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Changing of the Guard

Ware-Lyndon House has a new committee PAGE 10

Spotlight on the Gala achfonline.org

Our annual holiday gala is right around the corner PAGE 12


ATHENS-CLARKE HERITAGE FOUNDATION Fire Hall No. 2 489 Prince Avenue Athens, Georgia 30601 706-353-1801 e-mail: achf@bellsouth.net www.achfonline.org Executive Director: Amy C. Kissane Welcome Center Director: Evelyn Reece Hands On Athens Administrator: John A. Kissane MISSION To be a proactive force in developing community-wide understanding of the value of historic buildings, neighborhoods, and heritage. VISION To become the leading advocate for the importance of historic preservation to the future of the Athens community. ACHF 2015-2016 BOARD OF TRUSTEES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE TRUSTEES Kristen Morales, President Adam Hebbard, President-elect Daniel Epting, Treasurer Victoria Prevatt, Treasurer-elect Mary Fenwick Parrish, Recording Secretary Marvin Nunnally, Parliamentarian Linda Davis, Revolving Fund Liaison David Bryant, Past-president TRUSTEES Kevin Bates Kelsey Cochran Tracy Davenport Elizabeth Elliott Kevin Garrison

Jim Gillis Kim Klonowski Bill Kraeling Bobbie McKeller Kim Noland

Kjirsten Ogburn Paul Trudeau Jim Warnes Carol Williams Hollis Yates

HERITAGE CREDITS Editor: Jim Gillis Design: Eleonora Machado Heritage Newsletter Logo: Chris Bilheimer COVER PHOTO CREDITS: Welcome to West Cloverhurst! Holiday Gala Home Hosts and Gala Kick-off Party Hosts invite YOU to come to the 2015 Heritage Holiday Gala on Sunday, December 6. Pictured from left to right are: Frank and Lacy Sinkwich, Stacy and Clark Brown, Pat and Mike Waldrip, and Carrie and Eric Sewell. Home host Georgia Everson not pictured.

THANK YOU TO OUR ANNUAL HERITAGE SPONSORS Corinthian Level ($5,000) Ionic Level ($2,500) ETL Construction Services Surf Road Media Todd Emily Doric Level ($1,500) Athens Video, Inc. Carson Advisory, Inc. Dalton Carpet One Georgia Power Foundation Lindsay Transfer & Storage Pharma Tech Industries Southern Mutual Insurance Company


President from the

By Kristen Morales

Looking beyond historic districts For a minute, I thought I was dreaming. But there it was, in black and white on the mayor and commission’s agenda: the proposal of a locally designated historic district, brought by a commissioner. It didn’t seem real because so often local historic district proposals come to the mayor and commission already wrapped in layers of drama and rhetoric; this time it was quiet, almost peaceful. Typically, arguments of property rights and government intrusion try to drown out the preservationists working to retain the historic value of the neighborhood in which they chose to live. And usually it’s near the end of the process when the commissioners get caught in the middle, fielding calls from both sides But this time, there was very little drama around proposing a historic district for Rutherford Drive. Neighbors learned that one of their tidy brick 1940s-era homes was proposed to be torn down, and they went straight to commissioner Mike Hamby, who presented the proposal to the mayor and commission. After a quick discussion and vote, the commission approved exploring the historic district, and Hamby expects to see the proposal come to the Historic Preservation Commission for review early next year. This is great news for the Rutherford neighbors, whose homes are cohesive and from a specific era in the history of

Athens development. And we’re lucky to have a process in place that can protect our historic neighborhoods from development that would change their character. But what’s in place to preserve neighborhoods that aren’t as cohesive or have not been designated local historic districts? Well, hopefully we soon will have a new tool: an infill housing ordinance. Because, let’s be honest — if you live in an older neighborhood and you hear of a home nearby that’s being torn down, you feel a pit in your stomach. Too often, that modest-sized historic home is replaced by one more than double its size, and not always in keeping with the scale of the neighboring houses. It’s that fear that prompted neighbors on Rutherford Drive to ask for a local historic designation, but not everyone has that luxury. That’s why an infill housing ordinance is so important. I’m encouraged by Athens-Clarke County’s Planning Department and the recent momentum toward crafting an ordinance that would make new development more in the scale of existing historic homes. We need to encourage and embrace new development that works with our historic homes instead of trying to overshadow them. This is something that benefits all of Athens and gives our historic properties another line of defense.

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fire hall from the

By Amy C. Kissane, Executive Director Does Athens-Clarke County need an infill ordinance, that is, an ordinance that would define limits on new construction in established neighborhoods? The call for such an ordinance is coming from in-town residents witnessing moderate sized homes being demolished and replaced with much larger homes (outof-scale with existing homes in the area), oftentimes encroaching on traditional side yard setbacks or towering over neighbors, invading privacy and literally shading large swaths of residents’ yards. You’re not alone if you are asking why this is happening. Besides the obvious answer of people just wanting bigger homes, the fact is that when the county’s zoning ordinance and regulations were redone in the late 1990s, the new regulations did not take into account what already existed, deferring instead to “modern” standards thus creating a conflict between what is on the ground and what is allowed. An infill ordinance would not prevent demolition but would establish limits— in concert with zoning regulations—that would require new development to “respect” and be more in-keeping with existing development, sometimes referred to as “context sensitive design.” Local historic districts already have such protections in place, as well as guidelines that protect historic buildings themselves from inappropriate changes. Crafting an infill ordinance is not easy. There are a lot of questions to PA G E

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consider, such as, where in A-CC would the ordinance apply and what elements of new construction would be controlled. Fortunately, the A-CC Planning Department has for several years now been studying our infill housing issues, and on October 15 staff members Bruce Lonnee and Melanie Epting presented an overview of issues and potential strategies to the Planning Commission at a Work Session. Here are some excerpts from the A-CC Planning Department presentation: What is “infill”? Broadly, “infill” is development on vacant or underutilized parcels in previously developed areas that have access to community infrastructure and services. What are the advantages of infill housing? • Makes good use of urban land and infrastructure • Creates more “sustainability” within one’s city • Controls urban sprawl and the negative externalities that derive from it What are the challenges of infill housing? • Could place more stress on existing infrastructure • Increased density creates varying degrees of social problems

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• Potential for incompatibility in design with existing urban neighborhoods What are the common compatibility issues with infill development? Scale and massing, height, setbacks and orientation, fenestration, driveways and parking areas, details and materials, grading and stormwater runoff, landscaping, and tree protection. To what geographic area of A-CC should such an ordinance be applied? One preliminary suggestion is to apply the ordinance to an area bounded by the Middle Oconee River to the west/ southwest and the Outer Loop to the north, east and southeast and to focus on single-family neighborhoods only. The overall purpose for establishing an infill ordinance is to prevent wholesale changes in our traditional neighborhoods and to protect, at least to some degree, the character and scale that has predominated for decades. It’s always interesting to me, when we start to have these discussions, that people who are against controls cite the “property rights” of people buying into the neighborhoods but never seem to consider the rights of property owners who have lived and invested in the neighborhood for years, if not decades, and like it the way it is. The fact is there will be tension, differences of opinion, if the county starts to move toward adopting an infill ordinance. I for one would like a thorough public airing of any proposals. I want people to be educated about the issues and understand what the options are. And then I believe we can find commonground in agreeing on standards that protect our traditional neighborhoods and the people who live there but also allow neighborhoods to evolve to meet the needs of future generations.

Be a part of

Athens by being a part of ACHF. Since 1967, the Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation has been the leading advocate for not only preserving the history in Athens, but also looking towards its future. There is value in keeping historic structures — not only as a historical resource, but also as a living, breathing landmark that gives back to the community with everyone who walks, bikes or drives by.

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How can I join?

Turn to Page 23 (the inside back page) for a membership form, or visit ACHF online at www.achfonline.org. |

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UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA HISTORIC PRESERVATION MASTER PLAN UPDATE By Scott Messer, Director of Historic Preservation, UGA Office of University Architects (Photographs for this article provided by Laura Kviklys, FindIt Program Coordinator, UGA Center for Community Design & Preservation.)

August 2015 marked the end of the inventory/survey phase of the University of Georgia’s Historic Preservation Master Plan. The plan is intended to help guide cultural resource decision-making for the University’s resources statewide and to inform the Physical Master Planning process throughout the state. PA G E

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Throughout the past year, a team of UGA Historic Preservation (MHP) and Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) graduate assistants scoured the state identifying the University’s property holdings and documenting all structures at least 40 years of age. Notable designed and vernacular landscapes were also documented. The students worked under the supervision of the College of Environment and Design’s FindIt Program (http://findit.uga.

edu/) in collaboration with a diverse group of cultural resource consultants assembled by the firm Wiss-JanneyElstner Associates (WJE; http://www. wje.com/). The survey identified and documented 737 buildings and 55 potentially significant landscapes statewide. 309 of those resources were located in AthensClarke County with the remaining balance distributed over 21 counties,

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1938 4H Cottage at the Wahsega 4H Center, Lumpkin County.

1954 Administration Building at the Tifton Campus.

including Putnam County (91 -Rock Eagle 4-H, Ag School Research), Tift County (80 – UGA Tifton), Chatham County (49 – Tybee 4-H Camp, Skidway Institute of Oceanography), McIntosh County (48-Marine Institute), Lumpkin County (30 – Washega 4-H), and Spalding County (25 – UGA Griffin). Other counties with multiple resources were Oglethorpe (25), Sumter (15), Union and Whitefield (12 each). The survey team and the consultants are in the process of analyzing the survey data.

Preservation Office, Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation, Board of Regents, and representatives from the University’s anthropology/archeology and historic preservation programs. Attendees were presented preliminary survey overview and results as well as an introduction to the consultant team and a review of the university’s historic themes and contexts with attention to professional specialties of architectural history, resource integrity and condition assessments, archeology, and historic landscape. Participants spent the afternoon in a workshop brainstorming ideas to develop a set of Guiding Principles to be used by the consultants to complete the final document.

In September, under the direction of Steering Committee Chair Dean Dan Nadenicek (College of Environment and Design), the University hosted the Guiding Principles Workshop pulling together the University’s statewide historic preservation and archeological community. Preservation constituents invited to participate included representatives from the Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation, State Historic

1937 Seed Lab at the GA Mountain Experiment Station in Union County.

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Over the next ten months the College of Environment and Design, the Office of the University Architects, and the WJE team will work together to craft the planning document and its implementation process.

1975 Skidaway Research Institute building in Chatham County.

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ATHENS WELCOME CENTER UPDATE

By Evelyn Reece

CLASSIC CITY TOURS OFFERS FALL AND WINTER FUN

For the second fall season, Classic City Tours hosted its popular Haunted Happy Hour Tour at dusk each Thursday in October. Each downtown stroll revealed the backstories of Athens’ better known landmarks – and the folklore, facts, and fables of its people and places. Ever wonder which historic downtown buildings have a chilly story that is a bit hard to explain? Wonder no more! Each tour explores the spooks, specters, and other oddities of the Classic City. Contact the Welcome Center if you are interested in scheduling this fun after-hours tour for your group!

HOLIDAY SPIRITS MUSEUM MILE TOURS IN DECEMBER

Experience Holidays Past at Athens’ Unique House Museums On three Saturdays in December, the Athens Historic House Museum Association will host its award-winning Holiday Spirits Museum Mile Tours. The annual tour has become an Athens holiday tradition for many families. Athens’ finest homes will be carefully appointed with period holiday details, complete with the story behind the tradition. Each Saturday, a unique musical or dramatic performance will be featured at a different house and light refreshments will be served. Join us for the fun and learn about the evolution of the Southern holidays as experienced through the Federal, Greek Revival, and Victorian periods. Tours will be held on December 5th, 12, and 19th at 2:00 pm. Tickets are ONLY $25 each for the 2-hour tour. Early reservations are encouraged – call the Athens Welcome Center at 706353-1820.

BECOME AN AMBASSADOR FOR ATHENS! The Athens Welcome Center has two weekly spots available on Tuesdays or Thursdays, from 1-5 pm. If you know and love Athens and would enjoy meeting people from all over the world, consider serving as an ambassador for Athens! Our location, the Church-Waddel-Brumby House Museum, is at the heart of the town and gown story and serves as a key attraction in the heart of Athens’ boutique hotel district. Call or email Evelyn Reece at 706-353-1820 / athenswc@negia.net to learn more about this fun opportunity in a beautiful setting.

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Changing of the Guard By Kendell Turner, Chair, Historic Ware-Lyndon House Museum Committee

ACHF, which has owned the historic collection at the Ware-Lyndon House since 2002, operates the museum in partnership with the Lyndon House Arts Center. The Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation’s Ware-Lyndon House has a new committee, after nearly 20 years of exceptional guidance and involvement by a handful of devoted Athenians, namely Jim Carter, Janet Clark, Ron Evans, Anita Sams Holton, Burke Hodgson, and Dr. Robert and Harriet Nix. During their tenure this committee painstakingly decorated, refinished and furnished the historic house, so that now it stands as one of the finest house museums in the country and the best of its era in the state of Georgia. On August 30, 2015, longstanding chair Ron Evans turned the gavel over to Kendell Turner, and now the newly-established committee takes over with a precedence for success. And, they have hit the ground running with new partnerships and programs. The committee has formed a partnership with UGA’s Willson Center for Humanities and Art, whose Lab for Digital Humanities will work with the committee to digitally record the museum’s 10,000 plus artifacts that represent an historic interpretation of the home’s contents and of Athens in the mid-1800s. Fortunately, Jim Carter, a walking encyclopedia of the era, agreed to stay

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on the committee to help with the descriptive aspects of the project. He lives in a historic home of the same era with like furnishings near Philomath, Georgia…Greek translation, a “love of learning.” The committee has also reached out to Dale Couch, Director of Southern Decorative Arts at the Georgia Museum of Art (GMOA). Didi Dunphy, Program Supervisor of the Lyndon House Arts Center, will work with the committee to join with GMOA in hosting the 2016 MESDA (Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts) T extile Symposium that will take place January 14-16, 2016. Unique textiles will be displayed in the gallery leading to the historic house. In February of 2016, the committee, Lyndon House Arts Foundation and the Georgia Museum of Art will host a tour of the Ware-L yndon House for the participants of the Henry D. Green Decorative Arts Symposium. This is one of the premier decorative arts symposiums that takes place in the United States. And, finally, the committee is keeping a close eye on the completion of the Ware-Lyndon House garden project that includes extensive improvements to the front landscape of the house and the addition of a formal parterre garden on the west side. This is the last of the previous committee’s projects to be realized. ACHF, Leisure Services of Athens-Clarke County, and the Ware-Lyndon House Committee will host a party in celebration of the garden project in spring of 2016.

Committee members David Hammond, Karen Prasse, Kendell Turner, & Stephen Hollis.

The newly formed Ware-Lyndon House Committee is chaired by Kendell Turner. She and her husband Tony retired to Athens in 2013 and wasted no time getting involved. She is a member of The Collectors of the Georgia Museum of Art and serves on the Friends’ Board; she and Tony serve on the UGA Libraries’ Board of Visitors. She received a B.S. Degree in Art History from the University of Miami in 1985 after studying in Munich, Germany and Florence. Prior to moving to Georgia, Kendell served the City of Coral Gables, Florida, as a board member and chair of the city’s Historic Preservation Board and the city’s Library Advisory Board. She served as a writer and historian for the city’s digital “Talking Book” and founded Save the Alhambra Water Tower, a city historic monument. Kendell received the Key to the City of Coral Gables in 2013 for her extensive work and dedication to the city. Kendell has put together a dynamic committee including Greg Barnard, Sandy Baumwald, Jim Carter, Corbett Chandler, David Hammond, Stephen Hollis, Karen Prasse, Mitzi Prochnow, Jim Warnes, and Sara Williamson.

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Committee members Mitzi Prochnow and Greg Barnard.

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Spotlight on the Gala This year’s Gala will be on West Cloverhurst Avenue, one of Athens most historic streets and part of the W. Cloverhurst/Springdale National Register District. It will feature the historic homes of Georgia Everson, Carrie and Eric Sewell, Lacy and Frank Sinkwich, and Pat and Mike Waldrip. We are so grateful to these homeowners for their hospitality and generosity. We know you will love wandering along this most gracious and expansive street that was once the entryway to Henry Hull Carlton’s Cloverhurst Mansion.

This incredible 1910 photograph shows the Cloverhurst Mansion at the end of the drive/ street with the Waldrip Home in the foreground on the left. (Provided by Pat and Mike Waldrip.)

The W. Cloverhurst/Springdale National Register District occupies land that belonged to an experimental farm developed by New Jersey native John Meeker in the late 19th century. In 1885 Henry Hull Carlton bought Meeker’s property and built a large Second Empire style dwelling, the axial driveway of which would later become West Cloverhurst Avenue. Carlton was a doctor, lawyer, congressman, and the owner of the Athens Banner newspaper. After his death in 1901, the land was sold to Judge Hamilton McWhorter, who lived in the Cloverhurst mansion but also began to sell off parcels for development. Land on the north side of Springdale was not part of the Cloverhurst estate, belonging instead to Robert Bloomfield, industrialist and founder of Athens Manufacturing Company. House styles on Cloverhurst include Arts and Crafts influenced designs such as Colonial Revival, Tudor Revival, and bungalow. PA G E

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This chandelier is in the home that once belonged to the Gourmet Padre, who for years sold homemade candies that were made in a kitchen in the basement.

As with any historic house, our host homes have secrets to tell.

Basic Gala Info WHEN: 5:00 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 6, 2015 WHERE: Historic West Cloverhurst Neighborhood in Five Points HOW MUCH: Reservations are $55 for ACHF members and $80 for non-members. Purchase of a non-member reservation includes one-year complimentary membership in ACHF. MORE INFO: Visit www.achfonline.org for more information and to make reservations. QUESTIONS? Call 706-353-1801 or email achf@bellsouth.net.

Background photo: This was the office and library of a UGA President and Chancellor who built the house c. 1910. HE RI T A GE

The home where this fireplace can be found was completely gutted by fire.

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I N T R O D U C I N G

ACHF would like to recognize and thank our fabulous main caterers for this year’s Holiday Gala – home.made, LRG Provisions, Mama’s Boy and The National/Condor Chocolates! We couldn’t do the event without them and it certainly wouldn’t be the same. Of course, we’ll also have delicious desserts from local restaurants and caterers and we’d like to thank all of them for their generosity. Look for their names on the Gala program and be sure to patronize all of these wonderful businesses! Catering from Scratch… As with all good things, home.made began as a dream. Owner and chef Mimi Maumus spent nearly a decade studying under renowned chef Hugh Acheson and found her own identity with the development of this local business with the devoted following. She describes her food as modern classic southern, aka “culinary school grandma” – approachable, creative, thoughtful and delicious! “We are committed to producing memorable food experiences and enjoy putting inventive twists on old standards.” Pop-ups & Catering…LRG Provisions was born out of a desire by co-owners Jaamy Zarnegar and Melissa Clegg to offer a unique dining experience to their local community. Their 22 years at the Last Resort Grill has given them a long history of following their individual passions – love of food, community and discovery. “Since 1992, we have made a commitment to the growth and preservation of Athens and are very proud and grateful for the acceptance and loyalty of its residents.”

O U R C A T E R E R S

Southern Fun Dining…Mama’s Boy is a locally owned modern diner situated on the Greenway in Athens, Georgia. Mama’s Boy has been voted Athens’ Favorite Breakfast in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 and Favorite Brunch in 2012 and 2013 by Flagpole Magazine. The owners are Alicia Segars and Cooper Hudson and the chef is Colin Mays, and, in their own words, “We love all of our Mama’s Boys!” They serve breakfast, brunch, lunch and offer catering. The idea behind The National is simple…to provide a casual neighborhood gathering spot reminiscent of the bars and cafés we’ve enjoyed on travels to Europe. Mediterranean inspired food and wine is served for lunch and dinner in the dining room and throughout the day at the bar. While our menu points to culinary traditions from abroad, we value our local farmers and our dishes reflect the changing seasons in Northeast Georgia. The National is brought to you by Executive Chef Peter Dale and Hugh Acheson. ACHF would like to thank Stacy and Clark Brown for putting on a spectacular Gala Kick-off Party at their beautiful, mid-century modern home on Thursday, November 12. The Kick-off Party is a way for us to thank our Host Committee members and begin the countdown to everyone’s favorite holiday party! We’d also like to thank guide2athens and Bulldawg Illustrated for their generosity in sponsoring the party.

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Reminiscence of Galas Past

Do you know what the graphic on the Cloverhurst-Springdale sign symbolizes? A little digging into ACHF files uncovered an original graphic, done by Ron Evans, that explains just how clever it is! At the top of the symbol, is a 4-leaf Clover. Then, you have a semicircle facing down which symbolizes the hurst (or hill per Germanic derivation). The squiggly line in the middle is, you guessed it, a Spring. And, the semicircle facing up is the dale, or valley.

The holiday parties for ACHF have been festive highlights of the season for decades. The first events were held in endangered buildings or houses that might be on the way toward demolition! This drew attention to the pending doom of these places. That meant some were just a shell with no heat, and they certainly were not “party ready.” Some people who have attended these parties from the beginning will remember when members were bringing items from their attics and closets. Gilbert Milner would do a live auction—or should I say a wild auction—of everything from funky old candelabra to vintage clothing. These parties were held in sorority houses on December dates after school ended for the break. In those days volunteers spent all day decorating and making fresh wreaths that were also auctioned. Greenery had to be cut and brought by the truck load. All of the food was donated by members and Carl and Reggie Vipperman made their famous punch! Volunteers did the work while having a great time together. The festivities have been very successful—thanks in large part to the donations of artists and local businesses—and everyone has always excitedly awaited the annual party. Attendance increased so much that we finally out-grew the larger houses like Phi Mu and ADPi, and for several years the Classic Center became our venue and then the Botanical Gardens hosted several great celebrations. In recent years the occasion has evolved into a progressive party in historic neighborhoods. Fun times have been had on The Hill, Dearing Street, Henderson Avenue, Woodlawn, University Drive, Cobbham, and Bloomfield. Since no house is spacious enough to hold such a social crowd, we move from house to house tasting delicious courses donated by outstanding local caterers. Gracious homeowners have always opened their homes for these occasions, and again this year several Cloverhurst Avenue residents are opening their homes to welcome ACHF. We could not do this without their generosity. The ACHF holiday tradition continues and this year will certainly be another merry bash that you do not want to miss! See you there with bells on! Diane Adams (past ACHF Board Member and President (1996-1997, 1998-1999); longtime W. Cloverhurst resident)

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Kenneth Bugg (L) and Mark Carey (R) pose with homeowner Constance Colbert.

Background photo: Re-built structural system prior to floor installation.

HANDS on ATHENS

By John Kissane, HOA Administrator

In early October, DSI Group Design + Construction partnered with Hands On Athens to completely rebuild the front porch floor at 173 Lyndon Avenue, a ca.1900 dwelling in the Boulevard Historic District.

Photo on left: Completed porch floor. Photo on right: Ms. Colbert is once again able to enjoy her front porch.

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DSI generously donated all necessary labor for this technical project, which involved demolishing the rotted floor and structural members, installing a replacement structural system, and laying new tongue-and-groove flooring. As is often the case with HOA projects, this effort became more involved once work got started, as the DSI work team discovered that virtually all of the supporting elements of the porch were beyond repair. There was clearly no option but to replace everything. By the end of the week, homeowner Constance Colbert could once again enjoy sitting on her porch and enjoying Athens’ beautiful fall weather. (An HOA volunteer team will paint the porch floor later in the fall.)

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WHAT’S NEXT FOR SOUTHERN MANUFACTURING AND HAPPY TOP A perspective by Michael Smith, Athenian since 2007 involved in community affairs, public transportation and anti-poverty efforts.

A distressed property on the south side of Bryan Street.

Sometime during 1913 a street light was placed on the corner of Bryan and Miles Street. One of sixteen arc lamps added that year, the installation of the light near the entrance of Southern Mill cost about $34, according to a calculation derived from a report made by Captain J.W. Barnett, city engineer. The report was submitted to the mayor and council on New Year’s Eve and published in the Athens Daily Herald on January 8, 1914. Now, a century later, the street light is gone, replaced by a utility pole. Power and communication lines disappear inside the overgrowth of a vacant, neglected lot. In early 1903, when a group of investors led by William T. Bryan—a highly regarded 33-year-old entrepreneur—opened Southern Manufacturing Company, originally HE RI T A GE

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a batting mill, the city was buzzing with the news. By early summer, according to the front page newspaper article published by the Athens Banner on June 24th, work on a second building (a two-story high cotton mill 300 feet in length) was already in full swing. After a decade of steady growth, Athens was a boom town. What followed was a story for the ages. A story of hyper-local collaboration, including the building of the Boulevard neighborhood, the electrification of Athens, and the beginnings of the modern day industrial corridor starting just north of the railroad tracks on N. Chase Street leading to Newton Bridge Road. But more than just big business, a cultural blueprint appeared with the rise of what locals eventually called Southern Mill. Led by Bryan, Southern Mill built the first day school on Chase Street, started a semi-pro baseball team, sponsored free shows at the city park on Prince Avenue featuring the company band, helped start the Northeast Georgia Agricultural Fair where the Chase Park Warehouses now stand, and supported pop-up events by The-Lend-A-Club, the women’s social club of the day. Thousands attended these events over the first two decades of the twentieth century, and it all started with an unnamed, magical dirt road— eventually known as Bryan Street, a street now all but forgotten by our community. But with the much awaited redevelopment of Southern Mill by locally-owned Millworks at our finger tips, all that has to change, quickly. Today, the revitalization of Bryan Street

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is essential to insuring the successful redevelopment of Southern Mill. As a community, it is not fair to expect Carter Broun and the other owners of Millworks to make such a tremendous investment in our neighborhood without a commitment to do something about Bryan Street.

Southern Manufacturing – view from Bryan Street.

In the summer of 2014, my family purchased one of the three remaining mill houses north of the railroad tracks crossing under North Chase Street, instead of putting a downpayment on a house in another neighborhood. We paid fair market value because of our strong belief in the power of the Athens community to finally realize its long held dream to redevelop Southern Mill. The old house is now zoned as an employment-based industrial building, a perfect fit for the historic character of the neighborhood once known as

One of 3 remaining “double houses” on Bryan Street. The owner is 95-yrs-old. A former short-order cook, she has lived on the street for about seventy years.

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Over the next few months, after the planned development for Southern Mill is approved by the Mayor and Commission, possibly as early as November, the community conversation on the revitalization of Bryan Street will take center stage. My family hopes for community support in searching for simple solutions to save our street and making sure Southern Mill is open for business in the near future – an effort that might include the private acquisition of a handful of promising parcels on Bryan Street by others living here in Athens just as committed to protecting our city and neighborhoods.

The iconic water tower on North Chase St. The landmark is part of the Southern Mill planned development and is very near Bryan Street.

“Happy Top.” Along with the iconic water tower (a part of the Southern Mill property holdings) near the tracks on N. Chase Street, our building and street are critical links to Southern Mill, but the neglected vacant land on Miles Street and a few of the distressed properties on Bryan Street stand in the way of the community’s collaborative vision for Southern Mills.

By hyper-localizing the revitalization of this magical, long-forgotten street, we can follow the blueprint put in place more than a century ago, a plan that changed Athens forever and now allows us to do our part in redefining our progressive culture and collaborative nature in a way that protects and strengthens our great city. [Photos by Sean Dunn for Save Our Street – Athens, GA.]

A view of distressed properties on Bryan Street as you arrive from the loop down North Chase St. The iconic old water tower is nearby towards the east as you drive toward the Boulevard neighborhood.

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A NEW WEBSITE FOR ACHF! As is typically the case for nonprofit organizations that rely on volunteer support, making sweeping changes to various programs can take time. Web presence is no exception, and there’s no denying the fact that the ACHF website has been in need of a major upgrade for some time. After several years of discussions and planning, we have finally launched our new website! Board President Kristen Morales got the final stage in motion by selecting and formatting a clean and shiny Word Press template to build our new site.

Kristen, board members Paul Trudeau and Hollis Yates, and Amy Kissane spent several months developing content and graphics, and we think you’ll be pleased with the results. New features include: • A completely revamped menu with several new pages that cover all ACHF programs • A user-friendly home page with upto-date links and information on upcoming events • An event calendar with details on all programs and events • Information and links to a variety of resources for property owners

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ACHF MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE By Carol Williams, Chair

We want YOU!!

The membership drive for the Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation is underway and we invite you to join us in preserving the rich history and character of Athens. For almost 50 years ACHF has been a part of educating the community on preservation issues and the history behind the various buildings and homes in our community.

Your membership supports exciting opportunities to experience the many special places and people throughout the area. The semi-annual Fun-n-Friends, Heritage Walks, the annual Holiday Gala, educational programs, home and community tours and the annual Historic Preservation Awards ceremony are just a few of the events offered by the support of your membership. The newsletter is also packed with current information to keep you abreast of happenings and

history. You don’t want to miss a single issue! There are many ways for you to participate in the work of the Foundation. In addition to your attendance at events, we welcome you to volunteer on a committee or help with an event. The Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation is gearing up for its 50th Anniversary and we want to make sure you are kept informed of this upcoming celebration and encourage you to be involved in the planning.

We invite you to be a part of the largest membership campaign ever! Please invite your friends to join you in supporting the work of the Foundation as it continues to enhance the future by preserving the past. Please let me know if I may answer any questions about getting involved or the membership campaign. You may reach me at any time at 706-254-3716. Your support is sincerely appreciated and we look forward to seeing you at an upcoming event soon.

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In Memoriam JANEY M. COOLEY (1935 – 2015) A Life of Service By Jim Warnes

PATRICIA IRVIN COOPER (1927 – 2015) By James K. Reap

Janey Cooley, like most of us, was a woman of contradictions. A very private person in many ways, she unstintingly gave of herself to the Athens community. Janey loved Athens, especially downtown Athens, which she worked tirelessly to promote and protect.

Pat Cooper was an integral part of ACHF, especially the saving of the Church-Waddel-Brumby House (CWB) and ACHF’s early efforts to survey the county’s historic resources. She grew up in Oxford, Ohio, and, after coming to Athens, became particularly interested in Georgia history and vernacular architecture. She wrote widely on these subjects and was published in a number of important academic journals and most recently contributed an article to the local publication The Tangible Past in Athens, Georgia. In addition to her scholarly writings, Patricia made major contributions to the documentation of architectural heritage through the survey of historic structures of six Georgia Counties: Morgan, Elbert, Greene, Oconee, Oglethorpe and Clarke. Many of those structures were thoroughly documented in a number of National Register nominations she prepared including the ChurchWaddel-Brumby House and University of Georgia President’s House.

A native Athenian, Janey learned her craft from her father, an accountant who practiced in the Southern Mutual Building. Trust Officer by profession, Janey was more than the keeper and manager of her clients’ assets. When the occasion was appropriate, she found ways to help her clients make their lives more enjoyable. Accountants do not usually think outside the box, but versatility was a trait Janey nurtured. Janey had a delightful sense of humor, aware of the ironies life presents. Starting at age 18, Janey taught the pre-school Sunday School Class at First Baptist her entire life. Among her service to the community, Janey was a member of the Athens Pilot Club, Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation, Treasurer of the Athens Symphony, YWCO Board, Girl Scouts Council, Downtown Athens Property Owners Association, Council on Aging, United Way, Athens Arts Council, and the Overview Committee to examine the Unified Government. She was a mentor, who often had three mentees at a time. Janey served on the Mayor’s Commission for the Downtown Athens Historic District, the Vision 2000 Committee and still found time to be the treasurer of her condo association. Janey was the first woman to serve as the chair of The Athens General Hospital Authority. She was named a Woman of Distinction and was recognized by the Athena Award. Athens and its citizens were blessed by her efforts and her presence among us.

Patricia was also deeply involved in a hands-on way to preserve the natural and cultural heritage of Georgia. She always encouraged people to get out into the countryside and see Georgia’s heritage, helping to create the program of “rambles” for the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation. In her role as community activist, she was largely responsible for galvanizing the effort to save the Old Athens Cemetery among other properties. Most importantly, she was willing to generously share her knowledge and expertise with all those in the region interested in heritage. To foster future scholarship and carry forward her passion, she donated her photographs and notes to the Owens Library of the University of Georgia. This gift will be a living memorial, a gift that keeps on giving. Her contributions to the documentation of Athens history are many and significant, and we owe her much.

To make a donation, please contact Amy Kissane at 706-353-1801 or amykissane@bellsouth.net. PA G E

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JOIN ACHF TODAY

All members receive basic membership package including discounts on tours, events, and Fire Hall rentals; 10% discount at Welcome Center Shop; Heritage newsletter; and more.

I would like to become an ACHF member at the following basic level:

$30 Student $50 Individual $75 Family $100 Sustainer

I would like to increase my support by renewing at a higher level and receive complimentary ticket(s) to the Heritage Holiday Gala:

$250 Donor [1 ticket to Gala]

$500 Supporter [2 tickets to Gala]

$1000 Patron [4 tickets to Gala]

These programs depend on your support‌ thank you. Community Engagement

Athens High & Industrial School Marker Ben Epps Commemorative Statue Buena Vista Local Historic District Initiative Navy Supply Corps School Transfer

Heritage Education

Athens Area Realtors Workshops Athens Heritage Walks Guided Tours Heritage Newsletter Historic Property Owners Workshops Local Lore Girl Scout Badge

Tour of Homes

Historic Properties and Museums Athens Historic House Museum Association Church-Waddel-Brumby House Museum Historic Fire Hall No. 2 Ware-Lyndon House Museum

Membership Events Athenaeum Club Fun-n-Friends Heritage Holiday Gala Annual Meeting

Ongoing Programs

Athens Welcome Center Classic City Tours Façade Easements Hands On Athens Historic Preservation Revolving Fund Annual Historic Preservation Awards

To join ACHF, please complete the following information and return with your payment to: ACHF, Old Fire Hall No. 2, 489 Prince Avenue, Athens, Georgia 30601 Name(s): Mailing Address: Email Address(es): Phone No: Payment Type:

Enclosed Check (preferred)

Credit Card

Card number: 3-digit code (4 w. AE) Exp. Date: Name on Card: Ph. #: E-mail: You can also join online. Visit our website at www.achfonline.org.

Looking to volunteer? Check here if you would like to talk to someone at ACHF about volunteer opportunities.


ACHF is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization and donations are tax deductible.

for more information at 706.353.1801 or achf@bellsouth.net.

CONTACT US

for the Heritage Holiday Gala on Sunday, December 6, 2015.

SAVE-THE-DATE

for being a member of the Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation! Not sure if your membership dues are upto-date? Please contact us and we’ll be happy to help you out. Your dues support programs such as Hands On Athens, Athens Heritage Walks, Annual Preservation Awards, Preservation Matters, and the Athens Historic House Museum Association.

THANK YOU

www.achfonline.org

(706) 353-1801

Athens, Georgia 30601

489 Prince Avenue

Old Fire Hall No. 2

Interested in becoming an ACHF member? Visit our website at www.achfonline.org.

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Fall Heritage 2015  

Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation newsletter

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