion in outerwear and $1.3 billion in other accessories, sportswear and footwear. More than half of sales went through specialty shops, with 24% through chain stores and 22% online. Weather, as always, played a big role last year. It was a positive for the West, where snow returned after five years of drought and boosted sales and participation. Dry conditions east of Colorado offset that. The Midwest, Middle Atlantic and Northeast regions had warm, abbreviated winters, which stifled sales and participation. According to the NSAA Kottke End of Season Report

Get your copy of SIA’s Snow Sports Intelligence Report at snowsports.org/research.

produced by RRC Associates, resort visits were at 52.8 million in 2015-16, down from the previous two seasons. But overall participation remained stable – with 11.6 million downhill skiers, 4.6 million cross country skiers (up from 4.1) and 7.6 million snowboarders (down slightly). About 3.5 million reported snowshoeing in 2015-16. Next fall, SIA will be publishing a report profiling the groups that make up these numbers. For example, Core Skiers, Snowboarders and Nordic, as well as Family-Focused, The Balanced Warrior, The Luxe Traveler and others to help brands and retailers hone messaging and product features. SIA’s Downhill Consumer Intelligence Project, whose results are available at snowsports.org, makes these recommendations to increase participation in your region: Place content online that clearly describes how to get involved in snow sports in places consumers actually go.

Meetings should always be on a gondola, right? World Ski and Snowboard Festival | April 7-16, 2017

SALES IN $4.7B IN2015-16 100M AMERICANS ACTIVE IN WINTER 16M 8M SKI AND SNOWBOARD

CROSS-COUNTRY SKI AND SNOWSHOE

Consider sledding events in population centers to promote skiing and snowboarding and recruit new participants. Use social trends like the sharing economy, constant connection and festivals to promote snow. Sell equipment to participants who are not considered “core.” Use regular and consistent consumer intelligence research. Continue traditional programs that clearly work.

WORK CAN BE FUN TOO Ten days of snowsports, arts, music and friends, all happening this spring.

APRIL 7 - 16, 2017

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TOP TRENDS | NEW EXHIBITORS

FRESHMAN CLASS New exhibitors include head-toppers and insulators. By Brigid Mander SH*T THAT I KNIT Cozy Headwear

Since she was 10, Christina Fagan has had a passion for knitting. In college, she started a website called “Sh*t That I Knit” to keep her friends and family updated on her knitting projects. Just over a decade and a half after learning to knit, Fagan took a chance, quit her post-collegiate professional job, and turned a passion and a website (whose name was originally a joke intended just for those close to her) into a thriving and growing accessories business. The business almost started itself, according to Fagan. She developed a large Instagram following in her hometown of Boston and couldn’t keep up with the demand from people who wanted to buy her creations. So she hired a couple dozen passionate knitters to help with orders. But demand kept growing, so she recently transferred production to Lima, Peru, where her yarn – a soft, high-end merino – is also produced. Her knitters are now mothers and other women who knit from home in Peru. She is now able to sell multiple styles online, as well as supply retail stores and highend boutiques. Yet Fagan’s products are still far from the usual mass-produced, highprofit margin hats that come from China. Although her prices have come down a bit from when production was in Boston, the cute, fur pom-pommed hats still start at $125, due to fair pay for the Peruvian knitters and the use of high-end materials. “You have to appreciate the hand-knit, unique and high-quality aspect,” Fagan says. And the name? “Usually people love the name, sometimes they don’t,” she says. “I’m just going to roll with it for now.” Booth #1545

COLDPRUF

Insulated Outdoor Fun Although Indera Mills, ColdPruf ’s parent company, has been around for over 100 years, ColdPruf is less than a decade old. It should be no surprise that after so many decades of contract production, Indera decided to put its in-house expertise to task with a line of baselayers that range from traditional cotton to high-performance synthetic blends and 100% merino wool. The cotton line, according to company spokesman Ian Connor, is something of a nostalgic throwback to the company’s long heritage. The performance lines are meant to provide serious insulation for skiers, hunters, fishermen and others who venture outdoors in the cold, including those who make their living there – from ski patrol to carpenters. The ColdPruf line is sourced, knit and cut in a North Carolina factory, before being sewn and packaged in a partner Mexican factory. Aside from the care and expertise that has gone into the design and materials, the ColdPruf team has opted to keep the baselayers simple in colors, with sleek cuts and a basic, neutral color palate. ColdPruf ’s focus instead is on building a product that can stand up to seasons of constant wear and washing. An anti-microbial silver treatment helps to keep the garments from developing a stench. Booth #1317

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SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com


TOP TRENDS | NEW EXHIBITORS

MORE FRESHMEN A selection of new exhibitors at this year's Snow Show. By Lindsay Konzak 1. HILLRYDER

Polar Bear Snow Sports Co-Founder Daniel Sullivan was inspired to build the first HillRyder after a day of taking snowboarding lessons with his daughter. He had been frustrated by the sport’s sometimes steep learning curve. The result: HillRyder, a binding-less board with handles and “Twist and Turn” technology. The design, initially targeted at kids, is finally ready for launch after years of testing. Booth #3910

2. SAVE THE DUCK

It’s all in the name: Save the Duck has built its business on not using real down and instead features outerwear made with Plumtech, which imitates the fluffiness of down while preserving the advantages of thermal insulation. They claim the jackets are warmer, more breathable and lighter than the original. The jackets are also easy to travel with –

they fold up and pack small, even tucking into a handbag. Booth #418

3. SHREDSAVER

ShredSaver’s mantra: Save your legs, save your boots, and be safer on the chairlift. The product attaches to a rider’s waistline and then clips on bindings before the ride up. It uses the rider’s bodyweight to hold the board up, avoiding the uncomfortable hang, which twists knees and ankles. The product’s makers say it provides for a safer ride to the top, reduces fatigue and prevents damage to boots and laces. When at the top, ShredSaver comes off and goes into a pocket, or can be left in place, attached to the waist – ideal for kids. Booth #2480

4. SURE FOOT

Stop by the Sure Foot booth to see its Due North traction

aids demonstrated on a 300-pound block of ice. The Due North Everyday Pro Ice Traction Aids are for more extreme conditions, retaining elasticity in subzero temps with a 360-degree spike pattern for more push and lateral grip. The spikes are made out of tungsten carbide with a proprietary rubber tread design for improved traction. Sore feet? Sure Foot also has Rubz therapeutic foot massage tools onhand for Show-goers to try. Booth #943

5. TILL I DIE

Started as a side project out of Ryan Orabone’s apartment six years ago, Till I Die is a lifestyle clothing brand with a retro look. Look for performance and cotton tees with the taste of the 80s. One features a DeLorean graphic; another “80s Ladies,” complete with big hair and legwarmers. Then there’s the brand’s iconic shot-ski design and other imagery that embraces why we slide on snow: It’s fun. Booth #1351

2

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SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com


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TOP TRENDS | GEAR PREVIEW

GEAR GUIDE

Do your homework before getting lost on the Snow Show floor. By Lindsay Konzak Get the full story on each of these categories in the Snow Show Preview edition, available at SIAsnowshow.com or on the Show floor.

Versatility is the name of the game for skis in 2017-18 lines with a focus on responsive tech that performs better for more skiers. It’s about making a ski that excels in any condition. Some brands are also pulling back from over-segmenting their lines, which they say can be confusing to consumers. But other brands are still saving a place for ski specificity and continue to release product focused on where a skier wants to carve.

▲ FACTION 3.0 SKIS

SKI BOOTS

BUYER TIP Nick Castagnoli, brand manager, Group Rossignol North America

A lot of people still assume a ski boot has to be uncomfortable or cold – and that simply isn’t the case today. Create an environment that educates consumers and reinforces the importance of boot-fitting and the options available.

24

SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

While some ski-makers are gravitating toward more versatile planks, board-makers are releasing a surge of new shapes in 2017-18 to cater to specific styles of riding, whether it’s carving, splitboarding, park, rails or powder. Powder boards in particular are all the rage right now. That said, some riders are still demanding more versatile boards, and brands are responding. And carving has become “cool” again, per brand reps, driving new sidecut technology and directional boards that sport longer running lengths, wider widths and deep sidecuts.

▼ NEVER SUMMER MAVERIX SNOWBOARD

▲ K2 SPYNE 120 BOOT

Boots are going high-tech, blending technologies to reduce weight, improve rigidity and fight temperature fluctuations. As always, lighter gear is still a priority. And better fit through customization also remains a target for boot-makers. More high-end features are making their way to skiers seeking more recreational fits, according to Rossignol and Lange's Nick Castagnoli. He says boot-makers are making more shell and liner features, ski/hike modes, sole compatibility and customizable features available to this set. Walkmodes also continue to be hot, with a big focus on improving a boot's walkability.

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TOP TRENDS | GEAR PREVIEW

SNOWBOARD BOOTS

Comfort is in no danger of going out of style. Brands are pushing for better out-of-the-box fit in 2017-18 lines. Heat-moldable offerings, refined footbeds and liners, and improved lacing systems are facilitating comfort. Also look for a greater emphasis on durability even for designs destined for inbounds riding.

GOGGLES

It’s all about advanced lens tech in 2017-18 goggles – with a focus on vision that can adapt to all conditions. Brands are also aiming for greater versatility, including easy-to-change lens systems, adjustability on the go, fit with more helmets, and sizing for women and children.

▲ GIRO G ELLA TIDEPOOL GOGGLE

HELMETS

Consumers are willing to pay more to protect their domes, and brands are stepping up the tech to match their demands. MIPS comes standard on more and more models; and some brands are continuing to hone their own proprietary tech.

▲ SWEET PROTECTION TROOPER II HELMET

OUTERWEAR

NORDIC

26

Nordic gear in 2017-18 aims to make the sport more accessible and user-friendly for the masses. The goal: lowering the barrier to beginners and upping the fun factor. Expect to see more waxless skin tech and a growing focus on creating hardgoods bundles focused on a specific category and skillset, from entry-level recreational to backcountry enthusiasts. You’ll also see blurring of lines between the sport’s categories reflected in the latest lines, combining traditional tech for light touring, backcountry and alpine touring in Nordic. ▲ HOLDEN REDWOOD DOWN JACKET

▲ EIDER R0CKER JACKET

Function is still, of course, front and center with brands continuing to balance breathability and insulation with top-of-the-line fabric tech. But you can also expect eco-friendly touches in both ski and snowboard apparel in 2017-18 lines. And style is also top of mind. In some cases, you’ll see vintage design paired with modern technology; snowboard-apparel designers are also stealing inspiration from workwear and military aesthetics, as well as streetwear.

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COME VISIT US AT BOOTH #3509


TOP TRENDS | BACKCOUNTRY SNOWBOARDS

DROPPING IN

Look for tapered shapes and more backcountry boards for the ladies. By Morgan Tilton AT THE SHOW

1.

Jones

GROWTH SPURT

Some brands are debuting women’s split designs to feed the growing number of females heading into the backcountry. “The number of women isn’t as high (as men); I’m seeing manufacturers narrow offerings to hit the curb rather than offering many sizes,” says Venture Vice President Lisa Branner. “We have ladies riding our boards that are under 5 feet to over 6 feet tall: Two sizes won’t work for everyone.” Venture prioritizes women’s board sizes and flex patterns in a range of heights, feet lengths and weights. Brands are also honing split and backcountry features: “This category is seeing lots of improvements from higher-quality construction to more models, sizes, styles and options—at lower prices. The splitboard-consuming market tends to have money to spend and sees value in new, improved gear,” says evo’s Kevin Nimick.

2.

Designed by surfboard-shaper Chris Christenson, the freeride Mind Expander is an all-mountain board built for quick, wave-inspired turns with a shape that can also ride well switch and stomp tricks. The blunt nose is squared off, the tail is full for nimble maneuverability, and it’s made with the new triple-density Bamboo Surf wood core with bamboo stringers in the sidecut for improved turn power. Booth #3076

Never Summer

Stable in variable conditions, the Swift Split features the new Fusion Rocker Camber profile: with the Original Rocker Camber in the front for a loose, surfy feel and the Ripsaw Rocker Camber in the back, which allows for pressure and pop-out of a turn. Part of the Shaper Series, the nose and midsection are wide with generous taper to help riders stay atop wet slush or deep powder. Stout in profile, Never Summer's Insta/ Gator is a short, fat, easy-to-turn board with the same floatability as a long iteration (read: The same surface area remains) and tapered shape that’s awe-

some for tight trees and deep lines. Booth #3765

Rossignol

For floating powder, the directional XV Sushi features a tapered shape and swallowtail design to a beefy shovel for easy steering in deep turns. Rossignol also adds two splits: the XV Sushi Split 144 and Diva MagTek Split 152. Booth #3418

Venture

The Oracle Split is Venture’s first women’s all-mountain splitboard, designed to shred everything from ice to groomers, hardpack and pow. The directional shape, mellow taper, setback stance and shorter tail also features a women’s-specific flex pattern and tighter stance options. Booth #2478

Weston Snowboards

Weston is launching their debut boards for gals. An all-mountain, hybrid-camber shred stick, the Spruce is built for versatility from tree turns to park laps. The Riva is her freeride powder board. Booth #2717

QUIRKY SHAPES

Boxed noses, arrowhead outlines, jigsaw profiles: Alternative outlines and unique base contours are on the rise—especially tapered silhouettes and squished volumes. “Compact shapes that pack a ton of float and maneuverability in a small package are hot,” says Jones's Seth Lightcap. Weston Snowboards Owner Leo Tsuo agrees: “Short fatties are easy to maneuver and float in pow.” Riders’ quivers need to provide stability for all-mountain appeal and in variable terrain. “There’s been a refinement in terms of rideability with the goal of delivering a split that retains the snow feel and torsional stability of a solid construction; and pow-day toys that blend the stability of a longer board with quick, nimble maneuverability,” says Rossignol's Nick Castagnoli.

▲ NEVER SUMMER SWIFT SPLIT

3. NON-SPLIT STICK

For the moment, the increase in number of fresh splitboard models may have slowed, speculates Tsuo: “There was a flood into splitboards, but too many were split solids and not purpose-built for splitting.” Non-split designs that are shaped for powder appeal to the resort-to-backcountry crowd and shredders that prefer a quick hike lap rather than an all-day or hut-to-hut tour. “Resort freeriders and sidecountry explorers are wide open to quiver powderboards and unique all-mountain shapes,” Lightcap says.

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SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

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TOP TRENDS | BACKCOUNTRY SKIS & BOOTS

EARNING YOUR TURNS

Growing backcountry market is well-served by the new hardgoods tech on display at the Show. By Eugene Buchanan

1.

2.

WORTH THE WEIGHT

Like a fat ski in powder, weight savings continues to rise to the surface as a linchpin in backcountry design. Be it a boot or ski shaving off ounces (like Scarpa did with this year’s Maestrale and women’s Gea), keeping gear lighter underfoot leads to better strides and sales. “The push to make lighter gear with materials like carbon fiber is always in play,” says Cory Lowe of La Sportiva. “That’s where a lot of the design focus is.”

3.

GEAR FOR INBOUNDS AND OUT

If skiers are embracing the “sidecountry,” so too are designers, making skis and boots that handle on-piste and off with equal aplomb. The products work on the up, with walk modes and weight savings for touring, and the down, with more rigid components. "We're seeing a blurring of lines across more platforms—backcountry skis that are light enough to go up but hold well enough to ski inbounds, and boots made to charge hard but designed to be fit and forgotten so they can cross genres and terrain easier," says Fischer’s Andrew Gardner.

4.

ALL THE FEELS

With many skis looking the same these days, how do customers and retailers know what to buy? For some, it boils down to an ambiguous term called “feel.” “Many ski brands today make similar models in terms of specs,” says Salomon Alpine Commercial Manager Chris McKearin. “Brands are now having to distinguish themselves based largely on the feel of the ski.” Salomon handles this by focusing on materials that balance power, control, stability and weight. “It’s similar to Airbus technology to keep the wings stable without adding weight,” McKearin says.

5.

BIG PLAYERS EDGING IN

Per SIA, in 2015-16 more than 5 million people went backcountry skiing. For alpine brands, those numbers are getting harder to ignore. “Mainstream alpine brands like Salomon, Atomic and Tecnica are all pushing into the segment with BC-oriented product,” says La Sportiva’s Lowe. “While they have the existing advantage of distribution at traditional alpine ski shops, the core backcountry brands (Sportiva, Scarpa, Dynafit, G3, etc.) continue to have an advantage at specialty retail. We’ll see how long that relationship continues to hold.”

PERFORMANCE, POWER PARAMOUNT

Weight savings is nice and all, especially for the up, but for many manufacturers it’s still about the down. Isn’t that where customers have the most fun? “Market trends for AT boots are tracking towards lightweight, but it’s important to balance that with more power and performance in downhill mode,” says Scarpa CEO Kim Miller, adding that the two goals are on opposite ends of the spectrum. Scarpa addresses this by adding lighter-yet-stiffer Carbon Grilamid LFT to its Maestrale/Gea line, cutting 5 ounces per boot while increasing stiffness to 125.

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SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

▲ SCARPA MAESTRALE RS

▲ SALOMON X-ALP BOOT

▲ DALBELLO LUPO AX 125C

▲ G3 SENDr


▲ ELAN IBEX CARBON 84XLT

AT THE SHOW Atomic

The new Hawx Ultra XTD is a fully customizable, high-performance boot marrying freeride touring and all-mountain ripping. It combines two key Atomic technology stories – the tour- and skiability from its Backland line and performance from its Hawx Ultra boots. Booth #3835

Dalbello

Dalbello expands its Lupo boot series with new, wider-last backcountry models, including the 125-flex AX 125C. All maximize range of motion for climbing via a removable external Kinetic tongue and lightweight Air Plus liner. “There’s a clearer focus today as to touring-oriented products vs. freeride-oriented boots that have touring functionality,” Marketing Director Geoff Curtis says. Booth #4025

Elan

Fairly new to the touring scene, Elan embraces the backcountry with its new product line, the Ibex Collection. The high-tech line features Bridge Technol-

ogy, a 3D design with a noticeably thinner tubelight wood/carbon core and a larger vapor insert in the tip only. Look for the Ibex Carbon 84XLT and the Carbon 94XLT. Booth #2512

Fischer

The new men’s Travers Carbon and women’s My Travers Carbon uber-lightweight backcountry boots weigh in at just 1,080 grams (size 26.5). Each comes with an active cuff, Thermoshape Lite liner, and lace frame and BOA closure system. Booth #4218

G3

The new SENDr ski weighs just 3 lbs., 15 oz. (188cm) for a great weight-to-performance ratio for big lines and touring. It comes with G3's signature PU sidewalls and flat/positive camber to dampen bumps and play in pow. Match it with the new Scala LT skin. Booth #2911

Rossignol

Rossignol introduces the all-new 7 Series ski line, including the 86mm underfoot, 1,270-gram Seek 7. The

brand touts the 7 Series balance of lightweight for the ascent and stability and edge grip for the down.

Booth #3418

Scarpa

Look for five new backcountry boots from Scarpa, including a redesign of the Maestrale and Gea boots in new RS versions that are five ounces lighter and five flex points stiffer than predecessors thanks to new carbon-infused Grilamid material, a revamped web-frame rear shell and Z-shaped cable/lower-boot closure system. Also new is the race-oriented, ultralight Alien RS (1 lb., 14 oz.). Booth #3113

Salomon

Built specifically for the alpine touring market, Salomon enters 2017-18 with its new lightweight, X-Alp backcountry boot and ski. Weighing just 1,190 grams, the boot features a 3D rotating cuff, frictionless range of motion, a Contagrip sole for traction, carbon cuff for lateral stiffness and thinner-yet-stronger shell walls. Booth #4135


TOP TRENDS | BACKCOUNTRY ACCESSORIES

SAFE TRAVELS

Brands keep it simple with accessories for the backcountry and adopt an ethos of education. By Courtney Holden AT THE SHOW

1.

Arva Snow Safety Equipment

Built with Cordura 210 fabric, the new Reactor 15L Ultralight Women’s from Arva Snow Safety Equipment uses EVA foam inserts for what it considers an optimal balance of weight (just 4.85 pounds with canister) and durability. Booth #3219

USER-FRIENDLY TECH

It’s easy to get starry-eyed over flashy new features, but sometimes a KISS (keep it simple, stupid) strategy is best—especially when time is of the essence. Indeed, when seconds matter, users need to know how their gear works and not get overwhelmed by high-tech bells and whistles. This is especially the case given the growing number of amateur backcountry travelers. “It used to be that most snow safety equipment was used mainly by professionals who train with the products on the clock,” says Bruce Edgerly, vice president of marketing and global sales for BCA. “The industry has changed, and 95 percent of the market is now fun-seeking recreationists. They’re not as willing as pros to read their manuals and train. Products for them need to be intuitive.”

BCA

▲ MAMMUT BARRYVOX S BEACON

▲ SCOTT BACKCOUNTRY GUIDE AP 30

Booth #3658

2.

G3

WEIGHT LOSS

Backcountry brands engage in a constant dance between weight and durability. “Getting lighter is usually a factor of materials or design,” says Jeremy Jolley, U.S. brand & sales manager for Arva Snow Safety Equipment. “There is a balance between having something lightweight and something that will not break or fail.” This season, brands are getting creative. Whether it’s combining features so that one part has multiple purposes, simplifying a system by removing redundant pieces or switching materials—often to carbon fiber— companies are doing their darndest to decrease weight.

▲ G3 ION CRAMPON

The three-antennae Barryvox S beacon has three goals in mind: powerful search (achieved through a longer, wider range); easy handling (thanks to a simple, intuitive interface); and faster rescue through better signal retention, fewer “ghosting” beacons and continued search guidance during signal overlap. Booth #2915

EDUCATING CONSUMERS

Know-before-you-go programs and avalanche safety courses are crucial to safe backcountry adventuring. And now, more and more brands are taking on the role of educator through web videos and classes. The tools, tips and tricks highlighted aim to encourage safer and more fun out-of-bounds travel. “Our goal was to bring users into the backcountry by making them comfortable with the basics,” says Dustin Butcher, marketing manager for G3, which just launched a series of instructional web videos dubbed G3 U (as in G3 University). “If skiers know more about the logistics of preparation and travel in the backcountry, then it doesn't seem so daunting.”

SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

Designed to be installed or removed with a single hand (without having to remove your ski), G3’s Ion Ski Crampon keeps skiers standing tall even in less-thanideal conditions like firm snow and ice. Booth #2911

Mammut

3.

32

Feel the need, the need for … the Float 27 Speed airbag pack from BCA. Equipped with the revamped Float 2.0 system—which features a much smaller, 3000 psi compressed air cylinder and a more efficient Venturi system—this pack is perfect for those going fast and light in the backcountry.

Scott

▲ BCA FLOAT 27 SPEED

Minimalists will appreciate Scott's Backcountry Guide AP 30 backpack. Clocking in at just 5.9 pounds (including the airbag system and air cartridges), this lightweight carrier still features the Alpride 2.0 avalanche airbag system, separate pockets for safety equipment, a stow-away ice axe/pole fixation and padded, anatomically shaped hip belt. Booth #2845


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TOP TRENDS | WOMEN'S SNOWBOARDS

FAST ASCENT

Designers add and expand ladies’ performance gear for 2017-18. By Morgan Tilton

1. CATERING TO A SPECTRUM

More women are strapping in, and experienced female riders have more years under their belts. As a result, women aren’t locked into one-case-terrain-scenarios on the mountain. Females not only enjoy groomers and the park; they also seek steep hike-to lines and backcountry exploration. “A lot of our line was targeted toward women in the park and a more forgiving boot. We saw a need to support women that want a stiffer, burlier build,” says James Kim, Thirty Two brand merchandizing manager and senior footwear designer. The outcome: a built-out, performance-oriented boot that is a 9 or 10 on the rigidity scale.

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2. BACKCOUNTRY BLAZE

“The popularity of backcountry riding continues to grow. We are seeing more people leaving the confines of the resort. Performance matters and gear designed and sized specifically for women is definitely improving the overall backcountry experience,” says Dan Ventura, Spark R&D marketing manager. The brand took 3D scans of women’s boots and used those to design the ultimate universal binding straps. “It’s an exciting time in splitboarding with all of the new product coming out—there’s so much opportunity. And no matter how much or little snow, with splitboarding you get to go find it,” says Becca Ritter, co-owner.

3. HIGH-QUALITY TECH

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SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

▲ JONES MTB WOMEN'S SPLITBOARD BOOT

▲ BENT METAL BINDING WORKS UPSHOT

As women’s product lines grow and female participation climbs, high-quality women’sspecific designs are reflecting the techy features applied in the men’s line—“not just an attractive, feminine graphic,” says Marhar Founder and Designer Nathan Morse and Never Summer Marketing Manager Jenna Malmquist. Women pay attention to and want both: unique aesthetics, as well as a technical snowboard. “Female riders are becoming more knowledgeable about the products as the participation grows, and they want a product designed specifically for their needs,” Morse says.

AT THE SHOW Bent Metal Binding Works

The Upshot is their first women’s-specific all-mountain freestyle binding. A female-tailored med-soft flexing urethane highback and biaxial fiber drive plate provide a responsive, comfortable shred. Booth #2778

Gnu

A freestyle, park-focused directional twin design: the Gloss features the flexy camber combo profile (called C2) with rocker between the feet and camber extending in front of the feet. For all-mountain shredding, Jamie Anderson’s new design, the Free Spirit, is a short-wide freeride board with a stable mostly camber contour, wider waist and lightweight feel for freestyle fun—and the graphic is stellar. Booth #2778

Marhar

Diversifying the ladies line, the Jade is an all-mountain charger on the stiffer end with a camber bend to just outside the bindings and rocker at the tip and tail. A cross of embedded carbon fiber adds damping and creates stability for steep, fast lines. Booth #3473

Never Summer

Hello to Maverix: a medium-flex, all-around mountain board that’s great for dynamic, quick turns and long carves. The board boasts a tapered shape and the Fusion profile—ripsaw rocker camber in the back for a snap-out of turns and the original rocker camber in the front for a surfy feel. Never Summer also adds a wider version of the Aura, making them “the only brand who offers a wider version of a women’s model,” says the brand’s Jenna Malmquist. Booth #3765

Spark R&D

Boom: Two women’s-specific splitboard bindings are hitting shelves. The Arc offers a more flexible fit, while the Surge is stiffer and wider. Both sets debut with two color options and two sizes. Booth #2475

Thirty Two

The Jones MTB is the supreme splitboard boot for ladies. The pair is outfitted with a full-zip gaiter, the Walk Mode Collar—controlled by a Boa release system that allows the collar to fold down for greater mobility and comfort while skinning or walking—and crampon-compatible Vibram outsole. Booth #3562


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TOP TRENDS | WOMEN'S SKI BOOTS

SOLEFUL BOOTS Women’s boot models shed pounds; touring boots rise in popularity. By Krista Crabtree

GOT SOLES?

WARMTH AND WEIGHT LOSS

Weight is one of the biggest trends for 2017-18—from high-performance to touring models. The Salomon X Max line uses Twinframe2, a PA/PU blend that makes boots lighter and more responsive. Head’s Advant Edge W line trickles down to lower price point boots with big benefits from high-top tech, duo flex and control frame technology. Full Tilt’s Plush series feature an easy-entrance tongue and warm Intuition liner.

THE RISE OF THE DESCENT

According to SIA market research, women’s AT equipment sales rose 5 percent last season, with boots enjoying a boon in sales. Nordica’s Strider boot offers a 100mm-lasted high-performance hike model with a lightweight Lever Lock hike/ ride system. Scott’s Celeste III is the thirdgeneration women’s touring boot with a new rear hook walk/ski mechanism for better durability and performance. The ultralight, customizable Atomic Hawx Ultra XTD W boot blends high performance with touring capabilities.

▲ FISCHER MY CURV 110

Though many models still use a traditional alpine sole, there are two bootsole solutions that work with specific bindings, both designed to help make walking in ski boots easier: Grip Walk soles (created by Marker, used by companies like Nordica and Dalbello) and the rockered WTR sole (which stands for Walk-to-Ride, used by Salomon, Atomic, Rossignol and Lange).

3.

BUYER TIP Tracy Gibbons, president and buyer, Sturtevant’s

Women come in all shapes and sizes. We need to make sure we’re not just associating body style to a specific boot. Buy in a variety of flexes and widths. Brands are addressing more boots in the low volume fit, with more than ever to choose from.

AT THE SHOW Dalbello

A new 100mm last, women’s-specific cuff height and Instant Fit liner combine with the freeride performance of the Krypton design to create a boot that fits a wide range of foot sizes and calf shapes: the Chakra AX 85. Booth #4025

Fischer

Engineers and pro athletes designed the new highperformance My Curv 110 boot, which combines a 97mm last with Fischer’s fit-enhancing Vacu-Plast moldable shell technology. Booth #4218

Lange

▲ ROXA R3 105 W TI

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SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

Thanks to Lange’s new Dual 3D liner, foot and lower leg wrapping improve with thermo-formable materials of different densities placed in key fit zones in

the RX 90 W. A 3D imaging system creates a more anatomical shell and liner construction. Booth #3418

Roxa

The new R3 series is touted as one of the lightest high-performance alpine boots (close to 1500 grams) and features a Cabrio design and three models: a freeride hike/ski model, a freeski model and the R3 W TI, a performance four-buckle model. Booth #3907

Tecnica

Developed by a panel of top bootfitters and female testers, the Mach 1 Pro W LV features a new C.A.S. Cuff Adapter—a pliable upper cuff that can be heated to fit to the lower leg. The 98mm-lasted liner also has merino wool and Celliant for warmth. Booth #3407

▲ TECNICA MACH 1 PRO W LV

2.

▲ NORDICA STRIDER 110

1.


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TOP TRENDS | ALPINE BINDINGS

MOVING TARGETS Binding-makers meet the boot-sole challenge, focus on versatility. By Eric Smith

1.

2.

SOLE FOCUS

Compatibility with a mix of boot soles remains top of mind for ski-binding manufacturers as they respond to the "new soles that make walking in boots easier," says Andrew Couperthwait, product manager for HEAD/Tyrolia USA. For example, the company's Attack² features MBS (Multi Boot Standard) that accepts alpine, Grip Walk and Walk to Ride soles. Marker has expanded its SOLE.ID (adjustable to any boot sole within the AT or alpine norm) and Grip Walk offerings. This "disintegration of a boot sole standard for alpine skiing has created various challenges in the binding industry," says John Springer-Miller, chairman of KneeBinding Inc., so brands are focused on ensuring products adapt to the newest features and styles.

3.

BINDINGS SALES ON SOLID FOOTING

Sales of both alpine bindings and alpine touring bindings increased in the past year, according to SIA's 2016 Snow Sports Intelligence Report, with AT bindings seeing the biggest jump – a double-digit rise in the number of units sold. AT bindings sales were $17.5 million from August 2015 to March 2016, up 9.7 percent from the prior year, while sales in units surged 14.1 percent to 50,898. Alpine binding sales in dollars were $60.9 million, up 3.5 percent from the prior year, and alpine binding unit sales totaled 398,508, up 8.3 percent.

▲ MARKER SQUIRE

MEETING BACKCOUNTRY DEMANDS

A growing number of skiers are venturing out-of-bounds. Participation (both skiing and snowboarding) in nonresort, ungroomed backcountry climbed 21 percent compared with 2014-15, according to SIA research. "Brands are continuing to offer more binding options for backcountry touring-specific products. Lighter, stronger and safer is key," says Sean Kennedy, brand manager for Atomic. "Light and strong" is where companies are focused as more cater to the off-piste demographic, says Chris McKearin, alpine commercial manager for Salomon. "You want to have an optimum mix of lightweight for the ascent and strength for performance on the way down to ensure confidence when deep in the backcountry."

▲ ATOMIC BACKLAND TOUR

▲ HEAD/TYROLIA USA ATTACK2

▲ SALOMON MTN

AT THE SHOW Atomic

New features for the 2017-18 Backland Tour Binding include a notched easy stepin aid in the toe-piece that keeps the boot from sliding around when clicking in and a one-step brake lock/unlock that is easily accessible by pole, boot or mitten – all designed to make the transitions between walking and skiing easier, faster and warmer. Booth #3835

HEAD/Tyrolia

The re-designed Attack², which replaces the company's popular Attack, is a series of retail bindings compatible with both Alpine and Grip Walk soles with a redesigned toe piece for better performance and kinematics. The Attack² demo binding, offered in 13 and 11 DIN models, will be adaptable to alpine, Grip Walk, Walk to Ride and alpine touring soles. Booth #2829

38

SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

Marker

In the spirit of compatibility with the growing mix of boot soles in the market, Marker's new Squire 11 ID with SOLE.ID allows the skier to adjust the AFD (anti-friction device) to accommodate either AT (ISO 9523) or alpine (ISO 5355) boot-sole norms, giving them more flexibility and making it easier and safer to walk around the resort without reducing ski performance when they are on the slopes. Booth #4225

Salomon

The MTN was designed to be lightweight, reliable, easy-to-use and strong. Skiers can choose between a lightweight brake or a leash, while the binding's other options include multiple height aids for help on the ascent and a wide screw pattern that provides confidence on the descent. Booth #4135


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TOP TRENDS | SNOWBOARD BINDINGS

RELENTLESS REFINEMENT A focus on quality, customization drives 2017-18 lines. By Michael Sudmeier

1.

AT THE SHOW

2.

EMPHASIS ON QUALITY

Rather than the product of a revolution, the latest bindings are the result of relentless refinement. Simply put, “We are seeing a movement towards quality,” says Arbor Marketing Manager Sean Black. This is leading to “new materials, new construction methods, and an overall refinement of production processes,” says Union Binding Company Director of Marketing George Kleckner. To fine-tune the flex and response of their bindings, brands are infusing their highbacks and baseplates with new blends of urethane, nylon, carbon fiber and other materials. And whether through the use of new foams or injection-molded designs, “ankle straps are (being) stripped down to the bare essentials for lightweight, comfort and function,” says Bent Metal Product Manager Paul Ferrel. With the goal of enhancing comfort and response, brands are also expanding their use of canted footbeds.

Nitro

CHOICE RULES

Yet in the midst of these developments, choice reigns supreme. “We know riders have different styles, so customization to personalize performance is key to us,” says Rome Director of Sales Dan Sullivan. To allow riders to further adjust a binding’s dampening and flex, some brands are complementing their offerings with interchangeable footbed plates and baseplate cushions. New ratchet and ladder designs also provide smaller incremental adjustments for a refined fit. Nonetheless, the greatest opportunity to calibrate a binding to a rider’s preferences begins with its initial design. Consequently, a number of brands are “creating bindings that are specific for different types of riding,” explains Nitro Global Marketing Manager Knut Eliassen.

Thanks to a footbed with both lateral and longitudinal canting, the Carver offers especially precise turns. A stiffer strap enhances response, yet the binding is versatile enough to tackle the entire mountain. Booth #3179

Salomon

The Defender’s flexible heel cup provides a refined fit and maximizes range of motion. An asymmetrical highback angled forward 12 degrees relative to the baseplate and minimalistic straps with an articulated EVA foam layer enhance comfort and response. Booth #3565

Union Binding Company

The new Expedition Split Binding Series was developed over two years with Bryan Iguchi and Travis Rice. Expedition carries on the brand’s “less is more” product mentality and is ready to ride out of the box, with the aim of helping riders more easily get into splitboarding. Booth

40

SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

▲ SALOMON DEFENDER

▲ UNION EXPEDITION SPLIT

▲ FLOW FUSE HYBRID

▲ NITRO CARVER

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Member-owned and industry-inspired SnowSports Industries America (SIA) is the national, non-profit trade association that loves winter as much as you do. Built for the businesses of snow, SIA represents and supports core and on the rise suppliers of snow sports equipment, apparel and accessories. Our vision is to get more people around the globe engaging in an active winter lifestyle. Our purpose is to help the winter sports industry thrive and align SIA’s strategy with the opportunity ahead of us, not the challenges behind. Be a part of the winter sports industry – JOIN NOW!

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The Business of Snow


TOP TRENDS | SKI POLES

DO-ANYTHING POLES Multifunctional is the name of the game in new 2017-18 ski poles. By Brigid Mander

AT THE SHOW

1.

G3

The Via Carbon adjustable ski poles are perfect – stiff, lightweight, durable and adaptable – for a big day of ski touring or mountaineering. Booth #2911

A VERSATILE BENT

Leki

The Women’s Vertical Trigger, women’s-specific pole, is designed to perform in the backcountry and at resorts. The pole has modified specifications to fit a broad range of women’s heights and hand sizes without sacrificing performance. Booth #2925

▼ LEKI AERGONLITE 2 LADY VERTICAL

Swix

▼ G3 VIA CARBON

Consumers are demanding a more versatile ski pole, and manufacturers are responding. "With more and more people interested in skiing out-the-gate or backcountry terrain, the big theme that we see here at G3 is that these days, ski poles are more than poles – they're also tools," says Dustin Butcher, marketing manager at G3. "So you're starting to see more multi-use features on ski poles. In the past, we used to add these components onto ski poles ourselves – things like choke-down points on poles so you could grab the pole at a lower point for touring. Now, they're built in.” Pole-maker Leki agrees. “The trends seen in ski poles match those we see playing out in skis, boots and bindings. More and more skiers want equipment that can be used across a variety of activities: such as riding a lift one day and touring the next; skiing groomed corduroy today and chasing first tracks tomorrow,” says Greg Wozer, vice president at Leki.

The Triac 3.0 Nordic Pole is an updated version of the Triac pole, which plays into the demand for stiff and light poles, at home on groomed trails and in races. Booth #3107

Rossignol

▲ ROSSIGNOL TOURING PRO FOLDABLE

Rossignol debuts two new freeride pole options – one telescopic and one foldable. Both have "thumbs-up" grips with extended grip on the shaft for hiking/touring and new "hoola-hoop" rotational powder baskets. Booth #3418

2. FEMALE POWER

Also in line with trends in other ski hardgoods markets is the growing demand for women’s-specific ski poles. For some women, unisex versions don’t quite cut it, so some companies are offering poles with smaller grips and shorter lengths, but with the same materials for high performance.

3. SLIMMING DOWN

Consumers are looking for the same high performance and good swing weights in lighter versions. "Ski poles are simply getting lighter,” says G3’s Butcher. “It's about a balance of lightweight with integrated high-performance feature sets." The goal: making big days out in the mountains easier and more efficient.

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SWIX TRIAC 3.0 NORDIC POLE


TAKE THE RIGHT TURN The cross country binding is the heart of the entire Nordic setup. Transferring the skier’s power and dynamic action from the boot to the ski means a better experience on snow. Rossignol and Fischer are proud to introduce TURNAMICŽ, a new range of bindings, binding plates and boot soles that deliver a revolutionary leap forward in performance and ease-of-use.


TOP TRENDS | GLOVES

PAST MEETS FUTURE

Work wear and retro over-cuffs combine with touchscreen tech and mobility. By Ben Gavelda

GRIP AND RIP

While they protect our digits from the elements, gloves and mitts hinder movement: zipping zippers, cranking buckles, fidgeting with phones, latching Velcro – you name it. Things are even more critical in backcountry or ski-patrol scenarios when working with ropes and radios. More brands are integrating materials and designs that enhance dexterity, like Gore-Grip, to make those tasks easier and reduce the need for taking your gloves off.

TOUCHSCREEN TECH

Having your phone on-hill is increasingly common. Whether it’s using apps to track your speed and vertical; feeding social media; or connecting with friends—riders are spending more and more time with their hands on a phone. Touchscreen technology in fingertips is finding its way into more gloves than ever, allowing for easy phone use without exposing your fingers to the cold. The only thing touchscreen tech doesn’t do is keep said phone from slipping through fingers and off the chairlift.

▲ OUTDOOR RESEARCH AKSEL WORK GLOVE

▲ DAKINE PHANTOM GLOVE

▲ CELTEK GORE-TEX EL NIÑO MITTEN

Classic leather work gloves continue to dominate style for good reason—they’re simple and timeless. Genuine leather is durable and can be maintained with products like Sno-Seal and NikWax. Plus, putting on chains or shoveling the driveway just seems right in a pair. But rather than your hardware-store special, brands are injecting premium materials into these designs. Large, over-the-cuff designs are gaining traction for their warmth, storm seal, ease of use and classic style.

▲ GORDINI DOWNTEK EMPYREAN MITT

WORKWEAR AND OVERTIME

3.

AT THE SHOW Celtek

Celtek is known for its bold design, but they've upped the ante on the technical side, too. The El Niño Mitten comes with a Gore-Tex shell, Sherpa fleece interior and touchscreen tech. Bonus: iconic Jimbo Phillips art. Booth

#3679

Dakine

Dakine’s new Phantom Glove takes some moto inspiration and wraps it in a thin leather and Gore-Tex Grip shell for mobility and a more natural hand feel without skimping on Primaloft and fleece warmth. Booth #2563

44

FlyLow Gear

Upcycled premium outerwear fabric and craft beeswax baked into the full grain leather make the Unicorn Mitt rough, tough and built for all seasons. Booth

#2922

Gordini

The DownTek Empyrean Glove & Mitt for women features warmth driven by 700 fill power from 90% goose down and 10% goose feathers and a waterproof and windproof insert. Booth #2650

Hestra

The ErgoGrip Incline features an ErgoGrip

SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

finger design for maximum dexterity, perfect whether you’re skiing out of the gates or ski mountaineering. Booth #1824

Leki

With the Copper S Glove, Leki takes the heritage patroller look and integrates it with warm and flexible materials and a small loop that easily clicks into their Trigger S pole grips. Booth #2925

Outdoor Research

OR’s take on a classic work glove, the Aksel Glove, is warm enough for skiing and can change a tire in a blizzard just as well as it can change your boots from walk to

ski mode. Booth #2816

Rome

Rome’s genre-bending Bronson blends all good things into one—a snow-sealing over-cuff design, camo, and it’s both glove and mitt at the same time. Booth #3177

Scott

Scott’s staple glove, the Explorair Premium Glove, gets a facelift with new Gore-Active technology, which has better moisture management properties, keeping the glove warmer and drier. Booth #2845

▲ ROME BRONSON

2.

▲ SCOTT EXPLORAIR PREMIUM GLOVE

1.


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TOP TRENDS | BACKPACKS

THE NEXT GEN OF SAFETY Packs slim down, enhance ergonomics for airbag detonation and comfort. By Morgan Tilton

1.

2.

AIRY AND LIGHT

Airbag systems are downsizing and going lighter, which also frees compartment space for other gear. Case in point: BCA’s Float 2.0 avalanche airbag system is 30% smaller and 15% lighter than the present Float 1.0 engine. The result? Two packs (17- and 27-liter volumes) debuting the 2.0-setup weigh 5.6 and 5.7 pounds. (A 22-liter bag and Float 1.0 system weighs a pound more.)

3.

TECHY TRAVEL PACKS

If jetsetters are limited to one pack it’d better look hot, be ergonomic, fit in an overhead bin, and be ready for the winter trails and crag. “The majority of travel consumers don't want to look like they're embarking on an Everest expedition in their everyday life but still want the functionality and features that highly technical gear has brought to the category,” says Chris Hrenko, Deuter spokesperson.

▼ ORTOVOX AVABAG ASCENT

AMPED EFFICIENCY

Simple designs can increase the airbag deployment success —and powder turns. “It’s not like anyone is racing—but when you get to the bottom of a hike the quicker you transition, the sooner you get to the powder,” says Dakine’s product line manager of technical packs and luggage, Nate Kuder, highlighting Dakine’s diagonal ski-carry loop that now expands for a snowboard. Ortovox and Scott honed handle ergonomics for improved airbag deployment. And efficient airbag system mechanics are getting hype, too—which can lead to weight shed. BCA debuts a 30% smaller refillable Float compressed air cylinder. “The cylinder holds 20 percent of the air that goes into the airbag,” says BCA Vice President of Marketing Bruce Edgerly. “The rest gets pulled in from the venturi (ejector) from the outside world. The more efficient that process is, the less compressed gas you need.”

▼ SCOTT BACKCOUNTRY GUIDE AP 30

AT THE SHOW BCA

Durable and streamlined, the Float 17 Speed and Float 27 Speed airbag packs feature the new Float 2.0 engine, which carves off 20 percent of the weight. Booth #3658

BUYER TIP

Dakine

Scott House, communications, events and social media director, JANS Ltd. and White Pine Touring, Park City, Utah

The technical Mission Pro 25 features wings on the front—to strap down jackets or snowshoes—while the Heli Pro 24 boasts clean aesthetics for the half-day tourer and sidecountry lifestyle. Booth #2563

Deuter

The Walker 24 features a padded laptop sleeve that’s accessible from the side zipper, or from inside when the compression-style top is unclipped and folded back. Booth #2919

Ortovox

Thirty-seven percent of 46 victims wearing an airbag in a significant avalanche were unable to deploy their pack, according to a 2012 study by Dr. Pascal Haegeli. Aiming for increased airbag deployment success, Ortovox premieres the Ascent and Freerider packs with the Avabag system. Booth #2919

Sell airbag systems as a tool that’s part of a larger toolbox of rescue equipment: a beacon, shovel, probe, first aid kit, avalanche education, knowledge of the avalanche forecast, and in-the-field experience with mentors.

Rocky Mountain Underground

RMU's Core Pack has evolved into a go-anywhere, do-anything travel pack with an internal waterproof laptop-size electronic pouch, ski and snowboard carry, dual hydration system, and 270-degree zipper. Booth #3232

Scott

▲ DEUTER WALKER 24

46

▲ DAKINE MISSION PRO 25 ▲ RMU CORE PACK

SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

The Backcountry Guide AP 30 pack is 14 percent lighter due to the size reduction of the Alpride 2.0 airbag system (the inflator weighs 32% less than in the Alpride 1.0 system) — which also opens up space in the pack for other goods. Booth #2845


TOP TRENDS | SNOWBOARD RENTAL

TOP TO BOTTOM Brands supply what shops need to serve customers of all skills. By Dave Zook

Snowboard rentals range from inexpensive and easy options that provide a functional onhill experience to more specialized products: youth boards, a variety of camber profiles, improved boot and binding interfaces, and upscale rental/demo boards. Advances in technology and increased competition are pushing quality and variety even further. Many companies ponder how to draw a boarder in, what the right board is for the different skill levels, and how to provide one that will last, as well as be a thrill to ride.

THE CHALLENGES

“This is an intimidating sport, and we need to begin breaking down some of the barriers to entry, be more inviting, and make sure that from manufacturer to rental operation to snow school to the general on-snow experience, we are all doing our part to generate new life-long snowboard participants,” says Rossignol’s Nick Castagnoli. Kevin Addy, the North American sales manager for Flow, believes durability and quality are the two biggest challenges. “For the rental operation, there is nothing more frustrating than products that are out of commission, and for the end-user there is nothing more frustrating than products that do not work and are uncomfortable to use.”

THE REMEDIES

Addy says Flow is addressing the need for durable products with improvements to its Rhythm rental boards for 2017-18, including “internal protection based on the KushControl Urethane sidewall technology to increase

▲ K2 F16 SNOWBOARD

48

SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

the durability of the tip and tail without the need for external bumpers.” Further improvements to the urethaneinfused topsheet will bolster durability, as well. To promote a positive rental experience, getting riders out of the rental shop and on the chairlift as fast as possible remains a focus. Head addresses this with its 4D system, which is color-coded to match board, boot and binding. “The 4D system improves the speed of the process of adjusting the rental product setup, and also ensures that the customer has the correct length and width snowboard, and a boot-to-binding interface that improves rideability,’” says Head’s Mike Poole. Elan has upgraded its integrated disk rear-entry binding to help overcome binding issues—an area where beginners can easily get hung up. Bill Irwin, national sales manager for Elan, says a more visible, easy-to-read scale effectively addresses feedback the company has received. The amount of camber a board has can affect the experience for all levels of riders, and several variations are available. A beginner or youngster may be hindered by aggressive camber, but could benefit from something more than flat camber, as many rental boards carry. Vince Sanders of Never Summer Industries says: “I be-

lieve hybrid profile snowboards will be a big trend shaping the rental world. Even in our Shredder boards you can see the rocker camber profile, unlike a kids board that is flat and rides like a plank.” He adds that a hybrid camberrocker-camber profile provides the pivot point of center rocker, making it easier to go edge-to-edge, while reducing drag in flat areas. Additionally, the amount of flex a board should have is being tweaked, especially for the younger demographic with less power to muscle a board through a turn. Elan’s solution is a children’s 75cm Micro Prodigy rental board that utilizes its proprietary UFlex technology for softer flex.

STEPPING UP

Who said renting was only for beginners? More and more high-end snowboard manufacturers are offering their full lineup as demos, including Never Summer, Nidecker and Arbor. Nidecker North America, which owns Jones Snowboards, YES Snowboards and Now bindings, doesn’t have a specific rental lineup, but allows all of its retailers to order demo products. Josh Hoyer, vice president of sales and marketing for Nidecker North America, says high-end demos aren’t just for those looking to try before they buy, but also for travelers who want quality equipment without needing to bring their own gear. He says Nidecker is hoping to expand its demo centers moving forward. Overall, rental equipment remains at the core of growing the sport. As companies continue to expand and improve their rental options, every demographic will benefit.

▼ NEVER SUMMER SHREDDER


▼ HEAD 4D BINDING

▼ ELAN MICRO PRODIGY ▲ FLOW RHYTHM

▲ HEAD 4D BOOT THE GOLDRUSH RED MIRROR LENS TEMPLE CUMMINS, MT. BAKER LEGEND

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AT THE SHOW | DINING GUIDE

TASTY VITTLES Where to grab a bite to eat in the Mile High City. By Lindsay Konzak

Zagat just placed Denver No. 3 on its list of 26 Hottest Food Cities of 2016. Find out why. Here’s your guide to food in downtown Denver and beyond, if you’re willing to grab a cab.

Vital Root prides itself on using real ingredients that pack a lot of flavor. It’s in the Tennyson Art District, so get transport.

twists on standard breakfast fare, including the Breakfast Pot Pie and Snooze Spuds Deluxe.

7. WATERCOURSE FOODS

275 S. Logan St.; 303-282-6258; luciles.com

VEG-FRIENDLY FARE

MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.1

Make your way to Lucile’s for a plate of beignets, extra-large biscuits and a taste of the Cajun country. Some favorites: Eggs New Orleans, with tasty fried eggplant smothered in a delicious Cajun tomato sauce, and the Eggs Sardou with creamed spinach, Gulf shrimp, poached eggs and hollandaise.

4. THE CORNER BEET

BREAKFAST

1. LUCILE’S CREOLE CAFE

MILES FROM THE SHOW: 2.6

2. SAM’S NO. 3

1500 Curtis St.; 303-534-1927; samsno3.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 0.3

Open all day, Sam’s No. 3 offers hamburgers, Mexican fare and Greek dishes. But you’ll want to stop by for its filling breakfast menu, including its expansive skillet selections. Sam’s No. 3 is known for its green chili. Try it on the Wild Bill Skillet, complete with ground buffalo, fresh jalapeño and jack cheese.

3. SNOOZE

1701 Wynkoop St. (Union Station) 303-825-3526; snoozeeatery.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1

Snooze is worth the line you’ll inevitably stand in. This staple can be found in Union Station, featuring creative

1401 Ogden St.; 720-295-4447; cornerbeet.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.3

The Corner Beet specializes in cold-pressed juice and simple vegetarian and vegan fare. Bonus: It’s all organic. Try one of their creative Toast options, like the Gringo, with melted cheddar and pico, or the Hill, with hummus, cucumber, tomato, red onion, sprouts and balsamic glaze.

5. NATIVE FOODS CAFÉ

500 16th St. Mall 303-534-5366; nativefoods.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 0.3 MILES

Everything’s vegan at the fast-casual Native Foods Café but you’d never know it by the looks of the menu: Try the Avocado Kale Cheese Dip or Native Chicken Wings to start, and move on to a Portobello & Sausage Burger or a tasty bowl.

6. VITAL ROOT

3915 Tennyson St. 303-474-4131; vitalrootdenver.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 4.4

837 E. 17th Ave. 303-832-7313; watercoursefoods.com Billed as Denver’s “original vegan restaurant,” WaterCourse boasts a menu of comfort foods like Tofish ‘N’ Chips and Beet Wellington. What’s more, breakfast is served all. day. long. FAST CASUAL

8. SMASH BURGER

1201 16th St.; 720-292-5121; smashburger.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 0.5

For a quick but tasty bite, walk on down to Smash Burger on the 16th Street Mall. The burger joint features smashed Angus beef with its special Smash Sauce. Add a little kick with a Spicy Jalapeño Baja burger or the Buffalo & Bleu Cheese burger. Oh, and did we mention they have beer?

9. SNARF’S

891 14th St. Suite 160 303-573-3939; eatsnarfs.com

MILES FROM THE SHOW: 0.2 MILES

Get your standards at this popular chain – like a tuna, chicken salad or BLT, or try one of Snarf ’s specialty sandwiches, including its French Dip with Au Jus.

STAFF PICKS

The SIA crew offers up some of their favorite places to nosh in Denver.

City, O’ City: It’s a short walk from the Hyatt. They have a great menu of vegetarian and vegan fare that changes seasonally. Been going to City, O’ City since my first SIA in Denver and will always be going back. 206 E. 13th Ave. The Sushi Den: By far the best sushi I have ever had. Fresh fish flown in daily from one of Japan’s largest fish markets in the city of Fukuoka. 1487 S. Pearl St.

Todd Walton

The Curtis: Lunch at The Curtis is a great go-to for off-site lunch or to take a breather … great drinks, too. 1405 Curtis St. Zoe Ma Ma: It’s legit Chinese street food. Wash it all down with Oskar Blues Pinner or Mama’s. Tell Dale I sent ya’. Union Station ink! coffee: Don’t do the same old cup of burnt stuff or a frilly froo-froo whatever. Go to ink! coffee and get an espresso or something. You’ve earned it. 618 16th St.

Dave Wray

Larkburger: Get the Tuna Burger. Their fries are insane. It’s just down the street from the Show. 1617 California St., Unit B Elway’s: Stop at the happy hour at the Ritz from 4-6 p.m. 1881 Curtis St. Tag Restaurant: A really good meal. 1441 Larimer St.

LOLA

50

SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

FROM LEFT: COURTESY OF VISIT DENVER; LARKBURGER

Colin Edwards


14

16

6

17

11

3

15

LINGER 12 13

views from its location in Denver’s Highlands neighborhood.

8 20 10

5

17. LOLA

1575 Boulder St.; 720-570-8686; loladenver.com

2

18

9

MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.6 19 7 4

1

HIP BITES

10. EUCLID HALL

1317 14th St.; 303-595-4255; euclidhall.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 0.6

There’s no shortage of American-style pubs in Denver, but Euclid Hall has managed to become one of the city’s best thanks to its diverse menu. Find top-notch schnitzel, brats, poutine and house-made sausage.

14. HIGHLAND TAP & BURGER

2219 W. 32nd Ave. 720-287-4493; highlandtapdenver.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 2

11. FOREST ROOM 5

This hangout serves gourmet burgers and elevated pub food, such as duck fat fries, along with more than 20 local craft beers on tap. Try the sliders at happy hour, mixing and matching root beer pulled pork, beef and pulled chicken.

MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.5

15. THE KITCHEN NEXT DOOR

2532 15th St.; 303-433-7001; forestroom5.com Take a seat on a stump, grab yourself a drink and indulge in the greatness that is Forest Room 5. This rustic restaurant specializes in comfort food in a cozy environment. COURTESY OF VISIT DENVER (MAP & PHOTO)

and cozy environment, perfect for a group. Don’t worry: They’ve got plenty of sake, too.

12. FRESHCRAFT

1530 Blake, Suite A; 303-758-9608; freshcraft.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 0.6

Freshcraft serves “upscale comfort food in a casual atmosphere.” It is the place to go whether you are in an old T-shirt and work boots, or dressed up for the night out. Freshcraft has one of the most extensive beer lists in town, with 25 rotating taps and 125+ canned and bottled beers.

13. HAPA SUSHI

1514 Blake St.; 720-354-5058; hapasushi.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.1

Hapa offers an affordable selection of sushi in a modern

1701 Wynkoop Street (Union Station) Suite 100; 720-460-3730 thekitchen.com/next-door-union-station MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.1

The Kitchen Next Door is a community pub that embodies the idea of conversation and connection. Looking for a burger or a sandwich? Next Door has some delicious options such as a Kobsterstein Ranch Dry Aged Cheese Burger and the Next Door Beet Burger. The fries are delicious.

16. LINGER

2030 W. 30th Ave. 303-993-3120; lingerdenver.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 1.9

In a building that once served as a mortuary, Linger offers global street food in a fun and quirky atmosphere. Don’t let its history deter you though: The restaurant has stunning city

This Mexican fish house crafts delectable coastal cuisine, including duck sope, mariscos and its famous preparedat-your-table guacamole. Lola also offers more than 200 different tequilas and a selection of local craft beers and Mexican brews.

18. PIZZA REPUBLICA

890 14th St.; 303-623-2811; pizzarepublica.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 0.1

Just a short jaunt from the Show, Italian staple Pizza Republica serves up everything from salad and sandwiches to pasta and wood-fired Neapolitan pizza. Grab a traditional or unique pie, like the Duck & Fig.

19. STOUT STREET SOCIAL

1400 Stout St.; 720-214-9100; stoutstsocial.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 0.5

A top spot for casual seafood, Stout St. Social is a quick walk from the Convention Center. Try its daily fresh oysters or its Ahi Tuna Tower, featuring sushi-grade tuna, spicy crab, sushi rice, avocado, cucumber and citrus. The menu goes beyond seafood, with a selection of burgers, ribs and pasta. A FANCY AFFAIR

20. OCEAN PRIME

1465 Larimer St. (Larimer Square) 303-825-3663; ocean-prime.com MILES FROM THE SHOW: 0.6

Situated in the beautiful Larimer Square, Ocean Prime is a modern American restaurant and lounge that was chosen as editor’s pick for Best Seafood from 5280 Magazine. The spot also offers USDA Prime-cut steaks.

Get more delicious recommendations from dive to deluxe at visitdenver.org/SIA.

SIAsnowshow.com | DAY 1 | SNOW SHOW DAILY

51


AT THE SHOW | WHO'S COMING

EXHIBITORS

More than 900 brands on display at the Snow Show (as of Jan. 13, 2017; subject to change) Company

Company

Company

Company

Company

Company

2XU.. .................................. 1235 4F.... ................................... 1510 686..................................... 2965 Abom Inc. ....................... 1865A ACADEMY Snowboard Co. ............ 2975 Adaptive Spirit ...................... 19 adidas Snowboarding .....3062 Advanced Racking Systems ........................ 3247 Airblaster ........................... 2578 Airhole Facemasks ............ 2463 Aksels ................................ 2648 All Resort Furnishings........ 2406 Allett...............................2620 Aloha Products LLC ........... 3570 Alpaca Imports .................. 2546 Alpina Sports Corp. ........... 2512 Alpine Radius Control Technologies ..............3908 Alp-n-Rock LLC.................. 1327 Alps & Meters...................620 American Express OPEN ... 2906 Apex Sports Group LLC .... 4018 Arbor ................................. 3670 Arcade Belt Co. ................. 2566 Arctix ................................. 2430 Armada .............................. 4155 Arpin .................................216 Artesania Inc. ..................... 1633 ARVA ................................. 3219 Astis ................................... 2220 Athalon Sportgear Inc. ...... 4121 Athletic Event Supply .....3324 Atomic USA Inc ................. 3835 Auclair Sports Inc .............. 1330 AWSM Brand ..................... 2281 B Fresh Gear .....................766 Backcountry Access Inc. .... 3658 Ballistic Boardwear/ ShredSaver ................2480 BEARPAW .......................1143 BEMER ............................4107 Bern Unlimited Inc ..... 3674, 3677 Besso Imports .................... 1508 Big Agnes Inc .................... 2421 Bishop Binding Co ..........2317 Bjorn Daehlie North America ...........4109 Black Crows Skis ..............1865B Blackstrap .......................... 3156 Blizzard .................... 3407, 3507 BNY GLV .........................1450 Bollè .................................. 1162 Booster Strap .................... 3423 Boot Doc ........................... 3140 Boulder Gear ..................... 2629 Braven ................................. 362 Brekka.............................3430 Briko USA .......................... 3918 Buff Inc. ............................. 2645 BULA ................................. 1256 Burton Snowboards..Mtg Room 204 C3.... .................................. 3162

C4 Belts ............................. 2283 Capita Snowboards ........... 3162 Capranea Sports AG .......1513 Captuer Headwear ............ 2473 Carabiner Coffee ............... 2517 Carver Skateboards ........... 1579 Celtek ................................ 3679 CenterStone Technologies Inc. .......... 1835 CEP Compression Sportswear ................... 4031 CG Habitats ....................... 2177 Chaos ................................ 1529 Cheveux Corp. ................1453 Cirque Mountain Apparel ......................... 1543 Coal Headwear .................. 3162 Coalition Snow .................. 2614 COLDPRUF Base Layer..................1317 Colmar ..................... 1018, 1321 Colorado Mountain Club ...............16 Colorado Ski Country USA................. 1848 Corbeaux ........................... 1149 CP Sports North America LLC ................. 3638 Craghoppers ............... 735, 836 Crescent Moon Snowshoes.................... 4012 Crux Expedition Trailers .......................2822 D·CURVE ........................... 2265 Dakine ......................2563/2510 Dalbello Sports LLC........... 4025 Dale of Norway Inc .............. 829 Dang Shades ...................2964 Dare2b......................... 735, 836 Darn Tough Vermont ......... 2101 DC Shoes Inc ..................... 2682 Deeluxe ........................ 1865DL Demon United ................... 2571 Descente North America, Inc.................. 1008 Deuter ............................... 2919 Deviation Ski & Snowboard Works ........ 3325 Dinosaurs Will Die Snowboards.................. 2976 DMOS............................. 1865D DonJoy Performance ......3535 Double Diamond Sportswear ................... 1832 DPS SKIS............................ 3314 Dragon Alliance ................. 3170 Dynastar Skis ..................... 3513 Economic Development Corporation of Utah ..1825 EGG ................................3942 Eider .................................... 824 Eisbär Sportmodeu Gmbh ........................... 2825 EK Ekcessories Inc ..........3331 Elan Blanc .......................... 1830

Elan Skis ............................ 2512 Elevety Inc. .....................1171 EMU Australia.................... 1342 Endurance Enterprises Inc .............. 1801 Envy Snow Sports .............. 3837 Erik Sports-Whitewoods.... 3307 Eurosock International....... 1332 Everest Designs ................. 1045 E-Z UP International Inc.........4339 Faber & Company Inc. .............4211 Faction Skis ....................... 4150 Farm to Feet ...................... 4139 Fast Strap .......................... 3328 Fera International Corp. ...... 811 Fischer Skis US .................. 4218 FITS ................................... 1540 Fix Binding Co ................... 2580 Flow Sports Inc. ................. 2970 FlyLow Gear ...................... 2922 Fox River Mills Inc. ............ 2419 Freaker USA .....................947 Full Tilt Boots .................... 3847 G3 Genuine Guide Gear Inc ........................ 2911 Giro Sport Design ............. 3354 Gnarly .............................2966 Goal Zero .......................... 2416 GogglePal .........................765 Goldbergh ........................... 324 Goldwin America Inc ........... 613 Good Livin ......................... 3680 GOODE Ski Technologies.....................3226 GoPro .................................. 860 Gordini USA Inc ................. 2650 Grabber Inc. ...................... 3323 Grand Sierra Accessories ..................... 940 Grassroots California ......... 3680 H & H Sports Protection ....................945 H2O Guides Inc...............2514 HALTI OY ........................1044 Hammitt ............................230 Hand Out Gloves............... 2272 Handshake ......................2160 HangEmRight..................3538 HEAD/Tyrolia Wintersports ................. 2829 Heat Factory USA Inc ........ 1606 Helly Hansen ..................... 1514 Hestra Gloves LLC ............. 1824 Hi-Dow International ......4340 High Fives Non-Profit Foundation ................... 1052 Holden ............................... 3470 Holmenkol.US.................... 4207 Homeschool Outerwear .... 2479 Honey Stinger ................... 2426 Horizon Agency Inc ........... 2506 Hot Chillys ......................... 3135 Hotdish Snowskates .......... 3581 Hotfingers Gloves.............. 1507 Hotronic............................. 2939 Hovland Snowskates ......... 3581 HOWL ................................ 2672 ICE Outdoor Sports ........3940 Icelandic Design ................ 1316 Icelantic Skis ...................... 3218 Icepeak ................................ 202 Incredibles ......................2513 Indigo Ski USA LLC ........... 3221 InkMonstr .......................... 3330

International Skiing History Association (ISHA) ............ 21 Intrawest ........................1154 Itasca Footwear by C.O. Lynch Enterprises ......... 1245 J. Lindeberg......................611 Jack Wolfskin ....................526 Jail Jam .............................318 JLab Audio......................1066 Joshua Tree Skin Care ....... 1607 JOTT .................................318 Jupa Sports ....................... 1511 K2 Apparel .....................3953 K2 Skis ............................... 3753 K2 Snowboarding .............. 3758 Kamik ................................. 1435 Karakoram ......................... 3077 Karbon ............................... 1011 Kari Traa............................... 522 KASK Spa .......................... 3147 Kästle USA ......................... 3530 KGB SPORT ....................... 3605 Khombu ............................. 1343 Kicking Horse Coffee......2512 Killtec NA Inc. .................... 1829 Kinross Cashmere ...........1029 Kiss My Face LLC............... 1401 KJUS North America Inc...... 602 KneeBinding Inc. ............... 3316 Kombi Ltd. Inc. .................. 2835 Komperdell ........................ 3922 Krimson Klover .................. 1026 Kuhl Clothing..................... 1817 KULKEA ............................. 2433 KUUsport Mfg. Ltd. ........... 3912 Kwik Tek Inc. ...................... 3318 L2R Snowboards .............3572 LandYachtz ........................ 1577 Lange Ski Boots ................. 3513 Lasting Sport ..................2842 Laundromat ......................... 536 L-Bow Mittens ................... 2545 Le Bent .............................. 1036 Leki USA Inc ...................... 2925 Level USA .......................... 2364 Liberty Mountain ............... 3428 Liberty Skis ........................ 3830 Linda Richards Inc.............. 1318 Line Skis ............................. 3850 Liquid / Tension of Sweden ........................839 Lone Mountain Printing Inc ................1054 Look Bindings .................... 3513 Lorpen North America Inc......................1345 Lucky Bums Inc .................. 2621 Luhta USA Ltd ..................... 202 M. Miller ............................ 1021 Mad Jack Snowsports ....... 3539 Maison Montval ................... 318 Mammut Sports Group NA ..................... 2915 Marhar Snowboards .......... 3473 Marker USA ....................... 4225 Marmot Mountain LLC ...... 2316 MasterFit Enterprises ........ 3349 MDXONE .......................... 2267 Medical Data Carrier ......3249 Meier Skis .......................... 2914 Mervin Manufacturing ....... 2778 Message Factory Inc. .......... 821 Mitchie’s Matchings............. 331 Molliolli .............................326 Mons Royale USA .............. 3747

Montana Sport / North America Inc ........ 3344 MOTOTV Networks .......... 3334 Mountain Collective ............ 665 Mountain Uniforms............ 1320 Native Eyewear ................. 3335 NEFF.................................. 4165 Never Summer Industries ...................... 3765 Newland ............................ 1030 N-grained Inc. .................2413 Niche Snowboards ............ 3075 Nidecker North America .... 2979, 3076 NILS ................................... 1847 Nitro Snowboards ............. 3179 Nobile Skis & Snowboards ...............3352 Nordic Center.................... 4116 Nordica USA ............ 3408, 3509 NoSo Patches .................1546 NPD Sports and Leisure Trends .............. 3425 Oakley Inc.......................... 1457 Odd Molly.........................213 Omid Sports Inc ................872 One Way Sport USA .......... 4112 OneBall .............................. 2680 O’Neill ............................... 1556 Onewheel .......................... 1977 OOKPIK world ..................518 Optic Nerve ....................... 3152 Orage ................................ 1850 Origin Distribution..........1380 Original Ski Balm/ Adventure Balm .........3338 Ortovox USA Inc ............... 2919 Oskar Blues.....................2511 Outdoor Gear Inc. ............. 2629 Outdoor Research ..........2816 Outdoor Tech ...................... 962 OwnerIQ ...........................843 Pajar Canada ..................... 1635 Parajumpers ............ 1018, 1321 Patagonia Inc ..................... 1862 Pepper’s Polarized Eyewear ........................ 2952 Phunkshun Wear LLC......... 1547 Picture Organic Clothing.... 1865P Pinnacle Designs ............... 2427 PISTIL ................................. 2233 POC ................................... 3157 Point6 LLC ......................... 1630 Polar Bear Snow Sports LLC .................3910 Polarmax............................ 2438 Polartec LLC ...................... 2559 Popticals ............................ 1271 POW Gloves ...................... 3475 PowderJet Snowboards ....2415 Pret Inc .............................. 3742 Pretty Great LLC ................ 3478 Prior Snowboards & Skis.....2275 PSIA-AASI .............................. 20 Purnell ............................... 1542 Quiksilver Inc ..................... 2382 Rain Retail.......................... 1035 Randall Innovations ........3911 Rawik ................................. 2629 Redfeather Snowshoes...... 3410 Redox Clothing .................420 Regina Imports LLC ........... 1319 Reima Oy ........................1308 Remind Insoles .................. 2671 Rental World - Backshop ... 4307

Retail Control Systems ...1252 reusch SnowSports ............ 3635 Revolver Gear .................2277 Rezo Systems .................3746 Ride Snowboards .............. 4162 Ripclear.............................. 3252 Rocky Mountain Sunscreen ..................... 2460 Rocky Mountain Underground ................ 3232 Rodin Ltd ........................... 2615 Rome Snowboard Design Syndicate.......... 3177 Rossignol USA Inc. .. 3418, 3518, 3523, 3524 ROXA Sports ..................... 3907 Royal Racks .....................3580 Ruffolo Enterprises Inc ...... 2653 Rukka ................................... 202 Ruroc Ltd ........................... 3340 Salomon Snowboards........ 3565 Salomon USA .................... 4135 Sandbox ............................ 2576 Sauce Headwear .............1352 Save the Duck ...................418 Saxx Underwear Co........... 2570 Scarpa North America Inc................... 3113 Schure Sports U.S.A. Inc ......1011 Scott Sports ....................... 2845 Screamer Inc. ..................... 1037 Sector 9 ............................. 1877 Sego Skis ........................... 4342 Seirus Innovation ............... 2534 Sh*t That I Knit ...............1545 Sherpani International Inc............ 1434 Shred Optics...................... 1167 Sierra Sage Herbs ...........1138 Skea Ltd............................. 1814 Skhoop .............................. 2319 Ski and Snowboard Mechanics Workshops ....4106 Ski Kare Inc ........................ 3310 SkiA Designs...................... 4210 Skida .................................. 2001 Skiezy Inc ........................4010 SkiMetrix Ltd ..................... 3423 Slide-On ............................ 3423 Slippery Racer Sleds .......3528 Slytech Protection ............. 1167 Smartwool Corporation....... 851 Smith ............. 2852, 2853, 2859 Smokin’ Snowboards ......... 2573 Sno Skins Inc........................ 823 Sno-go ............................4108 Snowboarders and Skiers for Christ ............ 2182 Snowjam Canada Inc ......... 4068 SOLE.................................. 4337 SOS Outreach ....................... 22 Soul Poles .......................... 3909 Soulmotion Snowboards....2814 SP United USA Inc ............... 662 Spacecraft ......................... 2575 Spark R&D ......................... 2475 SplitFit Boots LLC ...........3424 Sport Obermeyer Ltd. ....... 1608 Sportcaster Company Inc .................. 657 Sports Accessories America Inc................... 2625 Sportube ........................... 2700 Spyder Active Sports Inc......... Mtg Room 401

52

SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

*New exhibitors are bolded


Company

Company

Company

Company

Company

Company

Spyderco ........................... 3250 Stance ................................ 2465 Stingray Eyewear .............941 Stockli Outdoor Sports ..... 3230 Stoney Surfers ................2414 Storm Creek Apparel ......2428 Strafe Outerwear ............... 2820 Sun Bum LLC ..................... 2269 Sun Valley Ski Tools Inc...... 3549 Sunice ................................ 1524 Sure Foot Corporation......943 Swany ................................ 1507 Sweet Protection ............... 3750 Swix Sport USA, Inc........... 3107 Tecnica USA............. 3407, 3507 Terramar Sports Inc ........... 2651 The Soze Group (TSG)....... 4213 Therma-Phone.................1071 ThirtyTwo ........................... 3562 Till I Die...........................1351 TOBE Outerwear ............... 1340 Toko ................................... 3107 Tomahawk International.....2521 Torch Coat Heater ..........1048 Transpack........................... 2839 Trespass USA ....................... 529 Turbine .............................. 3683 Turtle Fur ........................... 1430 Uniform Gallery ................. 4205 Union Bindings .................. 3162 US Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame ..................... 17 UVEX Sports Inc. ............... 2908 Vagabonds LLC .................318 Vail Resorts Inc. / Epic Pass ....558 Vans ................................... 2770 Vapur ................................. 2313 Vauhti Wax Technologies .....3828 Ventamatic Ltd ...............3537 Venture Snowboards ......2478

Vigor Eyewear ................3536 VillageHouse ..................... 1233 Volcom............................... 2983 Volkl ................................... 4225 VonZipper .......................... 3762 Vuarnet .............................. 3155 Weston Snowboards ...............2717 Westword .......................3336 Wintersteiger Inc. .... 2939, 3140 Wolfgang Man & Beast ................2619 Wolfie Furs Canada ........... 1821 WSI Sports ......................... 1353 YRC Freight ......................... 850 Zamst ..............................3923 Zanheadgear ..................... 2077 Zanier Sports Inc .............1865Z ZDAR Boot USA ................ 1231 Zeal Optics ........................ 2161

Jiangsu Rixi Zipper Co Ltd ..............647 Jining Glove and Sewing Product Col Ltd .............. 539 Jining Jian hua Zhongxing Ski Products Co. Ltd............................ 639 Jining Tian Jiu Industry & Trade Co. Ltd ...............642 K & K Clothing Accessories Co ............... 641 Nantong Rainbow Fashion Co. Ltd. ...........844 NET Sportswear Ltd .........849 Pixlee ................................651 Roaly Merchandises Inc ....... 741 Shanghai Qixia Sunshine I/E Co. Ltd ...................446 Shenzhen Pengyifa Industrial Co. Ltd ............ 645 Shenzhen Reanson Products Co., LTD .......... 848 Shifan Racewear Inc ............ 648 Texland & Nexko Co. Ltd............................ 551 Topper Crown International Inc.........1050 Toray International America Inc..................... 745 YKK (USA) Inc ...................... 750

Apex Ski Boots Armada Atomic Nordic & Alpine Bent Metal Bindings Bern Black Crows Black Diamond Equipment Bollè Blizzard Capita Snowboards Coalition Snow Dalbello Ski Boots DC Deviation Skis & Snowboards Dynafit DPS Skis Dragon Dynastar Skis Envy Snow Sports Elan Electric Fisher Alpine Flow Snowboarding Flux Bindings Full Tilt G3 Giro Goggles & Snow Helmets Gnu Snowboards Good Carbon Ski Products Grass Sticks HEAD Wintersports Alpine Skis, Ski Boots & Bindings HillRyder Icelantic Skis Indigo Ski Equipment Jones Snowboards K2 Skis & Snowboards

Kästle Skis Kerma Ski Poles La Sportiva Lange Ski Boots Leki Poles Liberty Skis Lib Tech Snowboards Line Skis Look Bindings Madshus Marhar Snowboard Marker Ski Bindings, Helmets & Goggles Meier Skis Native Eyewear Never Summer Snowboards Nitro snowboards Nordica Boots & Skis Now Bindings Oakley POC Ride Snowboards Rocky Mountain Underground Rome Snowboards Rossignol Alpine, Nordic, Snowboard & LOOK Bindings Scarpa Salomon Alpine, Snowboards, Goggles, Helmets & Nordic Sandbox Helmets Scott Sports Sego Skis Shred Helmets & Goggles Sims Snowboards Skia

Spy Start Wax & Poles Stockli Superfeet Swix Alpine Ski Tuning Equipment & Ski Poles Tecnica Tyrolia Alpine and Alpine Touring Ski Bindings Union Bindings Uvex Vans Venture Snowboards Volkl USA Von Zipper Sunglasses & Goggles Wintersteiger Yeah For It (Bataleon, Lobster, Switchback) Yes Snowboards Zeal Optics

Sourcing Snow 3M Thinsulate Insulation .............. 553, 3330 Amaterrace Inc .................... 742 Aparso (Fujian) Sportswear Co Ltd ......... 747 CBF Labels Inc ..................... 744 Celerant Technology Corporation .................... 847 DexShell Inc ....................1038 DTS Inc ................................ 542 Erictex Fashion Co Ltd ........ 650 Ex Fty ...............................644 GoggleOutlet ...................450 Guangzhou Yijia Optical Technique Co Ltd ........... 447

On-Snow Demo* Adidas Snowboarding Aloha Products Alpina Arbor Snowboards Arc'teryx

For the most up-to-date exhibitor listing, go to SIAsnowshow.com *In conjunction with the Western Winter Sports Representatives Association (WWSRA) Rocky Mountain Demo, and in partnership with Cross Country Ski Areas Association (CCSAA)

FEET COMPLETE

Insole Solutions for Snowsports Booth #3349

Masterfitinc.com (914) 944-9038


Product Zone REDEFINE WTF WASH THE FOAM

WITH THE 1 ST EVER REMOVEABLE WASHABLE + REPLACEABLE SKI GOGGLE FOAM www.dcurve.com

Special Advertising Section

COME CHECK IT OUT AT BOOTH # 2265 FOR A CHANCE TO WIN

Traveler boot bag

Featuring the freshest gear on the market today. Here is a sneak peek at what’s new and what’s coming from leading industry companies


PRODUCT PICKS | AT THE SHOW

WISH LIST WARM AND COZY APRÈS

BREAKING THE MOLD

Bridging the gap you didn’t know existed in your wardrobe between a vest and a cape, the insulated Urban Upslope Poncho can be worn over just about anything for an extra layer of warmth and style. The wind-resistant nylon outer shell reverses to a blackand-gray camo-print merino 250 blend (72% merino, 28% wool) lining. The Upslope Poncho also features quilted poly insulation, two hand-warmer pockets, merino trim and a merino-lined hood. Booth #851

Billed as the love child of a running shoe and a snow tire, Eva-the-All-Foam-Snowshoe from Boulder, Colo.-based Crescent Moon Snowshoes features a rocker shape and foam construction that forges a new path in product design and material. Lightweight with a sole that resembles tire treads and lacking the aluminum of a traditional snowshoe, the Eva is a Hoka running shoe on steroids, according to Crescent Moon President Jake Thamm, who says the Eva took seven years to develop. “Snowshoes are a little bit techie; they can be intimidating, kind of ‘gear-ish,” which I think has turned off a lot of people. Our purpose was to make snowshoeing not only non-technical and non-intimidating, but as fun-looking as it can be.” Booth #4012

Crescent Moon Eva-the-All-Foam-Snowshoe

Smartwool Urban Upslope Poncho

REAL SIMPLE

Dynastar Legend

BAILEY LARUE AND MADISON RAHHAL

To simplify what has become a confusing buying landscape for resort skiers, Dynastar is introducing a category it calls “Free All-Terrain.” “Over-segmentation has become a problem,” said Nick Castagnoli, brand and communications manager at Group Rossignol North America. The lines between “freeride” and “all-terrain” are becoming increasingly blurred, he said. The new Legend series—headlined by the flagship Legend X 106—harkens back to the Legend skis launched in the late 1990s when Jeremy Nobis was dropping steep Alaskan faces. The Legend skis also have a new visual technology that allows customers to see inside the ski through a TPU (transparent polyurethane) window to see the Powerdrive tech inside. It’ll help salespeople sell the technology. “If the consumer doesn’t see it, it’s like it’s not there,” Castagnoli said. Booth #3513

NAMED FOR A LEGEND Astis Caillie

As hardy as the female explorer they’re named after, the Caillie long-cuff mittens are bombproof showstoppers. Handmade locally in the U.S.A., Astis crafts each pair of gloves with natural materials—cowhide, beadwork and fur trim—meaning each one is genuinely unique. This fresh set celebrates Renè Cailliè, the first European to return alive from a Timbuktu expedition, and features ebony suede leather topped with wolf-gray fur trim and handstitched watermelon-lemon-turquoise beadwork on the gauntlet. But the artistry doesn’t come without backing: the thick silicone-injected leather is waterproof to survive a beating over hundreds of days in snow-blasted wilderness. Polartec and Thermal Pro High Loft insulation mean there’s no need for hand-warmers or separate liners. Bring it on—skiing, snowshoeing, dog walking, weather forecasting, snowmobiling, anything-outside-ing—and then wear ‘em out on the town. Booth #2220

SIAsnowshow.com | DAY 1 | SNOW SHOW DAILY

55


AT THE SHOW | EVENT CALENDAR

THE AGENDA Mark your calendars with these can't-miss seminars, keynotes and events. THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2017

All Day | Booth #2460 | Rocky Mountain Sunscreen

Complimentary Skin Cancer Screening: Rocky Mountain Sunscreen will have medical staff and volunteers onhand for complimentary screenings. 7-9:15 AM | Conference Room 103 Donut Dunking Christian Fellowship _ Inspirational Conversations 8-9 AM | Mile High Ballroom Opening Morning Breakfast and Speaker – Grant Korgan on Turning Attitude into Action - Possibility Through Positivity: High Fives Foundation presents record-holding Antarctic Explorer, world-renowned athlete, adventurer, author, loving husband and motivational speaker Grant Korgan, who lives an unlimited life around the globe after sustaining a life-altering spinal cord injury in 2010. Sponsored by Squaw Valley-Alpine Meadows, with CEO Andy Wirth introducing Korgan. Beverages provided by Hiball Energy, and the first 25 people to arrive will receive a free bigtruck hat.

10-10:30 AM | Industry+Intelligence (I+I) Studio (Booth #470) Innovative Composite Materials for Performance

and Safety Presented by Innegra Technologies 10 AM | Booth #2651 | Terramar Baselayer Giveaway: Terramar Sports is giving away 800 men’s and women’s baselayer tops. Terramar’s midweight products, Thermolator and Cloud Nine will be featured. 10:30 AM | Nordic Center Cappuccino Meet and Greet 10-11 AM | I+I Live (Booth #677) Digital Advertising Trends – Data Sharing and How It’s Being Used by Retailers and Brands in the Snow Sports Industry: Brands and retailers are sharing online browsing and shopping data for more efficient ways to advertise and drive shoppers to retail. In fact, a recent Forrester report showed that 85% of retailers say they will deploy some version of audience sharing by the end of 2017. In this session we’ll discuss what “data sharing” means and identify how to take advantage of it to drive sales outcomes. Presented by Connie Johnson, ownerIQ 11-11:30 PM | I+I Studio (Booth #470) The Future of Outdoor: Building a Sales & Ordering Platform Presented by Handshake NYC 11-12 PM | Nordic Center Your Next Customer: Who Are They? Presented by David Lively, The Lively Merchant 11-12 PM | I+I Live (Booth #677) Fortify Your Brand: Protecting Your Online Presence and Social Media Identity: This lecture will discuss how to effectively launch an online marketing program while avoiding common mistakes, which could result in expensive legal problems. Presented by Procopio 12 PM | Booth #3230 | Stöckli Doc DesRoches Award Presented by USSA 12-1 PM | I+I Live (Booth #677) 5 Transformative Athlete-Powered Marketing Ideas for Your Brand: Athletes, sponsored events, ambassadors, influencers, street teams, customer loyalty groups—we all have them. Many of us spend significant dollars to keep our

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SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

programs alive in hopes they’ll deliver aspirational and authentic marketing that reaches our core markets and new customers. But is it working? This one-hour idea jam shares five transformative marketing concepts that will change the way you think about building, running and leveraging your athlete programs in 2017 and beyond. Presented by Lindsay Nelson, imre 12-12:30 PM | I+I Studio (Booth #470) Inventory = High-Risk Asset Presented by Management One 12:30-1 PM | I+I Studio (Booth #470) Open to Buy, Explained in Simple Human Terms Presented by Management One 12-1:30 PM | Booth #1529 | Chaos Chris Anthony Poster Signing and Hat Sales: Chaos Headwear will host a limited-edition poster signing with celebrity athlete Chris Anthony. Chaos will also be selling hats as a fundraiser for Camber Outdoors (formerly OIWC). 1-1:30 PM | I+I Studio (Booth #470) Defining Your Line – IP Strategies & Considerations for Small- to MediumSized Companies Presented by Peter Malen, Workman Nydegger, IP Law 1-2 PM | I+I Live (Booth #677) Field Testing on the Go – Product Performance Meets Mobility: You’ve created a stellar new product and need feedback, but developing prototypes and monitoring performance data are pains and expensive. This session will look at new ways of capturing prototype data live to reduce costs and bring quality products to market faster. Presented by Centric Software 2 PM | Trail Gate Flight Deck | H20 Guides Dean Cummings on Backcountry Terrain Management Protocol: Join renowned big-mountain guide and Alaska heli-skiing pioneer Dean Cummings to learn practical backcountry terrain management protocol to help you avoid avalanches and take your skiing and riding to the next level. 2-3 PM | Nordic Center PR for the Retailer and Nordic Center Presented by MFA, NYC PR Agency 2-5 PM | Lower Lobby | Malakye Business Cards & Beers: Whether you are hiring, looking for a new position, making a business deal or meeting new people in the industry, this event is for you. Networking happy hour will be in the 200 corridor next to the Snow Show registration desk. Bring your business card (or resume). Register at Malakye.com. 3 PM | Trail Gate Trail Gate Happy Hour: Come have a cold one, courtesy of SIA and Oskar Blues Brewing. 3-5 PM | Booth #3354 | Giro Free Custom Hats: Stop by for a custom bigtruck hat, sewed in the booth. 4:30 PM | Booth #3518 | Rossignol Ski Utah + Rossignol Happy Hour 4-6 PM | Booth #2621 | Lucky Bums Happy Hour: Help Lucky Bums celebrate another great year with free beer flowing from 4 to 6. 5 PM | Booth #1862 | Patagonia Worn Wear DIY Happy Hour: Come drink beer and learn how to fix Patagonia

gear. Repair anything for a suggested donation of $5 and it’s yours to keep! (One per person, please.) A $5 MiiR 1% for the Planet pint cup donation is good for beer. All proceeds benefit Protect Our Winters. 5 PM | The Bridge SIA Happy Hour Sponsored by Spyder and USSA: Kick off another Snow Show with a drink in hand. 5-6:30 PM | Booth #1026 | Krimson Klover A Sweet Start to SIA – Cupcakes + Wine: Enjoy a happy hour and show your support for those out living boldly. Krimson Klover is selling Merino wool socks and assorted scarves to benefit Camber Outdoors (formerly OIWC). 6 PM | Booth #3583 World Video Premiere of VISITORS from videograss FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2017

All Day | Booth #2460 | Rocky Mountain Sunscreen

Complimentary Skin Cancer Screening: Rocky Mountain Sunscreen will have medical staff and volunteers onhand for complimentary screenings. 7-9:15 AM | Conference Room 103 Donut Dunking Christian Fellowship – Inspirational Conversations 7:30-9 AM | Mile High Ballroom Protect Our Winters Breakfast & Bloodies Annual Keynote Address – Leading on Climate in 2017…and Beyond: Join Protect Our Winters for breakfast burritos and Finlandia Bloody Marys and hear Naomi Oreskes’s amazing perspective on climate change in this post-election world, how a strategy of doubt and confusion has been used to stall climate progress and how we’re all going to lead on climate in 2017 and beyond. 10 AM | Booth #2651 | Terramar Baselayer Giveaway: Terramar Sports is giving away 800 men’s and women’s baselayer tops. Terramar’s midweight products, Thermolator and Cloud Nine will be featured. 10-10:30 AM | I+I Studio (Booth #470) Take the Guesswork Out of Clinic Execution Presented by GoSpotCheck 10:30-11 AM | I+I Studio (Booth #470) Keeping Track of Pros On and Off the Mountain Presented by GoSpotCheck 10-11 AM | I+I Live (Booth #677) Amazon Selling: Hear from Chip Neff on the importance of Amazon, controlling your brand online and driving sales through this channel. Presented by Chip Neff, Neff Headwear 11-11:30 | I+I Studio (Booth #470) Undercutting the Mistakes – How to Avoid Common Missteps with Minimum Advertised Price (MAP) Policies Presented by Procopio 11-12 PM | I+I Live (Booth #677) Approaches to Common IP Issues Faced by Snow Sports Companies: How do we protect our IP in a cost-effective manner? How much should we care about other companies’ IP? What do we do with the patents and trademarks we have? This will be an informal discussion with questions welcomed on IP management for snow sports compa-


nies. Presented by Cathleen Stadecker & Kevin McGrath, Downs Rachlin Martin, PLLC 11-12 PM | Rental World - Backshop (Booth #4307) Your Next Customer: Who Are They? Presented by David Lively, The Lively Merchant 12-1 PM | I+I Live (Booth #677) Tools for Product Managers: This presentation will clarify your understanding of the roles and responsibilities of product managers and the basic tools and resources required to help them perform at a high level. It will also debut survey results comparing what real-life product managers actually do in the outdoor industry versus what the books lead us to believe. Presented by Concurrent Product Development 12-12:30 PM | I+I Studio (Booth #470) The Business of Being Good – CSR Branding Best Practices Presented by Scream Agency 1-2 PM | Rental World - Backshop (Booth #4307) Serving Newbies in the Rental Department – A Look into Gear and Service Trends Aimed at Turning Newcomers into Core Participants: This session will provide et actionable tips and advice for all rental shops. Presented by Joe Hession, SNOW Operating; Ian Prichard, Black Tie Ski Rentals; Bill Irwin, Alpina/Elan Sports; and Mike Poole, Head Wintersports 1-2 PM | I+I Live (Booth #677) What You Don’t Know About Marketing to Moms – A Guide to Success in Building New Ski Families: This session will present findings from an annual ski guide survey of 500 ski moms, which can help companies target and market to ski families. Bonus: How to effectively work with mom bloggers to promote the ski industry. Presented by Nicole Feliciano, Momtrends Media 2 PM | Trail Gate Flight Deck | H20 Guides Dean Cummings on Backcountry Terrain Management Protocol: Join renowned big-mountain guide and Alaska heli-skiing pioneer Dean Cummings to learn practical backcountry terrain management protocol to avoid avalanches and take your skiing and riding to the next level. 2-3 PM | Nordic Center PR for the Retailer and Nordic Center Presented by MFA, NYC PR Agency 3 PM | Trail Gate Trail Gate Happy Hour: Come have a cold one, courtesy of SIA and Oskar Blues Brewing. 3-5 PM | Booth #3354 | Giro Free Custom Hats: Stop by for a custom bigtruck hat, sewed in the booth. 4 PM | Trail Gate | Bishop Bindings Unveiling of New Prototype Bindings 4 PM | Booth #1824 | Hestra Happy Hour: Stop by for a drink to wind down from your day at the Show. 4:30-6 PM | Booth #2852 | Smith Optics Happy Hour: Stop by for a drink. Smith will also present a check to the High Fives Foundation from the proceeds of sales from the Smith x High Fives collaboration that debuted in 2016. 4-6 PM | Booth #2621 | Lucky Bums Happy Hour: Help Lucky Bums celebrate another great year with free beer flowing from 4 to 6.

4-6 PM | Booth #2925 | Leki Happy Hour Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Trigger Grip System 4:30-6:30 PM | Booth #1529 | Chaos Chris Anthony Poster Signing and Hat Sales: Chaos Headwear will host a limited-edition poster signing with celebrity athlete Chris Anthony. Chaos will also be selling hats as fundraiser for Camber Outdoors (formerly OIWC). 5 PM | Booth #1862 | Patagonia Music & Mules Happy Hour: Join Patagonia and Protect Our Winters for mules, music and climate action. A $5 MiiR 1% for the Planet pint cup donation is good for beer and Finlandia Moscow Mules. All proceeds benefit Protect Our Winters. 5 PM | The Bridge Obermeyer’s 70th Anniversary Celebration Happy Hour: Join SIA at The Bridge to celebrate Sport Obermeyer’s 70th anniversary with yodeling and refreshments. 5 PM | Booth #2512 | Elan Happy Hour with Glen Plake: Join Elan, Active Interest Media and Oskar Blues Brewing, with an appearance by Glen Plake. 5 PM | Red Rocks Amphitheatre | Icelantic Icelantic’s Winter on the Rocks: The annual show at the Red Rocks Amphitheatre is back, featuring Zedd with Anderson .Paak & The Free Nationals and Lil Dicky. More details and tickets at icelanticskis.com.

7 PM | Lost Lake, 3602 Colfax | B Fresh Gear, WIME Snowboards, Kind-Dub After-Party Featuring Ice C.R.E.A.M. and Qbala

SATURDAY, JANUARY 28, 2017

All Day | Booth #2460 | Rocky Mountain Sunscreen

Complimentary Skin Cancer Screening: Rocky Mountain Sunscreen will have medical staff and volunteers onhand for complimentary screenings. 7-9:15 AM | Conference Room 103 Donut Dunking Christian Fellowship – Inspirational Conversations 10-11 PM | Booth #2829 | HEAD Ted Ligety Appearance 11-12 PM | I+I Live (Booth #677) The Future of OnDemand Retail: How mobile commerce, the sharing economy and social capitalism are changing consumer behavior – for good. Presented by Joe Dunnigan, swappow 12-1 PM | I+I Live (Booth #677) It’s All About You – How Personalization of Experience Has Become a Key Differentiator in Snow Sports: In the world of Uber, Amazon, social networking and automatic everything, customers and guests expect their experience with you to be customized and personalized for their needs and desires—even before they understand those needs themselves. The creators of the SkiLynx platform discuss how you can turn your understanding of your customer into a personal relationship with them that keeps them coming back for more. Presented by Sarah W. Stocker & Mark Danks, SkiLynx 2 PM | Trail Gate Flight Deck | H20 Guides Dean Cummings on Backcountry Terrain Management

Protocol: Join renowned big-mountain guide and Alaska heli-skiing pioneer Dean Cummings to learn practical backcountry terrain management protocol to avoid avalanches and take your skiing and riding to the next level. 3 PM | Trail Gate Trail Gate Happy Hour: Come have a cold one, courtesy of SIA and Oskar Blues Brewing. 3-5 PM | Booth #3354 | Giro Free Custom Hats: Stop by for a custom bigtruck hat, sewed in the booth. 4-6 PM | Booth #2925 | Leki Poster Signing with Glen Plake 5 PM | The Bridge SIA Town Hall Meeting: Let your voice be heard. Join SIA and your peers to talk about the future of the Snow Show and the organization. 5 PM | Stoney’s Bar and Grill, 1111 Lincoln St. AfterParty with Oskar Blues and SKI Magazine: Take a Dale’s Pale Ale trolley ride over to this after-party on Saturday night and enjoy an ‘80s band and general revelry on the eve of the final day of the Show. 7 PM | Summit Music Hall, 1902 Blake St. SIA Center Stage 2017: CAPiTA Presents RED FANG SUNDAY, JANUARY 29, 2017

All Day | Booth #2460 | Rocky Mountain Sunscreen

Complimentary Skin Cancer Screening: Rocky Mountain Sunscreen will have medical staff and volunteers on-hand for complimentary screenings. 7-9:15 AM | Conference Room 103 Donut Dunking Christian Fellowship – Inspirational Conversations 2 PM | Trail Gate Flight Deck | H20 Guides Dean Cummings on Backcountry Terrain Management Protocol: Join renowned big-mountain guide and Alaska heli-skiing pioneer Dean Cummings to learn practical backcountry terrain management protocol to avoid avalanches and take your skiing and riding to the next level. MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 2017

9 AM-3:30 PM | Copper Mountain On-Snow Demo/

Ski-Ride Fest and Nordic Demo

3 PM | Copper Mountain East Village Happy Hour and Roundtable with Kelly Davis, SIA Director of Research

8:30 PM | Copper Mountain Incline Bar & Grill | Elan

Afterhours Party: Let loose at the Demo with ‘80s band the Goonies and MC Glen Plake and Ripstick cocktails. TUESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2017

9 AM-3:30 PM | Copper Mountain On-Snow Demo/

Ski-Ride Fest and Nordic Demo

8:30-9 AM | Copper Mountain East Village Informal Breakfast Roundtable with Reese Brown, SIA Nordic Director

SIAsnowshow.com | DAY 1 | SNOW SHOW DAILY

57


AT THE SHOW | SHOW NEWS

SMASH THE SILOS

Panel encourages collaboration and taking advantage of state, community resources for growth. By Eric Smith The silos that exist throughout snow sports – hardgoods and softgoods, skiing

MAKE YOUR STORY STICK By Morgan Tilton

The constant drum of online content begs the question: How can we draw eyes to the stories that we want to tell? Three experts provided some clarity at Wednesday’s Industry + Intelligence seminar, “Make Your Story Stick”: SKI and SKImag.com's Kim Beekman, SKImag.com Director of Digital Media Josh Rashkin and Catapult Creative Labs SVP Digital and Creative Services Jonathan Dorn (pictured right). 1. Find out what your audience is searching for. Once you define an audience trend—be it “recycled fabric” or ‘best restaurants in Mammoth Lakes’— consider the timing of those searches. 2. Define an ownable niche that differentiates your messaging. “Don’t feed your followers a shotgun approach,” explained Beekman, regarding the too-familiar tug to create all-inclusive coverage. “You can’t be everything to everyone.” 3. Speak with an engaging, credible voice. To hone your brand’s voice, choose three words that define its character. Carefully edit your content across all mediums in order to maintain consistency. Define your tone. Understand and incorporate the language and jargon of your audience. 4. Focus on the three Ss. Keep content simple, short and service-oriented. 5. Use TLC to grow audience. Study audience engagement, which evolves and shifts constantly, and use that to modify your content. 6. Study what customers want from your brand. Your customers may have a green thumb, hypothetically speaking, but in a particular product realm such as skis and snowboards, they may not want to read about “green skis” made from recycled materials. Instead, they’d rather read about “technical skis made sustainably in wind-powered factories.”

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SNOW SHOW DAILY | DAY 1 | SIAsnowshow.com

▲ FROM LEFT, CHUCK SULLIVAN, LUIS BENITEZ AND JINJOO LEE SPEAK ABOUT BUSINESS RESOURCES.

SHOW OF TALENT Camber Outdoors panel addresses the role of talent in sustaining growth. By Helen Olsson Show attendees packed the Mile High Ballroom for yesterday’s “Future Lead-

ers & New Talent” panel led by Camber Outdoors, part of the SIA Industry + Intelligence day. Camber Outdoors executive director Deanne Buck kicked off the session with thoughts on how the industry can sustain growth through new talent. She presented some sobering statistics: 60 percent of college graduates are women; Google has invested $50 million to close the tech gender gap; for every 130 men, only 100 women are promoted to manager. Amy Luther, director of member strategy and engagement for Camber, moderated the panel, which included Kim Miller, CEO of Scarpa NA; Beth Steele, vice president of sales of Burton Snowboards (pictured above); Danica Carey, marketing manager at Seirus; and Cami Garrison, director of WWSRA. Garrison cautioned managers to never become complacent and always listen to those working for you. Miller echoed the thought by urging leaders in the audience to let go of their egos and to engage and listen to find out where people’s passions lie. “I fundamentally believe everyone has talent,” he said. Carey encouraged the idea of empowering employees to take risks, make mistakes and potentially thrive and come up with creative solutions. Steele, who started out as an administrative assistant at Burton, pointed out that she was not part of the industry and a visionary took a chance on her. “It was like a maze, and my mentor was just moving hurdles out of the way for me,” she said.

BAILEY LARUE AND MADISON RAHHAL

and snowboarding, manufacturing and retail – are stunting industry growth, according to panelists at Wednesday’s Industry + Intelligence “Grow Your Business” session. Breaking down these silos means the industry must do a better job of fostering collaboration, and companies must seek new solutions if they hope to gain market share. Tom Adams, director for the Utah Governor’s Office of Economic Development, moderated the panel that featured Luis Benitez, division director for the Colorado Outdoor Recreation Industry Office; Jinjoo Lee, commercial specialist for the U.S. Embassy in Korea; and Chuck Sullivan, president of Something Independent. “We have to understand what our collective voice and power looks like. That comes from looking at things a little bit differently," Benitez said. For example, Lee said her office can advise U.S. companies about exporting to South Korea and other Asian nations. Sullivan’s organization, Something Independent, helps Colorado businesses find market opportunities. And both Benitez and Adams said their respective state governments offer incentives for companies looking for capital to expand or move operations. Help can also be found through non-financial resources, such as trade association forums, regional coalitions and industry summits. Eschewing the idea that a rising tide lifts all boats – because, hey, this is a trade show for snow sports, not water sports – Adams prefers the phrase: “Many rocks make up the mountain.” “If collectively we get out of our own way and get out of the silos and start to think about this as a collective voice and a collective vision,” Benitez said, “the future will look a whole heck of a lot brighter.”


QUESTION OF THE DAY | AT THE SHOW

IS PRESIDENT TRUMP GOING TO MAKE SNOW SPORTS GREAT AGAIN?

MADE IN NORWAY  SINCE 1879

“No, but we will. Because we control our own destiny, not Donald Trump. Trump skis in jeans.”

—Ed Green, Sales Representative, Rocky Mountain Region, Dale of Norway Eagle, Colo.

“If he’s reversing everything on climate change, then he’s not helping our industry.”

—Eric Tung, President, Fera International Los Angeles, Calif.

“It’s a trick question, because they’ve always been great.”

MADISON RAHHAL

—Matt Stillman, Rome Snowboards Design Syndicate Waterbury, Vt.

“I think he has bigger things to worry about than whether our industry is going to grow or not. We need to take care of ourselves. I would rather he worry about our national security.”

—Heidi Theis, Principal and Sales Representative, Theis and Associates Minneapolis, Minn.

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