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SUMMER 2013

Annual awards Meet the winners of ACHF’s yearly prizes PAGE 6

Telling their stories Hands on Athens branches into oral history project PAGE 14

Historic Southern Manufacturing complex saved! Look for full details in Fall Heritage.

achfonline.org


ATHENS-CLARKE HERITAGE FOUNDATION Fire Hall No. 2 489 Prince Avenue Athens, Georgia 30601 706-353-1801 e-mail: achf@bellsouth.net www.achfonline.org Executive Director: Amy C. Kissane Welcome Center Director: Evelyn Reece Hands On Athens Administrator: John A. Kissane MISSION To be a proactive force in developing community-wide understanding of the value of historic buildings, neighborhoods, and heritage. VISION To become the leading advocate for the importance of historic preservation to the future of the Athens community. ACHF 2013-2014 BOARD OF TRUSTEES Jan Levinson, President David Bryant, President-elect/Education Chair Erika Lane, Treasurer-elect/Finance Chair Bill Kraeling, Treasurer-elect Kit Candler, Recording Secretary Marvin Nunnally, Parliamentarian Linda Davis, Revolving Fund Liaison/Preservation Issues Chair Daniel Epting Adam Hebbard, Development Chair Tim Kelly Cheri Leavy Kristen Morales, Communications Chair Kim Noland Kjirsten Ogburn Cullen O’Steen, Special Events Co-chair

Keith Plummer Victoria Prevatt Lori Scott Paul Trudeau Eric Vaughn Tom Wilfong Carol Williams Hollis Yates, Membership Chair

HERITAGE CREDITS Editor: Kristen Morales Design: Eleonora Machado Heritage Newsletter Logo: Chris Bilheimer Cover photo Award-winning First A.M.E. Church on Hull Street in downtown Athens.

THANK YOU TO OUR ANNUAL HERITAGE SPONSORS

Ionic Level ($2,500) Barber Creek Design ETL Construction Services Georgia Power Todd Emily Doric Level ($1,500) Aurum Studios, Ltd. Carson Advisory, Inc. Dalton Carpet One E+E Architecture, Inc. Lindsay Transfer & Storage


Message from the President By Jan Levinson, ACHF

I’m sitting down to write this having just returned from my first official ACHF meeting of the 2013-2014 year – a get-together with this year’s committee chairs to think through plans for programs and events. I can say that I left the meeting energized and feeling truly great about the year ahead for the Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation.

growing posse of dedicated volunteers – those who serve on the board, chair committees, set up and clean up events, and recruit new members, sponsors, and donors for the organization. These are the people who have turned ACHF into a successful and forward-thinking non-profit that will continue to help all residents in Athens see the value in historic preservation efforts in our town and beyond.

This year marks the start of my second term on the board. When first approached about taking on the role of President, I hesitated. I had grown comfortable chairing the membership committee over the past three years and felt good about returning to that role again, continuing with the same schedule of events and tasks I had tackled in years past, the familiar faces of my committee members, and the established routine for getting things done. But you know what they say about complacency? It breeds mediocrity.

If you’re reading this then there is a good chance you’re already a member of ACHF. Let me take this moment to thank you existing members for all that you’re already doing to help the Heritage Foundation stay active and involved in the Athens community; without your continued support, none of this would be possible.

But, let me also ask you to consider challenging yourself this year. Have you ever wanted to volunteer but weren’t sure how to get started?

To accomplish great things you have to challenge yourself.

Do you have a great idea for a new event or fundraising opportunity that would benefit ACHF? Or, maybe you just have some constructive feedback on what you’ve seen ACHF doing already, and what you’d like to see more of? I challenge you to get more involved with your favorite preservation non-profit this year, and help us

And so this year I’m challenging myself with this step up in the ranks of our board of trustees, taking on a new role and new duties as assigned. Over the last three years I have seen ACHF grow and change in amazing ways. Maybe some of these changes aren’t all that obvious from the outside, but from an inside perspective I’ve seen us make great strides in fundraising, in branding, in creating great new educational offerings for our members, and in planning ahead — thinking not just in terms of weeks or months, but about the long-term stability and success of the organization. I credit these changes to our amazing Director, Amy Kissane, and a steadily H ERI T A GE

keep the forward motion going. It can start with a simple email and we’ll go from there, just don’t be afraid to take that first step toward increased participation. I’m looking forward to another great year for ACHF and hope to see each of you at an upcoming program, event, or just in passing. I’m always open to hearing your ideas and suggestions. |

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Welcome Center Update

Athens Welcome Center update Photo by Creighton Cutts

By Evelyn Reece, Director & Curator

Rosa Thurmond leads volunteers and staff in singing Happy 40th birthday to the Athens Welcome Center.

Happy 40th birthday! Kimberly Isakovich, Cal Seaquist, Paula Williams, and Evelyn Wright. Also acknowledged are Creighton Cutts, Brittany Gunter, Glenn and Greg Reece for their often “invisible” yet unstoppable contributions such as bartending and catering, social media and heavy lifting; their support has no end.

Each year the Athens Welcome Center takes a moment to acknowledge the economic impact our volunteers impart to the Athens community at our Annual Volunteer Reception. This year the gathering evolved as a two-fold celebration coinciding with the 40th anniversary of the Welcome Center’s founding in 1973. The delightful and talented Rosa Thurmond led us in singing “Happy Birthday Welcome Center!”

We ask our extended ACHF family to please support the following local businesses for their donations: Five Points Bottle Shop, Roosters BBQ, and WaterMan Spring Water. Most importantly, please support the following restaurants who donated generous dining certificates to our volunteers: DePalma’s, East-West Bistro, Harry’s Pig Shop, Hilltop Grill, George’s Low Country Table, Last Resort, Marker 7, Melting Point, and Square One.

It was an “energizing” evening in more ways than one – undaunted by an electrical storm or torrential rain, ACHF board members, staff, friends, family, and volunteers gathered for what has been dubbed our “favorite party of the year.” This year we thank each of those who donate their time as Athens’ information specialists: Jessie Cragg, George Granade, PA G E

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Welcome Center Update

Two new pieces of furniture are now part of the Church-Waddel-Brumby House collection: An 1820 Jackson County sugar chest and a Madison County spinning wheel.

Something new at the ChurchWaddel-Brumby House*

which is a remarkable and rare Georgia example, perfect for our museum. We can finally thank Dale Couch and Jeff Finch for their eagle eyes in tracking it down, and also the ACHF Board for unanimously supporting its purchase! The sugar chest tells the story of life and luxury of the early 19th century and its well-proportioned and restrained design provides an excellent example of the plain, yet elegant, federal period furniture of the Piedmont South.

The Church-Waddel-Brumby House Museum celebrates the addition of two relatively new items to the Albert Dobbs Sams Collection: an 1820 Jackson County sugar chest and Madison County spinning wheel. We are pleased to announce that former ACHF Board member Kyle Campbell has loaned a treasured spinning wheel from the Campbell (Long) family estate. The piece brings new focus and life to the museum’s second-floor “Best Bedroom,” where women’s contributions to life ways of the period will be interpreted along with the agricultural impact of cotton and textiles to the region.

As always, we invite ACHF members and friends to visit any time to see the continued progress of the Church-Waddel-Brumby House Museum, take a tour, shop for that “perfect” locally made Athens gift, prepare for your visitors to our fair city, or to let us help you plan your next Georgia trip. REMEMBER: This is where our preservation movement and Athens hospitality began!

Lastly, for several years, the CWB Restoration Committee has been in pursuit of a particular sugar chest,

*The Church-Waddel-Brumby House is located at 280 E. Dougherty St., Athens H ERI T A GE

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Heritage in many forms

2013 ACHF Annual Awards The Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation hosted the 44th annual Historic Preservation Awards in June, recognizing preservation efforts, restorations and new construction in historic areas and all around Athens. This year’s winners also marked a new step in the recognition of social media, as it had a direct hand in two awards: the efforts to save Legion Pool, as well as the Facebook group “Growing Up in Athens, Ga.” Other winners included new construction that brought a modern twist to historic surroundings, an impressive restoration of a dilapidated yet stately Barber Street home, and a new local historic district for Athens. Commissioner Kathy Hoard was honored with the Phinizy Spalding Award for her long-term history as a successful advocate for protecting historic neighborhoods through local district designations and for her never-ending work in preservation education.

The following pages include a round-up of the winners.

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2013 Awards

ACHF’s 2013 Preservation Award Winners: Outstanding Achievement: Kristen Morales and Neighbors for Buena Vista Heights Local Historic District Designation Grassroots Preservation: Friends of Legion Pool/Sarah Baker, Kathy Prescott and Grady Thrasher for Saving Legion Pool Outstanding New Construction: Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority for Thomas-Carithers House, 530 South Milledge Avenue | General Contractor–ETL Construction Services Outstanding New Construction: Donald Scott for 378 Yonah Avenue | Architect–Bork Architectural Design, Inc. Outstanding Publication or Program: Jerry Crawley, Roy Moseman and Johnny Kesler for “Growing up in Athens, GA” Facebook Page Outstanding Rehabilitation: Chris Peterson, Peterson Properties, LLC for 290 Barber Street Outstanding Rehabilitation: UGA Office of University Architects for Memorial Hall Outstanding Rehabilitation: Chris Lloyd and John Barrett for 1195 South Milledge Avenue, Marker 7 Coastal Grill | Architect– Armentrout Matheny Thurmond; Landscape Architect–Josh Koon Outstanding Rehabilitation: Lorinda and Pete Crane for 297 Franklin Street | General Contractor–Nackashi Design + Construction Co. Outstanding Rehabilitation: Richard Hathaway and Michael Daniel for the Cheney House, 490 North Milledge Avenue Outstanding Rehabilitation: UGA College of Environment & Design, Office of Sustainability, and Office of University Architects for the Jackson Street Building | Architect–LP3 Architects; General Contractor–Evergreen Construction Stewardship: UGA Facilities Management Division/ Janine Duncan for North Campus Fence Stewardship: First A.M.E. Church for 521 North Hull Street | Architect– Armentrout, Matheny, Thurmond; General Contractor–Hutton Vandiver Commercial Construction; Subcontractor–Fletcher Roofing President’s Award: Parents, administrators, and stakeholders for Saving Historic Barrow School Phinizy Spalding Award: Kathy Hoard for lifetime achievement in historic preservation H ERI T A GE

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2013 Awards

Outstanding Achievement: Kristen Morales and Neighbors for Buena Vista Heights Local Historic District Designation

Legion Pool, long-time pool-goers Sarah Baker, Kathy Prescott, and Grady Thrasher mounted an aggressive campaign to save the pool from the wrecking ball. Citing its historic significance as a Depression-era WPA project and one of the earliest integrated pools in the South, the Friends of Legion Pool used letters of support, local and social media, and tireless outreach efforts to convince UGA that the pool was a unique and valuable community resource. Thanks to the hard work of the Friends, the university called of its plans to demolish Legion Pool, allowing one of the “happiest places in Athens” to continue to serve the community.

Residents of the Buena Vista Heights neighborhood, concerned about UGA’s expansion of a medical school on the old Navy Supply Corps School on Prince Ave. and subsequent development pressures, revived efforts to designate the area as a local historic district. Despite intense opposition from non-resident property owners and misinformation about what it means to live in an historic district, the resident’s efforts were rewarded. Now, any substantial exterior alteration or demolition permit for buildings within the district boundaries must be reviewed and approved by the city, ensuring that the historic Buena Vista Heights neighborhood will retain its character and integrity.

Outstanding New Construction: Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority for Thomas-Carithers House, 530 South Milledge Avenue | General Contractor–ETL Construction Services (Photo 1)

Grassroots Preservation: Friends of Legion Pool/Sarah Baker, Kathy Prescott and Grady Thrasher for Saving Legion Pool

The Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority at 530 S. Milledge Ave. was struggling with providing the necessary amenities for their growing chapter. A mid-20th century addition to the historic house was outdated

When the University of Georgia announced plans to demolish historic

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time when a local historic district designation process was dividing the neighborhood. Elements borrowed from nearby homes, such as the double gables, the elevated front porch, and central dormer, helped anchor the house to the street. The traditional features, paired with more modern looks, such as the stucco and cedar screen walls, are compatible with surroundings without mimicking them. Scale can sometimes be a more challenging feature to maintain in these cases, but Don and architect Lori Bork were able to design a 2258 square foot home that will accommodate a modern family’s needs.

and a major upgrade was needed. Because of the building’s designation as a local historic landmark, the challenge was to come up with a plan for a compatible addition that could meet the sorority’s needs. Working with ETL construction services and the A-CC Historic Preservation Commission, the sorority went through several rounds of meetings and design review to come up with a plan to demolish the non-original addition and construct a new addition that complimented 1896 house – the addition’s careful use of compatible materials and detailing compliment the main structure, while its overall scale and design suggest a sense of independence. Outstanding New Construction: Donald Scott for 378 Yonah Avenue | Architect–Bork Architectural Design, Inc. (Photo 2)

Outstanding Publication or Program: Jerry Crawley, Roy Moseman and Johnny Kesler for the “Growing up in Athens, GA” Facebook Page

A neighborhood is just as important as the houses that make it, and the house at 378 Yonah Avenue fits the bill. Donald Scott did an excellent job creating his home in a manner that is contemporary and compatible with the Buena Vista Heights area, at a

The Facebook page “Growing up in Athens, GA” was started by two young men in 2010, Matthew Woodruff and Taylor Burgess, who wanted to create a place for Athenians to share their stories and photographs. Within a year, they had 4,000 people following

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2013 Awards

the page and its discussions. In May 2011, Jerry Crawley, who now maintains the site, asked about getting involved. He had amassed a large personal collection of Athens photographs and wanted to contribute to the page. The page has quickly become an excellent community resource and even a valuable research tool, allowing for shared information in a public and free manner. It’s an innovative way to learn about, discuss, and celebrate Athens’ heritage and history. Outstanding Rehabilitation: Chris Peterson, Peterson Properties, LLC for 290 Barber Street (Photo 3) Built between 1910 and 1915 in the Boulevard neighborhood, the house at 290 Barber St. had fallen into disrepair from years spent as a neglected rental property and was structurally unsound. Fixing the issues with the home was a challenge. Chris Peterson took several 60-ton jacks to slowly lift the building up off its foundation to push exterior walls back into place, and then rebraced the entire house. Interior renovations were equally impressive as the exterior work. The time, effort, and resources that went into this project are truly monumental. Once a decaying, neglected rental property, Chris took painstaking effort to ensure that the house will be around for another 100 years.

Constructed in 1913, Memorial Hall is a fixture on the University of Georgia campus, although a large portion of the building went unused for several decades, which led to new plans for the building in 2010. The UGA Office of University Architects worked with Menefee Architecture of Atlanta to establish a program and budget to rehabilitate a large portion of the building to accommodate the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. The plan resulted in a retrofitting of the wings to accommodate new office space, involving new walls and subdivisions, heating and air systems, and associated electrical upgrades. Original floors, windows, trim, and the rotunda and skylight were restored as part of the project. The rehabilitation of Memorial Hall is another example of creative, tasteful design, and the extra effort put forth to work with the strange quirks of older buildings. Outstanding Rehabilitation: Chris Lloyd and John Barrett for 1195 South Milledge Avenue, Marker 7 Coastal Grill | Architect– Armentrout Matheny Thurmond; Landscape Architect–Josh Koon (Photo 5)

Outstanding Rehabilitation: UGA Office of University Architects for Memorial Hall (Photo 4)

What was once a gracious house and even a nursery school for the well-bred children of Athens in the 1930s, the building at 1195 Milledge Ave. began to decline as businesses and rentals encroached into the area by the 1960s. The property occupies one of the most prominent positions at the intersection of Milledge Ave.

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and Lumpkin St. in Five Points. Chris Lloyd, owner of Hilltop Grille, convinced owner John Barrett that it would be a great location for a restaurant and its architectural character could be repaired and preserved in the process. The repurposing of this house has brought new life to a once declining structure and has reinvigorated the corner of Lumpkin Street and Milledge Avenue. The resulting popularity of the Marker 7 restaurant speaks to the success of the design. Outstanding Rehabilitation: Lorinda and Pete Crane for 297 Franklin Street | General Contractor–Nackashi Design + Construction Co. (Photo 6) In the fall of 2011 Lorinda and Peter Crane agreed to purchase a dilapidated, 100-year-old house at 297 Franklin St., originally built by a member of the Epps family. To make things even more challenging, a large tree fell right on the roof of the house shortly after the purchase. The Cranes teamed with Jay Nackashi of Nackashi Design + Construction to work with what they had and save the house from what seemed to be a path to destruction. With the exception of a later addition that needed to be removed and rebuilt due to excessive rot, the house today is back to its original state, with all the modern amenities that Lorinda and Pete had envisioned. Outstanding Rehabilitation: Richard Hathaway and Michael Daniel for the Cheney House, 490 North Milledge Avenue (Photo 7) H ER I T A GE

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One of Athens’ finest examples of Victorian architecture, The Cheney House is on the Athens ClarkeHeritage Tour of Homes. After serving as a brokerage house for several years, Richard Hathaway of Hathaway Properties and Michael Daniel of the law firm Prior, Daniel & Wiltshire purchased the building in 2007 to house their offices. Although the house was in fair condition and operable as a commercial space, in 2012 they decided to address some pressing needs, including water damage and rot and a new paint job that would highlight the building’s distinct architectural features. As a result, the house has been given new life and is a much more accurate representation of how it looked when constructed over 100 years ago. Outstanding Rehabilitation: UGA College of Environment & Design, Office of Sustainability, and Office of University Architects for the Jackson Street Building | Architect–LP3 Architects; General Contractor–Evergreen Construction (Photo 8) In need of modern facilities and technology to live up to the standards of their award-winning Landscape Architecture program, the UGA College of Environment & Design took a hard look at moving to the former Lamar Dodd School of Art building on Jackson Street. The challenge was great, as the 49-year-old building was in need of major upgrades and repairs. The driving force behind this renovation was to acknowledge the SUMME R

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architect’s original intent and restore and preserve those elements critical to their vision. The college worked with the UGA Office of Sustainability on the building’s sustainable features, which included the installation of solar panels on its roof. Thanks to the strong partnerships of everyone involved, the College offers a stateof-the-art facility for students, faculty, and staff while preserving an excellent example of mid-century architecture.

black granite, were installed along with new mid-supports. Thanks to the stewardship of the Facility Maintenance Division, the fence will surely be standing proud for decades to come.

Stewardship: UGA Facilities Management Division/Janine Duncan for North Campus Fence (Photo 9)

The First AME Church is home to the oldest African American congregation in Athens, beginning worship services as early as 1845. In 2010 First AME launched a major capital campaign to provide for renovations to the sanctuary building. The scope of worked included restoring the stained glass windows, exterior wood doors, and new roof for the bell tower. All the work that went into this project was part of good stewardship — a congregation that truly loves their building and wants to take care of it, and was willing to work hard to pull together funding to make sure the work was done right.

Originally built over 150 years ago to keep livestock off of campus, the UGA North Campus fence is no longer needed for its former use. However, the fence is just as important today as an iconic image of Athens. The repairs proved to be somewhat of a puzzle, especially since there were no footsteps to follow. Every single piece was taken apart by hand and numbered to ensure they made it back to the correct spot. For the installation, new footers, made from American

Stewardship: First A.M.E. Church for 521 North Hull Street | Architect–Armentrout, Matheny, Thurmond; General Contractor– Hutton Vandiver Commercial Construction; Subcontractor– Fletcher Roofing (Photo 10)

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President’s Award: Parents, administrators, and stakeholders for Saving Historic Barrow School This year’s President’s Award honors a collaboration among committed individuals within the community and dedicated employees within local government that insured the protection of a historic building that means so much to so many. Now in its 90th year, the Barrow School has seen some of Athens best and brightest walk its halls. The original building began to stretch the limits of its functionality and when the funds arrived the Clarke County School District began exploring the options for bringing Barrow into the 21st century. A group of Barrow parents quickly assembled to make sure the School District understood the value of preserving the original building. This collaboration was a shining example of a successful community/government partnership that avoided any public fight or bitterness. Phinizy Spalding Award: Kathy Hoard for lifetime achievement in historic preservation

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Kathy was a unanimous selection of ACHF’s Board for the Phinizy Spalding Award. In putting together the presentation, we reached out to two long-time friends and fellow advocates, John Waters and Heidi Davison. These are excerpts from their tributes: From John, “Kathy is and has been an inspiration to all those interested in preservation and the enhancement of Athens’ cultural resources. The significance of her efforts is much greater than most people realize. She is a role model for her fellow elected officials and that is just one aspect of why her support has been, and is, so vital to preservation.” From Heidi, “Passion; tenacity; knowledge; a willingness to listen and consider all opinions; honesty matched with straight-forwardness; wit and sense of humor…are the magic weapons she wields in the heat of the battle! Kathy will wear out her shoe leather but never wear out her welcome.”

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Although senior citizen status is not a qualifying requirement for participation in the Hands On Athens program, it has always been the case that most HOA homeowners are elderly. In addition, the program’s clients are often long-term Athenians who have resided in their neighborhoods for several decades, if not longer.

Telling their Stories

With this in mind, it seemed obvious that here was some very important and interesting history, much of it in danger of being lost if not documented relatively soon. Oral history interviews sounded like an approach some of the older HOA homeowners might agree to, but accomplishing this was easier said than done. That is, until we learned of the First Person program newly initiated through UGA’s Richard B. Russell Library.

Hands On Athens embarks on oral history project

By John Kissane, HOA Administrator

Modeled somewhat after StoryCorps, a national initiative undertaken by National Public Radio and the Library of Congress, the First Person Project provides tools to would-be oral history interviewers and interviewees. The program got off the ground in the fall of 2012 and was inspired by the belief that everyone is an eyewitness to history and has a story to tell. This summer HOA approached three recent clients about being interviewed, and we were thrilled that they agreed. We also involved ACHF’s two summer interns, Laura Duvekot and Renee Donnell, who took great interest in their roles as interviewers. It was a big success!

The HOA clients interviewed were:

Geneva Blasingame, now in her early 60s, who grew up just south of Baxter Street near Legion Pool in a former African-American neighborhood known as “Lyndon Town.” Her parents were relocated to East Athens in 1964 when UGA acquired the property for dormitory construction, and Geneva has lived in her parents’ former house on East Broad Street for nearly two decades... Bennie Tillman, born in 1915, grew up in the Rocksprings/Waddell neighborhood and worked as a laborer and cook for UGA for several years before moving on to a position as a cook at St. Mary’s Hospital. In the early 1940s, Bennie and his brother built a unique rock house on Paris Street between West Broad and Waddell, where Bennie still lives today. Fannie Thornton, now in her mid-90s, grew up in the Reese Street neighborhood, attended Reese Street School and Athens High and Industrial School, and still lives in her own home on West Hancock Avenue. PA G E

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In their own words...

An easy way of understanding this project’s importance is to hear it from our two UGA Master of Historic Preservation interns, who both did an excellent job with the interviews. We look forward to working with Laura and Renee during the coming year on another round of Hands On Athens oral history interviews.

Laura

“Particularly moving to me was hearing the experience Ms. Blasingame, whose Geneva Blasingame looks at a 1950 family had been relocated as the University Sanborn Fire Insurance map of the “Lyndon expanded its campus in the 1960s. Town” neighborhood where she grew up, Looking at a Sanborn Fire Insurance Map in the vicinity of Baxter and Pope streets. from 1950, she was able to point to each house and share a memory about it: how many children the family that lived there had, how they kept their yard, or what the house itself looked like.  I pass that area of campus almost daily, and now see it in an entirely new light.  Even though there are no physical traces of the community that was once there, I’m glad that its stories are being shared and preserved by the Richard B. Russell Library. And hearing Mr. Tillman refer to the Rocksprings neighborhood as ‘the edge of town’ really put into perspective the amount of growth Athens has seen in the past half-century.” Bennie Tillman worked for UGA and

Renee

“The oral history project was amazing. Not only did I learn about past racial tensions in Athens, and how much the city has changed due to development, I also learned about the daily activities of individuals. Through these oral histories I learned how rural the city was about 50 years ago around the Alps Bridge area out to the new Walmart. I also learned how the UGA’s expansion displaced an entire neighborhood, and how much [that] affected the individuals that lived there.”

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St. Mary’s Hospital when he was younger. In the 1940s, he and his brother built a unique rock house on Paris Street, where he lives today.

Hands on Athens interns Laura Duvekot, left, and Renee Donnell talk with interview participant Ms. Jordan. SUMME R

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Name: Cullen O’Steen Profession: Interior designer and owner, Cullen & Co. Years in Athens: Born in Athens and attended UGA; left for work in Atlanta and Savannah before coming back six years ago to open her own interior design company. Member of ACHF for: Three years

What sparks your passion for historic preservation? A lot of it comes from my grandmother and greatgrandmother. My grandmother went to the Lucy Cobb Institute, and they both grew up here. Just hearing my whole life, “Oh, there was a house there where so-and-so grew up.” Their stories make the homes so much more real, and that’s why I want to see these older homes preserved. What historic building in Athens inspires you? The Bottleworks, where I now have my studio. When Pam NeSmith and Smith Wilson renovated it I thought, what a cool idea to take this old warehouse and turn it into something new. And when you think about the Coca-Cola bottler here, there’s so much Georgia history tied into that. I like helping to keep a building sustainable.

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Be a part of

Athens by being a part of ACHF. Since 1967, the Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation has been the leading advocate for not only preserving the history in Athens, but also looking towards its future. There is value in keeping historic structures — not only as a historical resource, but also as a living, breathing landmark that gives back to the community with everyone who walks, bikes or drives by.

What does my membership do?

It works on many levels. It provides funding for educational and community programs that happen throughout the year all around Athens, including programs in schools, classes for scout badges and the ever-popular series of Heritage Walks, which showcase different historic neighborhoods around town. Your membership dollars also support ongoing programs that are a part of the fabric of Athens, such as the Athens Welcome Center, Classic City Tours and Hands On Athens — all programs that also support the local economy while fostering neighborhood spirit.

How can I join?

Turn to Page 23 (the inside back page) for a membership form, or visit ACHF online at www.achfonline.org. H ER I T A GE

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You’re in good company!

Photo by Jennifer Lewis

ACHF is thankful for its legions of supporters in the Athens community. We thought we would each year print a list of our sponsors and members to share the love. Know someone who should be on the list, but isn’t? Talk to them about joining. See a friend listed below? Thank them for their support.

ACHF Current Membership List

Annual membership renewals mailed September 10th - don’t wait...renew today! Don’t see your name on the list? Call the Fire Hall at 706-3531801, or e-mail achf@bellsouth.net, for an update on your membership status. Annual Corporate Sponsors ($2,500) Barber Creek Design ETL Construction Services Georgia Power Company Todd Emily Annual Corporate Sponsors ($1,500) Aurum Studios, Ltd. E+E Architecture, Inc. Lindsay Transfer & Storage Raymond James/Carson Advisory

Life Members Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bowden Ethel and Verner Chaffin Kammy and Milton Leathers Mr. C.L. Morehead Susan and Don Myers Ms. Margie Spalding Charlotte and John Waters

Event Sponsors Barron’s Rental Center Burman Printing Cecilia’s Cakes Dondero’s Kitchen Epting Events Heirloom Café home.made catering Jackson Spalding, Inc. Jittery Joe’s Coffee PA G E

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Lumpkin Café Marti’s at Midday Oneta Woodworks Silver Lining Cupcake Co. Northeast Sales Distributing Co. Terrapin Beer Co. The Branded Butcher The National Trumps Catering Village Wine & Spirits

Patrons ($1000) Katherine and Bertis Downs Nancy and Jack Fontaine 2013

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ACHF Membership Supporters ($500) Joan and Gary Bertsch Susie and Travis Burch Sarah and Jud Doherty Mr. John Knowlton Ms. Catherine May Kristen and Ed Morales Libby and Van Morris Lane and Jim Norton Janet and Alex Patterson Mrs. C. Herman Terry

Donors ($250) Alison and David Abernathy Ms. Louise Adams Tanya and Kevin Adams Lucy and Buddy Allen Jane and George Benson Carol and Jeff Bishop Kelley and Mike Blanton Sally and Dan Coenen Greta and Stephen Covington Rabun and Drew Dekle Tonya and Peter Dugas Susan and Dick Ferguson Peggy and Denny Galis Rosemarie and John Goodrum Betsy and Harold Hughes Carrie and Tim Kelly Gena and Davis Knox Carol and Paul Kurtz Erika and Ricky Lane Cheri and Vance Leavy Becky and David Matheny Julie and John McLeod Katherine and Matt Moseley Pam and Dink NeSmith Kim and Tee Noland Cullen and Patrick O’Steen Barbara and Carl Parks Sarah and Chris Peterson Kris and Daniel Pittard Kim and Michael Ripps Eleanor and Alex Sams Lori and Tom Scott Carrie and Eric Sewell Gene and Dev Weeks Mr. Tom Wilfong Ms. Carol Williams Sustainers ($100) Carolyn and Randall Abney Mr. Chuck Jones Ms. Betsy Bean Anita and Barney Brannen Mrs. Emily A. Canine Betty and Hal Coler Ms. Linda Davis Coreen and Dan DeLamater Dr. Willie S. Farmer, Sr. Patrick Mizelle and Edwin Fisher

Ms. Helen Fosgate Mr. William Foster Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Gibson Mr. Charles Gluodenis Jeanne Barsanti and C.E. Greene Mrs. Smitty Griffith Carolyn and David Hally Ms. Nina Hellerstein Theresa Flynn and Doug Hellman Mr. Harvey Humphries Ms. Sylvia McCoy Hutchinson Beverly and Jack King Nancy and James Kissane Ms. Ellie Lanier Lorene and David Lefkowitz Elizabeth and Thomas Leonard Jennifer and Adam Lewis Becky and David Lockman Lori Ringhand and Dan Lorentz Ms. Bobbie McKeller Elaine and Mike Mitchell Mr. Richard Owens Jinx and Gordhan Patel Ms. Amburn Power Dr. Karen Prasse Suzanne and Kurt Reichle Tony Stringer and Alfredo Rodriguez Julie and Ira Roth Cookie and Abram Serotta Ms. Ethelyn Simpson Merry and Allen Stovall Fran and Emory Thomas Kathy Prescott and Grady Thrasher Reggie and Carl Vipperman Cathy and John Wegel Carol and Robert Winthrop Karen and Wray Witten Allison and Gene Wright

Linda and Bill Childers Jennifer McDowell and Brett Clementz Mary Kelly and Mark Cooney Valerie and Mel Cown Ann and Jack Crowley Lindsey and Mac Daniel Margaret and Charles Davis Elizabeth and Tony DeMarco Wayne and Mimi Dill Barbara and Vince Dooley Betsy and Blair Dorminey Lauren and David Dye Elizabeth and Michael Earl Nancy Hunter and Tom Edwards Mr. Ron Evans Ms. Yvina Fernandez Susan and Dick Field Kim Klonowski and Dean Firschein Lisa and Joe Frierson Mr. and Mrs. Leon Galis Jana and Terry Galis Michelle and Ethiel Garlington Mr. Charlie Garrett Carol and Peter Goerig Dr. and Mrs. Theodore M. Goetz Wendy Moore and Eric Griffith Jodie and Bob Guy Mary Stakes and Paul Hardy Nancy and Charlie Hartness Brigid Gerety and Carl Hawkins Jan Levinson and Adam Hebbard Conoly and Al Hester Susan and Peter Hodgson Carole and Robb Holmes Martee and Foy Horne Ms. Sandra Hudson Ms. Cissy Hutchinson Holly and John Ivy Diane and Rick Jerue Family ($75) Jason Jones and Scott Brandis Diane and Buck Adams Pamela Royster and Terry Allen Mrs. Monika Kapousouz Jane and David Kidd Virginia McKenna and Cardee and Jeremy Kilpatrick Art Archibald Stuart Brown and Asen Kirin Jen Cole and Allan Aycock Amy and John Kissane Dr. and Mrs. David Bacastow Charlotte and John Knight Sallyanne and James Barrow Deena and Sidney Kushner Mr. Gregg Bayard Theresa and Bill Lee Nancy and Robert Bostrom Myra Moore and David Lynn Julie and Hugh Bowles Camilla and William Bracewell Salley Davidson and Roger Malfatti Paulette and Chip Brown Kristy and Shannon Mayfield Cassie and David Bryant Pat and Hubert McAlexander Katherine and Robert Byrne Sara and John McArthur Nancy and James Cantrell Sue Custance and Laura and Charles Carter Clint McCrory Mr. and Mrs. J. Robert Penny and Robert McGuinn Chambers, Jr.

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ACHF Membership Sissy and Terry McRae Ms. Karen Middendorf Rebecca Oglesby and Lucky Miller Berkeley and Dan Minor Martie Hutchens and Herschel Mize Ms. Jennifer Moseley Jeanne and Dan Nadenicek Lori Bork Newcomer and Quint Newcomer Dorothy and Jim Newland Elizabeth and Tab Norris Frances Hensley and James Okey Gwen and John O’Looney Dorothy and Walter O’Niell Tonia and Tony Paramore Laura Chase and Silas Read Carol and James Reap Evelyn and Greg Reece Mr. Tom Reichert Rachel Mays and Ben Roberts Ms. Jennifer Rogers Mr. and Mrs. Albert D. Sams, Jr. Laura and Logan Sawyer Sherrie Gibney-Sherman and Ken Sherman Roz and George Simpson Kathy and Mark Slonaker Sandra and Jim Smith Sheila and Patrick Snead Ms. Brooke Stortz Laura and Jimmy Straehla Kay Giese and David Sweat Barbara and John Timmons Beth and Joe Tobin Jane and Bruce Travis Lucy and Lothar Tresp Tobie Bass and Paul Trudeau Ms. Candice Courcy Irene Budoff and Etta Wagner Jane and Joe Walsh Jana and Mike White Patty and John Whitehead Sue and Ed Wilde Joy and Terry Wingfield Maureen O’Brien and George Wright Individual ($50) Ms. Breckyn Alexander Ms. Bernadette Allard Ms. Margaret C. Allen Ms. Amy Andrews Mr. Charles Apostolik Ms. Mary Charles Howard Ms. Maggie Attaberry Ms. June Ball

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Mr. Richard Bennett Ms. Claire Benson Ms. Susan Boatright Ms. Sharon Bradley Ms. Anne Brightwell Ms. Mercer Brockenbrough Mr. Clay Bryant Ms. Lynn Bryant Mr. Kyle Campbell Mr. Paul Cassilly Mr. and Mrs. Harry Catchpole Ms. Shirley Chambliss Ms. Janey Cooley Ms. Patricia Cooper Ms. Frances Covert Ms. Gay Crowe Ms. Theresa Cullen Ms. Martha deBeaugrine Mr. Mike Dekle Mr. Larry Dendy Ms. Nancy Denson Ms. Leslie DeSimone Ms. Deborah Dietzler Mr. Carl Martin Elaine and Ben Dooley Ms. Carol Downs Maxine and Kenneth Easom Dr. Bill Eiland Ms. Sarah Elsbernd Mr. Lee Epting Ms. Georgia Everson Mr. Jeremy Field Ms. Jessica Garris Miller Ms. Melanie Ford Mr. Todd Fowler Mr. Kevin Garrison Ms. Cari Goetcheus Ms. Michele Griffin Mrs. Emily Honigberg Ms. Laura Johnson Ms. Judith Jones Mr. Glen Kaufman Ms. Suzanne King Mr. Will Kiser Ms. Emily Kissane Ms. Barbara Kuhn Mrs. Erika Lewis Ms. Jeanne Lindberg Ms. Chrisula Maragakis Mrs. Charlotte Marshall Ms. Carol Martin Dr. Judy Masters Mr. Les McCrary Cathe and Don McKim Mr. William Megathlin Donna and Tom Murphy Ms. Kathy Nahstoll Ms. Annette Nelson Ms. Kristin Nielsen Ms. Cathy Padgett Mr. Jim Paine

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Ms. Lois Player Dr. Mark Reinberger Ms. Laurie Reitsema Ms. Betty Robertson Ms. Marsha Rosenthal Ms. Lucy Rowland Ms. JoAn Salloum Captain and Mrs. Len Sapera Ms. Helene Schwartz Mr. David Seibert Ms. Emily Shuffstall Ms. Kristen Smith Ms. Dorothy Snyder Ms. Angela Stanley Ms. Angela Steedley Dr. Claire Swann Ms. Amanda Thompson Mr. Frank Thornburg Ms. Michele Turner Mr. Eric Vaughn Ms. Angela Welch Mr. Hubert Whitlow, Jr. Mrs. Kathleen Wilfong Katherine and Grady Wilson Student ($35) Mr. Jason Aldridge Ms. Annie Barnes Mr. Danny Bass Ms. Katherine Candler Mr. Jonathan Cassiday Ms. Alisha Cromwell Mr. Sean Dunlap Ms. Laura Duvekot Ms. Elizabeth Elliott Mr. Matthew R. Epperson Ms. Jamee Fiore Mr. Adam Martin Mr. John McBrayer Ms. Jennifer Morrison Mr. Mark Owens Mr. Milton Perry Ms. Kally Revels Ms. Caty Ann Rushing Ms. Katie Twomey Mr. Daniel Weldon Ms. Hollis Yates One-Year Complimentary Dr. Glenn Alex Ms. Naomi Al-Haroun Lisa and Terry Allen Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority Mr. Gill Autry Ms. Linda Bachman Sara and Todd Baker Ms. Susan Banister Mr. John Barrett Didi Dunphy and Jim Barsness Patrice Poulin and

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ACHF Membership Kevin Bates Amanda and Duane Bernt Cathy and Gene Blusiewicz Ms. Emily Boness Ms. Jennifer Broun Amy and Clark Byrnes Ms. Ashley Callahan Mrs. Kitty Camp Julie Cashin Ms. Elizabeth Chastain Supriya and Steve Chesser Children First, Inc. Lorinda and Pete Crane Bryan Hardman and Adam Crawley Mr. Jerry Crawley Ms. Susan Cross Martha Allen and Garry Dale Leslie and John DeMent Faye and Gary Doster Ms. Emily Doster Sandy and David Dwyer Sarah and Ben Ehlers Ms. Lisa Ellis Mr. T. J. Callaway Amy and Alan Flurry Lucy and Jim Gillis Barbara Ginn Anne and Robert Hardell Ms. Mary Hardman Mr. Richard Hathaway Ms. Ginger Heery Donna and Bill Hopper Margaret and Gene Howard Stacee Farrell and David Hyde Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Jackson Jo Ann and Bill Jahn Patricia and Christian Jaliu Lori Lucus and Mark Jordan

Mr. Jeffrey Jowdy Ms. Stacey Kelly Suzanne and Paul Kilgore Ms. Mary Alston Killen Caroline and Matthew Kinney Ms.Cybele Lange Dr. Phillip Lanoue, Superintendent Sara Ursrey and Forrest Leffer Angelyn and Ken Lewis Ms. Melissa Link Ms. Maria Lopez Ms. Eleonora Machado Amy Gellins and Tad MacMillan Ms. Andrea Malloy Mr. Chris Lloyd Ms. Amanda Martin Kimberly McCleary Teresa McLean Lydia and Ronald Menzies Lauren and Andrea Minter Mr. Roy Moseman Kjirsten and Charles Ogburn Mary Frances and Kevin O’Neil Diane Amann and Peter O’Niell Ms. Lillian Ouzts Mr. Henry Parker Ms. Marianne Parr Mr. Michael Daniel Ashley and Landon Pruitt Tami and Robert Ramsay Ms. Holly Reed Mona and Ed Robinson Mr. Manuel Robledo Mr. Rick Rodrigue Ms. Helen C. Roman

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Mr. Don Scott Mrs. Judy Slade Rachel Watkins and Larry Slutzky Susan Hable and Peter Smith Ms. Deborah Stanley Mr. Gordon Stelter Mr. Wilmot Greene Ms. Barbara Andrews Mr. Chris Holloway Mr. Robert Trudeau Ms. Tracy Vandiver Wanda White Ms. Marie Woods Ms. Jan Young Exchange Members Athens Downtown Development Authority Clarke County School District Friends of Oconee Hill Cemetery Georgia Museum of Art Lyndon House Arts Center Lyndon House Arts Foundation The Classic Center The Georgia Historical Society The Junior League of Athens Thomasville Landmarks, Inc. UGA College of Environment & Design UGA Facilities Management Division UGA Office of Sustainability UGA Office of University Architects UGA Libraries

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2013

Mark your calendar for the FALL FUN ’N’ FRIENDS the structures were torn down. You can see this wood put to new use in several new bars and restaurants around downtown Athens, as bar tops, tables and general decor.

We are excited about our host for the next Fun ‘n’ Friends event, where we will meet at Oneta Woodworks and Piedmont Bureau of Reclamation! These two companies work together to reclaim millwork and repurpose it into furnishings for some of our favorite spaces around town.

The rambling property and sawmill is also home to Piedmont Bureau of Reclamation, which works with local contractors to salvage wood and other materials from old homes and barns before they are torn down and lost.

Located just north of downtown Athens on North Avenue, Oneta Woodworks has an extensive collection of reclaimed wood from barns and homes, rescued before

More details to follow, so please mark your calendars for 5:30-7:30n p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26.

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Photo credits: http://onetawoodworks.com/

Membership renewals to be mailed the first week in September! DAY DATE NAME PLACE Thursday Sept 26 (5:30-7:30pm) Fall Fun-n-Friends Oneta Woodworks and Piedmont Bureau of Reclamation Sunday Sept 29 (2pm) Athens Heritage Walks Boulevard National Register District (Pratt Cassity) Sunday Oct 6 (2pm) Athens Heritage Walks Historic Prince Avenue (Amy Andrews) Saturday Oct 19 (10am) Athens Heritage Walks Historic Pulaski Heights Neighborhood (David Bryant) Friday Oct 25 4th Annual Historic Downtown Pub Crawl Wed+Thurs Oct 30+31 (7:30pm) Haunted History Tours (Michele Griffin) Saturday Nov 2 (10am) Athens Heritage Walks Through the Arch UGA Architectural Tour (Larry Dendy) Sunday Nov 3 (2pm) Athens Heritage Walks Bloomfield National Register District (D. Field and M. Causey) Sunday Nov 17 (2pm) Athens Heritage Walks Oconee Hill Cemetery National Register District (C. Marshall) Sunday Dec 8 Heritage Holiday Gala Holiday on THE HILL


Membership Rates

All members receive the Basic Membership Package including: free admission to Athenaeum Club and other membership events; discounts on tours, events, and rentals of Fire Hall No. 2; the Heritage newsletter; and much more.

I would like to become a member at the following level: $30 Student $50 Individual $75 Family $100 Sustainer I would like to increase my support by by joining at a Heritage Holiday Gala Host Committee Level:

$250 Donor [2 tickets to Gala] [Basic package plus a 10% discount at the Athens Welcome Center Gift Shop] $500 Supporter [4 tickets to Gala] [Above plus two Classic City Tours tickets; four tickets to Heritage Holiday Gala] $1,000 Patron [6 tickets to Gala] [Above plus six tickets to Heritage Holiday Gala]

These programs depend on your support‌ thank you. Community Engagement

Athens High & Industrial School Marker Ben Epps Commemorative Statue Buena Vista Local Historic District Initiative Navy Supply Corps School Transfer

Heritage Education

Athens Area Realtors Workshops Athens Heritage Walks Guided Tours Heritage Newsletter Historic Property Owners Workshops Local Lore Girl Scout Badge

Tour of Homes

Historic Properties and Museums Athens Historic House Museum Association Church-Waddel-Brumby House Museum Historic Fire Hall No. 2 Ware-Lyndon House Museum

Membership Events Athenaeum Club Fun-n-Friends Heritage Holiday Gala Annual Meeting

Ongoing Programs

Athens Welcome Center Classic City Tours Façade Easements Hands On Athens Historic Preservation Revolving Fund Annual Historic Preservation Awards

Looking to volunteer?

Check here if you would like to talk to someone at ACHF about volunteer opportunities such as membership, special events, education, tours, Hands On Athens, preservation awards, PR/ marketing, fundraising, newsletter, mailings, etc.

To join, complete the following information and return with payment to:

ACHF, 489 Prince Avenue, Athens, Georgia 30601 Name Address E-mail Phone

Payment Type:

Enclosed Check

Credit Card

Card number

Expiration Date

Name on Card Contact us at 706-353-1801 or achf@bellsouth.net

Thank you for Protecting the Past for the Future.


THANK YOU

on making a donation, contact us at 706.353.1801 or achf@bellsouth.net. ACHF is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization and donations are tax-deductible.

FOR INFORMATION

making an additional donation to support the Foundation’s positive contributions to the Athens community.

PLEASE CONSIDER

for being a member of the AthensClarke Heritage Foundation! Your membership dues support our many ongoing programs such as Preservation Matters, Hands On Athens, Athens Heritage Walks, Annual Preservation Awards, and the Athens Historic House Museum Association.

Fire Hall No. 2 489 Prince Ave. Athens, Georgia 30601 706-353-1801 www.achfonline.org

Athens, GA

Permit #403

PAID

U.S. Postage

Non-Profit Org.

RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED

INTERESTED IN BECOMING AN ACHF MEMBER? PLEASE CONTACT US AT ACHF@BELLSOUTH.NET


Heritage Summer 2013