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5 Foreword 9 Basic ingredients: specifications 17 ICE CREAM 18 Balancing an ice cream recipe 23 Preparing an ice cream mix 30 Basic recipes 41 SORBET 43 Balancing a sorbet recipe 45 Preparing a sorbet mix 48 Basic recipes 53 SEMIFREDDO 54 Ice cream parfait 59 Ice cream mousse 59 Ice cream soufflĂŠ 61 FINISHING TECHNIQUES 63 Finishing techniques with soft meringue 81 Finishing techniques with a glaze or thickened coulis 99 Finishing techniques with marzipan 113 Finishing techniques with biscuit or biscuits 133 Finishing techniques with chocolate 151 ICE CREAM DESSERTS 161 ICE CREAM LOLLIES 171 ICE CREAM CHOCOLATES 187 SAUCES 190 Explanatory glossary of terms


5 Foreword 9 Basic ingredients: specifications 17 ICE CREAM 18 Balancing an ice cream recipe 23 Preparing an ice cream mix 30 Basic recipes 41 SORBET 43 Balancing a sorbet recipe 45 Preparing a sorbet mix 48 Basic recipes 53 SEMIFREDDO 54 Ice cream parfait 59 Ice cream mousse 59 Ice cream soufflĂŠ 61 FINISHING TECHNIQUES 63 Finishing techniques with soft meringue 81 Finishing techniques with a glaze or thickened coulis 99 Finishing techniques with marzipan 113 Finishing techniques with biscuit or biscuits 133 Finishing techniques with chocolate 151 ICE CREAM DESSERTS 161 ICE CREAM LOLLIES 171 ICE CREAM CHOCOLATES 187 SAUCES 190 Explanatory glossary of terms


12

BASIC INGREDIENTS: SPECIFICATIONS

BASIC INGREDIENTS: SPECIFICATIONS

SUGARS

AIR

Sugars gives the following characteristics to the ice cream: ’ a sweet flavour; ’ influences the scoopability and the storage life; ’ lowers the freezing point; ’ influences the melting behaviour and gives a cold feel in the mouth; ’ increases the dry matter content.

Air gives the following characteristics to the ice cream: ’ the air bubbles determine the airiness and firmness of the ice cream; ’ softens the consistency; ’ reduces the feeling of coldness in the mouth; ’ reduces production costs. The extra air added by ice cream turbines (sometimes known as dashers) can increase the volume by between 100 % and 140 % (1 litre of ice cream weighs between 450 g and 600 g). Exceptionally, some manufacturers produce premium ice cream that weighs around 800 g per litre of volume. With traditional ‘craft’ ice cream, the average volume increase is around 40 % (1 litre of ice cream weighs +/- 750 g).

On average, a dosage of between 12 % and 16 % sucrose is used in the form of fine crystal sugar. The replacement of 25 % to maximum 50 % of the sucrose with glucose syrup, glucose powder, dextrose powder or invert sugar (or a combination thereof ) increases the shelf life and improves the scoopability of the ice cream. The lowering of the freezing point caused by dextrose, fructose, invert sugar and sorbitol is almost twice as high as the lowering caused by sucrose. Glycerol (E422), which is used to soften the ice cream (maximum 1.5 %) and to improve the scoopability, creates a 3.7 % lowering of the freezing point in comparison with sucrose. Glucose syrups and their derivatives are all given a DE-value (= dextrose equivalent value). The DE-value determines the sweetness value in relation to the sucrose (with a sweetness value of 100 %). A low DE-value means that less starch is broken down (= relatively low levels of glucose and maltose and relatively high levels of dextrin), that the product is less sweet and that its freezing point is relatively high (which means that the ice cream melts more slowly). These are used in particular as bulking agents for recipes with sugar replacements or alcoholic additives. A high DE-value means that more starch is broken down (= relatively high levels of glucose and maltose and relatively low levels of dextrin), that the product is sweeter and that its freezing point is relatively low (which means that the ice cream melts more quickly). It is possible to replace the sugar with sweeteners such as maltitol, fructose, sorbitol, isomalt, aspartame, maltodextrin, stevia, etc. In this case, it is better to use a mix of these sweeteners. It is also advisable to consult a dietician when developing recipes without added sugars.

The calculation for the volume increase (overrun) of ice cream is made as follows: the weight of 1 litre ice cream mix – the weight of 1 litre of ice cream the weight of 1 litre of ice cream

x 100 = % volume increase

Example: If one litre of the ice cream mix weighs 1050 g and 1 litre of finished ice cream weighs 750 g, then the ice cream has a volume increase rate of 40 %. 1050 - 750 750

x 100 =

300 750

x 100 = 40 % volume increase

STABILIZERS AND EMULSIFIERS Stabilizers and emulsifiers give the following characteristics to the ice cream: ’ retain moisture and increase the overrun; ’ have a stable structure and texture; ’ reduce ice formation during temperature variations; ’ slow down the rate of melting; ’ emulsify and disperse the fat as small particles in the water (this only occurs in fat-rich mixtures at a temperature above 65 °C). The use of egg yolk (and in particular lecithin), which can have both a stabilizing and an emulsifying effect, can be replaced either

in whole or in part by a combination of stabilizers (E410 locust bean gum, E412 guar gum, E407 carrageenan, E466 carboxymethyl cellulose, E441 gelatine, E440 pectin(s), E401 sodium alginate, etc.) and emulsifiers (E471 mono- and diglycerides of fatty acids and/or esters of sorbic acid (E200) and/or stearic acid (E570) or polysorbate 80 (E433)). Because each stabilizer is unique, for commercial purposes a mixture is usually offered, with the emulsifiers preadded. This mixture sometimes also contains dextrose, skimmed milk powder and aromatics.

13


12

BASIC INGREDIENTS: SPECIFICATIONS

BASIC INGREDIENTS: SPECIFICATIONS

SUGARS

AIR

Sugars gives the following characteristics to the ice cream: ’ a sweet flavour; ’ influences the scoopability and the storage life; ’ lowers the freezing point; ’ influences the melting behaviour and gives a cold feel in the mouth; ’ increases the dry matter content.

Air gives the following characteristics to the ice cream: ’ the air bubbles determine the airiness and firmness of the ice cream; ’ softens the consistency; ’ reduces the feeling of coldness in the mouth; ’ reduces production costs. The extra air added by ice cream turbines (sometimes known as dashers) can increase the volume by between 100 % and 140 % (1 litre of ice cream weighs between 450 g and 600 g). Exceptionally, some manufacturers produce premium ice cream that weighs around 800 g per litre of volume. With traditional ‘craft’ ice cream, the average volume increase is around 40 % (1 litre of ice cream weighs +/- 750 g).

On average, a dosage of between 12 % and 16 % sucrose is used in the form of fine crystal sugar. The replacement of 25 % to maximum 50 % of the sucrose with glucose syrup, glucose powder, dextrose powder or invert sugar (or a combination thereof ) increases the shelf life and improves the scoopability of the ice cream. The lowering of the freezing point caused by dextrose, fructose, invert sugar and sorbitol is almost twice as high as the lowering caused by sucrose. Glycerol (E422), which is used to soften the ice cream (maximum 1.5 %) and to improve the scoopability, creates a 3.7 % lowering of the freezing point in comparison with sucrose. Glucose syrups and their derivatives are all given a DE-value (= dextrose equivalent value). The DE-value determines the sweetness value in relation to the sucrose (with a sweetness value of 100 %). A low DE-value means that less starch is broken down (= relatively low levels of glucose and maltose and relatively high levels of dextrin), that the product is less sweet and that its freezing point is relatively high (which means that the ice cream melts more slowly). These are used in particular as bulking agents for recipes with sugar replacements or alcoholic additives. A high DE-value means that more starch is broken down (= relatively high levels of glucose and maltose and relatively low levels of dextrin), that the product is sweeter and that its freezing point is relatively low (which means that the ice cream melts more quickly). It is possible to replace the sugar with sweeteners such as maltitol, fructose, sorbitol, isomalt, aspartame, maltodextrin, stevia, etc. In this case, it is better to use a mix of these sweeteners. It is also advisable to consult a dietician when developing recipes without added sugars.

The calculation for the volume increase (overrun) of ice cream is made as follows: the weight of 1 litre ice cream mix – the weight of 1 litre of ice cream the weight of 1 litre of ice cream

x 100 = % volume increase

Example: If one litre of the ice cream mix weighs 1050 g and 1 litre of finished ice cream weighs 750 g, then the ice cream has a volume increase rate of 40 %. 1050 - 750 750

x 100 =

300 750

x 100 = 40 % volume increase

STABILIZERS AND EMULSIFIERS Stabilizers and emulsifiers give the following characteristics to the ice cream: ’ retain moisture and increase the overrun; ’ have a stable structure and texture; ’ reduce ice formation during temperature variations; ’ slow down the rate of melting; ’ emulsify and disperse the fat as small particles in the water (this only occurs in fat-rich mixtures at a temperature above 65 °C). The use of egg yolk (and in particular lecithin), which can have both a stabilizing and an emulsifying effect, can be replaced either

in whole or in part by a combination of stabilizers (E410 locust bean gum, E412 guar gum, E407 carrageenan, E466 carboxymethyl cellulose, E441 gelatine, E440 pectin(s), E401 sodium alginate, etc.) and emulsifiers (E471 mono- and diglycerides of fatty acids and/or esters of sorbic acid (E200) and/or stearic acid (E570) or polysorbate 80 (E433)). Because each stabilizer is unique, for commercial purposes a mixture is usually offered, with the emulsifiers preadded. This mixture sometimes also contains dextrose, skimmed milk powder and aromatics.

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Sorbet


Sorbet


74

FINISHING TECHNIQUES – (SOFT) MERINGUE

FINISHING TECHNIQUES – (SOFT) MERINGUE

FLEUR DE MERINGUE CONSTRUCTION 2 1

Fill a Flexipan-mould for small oval cakes with an ice cream parfait (1) of white chocolate. Sprinkle with white crispearls. Remove from the mould and keep in the freezer (= the interiors). Line a cooled flexible mould for oval cakes with a passion fruit sorbet (2) and press the interiors into the middle. Seal off the moulds with another layer of passion fruit sorbet and place in the freezer.

RECIPES Passion fruit sorbet (see basic recipe 2 on page 48) Ice cream parfait of white chocolate (see page 58) Italian meringue (see Raspberry on page 64) Hard meringue 250 g egg white 250 g sugar 125 g sugar 125 g powder sugar Beat together the egg white and the largest portion of sugar until they form a stiff foam. Add the smaller portion of sugar and beat further. Stir the icing sugar into the foam. Divide the foam into three equal portions. Keep one portion white. Colour the second portion yellow and the third portion red, using appropriate colorants that are bake-resistant. Place the three portions randomly on a baking mat.

Work the portions into and through each other, so that a marbled effect is obtained. Dry-bake for 1 hour in an oven at 100 °C to 120 °C. After 1 hour, turn off the oven and allow the meringue to dry further in the residual heat. Keep the meringue in a dry place in a well-sealed container.

FINISHING Remove the ice cream cakes from their moulds and return them briefly to the freezer. Pipe a floral motif in Italian meringue on the top of each cake. Press pieces of hard, coloured meringue to the sides of each cake. Decorate the tops with a sprig of red currants and a sprinkling of decorating sugar.

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74

FINISHING TECHNIQUES – (SOFT) MERINGUE

FINISHING TECHNIQUES – (SOFT) MERINGUE

FLEUR DE MERINGUE CONSTRUCTION 2 1

Fill a Flexipan-mould for small oval cakes with an ice cream parfait (1) of white chocolate. Sprinkle with white crispearls. Remove from the mould and keep in the freezer (= the interiors). Line a cooled flexible mould for oval cakes with a passion fruit sorbet (2) and press the interiors into the middle. Seal off the moulds with another layer of passion fruit sorbet and place in the freezer.

RECIPES Passion fruit sorbet (see basic recipe 2 on page 48) Ice cream parfait of white chocolate (see page 58) Italian meringue (see Raspberry on page 64) Hard meringue 250 g egg white 250 g sugar 125 g sugar 125 g powder sugar Beat together the egg white and the largest portion of sugar until they form a stiff foam. Add the smaller portion of sugar and beat further. Stir the icing sugar into the foam. Divide the foam into three equal portions. Keep one portion white. Colour the second portion yellow and the third portion red, using appropriate colorants that are bake-resistant. Place the three portions randomly on a baking mat.

Work the portions into and through each other, so that a marbled effect is obtained. Dry-bake for 1 hour in an oven at 100 °C to 120 °C. After 1 hour, turn off the oven and allow the meringue to dry further in the residual heat. Keep the meringue in a dry place in a well-sealed container.

FINISHING Remove the ice cream cakes from their moulds and return them briefly to the freezer. Pipe a floral motif in Italian meringue on the top of each cake. Press pieces of hard, coloured meringue to the sides of each cake. Decorate the tops with a sprig of red currants and a sprinkling of decorating sugar.

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90

FINISHING TECHNIQUES – GLAZE OR THICKENED COULIS

FINISHING TECHNIQUES – GLAZE OR THICKENED COULIS

CUBERDON CONSTRUCTION 4

2

3

1

Half fill a Flexipan-mould for rectangular cakes (with a notch) with cuberdon ice cream (1) (cuberdons are a type of Belgian sweet). Press some small pieces of cuberdon(2) into the ice cream and then place briefly in the freezer. When hard, fill the remainder of the mould with a second layer of cuberdon ice cream and return to the freezer.

RECIPES Cuberdon ice cream 1000 g full-cream milk 400 g cream 40 % 65 g skimmed milk powder 400 g cuberdon paste 55 g glucose powder DE 35-40 9 g stabilizer/emulsifier Prepare a standard ice cream mix (see page 23). Add the cuberdon paste to the still warm ice cream mix. For this recipe, the percentage of sugar is calculated on the basis of the cuberdon paste.

Passion fruit crisp 155 g melted white chocolate 40 g puffed rice 5 g passion fruit crunch powder* * Passion fruit crunch is made from concentrated passion fruit juice, maltodextrin and orange pulp. Mix the melted white chocolate with the puffed rice.

Add the passion fruit crunch powder. Roll out immediately (between two sheets of baking paper) to a thickness of 3 mm and place briefly in the fridge. Cut into rectangles measuring 4 cm by 12 cm (= 10 bases) and keep in the freezer.

Raspberry glaze 165 g raspberry puree without added sugars 35 g water 2 g gelatine, soaked in cold water Mix the raspberry puree with the water and heat to 60 °C. Add the soaked gelatine. Use at 15 °C.

Purple spray mixture 100 g melted cacao butter 100 g melted white chocolate red and blue powdered colorant Mix together the melted cacao butter and the melted white chocolate. Add the red and blue powdered colorants to this mixture and pass through a sieve. Using a compressor with a spray pistol, apply a fine layer of the spray mixture to the ice cream cakes.

FINISHING Press the ice cream cakes out of their flexible moulds, place them on a baking mat and spray them with the purple spray mixture. Place each cake on a passion fruit crisp base (3). Fill the notches in the cakes with the raspberry glaze (4) and place in the freezer. Decorate the top of each cake with a small coloured chocolate (see Banana on page 117: use powdered red colorant) and blocks of cuberdon.

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90

FINISHING TECHNIQUES – GLAZE OR THICKENED COULIS

FINISHING TECHNIQUES – GLAZE OR THICKENED COULIS

CUBERDON CONSTRUCTION 4

2

3

1

Half fill a Flexipan-mould for rectangular cakes (with a notch) with cuberdon ice cream (1) (cuberdons are a type of Belgian sweet). Press some small pieces of cuberdon(2) into the ice cream and then place briefly in the freezer. When hard, fill the remainder of the mould with a second layer of cuberdon ice cream and return to the freezer.

RECIPES Cuberdon ice cream 1000 g full-cream milk 400 g cream 40 % 65 g skimmed milk powder 400 g cuberdon paste 55 g glucose powder DE 35-40 9 g stabilizer/emulsifier Prepare a standard ice cream mix (see page 23). Add the cuberdon paste to the still warm ice cream mix. For this recipe, the percentage of sugar is calculated on the basis of the cuberdon paste.

Passion fruit crisp 155 g melted white chocolate 40 g puffed rice 5 g passion fruit crunch powder* * Passion fruit crunch is made from concentrated passion fruit juice, maltodextrin and orange pulp. Mix the melted white chocolate with the puffed rice.

Add the passion fruit crunch powder. Roll out immediately (between two sheets of baking paper) to a thickness of 3 mm and place briefly in the fridge. Cut into rectangles measuring 4 cm by 12 cm (= 10 bases) and keep in the freezer.

Raspberry glaze 165 g raspberry puree without added sugars 35 g water 2 g gelatine, soaked in cold water Mix the raspberry puree with the water and heat to 60 °C. Add the soaked gelatine. Use at 15 °C.

Purple spray mixture 100 g melted cacao butter 100 g melted white chocolate red and blue powdered colorant Mix together the melted cacao butter and the melted white chocolate. Add the red and blue powdered colorants to this mixture and pass through a sieve. Using a compressor with a spray pistol, apply a fine layer of the spray mixture to the ice cream cakes.

FINISHING Press the ice cream cakes out of their flexible moulds, place them on a baking mat and spray them with the purple spray mixture. Place each cake on a passion fruit crisp base (3). Fill the notches in the cakes with the raspberry glaze (4) and place in the freezer. Decorate the top of each cake with a small coloured chocolate (see Banana on page 117: use powdered red colorant) and blocks of cuberdon.

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152

ICE CREAM DESSERTS

ICE CREAM DESSERTS

MOJITO CONSTRUCTION Half fill the glass dishes with the lime and rum sorbet. Place in the freezer. Add a few blocks of mint jelly to the lime and rum sorbet. Fill up the glass dishes to within 1 cm of the rim with a further layer of lime and rum sorbet. Return to the freezer.

RECIPES Lime and rum sorbet 120 g sugar 60 g glucose powder 90 g maltodextrin 4 g stabilizer for sorbet 450 g drinking water 160 g lime puree 120 g rum Mix together the sugar, glucose powder, maltodextrin and the stabilizer. Heat the water to 65 °C, add the dry ingredients, and heat further to 85 °C.

Add the lime puree and the rum. Allow to mature for 20 minutes at 4 °C. Pass through the ice cream machine.

Mint jelly 250 g water 30 g raw cane sugar 10 g mint leaves 4 g agar agar powdered green colorant 2 g gelatine, soaked in cold water Bring the water and the raw cane sugar to the boil. Add the fresh mint leaves and allow to soak for 10 minutes. Pass through a fine sieve and add the agar agar. Bring the sieved fluid back to the boil. Add a little powdered green colorant and the gelatine. Immediately pour the jelly into a shallow dish, so that a 1 cm thick layer is formed. Allow to cool. Cut the mint jelly into blocks and keep in the freezer.

FINISHING Decorate each glass dish with some blocks of mint jelly, a sprig of fresh mint and a pipette filled with rum.

CERISE CONSTRUCTION Pour the cooled crèmeux of white chocolate, passion fruit and almonds into a glass dish and place in the fridge. Add the cherry beer sorbet and a red macaroon ice-lolly in the middle.

RECIPES Crèmeux of white chocolate, passion fruit and almonds 130 g passion fruit puree without added sugars 70 g almond milk 100 g egg yolk 100 g white chocolate 100 g butter Bring the passion fruit puree and almond milk to the boil. Beat the egg yolk loose. Pour part of the boiling puree mixture onto the loose-beaten egg yolk and mix thoroughly. Pour the resulting mixture into a cooking pot and heat between 80 °C and 85 °C. Immediately add the white chocolate (Callets, blocks or pieces) and mix thoroughly. Allow this cream to cool to 40 °C. Add the soft butter and mix briefly, but with vigour. Keep in the fridge.

Cherry beer sorbet 750 g cherry beer (‘Kriek Max’) 100 g raspberry puree without added sugars 140 g sugar 30 g glucose powder 5 g sorbet stabilizer Boil the cherry beer until it has a Brix-value of 15. Prepare the sorbet further in the standard manner (see page 45).

Place the cherry beer sorbet into a flexible mould for round cakes and place in the freezer. Place a lolly stick in the middle of each one.

Lolly of macaroon Recipe, see page 115. Pipe the macaroon mixture in blobs onto baking mats and place a lolly stick in the middle of each one. Allow to dry for 30 minutes. Bake for about 16 minutes at 150 °C.

FINISHING Decorate the glass dishes with a little bresilienne.

153


152

ICE CREAM DESSERTS

ICE CREAM DESSERTS

MOJITO CONSTRUCTION Half fill the glass dishes with the lime and rum sorbet. Place in the freezer. Add a few blocks of mint jelly to the lime and rum sorbet. Fill up the glass dishes to within 1 cm of the rim with a further layer of lime and rum sorbet. Return to the freezer.

RECIPES Lime and rum sorbet 120 g sugar 60 g glucose powder 90 g maltodextrin 4 g stabilizer for sorbet 450 g drinking water 160 g lime puree 120 g rum Mix together the sugar, glucose powder, maltodextrin and the stabilizer. Heat the water to 65 °C, add the dry ingredients, and heat further to 85 °C.

Add the lime puree and the rum. Allow to mature for 20 minutes at 4 °C. Pass through the ice cream machine.

Mint jelly 250 g water 30 g raw cane sugar 10 g mint leaves 4 g agar agar powdered green colorant 2 g gelatine, soaked in cold water Bring the water and the raw cane sugar to the boil. Add the fresh mint leaves and allow to soak for 10 minutes. Pass through a fine sieve and add the agar agar. Bring the sieved fluid back to the boil. Add a little powdered green colorant and the gelatine. Immediately pour the jelly into a shallow dish, so that a 1 cm thick layer is formed. Allow to cool. Cut the mint jelly into blocks and keep in the freezer.

FINISHING Decorate each glass dish with some blocks of mint jelly, a sprig of fresh mint and a pipette filled with rum.

CERISE CONSTRUCTION Pour the cooled crèmeux of white chocolate, passion fruit and almonds into a glass dish and place in the fridge. Add the cherry beer sorbet and a red macaroon ice-lolly in the middle.

RECIPES Crèmeux of white chocolate, passion fruit and almonds 130 g passion fruit puree without added sugars 70 g almond milk 100 g egg yolk 100 g white chocolate 100 g butter Bring the passion fruit puree and almond milk to the boil. Beat the egg yolk loose. Pour part of the boiling puree mixture onto the loose-beaten egg yolk and mix thoroughly. Pour the resulting mixture into a cooking pot and heat between 80 °C and 85 °C. Immediately add the white chocolate (Callets, blocks or pieces) and mix thoroughly. Allow this cream to cool to 40 °C. Add the soft butter and mix briefly, but with vigour. Keep in the fridge.

Cherry beer sorbet 750 g cherry beer (‘Kriek Max’) 100 g raspberry puree without added sugars 140 g sugar 30 g glucose powder 5 g sorbet stabilizer Boil the cherry beer until it has a Brix-value of 15. Prepare the sorbet further in the standard manner (see page 45).

Place the cherry beer sorbet into a flexible mould for round cakes and place in the freezer. Place a lolly stick in the middle of each one.

Lolly of macaroon Recipe, see page 115. Pipe the macaroon mixture in blobs onto baking mats and place a lolly stick in the middle of each one. Allow to dry for 30 minutes. Bake for about 16 minutes at 150 °C.

FINISHING Decorate the glass dishes with a little bresilienne.

153


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