October 2019 Edition - Access Press

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TWIN CITIES, MN PERMIT NO. 4766

Volume 30, Number 10

October 10, 2019

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Class action ruling a win for community

$10K

CLASS ACTION To page 3

The hearing room for the House Health and Human Services Policy Committee was at capacity September 11 where several bills had informational hearings.

Physician-assisted suicide bill faces uncertain fate at capitol by Access Press staff Should people with terminal illness be allowed to end their own lives with the help of doctors and other medical professionals? Or would state law allowing such a practice be misused, to end the lives of vulnerable people? Would people with disabilities become targeted under such a law? More than 200 people filled hearing rooms September 11 to hear debate on the highly emotional and controversial proposal under consideration by the Minnesota House. The hearing before the House Health and Human Services Policy Committee was informational, and went on for hours. No vote was taken. State lawmakers don’t go back into session until February 2020. Dozens of organizations are weighing in,

with some in support, others in opposition and still others offering qualified support if there are ways to prevent abuse of such a law. How to describe physician-assisted suicide is even up for debate, as shown by the stickers worn September 11. Bill foes wore “no assisted suicide" stickers. Supporters wore stickers stating, “I support end-of-life options.” Support and opposition to the proposal among lawmakers somewhat splits along party lines. Several House DFLers support such a bill, pointing to measures in place in eight other states. Current and past Minnesota proposals are modeled against one used in Oregon for more than 20 years. The bill likely won’t get very far in the Senate as Sen. Michelle Benson, R-Ham END OF LIFE BILL To page 15

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Support disability community journalism with your donation The Friends of Access Press group has extended its generous matching gift program for the newspaper’s readers, supporters and stakeholders. Through the end of the year, the program will match donations dollar-for-dollar up to $10,000, doubling your opportunity to promote disability awareness, influence policymaking, enhance services and programs, and increase accessibility for people with disabilities. Please do not miss this chance for a 100 percent match of your donation. For the past three years, I have been proud and delighted to serve on the Board of Directors of Access Press, the only organization of its type in Minnesota and one of 12 newspapers in the nation devoted to disability affairs. For nearly 30 years, Access Press has been an outstanding voice for all Minnesotans with disabilities and their families, addressing critical issues such as discrimination, independent living, benefits, poverty, human rights, employment, transportation, education, housing, crime, arts, culture, sports and other life aspects. I share my fellow board members’ enthusiasm for improving the lives of our fellow Minnesotans with disabilities as we strive to keep our organization and newspaper alive in the face of financial challenges. I urge you to contribute what you can to keep this voice functioning. The community of people with disabilities is the most disadvantaged group in nearly all quality-of-life measures, and the gap remains wide between people with disabilities and people without disabilities. This community is also the only group that could include anyone at some point in life. According to the Social Security Administration, 3 in 10 of today's 20-year-olds are expected to suffer one or more forms of disability before reaching 67, and nearly 69 percent of the private sector workforce has no

FILE PHOTO

A key ruling has been made in a court case involving Minnesotans with disabilities who live or lived in corporate adult foster care or group homes. On September 27 a U.S. District Court ruling declared that the policies and practices of the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS) are violating these Minnesotans’ constitutionally protected due process rights. The ruling also allows the case to proceed to trial, as a motion by DHS to have the rest of the case dismissed was denied. The 40-page ruling also urges both sides to reach an agreement in the case. U.S. District Court Judge Donovan Frank granted the plaintiffs’ motion for summary judgment, indicating that DHS is violating the due process guarantees of the Fourteenth Amendment and the Medicaid Act by failing to inform persons with disabilities that they are being denied a service to help them move to and live in the community. The ruling stated that DHS’s current policies and practices unlawfully force individuals to “wait indefinitely for requested services, never receiving an explanation on the status of the request, and without an opportunity to appeal” those service denials. The case was filed in 2016 on behalf of Tenner Murphy, by his guardian Kay Murphy; Marrie Bottelson; Dionne Swanson; and on behalf of others similarly situated. The DHS commissioner, which has changed over that time, is the defendant. Jodi Harpstead was recently appointed to that position by Gov. Tim Walz. Mid-Minnesota Legal Aid (MMLA) Disability Law Center is the lead attorney for Murphy. At the center of the Murphy versus Harpstead case is the desire by people with disabilities to make changes to Minnesota’s Medicaid service system, so that they may live more independent and integrated lives in the community. As the case proceeds through the court system the plaintiffs will be able to argue that their legal claims under the Americans with Disabilities Act and Medicaid Act will be allowed to proceed to trial. In denying DHS’ motion for summary judgment, Frank determined that “a systemwide remedy is the only way to provide relief” to improve the lives of people who seek to move out of group homes but are unable to do so under Minnesota’s current system. The case is a class action. Court documents indicate that some people covered by the class action have been placed in appropriate community settings. State officials counter that of the 45,438 disability waiver recipients in 2018, only 31 percent lived in group homes, and only 1.3 percent of those living in the facilities are putative class members. State officials argue that they are not over-relying on group homes and that the policies cited in the case don’t prevent people from moving to their preferred settings. DHS also contends that its policies and practices do comply with federal law and that if any alleged harm has occurred, the commissioner may not be held liable in her official capacity.

MN HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES/ANDRES VONBANK

by Access Press staff

Access Press founder Charlie Smith, Jr. long-term disability insurance. Furthermore, the most recent American Community Survey (ACS) dataset revealed the following characteristics of the underserved population with disabilities in Minnesota: Disability prevalence: In 2017, roughly 11 percent of Minnesota’s population, or 610,000 of the 5,521,400 residents of all ages, reported one or more disabilities. In addition, an estimated 5 percent (220,400) of Minnesotans age 15 and older have independent living disability, while 2.2 percent (115,600) of Minnesotans

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October 10, 2019 Volume 30, Number 10

EDITOR’S DESK

Tim Benjamin Fall so far has been soggy and chilly, with sprinkles of summer and nighttime hints of winter. It’s the time for making plans for the Real Minnesota weather we know is around the corner. Have you gotten your winter garb out and ready yet, or are you like me and keeping the coat closet out of sight and out of mind? This is not a strategy I recommend. I need to get my ponchos to the dry cleaners and my hats in the washer. At the beginning of the month, the Minnesota House of Representatives held a three-day “mini session” in Winona to listen to constituents and discuss a broad range of critical topics, including prescription drug prices. They budgeted about $100,000 for the trip, since it required legislators and staff to travel and stay overnight. News reports said the session provided a lot of valuable input. In 1997, the Legislature held about 30 mini-sessions around the state. If mini sessions catch on this time, and they come to your community, be sure to attend and help lawmakers understand

the health issues you face that can be improved by state policy. It sure would be nice, for instance, if they would address increasing the wages for home care workers and other direct support professionals. There are lots of other lifesustaining needs and benefits that need legislative attention and can affect “the greater good” in Minnesota. Speaking of greater good, you know that last month there was a hearing on legislation introduced last spring on end-of-life options for the terminally ill. In the House, the bill has 19 authors, and the Senate version has five; there seems to be major interest in taking on this divisive and difficult subject. Like most controversial legislation, this bill could dominate committee meetings and floor sessions and take up lots of time. It’s hard to know what is right or good on this issue. It’s heartbreaking to hear the stories of people who have suffered the impact of cancer and other terminal conditions for years without the ability to relieve their pain. I think this is a

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Suffering is subjective and one of those things that people can’t determine for anyone else. Many of us have met people who think that our life with a disability is suffering, or that we don’t have “quality of life.” dilemma that too many of us have had to face with family and close friends. It seems the only compassionate thing to do is to offer relief to the people we love. Unfortunately, I fear an ethical slippery slope would begin very quickly, and soon we would have other parties deciding who should be offered assisted suicide options. I genuinely believe that it wouldn’t take long before the determination of who is eligible for assisted suicide would include factors beyond suffering and pain. For instance, another overwhelming challenge that people who are terminally ill face is the cost of living and medical care without a job or insurance. When would cost start to be a deciding factor? And a term I’ve heard far too often from people thinking about someone else’s pain is “quality of life.” When would others start to decide that there wasn’t good enough quality of life for someone who has an illness called “terminal”? Suffering is subjective and one of those things that people can’t determine for anyone else. Many of us have met people who think that our life with a disability is suffering, or that we

don’t have “quality of life.” No matter how you contact your local House representative or state senator, be sure they hear your voice on these important issues. And as you get involved in the presidential primaries, make extra sure that these topics get on the agenda in caucuses and door-knocking campaigns so that the candidates know the disability community is here and it’s strong, and we’re advocates for our rights and dignity. The matching grant offered by the Access Press Friends and Board of Directors has been extended until the end of the year. This is the first time in the history of Access Press that the board has made this kind of donation. We’re in the midst of strategic planning and trying to find ways to earn more money, better serve our readers, and cut costs. It would be great if all of you could donate an extra ten or twenty dollars now when you can double your gift and show the Board of Directors that you appreciate Access Press as much as I know you do. Thank you for your support! ■

HISTORY NOTE

Shriners have a long legacy of fellowship and service to children with disabilities by Access Press staff As the longtime Twin Cities Shriners Healthcare for Children campus is readied for a new use by the University of Minnesota, people may ask, who are the Shriners? People with disabilities may be familiar with the organization through clinic visits or hospital stays. Others may see Shriners in area parades or at event, with members wearing distinctive fez hats. The Shriners got their start in 1870s New York City, where members of the Masons fraternal order gathered for lunches. Among regulars at the Knickerbocker Cottage were Dr. Walter M. Fleming and actor William J. “Billy” Florence. They discussed starting a new group, centered on fun and fellowship, more than ritual. Florence drew inspiration from an Arabian-themed party he’d attended while touring France. The exotic style, flavors and music of the Arabian-themed party inspired the theme for the new fraternity. Fleming used those ideas to develop the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, with an emblem, costumes, rituals and the distinctive red fez hat that members would wear. The first temple or chapter in the United States was launched in September 1872. By the early 20th century there were chapters throughout North America. The Shriners continued to growth, with dramatic growth after World War II. A Shriners history notes that a factor in the post-war growth was that soldiers wanted to continue their experience of camaraderie and service.

Much focus was on community service and fundraising to help others. One popular fundraiser, started in 1906, is the Shrine Circus, which is held around the nation. One important effort supported by the Shriners is hospitals for children, which were started in 1920. There have been as many as 22 hospitals in the United States, Canada and Mexico. The first hospital was opened in 1922 in Shreveport, Louisiana. The Minneapolis hospital opened in 1923. For years the hospitals were able to provide free care for children under age 18. Many medical conditions are covered including orthopedic care, burn treatment, cleft lip and palate care, and spinal cord injury rehabilitation. By the 1930s, the average stay at Shriners Hospital was one to two years. Shriners not only have supported the hospitals with a wide range of fundraisers, they also provided fun for children in the form of supplies for activities, gifts and special events for children. The care policies changed in mid-2012 due to a shrinking endowment. Shriners Hospitals began billing patients' insurance companies, but still offered free care to children without insurance and waives all out of pocket costs insurance doesn’t cover. Today, there are nearly 200 Shriners International temples across North America, South America, Europe and Southeast Asia. The History Note is a monthly column sponsored by the Minnesota Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities, www.mnddc.org or www.mncdd.org and www.partnersinpolicymaking.com.

Co-Founder/Publisher............................................................................................................Wm. A. Smith, Jr. (1990-96) Co-Founder/Publisher/ Editor-in-Chief.............................................................................. Charles F. Smith (1990-2001) Board of Directors.......Mohamed Alfash, Brigid Alseth, Stephen Anderson, John Clark, Jane Larson, Julius Williams, .....................................................................................................................................................................Kay Willshire, Mark Zangara Advertising Sales......... Michelle Hegarty, 612-807-1078 Cartoonist......................................................Scott Adams Executive Director.....................................Tim Benjamin Production........................................................ In-Fin Tuan Managing Editor........................................ Jane McClure Distribution............................................ S. C. Distribution Business Manager/Webmaster......... Dawn Frederick EDITORIAL: Editorial submissions and news releases on topics of interest to persons with disabilities, or persons serving those with disabilities, are welcomed. We reserve the right to edit all submissions. Editorial material and advertising do not necessarily reflect the view of the editor/publisher of Access Press. ADVERTISING RATES: Display Ad: $12 to $28 per column inch (size and frequency of run). Classified Ad: $14, plus 65¢ per word over 12 words. DEADLINE: 25th of each month. CIRCULATION/DISTRIBUTION: 11,000 copies are distributed the 10 th of each month through more than 200 locations statewide. Approximately 450 copies are mailed to individuals, including political, business, institutional and civic leaders. SUBSCRIPTION: $30 per year. Low-income, student and bulk subscriptions available at discounted rates. ABOUT ACCESS PRESS: A monthly newspaper published for persons with disabilities by Access Press, Ltd. Application to mail at Periodicals Postage Prices is Pending at the St. Paul, MN 55121 facility. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Access Press at 161 St. Anthony Ave, Suite 901, St. Paul, MN 55103. INQUIRIES AND ADDRESS CHANGES should be directed to: Access Press, The Capitol Ridge Inn Offices 161 St. Anthony Ave; #910, St. Paul, MN 55103; 651-644-2133; Fax: 651-644-2136; email: access@accesspress.org Website: nonprofitcharity.org

Costumed Shriners entertain children in this 1920s photo. Photos courtesy of MNCDD

Shriners Hospital offered many children's activities. This photo is from the 1930s.


October 10, 2019 Volume 30, Number 10

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Everybody counts, so prepare for the 2020 U.S. Census The Minneapolis Foundation, in partnership with Minnesota Census Mobilization Partnership, Minnesota Council on Foundations and the State of Minnesota, is administering state-funded grants to support Minnesota’s Complete Count Committees, working to achieve a complete and accurate count of Minnesota residents during the 2020 Census. People with disabilities are all too often undercounted as part of the census. Make sure everyone is counted. Census data help policymakers at all levels of government make a wide array of decisions which affect everyone’s lives. Countless programs are affected by census data, so everyone needs to be counted. A Complete Count Committee (CCC) may be established by tribal, state, and local governments, and/or community leaders, to increase awareness about the census, and motivate residents in the community to fill out the census form. The committees work best when they include a cross-section of community representatives from government agencies, education, business, religious organizations, and the media. The CCC is charged with developing and implementing a plan designed to target the unique characteristics of their community. To be eligible for a Complete Count Committee grant in the amount of $750, applicants must meet the following requirements: • Have submitted a written request to the U.S. Census Bureau to register as a Complete Count Committee for Census 2020 • Be a non-profit entity (501c3, government entity, school district, college or university) or operate under a fiscal agent.

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From page 1 age 5 and older have difficulty performing self-care activities such as dressing, bathing, or getting around inside the home. Employment rate: The employment rate of working-age people (ages 16 to 64) with disabilities in Minnesota was 48 percent, compared with 83 percent for working-age people without disabilities. Poverty: The poverty rate of working-age Minnesotans with disabilities was 24.3 percent in 2017, which is more than triple the poverty rate among working-age people without disabilities, 7.2 percent. Education attainment: Education Attainment dataset

• Agree to participate in one census outreach training provided by the MN State Demographic Center • Agree to participate in the Commit to Be Counted digital organizing campaign that will be managed by the MN State Demographic Center • Agree to use the grant for at least one of the following purposes: 1) Digital organizing; 2) Outreach to residents in high-density housing; or 3) Efforts to target historically undercounted communities.

The 2020 Census in Minnesota

As the 2020 Census approaches, what’s on the line

indicated that the proportion of people with disabilities with a university degree (bachelor's degree or higher) was 16 percent, less than half the nearly 40 percent rate among people without disabilities. Those distressing numbers, among many other measures, underscore the importance of Access Press’ vision and mission. Definitely, we have a lot of work to accomplish together to improve the lives of our fellow Minnesotans with disabilities. Your support of Access Press is crucial to our success in keeping the voice of all people with disabilities heard. In addition to my membership in the Access Press board, I serve on the board of the Minnesota Commission of Deaf, DeafBlind and Hard of Hearing, which serves as

What can your donation do?

Donations large and small are a great help to Access Press. Here are some ways donations help.

$30 Donation

Covers a one-year subscription for a low-income person with a disability. Our office receives many calls for people with disabilities who enjoy the newspaper, cannot afford to subscribe and cannot read it online. A gift subscription is a wonderful way to help the newspaper help its readers.

$100 Donation

Maintain one of many drop sites we have for Access Press in the community. We field many requests for drop sites and cannot accommodate them all.

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Helps cover the costs of writers and photographers for each issue.

CLASS ACTION From page 1

MMLA is pleased with the ruling. “Actions speak louder than words. For decades, DHS has made promises to our clients to provide services in the most integrated setting, and yet it has failed to honor that legal obligation, even though it is responsible for running the very program at issue in the suit,” said MMLA’s Litigation Director Justin Perl, lead counsel for the plaintiffs. “The current system is chock full of problems, and we are prepared to take the case to trial to protect the rights of the class members who have waited too long for DHS to do its job. We believe this case will improve the lives of all individuals living in group homes, by informing them of their housing options and supporting people with disabilities in an integrated setting in the community, just like people without disabilities. We need a consistent statewide system, as Judge Frank recognized, not one that is often dependent on the county in which one lives. It is time for DHS to stop shirking its responsibility to some of the most vulnerable members of our society. If it chooses not to do so, we are prepared to take the matter to trial in order to protect the rights of our clients.” As of Access

for Minnesotans? In a study to analyze the financial impact of census data on states, the George Washington Institute of Public Policy determined that in 2016 alone, Minnesota received more than $15 billion through 55 federal spending programs guided by data derived from the 2010 Census. Medicaid and federal student loans were the largest categories. It’s also important to note that, while high participation by Minnesotans in the 2010 Census resulted in our state retaining all of its congressional representation, population shifts coupled with a low response rate in a 2020 Census threaten to cost Minnesota a congressional district. An accurate count is essential to maintain our political representation as well as increase fair government funding of assistance to families. The Minneapolis Foundation is a partner of the Minnesota Census Mobilization Partnership, which was formed in 2016 to prepare for the 2020 Census. The state is poised for success because of key leadership from the Minnesota Council on Foundations, Minnesotans for the American Community Survey, and the Minnesota State Demographer’s Office. The Partnership’s success is also due to the ongoing input and participation of many diverse, cross-sector voices. Applications will be accepted until the allocated state funds are spent. If the eligibility criteria are met, a grant in the amount of $750 will be sent within three weeks of submitting the request. For more information, go to www.minneapolisfoundation.org

$350 Donation

Covers the costs of one month’s mailing, so our newspaper can be sent to Greater Minnesota destinations.

$500 Donation

Covers part of designing the print edition each month. Along with donations during our matching gifts drive, it’s also crucial for Access Press readers to continue to support and thank our advertisers. This issue is one in which we feature the Directory of Organizations. Many disability service businesses and organizations advertise services in the directory, which provides valuable one-stop shopping for our community members. Our print and online advertisers also help bring our readers the newspaper and website. Thank our advertisers the next time you do business with them. And if you patronize a disability community business that isn’t an advertiser, please put in a good word for Access Press. Thank you for your support!

Press deadline, DHS had not issued a response. The disability advocacy coalition ARRM has been an amicus party to the case. The issue of housing and services in group home settings has long been a difficult one for people with disabilities. Historically such facilities were and still are presented as a vast improvement over the large institutional settings where people were warehoused in the past. But all across the country, there has been debate over whether group homes provide a chance to be part of the community or if they are still a form of segregation. The plaintiffs in the Murphy case seek modifications to Minnesota’s residential service system to provide individuals with choices and prevent needless segregation of individuals in segregated residential settings. One request made throughout the case’s history is for more access to waiver services, which would allow people to do planning and look at options for moving out of facilities and into the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs. Timeliness of services under the Medicaid Act and violations of the ADA and RA are claimed as plaintiffs contend the state has failed to provide them with housing. The case has been a class action since September 2017.

the principal agency of the state to advocate on behalf of Minnesotans who are deaf, deafblind, and hard of hearing to ensure they have the same access to services, programs and opportunities as people with no disabilities. I am also a member of the State Cross-Agency Direct Care and Support Workforce Shortage Working Group, which has been working under the supervision of Olmstead Subcabinet on laying out a strategic vision addressing the crisis in the direct care and support workforce. In Minnesota, the number of unfilled direct support professional jobs started to increase dramatically around 2010, reaching a 20-year high in 2018, and the situation is expected to worsen over time, with thousands more direct support professionals needed in the coming years as baby boomers age and fewer people enter the workforce. I am also a selected member of the Minnesota Statewide Independent Living Council, awaiting formal appointment by the governor, so I can have another role in expanding the meaning of “accessibility” beyond physical structures, promoting community integration, and contributing to planning and policies necessary to provide independent living services to people with disabilities. At the Board of Directors of Access Press, I collaborate with the leadership and fellow board members on a wide range of activities that include my roles mentioned here in addition to more. Together and with your support, we can keep Access Press strong in advocating for the community of Minnesotans with disabilities. —Mohamed (Mourssi) Alfash, PhD, MBA, MPA, Access Press Board of Directors ■


October 10, 2019 Volume 30, Number 10

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FROM OUR COMMUNITY

She asks disability community to consider the End-Of-Life Options Act

RUEBEN ROSARIO

I testified before the Minnesota House my pain and allow me to Health & Human Services Policy Commitbe in relationship with my tee last month in strong support for the children, family and friends. End-of-Life Options Act, a bill that would But, when the time comes, authorize medical aid in dying for terminalI also want to have a good ly ill adults of sound mind. It would allow death. While I am still able individuals with fewer than six months to to speak for myself, I want live to obtain a medication they can self-into be able say good-bye and gest if their suffering becomes intolerable. die peacefully rather than I’ve been living with ovarian cancer for four deteriorate to the degree years and my health is on the decline. I’ve that doctors sedate me to undergone two major surgeries, 12 rounds unconsciousness while my of chemotherapy and have participated in family watches me slowly clinical trials. Few women with ovarian dwindle. Only when you've cancer live beyond five years. I am currently truly faced your own morin year four. tality or seen a loved one die As I look to my future, the natural procan you truly understand gression of this disease is grim. I’ve watched the importance of this bill. women in my cancer support group die, just I’m sharing this with the like the stats say, so I know what’s in store. I Access Press community Marianne Turnbull will likely have intestinal blockages and fisbecause so much of the tulas that lead to fecal drainage. I may have opposition to the End-ofsepsis. Fluid will build up in my abdomen and Life Option Act expressed at the lungs which will cause chest pain and shortness of breath. hearing came from members of the disability communiThe cancer-ridden fluid will have to be removed through ty. I heard two major concerns that I’d like to address in a large-bore needle inserted into my abdomen(again). As the spirit of open communication. the cancer spreads it can go to my vital organs, bones and One speaker took great offense at use of the term brain, my pain will increase, and I’ll become weaker. “death with dignity” and I agree. There is more than one I describe the gruesome details to explain why this way to live or die with dignity. As terminally ill people legislation is so important to me. I want to live for as long approach the end of life, they become unable to care for as I possibly can. I want the medical care that can ease themselves and are dependent on others. But, unlike

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people living with disabilities, they are dying. Each loss of function is a step closer to death and accompanied by suffering associated with the disease. I want the option to go out on my own terms when my suffering becomes unbearable. Only I can decide when I’ve had enough or what dignity means to me. That’s why I support this law. It’s all about autonomy and self-determination, and self-determination is a central tenet of the work I’ve done my entire life as a social worker. The other issue raised at the hearing was a concern about abuse. Some worried that insurance companies would deny care, especially to high-cost patients like those living with disabilities and recommend medical aid in dying instead. Or that doctors, families or others would use medical aid in dying as a method to end the life of vulnerable patients like those with disabilities. I know how hard the community has worked for fair and equal access to medical care and public services. But after 20 years of experience with medical aid in dying, Disability Rights Oregon (DRO) has declared that medical aid in dying poses no threat to people with disabilities. Not only has DRO received no complaints about abuse of the state’s Death with Dignity law, but, instead, they have received complaints that the medical-aid-in-dying law actually discriminates against the disabled by requiring self-ingestion. In the words of Stephen Hawking, “To keep someone alive against their wishes is the ultimate indignity.” I appreciate the opportunity to contribute to the conversation. Marianne Turnbull is a St. Paul resident.

In Memoriam f∏∏

Lasting legacy of disability advocacy - Marca Bristo, 1953– 2019 When she was paralyzed from the chest down in a 1977 diving accident, Marca Bristo recalled, “I lost my home, because it had stairs. I lost my job. I lost my income. I lost my health insurance, but I didn’t lose…that fighting spirit.” That fighting spirit was evident throughout the rest of her life as a local, national and international leader of the disability rights movement. Bristo, who was a member of the Rush University Medical Center Board of Trustees and a graduate of what is now the Rush University College of Nursing, died Sunday in her home in Chicago. She was 66 years old. In 1980 Bristo founded Access Living, a Chicagobased nonprofit organization that advocates and provides services for people with disabilities. Bristo remained the organization’s CEO until a few weeks before her death. Throughout her life, she was an agent for change. In 1984, along with other people with disabilities, Bristo physically blocked Chicago Transit Authority buses during protests and filed a lawsuit that forced the CTA to install lifts on buses and improve accessibility. Nationally, she helped to author the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the landmark 1990 law that outlawed discrimination against people with disabilities. “The law for the first time enshrined in federal law that disability is a normal part of the human condition and the world needed to change,” Bristo said in a Rush video reflecting on the law’s passage. Her advocacy also led to the first fair housing program in the country to address disability discrimination, the inclusion of disability issues in domestic violence law and the requirement for all televisions to have close-captioned decoders. Bristo’s perspective made a difference in countless ways at Rush and in other settings where she weighed in on access issues. In the early 1990s, prior to joining the Medical Center Board in 2008, she and colleagues from Access Living conducted an audit of the Medical Center’s facilities, providing Rush’s ADA Task Force with priorities for increasing access for people with disabilities. During the design phase for the tower that Rush opened in 2012, the building’s architects and engineers visited the new headquarters Access Living opened in 2007, which incorporated universal design standards – that is, features designed to be usable by all people, including people with disabilities. That visit resulted in the tower including universal design features such as carpet colors that provide better way finding for people with impaired vision and lower counters at reception areas for people in wheelchairs. Bristo also played a key role in ensuring the Tower restrooms were accessible. “I came over and looked at one of the mock patient rooms, and discovered pretty quickly that I couldn't go into the bathroom and close the door in my wheelchair because the door would get stuck on my chair when I tried to close it,” Bristo said in a 2015 interview. “They were already pretty finished, so I suggested, ‘Well, why don’t you just make the door swing both ways with hinges?’” Dr. Larry Goodman, former CEO of Rush University Medical Center and the Rush system, worked closely with Bristo over many years. “We are inspired by her extraordinary life,” he said. “Marca didn’t let her disability or anything else, stop her tireless pursuit of full accommodation of people with disabilities that would allow

them to live their lives as they choose and to make full use of their abilities. Rush is a better place for her work with us, and those of us who were fortunate to have known and worked with Marca are better for it as well.” President Bill Clinton appointed Bristo chairperson of the National Council on Disability, a position she held from 1994 to 2002. As the vice president of North America for Rehabilitation International, she participated in the negotiation for the United Nations’ Convention (UN) on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which the UN adopted in 2006. She was a co-founder and former president of the National Council on Independent Living and the most recent emeritus president of the U.S. International Council on Disabilities, a role that took her around the world advocating for people with disabilities. She was an adviser to President Obama and co-chair of Illinois Governor-elect J.B. Pritzker’s Transition Committee on Human Rights. In addition to the Rush board, Bristo served on the boards of Forefront and the Ford Foundation. Bristo received the Distinguished Service Award of the President of the United States in 1992; the Henry B. Betts Laureate, considered the Nobel Prize in the disability field, in 1993; and the 1993 United Way of Chicago Executive of the Year Award. She was named one of Chicago’s 100 Most Influential Women by Crain’s Chicago Business; made the Chicago Sun-Times’ list of 100 Most Powerful Women; and named one of Chicago magazine’s Chicagoans of the Year (in 2007). She received numerous other awards and honors. Raised in New York state on her family’s farm, Bristo earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Beloit College in Beloit, Wisconsin. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree in 1976 from what is now the Rush University College of Nursing, intending to be a midwife, and worked at Northwestern Medicine Prentice Women’s Hospital in the labor and delivery unit prior to her accident. There has been an outpouring of national and local leaders acknowledging Bristo’s many contributions.

“Without Marca’s work over the last 30 years, the Americans with Disabilities Act would not be in existence and I would not be a U.S. Senator,” said Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-IL), whom Bristo befriended while Duckworth was recovering from the loss of her legs in a combat injury. “Because she crawled up the steps of the United States capitol to pass the ADA, I get to roll through its corridors to cast my votes in the U.S. Senate … The disability community can thank Marca’s leadership, activism and sacrifice for the more inclusive society we live in today.” U.S. Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL) also paid tribute to Bristo, saying, “When she was paralyzed from the chest down in 1977, she pushed forward when others might have given up to lead an army of people with disabilities like her whose spirits are unyielding … Generations of Americans with disabilities will have Marca Bristo to thank for the freedoms they enjoy because she dedicated her life to them.” “Marca Bristo leaves an incredible legacy of making the world most just and accessible for everyone in her community,” said Governor Pritzker. “Her work will live on with the countless friends and colleagues she inspired, including me.” This article is excerpted from a longer article from Rush Medical Center. ■

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FROM OUR COMMUNITY

October 10, 2019 Volume 30, Number 10

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Be aware of important policy change or risk losing support by NAMI Minnesota In early September NAMI learned that a new policy to verify assets of some people on Medicaid went into effect on September 1. This largely impacts adults who are on Medical Assistance (MA) due to their disability (on a CADI waiver, MA-EPD, live in a long-term care facility, etc.) and whose eligibility is based on the amount of assets they have. It doesn’t include children. Under the new policy they must complete and sign a new form to allow the state to verify that their assets are not exceeding the limit. The state is mailing out this form between August 2019 and April 2020. Signed forms must be returned to the address listed in the letter. The problem with the policy is that individuals have only 10 days to return this form. If the form is not returned within this time period, the bulletin states that the person will lose their MA. DHS said that MA disability recipients will receive a second letter notifying them that they will lose their health insurance on the first of the month if they do not return this form in 10 days. There is no self-addressed stamped envelope with the form. Signed forms must be returned to the address listed in the letter. Mental health advocates have no problem with the policy itself, which requires people on MA due to their disability to fill out and sign a form so that DHS can verify that their assets do not exceed the eligibility limits. The law already places a limit on the amount of assets someone can own, and this just creates a process to verify the assets. This new policy impacts people on MA who are receiving long-term care, are on a disability waiver such as CADI, or are on MA-EPD. Advocates have a problem with the implementation of the policy that requires the form to be returned within 10 days. If this form is not returned within this time period, the bulletin states that the person will lose their MA. DHS said that MA disability recipients will receive a second letter notifying them that they will lose their health insurance on the first of the month if they do not return this form.

Your letters are welcome Access Press welcomes letters to the editor and commentary pieces from readers, on topics of interest to Minnesota’s disability community. Letters should be no more than 500 words, with 750 words per commentary. Ask the editors 161 St. Anthony Ave; #910 if more space is St. Paul, MN 55103 needed. Phone: 651-644-2133 Letters Fax: 651-644-2136 and guest Email: access@accesspress.org Website: www.accesspress.org commentaries must be signed by the authors or authors. With letters, a writer’s hometown is published but not a street address. Please send contact information in case the editors have questions about a letter or commentary. Contact information isn’t published unless the writer specifically requests that the newspaper do so. Pictures of the author can be published with a guest commentary but aren’t required. Access Press asks that letters and guest commentaries be specifically written for the newspaper. Letters must have a focus on disability issues and ideally, a focus on those issues as they affect Minnesotans. Form letters will not be published. Because Access Press is a non-profit publication and must follow regulations on political partisanship, political endorsement letters are not published. That is true for candidates’ endorsements as well as for ballot questions. Before making a submission writers are always encouraged to contact the newspaper to discuss ideas or to ask questions about From Our Community submissions, at 651-644-2133 or access@accesspress.org. Let the newspaper staff know if accommodations are needed to submit a letter or commentary. Letters and commentaries reflect the view of the authors and not the views of the staff and board of directors of Access Press. Deadline for the print edition of the newspaper is the 25th of each month, with publication the following month.

Ten days is simply too short a time period. It presumes that people’s addresses are current, that they open their mail daily or at least once a week, that they have an envelope and stamp, that they are at home and not in the hospital or residential treatment, and that they will be able to understand how to fill out the form without assistance. NAMI Minnesota is very concerned that people will not send the form back resulting in them losing their health insurance. “Ten days is simply not enough time,” said Sue Abderholden, executive director of NAMI Minnesota, “It presumes that people's addresses are current, that they open their mail daily or at least once a week, that they have an envelope and stamp and that they will be able to understand how to fill out the form without assistance.” It’s not uncommon for addresses not to be current and at times people’s symptoms make it difficult to stay on top of paperwork. “The end result will be that people will lose their health insurance,” said Shannah Mulvihill, executive director of Mental Health Minnesota. NAMI Minnesota is extremely disappointed with the way in which DHS has gotten the word out on this change. When the stakes are this high, it is simply not enough to

bury information about the ten-day timeline to return the asset verification form on page 6 of a department bulletin. Mental health advocates want to make sure that people who are on MA and their families know of this very important change. Any time people’s health insurance could be terminated there should be increased efforts to be sure that the general public knows and there should be a process to ensure that people don’t lose their health insurance due to poor addresses or the impact of the very symptoms that led to someone becoming eligible for MA. Another issue under the CADI waiver is that if someone is hospitalized more than 30-days they lose their CADI waiver and have to reapply and be reassessed. This can take anywhere from 30 to 90 days. Meanwhile the person is no longer hospitalized but also has no supports. If you or a loved one is receiving MA due to a disability; it is very important that you check your mail and promptly return this form to your county. If you aren’t going to meet the 10-day timeline or the deadline has passed, please contact your case manager or financial worker right away. Please contact us at namihelps@namimn.org if you have any questions about this process or you are at risk of losing your health insurance due to this change.


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REGIONAL NEWS Criminal charges against facility

Panel to look at human services reform Minnesota Governor Tim Walz has group to do so in the context of broad, announced the appointment of 11 forward-thinking recommendations Minnesotans to serve on the newly that will provide program efficiencies created Blue Ribbon Commission and produce healthier and fuller lives on Health and Human Services. for all Minnesotans at a sustainable Established by the 2019 Minnesota cost. Legislature, the group will help According to Malcolm, the state leaders craft a vision for longcommission’s discussions will not be term systemic reforms and identify limited to state government services. near-term strategies to improve “Sustainable improvements will not health outcomes, increase access, come through cost shifts that may fix reduce inequities and disparities, find one budget problem but create another,” administrative efficiencies, expand Malcolm said. “This work needs to be program integrity and steward informed by what we know about the real taxpayer dollars. cost drivers of health, and the broader The appointments were context of community conditions that Minnesota Governor Tim Walz announced September 20. Walz can make it easier or harder for people to thanked the appointees for their willingness to serve make better choices and for programs to deliver effective and highlighted their shared commitment to ensuring services.” that state health and human services programs are “This commission represents a new opportunity both effective and efficient in supporting the health to design and implement programs and services that and well-being of all Minnesotans. make a real difference for Minnesota residents and “Minnesotans rely on our health and human communities, while also maximizing the return on services programs to live full and productive lives. every dollar invested,” Harpstead said. “We want to That is why I am looking to this Blue Ribbon find ways to promote better health and fuller lives at a Commission to make recommendations on how to price we can afford – in that order.” improve outcomes, control costs in the short run and The appointees are Gayle Kvenvold, CEO, plan for the needs of the future,” Walz said. “With LeadingAge Minnesota; Sue Schettle, CEO, ARRM; this public private partnership, we are relying on lived Sida Ly-Xiong, national program manager, Robert Wood experience of program participants and expertise of Johnson Foundation; Jennifer DuPuis, associate director industry members to boost the impact of our work of health and human service, Fond du Lac Nation; Debra and ensure that our resources are invested wisely.” Krause, vice president, Minnesota Health Action Group; The appointments are announced after a series of Lisa Weed, executive vice president, SEIU Healthcare issues have dogged human services, including the Minnesota; Jennifer DeCubellis, director of Human resignation of former Commissioner Tony Lourey and Services and Public Health Department, Hennepin others in leadership posts, claims of misspent funds County; Sheila Kiscaden, county commissioner, and allegations of poor treatment of staff. Some state Olmsted County; Nona Ferguson, senior vice president lawmakers have called for splitting up the department. for Economic Assistance and Aging Services, Wilder The Blue Ribbon Commission, passed into law by Foundation; Shauna Reitmeier, CEO, Northwestern legislators and co-chaired by Department of Health Mental Health Center; and Julia Freeman, senior Commissioner Jan Malcolm and Department of organizer, Voices for Racial Justice. Human Services Commissioner Jodi Harpstead, Legislative appointees to the commission are will produce a report by October 2020 that includes Representatives Tina Liebling and Joe Schomacker; recommendations for specific health and human and Senators Rich Draheim and Matt Klein. services cost savings. The governor is charging the (Source: Minnesota DHS)

Paralympic trials to be in Minneapolis

The United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee announced that Minneapolis will host next year's team trials. The trials determine what athletes will be on Team USA at the Paralympic Games in Tokyo. One of the swimmers hoping to punch her ticket to Japan during the trials is Mallory Weggemann from Eagan. In 2008, however, Weggemann feared her days in the pool were over. She went in for an epidural to alleviate back pain, but the procedure left her paralyzed from the waist down instead. "When you're injured, they don't serve up life on a silver platter saying, 'here's everything you'll be able to do someday,'" Weggemann said. "It's very gloom. Rightfully so." A few months later, Minneapolis hosted the U.S. Trials for the 2008 Paralympic Games. Her family insisted Weggemann come with them to watch the swimming events at the University of Minnesota's Aquatic Center. "I always joke the only thing that got me to this pool ... was my very loving, very pushy, very supportive family that essentially didn't give me a choice," said

Weggemann. The athletes Weggemann met that day she credits with changing her outlook on life. Within 48 hours, she was back in the water learning adaptive swimming. "Being able to have that shift in perspective and be challenged to see it that way so early on following my own injury in so many ways saved me," Weggemann said. The rest, as they say, is history. Weggemann went on to win gold at the 2012 Paralympic Games. Now, nearly 12 years following her paralysis, she holds 15 world titles. "You don't have to live your life focusing on your disability," Weggemann said. "You can truly choose to change your perspective and your ability and what you're capable of doing." Weggemann will compete in next year's team trials with the advantage of it being held here in her home state. She hopes to make Team USA and ultimately another gold medal. But Weggemann also hopes the athletes competing will serve as motivation and an inspiration for others just as they did for her in 2008. (Source: KSTP TV)

In a rare criminal action against a senior care facility, Attorney General Keith Ellison has filed dozens of criminal charges against the staff and former owner of a northern Minnesota senior home where residents were allegedly beaten, robbed and denied vital medical care. The assisted-living facility, Chappy’s Golden Shores of Hill City, had its license revoked early this year after an investigation by the Minnesota Department of Health found multiple violations of state care regulations. Local and state authorities expanded their probe following allegations that a 58-year-old resident with dementia died from brain injuries after being severely beaten by caregivers at the facility. Ellison’s office in September took the unusual step of filing more than 70 criminal counts against the former owner, managers and staff of the senior home, following a far-reaching probe that included a review of more than 1 million pages of evidence. The charges include manslaughter, racketeering, theft, operating without a license and multiple counts of criminal neglect of vulnerable adults. Chappy’s former owner, Theresa Olson, was arrested and faces 25 charges, including one count of manslaughter for her role in the death of a resident. “Every Minnesotan deserves to live with dignity and respect. This does not exclude the sick and the vulnerable — it includes everyone,” Ellison said in a statement. In 2018 state health regulators uncovered what appeared to be alarming levels of violence — including physical, sexual and verbal abuse — at Chappy’s, and repeated cover-up efforts by facility administrators. Details of the abuse spurred such outrage that senior advocates repeatedly cited them as they lobbied for broader licensing legislation that passed the Minnesota Legislature this spring. The Health Department’s swift action to shut down Chappy’s, and the far-reaching scope of the criminal charges, appear to signal a tougher stance against elder abuse by state officials, who had come under criticism for insufficient efforts to protect vulnerable adults in senior care facilities. (Source: Star Tribune)

Popular disc jockey steps down After 17 years at the microphone at KS95 and many more years elsewhere, Larry "Moon" Thompson bid farewell to faithful listeners October 4. A long battle with multiple sclerosis forced his retirement. “My career ended at 7pm tonight. To all who sent me messages and posted such kind words.... Thank you," Moon wrote in a tweet. “And thank you for listening all these years. The team I had at KS95 was the dream team. Special thanks to Staci. Bangs. Blake. And Hubbard Radio. You helped my dreams come true."” Moon announced in August that his health was forcing him to step away from radio, as he continues to battle multiple sclerosis. He was diagnosed with the disease in 2005. “Sometimes in life you don't get to choose what goes on and my health is now making my decisions for me,” Moon said when he shocked listeners with his announcement in August. “For the last 14 years this thing has taken things away from me that I love. Like dancing with my wife, and playing with my kids and stuff. It's made a mess of things. But I just kept coming back, and I got to play radio star. And I'm so damn glad I did.” (Source: Bring Me the News)

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October 10, 2019 Volume 30, Number 10

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October 10, 2019 Volume 30, Number 10

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Do great things. Let us tackle the small stuff. • • • •

PCA Choice Personal Support and Respite Consumer Support Grant Consumer Directed Community Supports

lifeworks.org | 651-454-2732


October 10, 2019 Volume 30, Number 10

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DIRECTORY of Organizations HOME HEALTH CARE SERVICES Canoeing at Vinland’s main campus in Loretto, Minnesota

Mary T. Inc. Home Health Care

V-763-862-5426

TF-888-255-6400

www.marytinc.com

V-763-772-9963

TF-888-255-6400

www.marytinc.com/hospice_care.php

HOSPICE CARE Mary T. Inc. Hospice Care

HOUSING-CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING Vinland Center provides drug and alcohol treatment for adults with cognitive disabilities. We make all possible accommodations for cognitive deficits and individual learning styles. Located in Loretto, Minnesota — just 20 miles west of Minneapolis.

866.956.7612 • VinlandCenter.org

Ability Solutions & TwinCity Stairlifts

V-952-808-3646

F-952-808-2647

www.twincitystairlifts.com

AccessAbility Options, Inc.

V-763-571-6789

F-800-632-0798

www.accessoptionsmn.com

Accessibility Design

V-952-925-0301

F-952-926-7712

www.accessibilitydesign.com

Accessible Homes, LLC.

V-612-978-1054

F-651-554-3085

www.accessiblehomesllc.net

Lifeway Mobility

V-651-323-1190

TF-800-561-2333

www.lifewaymobility.com

Accessible Space, Inc. (ASI)

V-651-645-7271

TTY-800-466-7722

www.accessiblespace.org

Ebenezer Park Apartments

V-612-879-2233

TTY-612-879-8889

www.fairviewebenezer.org

National Handicap Housing Institute, Inc

V-651-639-9799

F-651-639-9699

www.nhhiaccessiblehousing.com

Rental Housing by Mary T. Inc.

V-763-862-5432

TF-888-255-6400

www.marytinc.com

HOUSING-RENTAL

INFORMATION/REFERRAL RESOURCES ADA Minnesota; a program within MCIL

V-651-603-2015

TF-888-630-9793

www.adaminnesota.org

Minnesota Council on Disability

V/TTY-651-361-7800

TTY-800-945-8913

www.disability.state.mn.us

PACER Center, Inc.

V-952-838-9000

TTY-952-838-0190

www.pacer.org

United Cerebral Palsy of Minnesota

V-651-265-7361

www.ucpmn.org

INSURANCE AssuredPartners of Minnesota, LLC

V-651-294-0710

TF-800-886-7201

F-651-644-9137

V-612-334-5970

TF-800-292-4150

www.mndlc.org

LEGAL Minnesota Disability Law Center

MEDICAL SUPPLIES/EQUIPMENT Handi Medical Supply

V-651-644-9770

F-651-644-0602

www.handimedical.com

Phoenix Medical Services Inc.

V-651-636-0848

F-651-636-5746

www.PhoenixMedical.org

Avivo

V-612-752-8074

F-612-752-8001

www.avivomn.org

Community Involvement Programs (CIP)

V-612-362-4434

V-612-362-4452

www.cipmn.org

MENTAL HEALTH

Accessible Space, Inc. Accessible, Affordable Housing For adults with qualifying disabilities. Over 50 barrier-free apartment communities & homes throughout the Metropolitan Area, Greater Minnesota, & throughout the Midwest. Locations also available in many other states. Income limits apply. Immediate openings Marshall, Willmar and Hibbing, Minnesota

Affordable Senior Apartments 'PS RVBMJGZJOH TFOJPS IPVTFIPMET BHF BOE CFUUFS .FUSP HSFBUFS MN locations available. Accessible apts. available for seniors in these locations. Income limits apply.

Housing with Care* t IPVS "TTJTUFE -JWJOH 4FSWJDFT t *OEFQFOEFOU -JWJOH 4FSWJDFT t 3FTJEFOU $PNNVOJUZ 4FUUJOH "EVMU 'PTUFS $BSF &MJHJCJMJUZ GPS PS TFMFDUJPO PG "4* TFSWJDFT JT OPU SFRVJSFE UP RVBMJGZ GPS IPVTJOH "4* TFSWJDFT BSF OPU BWBJMBCMF JO BMM MPDBUJPOT

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Call 800-466-7722 TTY/TDD 800-627-3529 www.accessiblespace.org

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October 10, 2019 Volume 30, Number 10

Pg 10

DIRECTORY of Organizations MENTAL HEALTH Fraser

V-612-861-1688

F-612-861-6050

www.fraser.org

National Alliance on Mental Illness of MN

V-651-645-2948

TF-888-NAMI-Helps

www.namihelps.org

Reach for Resources

V-952-200-3030

F-952-229-4468

www.reachforresources.org

Vinland National Center

V/TTY-763-479-3555 F-763-479-2605

www.vinlandcenter.org

Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare

V-651-290-8707

www.gillettechildrens.org

Wound Healing Center

V-715-268-0175

PHYSICIANS TTY-715-268-0177

www.AmeryMedicalCenter.org

RECREATION-ADAPTIVE HOBBY/EXERCISE/SPORTS/ARTS Courage Kenny Rehabilition Institute

V-612-775-2277

Drama Interaction, 501(c)3

V-952-220-1676

218-726-4762

www.allinahealth.org/couragekenny www.cokartscenter.com/ dramainteraction501c3.html

Highland Friendship Club

V-651-698-4096

www.highlandfriendshipclub.org

Mind Body Solutions

V-952-473-3700

www.mindbodysolutions.org

Reach for Resources

V-952-200-3030

F-952-229-4468

www.reachforresources.org

Upstream Arts

V-612-331-4584

F-612-353-6638

www.upstreamarts.org

RECREATION-DINING/BARS/CLUBS V-651-698-4096

Highland Friendship Club

www.highlandfriendshipclub.org

RECREATION-MOVIES/PERFORMING ARTS/SPECTATOR SPORTS/MUSEUM

...because everyone has a right to enjoy life.

Children's Theatre Company

V-612-874-0400

www.childrenstheatre.org

Highland Friendship Club

V-651-698-4096

www.highlandfriendshipclub.org

RECREATION-TRAVEL/CAMPING Hammer Travel

V-952-277-2458

TF-877-345-8599

www.hammertravel.com

True Friends

V-952-852-0101

TF-800-450-8376

www.truefriends.org

Ventures Travel

V-952-852-0107

TF-866-692-7400

www.venturestravel.org

Wilderness Inquiry

V-612-676-9400

TF-800-728-0719

www.wildernessinquiry.org

REHABILITATION (PHYSICAL, OCCUPATIONAL, SPEECH, AUDIOLOGY THERAPISTS) A Chance to Grow

V-612-789-1236

V-612-706-5555

www.actg.org

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute

V-763-588-0811

V-612-262-7979

www.allinahealth.org/couragekenny

DeafBlind Services of Minnesota (DBSM)

V-612-362-8454

TTY-612-362-8422

www.dbsmllc.org

Fraser

V-612-767-5180

F-612-861-6050

www.fraser.org

Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare

V-651-291-2848

TF-800-719-4040

www.gillettechildrens.org

In Home Personal Care

V-763-546-1000

F-763-546-1018

www.inhomepersonalcare.com

RESIDENTIAL/GROUP HOME PROGRAMS

Connect with us for Employment, Day and Self-Directed Services.

800.829.7110 MyMRCI.org

Community Involvement Programs (CIP)

V-612-362-4403

F-612-362-4417

www.cipmn.org

Fraser

V-612-861-1688

F-612-861-6050

www.fraser.org

Hammer Residences

V-952-473-1261

F-952-473-8629

www.Hammer.org

Living Well Disability Services

V-651-688-8808

F-651-688-8892

www.livingwell.org

Phoenix Residence

V-651-227-7655

F-651-227-6847

www.phoenixresidence.org

REM Minnesota

V-952-945-4952

F-952-922-6885

www.remminnesota.org

Restart, Inc.

V-952-767-3350

F-952-767-3351

www.restartincmn.org

Wingspan Life Resources

V-651-644-2665x100

V-651-646-3846

ww.wingspanlife.org

Can Do Canines

V-763-331-3000

F-763-331-3009

www.can-do-canines.org

Helping Paws, Inc.

V-952-988-9359

F-952-988-9296

www.helpingpaws.org

SERVICE ANIMALS Pawsitive Perspectives Assistance Dogs (PawPADs) V-612-643-5671

www.PawPADS.org

SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Ebenezer Care Center

V-612-879-2262

TTY-612-879-8889

www.fairviewebenezer.org

V-952-767-3350

F-952-767-3351

www.restartincmn.org

SOCIAL SERVICES Restart, Inc.

TECHNOLOGY Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare

V-651-290-8707

PACER Center, Inc.

V-952-838-9000

www.gillettechildrens.org

SMILES Center for Independent Living

V/TTY-507-345-7139 TF-888-676-6498

TTY-952-838-0190

www.pacer.org

www.smilescil.org

TRANSPORTATION RENTAL/SALES/MODIFICATION V-651-635-0655

TF-800-788-7479

www.imedmobility.com

Vision Loss Resources

V-612-843-3400

F-612-872-0189

www.visionlossresources.org

Volunteer Braille Services

V-763-544-2880

F-763-544-3612

www.vbsmn.org

IMED Mobility

VISION IMPAIRMENT

WAIVER CASE MANAGEMENT Fraser

V-612-861-1688

F-612-861-6050

www.fraser.org

Reach for Resources

V-952-200-3030

F-952-229-4468

www.reachforresources.org

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facebook.com/accesspress

twitter.com/accesspress


October 10, 2019 Volume 30, Number 10

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PEOPLE & PLACES Actor, Saints co-owner Bill Murray lends judging talents to Co-Lab by Chris Juhn This year’s annual Co-Lab event at the Show Gallery in St. Paul’s Lowertown neighborhood again had a unique twist. Actor, writer and Saints baseball team co-owner Bill Murray lent his time and talents to the event for another year. In September the Show Gallery hosted its fifth annual Co-Lab event. Co-Lab is an event where artists with disabilities get paired up with other artists who may or may not have disabilities. The pairings are based on personality and indicated interests. Over the next few months the paired up artists work on a project that will be shown in the gallery and juried by Murray. The Show Gallery is dedicated to showcasing artists with disabilities create and display artwork. It hosts shows throughout the year of disabled artists’ works as well as participating in the Lowertown Art Crawl twice a year. Murray came into the picture when he went to visit the Show Gallery. Gallery founder and owner Winna Bernard said, “I answered the door one day and it was Bill Murray. I panicked a little bit (as it was her first time meeting him). He asked what we needed, and I said, ‘a ladder.’ After I received the ladder, I ended up asking if he would be a judge. He’s been a judge every year since. He knows what an award from him could do for an artist’s career.” The event had around 250 people that attended the event, making it a full house. A total of three Bill Murray Awards were given out to six artists. Chloe Elizabeth Russel is a volunteer extensively involved in The Show Gallery. “My favorite part about Co Lab is piecing together which artists could possibly paired with one another based on their personality surveys. Sometimes the thing that these artists have in common is not so obvious, and maybe they even work in entirely different mediums and have totally different life experiences,” she said. “But they have indicated enough common interests to suggest they might have a lot to talk about and explore. I love to watch first hand as they untangle the mystery of their pairing. More often than not, they create the most compelling artwork.” This year’s Co-Lab show featured many artworks in many different styles. They had everything from paintings, an arcade machine with scrolls and LED lights that told stories with artwork in a scroll that moved, as well as interactive pieces. The Show Gallery Lowertown is a collaboration between two founding partner organizations. The Show and MSS, a nonprofit organization serving adults with disabilities in the Twin Cities. To learn more about the Co-Lab event or the Show Gallery, go to www.theshowgallerylowertown.org

Design n Bloom is award winner

Highlighting the importance of employer partnerships to improve the lives of people with disabilities, ProAct, Inc. in Eagan presented a 2019 Business Partner of the Year award to Design n Bloom, a family-owned florist in Eagan. Design n Bloom has provided special flower arrangements for nearly 20 years. It hired several individuals from ProAct to help operate the shop that produces its decorative and aromatic creations. The company was honored before a crowd of about 400 at ProAct’s Annual Recognition Banquet at Envision Event Center in Oakdale September 27. Kenow’s husband Steve, who assists with the business, spoke about the individuals from ProAct who work for the florist. “There’s an enthusiasm for getting the job done, no matter what it is. We want to applaud all of you for that,” said Kenow, who also works a separate job in the business sector. “Finding employees who come to work on time,

happy to be there and excited is rare these days. It’s just a joy to be able to be part of this and know that everyone has something to contribute. Thank you.” ProAct President and CEO Steve Ditschler said partners like Design n Bloom are wonderful examples who work closely with the nonprofit to provide opportunities for the people it serves. “We are grateful for their role in enhancing the quality of life for people with disabilities.” Company Owner Gayle Kenow said her home-based flower business saw changes after flower shops in the area began closing. “We’ve been growing, that’s for sure,” she said. Several individuals from ProAct help her with cleaning, floral wrapping, and organization. There are job coaches, as well, and Steve Kenow sometimes assists with deliveries in the evening. The floral designer with a bubbly demeanor said she treats others the way she wants to be treated. “We’re all a team here,” said Kenow. “Those who come here are so considerate. We’ve never had any worries.” The business has operated since 2001. ProAct Employment Development Manager Anna Cahak said Kenow recognizes the strengths of individuals from ProAct and supports them in their employment goals. “She provides continued partnership and outstanding support of employment opportunities for individuals looking to gain community employment,” said Cahak.

Families with autism have new partners The Autism Society of Minnesota (AuSM) has announced a partnership with the Somali American Parent Association (SAPA) and the Multicultural Autism Action Network (MAAN). Fueled by a twoyear Minnesota Department of Human Services Innovations Grant, this partnership will focus on supporting the metro area’s multicultural population with autism and similar disabilities. AuSM, SAPA, and MAAN will plan outreach to

families in order to provide education about navigation of quality, culturally appropriate services, and supports. Additionally, there will be several opportunities for facilitated participation in community opportunities for inclusive programming. “The fabric of the autism community is threaded with diversity that is often underserved by programs and services that are designed for a perceived majority,” said Ellie Wilson, AuSM executive director. “This project is about deepening meaningful connections with multicultural communities so that we can learn how to better include, serve, and advocate for our whole community, and all who belong to it.” Mohamed Mohamud, SAPA executive director, said, “Autism touches a great number within the Somali community, and many back home in Somalia didn’t even know autism existed. People didn’t have the opportunity to be educated. This grant empowers them to learn more about autism and their feelings. We really appreciate this kind of collaboration with AuSM and MAAN.” SAPA leaders believe that the outreach afforded by PEOPLE & PLACES To page 13

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October 10, 2019 Volume 30, Number 10

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ENJOY! Here is one more reminder that VSA Minnesota has shut down. The Accessible Arts Calendar and other VSA Minnesota’s arts accessibility resources move to the Minnesota Access Alliance, a collaborative group of accessibility coordinators based at the State Arts Board (https:// mnaccess.org/, or https://calendar.mnaccess.org, 651-539-2689. Services for artists with disabilities, including the Open Flow Forum gatherings, will also be provided by Springboard for the Arts. Contact Andy Sturdevant at 651-294-0907 or www.springboardforthearts.org School arts residencies for students with disabilities and teaching artists will be handled by Julie Strand at COMPAS, www.compas.org, 651-292-3249, 651-292-3254. Access Improvement Grants are now in the hands of the Metro Regional Arts Council: www.mrac.org, 651-645-0402; or Scott Artley, Accessibility Program Director, 651-523-6384. Accessibility assistance can be found through the Minnesota State Arts Board (www.arts. state.mn.us, 651-215-1600 or 800-866-2787), regional arts councils and disability organizations such as the Minnesota Council on Disabilities (www.disability.state.mn.us, 651-361-7800, 800-945-8913). Aubergine Park Square Theatre presents the story of a Korean family facing death and changes, at Park Square Theatre, Andy Boss Thrust Stage, 20 W. 7th Place, St. Paul. OC offered 7:30 p.m. Fri-Sat, Oct. 18-19 and 2 p.m. Sun, Oct. 20. Assistive listening devices available. Tickets AD/ASL/OC single ticket discount is half-price for patron and one guest with code ACC (regular $40, $55; previews $27, $37). Other discounts available. FFI: 651-291-7005, www.parksquaretheatre.org The Glass Menagerie Guthrie Theater presents Tennessee Williams’ story of fragile illusions in a Southern family, at Guthrie Theater, Wurtele Thrust Stage, 818 2nd St. S., Mpls. AD and OC offered 7:30 p.m. Fri, Oct. 11. AD and ASL offered 1 p.m. Sat, Oct. 12. Sensory tour available at 10:30 a.m. ASL offered 7:30 p.m. Fri, Oct. 18. Tickets reduced to $20 for AD/ASL, $25 for OC (regular $15-93). FFI: 612-377-2224, www.guthrietheater.org The Hollow Trademark Theater presents a world premiere production about the dualities of human nature and the mysticism of the outdoors, at Tek Box, in the Cowles Center for Dance & the Performing Arts, 516 Hennepin Ave., Mpls. ASL and AD offered 7:30 p.m. Thu, Oct. 10. Tickets $20. Discounts available. FFI: www.trademarktheater.org The Rocky Horror Show Park Square Theatre presents the sci-fi fantasy and a chance to do the time warp, at Park Square Theatre, Mainstage, 20 W. 7th Place, St. Paul. Assistive listening devices available. AD offered 7:30 p.m. Fri, Oct. 11. ASL offered 2 p.m. Sun, Oct. 13. OC offered 7:30 p.m. Fri, Oct. 25; 6 p.m. Sat, Oct. 26 and 2 p.m. Sun, Oct. 27. AD/ASL/OC single ticket discount is half-price for patron and one guest with code ACC (regular $55-$70). Other discounts available. FFI: 651-291-7005, www.parksquaretheatre.org Circus Abyssinia: Ethiopian Dreams Children’s Theatre Company presents a unique circus, at Children’s Theatre, United Health Group Stage, 2400 3rd Ave. S., Mpls. AD and ASL offered 7 p.m. Fri, Oct. 11. SF 7 p.m. Fri, Oct. 18. SF performances provide a supportive and welcoming environment for children and families affected by autism spectrum disorders and other sensory, social, and cognitive disabilities. Features include reduction of loud or jarring sounds, reductions in flashing or strobe lights, modification of the house lights, audience members are free to talk or move during the show, extra staff and volunteer support, designated quiet room and take a break space, and guidance and sensory supports (fidgets, earplugs, noise cancelling ear-muffs) available in the lobby before the show. Audience members are welcome to bring their own manipulatives, seat cushions, comfort objects and extra support items to the show. Families may select their own seats. If special assistance or a buffer seat is needed, call 612874-0400 or email access@childrenstheatre.org. For pre-visit resources, go to www.childrenstheatre.org/plan/sensory-friendly-programming. Children’s Theatre Company uses dynamic ticket pricing. To reserve ASL/ AD seating, visit: https://my.childrenstheatre.org and click on the ASL or AD link at the bottom of the page. Assistive listening devices, induction loop system, Braille programs and sensory tours available upon request. Discounts available. FFI: 612-874-0400, www.childrenstheatre.org Gloria: A Life History Theatre presents the story of the life of Gloria Steinem, at 30 E. 10th St., St. Paul. ASL and AD offered 2 p.m. Sun, Oct. 13. OC offered 7:30 p.m. Sat, Oct. 19 and 2 p.m. Sun, Oct. 20. Specify services needed. The accessible entrance is on the east side of the building off Cedar

HISTORY THEATRE

Arts program changes

Gloria: A Life is playing at History Theatre. More information is on this page. Gallery tours in ASL Walker Art Center, 725 Vineland Place, Mpls, offers free gallery tours in ASL. Next dates are 6 p.m. Thu, Oct. 17 and Nov. 21. No reservations required. A different exhibit is viewed each time. FFI: 612-375-7564, www.walkerart.org/calendar/2019/gallery-tours-in-asl Mike Birbiglia: The New One Actor Mike Birbiglia shares his hilarious take on parenting, at Ordway Music Theater, 345 Washington, St. Paul. OC offered 7:30 p.m. Thu, Oct. 17. ASL and AD offered 2 p.m. Sat, Oct. 19. Tickets start at $39. Braille, large-print programs and infrared listening systems available at Patron Services in Ordway’s first level lobby. If using ASL or Captioning, recommended seating locations (subject to availability) are ORCH-RGT G 307-310, ORCH-RGT H 308-311, ORCH-RGT J 309-312. FFI: 651-2244222, www.ordway.org/accessible-performances Comedy of Errors Theatre in the Round Players presents a twist on Shakespeare’s comedy about long-lost twins, at Theatre in the Round, 245 Cedar Ave., Mpls. AD offered 2 p.m. Sun, Oct. 20. Tactile tour at 1 p.m. upon request based on reservations. Large-print programs and assisted-listening devices available at every performance. Tickets $22. Discounts available. FFI: 612-333-3010, www.theatreintheround.org Science Museum Sensory Friendly Sundays Science Museum of Minnesota, 120 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul, hosts Sensory Friendly Sundays, 9 a.m. Sun, Oct. 20. Early access to galleries, and a lights-up, sounds-down Omnitheater show, which starts at 9 a.m. Tickets $8.95 to $24.95. Discounts for individuals, families and groups with limited incomes and free for working direct support staff when visiting with a client. Other tools for making a museum visit successful for visitors with autism and other sensory processing issues include pre-visit social narratives available for download online, SF companion scripts for Omnitheater films, noise-dampening headphones, SF visitors’ guide, and a renovated wellness room designed to give visitors a private, out-of-the-way space to nurse a child, pray or simply recharge away from the hustle and bustle of a busy museum. Located on Level 4 near the Native American ENJOY! To page 13

Street. The theatre has six spaces for wheelchairs, plus companion seats. Hearing enhancement devices and Braille or large print playbills are available. Tickets reduced to $25 for OC/AD/ASL patrons (regular $2556). Discounts available. FFI: 651-292-4323, www.historytheatre.com

Jimmy and Lorraine: A Musing Pillsbury House Theatre presents a meditation on the American political climate of the late 1950s, at Pillsbury House Theatre, 3501 Chicago Ave. S., Mpls. ASL offered 7:30 p.m. Sat, Oct. 12. Tickets are pick-the-price (regular $25). FFI: 612-825-0459, www.pillsburyhouseandtheatre.org The Most Happy Fella Skylark Opera Theatre presents a delightful musical productions, at the Historic Mounds Theatre, 1029 Hudson Road, St. Paul. ASL offered 7:30 p.m. Sat, Oct. 12. Tickets $50. Discounts available. FFI: Ticketworks, 612343-3390 or 1-888-779-0079, www.skylarkopera.org Sensory Friendly Sundays at the Walker Walker Art Center, 725 Vineland Place, Mpls, hosts Sensory Friendly Sundays, 8-11 a.m. Sun, Oct. 13. It is a monthly, free event for kids, teens and adults with autism spectrum disorder or sensory sensitivities and their families, offering the opportunity to make art together, explore the galleries, watch a short film, or just hang out in a different setting. The galleries will be closed to all other visitors, allowing guests to enjoy the museum in a safe environment where accommodations such as quiet spaces, headphones and fidgets can be provided. In order to ensure an optimal experience and avoid crowds, reserve space ahead of time online. This program was created in consultation with AuSM and the University of Minnesota’s Occupational Therapy Program. Upcoming dates Nov. 10 and Dec. 8. FFI: 612-375-7610, www.walkerart.org Bakken Museum Sensory Friendly Sunday Sensory Friendly Sundays, 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. the second Sun of every month. Next date is Oct. 13. 3537 Zenith Ave S, Mpls. The days allow people with autism spectrum disorders and sensory processing differences to have an enjoyable and interactive learning experience in a comfortable and accepting environment. Events will include modified programming for diverse sensory needs and specialized staff training. Bakken Museum is the world's only library and museum devoted to medical electricity. Its SF program was developed in consultation with AuSM. The museum will continue be open to the general public from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sun. Activities are free with museum admission, which starts at $10 for adults and includes discounts for children and seniors. FFI: www.thebakken.org Mozart the Adventurer Minnesota Orchestra and conductor Osmo Vänskä present a relaxed performance for audiences of all abilities, at 1111 Nicollet Mall, Mpls. ASL, OC, SENS offered 2 p.m. Sun, October 13, Noon pre-concert lobby activities and 3 p.m. post-concert lobby activities. Pre-concert lobby activities are free. The concert itself has a range of ticket prices. FFI: 612-371-5656, www.minnesotaorchestra.org

Our award-winning access services can help make your visit a memorable one.

GUTHRIE THEATER

Connect with us to learn more.

The Glass Menagerie is playing at Guthrie Theater. More information is on this page.

612.377.2224 / guthrietheater.org accessibility@guthrietheater.org Access programs at the Guthrie are sponsored by Travelers, Medtronic and Xcel Foundation


October 10, 2019 Volume 30, Number 10

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OPPORTUNITIES CHILDREN AND FAMILIES PACER workshop sampling PACER Center offers many useful free or low-cost workshops and other resources for families of children with any disabilities. Workshops are at PACER Center, 8161 Normandale Blvd., Bloomington, unless specified. Workshops are offered throughout the state, with some workshops available online. Advance registration is required for all workshops. At least 48 hours’ notice is needed for interpretation. Many workshops are live-streamed. Check out PACER’s website and link to the newsletter of statewide workshops that allows participants to pick and choose sessions designed for their needs. Getting it Right: Mental Health, Special Education, and 504 Plans is offered 6:30-8:30 p.m. Tue, Oct. 15 in Winona. The workshop will provide information on the challenges students with mental health needs have in the school setting and offer tips and strategies on providing instruction and support at school. Co-sponsored by the Hiawatha Valley Mental Health Center. Supplemental Security Income Benefits and Employment is offered 6:30-8:30 p.m. Tue, Oct. 15 in Montevideo. Learn how your youth can apply for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to help meet his or her postsecondary education, training, employment, and independent living goals. This workshop will include information on CareerForce center services, Vocational Rehabilitation Pre Employment Transition Services, and Pre-Ets for high school students will also be provided. What’s So Special about Turning Three is offered 6:30-8:30 p.m. Tue, Oct. 15 at PACER Center. Before their child’s third birthday, families on Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSP) will learn how to actively participate in the transition from Early Intervention services to Preschool Special Education services or other community-based services. Sponsored by PACER’s Family Information and Resources Project. Funding is made possible in part from the Minnesota Department of Education. The source of the funds is from federal awards, Special Education part B. Tech for Teens Club: Intro to Coding and Video Games is offered 10 a.m.-noon Sat, Oct. 19 at PACER Center. The two-hour hands-on workshop will introduce teens (boys and girls) with disabilities to the fundamentals of coding. Teens will create interactive games and stories while developing basic programming skills. This workshop is designed for students with basic computer skills, but no previous coding knowledge is required. Students of all abilities are encouraged to attend. Getting it Right: Mental Health and Special Education is offered 6:30-8:30 p.m. Mon, Oct. 21 in Bemidji and at PACER Center. The workshop will provide information on the challenges students with mental health needs have in the school setting and offer tips and strategies for using the IEP to provide support and instruction. FFI: PACER, 952-838-9000, 800-537-2237, www.pacer.org

INFO & ASSISTANCE The Metropolitan Center for Independent Living provides many life skills classes as well as fun outings and events for people with disabilities. MCIL is at 530 N. Robert Street, St Paul and most activities are there or start there. Classes and events are listed on the website, www.mcil-mn.org. Click on “Classes Groups and Sessions” for updated information or to print their calendar. Please give two weeks’ notice if the alternative format or other accommodations are needed. Events are free, accessible and mostly scent-free. FFI: 651-603-2030 Get to Know NAMI NAMI Minnesota (National Alliance on Mental Illness) hosts a free Get to Know NAMI class 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Wed, Oct. 16, at NAMI

ENJOY! From page 12

exhibition, the room is outfitted with soft lighting, a door that locks, a changing table, rocking chair, and other seating. Ask at the exhibits entrance for sound dampening headphones, a timer, or a kit containing headphones, fidgets, gloves, and sunglasses. It is available to visitors on a firstcome, first-served basis. The program was created in consultation with AusM. FFI: 651-221-9444 or 800-221-9444, www.smm.org Pipeline Penumbra Theatre presents the story of a young student who is caught in two worlds, at Penumbra Theatre, 270 N. Kent St., St. Paul. ASL offered 7:30 p.m. Sat, Oct. 26. Tickets $40. Discounts available, including for ASL tickets. FFI: 651-224-3180, boxoffice@penumbratheatre.org Tour for People with Memory Loss At 10 a.m. on the first Tue of every month the historic James J. Hill House, 240 Summit Ave., St. Paul, offers a sensory-based tour designed for people with memory loss and their caregivers. Each themed tour, usually an hour or less, highlights three rooms and is followed by an optional social time until 11:30 a.m. with pastries and coffee. Private group tours available for care facilities. Next tours Tue, Nov. 5 and Dec. 3. Free but reservations required. FFI: 651-297-2555, www.mnhs.org Open Walking Shadow Theatre Company presents a story of a complex magic act, at ArtBox Theater, 4200 E. 54th St., Mpls. AD offered 7:30 p.m. Thu, Oct. 24 and 2 p.m. Sun, Nov. 3, ASL offered 7:30 p.m. Sun, Oct. 27. Tickets $10-38. ASL/AD patrons

Minnesota, 1919 University Ave., Suite 400, St. Paul. Meet NAMI staff and volunteers and hear firsthand how NAMI’s work directly affects the lives of children and adults with mental illnesses and their families. Learn about education and support programs and how to advocate for better mental health policies. FFI: Kay King, 651-6452948 x113, kking@namimn.org Classes and support in Sauk Rapids Independent Lifestyles, Inc., 215 North Benton Dr., Sauk Rapids, offers many groups and classes, for free or a small fee. These include advocates for independence, post-polio and Parkinson’s support groups, and sports including bowling. Learn self-dense and improve fitness with a free one-month introductory classes, for both adapted martial arts and Tae Guk Known Do. Wear loose clothing and bring a bottle of water. The classes are on Fridays unless there is a holiday. Scott Ridlon is instructor. FFI: 320-2677717, 320-281-2042 Mental health support offered NAMI Minnesota offers more than 500 free educational classes and presentations statewide each year, along with help in navigating the mental health system. NAMI also has more than 70 free support groups for people living with a mental illness and their families. In the Twin Cities NAMI has about two dozen family support groups, more than 20 support groups for people living with a mental illness, anxiety support groups, groups for veterans and other groups. Led by trained facilitators, groups provide help and support. Parent resource groups are facilitated by a parent who has a child with a mental illness and who has been trained to lead support groups. A group meets 6:30-8 p.m. on the second and fourth Monday at Eagle Brook Church, 2401 East Buffalo St., White Bear Lake. FFI: Jody Lyons 651-645-2948 x109. Family support groups help families who have a relative with a mental illness. A group meets at 6:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wed at Centennial United Methodist Church, 1524 Co. Rd. C-2 West, Roseville. FFI: Anne Mae. 651-484-0599. Open Door Anxiety and Panic support groups help people cope with anxiety disorders. One group meets 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. the second and fourth Thu in Room 104, Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 700 Snelling Ave. S., St. Paul. Another group meets 6:30-8 p.m. the first and third Thu at Woodland Hills Church, 1740 Van Dyke St., St. Paul. A peer support group is offered for LGBTQ adults living with a mental illness. The group meets 1-2:30 p.m. Sat, Living Table United Church of Christ, 3805 E. 40th St, Mpls. FFI: David, 612-920-3925, 651645-2948. Young Adult NAMI Connection is a free support group for persons ages 16-20. One group meets 7-8:30 the first and third Thu at Friends Meeting House, 1725 Grand Ave., St. Paul. A group also meets 7-8:30 p.m. on the first and third Thu at Dental Office of Dr. Crandall & Associates, 2300 East Highway 96, White Bear Lake. The group is facilitated by young adults who live with mental illnesses and are doing well in recovery. A full calendar of all events is offered online. FFI: 651645-2948, www.namihelps.org St. Cloud Area Parkinson's Disease group St. Cloud Area Parkinson’s Disease Support Group typically meets 1-2 p.m. third Mon of each month at ILICIL Independent Lifestyles, 215 N. Benton Dr., Sauk Rapids. Meetings are open to those diagnosed with Parkinson’s, their families, caregivers and the general public. The free group provides support, education, and awareness about the disease. FFI: 320-529-9000 Adult support groups offered AuSM offers free support groups for adults with autism spectrum

pay what one can, $5 minimum in advance; $1 minimum at the door on space-available basis. Brown Paper Tickets: online or 800-838-3006. All seating is general admission. The front row of the auditorium is wheelchair accessible. If additional seating requirements or accommodations, contact 612-375-0300, www.walkingshadow.org Horn and Piano Duo Minnesota Orchestra presents an inclusive SF concert at 11 a.m. Sat, Oct 26at Orchestra Hall, 1111 Nicollet Mall, Mpls. It features Minnesota Orchestra horn player Brian Jensen, pianist Charles Scarborough, and talented guest musicians from the audience. It is hosted by Lyndie Walker, MT-BC, of Toneworks Music Therapy Services. The concert takes place in a relaxed environment where audience members are welcome to be who they are and enjoy music with family and friends. Fidgets, noise-canceling headphones and quiet spaces are available at all SF concerts, and attendees can also access online preparatory materials fur weeks before the concert. Stand-alone chairs provide for flexible seating and open space is available for those who wish to sit on the floor or move around the room. Doors open at 10 a.m. Tickets $6.25. FFI: 612-3715656, www.minnesotaorchestra.org/buy/tickets/ browse-calendar/eventdetail/1466/-/sensoryfriendly-concert-horn-and-piano-duo Snow White Children’s Theatre Company presents a unique adaptation of the classic fairy tale, at Children’s Theatre Company, Cargill Stage, 2400 3rd Ave. S., Mpls. AD and ASL offered 7 p.m. Fri, Nov. 1. SF offered 7 p.m. Fri, Dec. 6. SF performances provide a supportive and welcoming environment for children and families affected by autism spectrum disorders and other sensory, social, and

disorder. Groups include those for adult family members, women with autism spectrum disorders and independent adults with autism. Check the website for upcoming groups. Groups meet at the AuSM offices at 2380 Wycliff St. FFI: 651-647-1083 ext. 10, www.ausm.org Vision loss group offers activities Vision Loss Resources provides free and low-cost activities in the Twin Cities for people who are blind or visually impaired. Check out the newly redone website, accessible on smartphones, tablets, and laptops. Life skills classes for those with low vision; card games, craft classes, book clubs, walking groups, dinners out, special outings and technology classes are among the offerings. Participants need to RVSP to participate, at least three working days prior to an event. The calendar is also available on the Vision Loss Resources website and as a printable large-print PDF document for those who wish to print their own or additional copies. FFI: RSVP hotline, 612-843-3439; activity line and audio calendar, 612-253-5155, www.visionlossresources.org

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Networking and support The Autism Society of Minnesota (AuSM) Professional Networking Group meetings bring together mental health professionals who provide support to individuals on the autism spectrum together to learn. Each meeting will focus on a topic, such as therapeutic alliance, support services, or other problem-solving challenges. An AuSM counseling and consulting services staff member will present a case example and then facilitate an open group discussion for sharing relevant cases. Troubleshoot challenges and learn from other professionals. All meetings are held from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at AuSM's office, 2380 Wycliff St. #102, St. Paul. Upcoming dates include Nov. 18, Jan. 27 and March 23. RSVP. FFI: autismcounseling@ausm.org, 651-647-1083

VOLUNTEER

Book readers sought Volunteers are a valuable resource at Radio Talking Book, broadcasting local news and information programs to blind and print-impaired listeners from sites around the state and at the Communication Center in St. Paul. The goal is to provide accurate and timely information to our thousands of listeners throughout Minnesota and across the nation. FFI: Roberta Kitlinski, 651-539-1423 Be a tutor Minnesota Reading Corps and Minnesota Math Corps are seeking 1,700 tutors for the 2019-20 school year by asking residents to Help Minnesota Be More. Give Your Time As A Tutor. Both full- and part-time tutors are being recruited to begin a year of paid service this fall. By joining Reading Corps or Math Corps, individuals will be helping more than 35,000 students statewide. Reading Corps and Math Corps are statewide initiatives to help every Minnesota student become a successful reader by the end of third grade, and proficient in math by the end of eighth grade. Tutors are being sought for three different levels of commitment: 35, 25 or 18 hours a week. Tutors receive a stipend every two weeks and can earn up to an additional $4,200 for student loans or tuition, which can be gifted to a family member if the tutor is 55 or older. Many tutors also qualify for additional benefits like free health insurance and child care assistance. Sign up soon as tutors start work in August. FFI: www. minnesotareadingcorps.org, www.minnesotamathcorps.org Open the door to education Help adults reach their educational goals and earn their GED. Tutor, teach or assist in a classroom with the Minnesota Literacy Council. Give 2-3 hours a week and help people expand their opportunities and change their lives through education. Provides training and support and accommodations for volunteers with disabilities. FFI: Allison, 651-2519110, volunteer@mnliteracy.org, http://tinyurl.com/adult-opportunities

cognitive disabilities. Features include reduction of loud or jarring sounds, reductions in flashing or strobe lights, modification of the house lights, audience members are free to talk or move during the show, extra staff and volunteer support, designated quiet room and take a break space, and guidance and sensory supports (fidgets, earplugs, noise cancelling ear-muffs) available in the lobby before the show. Audience members are welcome to bring their own manipulatives, seat cushions, comfort objects and extra support items to the show. Families may select their own seats. If special assistance or a buffer seat is

needed, call 612-874-0400 or email access@ childrenstheatre.org. For pre-visit resources, go to www.childrenstheatre.org/plan/sensory-friendlyprogramming. Children’s Theatre Company uses dynamic ticket pricing. To reserve ASL/ AD seating, visit: https://my.childrenstheatre.org and click on the ASL or AD link at the bottom of the page. Assistive listening devices, induction loop system, Braille programs and sensory tours available upon request. Discounts available. FFI: 612-874-0400, www.childrenstheatre.org

DIAMOND HILL TOWNHOMES Diamond Hill Townhomes is a great property located near the Minneapolis International Airport. We have spacious two and three bedroom townhomes that are HUD subsidized and rent is 30% of the total household’s adjusted gross income. Diamond Hill Townhomes may be accepting applications for our large number of mobility impaired accessible units. Please contact us for more information.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Please call 612-726-9341.


Polar Plungers start time of chills, thrills

October 10, 2019 Volume 30, Number 10

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RADIO TALKING BOOK

Books available through library services Books broadcast on the Minnesota Radio Talking Book Network are available through the Minnesota Braille and Talking Book Library in Faribault. The catalog is online at www.mnbtbl.org, click on the link Search the Library Catalog. Persons living outside of Minnesota may obtain copies of books via an inter-library loan by contacting their home state’s Network Library for the National Library Service. Listen to the Minnesota Radio Talking Book, either live or archived programs, on the Internet at www.mnssb.org/rtb or on handheld devices via the SERO app (iOS or Android). Call the Talking Book Library for a password to the site. To find more about events go to the Facebook site, Minnesota Radio Talking Book. Call 1-800-722-0550, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon through Fri with questions. Daily book listings is also on the National Federation for the Blind (NFB) Newsline. Register for the NFB Newsline by calling 651-539-1424. Access Press is featured on It Makes a Difference, 9 p.m. Sun. The sampling published monthly in Access Press doesn’t represent the full array of programming. Many more programs and books are available. Donate to the State Services for the Blind at mn.gov/ deed/ssbdonate Chautauqua* Monday – Friday 6 a.m. Range, nonfiction by David Epstein, 2019. Generalists bring increased skill, creativity, and innovation to their work in all fields. Read by Robb Empson. 12 broadcasts; begins Mon, Oct. 14. The Consciousness Instinct, nonfiction by Michael S. Gazzaniga, 2019. Neuroscientist Michael S. Gazzinaga explains a fascinating discovery about the origins of human perceptions. Read by Lannois Neely. 11 broadcasts; begins Wed, Oct. 30. Bookworm* Monday – Friday noon Horse, fiction by Talley English, 2018. When Teagan’s father abandons the family, she must deal with starting at a new

school, all the while training a strong-willed horse called Ian. Read by Myrna Smith. 10 broadcasts; Nights in White Castle, nonfiction by Steve Rushin, 2019. Sportswriter Steve Rushin chronicles growing up in the Minneapolis suburb of Bloomington. Read by Glenn Miller. 10 broadcasts; begins Tue, Oct. 29. The Writer’s Voice* Monday – Friday 1 p.m. If You Lived Here, You’d be Home by Now, nonfiction by Christopher Ingram, 2019. Journalist Christopher Ingram published a dismissive article about Red Lake County, Minnesota. After readers’ reactions encouraged him to visit, soon he had fallen for the place. Read by Brenda Powell. Nine broadcasts; begins Mon, Oct. 28. Choice Reading* Monday – Friday 2 p.m. America Was Hard to Find, Fiction by Kathleen Alcott, 2019. In 1957 an astronaut and a radical meet up in the Mojave Desert. Thirty years later, their son sets out to find his estranged father. Read by Don Gerlach. 16 broadcasts; begins Mon, Oct. 14. – L, S Afternoon Report* Monday – Friday 4 p.m. Why Honor Matters, nonfiction by Tamler Sommers, 2018. “Honor cultures” include courage, integrity, responsibility, and a code of behavior. Read by John Mandeville. Nine broadcasts; begins Mon, Oct. 21 – L, R Night Journey* Monday – Friday 7 p.m. The Voice Inside, fiction by Brian Freeman, 2018. After a serial killer is sent away for life, detective Frost Easton discovers that his best friend planted false evidence on the accused. Read by John Marsicano. 12 broadcasts; begins Mon, Oct. 14. – V, L Justice Comes Home, fiction by Michael Giorgio, 2014. While a small Wisconsin town celebrates the end of World War II, the son of the town’s wealthiest family is murdered. Read by Diane Ladenson. Nine broadcasts; begins Wed, Oct. 30. – V, L

Potpourri* Monday – Friday 9 p.m. Monsieur Mediocre, nonfiction by John von Sothen, 2019. When journalist John von Sothen moved to Paris with his actress wife, he planned on staying only a few years. But 15 years later, France is his home. Read by Eileen Barratt. 10 broadcasts; begins Mon, Oct. 21. Good Night Owl* Monday – Friday 10 p.m. Girls Like Us, fiction by Cristina Alger, 2019. FBI agent Nell Flynn goes home to Long Island for her father’s funeral. But she finds herself in a murder investigation that points to her father. Read by Laura Young. Eight broadcasts; begins Wed, Oct. 16. – L, V Oddjobs, fiction by Heide Goody and Iain Grant, 2016. Sinister beings from beyond have come to pull the plug on humanity – but a young woman called Morag Murray still needs to finish the paperwork. Read by John Holden. 12 broadcasts; begins Mon, Oct. 28. Weekend Program Books Your Personal World, 1 p.m. Sat, presents Taking the Lead by Derek Hough, read by Beverly Burchett. (L) For the Younger Set, 11 a.m. Sun, presents White Rabbit by Caleb Roehrig, read by Peter Danbury (V, S, L); followed by Crap Kingdom by D.C. Pierson, read by Jim Tarbox (L). Poetic Reflections, noon Sun, presents This Light Falls in Many Forms by Kathie Giorgio, read by Cintra Godfrey (L); followed by Mourning Songs by Grace Schulman, read by Scott McKinney. The Great North, 4 p.m. Sun, presents Diesel Heart by Melvin Whitfield Carter Jr., read by John Mandeville. (V, S, L, R) All times listed are Central Standard Time. Abbreviations: V – violent content, RE – racial epithets, L – strong language, G – gory descriptions, S – sexual situations

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October 10, 2019 Volume 30, Number 10 DISABILITY VIEWPOINTS Disability Viewpoints, an award-winning public access television show by and for people with disabilities, is coming back with a new partnership with St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN). Mark Hughes and his team of co-hosts feature current news, interesting people and groups, and events in Minnesota’s disability community. Some shows are archived on YouTube, so search for Disability Viewpoints on that web channel to find past shows.

AROUND THE DIAL

Disability Viewpoints has a Facebook page, and past shows are highlighted on www. ctv15.org

DISABILITY AND PROGRESS Disability and Progress is aired on KFAI Radio, 6-7 p.m. Thursdays. Host Sam Jasmine and guests explore a wide range of topics important to people with disabilities. KFAI is at 90.3 FM in Minneapolis and 106.7 in St. Paul. Listeners outside of the Twin Cities, or those looking for a past show, will find show archives online at www.kfai.org. Look for the link to archives and for Disability and Progress. Listeners need to have a Real Audio Player downloaded so that this will work. A smartphone app is also available to hear archived programs. To comment or make suggestions, for future shows, call 612341-3144, or email disabilityandprogress@samjasmine.com. Note this is a new email address. Postal mail may be sent to KFAI, 1808 Riverside Ave. S., Disability and Progress, Box 116, Minneapolis MN 55454. HOODWAVE DISABILITY RADIO Daniel and Leah Hood have launched the HoodWave Disability Radio podcast. They believe that having a voice is very important, and a way to influence change. The Hoods are looking for podcast content and seek partners, as well as a quiet place to produce podcasts. Learn more at www.hoodwave.org or the HoodWave radio Facebook page, at HoodWave Disability Radio. OTHER PROGRAMMING Access Press is interested in listing other regularly scheduled broadcast, cablecast or podcast programs by and for people with disabilities. Programming needs to have a tie to Minnesota or the Upper Midwest. Anyone with questions can contact jane@ accesspress.org

PEOPLE & PLACES

From page 11 this grant fits well with its mission to reach the Somali community with education and resources that will help all families affected by autism. Fatima Molas, chairperson of MAAN sees the grant as an opportunity for stronger services through the partnerships, saying “MAAN has been supporting multicultural families with children with disabilities for some time, but the ability to partner with AuSM and SAPA advances our work in ways we would not be able to accomplish alone.” Throughout the next two years, grant partners seek to increase community participation and engagement. Several events will offer information on home- and community-based services, including employment, education and housing. Sensory- and disability-friendly community cultural events also are being coordinated. All partners see the need for multicultural information and resources to support the population with autism and similar disabilities. Molas said, “The innovation grant model allows us to expand our work, develop internal capacity, and most importantly, support more families of autistic children in our multicultural communities.”

Opioid advisory group set

Nineteen individuals selected for their personal and professional experience with opioid addiction and its consequences will help guide Minnesota’s efforts to combat a drug and overdose epidemic that has spread to every region of the state. The members of the newly appointed Opioid Epidemic Response Advisory Council bring a wide range of background and expertise to address a complex and multi-faceted problem. The council held its first meeting in September. Its first report and project funding recommendations are due in March of 2020. “The opioid scourge has claimed hundreds of lives, torn families apart, strained health care systems, exploded county budgets and ravaged our tribal communities,” said Gov. Tim Walz. “This advisory council will help us understand the problem from a variety of perspectives and help us

set priorities as we try to repair and recover from that damage.” Among other things, the council will make recommendations about projects and initiatives to be funded through the Opiate Epidemic Response Fund, which is expected to raise $20 million annually through fees collected from opioid prescribers, drug manufacturers and distributors. The council is made up of legislative and tribal leaders; health care professionals; experts in addiction treatment, mental illness and public health; a state district court judge; individuals in long-term recovery from opioid addiction; and those who experience chronic pain. Eleven of the council’s 19 voting members were appointed by Human Services Commissioner Jodi Harpstead, with another eight directly appointed by statute. The council is under the administration of the Department of Human Services. “Nearly 175 people applied for a seat on the council, so there was great public interest in finding measurable, effective and sustainable solutions to this problem,” said Commissioner Harpstead. “In addition to experience, members were chosen with geographic and gender diversity in mind. We placed special emphasis on including members from communities especially hard-hit by the epidemic.” Voting members include Willie Pearl Evans, Anoka; Kathryn L. Nevins, Nevis; Darin Prescott, Morton; Nicole Anderson, Onamia; Esther Muturi, New Hope; Alexia Reed Holtum, Minnetonka; Wendy Burt, St. Paul; Roy Sutherland, Minneapolis; Sarah Grosshuesch, Delano; Toni Napier, Ogema, Judge D. Korey Wahwassuck, Grand Rapids; Peter Carlson, Cannon Falls; Dr. Anne Pylkas, St. Paul; Katrina Howard, Minneapolis; and Dr. Halena Gazelka, Rochester. Legislators on the committee are Rep. Erin Koegel, Spring Lake Park; Rep. Dave Baker, Willmar; Sen. Mark Koran, North Branch and Sen. Chris Eaton, Brooklyn Center, MN Non-voting members include the commissioner of the Department of Human Services or a delegate; commissioner of the Department of Health or a delegate; and the commissioner of the Department of Corrections or a delegate.

END OF LIFE BILL From page 1

list of states that allows physicians and nonphysicians to make life and death decisions for vulnerable patients.” The group recommends instead that policymakers focus on quality end-of-life treatment and care such as improving palliative care, expanding public education around end-of-life decision-making, creating more accommodations for people with disabilities, and ensuring healthcare access in rural areas. Speaking at the hearing was Californian Stephanie Packer. She is terminally ill with pulmonary fibrosis as a result of diffuse scleroderma. Her home state has a law allowing assisted deaths. Packer noted that the drug costs for medications to assist with suicide are much cheaper than those she needs to stay alive, with some of her medications no longer being covered. Packer’s message to the House

Notice: Opening the 1 Bedroom Wait List

Project-Based Section 8/202; rent based on income for qualified applicants Applications may be downloaded at www.westonkaestates.commonbond.org starting at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, September 23, 2019. Completed applications must be received by mail. All qualified applicant will be placed on the Waiting List in the order they are received. CommonBond Communities

Equal Housing Opportunity

committee was that insurance companies, if given the option, would not help people health and live. "So, if there are other options out there to save them money, they are good businesspeople, and they are going to do it,” she said. But others said a physician-assisted suicide law would help people control their own destinies, end suffering and allow people to die on their own terms. Speakers discussed their own medical conditions and those of beloved family members. They described in detail how people who don’t have the right to make end-of-life decisions often struggle with painful illnesses. St. Paul resident Marianne Turnbull has stage 4 ovarian cancer. Turnbull told the committee she wants to be able to die on her own terms. "I want to live as long as I can. I want the medical care that can ease my pain and allow me to be in relationship

CLASSIFIEDS

Lake, chair of the Senate's Health and Human Services Finance and Policy Committee, is in opposition and instead wants state lawmakers to focus on palliative care needs. Benson called physician-assisted suicide a “dangerous policy” and said it won’t be heard in the Senate. She is especially concerned about people who live with mental illness and about people who may see physician-assisted suicide as a less expensive option to keeping someone alive. Benson issued a statement saying that people with disabilities are "at the greatest risk of outside influence clouding their personal judgment.” Testimony indicated sharp divisions in the medical, personal care and faith communities. One large and diverse coalition leading the charge against the bill is the Minnesota Alliance for Ethical Healthcare. The group also held a press conference to voice its objections. “This bill sets the stage for a treacherous healthcare future in Minnesota because it could make our state a suicide tourism destination,” said Kathy Ware, nurse and advocate for people with disabilities. “The bill lacks appropriate safeguards to protect poor, elderly, disabled and vulnerable persons and puts them at greatest risk. Minnesotans don’t deserve this.” “This is a dangerous bill that threatens to undermine quality, ethical health care in Minnesota,” said Dr. Neal Buddensiek, chief medical officer for Benedictine Health System in Shoreview. “If passed, Minnesota would be added to a small

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with my children, my family and my friends. But when the time comes, I want a good death,” she said. “I want to die at home. I want to be surrounded by people who love me.” (A commentary by Turnbull appears on page four of this issue of Access Press.) Some testimony in support of the bill drew on Oregon’s experience. In Oregon, 249 people obtained life-ending prescriptions under the state's law in 2018 and 168 of those individuals died after taking the drugs, as of January of this year. Eleven of those received the drugs before 2018. Seventy-nine percent of those who were prescribed the drugs were 65 or older, according to the Oregon Health Authority, and 63 percent had cancer. Rep. Mike Freiberg, DFL-Golden Valley, is the House’s chief sponsor of the bill. “At the end of the day this is about the patient,” he said. “This is about what patients are going through and the government not telling them what they have to do and how they should live the end of their lives.” The current version of Minnesota’s bill would allow people to request the drugs if they have less than six months to live. Two health care providers would have to sign off on the lethal dose. Under current Minnesota law, those who assist a suicide can face felony charges. In 2015, a jury in Dakota County found the corporation Final Exit Network guilty of helping an Apple Valley woman end her life. This fall an Eden Prairie man was found guilty of assisting his wife’s suicide in 2018, after she had lived with disabilities for most of her life. ■

For Rent Calvary Center Apts: 7650 Golden Valley Road, Golden Valley, MN. A Section 8 building now accepting applications for our waiting list. Call 9 am to 4 pm, Mon – Fri 763-546-4988 for an application. Equal Opportunity Housing. Find your new home with At Home Apartments. Call 651-224-1234 or visit AtHomeApartments.com for an apartment or town home. Equal Opportunity Housing. Classified rates: $15 (first 18 words) and 65¢ per word thereafter. Classified ads prepaid. Mail to: Access Press, Capitol Ridge Inn Offices; 161 St. Anthony Ave; #910; St. Paul, MN 55103; Phone: 651-644-2133; Fax 651-644-2136; Email: access@accesspress.org


October 10, 2019 Volume 30, Number 10

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