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SPRING 2014

Beech Haven

Polishing the county’s Arts & Crafts jewel PAGE 10

Call for nominations Know of a great historic project? Tell us about it PAGE 8

achfonline.org


ATHENS-CLARKE HERITAGE FOUNDATION Fire Hall No. 2 489 Prince Avenue Athens, Georgia 30601 706-353-1801 e-mail: achf@bellsouth.net www.achfonline.org Executive Director: Amy C. Kissane Welcome Center Director: Evelyn Reece Hands On Athens Administrator: John A. Kissane MISSION To be a proactive force in developing community-wide understanding of the value of historic buildings, neighborhoods, and heritage. VISION To become the leading advocate for the importance of historic preservation to the future of the Athens community. ACHF 2013-2014 BOARD OF TRUSTEES Jan Levinson, President David Bryant, President-elect/Education Chair Erika Lane, Treasurer-elect/Finance Chair Bill Kraeling, Treasurer-elect Kit Candler, Recording Secretary Marvin Nunnally, Parliamentarian Linda Davis, Revolving Fund Liaison/Preservation Issues Chair Daniel Epting Adam Hebbard, Development Chair Tim Kelly Cheri Leavy Kristen Morales, Communications Chair Kim Noland Kjirsten Ogburn Cullen O’Steen, Special Events Co-chair

Keith Plummer Victoria Prevatt Lori Scott Paul Trudeau Eric Vaughn Tom Wilfong Carol Williams Hollis Yates, Membership Chair

HERITAGE CREDITS Editor: Kristen Morales Design: Eleonora Machado Heritage Newsletter Logo: Chris Bilheimer Cover photo Beech Haven camelback bridge. Photo by Richard Hamm/Athens-Banner Herald.

THANK YOU TO OUR ANNUAL HERITAGE SPONSORS

Corinthian Level ($5,000) Ionic Level ($2,500) Barber Creek Design ETL Construction Services Todd Emily Doric Level ($1,500) Carson Advisory, Inc. Dalton Carpet One Georgia Power Foundation Lindsay Transfer & Storage Pharma Tech Industries Southern Mutual Insurance Co.


Message from the President By Jan Levinson, ACHF I write this today after emerging from a few days of snow and ice. I hope everyone stayed safe and warm during our second snowstorm of the year. This letter from the president will be one of many thanks to the amazing people who have given so generously to ACHF in recent months. I would like to start by recognizing our newest annual corporate sponsors, Southern Mutual Insurance Company and Pharma Tech Industries. The Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation is delighted to have Southern Mutual and Pharma Tech on board as sponsors at the Doric Level for the coming year and looks forward to the opportunities in these new partnerships. These connections could not have been made without the efforts of Dan Delamater and Allen Green at Southern Mutual and Kim and Tee Noland of Pharma Tech and the diligent work of the ACHF development committee chair, Adam Hebbard. Thanks to you all for your work on this initiative. It goes without saying that the work of this organization would not be possible without the continued support given by our annual heritage sponsors. These local businesses and individuals support the vision and mission of the foundation and their contributions make possible the many education and membership programs

we host each year and enable ACHF to continue to act as a proactive force in promoting preservation in the Athens community. I began with a thank you to Southern Mutual and Pharma Tech but would like to continue by recognizing our other esteemed sponsors: Barber Creek Design, Dalton Carpet One, ETL Construction Services, Georgia Power Foundation, Lindsay Transfer & Storage, Raymond James/Carson Advisory and Todd Emily. Thank you all for your contributions! Though the month of December now seems very far away, I would also like to take this opportunity to thank the members of our special events committee for their work in putting together an amazing Gala on the Hill. Though the weather was dreary, we had outstanding attendance and coupled with delicious food and welcoming homes (thank you Kimberly and Jim Fiscus, John Knowlton and Lee Epting!) the event was a great success. Thanks go especially to our gala co-chairs Alison Abernathy, Cheri Leavy and Cullen O’Steen. Each year this event just keeps getting better; thank you all for making 2013 the best event yet. We have a number of exciting programs in the works for this continues on page 22

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fire hall from the

By Amy C. Kissane, Executive Director

Historic preservation ordinance undergoes change The A-CC mayor and commission adopted several changes to the historic preservation ordinance at its Feb. 4 meeting. The two major changes were: (1) the addition of a mandatory public information meeting, with presentations by Planning Department staff, prior to public hearings held by the Historic Preservation Commission and Mayor and Commission and (2) the addition of language stating that A-CC is responsible for all costs associated with the required notification procedures. These changes are very welcome. They guarantee that neighborhood district advocates won’t have to bear these particular costs, as they did during the Buena Vista historic designation process. They also guarantee that A-CC will provide an opportunity — albeit near the end of the process — for the public to hear official information from and to ask questions of Planning Department staff and to recommend changes to the designation before it is final. Public hearings do not provide such give-and-take, which is vital to dispel PA G E

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common misconceptions about local historic designation. Unfortunately, one key thing has not changed and that is the county’s position that district advocates should take on the bulk of the designation process, including informing and educating residents throughout the process. This sometimes takes three years or more, along with preparing and paying for the local district designation report. Designation reports document a district’s historic and architectural characteristics, identify individual properties as either contributing or non-contributing, and recommend a district boundary. Such reports need to be prepared by a professional and so require hiring a consultant, the cost of which is likely to be over $3,000. I have heard people in our government say that since local historic district designation brings financial benefits (eight-year property tax abatements) to property owners, they should pay the costs. The implication is that historic districts benefit only those who live in them and that the HE RI T AGE

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A-Club Update

Looking out a new project A-Club visits window restoration project at UGA chapel By Hollis Yates, Membership Chair

The Athenaeum Club’s January outing was to UGA’s North Campus, to look at the recent window restoration of the 1835 Greek Revival Chapel. Scott Messer of the University Architects Office quietly began the project a year and a half ago with the full restoration of one of the north side windows. This single window was painstakingly taken apart, cleaned, repaired, and reassembled with each piece in its original place and new material replaced only when needed. Performing this work on one window was intentional, as it allowed the university to better estimate the cost and duration of repairing the other five triple-hung windows. Double Hung Historic Window Restoration from Greensboro, N.C., was then chosen to work with the UGA Facilities Management Division to restore the other windows. In spite of years of rot, several coats of paint, and termite damage, roughly 80 percent of the original window material was able to be salvaged and reused. The Chapel remains a popular event space for university functions, so the extensive project was performed over a two and a half week period during the holidays. The Chapel’s windows still contain much of their original 1830s material, including whole slabs of pig iron as the weights and the sashes are still functional. Careful observers will note that in recent memory the window trim has been white, but during repairs it was discovered that the original cover was a simple stain. Thus, the trim has been changed to a dark brown, as close to the original stain as possible. H ERI T A GE

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Athens Welcome Center Update Church-Waddel-Brumby Dining Table with late 18th century glass: Sheffield Epergne with Waterford bowls (center); Waterford turnover “helmet” bowls (left and right). Photo credit: Dwayne Allen Studios

House museum plays dress-up for Henry W. Green symposium By Evelyn Reece, Director/Curator In late January, when visitors from the Seventh Biennial Green Symposium arrived, the Church-WaddelBrumby House “dressed up” for the occasion. But no, not in diamonds — rather, The Georgia Museum of Art’s event Connections: Georgia in the World was the perfect opportunity to showcase a local family’s breathtaking collection of museumquality Federal Period cut and engraved glass. Befitting to the Symposium’s “world” theme, handmade pieces from Ireland, England, Scotland, and the United States were generously displayed throughout the house, including delicate prismatic candelabra, decanters, girandole candlesticks (complete with cut glass shades), glistening two-part punch bowls and a threepart centerpiece, compotes, fruit bowls, urns – and the list goes on! We examined “toddy lifters” (used

to elegantly serve “measured” libations), wineglass coolers (for rinsing between courses of wine), etched glass loving cups, an exquisite silver and crystal epergne, turnover “helmet” bowls, and a pineapple stand. We learned about the evolution of glass-making and the historical influences that affected design, and the subtle details that point to a piece’s origins. Most surprising to us was the discovery that many of the same motifs used in glass were also present within our museum’s architecture, wall coverings, and décor!The CWB House Museum Committee extends heartfelt thanks for the very generous loan from the Knecht Family, who entrusted their amazing collection to us for this special occasion. We hope you will stay tuned for more exhibits to come at the ChurchWaddel-Brumby House Museum.

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Athens Welcome Center Update

Celebrating Black History Month with historical tours

The Athens Welcome Center is located at 280 E. Dougherty St. Contact: 706-353-1820 or athenswc@negia.net

During Black History Month, Classic City Tours hosted Rosa Thurmond as tour guide for the African-American History Tour, which took place Feb. 22. At past years’ tours, audiences have been known to laugh, sing, and cry as she covers poignant moments in the transition of schools during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. This year’s tour was no different, as Thurmond shared beautiful stories about community spirit and the teachers and leaders who anchored neighborhoods and shaped the Athens we know today. This year’s bus tour stepped off at important sites including the ACHF award-winning H.T. Edwards School Complex and Morton Theatre. Other highights included First A.M.E. Church, New Town, and artist, Harold Rittenberry’s Sculpture Yard.

Special tour unearths past holidays

In December, the Athens Historic House Museum Association (AHHMA) hosted its award-winning Holiday Spirits Museum Theatre Tour. Tour-goers were transported to Christmases past with each house museum adorned in period-specific holiday décor, as unearthed by volunteer archivist, Jan Ballard. New tour commentary was researched, crafted, and delivered by tour-guide, Janet Parker, who covered the evolution of Athens’ holiday traditions over the course of four distinct epochs of the 19th century. We learned that during Athens’ earliest days, there were NO Christmas trees, only gifts of food, and the primary celebration was a weekH ERI T A GE

long fox hunt (complete with drunken revelry!). During the Antebellum Period, small table-top Christmas trees appeared and the Godey’s Ladies Book (a precurser to Good Housekeeping) set the style along with local newspaper ads, which motivated Athenians to purchase masses of red tulip bulbs, to be bloomed by the warmth of the mantelpiece and later planted in the spring. We learned that after the Civil War, Southerners “enjoyed” starvation parties, where they danced for hours with no refreshments served! Amidst the tour, a “surprise” visitor, renowned musician, Edward Hunter, appeared at the Church-Waddel-Brumby House as a delightful fiddler from the 1820s who evoked the sounds of fox hunts past. Rose of Athens Theatre amused attendees at the Cobb House with “’Tis a Gift to be Simple,” a riveting comedic exchange between T.R.R. Cobb and his extravagant sister-in-law, Maryann Cobb, about seasonal frivolity and (yes) religion. Lastly, the group enjoyed a remarkable performance by Dickens Carolers amidst the splendor of the Lyndon House, as decorated by America’s first garden club, Ladies’ Garden Club of Athens. |

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2014 Historic Preservation Awards:

CA

Have you noticed an outstanding building makeover in your neighborhood? Are you proud of the blood, sweat and tears you’ve put into your historic home?

Foundation’s 2014 Annual Preservation Awards on June 2

We want to hear about it! photos from 2013 Preservation Award Winners

Annually, the Heritage Foundation recognizes outstanding projects in our community in the categories of: Rehabilitation, Restoration, New Construction, Stewardship, Publications, and more. The winners will be showcased at the ACHF Preservation Awards ceremony on Monday, June 2. To see past award winners, visit our awards website: http://achfonline.org/awards/. To nominate a project, e-mail us at achf@bellsouth.net. PA G E

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Spring Fun-N-Friends

SPRING FUN-N-FRIENDS SAVE THE DATE This spring’s Fun ‘n’ Friends event will be held at the new Creature Comforts Brewery on Saturday, April 19, at 3 p.m.

The former Snow Tire Recap Plant is being thoughtfully reworked into a new brewery,

acknowledging the building’s original details and reusing materials whenever possible. On the tour we will be given an overview of the beer making process and the craftsmanship that went into this successful (and very cool) adaptive reuse project. Come thirsty and plan to bring a friend!

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Beech Haven

A jewel nestled off the Oconee River By Kristen Morales

Tucked into the hilly woodland off Atlanta Highway sits a jewel from the Arts & Crafts era. Set on a bluff, surrounded by native forests and running down to the Middle Oconee River is Beech Haven, the former summer retreat for the Rowland family. A-CC owns 82 acres of the original 250-acre tract, bounded by the river and neighborhoods such as Brooklyn and Forest Heights. 14 acres acquired by the county in 2013 include a historic home and extensive, hand-built stone features that are directly influenced by Asian styles. And it’s these house and garden features that not only make this property so special, but also mark it as a potentially nationally recognized site for its contributions to Arts & Crafts architecture and design. At least, that was the message shared by author and Arts & Crafts expert Paul Duchscherer at two events last month that focused on the property. And while he noted the beauty of the landscape, it’s the house — made of wood felled from the surrounding forest and incorporating spring-fed water features and PA G E

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stone fireplaces — and the garden’s Asian influences that make it so remarkable. And because it was all created in a small timeframe, by Charles and Effie Rowland around 1910, the property is even more unique as a specific snapshot in time. Charles spent time in Asia as a missionary for the Presbyterian church, and that influenced his creations in the garden. It’s filled with stone lamps and chairs, plus a network of small ponds. But the most noteworthy piece is a “camelback” bridge, which is directly influenced by Asian architecture, and curves over a babbling brook to create a perfect circle with the reflection in the water. Originally some 250 acres, the Rowland property was recognized in “Garden History of Georgia, 17331933.” In describing the grounds, the book notes the extensive plants and structures that existed at the time — and many still can be seen today. “Between the formal garden and the barn a long scuppernong arbor stretches across one side of a walkway, and at one corner of the barn a narrow path drops off through the woods and down a steep hillside to a spring. At the foot of the hill this woodland path crosses a tiny branch on a camelback bridge built of stone in imitation of the steep arched bridges of Japan. The grassy space around the spring is walled in, with comfortable armed benches built into the rock. From this point, rustic signs on the trees point the visitor over the hills by stepping stones to the ‘Silver Shoals’ of the river.” While those rustic signs and the scuppernong arbor no longer exist, many local officials and organizations are starting to lay the groundwork so that one day, they will return. Could Beech Haven be brought back to shine once again? And could it reach recognition on a national level? Time, and the work of a dedicated community, will tell. (What’s next for Beech Haven? See Page 19) H E RI T A GE

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Name: Amburn Power Member since: Probably the 1970s, says Amburn. I moved here in 1963 and after urban renewal, a lot of stuff had been destroyed. I saw the pictures of the houses destroyed on Prince; I just valued that so much.

What sparks your passion for historic preservation? Just Athens. Downtown has survived, and, somehow, there were enough people who were knowledgable and saved the historic neighborhoods and downtown. It’s the spirit of Athens.

Why do you feel strongly about historic preservation? Now people go downtown and see charm. It’s the thing that has made our downtown so unique. Obviously, the university has had a hand in that, but now we have a very charming city. It draws an interesting group of people. I’m grateful for those who fought the big battles, and today we fight the small ones.

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Be a part of

Athens by being a part of ACHF. Since 1967, the Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation has been the leading advocate for not only preserving the history in Athens, but also looking towards its future. There is value in keeping historic structures — not only as a historical resource, but also as a living, breathing landmark that gives back to the community with everyone who walks, bikes or drives by.

What does my membership do?

It works on many levels. It provides funding for educational and community programs that happen throughout the year all around Athens, including programs in schools, classes for scout badges and the ever-popular series of Heritage Walks, which showcase different historic neighborhoods around town. Your membership dollars also support ongoing programs that are a part of the fabric of Athens, such as the Athens Welcome Center, Classic City Tours and Hands On Athens — all programs that also support the local economy while fostering neighborhood spirit.

How can I join?

Turn to Page 23 (the inside back page) for a membership form, or visit ACHF online at www.achfonline.org. H E RI T A GE

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The Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation cordially invites you to a Holiday on The Hill, Sunday, December 8, 2013.

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The Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation cordially invites you to a Holiday on The Hill, Sunday, December 8, 2013.

2013 HERITAGE HOLIDAY GALA Holiday on the Hill

Hill,

A special thank you to our hosts, sponsors, donors and committee! Our winter 2013 event was the most successful yet. Thanks so much to our hosts at The Hill, along with everyone who sponsored or donated food and drinks and auction items. We had a record number of people attend our annual holiday event, despite the drizzle, and everyone who came agreed the misty weather added to the allure and atmosphere of the neighborhood. We look forward to seeing you this winter for another festive gala. PA G E

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Winter gala recap

Holiday on The Hill Home Hosts Lee Epting c. 1800 Donnald-Epting House saved and moved from Donalds, South Carolina Kimberly and Jim Fiscus c. 1830 Booth-Causey House saved and moved from downtown Watkinsville, Georgia John Knowlton c. 1820 Thurmond-Barks-Knowlton House saved and moved from Barrow County, Georgia

Holiday on The Hill Event Sponsors Barron’s Rental Center Bulldawg Illustrated Burman Printing

Epting Events guide2athens Marti’s at Midday

Holiday on The Hill Food & Beverage Donors Big City Bread Café Cecilia Villaveces Cakes Cheesecakes by Tammy Epting Events George’s Low Country Grill GiGi’s Cupcakes Golden Chick Half Baked Cookie Company Heirloom Café home.made Catering Independent Baking Company Jittery Joe’s J’s Bottle Shop La Dolce Vita

Lumpkin Café Mama’s Boy Marti’s at Midday Phickles Pulaski Heights Barbeque Shiraz Fine Wine and Gourmet The Branded Butcher The Grit The Last Resort The National Trader Joe’s Trumps Catering Waterman

Holiday on The Hill Auction Donors Agora Vintage Alex Sams Appointments at Five Ashford Manor Athens Downtown Dev. Authority Athens Food Tours Athens Welcome Center Avid Bookshop Bertis and Katherine Downs BMA Designs, Interior Design Britt Bass Turner Brynn Weiermiller Bulldawg Illustrated CAP MAN Caty Rushing Chops and Hops Cullen & Co. Ella Sams Five and Ten Gena Knox guide2athens Half Moon Outfitters Heery’s Clothes Closet Heery’s Too Janet and Alex Patterson

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Jittery Joe’s Katie Steffes Kristen and Ed Morales Lee Epting Margie Spalding Marker 7 Seafood Grill Marquin Campbell Jewelry Michael Lachowski Model Citizen Salon Plain Jane Rebecca Lang REM Rinne Allen R Wood Stan Mullins’ Studio Steve Penley Studio in Athens Tall Boy Beverage Tami Ramsay The Hub Bicycles Treehouse Kid & Craft Two Story Coffee Widespread Panic Zack Brendel, Oneta Woodworks

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Winter gala recap

Holiday on The Hill Host Committee Alison and David Abernathy Diane and Buck Adams Lucy and Buddy Allen Jen Cole & Allan Aycock Jonathan Bennett Joan and Gary Bertsch Carol and Jeff Bishop Brenda Blanton Susie and Travis Burch Betsey and Ricky Chastain Greta and Stephen Covington Susie Cross Ann and Jack Crowley Lindsey and Mac Daniel Linda Davis Rabun and Drew Dekle Elizabeth and Anthony DeMarco

Sarah and Jud Doherty Katherine and Bertis Downs Bobbie Epting Melanie Graham & Daniel Epting Lee Epting Kim Klonowski & Dean Firschein Kimberly and Jim Fiscus Peggy and Denny Galis Kevin Garrison Rosemarie and John Goodrum Jan Levinson & Adam Hebbard Diane and Bill Hopper Lori Lucas & Mark Jordan Carrie and Tim Kelly

Stuart Brown & Asen Kirin Charlotte and John Knight John Knowlton Erika and Ricky Lane Cheri and Vance Leavy Beverly Logan Becky and David Matheny Julie and John McLeod Kristen and Ed Morales Libby and Van Morris Pam NeSmith, Historic Smithonia Farm Kim and Tee Noland Lane and Jim Norton Kjirsten and Charles Ogburn Cullen and Patrick O’Steen Richard Owens Barb and Carl Parks

Janet and Alex Patterson Sarah and Chris Peterson Kim and Michael Ripps Eleanor and Alex Sams Lori and Tom Scott Carrie and Eric Sewell Lacy and Frank Sinkwich Margie Spalding Merry and Allen Stovall Scott Simpson & Eric Vaughn Charlotte and John Waters Gene and Dev Weeks Tom Wilfong Carol Williams Frances Williams Kitty Wilson Dianne Penny & Smith Wilson

Holiday on The Hill Event Committee Event co-chairs: Alison Abernathy, Cheri Leavy and Cullen O’Steen. Special Events Committee Chair: Alex Sams. Auction Chair: Breckyn Alexander. Food Chair: Marti Schimmel. Event Committee members: Ashley Berry, Mercer Brockenbrough, Daniel Epting, Erika Lane, David Matheny, Eleanor Sams, Lori Scott and Eric Vaughn

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Winter gala recap

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Winter gala recap

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Beech Haven

W h a t ’s n e x t f o r B e e c h H ave n ? By Amy C. Kissane ACHF is working with county officials to establish guidelines for the foundation to play a role in preserving the Beech Haven property, specifically the 1910 historic house and the camelback bridge. The house—two stories with wood siding, multiple screened and un-screened porches, two stone fireplaces, and distinctive windows— is in immediate need of repairs, a new roof, and mothballing to prevent it from deteriorating. The camelback bridge also needs to be stabilized in order to prevent further erosion and collapse. The county does not have resources to spend and has not, at this time, determined a use for the property, but without immediate intervention the house and bridge could be lost for good. If an agreement is reached,

ACHF will oversee stabilization of the house and bridge with financial support coming from Rowland family members and other individuals. In the meantime, a number of other groups are busy learning about this unique property and planning for its future including several A-CC commissions (Greenway Commission, Historic Preservation Commission and Cultural Affairs Commission); UGA College of Environment and Design; and the T.R.R. Cobb House. The property is in A-CC Commissioner Jerry NeSmith’s district, and Commissioner NeSmith along with family member Lucy Rowland have been working tirelessly to bring attention to the property to be sure it is preserved for the future.

IN MEMORIAM Jane White Tyson Cassady

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IN MEMORIAM

Preservationist Jane Cassady of Athens passed away Feb. 8, 2014. Jane worked and volunteered tirelessly and her influence was felt nationally. She worked with the GA Trust for Historic Preservation, GA Historic Preservation Division, Kentucky Heritage Council, Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana, and the NE Georgia Regional Development Center. She authored “Preserving Cultural and Historic Landscapes: A Study of Preservation Policies and Techniques” in 1997 and co-authored “The New Georgia Guide” in 1996. She served as secretary of the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions, as a board member of Preservation Action in Washington, DC, and was a founding member of Preservation Kentucky. Locally, Jane served on the A-CC Historic Preservation Commission from 1989-1994/2003, chairing the commission from 1991-1994. She also served on ACHF’s Board of Trustees as Secretary from 1981-1985 and was ACHF’s project manager for the T.R. R. Cobb House project. Jane’s smiling face, positive demeanor, and passion for preservation will be greatly missed. Our thoughts and prayers are with Jane’s family who have kindly designated ACHF as the recipient of memorial donations.


HANDS on ATHENS

Spring work Weekend marks a milestone by John Kissane, HOA Administrator This April 11-13 will mark a milestone for ACHF’s Hands On Athens program. It will be the 15th annual Spring Work Weekend, as about 200 volunteers are expected to come out and complete much-needed repairs for a dozen low-income homeowners in the Hancock Corridor, East Athens and Newtown neighborhoods. The program began with a neighborhood clean-up along West Hancock Avenue in the fall of 1999, and then three houses were worked on the following spring. Since then, more than 100 homeowners have benefited from Hands On Athens and its tremendous volunteers.

Skilled as well as unskilled volunteers are needed this April! So please consider lending a hand during one or more shifts that weekend. Looking ahead, changes are coming for Hands On Athens after this spring. The program will shift from focusing on one large annual effort to planning and carrying out work projects throughout the year. We will develop a database of eligible applicants to be matched up with volunteer groups, so that the program will be more responsive to community needs and offer volunteer opportunities on a regular basis. Fortunately, HOA was selected to participate this semester in a volunteer management class within UGA’s School of Social Work, taught by Kristina Jaskyte Bahr. Two graduate students in the class are now working with HOA to create a volunteer development plan by the end of April. This is perfect timing, as we will use the plan going forward into the new fiscal year that begins July 1. PA G E

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Epting Events unveils newly renovated Georgian ballroom

Renovations Help to Revitalize Historic Downtown Athens Venue Epting Events and the owners of the historic Georgia Hotel in downtown Athens recently wrapped up renovations of the ballroom, bringing an updated “blank slate” aesthetic to the space. The last few months has been market by renovating the ballrooms, including new paint, carpets, and window treatments. All of these renovations merge the building’s historical details with the needs of the 21st century. Epting Events has already begun accepting rentals for the ballroom space and they look forward to the creative opportunities that this new space offers. The Georgian Hotel is one of downtown Athens’ finest event venues, and Epting Events has been selected as the venue manager and preferred caterer for the Georgian’s event space. A. Ten Eyck Brown, an architect from Atlanta, built the Georgian in 1909 in the Georgian Revival style. At the time, it was the finest hotel in the Southeast. In recent years, the Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation has financed preservation and renovation efforts. Today, the building is part of the Downtown Athens Historic District, which means it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. “Historic preservation is one of my personal passions and I am glad that we’ve had the opportunity to reopen the Georgian ballroom and help restore this historic space to its former glory,” said Lee Epting, founder of Epting Events. “We have a great relationship with the people and businessowners of Athens and look forward to hosting many wonderful events in our newest space.” H E RI T A GE

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SPRING 2014 *Time tentative

DAY DATE NAME PLACE Fri-Sun April 11-13 Hands On Athens Spring Work Weekend Registration at ACHF headquarters in Old Fire Hall No. 2, 489 Prince Avenue. Saturday April 19 @ 3:30 pm ACHF Spring Fun-n-Friends Creature Comforts Brewery, 297 W. Hancock Ave. Saturday May 24 Preservation Matters Bus Trip to Greenville, S.C. Monday June 2 @ 6:30 pm* 45th Annual Preservation Awards The Morton Theatre 195 W. Washington Street Monday June 23 ACHF Annual Meeting Time and place TBD Athenaeum Club Events – Join the A-Club Facebook page to find out about upcoming events!

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Message from the President spring. Our education committee is in the midst of planning a bus tour of nearby Greenville, S.C., and is working on a long-term project, as a followup to last year’s Jeff Speck lecture, to undertake a study of transportation alternatives for historic intown neighborhoods. An ongoing project to conduct a windshield survey of historic properties in the county is nearly finished and our board members will be briefed on the results and begin discussion on what next steps might be taken in looking to secure the future of those historic resourced identified thus far. And, of course, our membership committee is busy planning a series of fantastic events for the spring, including a Fun ’n Friends event at the new Creature Comforts brewery (inside the former Snow Tire building) in April. Thanks to all members of the board and its committees for your great work. I know already that 2014 will be a great year for ACHF due to your efforts. As always, I encourage all of our members to keep up to date with what is happening at ACHF by checking in with the website, our updates on Facebook, and of course by reading this newsletter (put together by our tireless editor Kristen Morales). We appreciate your continued support and hope to see you at many of the great events in the coming months. continued from page 4

From the Fire Hall only benefit is financial. Yes, property owners in local historic districts can potentially qualify for a one-time, eight-year property tax assessment freeze, but they also sacrifice a certain amount of control over what they can do with the exterior of their homes and that sacrifice is for the betterment of the community as a whole. Why do we have local historic districts – is it simply to give property owners a break on their taxes? No. The historic preservation ordinance was adopted “in support and furtherance of Athens-Clarke County’s findings and determination that the historical, cultural and aesthetic heritage of A-CC is among its most valued and important assets,” and goes on to say that preserving these assets is essential to the general welfare, neighborhood revitalization, tourism, and economic prosperity. PA G E

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Membership Rates

All members receive the Basic Membership Package including: free admission to Athenaeum Club and other membership events; discounts on tours, events, and rentals of Fire Hall No. 2; the Heritage newsletter; and much more.

I would like to become a member at the following level: $30 Student $50 Individual $75 Family $100 Sustainer I would like to increase my support by by joining at a Heritage Holiday Gala Host Committee Level:

$250 Donor [2 tickets to Gala] [Basic package plus a 10% discount at the Athens Welcome Center Gift Shop] $500 Supporter [4 tickets to Gala] [Above plus two Classic City Tours tickets; four tickets to Heritage Holiday Gala] $1,000 Patron [6 tickets to Gala] [Above plus six tickets to Heritage Holiday Gala]

These programs depend on your support‌ thank you. Community Engagement

Athens High & Industrial School Marker Ben Epps Commemorative Statue Buena Vista Local Historic District Initiative Navy Supply Corps School Transfer

Heritage Education

Athens Area Realtors Workshops Athens Heritage Walks Guided Tours Heritage Newsletter Historic Property Owners Workshops Local Lore Girl Scout Badge

Tour of Homes

Historic Properties and Museums Athens Historic House Museum Association Church-Waddel-Brumby House Museum Historic Fire Hall No. 2 Ware-Lyndon House Museum

Membership Events Athenaeum Club Fun-n-Friends Heritage Holiday Gala Annual Meeting

Ongoing Programs

Athens Welcome Center Classic City Tours Façade Easements Hands On Athens Historic Preservation Revolving Fund Annual Historic Preservation Awards

Looking to volunteer?

Check here if you would like to talk to someone at ACHF about volunteer opportunities such as membership, special events, education, tours, Hands On Athens, preservation awards, PR/ marketing, fundraising, newsletter, mailings, etc.

To join, complete the following information and return with payment to:

ACHF, 489 Prince Avenue, Athens, Georgia 30601 Name Address E-mail Phone

Payment Type:

Enclosed Check

Credit Card

Card number

Expiration Date

Name on Card Contact us at 706-353-1801 or achf@bellsouth.net

Thank you for Protecting the Past for the Future.


THANK YOU

on making a donation, contact us at 706.353.1801 or achf@bellsouth.net. ACHF is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization and donations are tax-deductible.

FOR INFORMATION

making an additional donation to support the Foundation’s positive contributions to the Athens community.

PLEASE CONSIDER

for being a member of the AthensClarke Heritage Foundation! Your membership dues support our many ongoing programs such as Preservation Matters, Hands On Athens, Athens Heritage Walks, Annual Preservation Awards, and the Athens Historic House Museum Association.

Fire Hall No. 2 489 Prince Ave. Athens, Georgia 30601 706-353-1801 www.achfonline.org

Athens, GA

Permit #403

PAID

U.S. Postage

Non-Profit Org.

RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED

INTERESTED IN BECOMING AN ACHF MEMBER? PLEASE CONTACT US AT ACHF@BELLSOUTH.NET


Spring Heritage 2014