Page 1

President’s Report 2006

ACP

Sciences forLife


President’s Report 2006

Editor Ron Lesko Managing Editor Christine Shields Contributing Writers Shannon Ballard Jane Gottlieb James J. Gozzo, Ph.D. Ron Lesko Christine Shields Contributing Photographers Nancie Battaglia Ron Lesko Mark McCarty Kris Qua Christine Shields Design Envision Communications Consultants Cover Photo EEG and EKG images Getty Images

President’s Message

1

Faculty Research Nano is now at ACP New center advances leadership role in nanopharmaceuticals

2 3

Doing the math ACP launches Research Institute for Health Outcomes

4

Focused on a quiet killer Kidney research growing at ACP

7

The cure, dear Brutus, is not in our stars but in ourselves Bill Millington probes the brain to end addiction

6

Getting to the heart of the matter ACP faculty study cardiovascular disease from many angles

8

Student Research Fountain of youth ACP programs interest kids in science, math Working for the cure Salvatore Ferro ’09

Swiss please! Kara Jastemski ’07

Expanding horizons through inquiry Summer research at ACP

Scholarly Activity Pharmaceutical Research Institute Pharmaceutical Sciences Pharmacy Practice Arts and Sciences Health Sciences

Administration and Finance Board of Trustees Research Contact Information Financial Statements

Gifts and Donations A Capital Success President James J. Gozzo, Ph.D., reflects on ACP’s first capital campaign Gifts and Donations

Office of Institutional Advancement

10 11 12 13 14 16 17 19 24 25

26 27 27 28

30 31 32 41


President’s message Expanding research to enhance education

Pursuing excellence. That has been the theme and great strength of an Albany College of Pharmacy education for many years. As an academic institution, our focus is on advancing health care through education and scientific, clinical and humanistic research. As we continually enhance the research environment at ACP, we remain committed to expanding research activities across the institution, advancing the overall body of knowledge in many diverse disciplines. However, we also are committed to expanding these efforts with careful attention to ways in which we can coalesce the talents and interests of our faculty around critical themes. I am pleased to report that we have made significant progress in this endeavor over the past year. This edition of our President’s Report, the annual publication of research, scholarly activity and donor support at ACP, is … well … focused on those efforts! The cover story examines the variety of ways in which ACP faculty are involved with cardiovascular disease (page 8). This is one of many disease states in which ACP has a number of faculty conducting scientific and clinical inquiry. From basic science to patient care and outcomes assessment, ACP faculty are involved along the full continuum of research activities aimed at a deeper understanding and improved treatment of America’s No. 1 killer. We welcomed the creation of our second institute last fall, the Research Institute for Health Outcomes (RIHO; page 4). Under the direction of Department of Pharmacy Practice faculty member Leon Cosler ’82,

Ph.D., the Institute brings together the research interests of more than a dozen ACP faculty members into a diverse, transdisciplinary group. Its mission is to work in collaboration with researchers locally, nationally and internationally to respond to the rapidly increasing need for high-quality, scientifically sound medical and financial data in health outcomes and pharmacoeconomic research. RIHO provides a perfect complement to our Pharmaceutical Research Institute (PRI), which is focused on drug discovery and development. Together, these two entities provide our students first-hand exposure to research across the full spectrum of pharmaceutical development and patient care – from the bench to the bedside – and advance ACP’s leadership role in helping to develop better, more effective medications. We have continued the development of PRI with the establishment of our Center for NanoPharmaceuticals (page 2), thanks to a $2 million grant from the New York State Legislature in 2006. We have continued to take a leadership role in nephrology research through the work of the Albany Nephrology Pharmacy Group (ANephRx; page 7), and we have continued to pursue breakthrough advances in basic science, highlighted in this issue by the work of Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences Chair Bill Millington, Ph.D., on the neurological triggers of addiction (page 6).

Doctor of Pharmacy candidates Salvatore Ferro ’09 and Kara Jastemski ’07. We are grateful for your continued support of all of these efforts. We closed a successful Capital Campaign last fall, achieving 180 percent of our goal, and welcomed a record level of contributions to the ACP Annual Fund in 2005-06. Just as our research contributions are critical to the advancement of education in the sciences and the advancement of health care, so are your contributions vital to help us attain our goals.

Our focus on bringing the power of all of our research activities to our students (page 10) also has continued through expanded opportunities for students like 1


Faculty Research

Dhruba Jyoti Bharali, Ph.D., specializes in nanotechnology and its use in gene, vaccine, drug and targeted delivery. 2


Nano is now at ACP New center advances leadership role in nanopharmaceuticals

Nanopharmaceutical technology

will help doctors pinpoint brain tumors and fight them in their earliest stages. It will help blast chemotherapy directly into cancerous breast tissue to help patients fight the disease without the debilitating side effects of current chemotherapy treatments. It will lead to the reformulation of old drugs so that they are safer and more effective. Nanopharmaceutical technology is one of the most exciting new fields in medical and pharmaceutical research, and Albany College of Pharmacy has been a leader since founding the Pharmaceutical Research Institute in 2002. Now the College is taking an even greater step forward in the development of this critical drug discovery and delivery platform through the creation of its Center for NanoPharmaceuticals. Operating under the umbrella of PRI, the Center is among few of its kind internationally. It is bringing together experts in science, medicine and technology from ACP, the region, state, nation and the world to attack disease with the smallest particles currently available in science. Located at the University of Albany’s East Campus in East Greenbush, just across the Hudson River from Albany, the Center was made possible through a $2 million grant from the New York State Legislature in 2006. It represents the third phase of PRI’s development, following the construction of preformulation and stability testing laboratories in 2005, and continues the College’s emphasis on moving pharmaceutical research and delivery into new territory. “This is really unique because we are bringing nanotechnology, biotechnology, drug formulation and drug delivery together under one roof,’’ says PRI

Executive Vice President and Chairman Shaker Mousa, Ph.D., who worked in drug discovery at DuPont Pharmaceuticals Co. for 17 years before joining ACP. “We want to use all the skills of people from different disciplines and different angles who come from all over the globe.’’ By the close of 2006, as equipment was still being ordered and labs set up, the Center already had $1.5 million in contracts with such entities as the United States Department of Defense and the National Institutes of Health, along with private biotechnology firms and foundations. Five scientists from within the United States and Russia had been recruited to join a 20-member interdisciplinary staff. Dr. Mousa plans to add five more in 2007. Their pursuit focuses on creating and manipulating particles that are 10,000 times smaller than a human hair. With these, drugs can be steered to specific cellular targets anywhere in the body, where they can do good while minimizing risks and painful side effects. “It’s like a missile trying to hit the target without hitting the friendly cells,’’ Dr. Mousa says. In addition, traditional medicines

can be reformulated to eliminate some of the barriers biology presents, such as limited supply. Dr. Mousa is hopeful that new-generation drugs can combat and treat vascular diseases, heal skin wounds and even grow blood vessels in heart patients. Another benefit for ACP includes the opportunity for students to participate in cutting-edge experiments and learn about new discoveries in pharmaceutical research nearly as soon as they are made. “We have students who are in their fifth and sixth year involved throughout the Center,’’ Dr. Mousa says. “They need to be involved in this environment. In the future we won’t have a one-size-fits-all approach to discovery and we need to be preparing future generations of researchers.’’

PRI’s Executive Vice President and Chairman Shaker Mousa, Ph.D., in the hematology lab with Assistant Director Ahmad Aljada, Ph.D.

3


Doing the math ACP launches Research Institute for Health Outcomes

RIHO Director Leon Cosler ’82, Ph.D., right, and Assistant Director Patrick Meek, Pharm.D.

Two trillion is almost an unthinkable

number. But think on it we must. Total health care expenditures in the United States were projected to be nearly $2.2 trillion in 2006, and are expected to rise to more than $4 trillion by 2015, according to the National Coalition on Healthcare. Escalating health care costs will be one of the most significant challenges to global economies in this century. What are the costs of specific medical interventions and how do they affect patients and insurance companies? Does health care spending bring the most value for the dollar? Which medical interventions are best for the patient and what are the end results of that care? Responding to the rapidly increasing need for high-quality, scientifically sound medical and financial data in health outcomes and pharmacoeconomic research, Albany College of Pharmacy has established the Research Institute for Health Outcomes to begin to address some of these crucial questions. 4

“Health professionals and decision makers will require increasing amounts of scientific evidence aimed at maximizing patient health with limited financial resources,” says Leon Cosler ’82, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and RIHO’s first director. The Institute merges the research activities and clinical expertise of more than a dozen ACP faculty members into a

centrated focus area in these critical disciplines,” says Dean Mehdi Boroujerdi, Pharm.D., Ph.D. “We are well positioned to take a leading role in health outcomes and pharmacoeconomic research, providing much-needed data that will benefit both patients and providers.” The Institute’s research will include several primary areas: • Analyzing local, state, national and international health care databases • Conducting evaluations of health service use patterns • Evaluating clinically oriented pharmacy services and targeted disease management programs • Conducting systematic reviews of published studies in order to summarize therapeutic effectiveness of new and existing medical technologies • Evaluating adherence to clinical treatment guidelines • Estimating costs of treatment utilizing a variety of data sources • Creating and analyzing economic decision models and simulation of the effects of medical interventions, diagnostic tests or health policy decisions.

“Health professionals and decision makers will require increasing amounts of scientific evidence aimed at maximizing patient health with limited financial resources.” – Leon Cosler ’82, Ph.D.

diverse, transdisciplinary group that will work in collaboration with researchers locally, nationally and internationally. “As our faculty has grown in size and diversity this decade through the College’s strategic plan, we have developed a con-

“The opportunities for collaborative work on our own campus and with researchers at other institutions will deliver valuable data to improve both the quality and affordability of health care,” Dr. Cosler says.


One such opportunity Dr. Cosler currently is investigating along with faculty members Sarah Scarpace, Pharm.D., BCOP, and Machaon Bonafede, Ph.D., is in the field of cancer surveillance and treatment. Their goal is to match insurance data from upstate New York with the official cancer registry maintained at the New York State Department of Health. “The project will yield a database of confirmed cancer patients that can be used to conduct a variety of outcomes research questions,” says Dr. Cosler. By comparing insurance claims to the tumor registry, the trio will be able to glean much information about the prevalence of certain types of cancer, disease stage and demographics as well as treatment trends and costs, explains Dr. Scarpace. Patrick D. Meek, Pharm.D., assistant director of RIHO and an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice, is using a large managed care claims database to study disease management

costs for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. He also is reviewing hepatitis B management strategies. Other research interests include the development of methods for costing of drug therapy for use in outcomes studies, and risk adjustment methods for evaluation of treatment interventions in inflammatory bowel disease. Margaret Malone, Ph.D., FCCP, chair of the Department of Pharmacy Practice, and John Polimeni, Ph.D., an assistant professor of economics in the department, in collaboration with col-

leagues at Albany Medical College, are evaluating several outcome-based aspects of patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Most recently they have examined and published the impact of binge-eating behavior and depression on weight-loss outcomes after surgery. They also have collected data on the use of nutritional supplements, correlation with preoperative weight loss and overall surgical outcomes and the effect of bariatric surgery on calcium, vitamin D and parathyroid hormone levels. Their findings were presented at the 2006 National Obesity Research meeting. Other faculty collaborations include those with New York State’s Medicaid Drug Utilization Review program, the Thomson-Medstat Marketscan Database, Stratton Veteran’s Administration Medical Center and the Upstate New York Consortium for Health Care Policy and Research.

Above: Margaret Malone, Ph.D., FCCP, and John Polimeni, Ph.D. are evaluating outcome-based aspects of bariatric surgery.

Left: Sarah Scarpace, Pharm.D., BCOP, discusses a grant proposal on cancer surveillance with Leon Cosler ’82, Ph.D., center, and Machaon Bonafede, Ph.D.

5


The cure, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves … Bill Millington probes the brain to end addiction

The answer, Bill Millington, Ph.D.,

William Millington, Ph.D., and colleagues are researching ways to prevent addiction.

6

believes, to one of the world’s most debilitating diseases may be a drug produced by the world’s most sophisticated instrument – the human brain. Dr. Millington has identified a small peptide produced in the brain that inhibits the neural pathway responsible for drug and alcohol addiction. Cut off the flow of information down the “pleasure pathway” and you stop the craving for addictive substances like nicotine, alcohol, morphine and amphetamines, as well as powerful prescription medications that also can lead to addiction. “If we can find a way to block the euphoria these drugs produce, we may be able to prevent patients from becoming addicted to prescription drugs like morphine and oxycodone, and help people recover from addiction to alcohol, nicotine and other drugs of abuse,” says Dr. Millington, acting chair in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. The peptide, glycyl-glutamine – or GQ – is produced from β-endorphin, an endogenous opiate-like peptide, in the brain.

The discovery of GQ’s unique properties arose from basic studies on the neurobiology of addiction. This research indicated that GQ is produced by neurons that inhibit the addictive process. This would explain why GQ is able to counteract the rewarding effects of a variety of addictive drugs and prevent the psychological and physical withdrawal symptoms of morphine or nicotine addiction. The peptide is small, about the size of most commercially produced drugs, but one obstacle Dr. Millington and his colleagues faced was that GQ won’t cross the blood-brain barrier. They overcame this obstacle by designing a cyclic derivative of GQ capable of entering the brain from the circulation. Now they are working with ACP colleague Floyd Brownewell, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Arts and Sciences, to improve the molecule. Dr. Brownewell is designing molecules that will enter the brain with better efficacy and act in the brain with greater potency. Dr. Brownewell’s work emphasizes the importance of teamwork in translating basic science research into clinically useful drugs. It also illustrates ACP’s growing ability to solve research problems with a variety of expertise. Other key members of Dr. Millington’s team include Gokhan Göktalay, M.D., Ph.D., and Sinan Cavun, M.D., Ph.D., visiting scientists from Uludag University in Bursa, Turkey, as well as collaborators at Wake Forest University and Ion Technologies Inc. in Winston-Salem, N.C., and the University of MissouriKansas City. They now are seeking funding to transform GQ into a potentially useful drug. At ACP, Dr. Brownewell will continue to develop better cyclic GQ-like molecules and Prashant Chikhale, Ph.D., an

associate professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, will study how effectively the drugs cross the blood-brain barrier. Dean Mehdi Boroujerdi, Pharm.D., Ph.D., will serve as a consultant on pharmacokinetic studies designed to elucidate the time course and metabolism of GQ analogs. Shaker Mousa, Ph.D., executive vice president and chairman of the Pharmaceutical Research Institute at ACP, will consult on the drug development potential of the research. “ACP is a great place for this type of research because we have faculty with the expertise necessary to conduct basic academic research – to identify molecules in the brain with interesting pharmacological properties, for example – and the ability to develop clinically useful drugs from endogenous molecules,” Dr. Millington says. According to the Partnership for a Drug-free America, 23 million people in the United States needed treatment for drugs or alcohol in 2005. Only 10 percent received treatment, according to the organization’s data. Many still believe addiction to be a moral issue, rather than a medical problem. Dr. Millington disagrees, pointing to genetic evidence that continues to emerge from rapid advances in neuroscience research. “For pharmacologists, addiction is now a treatable disorder,” Dr. Millington says. “There was a time, and it wasn’t that long ago, when we thought schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders resulted from moral weakness or possession by demons. “Perhaps in the future we will also treat addiction as a medical problem, not a moral failure.”


Focused on a quiet killer Kidney research growing at ACP

The Albany Nephrology Pharmacy Group (ANephRx) at ACP is gaining momentum in its research and outreach regarding medication use in patients with kidney disease. Formed in 2005 as a confluence of nephrology pharmacy researchers at the College, the group consists of George Bailie, Pharm.D., Ph.D., associate dean for research and graduate education, Darren Grabe ’93, Pharm.D., and Harold Manley ’96, Pharm.D., BCPS, all faculty in the Department of Pharmacy Practice. The group also has added its first fellowship. Katie Pallotta ’06, Pharm.D., has joined the group for a two-year nephrology pharmacy fellowship in research and education. ANephRx’s focus during 2006 was on two research efforts in particular: assessing the impact that community pharmacists could have in identifying and screening patients for early kidney disease, and analyzing changes in prescriptions during daily nocturnal home hemodialysis (DNHHD), the lesser-studied but promising type of dialysis used by some patients with end-stage kidney disease.

In the first project, the group collaborated with Department of Pharmacy Practice faculty member Mario Zeolla ’97, Pharm.D., BCPS, a community pharmacist. “Most patients with early kidney disease are asymptomatic; they don’t know they have it,” Dr. Bailie says. “If we can identify patients early in the process and make the appropriate interventions, we can significantly slow their progression toward kidney failure.” Kidney disease quietly has become a public health issue of near-epidemic proportions. More than 20 million people in the United States have chronic kidney disease, yet the public is relatively unaware of the threat. Community pharmacists are in an ideal position to identify patients at risk, particularly those with diabetes or hypertension. “This is an important long-term public health initiative,” says Dr. Grabe. On the nocturnal home hemodialysis project, ANephRx is trying to determine predictors of medication use and associated outcomes, says Dr. Bailie. A reduction in medication use could improve patients’

overall health and quality of life. The project is an extension of the group’s ongoing collaboration with Christopher Hoy, M.D., a nephrologist at the Rubin Dialysis Center in Clifton Park, N.Y. ANephRx has been examining Dr. Hoy’s data on DNHHD patients for medication utilization, prescribing patterns and outcomes, resulting in some of the first literature published on medication use in these patients. Dr. Grabe and Dr. Manley presented abstracts on the data at the American Society of Nephrology meeting in San Diego last fall: Dr. Manley on the medication burden of patients with kidney disease, and Dr. Grabe on the treatment of anemia and bone disease in these patients and associated outcomes. Their work on DNHHD partially is funded by a grant from ACP. ANephRx also hopes to access a national database of children with chronic kidney disease who have received kidney transplants. “We know a lot about medication use in the adult dialysis population, but pediatric data is scarce,” says Dr. Grabe. “The drugs are approved for adults, so pediatric nephrologists must adjust the dosages for children. We’d like to use this data to make recommendations about their use.” All three ANephRx members are well-known in the field. Dr. Manley is chair of the Nephrology Practice Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy, and Dr. Grabe is the chair-elect. Dr. Bailie is cochair of the Medical Advisory Board of the Northeast New York Chapter of the National Kidney Foundation, while Dr. Grabe serves as co-vice chair. Dr. Bailie and Dr. Manley are principals of Nephrology Pharmacy Associates based in Verona, Wis., and are fellows of the American Society of Nephrology.

ANephRx researchers Darren Grabe ’93, Pharm.D., Harold Manley ’96, Pharm.D., BCPS, and George Baile, Pharm.D., Ph.D., discuss their work on medication use in patients with kidney disease.

7


Getting to the heart of the matter ACP faculty study cardiovascular disease from many angles

Gina Garrison ’94, Pharm.D., speaks with a patient at Latham Internal Medicine and Pediatrics.

8

From the bench to the bedside, ACP faculty are deployed in a wide range of research projects aimed at solving mysteries of cardiovascular diseases and improving the quality of patient care and education related to this deadly disease. At Latham Internal Medicine and Pediatrics of Albany Medical Center, patients have access to pharmacy services provided by Gina Garrison ’94, Pharm.D., and her sixth-year ACP Pharm.D. clerkship students. Working collaboratively with physicians and nurses, Dr. Garrison and her students collect patient medical history information, discuss medication benefits or side effects and recommend drug therapies to patients during office visits. Dr. Garrison’s practice site is an example of – and catalyst for – the widening recognition of the valuable role pharmacists can provide in prevention and management of disease. “Our patients and clinicians appreciate the valuable drug information and treatment recommendations we are able to provide about lifestyle changes and medications,’’ says Dr. Garrison, an associate professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice. While Dr. Garrison is involved with patient counseling and drug management consultations for a variety of medical conditions, she and her students spend significant time working with conditions related to heart disease. This was the impetus behind the one-year study Dr. Garrison is conducting along with other ACP faculty, Aimee Strang ’98, Pharm.D., BCPS, Shannon Rivers ’04, Pharm.D., BCPS, and Teresa Lubowski ’85, Pharm.D. Using a $20,000 unrestricted educational grant from Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, 56 sixth-year Pharm.D. students interviewed and educated adult patients about heart disease risk at three medical prac-

tices. Pharmacy students enter patientspecific medical data into an interactive computer program to visually demonstrate the effects of controlling coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, such as high blood pressure, smoking and high cholesterol. Patient adherence to prescribed medications and overall satisfaction with the education session are assessed in the study, as are student benefits of gaining longitudinal experience with assessing CHD risk factors in a variety of patients. Patient response to the study has been positive, learning about the strong, collective effects of CHD risk factors and the importance of taking prescribed medications for conditions that contribute to heart disease.

“One patient enjoyed learning about her risk of heart disease so much, she wanted to know if her sister could get enrolled in the study, too,” Dr. Garrison says. Such explorations are consistent with ACP’s push to help move medical care beyond simply reacting to disease to a broader focus on prevention and cure. In addition to providing – and advocating for – expanded patient care and counseling services, ACP faculty also actively are engaged in other research related to the full spectrum of cardiovascular disease, including outcomes research and basic science. As important as their own investigation, faculty say, is the opportunity for ACP students to participate, enhancing the value of their education.


“It’s important for our students to look at the health care system and achieve a greater depth of knowledge about the patients,’’ says Robert Hamilton ’77, Pharm.D., a professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice. “We try to make them understand that it’s a patient with a disease, not a disease we’re giving the drug to.’’ Since 2004, Dr. Hamilton has studied New York’s Medicaid rolls to see whether patients with congestive heart failure are receiving the recommended drugs – usually a combination of ACE inhibitors and beta blockers. Doing so can add years to their lives, but Dr. Hamilton found that fewer than 20 percent received this combination in 2003. Dr. Hamilton has sent letters to recipients who were not receiving recommended therapy, suggesting they talk to their doctors. He believes that implementing Collaborative Drug Therapy Management in New York would help more patients get the right treatment for cardiovascular and other diseases by bringing pharmacists into the dialogue earlier in the process.

orative pharmacyrelated academic and research environment at ACP to develop drugs that prevent and treat septic shock. Among his recent findings, he has discovered that the lethal condition originates in the brain, rather than in blood vessels. It is a breakthrough that opens the way for treatments that can prevent septic shock and save lives. Dr. Feleder’s success demonstrates the importance of collaborative efforts between medical and pharmaceutical scientists. “The interaction with other scientists is completely different from working with other doctors,’’ he explains, “because at ACP we can take our knowledge to make new drugs. “Doctors don’t think about making

“It’s important for our students to look at the health care system and achieve a greater depth of knowledge about the patients. We try to make them understand that it’s a patient with a disease, not a disease we’re giving the drug to.” – Robert Hamilton ’72, Pharm.D. Carlos Feleder, M.D., Ph.D., also is bridging the worlds of medicine and pharmaceutical care in his own work with the cardiovascular system. An assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dr. Feleder has chosen to work in the collab-

drugs, they think about expanding the knowledge and understanding the disease. Here, I can do both.’’ Also devising approaches to control heart disease is Shaker Mousa, Ph.D., executive vice president and chairman of ACP’s Pharmaceutical Research Institute.

Shaker Mousa, Ph.D., executive vice president and chairman of the Pharmaceutical Research Institute, is researching a way to stop clots through a combination of natural ingredients.

A veteran of DuPont Pharmaceuticals Co., Dr. Mousa is the inventor of the Cardiolite Scan, which has become the gold standard for detecting early signs of heart attack. Among Dr. Mousa’s many current projects, he is seeking a combination of natural ingredients to help keep the heart healthy. Dr. Mousa is developing supplements using garlic and the materials in purple grape juice and pomegranate, which, when combined correctly, stop clots. This is another activity that highlights the important focus of exposing students to cutting-edge research so that they may benefit from the knowledge of faculty pursuing breakthrough discoveries in a wide range of disciplines. The more students who have the opportunity to get involved in research during their academic careers, the more who will be likely to go on to conduct their own studies and, in turn, share their expertise with a new generation of aspiring scientists and clinicians. “We find that one plus one doesn’t equal two,’’ Dr. Mousa says. “One plus one equals thousands.” 9


Student Research

What we have to learn to do, we learn by doing. – Aristotle

There are many opportunities to learn by doing at ACP. Beginning with children as early as third grade and continuing right up through the sixth year of the Doctor of Pharmacy program, students are actively engaged on some level with research projects – from the basic to the mind boggling. New this winter at the College is the ACP Academy, designed to interest Albany Public School students in third grade and up in the sciences and math. The program eventually will have students in all grade levels through high school, and will culminate with ACP’s long-standing summer research program for students between the junior and senior year of high school. ACP students participate in research with faculty mentors throughout the academic year, and also can pursue a Summer Research Internship that provides a stipend and housing for those interested in pursuing laboratory, clinical and other research projects. The eight-week program is open to full-time students in all years and from all degree programs. It is yet another way for students to broaden their academic and professional interests at ACP.

10


Fountain of youth ACP programs interest kids in science, math

Albany College of Pharmacy is

home to a new after-school academy for elementary school students from Albany’s Delaware Community School (formerly Public School 18), expanding the College’s work with students from the local community to help encourage interest – and excellence! – in math and science. The College launched the ACP Academy in February, welcoming 28 third graders to campus twice a week for an eight-week science enrichment program. The children engage in scientific exploration under the guidance of a teacher from the elementary school, with 24 ACP students as one-on-one mentors. “We’ve had a huge amount of interest from students who want to work with these children,” says Tiffany Gutierrez, ACP’s executive director of financial aid and coordinator of the program. The academy is part of the Help Yourself Foundation, launched last year by former Union College President Roger Hull, S.J.D., to create college-based programs for disadvantaged children who show potential. ACP President James J. Gozzo, Ph.D., joined Dr. Hull and The College of St. Rose President R. Mark Sullivan, Ed.D., in meetings with local newspaper editors and reporters in the fall to discuss the program (St. Rose and ACP are the first two local colleges to start Help Yourself academies). The program attracted extensive media coverage. “This is the right idea at the right time,” Dr. Hull says. “Most educational experts agree that if one is going to have an impact on young children’s educational development, those children must be reached by the third grade.” The benefits of the program are twofold, says Dr. Gozzo, who promised an ACP scholarship to students who complete the program and are subsequently

accepted to the College. “We want to encourage these students at an early age to succeed, to help them build confidence in themselves academically, particularly in math and science,” he says. “We also believe our students, faculty and staff will benefit from this program through their interactions with these young students, enriching our entire campus community.” The College’s goal, Dr. Gozzo says, is to encourage the students to continue in the program from third grade on. Eventually, the ACP Academy will have 10 different grade levels of elementary, middle and high school students participating, with the College’s existing High School Summer Research Program serving as a capstone experience between the junior and senior years of high school. Started in 1999, the summer program provides hands-on research experience in pharmaceutical sciences as well as exposure to a college campus for students who are preparing to make choices about the next step in their education. Six students participated in the summer program in 2006, spending three days each week involved in lab research, one day conducting research literature reviews or participating in workshops, and one day visiting medical and research facilities. Students were introduced to experimental methods, scientific writing and laboratory notebook keeping by program director David Clarke, Ph.D., associate professor and chair of the Department of Arts and Sciences. They also learned about drug discovery and clinical trials through the Drug Development Lecture Series presented by faculty from ACP and Albany Medical College. Students were paired and assigned faculty mentors to work on specific research projects for the duration of the program. Sam Broadaway and Julia Cos-

grove of Albany High School worked on a project titled “Effect of Castration on Mitochondrial and Sarcoplasmic Reticular Function” with Professor Robert Levin, Ph.D., of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Zoya Aziz of Academy of the Holy Names in Albany and Eugene Kipniss of Albany High worked with Shaker Mousa, Ph.D., executive vice president and chairman of the Pharmaceutical Research Institute at ACP, on a project called “Anticoagulant Potency of Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) Fractions.” Ryan Sanford of Loudonville Christian School and Brittany Bobb of Albany High worked on a project titled “Developmental Analysis and Genetic Mapping of Eph Receptor Signaling Genes” with Richard Dearborn Jr., Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. “By far the best part of the program was working alongside a professor and helping him with original research,” Ryan says. “One of the greatest things I learned was how my love for chemistry and biochemistry can be applied in an industrial way to research and produce drugs.”

The ACP Academy pairs ACP mentors with third-graders from the Delaware Community School for an after-school science enrichment program.

11


Working for the cure Salvatore Ferro ’09

Sal Ferro '09 presented his research on the costs of colon cancer treatment at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting.

12

Salvatore Ferro ’09 was surrounded.

Just midway through his third year in ACP’s Pharm.D. program, Sal was at the Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium in San Francisco in January 2006 to present his research on “Variation in the Cost of Treatment for Colorectal Cancer.” Looking around at the sea of oncologists clustering around his poster, he realized they all wanted more information. “Doctors just don’t know how much chemotherapy costs,” says Sal. “I brought 50 poster handouts with me and they were all gone in a minute.” For Sal, presenting as the lead author of a study undertaken with a team of faculty and researchers from ACP, the James P. Wilmot Cancer Center at the University of Rochester Medical Center and the Awareness of Neutropenia in Chemotherapy (ANC) Coordinating Center in Albany, the trip was a revelation. Collaborating with him were ACP faculty members Leon Cosler ’82, Ph.D, director of the new Research Institute for Health Outcomes at ACP, and Sarah Scarpace, Pharm.D., BCOP, both assistant professors in the Department of Pharmacy Practice. The team also included a combi-

nation of off-site researchers ranging from oncologists to bio-statisticians in Albany and Rochester. A second poster and abstract on costs in colorectal cancer was presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in June 2006. “The fact that Sal’s abstract and poster were accepted at a meeting like ASCO, the world’s largest professional meeting for oncologists, is a phenomenal accomplishment for anyone doing research, let alone a student,” says Dr. Cosler. This past fall, Sal, in conjunction with some of the same key players, including Drs. Cosler and Scarpace and ACP student Brian Myer ’07, a senior in the Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences program, presented their work “Are Phenothiazines Overused in Cancer Chemotherapy” at the 2006 American College of Clinical Pharmacy meeting. Their research showed a significantly higher rate of neutropenia, a serious side effect resulting from a lowered white blood cell count, in patients who took phenothiazines, a class of drugs used to treat nausea during chemotherapy regimens. Sal knew early on that he wanted to specialize in oncology and first met with Dr. Scarpace, a board certified oncology pharmacist, at the start of his second year at ACP in the fall of 2005. “I had only been teaching at ACP for about a month when Sal approached me,” Dr. Scarpace said. “He knew I was in the field and wanted to get started on a

research project right away.” Dr. Scarpace set up a hands-on experience in a clinical oncology pharmacy setting at the University of Rochester Medical Center. She also referred him to Dr. Cosler. In his first research project, Sal found there was no place to go to find out how much it costs to treat someone with colon cancer. “You do a literature search and you come up with nothing,” says Dr. Scarpace. “No one has these numbers.” And the numbers he came up with were astounding. Costs varied considerably, particularly in late-stage illness, with drug regimens differing by as much as $36,699 per patient. “The implications are stunning,” Dr. Cosler says. “The escalating costs of more advanced chemotherapy drugs and supportive agents for colorectal cancer will have a tremendous impact on health care.” Sal’s work is ongoing. He has submitted the colorectal cancer study to Cancer, a prestigious journal in the field, and has plans to prepare the neutropenia research for publication as well. He also will help to raise funds for cancer research as treasurer of ACP’s new chapter of the American Cancer Society’s Colleges Against Cancer. With two years at ACP still to go, Sal’s future goals are clear. “Cancer will affect every single one of us, either directly or through someone we love,” he says. “I hope to improve the lives of those affected by cancer, through a job in the pharmacy industry bringing new drugs to market or by working directly with patients as an oncology pharmacist. “The most important thing I learned from my research is that a small group of key people can make a difference,” says Sal.


Swiss please! Kara Jastemski ’07

Kara Jastemski ’07 has seen how pharmacy is practiced halfway around the world. Her world never will be the same. A sixth-year student in ACP’s Doctor of Pharmacy program, Kara completed a five-week rotation in Basel, Switzerland, last summer, opening her eyes to a panorama of career options in pharmacy, particularly in research. “Having the chance to see and experience international pharmacy had a tremendous impact on me as a future professional,” she says. “Each day brought the opportunity to be exposed to something new.” Kara participated in the second year of ACP’s new Pharm.D. advanced pharmacy practice experience elective in Basel. She worked with Andre Scholer, Ph.D., head of the Clinical Chemistry Laboratory at the University Hospital. The hospital chemistry lab where Kara worked was focused on toxicology. She analyzed urine samples to monitor patients in drug rehabilitation facilities and worked side-by-side with Dr. Scholer to solve complex patient cases. She also had the opportunity to learn chromatography, a technique used for the separation of mixtures.

One of the highlights of Kara’s experience was a research project undertaken with Dr. Scholer and another chemist. Kara tested and compared more than 20 urine samples of patients at rehab centers on five different kinds of drug-abuse tests to see if the tests showed consistent results. Her findings were presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society of Swiss Chemists last fall. “This experience showed me a totally different side of pharmacy,” Kara says. “I had never really done research before and realized that it may be something I’d be interested in doing in the future. I’m used to reading about studies and their results but this was the first time I could actually see results firsthand.” Day trips to laboratory, hospital and community settings gave her a chance to see other areas in which pharmacists practice in Switzerland. “The time spent with pharmacists at the hospital gave me a very different perspective on international pharmacy,” says Kara. “In Switzerland, doctors have begun to hand medications out directly to patients, causing a decrease in the need for pharmacists. It’s very different from

“Having the chance to see and experience international pharmacy had a tremendous impact on me as a future professional.” – Kara Jastemski ’07

“The rotation in Basel helps students to grasp the scope and variety of opportunities that await ACP graduates,” says Kevin Hickey, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Arts and Sciences. “The earlier and more often this can occur, the better.”

“It was hard to believe there was a program that supplied illegal drugs, but after seeing the statistics, it seemed that the program has had positive results,” Kara says. “Sixth year offers the chance to use what you’ve learned in your classes at ACP,” she adds. “Seeing things in practice makes everything come together and really brings home how essential pharmacists are to the health care profession.”

Kara Jastemski '07 focused on toxicology during her rotation in Basel, Switzerland.

the U.S., where there is such a demand.” Kara also spent a day at a heroin clinic to see the human side of the testing she had been doing. Addicts who agree to comply with the rules of a clinic or hospital are allowed to pick up clean heroin twice daily in Switzerland. 13


Expanding horizons through inquiry Summer research at ACP

One of several summer research students, B.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences major Shaarika Sarasija ’09 spent her summer working with faculty member Jeffrey Voigt, Ph.D., researching a tumor suppressing protein for breast cancer patients.

14

Every academic program at ACP is grounded in the basic fundamentals of scientific research and patient care. Expanding opportunities for students to delve deeper into both realms outside of the classroom is a key focus of the College’s strategic plan. With opportunities for faculty-mentored research in a wide variety of settings, students are exposed to myriad opportunities to put in practice what they learn in class while also gaining experience in new areas. Ten students from both the Doctor of Pharmacy and Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences programs participated in the 2006 Summer Research Internships. “Exposure to research methodology and scholarly activities are important in pharmacy and health sciences education, and to the student experience at ACP,” says Dean Mehdi Boroujerdi, Pharm.D., Ph.D. “The more opportunities our students have to be involved in research with our faculty and other experts in the field, the better they will be prepared for the increasingly complex world of health care.” Pharm.D. student Andrea Searle ’08 spent her summer working with Department of Pharmacy Practice faculty member Michael Kane ’84, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, a clinical pharmacy specialist at The Endocrine Group in Albany. The work involved a study of Thiazolidinedione (TZD) in the treatment of Type-2 diabetes mellitus. “This project challenged me in more ways than I could have imagined,” says Andrea. “It allowed me to develop a database from electronic medical records, broaden my knowledge of statistical analysis and understand a wide array of patient outcomes, both immediate and long-term, affected by TZD use.

“Most importantly, it exposed me to the practice of clinical pharmacy. I spent every day surrounded by physicians and pharmacists and had the privilege of seeing patients with both.” Andrea’s research has been accepted for presentation at the American College of Clinical Pharmacy spring meeting in Memphis, Tennessee, and the American Diabetes Association 67th Scientific Sessions to be held in Chicago in June. Researching another facet of health outcomes under the guidance of Department of Pharmacy Practice faculty member Leon Cosler ’82, Ph.D., Brian Myer ’07 (B.S. Pharmaceutical Sciences) worked with the Awareness of Neutropenia in Chemotherapy Study Group led by oncologist Gary Lyman, M.D., to analyze characteristics and treatment patterns of ovarian cancer patients. Drawing data from a nationwide registry of oncology practices, Brian assessed the incidence of neutropenia, a chemotherapy toxicity that often prevents patients from receiving the optimal dose and schedule of treatment. “The most important part of the experience was seeing the impact that a physician can have on improving patient treatment,” says Brian, who plans to continue on to medical school after earning his undergraduate degree in May. “I aspire to one day make my own contribution to advancing treatment to ensure

that patients have the greatest chance for a complete recovery.” Sophomore Shaarika Sarasija ’09 (B.S. Pharmaceutical Sciences) also focused her research in the cancer arena but took a different tack. Working with human breast cancer cells, her project with Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences faculty member Jeffrey Voigt, Ph.D., investigated the ability of the tumor-suppressor protein VDUP1 (Vitamin D3-Up Regulated Protein 1) to regulate the activity of p53, a protein that affects the ability of cells to divide. “The work that Shaarika did has not been done before by anyone else and represents a novel finding that could be very important in understanding how tumor cell proliferation is regulated,” says Dr. Voigt. “She also learned a great deal about hypothesis testing and how to design an experiment that answers a specific question.” HIV was the focus of fourth-year Pharm.D. student Ramy El-kholi ’09 and Department of Pharmacy Practice faculty member Christopher Miller, Pharm.D., BCPS. They tried to determine the effectiveness of a drug regimen utilizing protease inhibitors, which block the enzyme HIV needs in order to make new viruses, in combination with the antiretroviral agents Tenofovir and Didanosine. “I had a hands-on opportunity to


learn a great deal about HIV while working at a local clinic,” says Ramy. “The project also gave me insight into how many steps go into a research project; from Institutional Review Board proposals to the preparation of manuscripts.” Jeffrey Graves ’07 (Pharm.D.) spent his summer working with Thomas Lodise, Pharm.D., to examine the effects of certain antibiotics. In one study, the pair evaluated the effect of a higher dosing schedule of vancomycin on nephrotoxicity. They also prepared for publication a manuscript on the relationship of flouroquinolone antibiotics to glucose intolerance in elderly patients.

“The more opportunities our students have to be involved in research with our faculty and other experts in the field, the better they will be prepared for the increasingly complex world of health care.” – Dean Mehdi Boroujerdi, Pharm.D., Ph.D. “Working with Dr. Lodise has allowed me to develop a thorough understanding of clinical/epidemiologic based research,” Jeffrey says. “I’ve developed skills that have given me a more definitive understanding of many concepts taught in the classroom.” Though all of the summer projects vary in their focus, one thing is consistent: Research, whether in a laboratory, clinical or community setting, is an integral and invaluable part of the undergraduate educational experience at ACP, allowing students a unique opportunity to develop the thinking skills so critical to a scientist while allowing them to see how their work will benefit patients and inform their career directions. Sciences for life.

2006 Summer Research Internship Projects Solomon Chang ’11 (Pharm.D.) and Richard Dearborn, Ph.D. Assessment of tumor supressant effect of Vitamin D3 Up-regulated Protein 1 (VDUP1) in Drosophila Ramy El-Kholi ’09 (Pharm.D.) and Christopher Miller, Pharm.D., BCPS Efficacy of protease inhibitor-based therapy with the NRTI combination of Tenofovir plus Didanosine in HIV-infected patients Samuel Evang ’08 (Pharm.D.) and Martha Hass, Ph.D. Synthesis and antioxidant activity of adducts of lipoic acid and α-Tocopherol Jeffrey Graves ’07 (Pharm.D.) and Thomas Lodise, Pharm.D. Examination of the relationship between empirical Vancomycin dosing and onset of nephrotoxicity Neil Mandalaywala ’09 (B.S. Pharmaceutical Sciences) and Richard Dearborn, Ph.D. Analysis of VDUP1 expression during embryonic development in Drosophila Brian Myer ’07 (B.S. Pharmaceutical Sciences) and Leon Cosler ’82, Ph.D. Chemotherapy-induced toxicities among ovarian cancer patients Aniwaa Owusu Obeng ’11 (Pharm.D.) and Adwoa Nornoo, Ph.D. Oral microemulsions as P-Glycoprotein inhibitors to enhance the permeability of Paclitaxel across Caco-2 cell monolayers Alexandra Rehfuss ’09 (Pharm.D.) and Robert Levin, Ph.D. Etiology of interstitial cystitis: A novel animal model Shaarika Sarasija ’09 (B.S. Pharmaceutical Sciences) and Jeffrey Voigt, Ph.D. The regulation of p53 by VDUP1 Andrea Searle ’08 (Pharm.D.) and Michael Kane ’84, Pharm.D. Thiazolidinedione durability in the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus

15


Scholarly Activity

Pharmaceutical Research Institute Publications Shaker A. Mousa Davis FB, Tang HY, Shih A, Keating T, Lansing L, Hercbergs A, Fenstermaker RA, Mousa AS, Mousa SA, Davis PJ and Lin HY. Acting via a cell surface receptor, thyroid hormone is a growth factor for glioma cells. Cancer Research 66(14):7270-5, 2006. Mousa SA. Role of current and emerging antithrombotics in thrombosis and cancer. Drugs of Today (Barcelona, Spain) 42(5):331-50, May 2006. Murugesan S, Mousa SA, Vijayaraghavan A, Ajayan PM and Linhardt RJ. Ionic liquid-derived bloodcompatible composite membranes for kidney dialysis. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B, Applied Biomaterials, April 24, 2006 (Epub ahead of print). Mousa SA. Commentary: Emerging links between thrombosis and cancer: The role of low molecular weight heparin. Clinical Advances in Hematology & Oncology: H&O 4(2, Supplement 3):12-14, February 2006. Mousa SA and Abdel-Razeq HN. Ximelagatran, the new oral anticoagulant: Would warfarin survive the challenge? Cardiovascular Drug Reviews 23(4):331-44, Winter 2005. Murugesan S, Park TJ, Yang H, Mousa SA and Linhardt RJ. Blood compatible carbon nanotubes—nano-based neoproteoglycans. Langmuir: The ACS Journal of Surfaces and Colloids 22(8):3461-3, April 2006. Mousa SA. Anti-thrombotics in thrombosis and cancer. Future Oncology (London, England) 1(3):395-403, June 2005. Zhang F, Sun P, Munoz E, Chi L, Sakai S, Toida T, Zhang H, Mousa SA and Linhardt RJ. Microscale isolation and analysis of heparin from plasma using an anion-exchange spin column. Analytical Biochemistry 353(2):284-6, June 2006. (Epub Feb 2006).

16

Mousa SA. Inhibitory effect of C-reactive protein on the release of tissue factor pathway inhibitor from human endothelial cells: Reversal by low molecular weight heparin. The International Journal of Angiology 25(1):10-3, March 2006. Mousa SA. Antithrombotics in thrombosis and cancer. Hämostaseologie 25(4):380-6, November 2005. Mousa SA, O’Connor LJ, Davis FB and Davis PJ. Proangiogenesis action of the thyroid hormone analog 3, 5diiodothyropropionic acid (DITPA) is initiated at the cell surface and is integrin mediated. Endocrinology 147(4):1602-7, April 2006 (Epub December 2005).

and platelet/fibrin-accelerated tumor growth in the chick chorioallantoic membrane model. Nutrition and Cancer 52(1):59-65, 2005.

Mousa AS and Mousa SA. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of nicotine’s pro-angiogenesis activity and its potential impact on cancer. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 97(6):1370-8, April 2006.

Sehgal LR, Wong J, He J, Wood T, Takagi I, Eldibany M, Caprini J and Mousa SA. Novel in vitro perfusion model to study the interaction between coagulation and blood-borne metastasis. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 96(4):700-8, November 2005.

Mousa AS and Mousa SA. Anti-angiogenesis efficacy of the garlic ingredient alliin and antioxidants: Role of nitric oxide and p53. Nutrition and Cancer 53(1):104-10, 2005.

Mousa SA. Emerging links between thrombosis, inflammation and cancer: Role of heparin. Acta Chirurgica Belgica 105(3):237-48, May-June 2005.

Fareed J, Iqbal O, Nader H, Mousa SA, Wahi R, Coyne E and Bick RL. Generic low molecular weight heparins: a significant dilemma. Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis 11(4):363-6, October 2005.

Mousa SA and Mousa AS. Recent advances in anti-angiogenesis strategies. Drugs of the Future 30(10):1047, October 2005.

Mousa SA. Elevation of plasma von Willebrand factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in obese subjects and their reduction by the low molecular weight heparin tinzaparin. International Angiology 24(3):278-81, September 2005. Mousa SA, O’Connor LJ, Bergh JJ, Davis FB, Scanlan TS and Davis PJ. The proangiogenic action of thyroid hormone analogue GC-1 is initiated at an integrin. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology 46(3):356-60, September 2005. Mousa SS, Mousa SS and Mousa SA. Effect of resveratrol on angiogenesis

Grants Project: Comparative effects between Fondaparinux and Enoxaparin on wound healing Sponsor: GlaxoSmithKline Total Grant: $35,700 Project period: 1/06-9/06 Project: Evaluations of anti-angiogenesis thyroid hormone antagonists in cancer models Sponsor: Charitable Leadership Foundation Medical Technology Acceleration Program Total Grant: $231,250 Project period: 9/05-9/06 Project: Physicochemical characterization and initial stability assessment of AFP-derived antistrophic octapeptide

Sponsor: Charitable Leadership Foundation Medical Technology Acceleration Program Total Grant: $84,375 Project period: 10/05-7/06 Project: Generation of PQQ conjugated polymers physicochemical characterization and initial stability assessment Sponsor: Charitable Leadership Foundation Medical Technology Acceleration Program Total Grant: $125,000 Project period: 10/05-8/06 Project: A single-dose, randomized, open-label, four-way crossover study to characterize plasma Heparin and to evaluate the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of Heparin and SNAC following oral Heparin/SNAC capsules administration versus intravenous Heparin injection or oral Heparin in healthy male subjects Sponsor: Emisphere Technologies, Inc. Total Grant: $182,275 Project period: 10/05-10/06 Project: Potential anti-angiogenesis efficacy of Othera’s novel antioxidants Sponsor: Othera Pharmaceuticals Inc. Total Grant: $24,000 Project period: 10/05-7/06 Project: Anti-angiogenesis efficacy and mechanism(s) of Othera’s novel antioxidant, TPH, and its impact on the anti-angiogenesis efficacy of potential strategies for ocular neovascularization-mediated disorders in human endothelial 3-dimensional


Pharmaceutical Sciences sprouting model Sponsor: Othera Pharmaceuticals Inc. Total Grant: $57,600 Project period: 1/06-12/06 Project: Anti-angiogenesis efficacy of intravenously administered TPH alone or in combination with Avastin or Macugen in the CAM model Sponsor: Othera Pharmaceuticals Inc. Total Grant: $38,400 Project period: 3/06-12/06 Project: Cellular and molecular mechanisms of TPH in the modulation of complement activation and inflammation Sponsor: Othera Pharmaceuticals Inc. Total Grant: $54,000 Project period: 3/06-01/07 Project: Role of 1, 6 Anhydo in Enoxaparin fractions in the modulation of endothelial tissue factor pathway inhibitor Sponsor: Aventis Total Grant: $100,000 Project period: 6/06-05/07 Project: Generation of tetrac conjugate polymers, physiochemical characterization, and initial stability assessment Sponsor: CLF Medical Technology Acceleration Program, Inc. Total Grant: $125,000 Project period: 2/06-12/06 Project: Ten gram scale up and characterization of PQQ-PVA conjugated polymer Sponsor: CLF Medical Technology Acceleration Program, Inc. Total Grant: $25,000 Project period: 2/06-6/06 Project: Kininogen in ocular angiogenesis-mediated disorders Sponsor: Vascular Vision Pharmaceuticals Co./NIH (Eye Institute and Cancer Institute) Total Grant: $100,000 Project period: 10/05-12/06 Project: Wound healing and haemostatic treatment using novel pharmaceutical nanoploymer or nanoparticles formulation of thyroid hormone T4 analogs Sponsor: CLF Medical Technology Acceleration Program, Inc. Total Grant: $306,900 Project period: 4/06-10/06 Abstracts/Presentations Mousa SA. Commentary: Emerging links between thrombosis and cancer: The role of low molecular weight heparin. Third International Conference on Thrombosis and Haemostasis Issues in Cancer, Bergamo, Italy, October 2005.

Publications Prashant J. Chikhale Sliesoraitis S and Chikhale PJ. Carboplatin-induced hypersensitivity. International Journal of Gynecological Cancer 14:1-6, 2005. Carlos Feleder Blatteis CM, Li S, Li Z, Feleder C and Perlik V. Cytokines, PGE2 and endotoxic fever: A re-assessment. Prostaglandin, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids 76:1-18, 2005 Feleder C, Perlik V, Tang Y, Blatteis CM. Putative antihiperpyretic factor induced by LPS in spleen of guinea pigs. American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory Integrative Comparative Physiology. 289(3):R680-687, Sept. 2005. Li Z, Perlik V, Feleder C, Tang Y and Blatteis CM. Kupffer cell-generated PGE2 triggers the febrile response of guinea pigs to intravenously injected LPS. American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory Integrative Comparative Physiology. 290:R1262-1270, 2006. Blatteis CM, Li S, Li Z, Feleder C and Perlik V. Cytokines, PGE2 and endotoxic fever: A re-assessment. Prostaglandins and Other Lipid Mediators 76(1-4):1-18, 2005. Robert M. Levin Erdem E, Leggett RE, Dicks B, Kogan B and Levin RM. Effect of bilateral ischemia followed by reperfusion on superoxide dismutase activity and contraction. BJU International 96:169174, July 2005. Agartan CA, Whitbeck C, Leggett RE, Chichester P and Levin RM. Effect of ethanol on the protection of urinary bladder function by grape suspensions. Urology 66:213-217, 2005. Levin RM, Agartan CA, Whitbeck C,

Leggett RE, Chichester P, Neuman P and Johnson A. Effect of partial outlet obstruction on nitrotyrosine content and distribution within the rabbit bladder. Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry 276(1-2):143-148, Aug. 2005. Aikawa K, Chichester P, Whitbeck C and Levin RM. The effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibition on changes induced by estradiol in bladders from ovariectomized rabbits Urologia Internationalis 75:133-138, 2005. Levin RM, Reed TP, Whitbeck C, Chichester P and Damaser M. Effect of strip length on the contractile dysfunction of bladder smooth muscle following outlet obstruction. Urology 66:659-664, 2005. Damaser MS, Whitbeck C, Chichester P and Levin RM. Effect of vaginal distension on blood flow and hypoxia of the urogenital organs of the female rat. Journal of Applied Physiology 98(5):1884-1890, 2005. Matsumoto S, Hanai T, Yoshioka N, Shimizu N, Sugiyama T, Uemura H and Levin RM. Edaravone protects against ischemia/reperfusion-induced functional and biochemical changes in rat urinary bladder. Urology 66:892-896, 2005.

Whitbeck C, Sourial MW, Sourial M and Levin RM. Comparative effects of in-vitro ischemia on the contractile responses of the mouse and rat bladders to various forms of stimulation. Urology 67(4):859-863, April 2006. Badger WJ, Whitbeck C, Kogan, B, Chichester P and Levin RM. The immediate effect of castration on female rabbit bladder blood flow and tissue oxygenation. Urologia Internationalis 76:264-268, 2006. Stevenson K, Kucich U, Whitbeck C, Levin RM and Howard PS. Functional changes in bladder tissue from type III collagen-deficient mice. Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry 283:107114, 2006. Erdem E, Whitbeck C, Kogan BA and Levin RM. Effect of maturation and aging on response of the rabbit bladder to bilateral in vivo ischemia/reperfusion. Urology 67:220-224, 2006. William R. Millington Cavun S, Göktalay G and Millington WR. Glycyl-glutamine, an endogenous endorphin-derived peptide, inhibits morphine conditioned place preference, tolerance, dependence and withdrawal. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 315:949-958, 2005.

Lin AD, Mannikarottu AS, Chaudhry A, Whitbeck C, Kogan BA, Chichester P and Levin RM. Protective effects of grape suspension on in-vivo ischemia/reperfusion of the rabbit bladder. BJU International 96(9):13971402, Dec. 2005.

Resch GE, Shridharani S, Millington WR, Garris DR and Simpson CW. Glycyl-glutamine in the nucleus accumbens reduces ethanol intake in alcohol preferring (P) rats. Brain Research 1058:73-81, 2005.

Levin RM, Longhurst PA, Whitbeck C and Korstanje C. The effect of tamsulosin on the response of the rabbit bladder to partial outlet obstruction. Neurourology and Urodynamics 25:89-94, 2006.

Göktalay G, Cavun S, Levendusky MC, Hamilton JR and Millington WR. Glycyl-glutamine inhibits nicotine conditioned place preference and withdrawal. European Journal of Pharmacology 530:95-102, 2006. Göktalay G, Cavun S, Levendusky MC, Resch GE, Veno PA and Millington WR. Hemorrhage activates proopiomelanocortin neurons in the rat hypothalamus. Brain Research 1070:45-55, 2006. HaiAn Zheng Zhao J, Zheng H and Xie X-Q. NMR characterization of recombinant transmembrane protein CB2 fragment CB2(180-233). Protein and Peptide Letters 13(4):335-42, 2006. Grants Richard E. Dearborn Project: Elucidation of vitamin D3 upregulated protein 1 tumor suppressor Bold – denotes ACP faculty collaborating on a project

17


Scholarly Activity Pharmaceutical Sciences, continued function during brain development in Drosophila Sponsor: Albany College of Pharmacy, Intramural Grant Current period: $2,500 Project Period (2006-2007): $4,000 Project: Mapping and developmental analysis of eph receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway genes in Drosophila Sponsor: Albany College of Pharmacy, Intramural Grant Current period: $5,000 Project period (2005-2006): $5,000 Robert M. Levin Project: Biomarkers predicting the severity of obstruction-induced bladder dysfunction Sponsor: VA Merit Review Grant Current period: $140,000 Project period (2006–2010): $560,000

Abstracts/Presentations Prashant J. Chikhale Birnby L, Murugesan S, Chichester P, Linhardt RJ and Chikhale PJ. Anticancer activity of a novel glycosaminoglycan, acharan sulfate against brain tumor cells. 33rd Controlled Release Society Annual Meeting, Vienna, Austria, July 2006. Richard E. Dearborn Dearborn Jr. RE, Snyder RG, Levendusky MC and Voigt JM. Sustained expression of the vitamin D3 up-regulated protein 1 (VDUP1) tumor suppressor correlates with glial subtype differentiation during Drosophila optic lobe development. Society for Neuroscience 36th Annual Meeting, Atlanta, Ga., October 2006.

Project: Ischemic etiology of obstructive bladder dysfunction Sponsor: National Institutes of Health Current period: $288,570 Project period (2004–2008): $1,154,280

Carlos Feleder Feleder C, Perlik V and Blatteis CM. Preoptic nitric oxide attenuates endotoxic fever by inhibiting the preoptic release of norepinephrine. Second International Meeting on Physiology and Pharmacology of Temperature Regulation. Phoenix, Ariz., March 2006.

Project: Protein oxidation induced by partial outlet obstruction: Etiology for obstructive bladder dysfunction Sponsor: Astellas USA Research Foundation Current period: $33,000 Project period (2005-2006): $33,000

Feleder C, Perlik V and Blatteis CM. Preoptic norepinephrine mediates the febrile reponse of guinea pigs to lipopolysaccharide. Second International Meeting on Physiology and Pharmacology of Temperature Regulation. Phoenix, Ariz., March 2006.

Project: The effect of darifenacin on overactive bladder in female and male rabbits Sponsor: Novartis Pharmaceutical Co. Current period: $27,055 Project period (2006-2007): $27,055

Feleder C, Yilmaz MS, Göktalay G and Millington WR. Evidence that activation of the vagus nerve initiates the fall in arterial pressure evoked by low, but not high, dose lipopolysaccharide. Society for Neuroscience, Atlanta, Ga., October 2006.

William R. Millington Project: Pharmacotherapy for opiate addiction and toxicity Sponsor: National Institute on Drug Abuse Current period: $90,929 Project period (2005-2006): $90,929 Project: Mechanism of action of the endorphin derived peptide glycyl-glutamine in the prevention of morphine dependence. Sponsor: Scientific and Research Council of Turkey Current period: $30,000 Project period (2006-2009): $90,000 Project: Inhibition of alcohol intake by a non-opioid peptide. Sponsor: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Co-investigator: C. Wayne Simpson Current period: $100,000 Project period (2003-2006): $300,000

18

Yilmaz MS, Göktalay G, Millington WR and Feleder C. The initial fall in arterial pressure evoked by lipopolysaccharide is mediated by the preoptic anterior hypothalamic area. Society for Neuroscience, Atlanta, Ga., October 2006. Feleder C, Yilmaz MS, Göktalay G, and Millington WR. Neither vagotomy nor pentoxifilline inhibit a high dose lipopolysaccharide-induced (LPS) hypotension in rats: Possible role of a central mechanism. Society for Neuroscience, Atlanta, Ga., October 2006. Feleder C. The role of the spleen in the febrile response. University of Buenos Aires School of Medicine, Department of Physiology, Buenos Aires, Argentina, July 2006. Feleder C. Afferent and efferent signaling during the inflammatory response. The Favaloro Foundation and University, Graduate Depart-

ment, Buenos Aires, Argentina, July 2006.

can Urological Association, Atlanta, Ga., May 2006.

Feleder C. From the liver to the brain: The role of complement. The National University of La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina, July 2006.

Levin R. Role of nitric oxide in the urinary bladder function: Effect of argenine. American Urological Association, Atlanta, Ga., May 2006.

Feleder C, Perlik V, Tang Y and Blatteis CM. A factor derived from the spleen attenuates hepatic LPS uptake and the febrile response. A novel antipyretic mechanism. Society for Experimental Biology, San Diego, Calif., April 2005.

Levin R. Effect of cyclical estrogen on bladder weight, function and structure. American Urological Association, Atlanta, Ga., May 2006.

Robert Levin Levin R. Estrogen induced functional hypertrophy of the rabbit urinary bladder. International Continence Society, Montreal, Canada, September 2005. Levin R. Protective effects of grape suspensions on in vivo ischemia / reperfusion of the rabbit urinary bladder. International Continence Society, Montreal, Canada, September 2005. Levin R. L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor reduces oxidative damage following partial outlet obstruction of the rabbit urinary bladder. International Continence Society, Montreal, Canada, September 2005. Levin R. Role of nitric oxide in urinary bladder function: Effect of argentine. Annual Meeting of the Society for Basic Urological Research, Miami Beach, Fla., December 2005 Levin R. The early effects of ovariectomy and estrogen administration on female rabbit bladder blood flow, tissue oxygenation, structure and function. Urological Research Society, Boston, Mass., November 2005. Levin R. Ischemic nature of obstructive urological dysfunction. Nippon Shinyaku Company, Nara, Japan, March 2006. Levin R. Role of natural products in the protection and treatment of obstructive bladder dysfunction. Fukushima Department of Urology, Fukushima, Japan, March 2006. Levin R. Ischemic nature of obstructive urological dysfunction. Ordway Research Institute, Albany, NY, March 2006.

Levin, R. Alterations of contractile and regulatory proteins following ovariectomy and estrogen administration in the female rabbit urinary bladder. American Urological Association, Atlanta, Ga., May 2006. William Millington Göktalay G, Hamilton J, Cavun S, Levendusky M and Millington WR. The β-endorphin derived peptide glycyl-glutamine inhibits nicotine conditioned place preference and withdrawal. International Narcotics Research Conference, Annapolis, Md., July 2005. Yilmaz MS, Göktalay G, Millington WR and Feleder C. The initial fall in arterial pressure evoked by lipopolysaccharide is mediated by the preoptic anterior hypothalamic area. Society for Neuroscience 36th Annual Meeting, Atlanta, Ga., October 2006. Feleder C, Yilmaz MS, Göktalay G and Millington WR. Neither vagotomy nor pentoxifilline inhibit a high dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hypotension in rats: Possible role of a central mechanism. Society for Neuroscience 36th Annual Meeting, Atlanta, Ga., October 2006. Adwoa Nornoo Nornoo A. The role of p-glycoproteins in drug absorption from oral microemulsions. Albany College of Pharmacy, Albany, N.Y., June 2006. Jeffrey M. Voigt Voigt JM. Inhibition of AP-1 activity in MCF-7 cells by Vitamin D3 and VDUP1. American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C., May 2006.

Levin R. Estrogen induced functional hypertrophy of the female rabbit bladder. American Urological Association, Atlanta, Ga., May 2006.

Dearborn Jr. RE, Snyder RG, Levendusky MC and Voigt JM. Sustained expression of the vitamin D3 up-regulated protein 1 (VDUP1) tumor suppressor correlates with glial subtype differentiation during Drosophila optic lobe development. Society for Neuroscience 36th Annual Meeting, Atlanta, Ga., October 2006.

Levin R. Estrogen induces angiogenesis growth into smooth muscle cells of the female rabbit bladder. Ameri-

HaiAn Zheng Sheng WY, Zheng H, Zhao J and Xie X-Q. NMR structure of a transmem-


Pharmacy Practice brane bundle from GPCR CB2. 15th World Congress of Pharmacology, Beijing, China, July 2006. Huang Y-B, Zhang Y-S, Zhang Y, Cheng P, Sun J-R, Ren J, Xie J and Zheng H. Biosynthesis and preparation of a human proinsulin C-peptide for clinical studies. National AAPS Biotechnology Conference, Boston, Mass., June 2006. Huang Y-B, Zheng H, Zhang Y, Sun JR, Xie J, Chang X-H, Cui H and Ren J. Expression, purification, preparation and preclinical study of an anti-id minibody. National American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists Biotechnology Conference, Boston, Mass., June 2006. Xie X-Q, Zheng H, Sheng W, Chen J, Zhao J and Zhang Y. GPCR NMR structural proteomics: CB2 receptor structure for in-silico CB2 ligand design. G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Evolving Concepts and New Techniques, Keystone, Co., February 2006.

Publications George R. Baile Bailie GR, Mason NA, Elwell RJ and Sy FZ. Analysis of medication use in peritoneal dialysis patients in two units. Peritoneal Dialysis International 25:287-290, 2005. Charytan C, Qunibi W and Bailie GR, for the Venofer Clinical Studies Group. Comparison of intravenous iron sucrose to oral iron in the treatment of anemic patients with chronic kidney disease not on dialysis. Nephron. Clinical Practice 100:c55c62, 2005. Elwell RJ, Frye RF and Bailie GR. Pharmacokinetics of intraperitoneal cefepime in automated peritoneal dialysis. Peritoneal Dialysis International 25:380-386, 2005. Bailie GR, Eisele G, Liu L, Roys E, Kiser M, Finkelstein F, Wolfe R, Port F, Burrows-Hudson S and Saran R. Patterns of medication use in the RRICKD Study: Focus on medications with cardiovascular effects. Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation 20:11101115, 2005. Bailie GR, Clark JA, Lane CE, Lane PL. Hypersensitivity reactions and deaths associated with intravenous iron preparations. Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation 20:1443-1449, 2005. Elwell RJ, Manley HJ, Frye RF and Bailie GR. Pharmacokinetics of intraperitoneal cefazolin and ceftazidime coadministered to CAPD patients. The International Journal of Artificial Organs 28:808-816, 2006. Bailie GR, Mason NA, Elder SJ, Andreucci VE, Greenwood RN, Akiba T, Saiyo A, Bragg-Gresham JL, Gillespie BW and Young EW. Large variations in prescriptions of gastrointestinal medications in hemodialysis patients on three continents: The Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study. Hemodialysis International 10:180-188, 2006. Piraino B, Bailie GR, Bernardini J, et al. Peritoneal dialysis-related infections recommendations: 2005 update. Peritoneal Dialysis International 25:107-131, 2005. Bailie GR. Therapeutic dilemmas in the management of peritonitis. Peritoneal Dialysis International 25:152156, 2005. Bailie GR. Risk of allergic reactions: is there any reason to choose iron sucrose over iron dextran? Anemia Network Update 4:4-6, 2005.

Manley HJ, Canella CA, Bailie GR and St. Peter WL. Medication-related problems in hemodialysis patients: A pooled analysis. American Journal of Kidney Diseases 46:669-680, 2005. Bailie GR and Massry SG. Clinical practice guidelines for bone metabolism and chronic kidney disease: an overview. Pharmacotherapy 12:16871707, December 2005. Cavill I, Auerbach M, Bailie GR, Barrett-Lee P, Beguine Y, Kaltwasser P, Littlewood T, Macdougall IC and Wilson K. Iron and the anaemia of chronic disease: A review and strategic recommendations. Current Medical Research and Opinion 22:731-737, 2006. Van Wyck DB, Eckardt K-U, Adamson JW, Bailie GR, et al. National Kidney Foundation. KDOQI Clinical practice guidelines and clinical practice recommendations for anemia in chronic kidney disease. American Journal of Kidney Diseases 47(Supplement 3):S1-S146, 2006. Jennifer Cerulli Cerulli J and Marciniak M. Ask the pharmacist: How can I use medication safely? The Spotlight (Bethlehem edition), October 2005. Leon E. Cosler Pearson SA, Soumerai S, Mah C, Cosler LE, et. al. Racial disparities in access after regulatory surveillance of benzodiazepines. Archives of Internal Medicine 166(5):572-9, March 2006. Kuderer NM, Dale DC, Crawford J, Cosler LE and Lyman GH. Mortality, morbidity, and cost associated with febrile neutropenia in adult cancer patients. Cancer 106(10):2258-66, May 2006. Cosler LE, Sivasubramaniam V, Agboola O, Crawford J, Dale D and Lyman GH. Effect of outpatient treatment of febrile neutropenia on the risk threshold for the use of CSF in patients with cancer treated with chemotherapy. Value in Health 8(1):47-52, 2005. Hornberger J, Cosler LE and Lyman GH. Economic analysis of targeting chemotherapy using a 21-gene RTPCR assay in lymph-node-negative, estrogen-receptor-positive, earlystage breast cancer. The American Journal of Managed Care 11(8):31324, 2005. Angela C. Dominelli Zeolla MM, Brodeur MR, Dominelli AC, Haines ST and Allie ND. Development and validation of an instrument to determine patient knowledge: The

Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge (OAK) Test. Annals of Pharmacotherapy 40(4):633-8, April 2006. Dominelli AC. Powerful medicines: The benefits, risks and costs of prescription drugs (Book Review). American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 69(1):13, March 2005. Dominelli AC, Clarke DW, Flint R, Kahn S, Reed T and Papandrea D. The impact on pharmaceutical education on knowledge and attitudes of directto-consumer advertising. Proceedings of the NorthEast Undergraduate Research Organization for Neuroscience Conference, Hunter College, New York, N.Y., April 2006. Roland J. Elwell Elwell RJ, Manley HJ, Frye RF and Bailie GR. Pharmacokinetics of intraperitoneal cefazolin and ceftazidime coadministered to CAPD patients. The International Journal of Artificial Organs 28:808-816, August 2005. Thomas P. Lodise Deryke A, Lodise TP, Rybak MJ and McKinnon PS. Epidemiology, treatment and outcomes of nosocomial bacteremic Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia. Chest 128(3):1414-22, September 2005. Lodise TP, Rhoney DH, Tam VH, McKinnon PS and Drusano GL. Pharmacodynamic profiling of Cefepime in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of hospitalized patients with external ventriculostomies. Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. 54(3):223-30, March 2006. Teresa J. Lubowski Lubowski TJ. Relationship between obesity and cardiovascular risk factors: Findings from a multi-state screening project in the United States. Current Medical Research and Opinion 21(11):1755-1761, 2005. Margaret Malone Malone M. Medication associated with weight gain. Annals of Pharmacotherapy 39 (Online, DOI 10.1345/aph.1G333), November 2005. Malone M, Alger SA and Anderson DA. The Lifestyle Challenge program: A multidisciplinary approach to weight management. Annals of Pharmacotherapy 39 (Online, DOI 10.1345/aph.1G287), November 2005. Malone M, Alger-Mayer S and Anderson D. Does medication use change

Bold – denotes ACP faculty collaborating on a project

19


Scholarly Activity Pharmacy Practice, continued during a weight loss program? Pharmacotherapy 25:1467(Abstract), 2005. Harold J. Manley Manley HJ, Cannella CA, Bailie GR and St. Peter WL. Medication-related problems in ambulatory hemodialysis patients: A pooled analysis. American Journal of Kidney Diseases 46(4):669-80, October 2005. Christopher D. Miller Miller CD, Rebuck JA, Ahern JW and Rogers FB. Daily evaluation of macroaspiration in the critically ill posttrauma patient. Current Surgery 62(5):504-8, 2005. Miller C, Lomaestro B, Park S and Perlin D. Progressive esophagitis caused by Candida albicans with reduced susceptibilty to Caspofungin. Pharmacotherapy 26:877-880, 2006. John M. Polimeni Polimeni JM. Simulating agricultural conversion to residential use in the Hudson River Valley: Scenario analyses and case studies. Agriculture and Human Values 22(4):377-393, 2005. Polimeni JM and Chandrasekara R. Water, development and state security in South Asia: Scenarios for China and India. Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture 6(3), Summer 2006. Polimeni JM, Polimeni RI, Shirey RL, Trees CL and Trees WS. The demand for community supported agriculture. Journal of Business and Economics Research 4(2):49-60, 2006.

Polimeni JM, Polimeni RI, Shirey RL, Trees CL and Trees WS. The supply of community supported agriculture. Journal of Business and Economics Research 4(3)17-22, 2006. Polimeni JM. Transdisciplinary research: Moving forward. International Journal of Transdisciplinary Research 1(1):1-3, July 2006. Darren M. Triller Triller DM. Medication management model as experiential education tool for students of pharmacy. Home Health Care Services Quarterly. 24(12):47-59, 2005. Triller DM, Clause SL and Hamilton RA. Risk of adverse drug events by patient destination after hospital discharge. American Journal of Healthsystem Pharmacy 62(18):1883-1889, Sept. 2005. Triller DM, Donnelly J and Rugge J. Travel-related savings through a rural, clinic-based automated drug dispensing system. Journal of Community Health 30(6):467-476, 2005. Williams EM and Triller DM. Recurrent acute Nitrofurantoin-induced pulmonary toxicity. Pharmacotherapy 26:713-718, 2006. Nicole M. Stack Stack NM and Shimp LA. Vaginal and vulvovaginal disorders in Handbook of Nonprescription Drugs: An Interactive Approach to Self-Care, 15th edition (Berardi RR, Kroon LA, McDer-

mott JH, Newton GD, eds). American Pharmacists Association, Washington, D.C., 2006. Rudd KM and Stack NM. Cultural competency for new practitioners. American Journal of Health-system Pharmacy 63(10):912- 913, May 2006.

Abstracts/Presentations George R. Baile Bailie GR. Epidemiology of adverse events to intravenous iron. Nordic Nephrologists Meeting, Copenhagen, Denmark, September 2005.

Stack NM and Rudd KM. Advanced pharmacy practice for new practitioners. American Journal of Health-system Pharmacy 63(12):1126- 1127.

Bailie GR. The measurement of clinical outcomes utilizing real world trial design: ESRD Case Study. Academy of Managed Care Pharmacists Educational Conference, Nashville, Tenn., October 2005.

Mario M. Zeolla Draugalis JR, DiPiro JT, Zeolla MM and Schwinghammer TL. A career in academic pharmacy: Opportunities, challenges and rewards. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 70(1):Article 17, 2006.

Bailie GR. Chronic Kidney Disease: Clinical Practice Guidelines for Bone Disease. CE program, First Health Services Corporation, Richmond, November 2005.

Zeolla MM, Brodeur MR, Dominelli A, Haines ST and Allie N. Development and validation of an instrument to determine patient knowledge: The Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge (OAK) Test. The Annals of Pharmacotherapy 40:633-638, 2006. Grants Angela C. Dominelli Project: Lessons learned from the initial Medicare Part D outreach effort Sponsor: Albany College of Pharmacy Intramural Grant Co-investigators: Patrick Meek Current period: $3,500 Project period: $3,500 Thomas P. Lodise Project: Prediction model to identify patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections at risk for multi-drug resistance Sponsor: Elan Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Co-investigators: Ben Lomaestro and Eileen Graffunder Current period: $25,000 Project period: $25,000 Project: Examination of the relationship between empirical Vancomycin dosing and onset of nephrotoxicity. Sponsor: Pfizer, Inc. Co-Investigator: Ben Lomaestro Current period: $25,000 Project period: $25,000 Macary Weck Marciniak Project: American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy/Wal-Mart Annual Conference Scholarship Program Sponsor: American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy/Wal-Mart Co-investigator: Sarah A. Parnapy Current period: $1,000 Project period: $1,000

Elwell RJ, Hoy CD, Daoui R, Meola S, Bailie GR, Manley HJ and Grabe DW. Achieving K/DOQI anemia targets in daily nocturnal hemodialysis patients. American Society of Nephrology 38th Annual Renal Week, Philadelphia, Pa., November 2005. Grabe DW, Elwell RJ, Brodeur MR and Bailie GR. Prospective analysis of the impact of clinical clerkship experiences on the ethical development of pharmacy students. American College of Clinical Pharmacy Annual Meeting, San Francisco, Calif., October 2005. Laurie L. Briceland Briceland LL, Briscoe-Dwyer LA, Cronin LM, Pavelka RW and Lubowski TJ. A medication reconciliation and evaluation project conducted by Pharm.D. students in a multi-health system. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting, San Diego, Calif., July 2006. Briceland LL and Hamilton RA. Comparison of 1:1 versus 1:2 preceptor/student ratios on advanced practice experience. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting, San Diego, Calif., July 2006. Briceland LL and Lubowksi TJ. Improving communications with experiential education preceptors. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting, San Diego, Calif., July 2006. Michael R. Brodeur Brodeur MR. Glucagon therapeutics uses with a focus on beta blocker overdose. Colonie Emergency Medical Services, Colonie, N.Y., May 2006. Brodeur MR. Dopamine: Continuing medical education. Colonie Emergency Medical Services, Colonie N.Y., March 2006.

20


Brodeur MR. Metoprolol: Continuing medical education. Colonie Emergency Medical Services, Colonie N.Y., March 2006. Brodeur MR. Haloperidol: Continuing medical education. Colonie Emergency Medical Services, Colonie N.Y., November 2005. Brodeur MR. Etomidate: Continuing medical education. Colonie Emergency Medical Services, Colonie N.Y., November 2005. Susan P. Bruce Bruce SP. Medication-related issues in scleroderma. Capital District Scleroderma Support Group (Tri-State Chapter), Schenectady, N.Y., November 2005. Bruce SP. Response to the ACPE Accreditation Standards and Guidelines: Report of the ACCP 2004-05 Educational Affairs Committee. American College of Clinical Pharmacy Annual Meeting Town Hall session, San Francisco, Calif., October 2005. Jennifer Cerulli Cinelli E, Cerulli J, Zeolla M, Weck M and Cottrell J. A community pharmacy-based target intervention program to promote calcium supplement use in persons on osteoporosis medications. Nonprescription Medicines Academy, Cincinnati, Ohio, September 2005. Cerulli J. NCEP guidelines and hypertriglyceridemia medications. The Skinny on Fatty Acids: The efficacy of Omega-3s Dinner Symposium, National Community Pharmacists Association Annual Meeting, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., October 2005. Leon E. Cosler Cosler LE , Kuderer NM, Hornberger J and Lyman GH. 21-gene RT-PCR assay in lymph node negative (LN-), estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer: An economic analysis including prognostic and predictive information. American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Atlanta, Ga., June 2006.

Khorana AA and Lyman GH. Variation in the cost of treatment for colorectal cancer. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Atlanta, Ga., June 2006. Lyman GH and Cosler LE. Cost-effectiveness analysis of G-CSF in elderly patients with aggressive nonHodgkins’s Lymphoma receiving CHOP. Eleventh Annual International Meeting of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, Philadelphia, Pa., May 2006. Polimeni JM, Polimeni RI, Cosler LE and Chandrasekara RW. Changes in healthcare financing in Malaysia. 2nd International Conference on Health Financing in Developing Countries, Clermont-Ferrand, France, December 2005. Polimeni JM, Polimeni RI, Cosler LE and Chandrasekara R. The Barrio Adentro health financing mission in Venezuela. 2nd International Conference on Health Financing in Developing Countries, Clermont-Ferrand, France, December 2005. Cosler LE, Eldar-Lissai A, Dale DC, Crawford J and Lyman GH. Economic analysis of Pegfilgrastim in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. American College of Clinical Pharmacy Annual Meeting, San Francisco, Calif. October 2005. Eldar-Lissai A, Cosler LE and Lyman GH. Can the use of prophylactic pegfilgrastim reduce the cost of cancer treatment? Society for Medical Decision Making, San Francisco, Calif., October 2005. Cosler LE. Update on the Awareness of Neutropenia in Chemotherapy (ANC) Registry. National Investigators Meeting, Amgen Inc., San Francisco, Calif., June 2006. Angela C. Dominelli Dominelli AC. Health Care Law Conference, Medicare Part D: Appeals and exceptions. Albany Law School, Albany, N.Y., June 2006.

Dale DC, Cosler LE, Wolff DA, Culakova E, Poniewierski MS, Crawford J and Lyman GH. Economic analysis of prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor use bases on a risk model for neutropenic complications in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Atlanta, Ga., June 2006.

Dominelli AC. Health Care Law Conference, Medicare Part D: Appeals and exceptions. New York State Office for the Aging at Albany College of Pharmacy, Albany, N.Y., May 2006.

Ferro SA, Cosler LE, Wolff DA, Poniewierski, MS, Culakova E,

Dominelli AC. Medicare Part D outreach, Albany College of Pharmacy

Dominelli AC. Medicare Part D: After the dust settles. Annual Meeting of the National Association of Medicaid Pharmacy Administrators, Milwaukee, Wis., July 2006.

Continuing Education Program, December 2005. Dominelli AC.The Medicare Part D prescription drug program. Albany College of Pharmacy Annual Law Day Continuing Education Program, November 2005. Dominelli AC.The Medicare prescription drug program. Albany Law School Annual Senior Law Day, October 2005. Sara E. Dugan Dugan SE. Pediatric polypsychopharmacology: Where’s the proof? KIDS Oneida and CNY Mental Health Care Systems, Oneida, N.Y., November 2005. Dugan SE. Agitation induced by pioglitazone: A case study. College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists Annual Meeting, Baltimore, Md., April 2006. Roland J. Elwell Elwell, RJ, Hoy CD, Daoui R, Meola S, Bailie GR, Manley HJ and Grabe DW. Achieving K/DOQI anemia targets in daily nocturnal hemodialysis patients. American Society of Nephrology 38th Annual Renal Week Meeting, Philadelphia, Penn., November 2005. Gina Garrison Garrison G and Fiaschetti S. Tobacco: The problems and solutions. Albany College of Pharmacy, Albany, N.Y., April 2006. Darren W. Grabe Grabe DW, Elwell RJ, Brodeur MR and Bailie GR. Prospective analysis of the impact of clinical clerkship experiences on the ethical development of pharmacy students. American Col-

lege of Clinical Pharmacy Annual Meeting, San Francisco, Calif., October 2005. Grabe DW, Hoy CD, Meola S, Bailie GR, Manley HJ, Daoui R and Elwell RJ. Achievement of K/DOQI bone and mineral disease targets in daily nocturnal hemodialysis patients. American Society of Nephrology 38th Annual Renal Week Meeting, Philadelphia, Penn., November 2005. Grabe DW, Hoy CD, Manley HJ, Meola S and Bailie GR. Characterization of medication use in patients treated with daily nocturnal home hemodialysis: Trends over time. National Kidney Foundation Spring Clinical Meetings, Chicago, Ill., April 2006. Grabe DW, Hoy C, Manley HJ, Meola S and Bailie GR. Medication use patterns treated with daily nocturnal home hemodialysis: Trends over time. American Journal of Kidney Diseases A31(abstract 52), 2006. Thomas P. Lodise Lodise TP, Patel N, Graves J and Lomaestro BM. Relationship between prior antibiotic exposure and multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 16th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Nice, France. April 2006. Patel N and Lodise TP. Risk factors for Carbapenem-resistance among patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa respiratory tract infections. 16th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Nice, France. April 2006.

Bold – denotes ACP faculty collaborating on a project

21


Scholarly Activity Pharmacy Practice, continued Lodise TP, Ma L, Pypstra R, Kahn J, Noel G and Drusano GL. Pharmacodynamic profiling of Ceftobiprole for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections and nosocomial pneumonia. 16th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Nice, France. April 2006. Davis SL, Lodise TP, Mohr J and McKinnon PS. Risk factors for inappropriate empiric antibiotic therapy in ICU patients with gram-negative bacteremia #K-1523. 45th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Washington D.C., December 2005. Davis SL, Mohr J, Lodise TP and McKinnon PS. Multicenter cohort analysis of epidemiology, inadequate antibiotic therapy and outcomes of patients with gram-negative bacteremia in the ICU. 45th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Washington D.C., December 2005. Karpe B, Lodise TP, Kinzig-Schippers M, Drusano GL and SĂśrgel F. Pharmacodynamic profile of Cefditoren in the plasma and epithelial lining fluid. Annual Meeting of the German Pharmaceutical Society, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz, Germany, October 2005. Lodise TP, Drusano GL, Ma L, Pypstra R, Kahn J and Noel GL. Determination of optimal renal dosage adjustment for Ceftibiprole. 43nd Infectious Diseases Society of America meeting, San Francisco, Calif., October 2005. Lodise TP, Graves J, Patel N, Graffunder E and Lomaestro BM. The impact of prior antibiotic exposure and delayed appropriate treatment on outcomes of patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infections. 43nd Infectious Diseases Society of America meeting, San Francisco, Calif., October 2005. Lodise TP, Ma L, Gotfried M, Barriere S and Drusano GL. Telavancin penetration into epithelial lining fluid as determined by population pharmacokinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulation. 43nd Infectious Diseases Society of America meeting, San Francisco, Calif., October 2005. Lodise TP, Nau R, Kinzig M, Ma L, Sorgel F and Drusano GL. Probability of target attainment for Ceftazidime, Ceftriaxone and Cefotaxime in the cerebrospinal fluid. 45th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Washington D.C., December 2005.

22

Lodise TP and Rybak MJ. Evolving epidemiology of community-acquired Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus at an urban teaching hospital. 43nd Infectious Diseases Society of America meeting, San Francisco, Calif., October 2005. Lodise TP. The evolving epidemiology and treatment of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections. ACPE accredited continuing education, Albany College of Pharmacy, Albany, N.Y., September 2005. Schwarzbard L, Lodise TP, Lomaestro BM and Smith RP. Comparison of glucose intolerance between Gatifloxacin and Levofloxacin in elderly, hospitalized patients. 45th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Washington D.C., December 2005. Lodise TP. Use of antibiotics in the community setting: When is it OK to pull the trigger? 2006 Capital Area Pharmacists Society Annual Convention, Albany, N.Y., April 2006. Lodise TP. Strategies to improve the probability of a clinical response for patients with infections. Albany Medical Center Hospital Internal Medicine Resident’s Rounds, Albany, N.Y., April 2006. Lodise TP. Outcomes and economic considerations with serious infections due to Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Decision Sciences and Engineering Systems, Troy, N.Y., March 2006. Lodise TP. Strategies to improve outcomes of patients with infections. Capital Region Antibiotic Advisory Committee, Troy, N.Y., February 2006. Lodise TP. Treatment of communityacquired pneumonia: Ketolides versus Fluoroquinolones (Debates in Therapeutics). American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Midyear Clinical Meeting, Las Vegas, Nev., December 2005. Lodise TP. New agents for Gram-positive infections: A focus on Daptomycin. New York State Council of Health-system Pharmacists, Albany, N.Y., December 2005. Lodise TP. Outcomes and economic considerations with serious infections due to Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Albany Chapter of theAmerican Statistical Association, Albany, N.Y., October 2005. Teresa J. Lubowski Lubowski TJ, Briscoe-Dwyer LA,

Cronin LM, Pavelka RW, Briceland LL and Hamilton RA. A medication reconciliation and evaluation project conducted by Pharm. D. students in a multi-site health system. New York State Council of Health-system Pharmacists Annual Assembly, Bolton Landing N.Y., May 2006. Margaret Malone Malone M. Managing nutritional supplements and drug therapy post gastric bypass. American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Clinical Nutrition Week, Dallas, Texas, February 2006. Harold J. Manley Manley HJ. Pharmacy in the hospital environment. Genzyme, Inc. Renal Division Hospital CSS Training, Cambridge, Mass., July 2005. Manley HJ, Hoy C, Grabe DW, Meola S and Bailie GR. Pharmacoeconomic and medication burdens in patients treated with daily nocturnal home hemodialysis. American Journal of Kidney Diseases A42 (abstract 95), 2006. Manley HJ. Medication related problems in chronic kidney disease patients. Society Quebec Nephrologie, Magog, Canada, April 2006.

Manley HJ. Young Investigator Award: Medication related problems in chronic kidney disease patients. American College of Clinical Pharmacy Spring Meeting, Monterey, Calif., April 2006. Manley HJ. Nephrology Review Pharmacotherapy Preparatory Course, American College of Clinical Pharmacy Spring Meeting, Monterey, CA, April 2006. Manley HJ. Improving safety: Medication management and formularies. National Kidney Foundation Clinical Meeting, Chicago, Ill., April 2006. Manley HJ. Medication related problems in chronic kidney disease patients. National Kidney Foundation Clinical Meeting, Chicago, Ill., April 2006. Macary Weck Marciniak Marciniak M. The ABCs of Medicare Part D and medication therapy management services. APhA-ASP Midyear Regional Meeting, Las Vegas, Nev., October 2005. Marciniak M. Successful navigation through the pharmacy residency process. APhA-ASP Midyear Regional Meeting, Las Vegas, Nev., October 2005.


Marciniak M. The ABCs of Medicare Part D and medication therapy management services. APhA-ASP Midyear Regional Meeting, Buffalo, N.Y., October 2005. Marciniak M. Successful navigation through the pharmacy residency process. APhA-ASP Midyear Regional Meeting, Buffalo, N.Y., October 2005. Marciniak M. Smooth transitions: What to expect as a new practitioner. Pharmacists Society of the State of New York Midwinter Conference, Albany N.Y., January 2006. Marciniak M. The rookie’s guide to convention. Pharmacists Society of the State of New York Midwinter Conference, Albany N.Y., January 2006. Marciniak M. Pharmacist curriculum for administering vaccines. New York State Association of County Health Officials, New York State Immunization Conference, Cooperstown, N.Y., April 2006. Marciniak M and Shirley K. Ask the pharmacist: Focus on methadone. Whitney M. Young Health Center Methadone Maintenance Treatment Program, Albany, N.Y. May 2006. Weck M. IMPACT 2005: Improving medication persistence, adherence and compliance with therapy. AmerisourceBergen National Healthcare Conference and Exposition, Las Vegas, Nev., July 2005. Weck M. IMPACT 2005: Improving medication persistence, adherence and compliance with therapy. AmerisourceBergen National Healthcare Conference and Exposition, Las Vegas, Nev., July 2005. Weck M. Live press briefing for the New York State passage of the “Unintended Pregnancy Prevention Act” (A.116/S.3661), which would have allowed pharmacist-provision of emergency contraception without a prescription, Legislative Office Building, Albany, N.Y., August 2005. Christopher Miller Miller C. Confronting antiretroviral therapy: A practical approach. Infectious Diseases Update, Albany College of Pharmacy, Albany, N.Y., September 2005. Miller C. Adherence and outcomes with antiretroviral therapy. American College of Clinical Pharmacy Annual Meeting. San Francisco, Calif., October 2005. Miller C. Confronting drug interactions with antiretroviral therapy.

Upper Hudson Primary Care Consortium Annual HIV Update, Lake Placid, N.Y., December 2005 Miller C. Antiretroviral resistance: The fight continues. New York Society for Health Planning Professional Meeting. Albany, N.Y., February 2006. Miller C. Managing antiretroviral resistance. Correctional Medical Services’ Physician’s Assistant and Nurse Practitioner Regional Conference. Trenton, N.J., January 2006. Miller C. Opportunistic infection prophylaxis: Concepts of drug therapy. Schenectady Family Health, Schenectady, N.Y., January 2006. Miller C. Opportunistic infection prophylaxis: Focus on pharmacology. Schenectady Family Health, Schenectady, N.Y., January 2006. Miller C. Opportunistic infections: Discussing therapy options. Resident conference, St. Clare’s Hospital, Schenectady, N.Y. June 2006. Miller C. Medication errors and antiretroviral therapy: Getting it right. Whitney M. Young Health Center, Albany, N.Y. June 2006. John M. Polimeni Polimeni JM and Chandrasekara R. Water, development and state security in China: Water as catalyst for international conflict. Proceedings of the International Conference on Water Culture and Water Environment Protection, Kunming, China, September 2005. Polimeni JM and Polimeni RI. Jevons’ paradox and the myth of technological liberation. Complexity, Science and Society Conference, Liverpool, United Kingdom, September 2005. Polimeni JM and Polimeni RI. Socioeconomic hysteresis in transitional economies: The case of Romania. Complexity, Science and Society Conference, Liverpool, United Kingdom, September 2005. Polimeni JM, Polimeni RI, Shirey RL, Trees CL and Trees WS. Is the demand for community supported agriculture sustainable? United States Society for Ecological Economics Third Biennial Conference, Tacoma, Wash., July 2005. Polimeni JM, Polimeni RI and Cosler LE. Pharmaceuticals hormones and other organic wastewater contaminants in the United States, United States Society for Ecological Economics Third Biennial Conference, Tacoma, Wash., July 2005.

Polimeni JM, Polimeni RI and Pociovalisteanu D. Globalization and traditional institutions in Nigeria: A tale of two villages, Globalization is Identity, Constantin Brancusi University, Targu-Jiu, Romania, June 2006. Polimeni JM, Polimeni RI and Albu LL. Nicholas Georgescu-Roegen and modern economy. Sesiunea Omagiala Nicholas-Georgescu Roegen, Romanian Academy Institute for Economic Forecasting, Bucharest, Romania, February 2006. Polimeni JM, Polimeni RI and Cosler LE. Pharmaceuticals, hormones and other organic wastewater contaminants in the United States. International Health Economics Association 5th World Congress, Barcelona, Spain, July 2005. Polimeni JM. Food security threats to the urban food supply. Food and Drug Administration Centennial Celebration, College Park, Md., March 2006. Marisa P. Rahn Mills KD, Rahn MP and Brass C. A novel team approach to antibiotic streamlining. American College of Clinical Pharmacy Annual Meeting, San Francisco, Calif., October 2005. Mills KD, Brass C and Rahn MP. Quantifying the potential impact of antibiotic management services

through prospective evaluation. American College of Clinical Pharmacy Annual Meeting, San Francisco, Calif. October 2005. Rahn MP. The evolving role of the pharmacist. Microbiology Department, Albany Medical Center, Albany, N.Y., October 2005. Rahn MP. A guide to antimicrobial selection in community-acquired pneumonia. Internal Medicine Department, Albany Medical Center, Albany, N.Y. November 2005. Shannon Rivers Rivers S. Alternative medicine: Is there a place for herbal medications in diabetes care? 7th Annual Goodman’s Symposium, Albany, N.Y., April 2006. Rivers S. Pharmacological Advances in Diabetes Care. 7th Annual Goodman’s Symposium, Albany, N.Y., April 2006. Rivers S. Professional societies: Changing the future of pharmacy. Presented to Pharmacy I students at the University of Buffalo, Buffalo N.Y., April 2006. Sarah L. Scarpace Scarpace SL. 2006 NCCN Clinical Practice Guideline: Breast Cancer: Highlights for Pharmacy Practice, Albany College of Pharmacy 28th Annual Pharmacy Practice Institute, Lake George, N.Y., March 2006. Scarpace SL. Herbs and the cancer patient. Gilda’s Club, Latham, N.Y., March 2006. Ferro S, Cosler L, Wolff D, Poniewierski M, Culakova E, Scarpace SL, Khovana A and Lyman GH. Variation in the cost of colorectal cancer. American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, Atlanta, Ga., June 2006. Zielonka M and Scarpace SL. Efficacy of standard treatment used for chemotherapy-induced emesis in the VAMC population. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Eastern States Conference, Baltimore, Md., May 2006. Scarpace SL. Complementary and alternative medicine. Empowerment: Strength through Community Conference, Health Law Clinic of the Albany Law Clinic and Justice Center, Albany Law School, Albany, N.Y., June 2006.

Bold – denotes ACP faculty collaborating on a project

23


Scholarly Activity Pharmacy Practice, continued Scarpace SL. Breast cancer treatments: FDA labels and the literature. Northeast Medicaid Drug Utilization Review Conference, Albany, N.Y. June 2006. Heather M. Spanbauer Spanbauer HM, Wyman CA, Zurick GM, Redhead A, Fiden W and Morse GD. Preliminary findings of a pharmacotherapy management program aimed at increasing continuity of care in patients discharged from a county hospital. American College of Clinical Pharmacy Annual Meeting. San Francisco, Calif., October 2005. Spanbauer HM. Insulin: The old, the new and the future. Albany Family Practice, Albany, N.Y., October 2005. Nicole M. Stack Stack NM and Veille JC. Assessment of the frequency of use and types of over the counter (OTC) medications in an ambulatory obstetric population. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Midyear Clinical Meeting, Las Vegas, Nev., December 2005. Stack NM. Developing a treatment approach for patients with tobacco dependence. LIU Continuing Education Program: Pulling the Trigger on Asthma and COPD, East Elmhurst, N.Y., September 2005. Stack NM. The ethics of conscientious objection: A pharmacist’s perspective. Albany Medical College, Albany, N.Y., February 2006. Rudd KM and Stack NM. The prevalence of cultural competency training at schools and colleges of pharmacy. American College of Clinical Pharmacy Spring Practice and Research Forum, Monterey, Calif., April 2006. Stack NM. Treating tobacco dependence. Certified Diabetes Educators of Northeast New York, National Kidney Foundation of Northeast New York, Inc., East Greenbush, N.Y., February 2006. Stack NM. Emergency contraception: Debating and defining the pharmacist’s role. Royal County Chapter of the New York State Council of Health System Pharmacists Women’s Health Conference, East Elmhurst, N.Y., March 2006.

24

Darren M. Triller Triller DM, Brodeur MR and Bruce SP. Technology in the classroom: Student assessment of adequacy and ability to meet educational outcomes. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting, Cincinnati, Ohio, July 2005. Triller DM. Avoiding adverse drug events. Family Care Givers Resource Fair, Columbia-Greene Community College, Hudson, N.Y. September 2005. Ellen M. Williams Williams E. Professional societies: Changing the future of pharmacy. University of Buffalo, Buffalo, N.Y., April 2006. Williams E and Marciniak M. Smooth transitions: What to expect as a new practitioner. American Pharmacists Association at Albany College of Pharmacy, Albany N.Y., May 2006. Mario M. Zeolla Zeolla MM. Dietary and herbal supplements: Important information for patients. Educational symposium for senior citizens sponsored by Oneida County Office for the Aging and the Mohawk Valley Pharmacists Society, Utica, N.Y. October 2005. Humphrey K, Zeolla MM, Cerulli J, Marciniak M and Cottrell J. A community pharmacy target intervention program (TIP) to assess gastrointestinal risk in persons receiving NSAIDs. American Pharmacists Association Annual Meeting, San Francisco Calif., March 2006. Mott DA, Farris KB, Zeolla MM, Chewning BA and Osterhaus M. Colleagues in research: Focus on evaluation of pharmacy services. American Pharmacists Association Annual Meeting, San Francisco, Calif., March 2006. Zeolla MM. Herbs and spices: An overview of dietary supplements. Mohawk Valley Pharmacists Society, Utica, N.Y., April 2006.

Arts and Sciences Publications/Exhibits Kenneth J. Blume Blume KJ. Historical Dictionary of U.S. Diplomacy from the Civil War to World War I. Scarecrow Press, Lanham, Md., 2005. Margaret Carroll Carroll M. John McGahern’s Memoir (Book Review), Canadian Journal of Irish Studies 31(2):79-80, Fall 2005.

Dudley Moon Moon D. Herbal products and botanicals: Opportunities and concerns. Pharmacy Practice for Technicians, 3rd edition (J. Durgin, Z. Hana and J. Mastanduono, eds.), Delmar Publishers, Albany, N.Y., 2005. Elisabeth L. Vines Vines EL. Oil painting “Virginia Spring,” Tri County 24th Annual National Small Works, Cobleskill, N.Y., July-August 2006.

J. Daniel d‘Oney d’Oney JD. The Houma Nation in Mississippi’s early French Colonial period: Modern interpretations and influences. Journal of Mississippi History, 68(1):43-60, Spring 2006.

Vines EL and Staley K. Two-person retrospective illustration show, First Unitarian Society of Schenectady, Schenectady, N.Y., June-September 2006.

d’Oney JD. The Houma Nation: A brief overview of the literature. Louisiana History XLVII(1):63-90, Winter 2006.

Vines EL. Oil painting “Nola Live,” 41st annual Arts Center of the Capital Region’s Fences Show, Troy, N.Y. June-July 2006.

Kevin M. Hickey Hickey KM. Entries on “Race,” “Colonialism,” “J. California Cooper” and “Olaudah Equiano.” Encyclopedia of African American Literature (Hans Ostrom and J. David Macey, Jr., eds.), Greenwood Press, Westport, Conn., 2005.

Vines EL. One person show of oil paintings, Bethlehem Town Public Library, Delmar, N.Y., January 2006.

Hickey KM. Entries on “Toussaint L’Ouverture,” “Middle Passage,” “Eurocentrism” and “J. California Cooper.” Encyclopedia of Multiethnic Literature. (Emmanuel Nelson, ed.), Greenwood Press, Westport, Conn., 2005.

Sandra K. Winn Winn SK and Karatsolis A. Interactive learning: Using tablet PCs and DyKnow to foster learning communities in Proceedings of the International Conference on Information Communications Technologies in Education (Ken Fernstrom and Kostas Tsolakidis, eds.), University College of Fraser Valley Press, Abbotsford, Canada, 2006.

Andreas Karatsolis Karatsolis A. Kairion: A rhetorical approach to the visualization of sources. WSEAS Transactions and Communication 8(4):637-642, August 2005.

Vines EL. Oil painting “Jeep for Sale,” 40th annual Arts Center of the Capital Region’s Fences Select Show, Troy, N.Y., July-Aug. 2005.


Health Sciences Grants David W. Clarke Project: Fiber optic sampling and diode array spectrometers to improve the general chemistry lab Sponsor: Pittsburgh Conference Memorial National College Grant Program Current period: $9,000 Project period: $9,000 Abstracts/ Presentations Margaret Carroll Carroll M. The Irish letters of Philip J. Gallagher. Mid-Atlantic Meeting of the American Conference for Irish Studies, Drew University, Camden, N.J., November 2005. David W. Clarke Dominelli AC, Clarke DW, Flint R, Reed T and Khan S. The impact of pharmaceutical education on attitudes, knowledge and influence of direct-to-consumer advertising. Northeast Undergraduate Research Organization for Neuroscience, New York, N.Y., April 2006. Cosler L, Clarke DW and Jarvis J. Assessing the effectiveness of webbased experiments within a general chemistry laboratory. Northeast Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Fairfield, Conn., July 2005. Timothy Coffey Coffey T. Our Little Red Book: Peer journal as indicator of institutional tensions. North Eastern Writing Center Association Conference, Nashua, N.H., April 2006. Kevin M. Hickey Hickey KM. Healing history: African women writers salving the future. Africa and the Diaspora: Agents for Change Conference, State University of New York, Albany, N.Y., March 2006. Hickey KM. Teleology and space in Michel de Montaigne’s Of Cannibals. Fiftieth Annual Renaissance Conference of Southern California, San Marino, Calif., March 2006. Hickey KM and O’Brien A. Contemporary African Literature. Africa and the Americas Colloquia (National Endowment for the Humanities), Westchester Community College, Valhalla, N.Y., February 2006.

Hickey KM and Smorkaloff P. Contemporary Caribbean Literature. Africa and the Americas Colloquia (National Endowment for the Humanities), Westchester Community College, Valhalla, N.Y., April 2006. Marion Jacobson Jacobson M. The celluloid lyre: The mainstream piano accordion tradition in America in the twentieth century. Society for Ethnomusicology Annual Meeting, Atlanta, Ga., November 2005. Andreas Karatsolis Karatsolis A. Kairion: A rhetorical approach to the visualization of sources. World Scientific and Engineering Academy and Society, Computers and Communication Conference, Athens, Greece, July 2005. Karatsolis A. Delivering presentations with the Adirondack Distance Network. Albany College of Pharmacy workshop for preceptors and pharmacists, Albany, N.Y., January 2006. Erika A. Muse Muse EA. Contentious divides and the legislation of morality: Defining homosexuality, traditional marriage and civil rights among Chinese Christians of Massachusetts. Asian Pacific American Religious Research Initiative, Berkeley, Calif., August 2006. Michael S. Pittman Pittman MS. Laughter as demolition and reconstruction in Gurdjieff’s Beelzebub’s Tales to his Grandson. Proceedings of the 11th International Humanities All and Everything Conference, Essex, U.K., April 2006. Sandra K. Winn Winn SK. Tablet P.C.s in the writing classroom: The shift to information design. Writing, Teaching and Technology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass., April 2006.

Publications

Grants

Indra Balachandran Balachandran I. Gaining momentum in the fight against breast cancer. Advance for Medical Laboratory Professionals 17(11), 2005.

M. Elyse Wheeler Project: Student microscopes Sponsor: Bender Scientific Fund Current period: $9,775 Project period: $9,775

Abstracts/Presentations Indra Balachandran Balachandran I. Cyto bootcamp: A comprehensive review for Board examinations. Albany College of Pharmacy, Albany, N.Y. August 2006. Balachandran I. Cytopreparation, staining and laboratory operations: Review with a focus on the CT and SCT board exams. American Society of Cytotechnology meeting, Las Vegas, Nev., April 2006. Balachandran I. Interesting cases: A neuron challenge in non-gynecologic cytology. American Society of Cytotechnology meeting, Las Vegas, Nev., April 2006. Balachandran I. Urinary cytology: What we can do with a high degree of accuracy? American Society of Cytopathology Teleconference, December 2005. Taylor J and Balachandran I. Creating a new profession: Can physician assistant and nurse practitioner scope of practice be used as a model to design a cytopathology practitioner? American Society of Allied Health Professionals National Meeting, San Antonio, Tex., November 2005.

Bold – denotes ACP faculty collaborating on a project

25


Administration and Finance

26


Albany College of Pharmacy Board of Trustees

Officers

Kandyce J. Daley ’74, Chair Zachary I. Hanan ’63, Vice Chair Michael F. Bette, Treasurer Robert F. McGaugh ’57, Secretary

Trustees

Stephen C. Ainlay James E. Bollinger ’58 Robert S. Busch J. Gordon Dailey ’57 Richard H. Daffner ’63 Christopher Del Vecchio ’88 Francis J. DiLascia ’54 Melvin Friedland ’58 Bridget-ann Hart ’80 Hugh A. Johnson David M. Kile ’74 Jeannette S. Lamb ’57 Joseph M. Lapetina Thomas O. Maggs Richard G. Robison ’52

Chairman Emeritus

Alfred J. Collins Jr. ’53

Trustee Emeritus

Kenneth M. Nirenberg

Research Contact Information Office of Grants Administration George R. Bailie, Pharm.D., Ph.D. Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Education 518.694.7235 bailieg@acp.edu

Pharmaceutical Research Institute Shaker A. Mousa, Ph.D. Executive Vice President and Chairman 518.694.7397 mousas@acp.edu

Sunita Chowfin Grants Administrator 518.694.7144 chowfins@acp.edu Diane Vincent Grants Accounting Manager 518.694.7313 vincentd@acp.edu

27


Albany College of Pharmacy Balance Sheet

Assets

Cash and Cash Equivalents Investments Other Assets Accounts Receivable-Students Receivables-Government Entities Other Receivables Pledges Receivable Student Loans Receivable Agency Funds Deposits with bond Trustess Property,Plant & Equipment – Net Total Assets

June 30, 2006 $ 7,464,922 8,931,062 1,228,601 195,880 178,752 1,678,467 593,536 2,307,252 140,618 1,239,308 35,288,919 $59,247,317

Liabilities and Net Assets

28

Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Deferred income and deposits U.S. government grants refundable Bonds Payable Capital lease obligation Expected Post Retirement Benefit Obligation Deposits held in custody for others Total Liabilities

$ 3,410,205 2,471,254 2,089,184 22,413,655 2,170,208 1,498,582 140,618 $34,193,706

Net Assets UNRESTRICTED: For current operations Funds functioning as an endowment Plant Fund Total unrestricted net assets

$ 1,771,662 4,053,778 13,216,038 $19,041,478

TEMPORARILY RESTRICTED: Unexpended funds received for restricted purposes College matching contribution to student loans Total temporarily restricted net assets

$ 1,286,499 328,921 $ 1,615,420

PERMANENTLY RESTRICTED Endowment Funds O’Brien Loan Fund Total permanently restricted net assets Total Net Assets Total Liabilities and Net Assets

$ 4,363,770 32,943 4,396,713 25,053,611 $59,247,317


Revenues

June 30, 2006

Student Tuition and Fees

Government Contracts and Grants Gifts and Pledges

77.64% 7.02%

1.91%

Investment Income

2.96%

Other Sources

2.88%

Postgraduate Education Auxiliary Enterprises

Expenses

0.75%

6.84%

100.00%

June 30, 2006

General Administration Research

Student Financial Aid Physical Plant

Institutional Advancement Postgraduate Education

Instruction/Student Services

18.89% 11.98%

1.81%

20.92%

3.68%

0.81%

41.91%

100.00%

29


Gifts and Donations

The new Student Center, designed by Envision Architects, PC and dedicated in September 2006, is the crowning achievement in ACP's transformation this decade from a one-building commuter college to a vibrant, residential institution with an inviting, full-service campus. 30


A Capital Success President James J. Gozzo, Ph.D., reflects on ACP’s first Capital Campaign

In October 2006, ACP closed its first Capital Campaign. Kicked off with great pomp and circumstance in 2001, the $10 million goal represented a bold undertaking for the College, a challenge to everyone in the ACP community to work toward a set of common goals in our efforts to advance the institution at a critical time in our history. I am pleased to report to you that with your help we not only met our ambitious goal, we surpassed it by more than 80 percent. The $18.1 million raised during ACP’s first dedicated Capital Campaign has helped continue the institution’s transformation. We closed the final academic year of the 20th century, 1999-2000, with a one-building campus, one off-campus residence facility and about 640 total students in one academic program. Today, as we reflect on the many achievements in just a few short years, we are able to offer so much more as a result of our fundraising success and your generous gifts: • An eight-building campus, including renovations of the former Christian Brothers Academy main building to create our “June 2, 2001, the kickoff of our first Capital Campaign, marked the Classroom Building and attached Albert beginning of a new era at ACP. The growth in students, faculty and M. White Gymnasium. our facilities has been unprecedented in the College’s history. Our • A ninth facility, the Center for NanoPharability to move ACP forward has been due in great measure to the maceuticals, just across the Hudson River response of our board, alumni, faculty and outside pharmacy supin East Greenbush. port of the Capital Campaign. My sincere thanks to all those who • Three on-campus residence facilities that contributed in making our long-term goals a reality.” serve as home to about 800 of our 1,240 – ACP Board of Trustees Chair Kandyce J. Daley ’74 students. Capital Campaign chair • The ACP Student Center at the heart of a 40-acre campus. • Increased scholarship funding. • A state-of-the-art technology infrastructure for teaching and learning. • Bachelor of Science programs in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Biomedical Technology to complement the core six-year Doctor of Pharmacy program. • Joint academic programs with Albany Law School, Albany Medical College and Union Graduate College to offer our students diverse pathways to law school, medical school and physician assistant studies, M.S. and MBA programs. • The Pharmaceutical Research Institute at Albany College of Pharmacy, led by our first endowed faculty chair, “The remarkable growth of ACP as a result of the Capital Campaign is a tribute to all PRI Executive Vice President and who participated in helping us reach and then far surpass our goal. The transformation Chairman Shaker Mousa, Ph.D. of this campus and this institution is unprecedented in our history. I am very pleased • The Rudolph H. Blythe ’31 Research with everything we have accomplished with President Gozzo’s leadership and the supFund. port of trustees, alumni and the entire ACP community, and I look forward to continued • Expanded faculty research productiviprogress as we work together to advance the College in the years to come.” ty in all disciplines, including human– ACP Board of Trustees Chairman Emeritus Alfred J. Collins Jr. ’53 ities, biomedical science and pharmaACP Board of Trustees chairman, 1985-91 and 1997-2003 cy practice. • The George ’28 and Leona Lewis Library. • The state-of-the-art Pharmacy Practice Laboratory and the James J. Morrissey ’65 Gallery. Along with commendable participation from members and friends of the ACP community, we enjoyed great leadership in this exceptional effort. Kandyce J. Daley ’74 served as chair of the Capital Campaign and, since 2003, has served as chair of the ACP Board of Trustees. She was a driving force behind our fundraising success. We owe a debt of gratitude as well to Alfred J. Collins Jr. ’53, chair of the ACP Board of Trustees for two six-year terms, including 1997-2003 as we established this vital fundraising goal and then began our work toward it – and beyond! Al served 30 years on the Board of Trustees, was elected chairman emeritus in 2003 and continues to be an important advisor to the College. This campaign has been a great success, and we look ahead to future growth as we strive to enhance our level of excellence. 31


Gifts and Donations Giving Clubs Albany College of Pharmacy gratefully acknowledges the generous support received from alumni, corporations, foundations, faculty, staff, administration and friends. Whether it be a gift to the Annual Fund, sponsorship of a flag at the Dean’s Cup golf tournament, underwriting an event or program or a gift to a scholarship fund, this support contributes to furthering ACP’s dedication to the preparing and educating of students for the practice of pharmacy and related health care professions.

Chairman’s Circle $25,000 and Over Kandyce J. Daley ’74 † Eckerd Corporation Foundation Maruzen Pharmaceuticals Co., LTD Fouad and Amal Morkos Robison Family Foundation Richard G. Robison ’52 †

President’s Circle $15,000 - $24,999 Brooks/Eckerd Pharmacy James J. Gozzo Kinney Drugs Foundation, Inc. Walgreens

Dean’s Circle $10,000 - $14,999 Anonymous Melvin S. Friedland ’58 † James J. and Gloria Hunter Francis M. Steed ’53 The Edward P. Swyer Foundation, Inc.

William Mansfield Circle $5,000 - $9,999 Frank C. Berning ’67 Michael F. Bette † Robert H. Brakemeier ’65 CVS Rinaldo V. DeNuzzo ’52 Envision Architects PC G. E. Foundation Thomas J. Morrissey Rose & Kiernan, Inc. David M. Rubin and Carol Ju Sano-Rubin Construction Services St. Luke’s Hospital TD Banknorth N.A. Kinney Drugs Foundation, Inc. Carolyn A. White

Willis Tucker Circle $2,500 - $4,999 Anonymous Abbott Laboratories Accent Commercial Furniture, Inc. Lucille Cerro ComDoc, Inc. Sara ’91 and Christopher DelVecchio ’88 † John J. Denio Follett Higher Education Group Gateway Companies, Inc. Geno ’83 and Theresa ’86 Germano Johnson Illington Advisors, LLC Leon N. Kentner ’81 Josie Leighton Markel Insurance Company Marion T. Morton ’84 Robert E. L. and Ellen Nesbitt Pfizer, Inc. Gary J. Salamido ’86 Larry E. Small ’71

32

Sodexho Inc. & Affiliates Wyeth Laboratories

Archibald McClure Circle $1,000 - $2,499 Anonymous Morris L. Abramson ’55 Andrew R. Allen ’68 Allen’s Upholstery and Carpet Cleaning Nick G. Anagnost ’57 Babcock Financial Advisors, Inc. James W. Bevilacqua ’79 James E. Bollinger ’58 † Mehdi Boroujerdi Brian ’96 and Stacey ’96 Bruyns Michael P. Buckley Capital District YMCA Donald R. Charles Jr. ’67 Anthony Chiffy Sr. ’60 Robert ’76 and Glynis ’75 Clark Richard A. Cognetti ’69 Doris M. Colby ’42* John ’70 and Lynne ’69 Cote Richard H. Daffner ’63 † J. Gordon Dailey ’57 † William G. Davis ’70 David P. DeMagistris ’77 Kim ’75 and Rose Mary ’75 Demers Albert L. DiDonna ’65 Vicki A. DiLorenzo G. Winston Dobbins ’58 * Leonard E. Dwyer ’58 Eli Lilly and Company Edward ’59 and Dorothy ’62 Fausel Rocco Femia Sr. ’60 First Niagara Bank Jane W. Fox ’68 Jon J. Gallagher ’62 Timothy T. Garrity ’66 Mary E. Giamartino ’78 Thomas P. Gillette ’65 Rocco F. Giruzzi Jr. ’58 GlaxoSmithKline, Inc. Robert J. Gould Anthony J. Graziano ’84 Sean P. Greene ’00 Bridget-Ann Hart ’80 † Patrick ’71 and Patricia ’69 Howlett InterfaceFLOR Commercial Joseph P. Mangione, Inc. Krackeler Scientific, Inc. Joseph M. Lapetina † Michael B. Levine ’72 Marcia M. Locke ’73 Remo A. Lotano ’56 Mabey’s Moving & Storage, Inc. Edward Maiuro Mia L. Mancuso Francesca A. Marchio Frank Mauro ’71 Robert F. McGaugh ’57 † James ’82 and Marian ’82 McLaughlin Jack A. Monakey ’53 Thomas B. Moore ’56

Stephen B. Morgan ’70 Shaker A. Mousa David J. Muller ’73 Novartis U.S. Foundation James W. Nowicki ’62 Charles W. Owens ’54 Shawn and Alicia Pepe Vincent A. Pigula ’74 Carol R. Powell ’60 Dominic and Tina Raco RBC Capital Markets Joseph S. Rebisz Jr. ’70 Allen L. Rivlin ’62 Scott F. and Barbara J. Rogler ’88 James J. Roome Jr. ’79 John Spanburgh ’64 Stulmaker, Kohn & Richardson Larry G. Tabor ’88 Technical Building Services Scott M. Terrillion ’85 Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. M. Elyse Wheeler Patricia S. Wilson ’83 Ronald Winchell ’65 John M. Woychick Matthew T. Yancey ’99

Pharmacy Associate $500 - $999 Anthony Albano ’57 Robert J. Alessi ’82 Alfred A. Austin Jr. ’97 Patricia C. Baron ’87 Earl R. Black ’91 Elke M. Blaetz ’92 Robert ’83 and Bonnie ’83 Blum David ’83 and Anne ’87 Bombard John G. Breitnauer ’79 Buffalo Hotel Supply Co., Inc. James P. Byrnes ’66 Thomas E. Byrnes ’57 Shelly A. Calabrese Michael J. Canale ’76 Herbert G. and Linda Chorbajian Carol A. Ciufo ’57 Philip W. Cornell ’69 Richard T. Cornell ’65 Patricia A. Cunningham ’78 Thomas DellaRocca H. Russell Denegar ’43 Mark W. Fagnan ’97 Frank C. Flannery ’66 Louis J. Fratto Jr. ’74 Mark Gersten ’81 William Gonz ’56 Gail Goodman Snitkoff Frederick S. Haggerty ’50 Robert C. Hartz Jr. ’66 Hiscock & Barclay, LLP Hoffmann-La Roche, Inc. James L. ’92 and Jacqueline ’93 Holmes Philip M. Hritcko ’83 John ’70 and Paula ’73 Huebeler Bernard G. Janeczko ’87 Susan M. ’74 and David M. Kile ’74 †

Pratima Kunchala John P. LeGrand ’70 Tiffany I. Loder ’93 Edward A. Loeber ’80 Karen A. Lofstrand ’85 Carmine Lotano ’58 Remo A. Lotano ’56 Joseph ’93 and Heather ’97 Manley John F. McCarthy ’58 Sergio A. Mendez Merrill Lynch & Co., Inc. Nicholas Mesiti Metro Resources, LLC Harry J. Mikhitarian ’54* Kenneth W. Miller Donald ’79 and Sarah ’80 Nash Thomas H. Neely ’71 Barbara J. Olchek ’69 Kimberley D. Organ ’06 Benjamin J. Peck ’55 Wallace B. Pickworth ’69 Robert B. Rasmussen Gregg W. Richmond ’72 Rite Aid Corporation Peter Robinson ’51 Warren C. Rolen ’62 John E. Romeo ’86 Peter ’65 and Karen ’68 Ryan Thomas M. Sands ’66 Schindler Elevator Co. Gregory J. Sciarra ’93 Edward T. Shea Siena College Lilia Singer Regina G. Snyder ’47 Steven M. St. Onge David R. Stachnik ’77 Robert M. Stote ’60 Tech Valley Communications Laura G. Tepper ’52 Tracey J. Toner ’95 Frank A. Viviani ’58 Marc L. Watrous ’91 John T. Westerman Jr. ’78 Wayne F. Woodcock ’57 A. John Wylie ’68

Mortar & Pestle $250 - $499 Action Window Cleaning Co., Inc. All Seasons Services, Inc. Alumni Association of ACP, Inc. Ronald A. Amedio ’65 American Chemical & Equipment Co. James L. Anderson ATEC Group Jolene R. Bates ’81 Ken and Sara Beckley Benefit Resource, Inc. Joel Benware Raymond J. Blake Jr. ’51 Amy D. Blanchard ’81 John A. Bottiroli ’61 Susan P. Bruce ’98 Donald H. Butlein ’52 Christine V. Camille ’86


Capital District Physicians Health Plan, Inc. Francis A. Carbone ’63 David J. Carpenter ’81 Christopher K. Casey ’79 Nicholas ’65 and Nancy ’65 Chervinsky Alfred J. Collins III Colonie Mechanical Contractors, Inc. Cooley Motors Joseph R. Corbo ’93 Selig D. Corman ’58 Russell D. Cranston ’69 Joanne Criscione McTague ’76 Digital Page Jennifer L. DiPasquale ’00 Warren E. Doetch ’58 Angela C. Dominelli ’78 Dudley Associates David D. Edwards ’65 Frederick A. Ellis ’75 James G. Evans Jr. ’65 Excel Systems, Inc. Express Scripts/Value Rx John J. Faragon ’96 Christopher A. Fausel ’93 Joseph A. Fiscella Sr. ’53 Louis ’58 and Marilyn ’61 Fortin C. David Fox ’58 Gilbert Fudin ’53 Thomas ’83 and Teresa ’83 Garcia Reeder ’68 and Sally ’68 Gates L. Thomas ’92 and Maureen ’92 Geiser Gregory ’71 and Barbara ’72 George Girvin & Ferlazzo, P.C. Thomas ’71 and Mary ’73 Golden Gale L. Gridley ’63 Donald F. Hall ’59 Steven ’85 and Joyce ’86 Hansel Heslin, Rothenberg, Farley & Mesiti, P.C. Hession Electric, Inc. Higher Education Marketing Associates, Inc. Rickey N. Hogle ’76 R. Gary ’72 and Olesia ’75 Hollenbeck Mark ’83 and Stephanie ’83 Hopson Susan L. Iwanowicz Jacqueline E. Jacobi ’88 Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies Gary ’71 and Bessie ’72 Johnson James ’71 and Eileen ’70 Katovitch William E. Kilburn III ’56 Christopher Klein ’85 and Jennifer Caloia ’86 Paul ’71 and Ellen ’71 Koehler KONE, Inc. Arthur ’59 and Jeannie ’59 Kramer Paul ’92 and Mary Jo Lakomski John ’88 and Diane ’88 Lawatsch Susan M. Learned-Coughlin ’91 Heather Lenz ’93 Ronald E. Lesko Dawn E. MacElroy ’91 Mac-Gray Services, Inc. Michael L. Maggy ’85 Main-Care Energy Mary Beth Marten ’03 Virginia M. McBride ’53 Marilyn A. Mc Carthy ’54 Sean F. McCarthy ’83 John T. McDonald III ’85 Patrick S. McGraw Merck Partnership for Giving Catherine Merriman Henry C. ’74 and Nancy ’74 Miller Milliman Consultants & Actuaries MLB Industries, Inc.

Martha Naber ’03 David W. Newton Gregory ’92 and Mary Lou ’91 Notaro Philip J. O’Neill ’59 Patricia Osowick Suzette A. Pablo ’06 Mark ’82 and Karla ’91 Palmer Phelps Brothers, Inc. Cynthia F. Phillips ’72 James ’78 and Janice ’77 Pizzolanti Darren M. Pynn ’88 Mark J. Quackenbush ’79 Frank M. Reff ’92 Robinson Hall Architectural Products, Inc. Ronald ’96 and Brandi ’96 Romano Teryl A. Romeo ’03 Richard A. Rubin ’61 Howard A. Rubinger ’63 Sawchuk, Brown Associates Robert C. Schmitt ’52 Judith A. Schmonsky John J. Sheeley Jr. ’63 Christine Shields Michael Simon ’65 Linford ’51 and Nancy ’51 Snyder Erin E. Southwick ’94 Daniel J. Spicer Greg ’98 and Michelle ’98 Stanley Stants Combustion Assoc., Inc. Patrick J. Steed ’67 William R. Steed ’57 Gregory ’80 and Elizabeth ’80 Szymaniak Norton W. Taylor ’49 Margaret E. Teitsch Alan P. Tubbs ’54 TurfLinks, Inc. Tamara H. Turner ’88 University Heights College Suites Ruth-Ellen Van Arnam ’94 David B. Van Etten ’61 Elwin E. VanValkenburg ’52 Daniel J. Villa ’76 Doris R. Voigt ’69 John ’70 and Maria ’70 Wakefield Mark L. Williams ’58 Barry F. Wishengrad ’61 Julie O. Yontz ’06 Lois A. Yontz ’65 Jeffery B. Zlotnick ’75

Maroon & White $100 - $249 Ace Pest Control Specialists, Inc. Maryjane Aiello ’78 Albany Law School Albertson’s, Inc. Beatrice C. Allis-Minion ’72 Kelly L. Anderson ’98 Richard ’92 and Tracey ’92 Andrews Mary H. Andritz Anne E. Astemborski ’85 Daniel M. Astry ’77 Frank Avason ’94 Jeffrey C. Bachta ’93 Maria O. Bachynsky ’67 P. Edgar Badgley ’57 Donna R. Bahan ’62 William A. Banovic ’68 Stephen ’98 and Jeannie ’97 Baratta Debra L. Barber ’88 James C. Barclay Jr. ’74 Wesley Barnard ’58 Christine M. Bartfai ’83 Alan Bauer

Patrick ’80 and Deborah ’79 Bauman Judith M. Beaulac ’72 Andre E. Beliveau David J. Bendyk ’83 Henry R. Bennett ’31 Teresa A. Benosky ’83 Sam F. Berardino III ’80 Steven H. Berkowitz ’75 Alan ’92 and Cory ’92 Bernstein Janis L. Best ’42 David Bibliowicz ’79 Eileen Bidell ’85 Carlton A. Bigelow ’54 Alan R. Bilicki ’86 Dominick A. Bizzarro ’87 Alan Blum ’69 Nicholas S. Bonarrigo ’65 Holly M. Bonsignore ’82 Robert D. Boroujerdi Jeffrey R. Bouchard ’78 Todd D. Bourn ’94 Pamela M. Bowers ’89 Jack E. Boylan ’57 Denice A. Brady ’82 David C. Brands ’68 Francis R. Brendis ’58 Joseph L. Breton ’99 Orel E. Briceland Jr. ’49* Bristol-Myers Squibb Robert G. Brockley ’77 Nicholas R. Brogcinski ’03 Fred ’77 and Marylourdes ’77 Brundige Thomas E. Buchanan ’80 Daniel J. Burke Larry ’70 and Veronica ’69 Burling Edward L. Burns ’55 J. Michael ’77 and Joan M. ’78 Burns Julie L. Burns ’82 Michael ’80 and Jane ’81 Butler Alicia C. Cadogan ’93 Michael J. Calveric ’76 Paul P. Cammuso ’76 Patricia B. Carney ’51 Alan J. Carpenter ’67 Norman W. Carter ’68 Jack C. Caryl ’42 Jean B. Chambers ’46 Joseph Cherkis ’93 Albert G. Chmura ’69 James L. Clark Jr. ’75 Mark W. Clayburn ’77 Alana C. Clegg ’65 Esten Coan ’52 John J. and S. Carol Cody Jr. Lois A. Cogovan ’63 Elliot Cohen ’58 Neil R. Cohen ’66 Alfred J. Collins Jr. ’53 † Michael E. Collins ’78 Timothy C. Colyer ’65 Ralph N. Comanzo ’58 Carly Connors Paul F. Consroe ’66 Jill M. Corbett ’89 David R. Corina ’52 Baird C. Couch ’62 Vincent A. Cozzarelli ’61 Robert J. Craner ’70 Keith F. Crimmins ’80 Elizabeth C. Cronin Kathleen A. Cronin Michael Cronin Rose C. Cronin James ’87 and Colleen ’88 Cross Steven ’83 and Karen ’85 Crouch Thomas Curtis ’73 Jaclyn K. Dacier ’91

Arthur ’76 and Mary ’88 D’Addario Susan D. Dahm ’66 David J. Dalton ’76 Thomas J. Dalton Michele S. Danish ’72 Michael ’99 and Nicole ’03 Darbyshire Robert ’89 and Maryanne ’89 Davis Shelly B. Day ’92 Maia T. Decker ’02 Geraldine A. DeGrazio ’68 Burton ’79 and Patti ’79 Deis Angelo P. DelZotto ’71 Stacy M. DeTomaso ’93 Leonard D. DeVito ’67 Victoria R. Dingman ’94 Sean C. ’88 and Imelda ’88 Dobbins Patricia F. Donato ’79 Kenneth P. Drabik ’74 Cynthia S. Dudek ’80 Tania M. Durante ’91 Jenna M. Eccles ’96 William H. Eccles Jr. ’62 Clayton ’90 and Michelle ’91 Edwards Kathleen F. Egan Lori Ehrensbeck George M. Ehrmann ’54 Mark S. English ’98 Deanna Ennello-Butler Celia F. Epstein ’61 Leonard Every ’51 Rita A. Fahr ’79 Christopher ’87 and Kathleen ’87 Fama Pat Faragon ’56 James F. Fazzari ’76 Michael C. Federici ’73 Leslie P. Felpel ’61 Floyd Firman Jr. ’62 Joseph Fiscella Jr. ’82 Janis L. Fisher Shanna A. Fitzpatrick ’89 Robert Fizette ’83 William B. Fizette ’51 Harold M. and Patricia Flannery Derek ’94 and Amy ’94 Fluty James ’93 and Lisa ’94 Fluty Andrew ’87 and Kelly ’89 Flynn John D. Forman ’52 Barbara A. Forster ’93 Martin J. Fox ’80 James Francese Jr. ’52 Pearl P. French ’97 Angelo M. Friello ’57 Jeffrey Fudin ’81 William J. Furman ’71 Dean M. Furnia ’80 Peter S. Gage ’81 Robert ’92 and Julie ’93 Galer Douglas M. Gay ’82 Sharon C. Geerts ’90 Guy T. Gervais ’56 Ronald A. Giordano ’63 Herbert T. Goggins Sr. ’59 Stanley R. Goldman ’51 David M. Goodrich ’69 Ronald B. Goodspeed ’69 Thomas F. Goss ’85 Timothy B. Govel ’89 Bernard ’71 and Doreen ’72 Graham James T. Gratch ’79 Marilyn S. Green ’57 David A. Grella ’75 Terry ’73 and Gloria ’90 Griffin William ’85 and Dorothea ’83 Griffiths † Trustee * Deceased

33


Gifts and Donations Giving Clubs, continued Vincent M. Grimaldi Sr. ’62 Joseph P. Guarino ’74 Carrie L. Guetzloff ’90 John J. Guokas ’62 Christine T. Haack ’76 Mary E. Haggard ’83 Wayne W. Halayko ’80 Eldon R. Hall ’75 William ’58 and Ann ’58 Hallenbeck Mary Ann Halloran ’85 Robert A. Hamilton ’77 Thomas C. Hanley ’48 Elaine I. Harrica ’71 James E. Harrington ’54 Charles A. Harsanyi ’61 William V. Hastings ’62 Kathleen M. Hayes ’81 Daniel P. Healy ’82 Suzanne M. Hemingway ’83 Frank A. Hempstead ’58 John ’66 and Jane ’66 Henty Brian M. Herschenhorn ’02 Alan J. Hess ’72 Rebecca M. Hilborn ’95 Allison A. Hoff ’95 Eugene A. Hoh ’61 Christopher T. Horning ’96 David R. Houck ’89 Lisa M. Houk ’80 Diana C. House ’86 Kenneth A. Hoyt ’96 Everett ’76 and Sally ’76 Hunt Mark A. Hunter ’98 Robert B. Hunter ’73 Murray P. Hyatt ’56 David S. Jackson ’66 Nicole L. Jareo ’96 Paul E. Johnson ’84 Harold B. Jones ’51 Kyoung-Sil Kang ’97 Gerald H. Katzman Robert S. Keenan Vicki S. Kelsey ’66 James J. Kitts ’66 Grant J. Knickerbocker ’89 Bertram L. Kohn ’60 James M. Kopp Janine C. Kozak ’90 Norman G. Kraft ’54 Albert J. Kronman ’53 David A. Kvancz ’79 John ’92 and Laurie ’95 Kwasnik Stephen J. Kwasnik ’90 John J. Kwasnowski ’53 Anthony E. Laiacona Jr. ’76 James G. Laird Paul A. Lanciault ’56 Jennifer R. Landaverde ’97 Rose E. Lang ’69 David ’89 and Jean ’90 Lange Salvatore J. Lanzafame ’55 Mark P. Laurin ’80 John P. Lawrence ’77 Susan N. Layne ’61 Matthew ’86 and Lynne ’86 Lee Roger A. Lemke Jr. ’87 Edward A. Lenz ’56 Dale R. Lewis ’93 Ning Liao ’03 Douglas R. Lindke ’80 Paul G. Litynski ’77 Henry G. Lobl ’68 Lockheed Martin Sharifa N. Lockridge ’96 Donald F. Lutz ’49 Karrie O. Lyndaker ’95 Wayne A. Mabb ’70

34

Peter W. MacArthur ’78 Maureen E. Mack ’94 Patricia A. MacMaster ’94 Frederick J. Macri ’74 Leo E. Maggy ’58 John M. ’61 and Marilyn ’75 Mahanna Ralph ’59 and Mary Lou ’60 Mancini Paul Mangione Jr. ’88 Michael Mangione Rose Ann M. Manning ’86 Marie Marhan Dropkin ’82 Richard A. Marra ’60 John M. Marraffa Jr. ’03 Bruce D. Martin ’55 Nicolina M. Martini ’79 Lisa Ann Mason ’83 Melvyn Masters ’55 Raymond D. Matthews ’89 Constance S. Matthys ’80 Lester E. Maxik ’52 Kathleen A. McCasland ’79 Joseph M. McDonald Lynn K. McKinnon ’88 Ronald W. McLean ’51 Edward J. McNulty ’67 Sheila A. McShane ’89 Gordon H. Meagley ’51 Richard J. Menapace ’56 Angelo A. Mercurio ’51 Anthony V. Merola ’94 Emerson S. Metzler ’95 Jeffrey G. Middendorf ’96 Roxie J. Miles ’70 Karen R. Miller ’85 Michael ’97 and Katy-Erin ’91 Miller Richard Miller ’50 Robert A. Miller ’54 Robert W. Miller ’59 Theodore L. Mitchell ’80 Edward P. Molloy ’62 Melvin Mones ’51 Patrick M. Mongillo ’78 Amy J. Montpelier ’84 Mark E. Morin ’95 Francis J. Mosher IV ’80 Mary E. Murphy ’48 Anita N. Murray ’82 David M. Murray ’74 Scott W. Murray ’86 John F. Naioti ’74 Thomas J. Natalie ’96 Krista M. Nelson ’94 Andrew E. Nielsen ’51 Harry P. Norman ’61 Bernard Nowitz ’60 Lou Ann R. Obernesser ’82 James P. O’Brien ’60 Thomas F. and Maureen O’Brien George H. O’Connell ’58 Lynn Odett ’97 Dennis R. O’Grady ’61 David M. Oles ’76 Timothy P. O’Neill Steven E. Paige Christopher ’86 and Lisa ’85 Palmer Henry A. Palmer ’57 Michael ’93 and Lori ’94 Panasci Barry ’69 and Linda ’70 Paraizo Nicole M. Parrish ’89 Julius A. Pasquariello ’83 John V. Pelella ’74 Andrew R. Perkins ’56 Donald J. Perrone ’52 Louis V. and Rosemary Perrotta William A. Petersen ’52 Brenda L. Petrie ’00 Robert ’86 and Becky ’86 Petronio

Anne K. Pierson ’51 Samuel ’85 and Naomi ’85 Piraino Andrew M. Polak ’83 Mary Beth C. Poland ’75 Eugene R. Ponessa ’53 Dominick ’75 and Ingeborg ’77 Porco David G. Potter ’89 Jack A. Pross Sr. ’67 Kimberly C. Puglisi ’92 Susan M. Quinn ’88 Manuel Ramirez ’91 Arthur A. Ramsey ’62 A. Alan Rand ’56 Ray Sign, Inc. Michelle B. Reff ’91 Robert and Mary Reilly Renaissance Corporation of Albany Kristin N. Renzi ’92 Mark A. Riegelhaupt ’79 David Riley ’80 Armand Rivers James and Blanche Rivers John and Margaret E. Rivers Maryann R. Roefaro ’81 Stanley R. Rolen ’56 Thomas M. Rosselli ’93 Daniel Rubinson ’52 John P. Ryan ’88 Michael P. Ryan ’85 John D. Salo ’91 Gary E. Sambrook Jr. ’98 Gary M. Sanges ’73 Herbert V. Savage ’51 Thomas A. Saxby ’85 Bernard E. Schallehn Howard Schwartz ’48 Brian J. Scott ’93 Matthew ’94 and Diane ’97 Scott James L. Senese ’77 James H. Serour ’72 John H. Shambo ’85 Jerome B. Shapiro ’52 Jay A. Sherline ’63 Donald A. Sherman ’51 John F. Sherman ’49 Leonard G. Sherwood ’56 Michael S. Sherwood ’86 Scott ’89 and Carol ’89 Sherwood David Silverhart ’51 John P. and Donna Singleton Luanne Sitterly ’94 Kathy A. Smith ’81 Edward and Muriel Sowek Patrick Spado ’78 Kelley S. Spencer ’91 James R. Spillan ’56 Stanley R. Stankes ’50 Edgar V. Stevens ’67 Alvin E. Strack ’56 Lewis W. Sturgess ’53 Michael J. Sube ’58 Gerald T. Sweet ’63 Garen Szablewski ’81 David E. Talarico ’62 Philip Teicher ’51 Fred M. Thomas ’66 Barbara Thurston ’63 Leila M. Tibi ’02 Kelly E. Toia ’87 Christopher A. Tomchik ’00 Patricia G. Tompkins Edward L. Toomajian ’81 James H. Toomajian ’82 Robert M. Toomajian ’62 Edward ’81 and Rosemary ’81* Toomajian Kathleen M. Tornatore-Morse ’78

Janice K. Treichler ’58 Edward J. Trnka ’59 Edward A. Ullmann ’73 David E. Urban ’74 David E. Van Valkenburg ’81 Robert H. Van Vlack ’52 Elmer P. Vandenburgh ’56 Laurie A. Villanueva ’99 Jennifer J. Wagner ’94 John T. Ward ’76 Susan E. Waterman ’77 Robert J. and Kristine Weaver Harold L. Weisberg ’55 Elizabeth A. Weston ’90 David R. Wieland ’73 Korey H. Willard ’80 Douglas V. and Donna Williams Michael D. Willson ’83 Kristen M. Winters ’91 Peter ’88 and Karen ’88 Wirth Jean M. Witkowski ’93 Barbara A. Wood Matthew J. Woodcock ’87 Edward ’61 and Karen ’63 Wortley Kathleen M. Wyatt ’88 Mary Yates ’64 Rolf ’79 and Beverly ’79 Zakariassen Paul R. Zalewski ’83 Richard J. Zalewski ’74 Linda K. Zent ’75 HaiAn Zheng Karen M. Ziomek ’77


Class Giving 1931 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Henry R. Bennett

2 1 50

Thomas J. Connolly Betty B. Frink Marie R. Hare Donald F. Lutz Edmond A. Robert John F. Sherman Norton W. Taylor

Laura G. Tepper Gordon Van Debogart Elwin E. VanValkenburg Robert H. Van Vlack

1953

1942 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Janis L. Best Jack C. Caryl Doris M. Colby*

10 3 33 $1,200

1943 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: June T. Bloomer Dorothy G. Carman H. Russell Denegar

12 3 25 $875

6 1 16

1945 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Betty J. Houghtaling

6 1 16

1946 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Jean B. Chambers

11 1 9

1947 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Mary S. Nellis Regina G. Snyder

17 2 11 $550

21 7 33 $560

1949 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Orel E. Briceland Jr.* G. Robert Carney

54 7 12 $945

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Raymond J. Blake Jr. Patricia B. Carney Leonard Every William B. Fizette Stanley R. Goldman Harold Jaffee Harold B. Jones Ronald W. McLean Gordon H. Meagley Angelo A. Mercurio Melvin Mones Andrew E. Nielsen Anne K. Pierson Peter Robinson Herbert V. Savage Helen F. Scott Martin Scully Harold W. Seitz Donald A. Sherman Eugene D. Sherman David Silverhart Linford A. Snyder Jr. Nancy W. Snyder William H. Steckel Philip Teicher Alfred Weinstein Donald D. Weinstein

64 27 42 $3,375

43 9 20 $975

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Anonymous Donald H. Butlien Walter Cherniak Esten Coan David R. Corina Rinaldo V. DeNuzzo John D. Forman James Francese Jr. Lester E. Maxik Joseph G. Mount Donald J. Perrone William A. Petersen Richard G. Robison † Daniel Rubinson Robert C. Schmitt Jerome B. Shapiro

57 16 28 $12,823

1957

1954 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Carlton A. Bigelow George M. Ehrmann David Gewirtzman Lorraine P. Godson James E. Harrington Robert O. Hitchcock Norman G. Kraft Marilyn A. Mc Carthy Harry J. Mikhitarian* Robert A. Miller Charles W. Owens Alan P. Tubbs

56 12 21 $4,225

60 20 33 $35,802

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Morris L. Abramson Marilyn D. Browne Edward L. Burns June F. Cherniak James E. Gannon Miriam L. Hogle Salvatore J. Lanzafame William J. Mahanna Bruce D. Martin Melvyn Masters John D. Murphy Benjamin J. Peck Harold L. Weisberg

46 13 28 $2,600

1956 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Ruth J. Benedetto Pat Faragon Thomas F. Flynn Jr. Guy T. Gervais William Gonz

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Anthony Albano Nick G. Anagnost P. Edgar Badgley Jack E. Boylan Thomas E. Byrnes Carol A. Ciufo J. Gordon Dailey † Angelo M. Friello Marilyn S. Green Robert F. Mc Gaugh † Henry A. Palmer William J. Reilly William R. Steed Jerome A. Wilk Wayne F. Woodcock

60 15 25 $7,180

1958

1955

1952

1948 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Myron J. Bach Thomas C. Hanley Walter Houghtaling Irmgard S. Kaiser Thomas C. Lopresti Mary E. Murphy Howard Schwartz

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Frederick S. Haggerty Eleanor Van Buren Messia Robert A. Messia Richard Miller Elizabeth V. Sheldon Stanley R. Stankes Gene D. Vollmer

1951

1944 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Mary M. Andrews

1950

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Gilbert S. Banker Alfred J. Collins Jr. † Gilbert J. DeLucia Joseph A. Fiscella Sr. Gilbert Fudin Albert J. Kronman John J. Kwasnowski Virginia M. McBride Charles J. Mintzer Jack A. Monakey Lawrence M. Mosse Eugene R. Ponessa Francis M. Steed Lewis W. Sturgess Robert E. Thiess James D. Waters

Joseph G. Guerra Murray P. Hyatt William E. Kilburn III Paul A. Lanciault Edward A. Lenz Remo A. Lotano Joseph W. MacFarland William J. Maher Louis A. Mancuso Richard J. Menapace Leonard E. Meyers Thomas B. Moore Andrew R. Perkins Vincent F. Polvino A. Alan Rand Stanley R. Rolen Leonard G. Sherwood Joseph J. Simmons James R. Spillan Alvin E. Strack Elmer P. Vandenburgh Lawrence B. Zegarelli

50 27 54 $5,466

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: G. Wesley Barnard James E. Bollinger † Francis R. Brendis Elliot Cohen Ralph N. Comanzo Selig D. Corman G. Winston Dobbins* Warren E. Doetch Leonard E. Dwyer Louis P. Fortin C. David Fox Melvin S. Friedland † Rocco F. Giruzzi Jr. Barry Goldstein Ann S. Hallenbeck William C. Hallenbeck Frank A. Hempstead Donald J. Jordan Carmine Lotano Leo E. Maggy John F. McCarthy George H. O'Connell Ann D. Oathout Robert S. Pomerantz Jack M. Rosenberg James E. Skeals

68 31 46 $22,098

† Trustee * Deceased

35


Gifts and Donations Class Giving, continued Michael J. Sube Janice K. Treichler Harold E. Veeder Jr. Frank A. Viviani Mark L. Williams

1962

1959 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Edward A. Fausel William J. Finn Lawrence M. Gifford Herbert T. Goggins Sr. Donald F. Hall Lester R. Kleinman Arthur Kramer Jeannie Kramer Ralph T. Mancini Robert W. Miller Philip J. O'Neill Joseph G. Rampe Burton W. Segelin Edward J. Trnka Betty L. Williams

65 15 23 $4,015

1960 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Anthony Chiffy Sr. Claire D. Childs Rocco Femia Sr. Cynthia S. Gabriels Bertram L. Kohn Michael A. Lotano Mary Lou S. Mancini Richard A. Marra Bernard Nowitz James P. O'Brien Carol R. Powell Jerald M. Stemerman Robert M. Stote

60 13 22 $4,575

1961 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Dorita G. Aboufadel John A. Bottiroli Vincent A. Cozzarelli Geraldine A. DeSeve Celia F. Epstein Leslie P. Felpel Marilyn C. Fortin Roy F. Hammecker Charles A. Harsanyi Eugene A. Hoh Gene Hohenstein Nancy M. Horne A. Joseph Kallfelz Susan N. Layne Alfred A. Lotano John M. Mahanna Harry P. Norman Dennis R. O'Grady Richard A. Rubin Thomas A. Somlo David B. Van Etten F. Hamilton White III Barry F. Wishengrad Edward J. Wortley

36

75 24 32 $3,383

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Donna R. Bahan Baird C. Couch John J. Duffy William H. Eccles Jr. Dorothy M. Fausel Harry M. Fertik Floyd Firman Jr. Jon J. Gallagher Vincent M. Grimaldi Sr. John J. Guokas Walter G. Hagues Keith A. Harris William V. Hastings Elaine G. Henry Frank C. La Puma Linda J. Lovejoy Edward P. Molloy Joan E. Murray James W. Nowicki Arthur A. Ramsey Allen L. Rivlin Warren C. Rolen David E. Talarico Robert M. Toomajian

76 24 32 $7,075

88 17 19 $3,284

17 3 18 $1,150

1965 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Ronald A. Amedio Nicholas S. Bonarrigo Robert H. Brakemeier Nancy F. Chervinsky Nicholas Chervinsky Alana C. Clegg Timothy C. Colyer Richard T. Cornell

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Lee A. Anderson James P. Byrnes Mary L. Carney James E. Chaffee Melanie D. Clough Neil R. Cohen Gary R. Coloton Paul F. Consroe Susan D. Dahm Frank C. Flannery Anna K. Forster Timothy T. Garrity Robert C. Hartz Jr. Jane C. Henty John C. Henty David S. Jackson Vicki S. Kelsey James J. Kitts Thomas M. Sands Paul J. Schreiner Fred M. Thomas Marie G. Windover

71 22 31 $5,188

86 24 28 $12,105

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Maria O. Bachynsky Frank C. Berning Thomas L. Breon Alan J. Carpenter Donald R. Charles Jr. Diane F. DeGroff Leonard D. DeVito Joadele C. Dumper Mary Ellen Gilkinson Robert R. Henion III Edward J. Mc Nulty Jack A. Pross Sr. Neil T. Schram Patrick J. Steed Edgar V. Stevens

79 15 19 $7,260

1968 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Andrew R. Allen William A. Banovic David C. Brands Norman W. Carter Geraldine A. DeGrazio

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Kalsey D. Arquette Sally M. Bauer Alan Blum Veronica M. Burling Albert G. Chmura Richard A. Cognetti Philip W. Cornell Lynne K. Cote Russell D. Cranston David M. Goodrich Ronald B. Goodspeed Patricia A. Howlett Sylvia M. Kaminsky Rose E. Lang Barbara J. Olchek Barry A. Paraizo Wallace B. Pickworth Dianne S. Rutledge David A. Saelens John V. Tagliaferri Doris R. Voigt

90 21 23 $7,095

1970

1967

1964 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Janice M. Morrison John Spanburgh Mary Yates

1969

1966

1963 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Francis A. Carbone William A. Cetnar Michael J. Clough Lois A. Cogovan Richard H. Daffner †Maureen Foley Ronald A. Giordano Gale L. Gridley Diane G. Lubertine Francis E. O'Hearn Thomas V. Oathout Howard A. Rubinger John J. Sheeley Jr. Jay A. Sherline Gerald T. Sweet Barbara Thurston Karen A. Wortley

Susann L. Dugo Jane W. Fox Reeder D. Gates Sally S. Gates Raymond T. Giblin Duane E. Kozak Henry G. Lobl Gerald A. Pedinotti Karen M. Ryan Ronald S. Sahr Suzette P. Usher A. John Wylie

Albert L. DiDonna Thomas S. Drahushuk Jean L. Duvall Robert S. Edson David D. Edwards James G. Evans Jr. Thomas P. Gillette J. William Johnson Jr. William Leroy Evan D. MacEwan John W. Mauger Peter J. Ryan Michael Simon Ronald Winchell Lois A. Yontz

89 17 19 $5,025

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Harvey M. Arbit Larry M. Burling Norma Jean W. Coloton John R. Cote Richard M. Cotrupe Robert J. Craner William G. Davis Linda L. Drew Ronald A. Gailey John C. Huebeler Eileen Katovitch John P. LeGrand Mark S. Lenes Wayne A. Mabb Roxie J. Miles Stephen B. Morgan Linda S. Paraizo Andrea S. Person Joseph S. Rebisz Edward J. Ryan John D. Wakefield Maria T. Wakefield

78 22 28 $7,449

1971 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Jon P. Bushnell Angelo P. DelZotto

78 22 28 $9,085


Angelo M. Emmi William J. Furman Gregory P. George Thomas F. Golden Jr. Bernard W. Graham Elaine I. Harrica David P. Hores Patrick E. Howlett Gary P. Johnson James F. Katovitch Anne M. Klupa Robert A. Klupa Ellen D. Koehler Paul F. Koehler August L. Magnanti Jr. Frank Mauro John F. Mitchell Thomas H. Neely Larry E. Small Mary Anne K. Valenti

Kenneth P. Drabik Eileen L. Faist Richard C. Finkle Louis J. Fratto Jr. Wayne F. Geiser Joseph P. Guarino Wladmyr B. Jurkiw David M. Kile Susan M. Kile Frederick J. Macri Henry C. Miller Nancy Miller David M. Murray John F. Naioti Ann M. Osborne Michael J. Osborne John V. Pelella Vincent A. Pigula Cecelia A. Steffek David E. Urban Richard J. Zalewski

David M. Oles Daniel J. Villa John T. Ward Joanne M. Wisnieski

1977

1972 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Beatrice C. Allis-Minion Judith M. Beaulac Michele S. Danish Barbara H. George Doreen Z. Graham Christine Guertin Alan J. Hess R. Gary Hollenbeck Bessie P. Johnson Michael B. Levine Robert J. Locke Patricia A. Pafundi Cynthia F. Phillips Frank M. Piacente Gregg W. Richmond James H. Serour Sarah L. Shultz

81 17 21 $3,718

1973 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Alan F. Beck Thomas Curtis Michael C. Federici Kathleen M. Galletta Vincent A. Galletta Mary H. Golden Terry A. Griffin Lawrence E. Guertin Paula H. Huebeler Robert B. Hunter Marcia M. Locke David J. Muller Clyde H. Ronk Gary M. Sanges Timothy D. Suenram Edward A. Ullmann David R. Wieland

71 17 24 $4,745

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Steven H. Berkowitz Glynis P. Clark James L. Clark Jr. Kim M. Demers Rose Mary C. Demers Edward F. Dombroski Sr. Frederick A. Ellis Phillip C. Fifield Ethel D. Frost Marie L. Greener David A. Grella Eldon R. Hall Olesia A. Hollenbeck Marilyn S. Mahanna Barbara L. McNiff Jane M. O'Neill Dennis J. Peat Mary Beth C. Poland Dominick J. Porco Diane B. Sacco Robert J. Stankes Linda K. Zent Jeffrey B. Zlotnick

107 23 21 $7,145

86 25 29 $11,192

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Michael J. Calveric Paul P. Cammuso Michael J. Canale Robert F. Clark Joanne Criscione McTague Arthur A. D'Addario David J. Dalton James F. Fazzari Thomas Fiore Donald A. Fortier Frank G. Giamartino* Christine T. Haack Kenneth Hogan Rickey N. Hogle Everett M. Hunt Sally A. Hunt David A. Keyser Eric T. Klippel Anthony E. Laiacona Jr. Marilyn N. Miller O'Dell

112 25 22 $4,745

1980

1978

1976

1974 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: James C. Barclay Kandyce J. Daley † John C. Dean

1975

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Daniel M. Astry Robert G. Brockley Fred E. Brundige Marylourdes T. Brundige J. Michael Burns Mark W. Clayburn David P. Demagistris Marlene G. Dickson Robert A. Hamilton Joan W. Hayes Scott W. Hayes John P. Lawrence William J. Libera Paul G. Litynski Joseph A. Maiello Debra S. Masel Carol J. Peat Janice M. Pizzolanti Ingeborg S. Porco Linda E. Rosenthal James L. Senese David R. Stachnik Kathleen A. Toucher Susan E. Waterman Karen M. Ziomek

103 24 23 $4,860

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Maryjane Aiello Christopher A. Aldi Jeffrey R. Bouchard Joan M. Burns Michael E. Collins Mark E. Connelly Patricia A. Cunningham Angela C. Dominelli William M. Fiero Colleen Fleshman Mary E. Giamartino John R. Henry Sandra A. Judge David W. Lewis Peter W. MacArthur Patrick M. Mongillo Julie C. Pearson James A. Pizzolanti Patrick Spado John T. Westerman Jr.

116 20 17 $3,810

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Patrick R. Bauman Sam F. Berardino III Thomas E. Buchanan Michael P. Butler Keith F. Crimmins Cynthia S. Dudek Martin J. Fox Dean M. Furnia Geraldine K. Gates Wayne W. Halayko Bridget-Ann Hart † Michael S. Hayes Lisa M. Houk Lory L. Huller Garret H. Huyer Christie H. Hylwa Mark P. Laurin Douglas R. Lindke Edward A. Loeber Constance S. Matthys Theodore L. Mitchell Francis J. Mosher IV Sarah B. Nash David Riley Elizabeth A. Stanzione Elizabeth A. Szymaniak Gregory Szymaniak Korey H. Willard

114 28 25 $5,850

1981

1979 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Deborah R. Bauman Michael J. Bertoni James W. Bevilacqua David Bibliowicz John G. Breitnauer Brian M. Carroll Christopher K. Casey Burton F. Deis

Patricia F. Donato Wendy A. Dulin Rita A. Fahr Gregory A. Fuller James T. Gratch Bruce D. Hatch Mark L. Hylwa David A. Kvancz Nicolina M. Martini Kathleen A. McCasland Donald M. Nash Jr. Earl W. Pease Mark J. Quackenbush Mark A. Riegelhaupt James J. Roome Jr. Jean E. Siegrist Richard E. Siegrist Maria C. Steinbach Colleen D. Tebbe Elizabeth S. Voss Patricia C. Wason Beverly J. Zakariassen Rolf Zakariassen

127 31 24 $7,055

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Jolene R. Bates Amy D. Blanchard Cheryl A. Burtch Jane P. Butler David J. Carpenter Walter Czajka James W. Duffy Jeffrey Fudin Peter S. Gage Mark Gersten Kathleen M. Hayes Lorraine G. Herkenham

122 29 24 $7,120

† Trustee * Deceased

37


Gifts and Donations Class Giving, continued Leigh A. Hill Michelle S. Hoskins Thomas Hoskins Alesa M. Hughto Eugene R. Jackey Jr. Leon N. Kentner Frederick G. Miller Colleen H. O'Malley Maryann R. Roefaro Kathy A. Smith Nancy Ann M. Stellato Garen Szablewski Edward L. Toomajian Rosemary S. Toomajian* David E. Van Valkenburg Kimberly M. Zebrowski Michael Zebrowski

1982 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Robert J. Alessi Holly M. Bonsignore Denice A. Brady Roseanne T. Burke Julie K. Burns Fred A. Carroll III Diane L. Chmel Lynne A. Darling Jolee R. Dawidowicz Joseph Fiscella Jr. Dale H. Franz Douglas M. Gay Daniel P. Healy Janet M. Johnson Kerry R. Johnston Peter M. Lamanna Marie M. Marhan Dropkin James McLaughlin Marian E. McLaughlin Anita N. Murray Lou Ann R. Obernesser Mark S. Palmer Mark E. Pochal John S. Podesta Keith W. Preston Stephanie D. Preston Terrence K. Reid Karen A. Snyder Gale E. Soltys James H. Toomajian Evelyn M. Vavra John P. Vavra William G. Waldron Jr. Richard J. Zeppieri

119 34 29 $4,560

38

James M. Peters Naomi M. Piraino Samuel T. Piraino Michael P. Ryan Thomas A. Saxby John H. Shambo Scott M. Terrillion

1986

1984 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Stephen A. Bean Suzanne E. Caravella Robert L. Correia Andrew J. Farrell Steven Fiero Anthony J. Graziano Cynthia M. Harris Debora House Paul E. Johnson Robert A. Loudis Maryanne Mackey Amy J. Montpelier Donald Morse Marion T. Morton Jeffery W. Opal Douglas F. Perryman James H. Purcell Nancy A. Wiley Sau K. Yuen Daria F. Yuschak

109 20 18 $4,445

106 35 33 $12,010

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Anne E. Astemborski Eileen Bidell Karen M. Crouch Tracey A. Denardo Carla A. Desrosiers Thomas F. Goss William O. Griffiths Mary Ann Halloran Steven B. Hansel Christopher J. Klein Pamela B. Krolczyk Mary Beth Lavin Karen A. Lofstrand Shonna B. Loudis Teresa J. Lubowski Michael L. Maggy John T. McDonald III Angela D. Miczek Karen R. Miller John A. Noviasky Cathy M. Osborne Lisa A. Palmer

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Jennifer L. Battin Alan R. Bilicki Michael P. Buckley Jennifer Caloia Christine V. Camille Mariangela K. Capozzi Karen B. Fiero Tammy V. Garrett Theresa B. Germano Joyce Hansel Diana C. House Lynne K. Lee Matthew D. Lee Rose Ann M. Manning Richard A. Marasco Scott W. Murray Christopher G. Palmer John F. Peebles Becky B. Petronio Robert C. Petronio Jr. John E. Romeo Gary J. Salamido Michael S. Sherwood

127 22 17 $10,610

120 29 24 $5,175

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Sidney C. Anderson Patricia C. Baron James A. Bartosik Richard A. Billington Dominick A. Bizzarro Anne L. Bombard Marc D. Boulais Everett D. Cronizer James F. Cross Dorothy A. Eno Christopher A. Fama Kathleen Fama Suzanne A. Figary Andrew G. Flynn Bernard G. Janeczko Barbara J. Joyce Roger A. Lemke Jr. Kelly E. Toia Matthew J. Woodcock

131 19 15 $2,830

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Pamela M. Bowers Colleen W. Breault Tammy Brown Jill M. Corbett Maryanne Davis Robert J. Davis Lisa A. Findlater Shanna A. Fitzpatrick Kelly L. Flynn Lorie A. Giamartino Timothy B. Govel David R. Houck Timothy S. Jennings Grant J. Knickerbocker David O. Lange Michael M. Mascitelli Raymond D. Matthews Sheila A. McShane Lynda M. Overstrom Nicole M. Parrish David G. Potter Bridget O. Rowan Carol W. Sherwood Scott F. Sherwood Anne E. Triller Darren M. Triller John A. Wind

148 27 18 $2,400

1990

1988 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Laura A. Ahanj Debra L. Barber Kelley A. Cirillo Colleen A. Cross Mary P. D'Addario Christopher DelVecchio †Imelda N. Dobbins Sean C. Dobbins

Michael A. Farina Kenneth R. Freebern Martin J. Irons Jacqueline E. Jacobi Marcia A. Kall Diane M. Lawatsch John O. Lawatsch Paul Mangione Jr. Lynn K. McKinnon Darren M. Pynn Susan M. Quinn Concetta C. Rahn Barbara J. Rogler John P. Ryan Larry G. Tabor Tamara H. Turner Josephine D. Wales Suzanne M. Walton Marcia R. Whitbeck Karen P. Wirth Peter E. Wirth Kathleen M. Wyatt

1989

1987

1985

1983 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Christine M. Bartfai David J. Bendyk Teresa A. Benosky Bonnie B. Blum Robert A. Blum David S. Bombard Dawn B. Carlisle Mona A. Cichello Steven C. Crouch Charles A. Danneker III Laura R. Davis David E. Etz Mary A. Etz

Robert Fizette Teresa M. Garcia Thomas P. Garcia Geno J. Germano Jr. Dorothea A. Griffiths Mary E. Haggard Suzanne M. Hemingway Mark E. Hopson Stephanie L. Hopson Bruce L. Hotchkiss Philip M. Hritcko Lisa Ann Mason Sean F. McCarthy Andrew J. Oaks Carole D. Oaks Julius A. Pasquariello Andrew M. Polak Jerry F. Powers David M. Tenero Michael D. Willson Patricia S. Wilson Paul R. Zalewski

125 30 24 $9,067

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Ellen M. Aschbrenner Lisa A. Carney Clayton D. Edwards James T. Galgano Wendy W. Galgano Sharon C. Geerts Gloria G. Griffin Carrie L. Guetzloff Janine C. Kozak Stephen J. Kwasnik Jean A. Lange Edward T. Lanoue Laurie L. Nicknair-Lipski William E. Peck Robert J. Plitnick

113 19 17 $1,550


Susan M. Van Vranken Carlos N. Velez Sarah C. Velez Elizabeth A. Weston

1991 141 Class Size: 21 # of Donors: 15 % of Participants: Total Gift: $6,190 Mary E. Billington Earl R. Black Jaclyn K. Dacier Sara L. DelVecchio James L. Devine III Tania M. Durante Michelle B. Edwards Jeffrey J. Kirkby Susan M. Learned-Coughlin Dawn E. MacElroy Katy-Erin Miller Mary Lou Notaro Karla M. Palmer Lisa D. Passino Manuel Ramirez Michelle B. Reff John D. Salo Kelley S. Spencer Marybeth S. Timian Marc L. Watrous Kristen M. Winters

1992 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Richard S. Andrews Tracey L. Andrews Ronald F. Barbic Alan M. Bernstein Cory A. Bernstein Elke M. Blaetz Sharon G. Bridgeford Jeffrey P. Burbank Shelly B. Day Kathy A. Devine Brenda L. Dorr Robert P. Galer L. Thomas Geiser Maureen A. Geiser James L. Holmes Joanne M. Kaucher John M. Kwasnik Mary Jo G. Lakomski Paul G. Lakomski Lisa R. LaLoggia Marc J. Mahay Denise A. Nero Gregory Notaro Glen F. Palmer Daniel M. Pruski Kimberly C. Puglisi Frank M. Reff Kristin N. Renzi Catherine Spoletini Keith E. Stanley Patricia A. Zagami

140 31 22 $4,945

1996 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Lynn M. Abbate Brian A. Bruyns Stacy Bruyns Tracey M. Carbonetto Jenna M. Eccles Jennifer Evans John J. Faragon Christopher T. Horning Kenneth A. Hoyt Nicole L. Jareo Sharifa N. Lockridge Matthew T. Maurer Jeffrey G. Middendorf Thomas J. Natalie Brandi L. Romano Ronald V. Romano Margaret E. Turoski

1994 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Frank Avason Todd D. Bourn Deborah E. Burbank Bonny K. Decastro Victoria R. Dingman Kelly M. Doan Amy M. Fluty Derek E. Fluty Lisa A. Fluty Kristin A. Hanson Kimberley A. Jakubiak Margaret W. Karl Kristin M. Kim Jeffrey M. Kupiec Maureen E. Mack Patricia A. MacMaster Anthony V. Merola Lisa A. Morana Krista M. Nelson Lori A. Panasci Matthew Scott Luanne Sitterly Erin E. Southwick Tina M. Valdeon Ruth-Ellen Van Arnam Jennifer J. Wagner

120 27 23 $4,705

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Teresa M. Hardy Janet Hert Rebecca M. Hilborn Allison A. Hoff Barbara A. Jensen Ellen J. Kenney Laurie J. Kwasnik Karrie O. Lyndaker Emerson S. Metzler Mark E. Morin Mary J. St. Hilaire Tracey J. Toner

121 17 14 $5,085

135 26 19 $2,655

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Alfred A. Austin Jr. Jeannie K. Baratta Erin M. Buckley Melissa A. Burdash Peter T. Burdash James P. Edson Mark W. Fagnan Pearl P. French Kyoung-Sil Kang Heather A. King Jennifer R. Landaverde Heather A. Manley Kristen M. Maurer Michael T. Miller Lynn Odett Brian J. Possinger Diane P. Scott Mario M. Zeolla

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Jennifer L. DiPasquale Sean P. Greene Brenda L. Petrie Karen L. Smith Christopher A. Tomchik

126 12 9 $1,455

135 18 13 $2,735

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Thomas Grandville Michael S. Leake Kelly C. Sullivan

110 3 2 $150

2002 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Sarah E. Cooke Maia T. Decker Brian M. Herschenhorn Robert A. Meyer Dipak K. Mistry Kelly M. Rudd Leila M. Tibi

136 7 5 $405

2003

146 14 9 $1,845

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Nicholas R. Brogcinski Nicole N. Darbyshire Ning Liao John M. Marraffa Jr. Mary Beth Marten Martha Naber Teryl A. Romeo

127 7 5 $1,450

2004 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Julia L. Bartoszek Nicole A. Bulmer

130 2 1 $120

2006

1999 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Joseph L. Breton Andrea M. Brooke Rebecca A. Conrad

109 5 4 $1,770

2001

1998 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Amanda L. Allen Kelly L. Anderson Stephen M. Baratta Susan P. Bruce Julie A. English Mark S. English Margery M. Fellenzer Mark A. Hunter Gary E. Sambrook Jr. Kristen M. Scanio Mark E. Scanio Kelly A. Sharp Greg R. Stanley Michelle M. Stanley

Michael J. Darbyshire Mariesa L. Giso Laurie A. Villanueva Matthew T. Yancey Susan E. Yerry Christine M. Zeolla

2000

1997

1995

1993 Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Total Gift: Thomas W. Algozzine

Jeffrey C. Bachta Lora R. Becker Alicia C. Cadogan Joseph Cherkis Joseph R. Corbo Stacy M. DeTomaso Christopher A. Fausel James L. Fluty Barbara A. Forster Julie M. Galer Scott T. Hanson Jacqueline L. Holmes Chong Ki Kim Heather Lenz Dale R. Lewis Tiffany I. Loder Robert Makofske Joseph D. Manley Michael A. Panasci Thomas M. Rosselli Diane G. Schroeder Gregory J. Sciarra Brian J. Scott Laura A. Stevens Brian J. Summa Jean M. Witkowski

130 9 6 $1,981

Class Size: # of Donors: % of Participants: Karolyn M. Abbott Kimberley D. Organ Suzette A. Pablo Timothy C. Randolph Julie O. Yontz

138 5 3

†Trustee * Deceased

39


Friends of ACP

In Memoriam

Trustees, Administration, Faculty, Staff, and Friends $184,568 Albany Law School James L. Anderson Mary H. Andritz Alan R. Bauer Kenneth and Sara M. Beckley Andre E. Beliveau Joel Benware James E. Bollinger ’58 † Mehdi Boroujerdi Robert D. Boroujerdi Susan P. Bruce ’98 Daniel J. Burke Shelly A. Calabrese Lucille Cerro Herbert G. and Linda Chorbajian John J. Cody Jr. Joseph E. Coffey Alfred J. Collins III Alfred J. Collins Jr. ’53 † Carly Connors Elizabeth C. Cronin Kathleen A. Cronin Michael Cronin Rose C. Cronin William M. Cronin Maria D. Crounse Anthony Crucetti J. Gordon Dailey ’57 † Kandyce J. Daley ’74 † Thomas J. Dalton Lynne M. DellaRocca Thomas DellaRocca Christopher DelVecchio ’88 † John J. Denio Rinaldo V. DeNuzzo ’52 Vicki A. DiLorenzo Angela C. Dominelli ’78 Kathleen F. Egan Lori Ehrensbeck Deanna Ennello-Butler Hua Fan Janis L. Fisher Harold M. and Patricia Flannery Andrew Flynn ’87 Louis Fortin ’58 Melvin S. Friedland ’58 † Gail Goodman Snitkoff Robert J. Gould James J. Gozzo Corena E. Graham Robert A. Hamilton ’77 Bridget-Ann Hart ’80 † Kevin M. Hickey James J. and Gloria Hunter Garret H. Huyer Susan L. Iwanowicz Gerald H. Katzman Robert S. Keenan Frank Kerwin David M. Kile ’74 † James M. Kopp Pratima Kunchala James G. Laird David Langley Joseph M. Lapetina † Josie Leighton Ronald E. Lesko Bertram Lieberman Leonard C. Lipkin Teresa J. Lubowski ’85 Edward Maiuro Mia L. Mancuso Michael F. Mangione

40

Francesca A. Marchio Joseph M. McDonald Robert F. Mc Gaugh ’57 † Patrick S. McGraw Sergio A. Mendez Catherine Merriman Nicholas Mesiti Kenneth W. Miller Fouad and Amal Morkos Thomas J. Morrissey Shaker A. Mousa Lee M. and Roberta Nackman Bengt W. Nelson Robert E. L. and Ellen Nesbitt New Salem Volunteer Fire Dept. Aux. David W. Newton Louise E. Newton Adwoa Olufunlayo Nornoo Thomas and Maureen E. O’Brien Timothy P. O’Neill Patricia F. Osowick Steven E. Paige Shawn and Alicia T. Pepe Louis V. and Rosemary Perrotta Nicholas G. Popovich Dominic and Tina Raco Robert B. Rasmussen Robert and Mary Reilly Armand Rivers James F. and Blanche Rivers John and Margaret E. Rivers Richard G. Robison ’52 † Scott F. Rogler Gary J. Salamido ’86 Bernard E. Schallehn Judith A. Schmonsky Edward T. Shea Christine Shields Siena College Lilia Singer John P. and Donna Singleton Edward and Muriel Sowek Daniel J. Spicer Steven M. St. Onge Margaret E. Teitsch Patricia G. Tompkins Gino Turchi John C. and Anne Weaver Robert J. and Kristine Weaver M. Elyse Wheeler Carolyn White Douglas V. and Donna Williams Barbara A. Wood John M. Woychick David Zdunczyk Mario M. Zeolla ’97 HaiAn Zheng

In Memory of Stephen W. Bull ’51 Melvin Mones ’51

In Memory of Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Neugebauer Patricia S. Wilson ’83

Steven M. and Joanne M. LaFay Joseph M. † and Mary G. Lapetina Michael and Lori M. Levine Ralph and Mary Lou Mancini Anthony F. and Joan M. Mastrianni Donna T. Mastrianni Francis A. and Linda P. Mastrianni Michelena Mastrianni Marilyn A. Mc Carthy ’54 Regina V. Merola Kenneth and Shelly Miller Stacey M. Millis Katherine I. Moss Carol A. Napierski Helen K. Napierski Neonatal Respiratory Diseases Ellen M. O’Brien Katherine M. O’Brien Robert L. and Mary K. O’Brien Henry and Janice Palmer Jude H. and Mary C. Reardon Joseph P. Romeo George J. and Mary Jo Rutnik Neil T. and Valentina Schram Walter and Renee Schwartz William J. and Maureen Shafer Robert M. State ’60 Irving and Arthea Strongin Joyce Trenchard Walter Uccellini Freda D. White Robert and Sally Wygant Miller Young

In Memory of Francis J. O’Brien ’20 Edward J. Mc Nulty ’67

In Memory of Richard Wilson ’58 Harold E. Veeder Jr. ’58

In Memory of Julius Osowick ’55 Patricia Osowick

In Memory of Harry D. Yontz Lois A. Yontz ’65

In Memory of David Daffner ’34 Richard H. Daffner ’63 † In Memory of Morris Daffner ’32 Richard H. Daffner ’63 † In Memory of Charlotte Forman John D. Forman ’52 In Memory of Susan Greenspan Koblantz ’65 Sturmius G. Braun In Memory of Gary W. Hamblen ’59 Maria D. Crounse Corena E. Graham New Salem Volunteer Fire Dept. Aux. In Memory of Alan MacCollam ’43 David B. Van Etten ’61 In Memory of William Mansfield Janis L. Best ’42 In Memory of Harry Mikhitarian ’54 Selig D. Corman ’58

In Memory of Robert L. Powell Carol R. Powell ’60 In Memory of Harry S. Spaulding Jr. ’53 Richard G. Robison ’52 † In Memory of Rosemary S. Toomajian ’81 Edward L. Toomajian ’81 In Memory of Matthew Verderame James P. O’Brien ’60 In Memory of Albert M. White Peter and Rosalie Ahl Donald F. and Elizabeth F. Arnold Mark L. Aronowitz Jolene R. Bates ’81 Diane F. Bosse Richard J. Cipullo James R. Coughlin H. Russell ’43 and Katherine Denegar Rinaldo V. ’52 and Lucy B. DeNuzzo Jonathan R. and Eliza M. Duade Pat Faragon ’56 Christopher A. Fausel ’93 Michael J. and Amy A. Flaherty Jr. Cynthia S. Gabriels ’60 Jeffrey W. and Mary Gennoy Elizabeth S. Goodman Gerald F. and Catherine A. Griner Susan B. Hill Stephanie Keyser William E. Kilburn III ’56 Susan M. and David M. ’74 Kile † Mark T. and Patricia M. Kircher


Corporations and Foundations

Matching Companies

$383,314 Anonymous Alumni Association of ACP, Inc. Abbott Laboratories Accent Commercial Furniture, Inc. Ace Pest Control Specialists, Inc. Action Window Cleaning Co., Inc. Albertson's, Inc. All Seasons Services, Inc. Allen's Carpet Cleaning American Chemical & Equipment Co. ATEC Group Babcock Financial Advisors, Inc. Benefit Resource, Inc. Bristol-Myers Squibb Brooks/Eckerd Pharmacy M.P. Buckley, LLC Buffalo Hotel Supply Co., Inc. Capital District Physicians' Health Plan, Inc. Capital District YMCA Colonie Mechanical Contractors, Inc. ComDoc, Inc. Cooley Motors CVS Digital Page Dudley Associates Eckerd Corporation Foundation Eli Lilly and Company Envision Architects PC Excel Systems Inc. Express Scripts/Value Rx First Niagara Bank Follett Higher Education Group Gateway GE Foundation Girvin & Ferlazzo, P.C. GlaxoSmithKline, Inc. Heslin, Rothenberg, Farley & Mesiti P.C. Hession Electric, Inc. Higher Education Marketing Associates, Inc. Hiscock & Barclay, LLP Hoffmann-La Roche Inc. InterfaceFLOR Commercial Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies

$71,546 Abbott Laboratories Albertson’s, Inc. Bristol-Myers Squibb Brooks/Eckerd Pharmacy Eli Lilly and Company Express Scripts/Value Rx G.E. Foundation GlaxoSmithKline, Inc. Hoffmann-La Roche Inc. Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies Kinney Drugs Foundation, Inc. Lockheed Martin Merck Partnership for Giving Novartis U.S. Foundation Pfizer, Inc. Publix Super Markets Charities Schering Corporation Wyeth Laboratories

Johnson Illington Advisors, LLC Joseph P. Mangione, Inc. Kinney Drugs Foundation, Inc. KONE, Inc. Krackeler Scientific, Inc. Lockheed Martin Mabey's Moving & Storage, Inc. Mac-Gray Services, Inc. Main-Care Energy Markel Insurance Company Maruzen Pharmaceuticals Co., LTD Merck Partnership for Giving Merrill Lynch Milliman Consultants & Actuaries MLB Industries, Inc. NEC Unified Solutions, Inc. Novartis U.S. Foundation Pfizer, Inc. Phelps Brothers Inc. Publix Super Markets Charities Ray Sign, Inc. RBC Capital Markets Renaissance Corporation of Albany, Inc. Rite Aid Corporation Robinson Hall Architectural Products, Inc. Robison Family Foundation Rose & Kiernan, Inc. Sano-Rubin Construction Services Sawchuk, Brown Associates Schering Corporation Schindler Elevator Co. Sodexho Inc. & Affiliates Stants Combustion Assoc., Inc. Stulmaker, Kohn & Richardson The Edward P. Swyer Foundation, Inc. TD Banknorth, N.A. Tech Valley Communications Technical Building Services TurfLinks, Inc. University Heights College Suites Walgreens Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. Wyeth Laboratories

In-kind Gifts James L. Clark Jr. Curtis 1000 H. Russell Denegar ’43 Depe Dene Resort Hannaford Bros. Hiland Golf Club Jack Byrne Ford & Mercury Kinney Drugs Foundation, Inc. Metro Resources Mohawk River Club Northeast Jewelers Oliver’s Beverage Center Pepsi Price Chopper Supermarkets The Sagamore Six Flags/Great Escape Linford A. ’51 and Nancy ’51 Snyder St. Luke’s Hospital TurfLinks, Inc.

† Trustee * Deceased

Office of Institutional Advancement The Office of Institutional Advancement at Albany College of Pharmacy supports the mission and strategic plan of the College by cultivating vital relationships and providing timely, relevant communication with our diverse constituencies. These audiences include alumni, corporations, foundations, government and community leaders, the media and the campus community. Through these activities, we seek to engage all of our constituents in the continuous advancement of ACP as a national leader in scientific education. Vicki A. DiLorenzo Vice President of Institutional Advancement 518.694.7331 dilorenv@acp.edu

Deanna Ennello-Butler Associate Director of Advancement Research 518.694.7305 ennellod@acp.edu

Ron Lesko Executive Director of Marketing and Communications 518.694.7394 leskor@acp.edu

David Zdunczyk Director of Development 518.694.7251 davidz@acp.edu

Lynne M. DellaRocca Systems Administrator 518.694.7253 dellarol@acp.edu

Christine A. Shields Associate Director of Marketing and Communications 518.694.7389 shieldsc@acp.edu

Shelly A. Calabrese Director of Annual Programs 518.694.7304 calabres@acp.edu

Deborah S. Reutter Coordinator of Institutional Advancement 518.694.7220 reutterd@acp.edu

The 2006 Report of Gifts includes donations of $100 and up received from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2006. Gifts received after December 31, 2006, will be included in the 2007 Report of Gifts. The accuracy of this report is important to us. Please contact the Office of Institutional Advancement at (518) 694-7253 to report any inaccuracies or omissions so that our records can be corrected.

41


ACP

Sciences forLife

ALBANY COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 106 New Scotland Avenue Albany, NY 12208-3492 1-888-203-8010 www.acp.edu

Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Albany, NY Permit No. 349

President's Report 2006  

ACPHS President's Report 2006

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you