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A L B A N Y C O L L E G E O F P H A R M A C Y A N D H E A LT H S C I E N C E S M A G A Z I N E

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Alumni News

SEND STORY IDEAS, COMMENTS, LET TERS, AND SUGGESTIONS TO :

Alumni News ACPHS 106 New Scotland Ave Albany, NY 12208 888.203.8010 alumni@acphs.edu www.acphs.edu

EDITOR

Megan Davis

Alumni News ALBANY COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND HEALTH SCIENCES MAGAZINE

SUMMER 2013

WRITERS

Michael Buckley Gil Chorbajian Megan Davis Amy Halloran Bill Jabour PHOTOGRAPHERS

Don Elliot Gary Gold Kris Qua DESIGN

Coppola Design

IN T HIS IS SUE : 05 NEW MICROBIOLOGY PROGRAM DEBUTS IN 2013  THE ADDITION OF THIS BACHELOR'S PROGRAM BRINGS THE COLLEGE ONE STEP CLOSER TO REACHING THE TARGETED 60/40 ENROLLMENT GOAL

13 PEER MENTORS MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE  THIS VITAL PROGRAM HELPS MAKE THE TRANSITION TO COLLEGE MORE NATURAL AND EASES THE ANXIETY OF BEING AWAY FROM HOME

14 SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAM  AN INTENSE AND CONCENTRATED RESEARCH EXPERIENCE TURNED TWO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS ONTO THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE OFFERINGS AT ACPHS

21 ALL IN THE FAMILY  AN ATTIC DISCOVERY DATING BACK TO THE EARLY 1900S CONNECTS RECENT ALUMNUS TO ACPHS

PLUS :

6 A WORLD BEYOND ACPHS 8 ALUMNI BACK ON CAMPUS 24 CLASS NOTES

SUMMER 2013 1

MES S AGE F RO M BILL JA BOUR

We’re excited to share this edition of the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Alumni News magazine. It’s packed with photos, alumni updates, and news from around the College. As most of you know, ACPHS President James J. Gozzo announced in April that he will be stepping down at the end of the next academic year. Since being hired as the seventh president of the College in 1998, Dr. Gozzo has led ACPHS through a period of remarkable growth. He has overseen the addition of new academic programs, expanded the College’s geographic footprint, enhanced research, and helped raise millions of dollars for the institution (see page 4). He has left an indelible mark on ACPHS, and we hope you will join us as we celebrate and honor him in the year ahead. One of Dr. Gozzo’s many achievements was the 2009 opening of a campus in Colchester, Vermont. In May, the Vermont Campus graduated its first class when 74 students received their Pharm.D.’s and listened to U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy deliver the commence-

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ment address. In an effort to encourage future students to attend the Vermont Campus, members of the Class of 2013 have created a “Legends Never Die” scholarship which has raised $28,650 to date. We hope many of these new graduates will return next year for Reunion Weekend. If the 2013 event was any indication, they will certainly find it well worth the trip! On behalf of the entire ACPHS community, I would like to thank everyone who returned to campus in early June. From the Welcome Back Dinner honoring preceptors and the classes of 1958 and 1963 to the always popular Casino Night, Reunion Weekend was filled with lots of laughter as old memories were recalled and new ones were made. You can view photos from the Weekend at acphs.edu/reunion.

As we look ahead, we have a number of terrific alumni events on tap for the summer. A bus trip to Fenway Park is scheduled for July 20; the 20th annual President’s Cup Golf Tournament will be held July 29 at Albany Country Club; and in August, we are hosting a polo event and day at the races in Saratoga. If you have news that you would like to share or questions about upcoming events, please do not hesitate to contact me. I hope to hear from you soon! Regards, Bill Jabour Director of Annual Giving and Alumni Relations william.jabour@acphs.edu (518) 694-7393

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President Gozzo to Step Down as Head of the College in June 2014

ACPHS President James Gozzo recently announced that he will be stepping down as president of the College, effective June 30, 2014. Hired as the seventh president/dean of the school in 1998, Dr. Gozzo has led ACPHS through a period of unprecedented growth and expansion, including the construction or acquisition of seven buildings on the Albany Campus, the establishment of the Vermont Campus, the addition of ten new bachelor's and graduate programs, increased enrollment, the establishment of the Pharmaceutical Research Institute (PRI) in 2003, implementation of community service programs such as the ACPHS Academy for elementary schoolchildren in the sciences and math and the Summer High School Enrichment Program, the launch of the College’s first-ever Capital Campaign in 1999 which exceeded its $10 million goal, and growing the College’s endowment from $8 million to more than $20 million. A national search is underway for his replacement.

Angela Dominelli ’78 Named Dean of School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Angela Dominelli, MBA, PhD, was named Dean of the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences in an April announcement. Dr. Dominelli, who had been Interim Dean since last July 1, has served in both faculty and administrative roles at ACPHS since 2000. A

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member of the ACPHS Class of 1978, Dr. Dominelli has also worked in administrative capacities at a variety of health care organizations, including MVP Health Care and Electronic Data Systems (EDS). She continues to teach sections of Pharmacy Administration and the Profiles in Leadership elective.

John Denio Named Provost

bia and two foreign countries: Canada and Cuba. The day before on May 18, alumnus Richard H. Daffner, MD, FACR, Class of 1963, was the keynote speaker for the College’s 133rd graduation ceremony on the Albany Campus. The College awarded 5 bachelors, 42 masters and 210 doctor of pharmacy degrees totalling 257 graduates, making it the largest graduating class in ACPHS history. Eighteen percent of the graduating Albany students were from foreign countries.

Health & Wellness Expo Set for Sept 28 John Denio, MS, MBA, was recently named Provost of the College. Denio, who had been serving as the Interim Provost since last July 1, has been with the College since 1976 and has served as a faculty member since 1977. The former ACPHS Teacher of the Year has taught courses ranging from calculus to economics and still teaches an elective course in management. In addition to serving on numerous committees and in a variety of advising roles, he has also held several administrative positions in the areas of Academic Affairs and Student Affairs, most recently as Dean of Students.

Vermont Campus Graduates First Class On May 19, the College made history by graduating its first class of 74 students from the Colchester, Vermont campus. United States Sen. Patrick J. Leahy, D-Vt., delivered the commencement address and told the graduates they will play vital roles in the future discussion about health care. “Whether you choose to work in a hospital, pharmacy, longterm care facility, or in the world of research or academia, you will find pivotal roles in developing and managing the treatment of disease,” Leahy said. The 74 graduates represented 20 states, the District of Colum-

Save the date for the second annual Health & Wellness Expo on Saturday, September 28 from 10am–3pm right here on the ACPHS campus.

Last October, the Health & Wellness Expo, co-sponsored by ACPHS and MVP Health Care, was by all measurements a great success. Following the morning’s 5K race, a steady flow of people streamed to the campus to receive health screenings, get discounted flu shots, visit the farmer’s market, and meet with nearly 50 vendors of health and wellness services. One of the biggest attractions was the medication takeback program where approximately 200 pounds of unused or expired drugs were collected. MVP is partnering with ACPHS again on September 28 to offer an even bigger and better Health & Wellness Expo and 5K event this year! As details become finalized we will be posting them at acphs.edu/ healthexpo. Keep checking back for more information.

New BS Program in Microbiology Approved

The College received approval from the New York State Education Department to offer a bachelor’s degree in Microbiology and will enroll the program’s first class in fall 2013. The addition of the Microbiology program continues the academic expansion of the College over the past decade, which in addition to the doctor of pharmacy program, now includes five bachelor’s programs and five graduate programs. “Our bachelor’s program in Microbiology will not only provide students with the intellectual and practical skills required for successful careers as microbiologists, it will give them a broad based understanding of how this discipline, and science in general, can be used to meet societal needs,” said David Clarke, PhD, Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at ACPHS.

Relay for Life Funds Hit Record-Breaking Numbers When Relay for Life concluded on April 13, the Albany Campus had raised just over $40,000 for the American Cancer Society. It was another successful event for Colleges Against Cancer, but the total fell just short of the school’s previous high of $41,604 which was set in 2010. Since the event concluded, donations have continued to come in, and at last check that total has soared to $43,722.85 – an all-time ACPHS record! Contributions are being accepted until August 31, so that figure may climb even higher. Visit the ACPHS Relay for Life web page if you’d like to make a gift. Go to relayforlife.org and search “Albany College of Pharmacy.”

Women’s Hoops Team Wins National Championship

Panthers Take the NEW Field

As a new member of the United States Collegiate Athletic Association, ACPHS sports teams got off to a very powerful start. History was made in March when the ACPHS women’s basketball team defeated Berkeley College 60–54 to win the USCAA Division II National Championship. The win marks the school’s first ever national championship in any sport. In fact, in the Week 7 USCAA Poll released in mid-January, the ACPHS women’s basketball team was ranked number one in the country. This standing marks the first time in the College’s history that an ACPHS team was ranked as the top team in the nation for a sport.

Phase 1 of the newly renovated athletics field project is complete. In addition to augmenting the size of the field to bring it up to NCAA standards (75 yards in width by 120 yards in length), brand new artificial turf and a six lane rubberized track was installed.

Last fall, the ACPHS women’s soccer team was one of eight teams to qualify for the USCAA national championship tournament in Asheville, NC. The Panthers were seeded 5th and after defeating Paul Smith’s College in the first round of the tournament, they advanced to the “Final Four.” Although the ACPHS women were defeated 7–1 by two-time defending champion University of MaineFt. Kent in the semifinals, the loss did not overshadow what was otherwise an incredible year for the team. The men’s soccer team also had a strong season. They went undefeated in the Hudson Valley Men’s Athletic Conference regular season (5-0-1) and finished with an 8-5-2 record. This earned them a spot in the Hudson Valley Athletic Conference championship game against Berkeley College where the were defeated 5-1. For the first time ever, ACPHS will offer track and field in the Spring of 2014. Tom Hartnett is the head coach for men’s and women’s cross country and will also be leading the track and field teams.

“This is a huge step forward for the College,” noted President Gozzo. “This much anticipated renovation will benefit our student athletes and the entire Institution and will secure our place in this community for generations to come. By giving players a reliable facility to play and practice, students a safe place to unwind, and the community a beautiful environment to host and attend events, we will build camaraderie across campus and bring the public into our close knit family here at the College.” Phase Two will add lights and long-jump pit and is expected to be completed in 2014.

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A World Beyond ACPHS GLOBAL E X PERIEN CES A LLOW ST UDEN T S TO SEE THE WO RL D F RO M NE W PERSPEC TIV ES International study continues to enhance the “globalization” of student learning at ACPHS. As part of the College’s 2012–17 Strategic Plan, one of the seven goals is to implement globalization by expanding the amount of international offerings and increase the number of students participating in these international offerings, with the objective to reach 100% in five years. Global experiences allow students to see the world from new perspectives and be enriched by different cultures. By developing new intercultural skills, these students can apply valuable insight and knowledge throughout their careers as pharmacists and health care experts.

Dominica

China

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At ACPHS every student is encouraged or given the opportunity to travel, learn, and discover abroad by way of academic courses, rotations, or mission trips. Destinations include Belize, Brazil, Central America, China, Costa Rica, Dominica, Guatemala, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Korea, Peru, Senegal, South America and Switzerland. Education does not end in the classroom or at the borders of the campus or country; at ACPHS students are encouraged to see the world as their classroom.

Kenya

Belize

Belize

Belize

Belize

Belize

Belize

Belize

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Alumni Back on Campus

Prescription Drug Abuse a Growing Problem The College hosted a Town Hall Meeting on Prescription Drug Abuse in late April with the Addictions Care Center of Albany (ACCA) and Albany County STOP-DWI. More than 60 people turned out for a panel discussion with local experts to hear about the dangers of prescription drug abuse, its impact on our community, and efforts being made

The Evolving Role of the Pharmacist Today’s pharmacist is not the same practitioner from 20 years ago. Along with doctors, nurses, and other professionals, pharmacists have increasingly become a more essential part of a patient’s health care management team. According to Brian Gallagher, senior vice president of government affairs for the American Pharmacists Association, APhA is on a mission to redefine pharmacists’ roles with “pharmaceutical care.” That means more opportunities for pharmacists and current students who are planning careers in pharmacy. Career options and pathways are certainly encouraging and exciting for students to consider, but can sometimes be overwhelming. Fortunately, the College offers a Career Pathways Program through the Career Services office which acts as a guide for students who are uncertain about their career choices. Initially developed in the early 1980s and refined through the years to reflect changes in the field, this program uses research exercises and a live workshop to allow students to explore various parts of the profession. The program affords students the opportunity to discover their

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A LUMNI A RE OUR BE ST A S SE T S We welcome you back to campus to share your knowledge. Students want to learn from you. If you’re interested in sharing your story and professional expertise, contact: Office of Alumni Relations alumni@acphs.edu (518) 694-7393

to combat the issue. New York State Assemblyman John McDonald ’85 was among the panelists. As a pharmacist, co-owner of Marra’s Pharmacy in Cohoes, NY, and former mayor of that city, McDonald spoke with conviction about the importance of education and medication adherence. With the average person today seeing several different doctors and often being prescribed multiple medications, McDonald stressed the importance of patients having oneon-one relationships with their pharmacists. “This is not baby aspirin we’re talking about. These are real medications that have real impact. They work well, when taken appropriately,” McDonald explained, but when overused, or more importantly, not taken properly, the situation has potential to quickly spiral out of control. Representatives from the ACCA shared reallife experiences with the audience and urged participants to use their services or point folks in their direction if they know someone who is struggling with prescription drug abuse.

passions and use their educational experiences to develop their own pathway. Equally beneficial, Dr. Ralph ’59 and Mary Lou ’60 Mancini developed the infographic (page 9) that illustrates a spectrum of career opportunities within the profession of pharmacy. The Mancini’s recently returned to campus and spoke with first and second year students to highlight these various career pathways. Their visit and presentation was a unique opportunity for students to see the Career Pathways Program in motion. This networking opportunity provided students with guidance and tools on how to build a successful and lucrative careers in pharmacy.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES with a PharmD

PHARMACY

Community Pharmacy Hospital Pharmacy Pharmacy Benefits Management (PBM) VA Long Term Care

Quality Assurance Government Affairs Regulatory Affairs Sales Marketing Research Manufacturing

PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY

FEDERAL / STATE

LAW

Drug Discovery Drug Development

FDA State Board of Pharmacy State Board Inspector

General Law Intellectual Property

ARMED FORCES MEDICAL SERVICE CORPS Navy / Army / Air Force / Marines

POST GRADUATE EDUCATION MS / PhD

ACADEMIA

Medicine Dentistry Veterinary Medicine

College Science Dept Pharmacy School

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Inspiring Students to Make a Difference Get out of your comfort zone and get involved, was the message from Michael Maggy ’85 to a packed lecture hall of students. As guest speaker for the College’s Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP) student organization

and owner of Maggy’s Pharmacy in Dannemora, NY, Mike spoke about the importance of making a difference and raising the bar as a health care practitioner. He encouraged students to let their voices be heard at Pharmacy Legislative Day. He called on them to attend the April event at the State Capitol and to take action. He spoke about the need for young aspiring pharmacists to get involved, raise issues, and speak professionally and passionately to legislators about health care issues affecting pharmacists. Pharmacy Legislative Day is an opportunity for students to watch floor debates or committee hearings on bills concerning health care. This year more than 50 ACPHS students and faculty attended Pharmacy Legislative Day in Albany.

Medical Technology Degree Provides Opportunity With an undergraduate degree from Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences and a graduate degree from Albany Medical College, Michael Ryan ’85 is quite familiar with New Scotland Avenue. So he did not need to learn a new commute when he started his job on that same road as the director of Division of Laboratory Qualification Certification with the New York State Department of Health. As an ACPHS graduate with a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology, Mike never planned to work in the regulatory part of the field. “In fact, that’s the one part of this field I said I would never work in and here I am,” Mike shares. “But being a medical technologist gives me a unique perspective on the regulatory world.” Originally from Auburn, NY, Mike came to ACPHS in part because the Medical Technology program had a great reputation and allowed students the opportunity to be in the lab at St. Peter’s Hospital for one full year. “It definitely put ACPHS students ahead of others, having an entire year of real experience,” he says. After holding positions at the Albany Stratton VA Medical Center, St. Peter’s Hospital, and with the state, Mike found himself pursuing a PhD from Albany Medical College. Then in 2008 while directing the Genomics Core Facility for the Wadsworth Center he was asked to join the Division of Laboratory Quality Certification. “The Genomics facility was focused on DNA sequencing, DNA microarrays, and genotyping,” Mike explains. “It was inevitable that these types of technologies would begin to enter the clinical testing world. The opportunity has allowed me to work in an area that has a direct impact on public health.”

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Mike’s work now focuses on the ever evolving regulatory world of laboratory certification. “The State of New York’s regulations for laboratories are actually more comprehensive than the FDA’s standards and many private labs follow New York’s standards because they are so comprehensive,” he shares. But being proactive is one of Mike’s many challenges. “There seems to be more and more laboratory testing at the molecular level,” he says. “We’re seeing labs develop testing based on DNA and we have to stay on top of those new developments from a regulatory angle. Having a background as a medical technologist and a molecular biologist has been quite valuable. I can relate to the challenges that the clinical laboratories have in meeting the requirements needed to perform testing and can appreciate the rapid advances being made in laboratory testing. I think my combined knowledge gives me a level of credibility with my peers.” Mike was the keynote speaker in April for the College’s National Laboratory Professionals Week. Mike’s presentation highlighted the Science Behind the Regulatory World.

IT’S NEVER TOO SOON TO CONSIDER A

Planned Gift by

Michael Buckley DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT

“I’ll give when I’m gone” was the response

A small number of your fellow alumni have

to one of the very first phone calls I made

decided to navigate around all of those troubles

as a student phonathon caller in College. At

by including the College in their estate plans

eighteen-years-old, just trying to make enough

through a will bequest. Bequests are the most

money to pay for Spring Break, it wasn’t exactly

straight forward and easiest of ways to make

the response I was expecting. I may have been

a planned gift. Donors can allocate a specific

a little naïve to think that everyone would be

amount or a percentage to the College and can

enthusiastic about the College. I quickly came

even specify a program they would like their

to realize that the alumni who did not support

gift to be directed to. Because it is a charitable

the Annual Fund far outweighed the ones who

gift, the biggest advantage of a bequest is the

did support. While this wasn’t the only “no”

tax advantage that your estate earns.

response I received to my plea for twenty-five

An additional benefit of a bequest is that it

dollars, it was one of the most passionate and

is completely revocable, so at any time and for

memorable. I sometimes look back and chuckle

any reason you can change your plans. Should

at the fact that I pursued a career in fund

the number of grandchildren you have increase,

raising, given my lack of success in the very

your spouse pass away or your philanthropic

beginning.

priorities change, you have complete control.

While it may have been a response that

If I can answer any questions about how a

caused me to pause for a minute or two, it is a

will bequest or other gift types can benefit you

response I’ve come to hear more often, albeit

and your alma mater, please don’t hesitate to

not as passionately. Many of the College’s

get in touch with me at 518-694-7126. There

alumni have a great deal of respect and affinity

is also a great deal of information on our web-

towards their alma mater and want to make a

site at www.acphs.edu under “Estate Planning”.

financial gift. For many though, the thought of

If I could go back to that phone call from my

outliving their assets is troubling and, especially

first year in College, I would definitely make

given the economic climate we live in, many al-

sure to note the name of the alumnus. For all I

ums hesitate. For many more alumni, they want

know, he was serious and one day there will be

to make a significant gift, but aren’t the type

a brand new building on campus, a “full ride”

to be recognized. Sometimes the fear of their

scholarship, or a brand new research center

friends and colleagues seeing their philanthropy

with his name on it!

at work makes them reluctant to give at all.

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PEER MENTORS MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE

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hink back to your first day as a student at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. Along with the inherent excitement you felt about starting your new college life, you naturally may have experienced some anxiety, fear, and even battled homesickness. The Peer Mentor Group at ACPHS is the first place where many incoming freshmen and transfer students turn to express some of those very feelings. This student driven program started out in 2009 with an advisor, two student mentors, and four coordinators. “Today we have about 50 mentors,” shares Julianne Messia, Director of Academic Learning Services and advisor of the program. “We try to pair students who come in with a mentor who has similar interests.” New students generally learn about the program during their freshmen orientation or at an open house while visiting the campus. “Marketing for the Peer Mentor Group is almost exclusively a word of mouth process. The message is shared by the Admissions Office and through our student ambassadors very early on,” Julianne explains. “We want to get the word out beforehand so that incoming freshmen and transfer students know where to turn before even stepping onto campus that first day of class.” The program is aimed at keeping new students informed and educated about their new college environment, helping to make the transition to college an enjoyable one. “Fifty percent of our applicants were mentees themselves,” Julianne says. Such is the case for doctor of pharmacy students Mara Garfinkel ’17, Christina Lombardi ’17, and Brianna Luft ’16. After seeking out the mentor program as a freshman, Mara, who is now entering her third year at the College and a coordinator for the Peer Mentor Group, felt fortunate to have had a service to rely on when she most needed some help. “The idea of having a ‘big brother or big sister’ comforted me,” Mara shares. “Talking to an upper classmen before coming to the school helped tremendously. Also, having someone to talk to about my grades and classes was very helpful. When I was worried about a test or concerned that I did not do well enough, my mentor assured me that I was doing great and encouraged me to keep working hard. She made the transition into college an easier one.” Christina Lombardi would agree and adds that the connections you make with your mentor and mentee or not just fleeting relationships. “It’s a relationship that sustains and connects over the years. I’d like to think we get better every year at pairing our mentees with their mentors,” she says. Accomplished and proud are two words Brianna associates with the program. “I’ve learned that there is a difference between telling someone what to do and letting them figure out what is best for them,” she shares. “It feels really good to help someone else. Whenever I get a message from my mentee that I’ve eased her mind or helped her out, I feel great. This concept really shows me that pharmacy is the perfect program for me, because as a pharmacist I will help people every single day.”

For more information about the program go to the Peer Mentor Group blog at acphs-peermentors.com

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The Summer Enrichment Program at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences not only fosters collaboration between high school students and research experts at the College, it highlights the many research opportunities available and prepares students for what to expect from an intensive health sciences college program. This academic year two former participants of the program are currently enrolled as second year students at ACPHS.

Summer Research Each year at the closing ceremonies for the ACPHS Summer Enrichment Program, a group of high school students gather in the Collins Boardroom to present their findings to an audience of fellow students, faculty, staff, and often family members. The program, which has been offered by the college in conjunction with the City of Albany since 1998, serves to expose high school students who have a deep interest in science to research opportunities and careers that might not otherwise be available to them. The enrichment program began under the direction of President James Gozzo, PhD, shortly after he was named president of the College 15 years ago. Six to eight students are selected and spend six weeks working with ACPHS faculty researchers. The students are recommended for the program by their guidance counselors. Each week of the program, students conduct three days of research with an ACPHS faculty member, participate in one day of instructional activities and use the remaining day to tour a pharmaceutical or biomedical company in the region. Since 1999, eleven students who have participated in the Summer Enrichment Program have subsequently enrolled at ACPHS. Presently, two of them are now second year students at the College. Mahnoor Ali and Brandon LaPorte – both graduates of Albany High School – participated

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in the program three summers ago and say that their research experience was predominantly the impetus for their decision to choose ACPHS. “The work we did taught me that you don’t have to be in a lab to conduct research,” Mahnoor says, who studied under Dr. Nimish Patel and researched the effect of the hepatitis B vaccine on hemodialysis patients. “I really liked that a lot of the work was independent and it was interesting to see how the research played out in real life.” > > > > > > >

< < < < < < <

The learning environment at ACPHS coupled with the program offerings also attracted Mahnoor to pursue a bachelor of science degree in Health and Human Sciences. “As someone who has a deep interest in the health care field, I found that the program was a great opportunity to begin thinking about my career path seriously and realistically. In high school I was never exposed to lab work that intense, so having that background and being in a research lab definitely helped prepare me for my college coursework and set me on the right path.” Brandon was headed down a different course before participating in the Summer Enrichment

Program OPENING DOORS FOR AREA HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

Program. “I actually wanted to go to Northeastern University,” he recalls. “I wasn’t considering ACPHS until I participated in the program. It opened my eyes to what a good school ACPHS is and of all the colleges of which I was accepted, this was definitely the best place and fit for me.” David Clarke, PhD, associate professor of chemistry, dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, and advisor to the program explains that as part of their applications, all students must provide transcripts, PSAT scores, essays about their career goals, and what they hope to get from the program. “The students we enroll in the program have enjoyed and done well in their high school chemistry and biology courses,” says David. “Most of them have an interest in pursuing a career in health or medical fields, but don’t yet know about many of the options available to them.” Brandon wants to advance to medical school and pursue a career as a doctor once he graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences. He says that he would recommend the program to high school students “because its higher level learning and it really helps you with critical thinking. I think if it hadn’t been for the program, I wouldn’t have such a good understanding of what I want to do in the future.”

AREA HIGH SCHOOLS THAT HAVE PARTICIPATED IN THE SUMMER ENRICHMENT PROGRAM INCLUDE: + Academy of Holy Names + Albany Academy for Boys & Girls + Albany High School + Albany Leadership Charter High School for Girls + Catholic Central High School + Columbia High School + Guilderland High School + Loudonville Christian School + Troy High School

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C OMMENCEMENT

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:: A L B A N Y, M AY 18

C OMMENCEMENT

:: V E R MON T, M AY 19

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REUNION WEEKEND

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:: J U N E 7– 9

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FE ATURE STO RY

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All in the Family C E N T U RY O L D AT T IC D I S C OV E RY L I N K S FA M I LY T O AC P H S

S U M M E R 2 0 1 3 21

urtis Gibbon, ’12, knew early on he wanted to be a pharmacist. “I like being there, being a resource for people,” says Gibbon, an Eagle Scout who enjoys the community aspect of the profession. The pharmacy program at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences felt like the right fit to him, so he applied early decision and was accepted before his friends even determined what they wanted to study. Though he needed nothing to assure him he was on the right path, Gibbon got a big affirmation the second year he was a student at ACPHS. That Christmas, he unwrapped a small package and found a slim Lilly textbook from the late 1800s. The binding was light blue, and the inside back cover was inscribed with the name of his great great grandfather, Leo H. Gibbon. Underneath that signature, his great grandfather Arnold had practiced writing his name. Leo Hearnshaw Gibbon graduated with 34 others from what was known then as

of the graduating class, as well as his diploma, the textbook, and his license from New York State. He had everything but the book framed, and the elegant documents and image now decorate the walls of the recent graduate’s apartment. Curtis Gibbon says it was pretty odd, and even a little eerie, to find this connection to his college. “I thought, well, that’s kind of neat,” he says. “It maybe explained some exams where I guessed and I passed. Maybe he was looking out for me!” No one in his extended or even immediate family has pursued a career in health care. His father is an engineer, and his brother is a lawyer. “There’s a guy I would have been able to talk to,” Curtis says about his great great grandfather. “A lot of times I’ll go home and tell people how my day was, and they’ll just look at me.” Leo H. Gibbon the pharmacist could have understood his language. Even though he missed out on talking shop,

It maybe explained some exams where I guessed and I passed.

Maybe he was looking out for me! Albany College of Pharmacy in 1900. The college was not yet 20 years old, and the Oxford, New York native, was just 25. The news that a relative had attended ACPHS was a surprise. Curtis Gibbon never heard stories about his great great grandfather, the pharmacist, probably because Leo H. Gibbon died just six years after he graduated. He and his wife Elizabeth had one son; when Leo died, Elizabeth remarried, and tucked the remnants of her husband’s time at Albany College of Pharmacy in the attic of her new home. Curtis’ father, Randy Gibbon, was unfamiliar with his great grandfather’s history, too, learning of it only once his son was enrolled. “When a few of my cousins found out that Curt was going to ACPHS to become a pharmacist, they contacted me about our great grandfather,” said Randy Gibbon. These cousins gave him a photograph

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Curtis thinks his relative lent him a little boost of luck in landing a good job pretty quickly out of school. “Once I was licensed, I was able to find a permanent position in a pharmacy fairly quickly,” says Gibbon. “I was fortunate not to have to spend time floating.”

Even with Leo H. Gibbon looking over his shoulder, Curtis Gibbon didn’t coast through his education. “You’re just working all the time. You’d spend entire days just studying, and it wasn’t anything that just came naturally, unfortunately,” says Gibbon. “I passed my exams with flying colors so I can’t complain, but it was tough.” Some of the most engaging and satisfying times he had during his college career were on his rotations with ACPHS professors, Dr.

L eo H . Gibbon

L eo Henr y Gibbon’s diploma—ACP’s g raduating class of 1900

Michael Kane ’84 and Dr. Amit Pai. Dr. Kane’s practice site is the Endocrine Group in Albany. Sometimes they saw patients every 15 minutes, and had to do a full workup each time. The rigor of the rotation really helped him understand diabetes, a subject he hadn’t understood very well in class. When you work that hard, he says, you learn a lot. “If you had a question, he was right there,” Gibbon says of Dr. Kane. “When it got really busy we’d still be able to shoot jokes back and forth, which made it a little less stressful.” Dr. Pai, he says, was very helpful, too. “The first day he asked, ’How can I make this rotation suit what you want?’” Gibbon recalls. Boards were coming up, so people asked for help with that. “He would squeeze in time to go over practice problems with us and practice test questions,” Gibbon says. Gibbon also did a rotation with Bartles Pharmacy, a small pharmacy in Norwich, and Lourdes Hospital in Binghamton. Working with the New York Health Plan

Association helped him see the insurance side of the industry. Educationally, there are not many parallels to draw between Curtis Gibbon’s six years of education and his great great grandfather’s two years at Albany College of Pharmacy. While Leo H. Gibbon likely also worked at a pharmacy during his schooling – Curtis worked at a CVS on Delaware Avenue, and interned at another CVS in East Greenbush for one of his rotations – industry standards in the late 1800s had little to do with their 21st century counterparts. The State Board of Pharmacy was established in 1884, and education requirements for licensing only came into play in 1905. Then, the state required candidates to be graduates of a college or School of Pharmacy with oversight from the state Board of Regents. Still, the thread of connection matters to the newly licensed pharmacist in terms both mysterious and whimsical. “I’m jealous of his mustache,” says Gibbon of his relative’s bushy handlebar. “I don’t think I can do that.”

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CL A S S NOTES

SHA RE YOUR NE WS ! The Office of Institutional Advancement is happy to pass along your news and messages to fellow classmates and community members. If you would like to share an announcement, news or update regarding your professional and/or personal life, please contact: Office of Institutional Advancement at (518) 694-7393 or email alumni@acphs.edu.

1960

1981

Congratulations to Edward Katz, who qualified for the 2012 Nature Valley NASTAR National Skiing Championships. Ed qualified by earning a top 5 resort ranking in his age, gender category, and division. The National Championships were held in Winter Park, CO March 22–25, 2012.

Congratulations to Maryann Roefaro for publishing her leadership book entitled, Building the Team from the Inside Out. Maryann’s book can be purchased online through Amazon.com.

1968 Bob Christiansen and his wife Deanna recently purchased a winter home in Venice, FL. They spend the winter months escaping the snow and kayaking, fishing, boating, biking, and playing golf. Their son Kyle recently graduated from Albany Law School and is practicing with a lobbying firm in Albany.

1976 Daniel J. Villa retired from the American Red Cross of Northern New York as Executive Director. During retirement, Dan plans to remain heavily involved with the Jefferson Community College, Watertown (NY) Family YMCA, and Samaritan Medical Center boards. Prior to his career at the Red Cross, Dan was president of ProAct, Kinney Drug Inc.’s prescription benefit management division.

1977 & 1978 J. Michael Burns ’77 and Joan DiLaura Burns ’78 recently moved to Hilton Head Island, SC after 17 years in Loveland, Ohio. Both Mike and Joan have retired and look forward to working on their golf games.

1979 Donald Nash Jr., recently opened Patient’s Pharmacy Inc. in Jamestown. Patient’s Pharmacy is independently and locally owned by Donald, who serves as president, and Diane Mathews, vice president. Donald previously served as pharmacy director at Westfield Memorial Hospital, the Chautauqua County Home, Tri-County Memorial Hospital, Heritage Village Retirement Home and was a staff pharmacist at Brooks Memorial Hospital.

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Mark Gersten went on his first medical mission trip to the Dominican Republic in February ’12. In July ’12 he accepted a position as full professor and medical director of Masters Level Physician Assistant Program at Baldwin Wallace University in Berea (a suburb of Cleveland), Ohio.

1982 Dr. Nick Zacharczenko DDS, MSD, RPh, is currently ranked 6th in the USTA Eastern Division, Northern Region in Men’s singles tennis. He has been ranked in the top ten for the last five years. Earlier in the year, Nick won gold in the men’s Javelin at the Liberty Games (formerly Empire State Games) in the 50–54 category. He also placed second in the 100m dash at this event.

1989 Sheila McShane earned her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from Tuskegee University–School of Veterinary Medicine in May 2013. Sheila will be heading onto Oklahoma State University as a 1st year resident in anatomic pathology in July 2013.

1990 Clayton D. Edwards, R.Ph., MBA became Senior Vice President, Mail Service Operations at OPTUMRx Prescription Solutions in January. Clayton and his wife Michelle (Class of 1991) are currently residing in San Diego, California.

1999 Lt. Col. Jeffrey Baker, recently took command of the New York Army National Guard’s UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter battalion. Lt. Col. Baker, is a practicing pharmacist for Price Chopper, and a veteran of the Iraq War. He took command of the 3rd Battalion 142nd Aviation, an Assault Helicopter Battalion, on September 7, 2012. The battalion has elements based at Albany International Airport in Latham and at MacArthur Airport on Long Island.

Tate Music Group recording artists Thirty1 & Mandolin recently released their debut album, “Hear My Voice.” Thirty1 & Mandolin, based in Malone, NY is a six-piece soul/folk band that includes Mike Dufort on drums and ukulele. For more information on the band and their album, please contact Mike at michael. dufort@alumni.acphs.edu.

2003 Congratulations to John Marraffa and his wife Lauren who welcomed their son, Nicholas John Marraffa, to the world on June 8, 2012.

2009 Whitney Caron is currently completing her PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Whitney also recently got engaged to Justin Kirschbrown. A September 2013 wedding is planned.

2010 Megan Elizabeth Gugino and Egor Andreevich Veslov, married on August 11, 2012 at St. John the Evangelist Church in Schenectady. A reception followed at Glen Sanders Mansion in Scotia. The couple’s honeymoon included stops in Paris, London, and the Greek Islands. Both, Megan and Egor are employed by Walgreens and reside in Albany. Meaghan Fahd and Marc Sloane married on August 18, 2012 at Turning Stone Resort and Casino in Verona, NY. The couple currently resides in Jamesville, NY.

2011 Gina M. Ciampino and Philip Sidoti were married on September 15, 2012 at St. Luke’s Roman Catholic Church in Schenectady, NY. Gina is currently a pharmacist at Aumiller’s Pharmacy in Schenectady.

2012 In July, Danielle Zsido of Highland Mills, Orange County, active Army, medical service corps was commissioned with 23 fellow Army Reserve cadets as second lieutenants following completion of a Mohawk Battalion program at Siena College, Loudonville, and graduation from college.

Donald Nash outside his pharmacy in Jamestown.

Nick Zacharczenko

Dan Villa

Lt. Col. Jeffrey Baker

Cover of Maryann Roefaroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book.

Mike Dufortâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s children

Megan Gugino and Egor Veslov

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CALLING ALL ALUMNI

Preceptors Wanted The Office of Experiential Education is seeking introductory and advanced clinical placement for students, and they want to hear from you. “While we are always looking for preceptors across all pharmacy pathways in the United States and internationally, clinical or hospital placement is our biggest need,” says Laurie Briceland ’83, Assistant Dean for Pharmacy Admissions and Experiential Education. David Coriale, class of 1997, is the clinical pharmacy coordinator at St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Utica, NY, and has been a preceptor for almost 15 years. “I like teaching, and I like learning,” David says. “And as a preceptor I can do both. It’s a rewarding experience and a valuable networking opportunity for the student and me.”

Help shape a student’s future and launch a professional career by becoming a preceptor today.

Some worry that precepting can be too time consuming, but David says it’s quite the contrary. “If you plan ahead, it will actually save you time,” he shares. “Most students help you in your professional practice and keep things running more efficiently.” As a preceptor, ACPHS provides you with credit vouchers which can be applied to ACPHS continuing education programs, tuition for college courses, professional licensing fees, ACPHS college bookstore purchased text books and reference guides, medical supplies and much more. Think about the guidance your preceptor afforded you as a student. This is an opportunity to be part of that tradition and pay it forward. Volunteer your time and expertise. Give back to the profession. Help train the next generation of pharmacists and stay connected to the College.

FO R M O RE INFO RM ATIO N OR TO GE T STA RTED A S A PRECEP TO R C O NTAC T Laurie Briceland laurie.briceland@acphs.edu

Michael Bette, Trustee April 11, 2013 Born in the Bronx and raised on Long Island, Michael Bette started working construction in 1959 and moved to the Capital Region in 1965 to co-manage the upstate operations of D. Fortunato, a Long Island-based contractor. Over the past 50 years, Michael Bette successfully delivered more than $8 billion worth of construction projects in New York,

Six of Bette’s seven children followed their father into the business. Like their father, all five of his sons are civil engineers. Mr. Bette served on the board of trustees at Manhattan College and Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. His son

Texas, Florida and elsewhere, including bridges, schools, luxury condos, office buildings, and health care facilities. His projects included major work at The New York World’s Fair, Empire State Plaza and numerous colleges including Siena, University at Albany and ACPHS; and many hospitals, including St. Peter’s, Ellis and Albany Medical Center.

Matthew is now a member of the ACPHS Board of Trustees. Mr. Bette was also a philanthropist, having served on the boards of Hope House and Twin Rivers Council of Boy Scouts of America. Mr. Bette is survived by his wife of 54 years, Mary Ann; seven children and 16 grandchildren. He was a dear friend of the College.

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Report of Gifts Each year, members of the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences community make gifts in a variety of ways, in support of our students and numerous initiatives which advance the mission of the College. These symbols of generosity are gratefully appreciated and accepted in the name of our current endowment, various scholarship funds, in honor or in memory of a loved one, and to other funds and strategic initiatives. Gifts are also often made in honor of special occasions and celebrations such as birthdays, anniversaries, reunions, and more.

A lbA n y C o llege o f PhA rm ACy A nd he A lth S Cien Ce S

Report of Gifts 2011–2012

The Office of Institutional Advancement, in the preparation of the Annual Report of Gifts, strives for accuracy and completeness in acknowledging our donors and reporting gifts. We kindly request corrections be made to us at the below address. Thank you for your continued support. It is vital to our students and the continued growth of Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. The report is now available at acphs.edu or a hard copy can be requested by contacting the Office of Institutional Advancement at 888.203.8010, 518.694.7393, or alumni@acphs.edu.

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President’s Cup Golf Tournament ALUMNI

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Alumni and Friends Reception at Saratoga Polo

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Alumni and Friends Day at the Races

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2013–14

White Coat Ceremony

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A L B A N Y C O L L E G E O F P H A R M AC Y A N D H E A LT H S C I E N C E S

Goal: $350,000

White Coat Ceremony Scholarship Dinner

Health + Wellness Expo Mario Zeolla 5K Run / Walk Alumni Soccer Game

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Help us fill the test tube. Support the College by making your gift to the Annual Fund today at acphs.edu/donate.

DO YOU SUBSCRIBE TO THE ALUMNI ALERT ENEWSLETTER? Get all of your ACPHS and industry news delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the free Alumni Alert online newsletter and be the first to know whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on at the College and beyond. Email alumni@acphs.edu to be added to the Alumni Alert list.

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