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DAILY NEWS IN ENGLISH

Liberians still seek justice for war crimes

Peterson Sonyah was only 16 years old when he sought refuge in St Peterʼs Lutheran church on the outskirts of the Liberian capital, Monrovia. It was 1990, and Liberiaʼs first civil war had already been raging for a year. As rebels laid siege to Monrovia, an estimated 2,000 people crammed in the church, hoping to avoid the violence Troops loyal to then president Samuel K. Doe broke into the church killing, raping, setting fires, and sparing only the lives of those able to bribe them. 600 people died. "When the soldiers stormed the building, everyone was crying: men, women and children. They were killing innocent people. I lost my father, my uncle and my cousins, seven persons in all," Sonyah recalled. Like other survivors of Liberiaʼs two civil wars, which raged from 1989-1997 and 1999-2003, Peterson Sonyah is still waiting for justice.

Divers rescue all Thai boys and coach from cave Rescue workers have successfully brought out all the members of a local young football team from a cave in northern Thailand, ensuring a happy ending to a 17-day ordeal that had gripped the world. Earlier in the day, authorities sent rescue teams into Tham Luang Nang Non cave for the third and final stage of an against-the-odds operation to extract the remaining members of the "Wild Boars" football team. Skilled divers navigating tight, winding tunnels successfully brought eight boys from the flooded cave complex during missions on Sunday and Monday. Tuesdayʼs push aimed to free the four remaining children and their 25-year-old coach. "We are not sure if this is a miracle, a science, or what," a post on the Navy SEALs Facebook page read. "All the 13 Wild Boars are now out of the cave."

157/2018 • 12 JULY, 2018

German interior minister presents his migration master plan German Interior Minister Horst Seehofer has presented his longawaited asylum master plan

Astronaut Maurer: Caves are ʼa completely different worldʼ DW: What was the most difficult aspect of caving for you? Matthias Maurer: There

are different aspects. One is the technical aspect. You have to learn the different skills so that you can climb. Basically caving is climbing, but underground. Itʼs also about teamwork because you have a task in a team and you can only be successful as a team. And you have to adapt to the environment which I have to say was also quite challenging. What correlations are

there between caving and exploration on the moon or drilling on Mars? What kind of practical things could you learn caving that would be potentially applicable on a planet or on a moon? We did two different training exercises at ESA. One is the caving for team-work fostering so that you be‐ come a good team member and you learn to interact with your colleagues.

German Interior Minister Horst Seehofer has presented his longawaited asylum "master plan." But he did not include the lastminute compromises made with coalition partners last week, which averted a government crisis. Interior Minister Horst Seehofer finally got to present his migration "master plan" to the press on Tuesday, a month after it was blocked at the last minute by Chancellor Angela Merkel, precipitating a crisis in theGerman government that almost cost them both their jobs. But the minister does not appear to have been out to calm the waters, calling reporters to a press conference in the Interior Ministry to present a plan that did not include the 11th-hour compromises made by the government last week, which averted his resignation. Instead, Seehofer, who is also head of the Christian Social Union (CSU), the Bavarian sister party to Merkelʼs Christian Democratic Union (CDU), emphasized that "this isnʼt a master plan of the coalition, but a master plan of this house." He was referring to the Interior Ministry, but could also be presenting a plan by his party. The document published on Tuesday, he said, had been finalized on July 4, which meant that it did not include the compromises made last week with Merkel and with the coalitionʼs ju-

nior partner, the Social Democratic Party (SPD). He also admitted that it was not yet clear which measures contained in the plan the center-left would agree to. Perhaps most provocatively, Seehoferʼs plan still contained the term "transit centers," which the SPD had vetoed in favor of "transit procedures," and which has already been ditched by the government he represents. Still, the interior minister refused to admit it was a provocation – at least not in so many words. "It is not a provocation, but if you like, you could also see it that way," he told the Bild newspaper elliptically. In its introduction, the plan also demands that "asylum seekers work actively on their asylum procedures. We want to stop people disappearing during or after their asylum procedures, or hide their real identities." Seehoferʼs "master plan," now effectively published after it has gone out of date, included so-called transit centers situated at the German-Austrian border, in which asylum seekers would be held if another country was found to be responsible for their applications.

Chinese dissident Liu Xia arrival in Germany: ʼA gift to the German governmentʼ Human rights activist Tienchi MartinLiao, editor of Liu Xiaoboʼs works, has been a friend of the Nobel Peace Prize winnerʼs family for years. With peace prize winner Liao Yiwu, Nobel Literature Prize winner Herta Müller and many other intellectuals in Germany, she has worked for the release of Liu Xia. Martin-Liao, an author, translator and publisher, lives in Cologne and heads the unofficial Chinese PEN organization helping writers at risk, a position she took on in 2009 after Liu Xiaobo was arrested.

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157/2018 • 12 July, 2018

Ethiopiaʼs Anuak refugees are wary of returning home

It took Okwalla Ochang Cham (above with his family) two years to complete the dangerous journey from his home country of Ethiopia to South Sudan. "I had no money for transport up until South Sudan so I had to walk most of the way," he told DW. In April, Cham finally reached his destination – the Gorom refugee settlement, some 25 km north of South Sudanʼs capital of Juba – where he was reunited with his wife and three children. 29-yearold Cham is relived to be in the relative safety of the camp. Heʼs an Anuak, an ethnic minority group living in western Ethiopia in the fertile state of Gambela, which borders South Sudan. For decades, the Anuak have experienced government persecution, alongside conflicts with other ethnic groups who were forcibly resettled to the region. Most recently, investment projects, such as sugar cane production, have led to the Anuak losing large areas of ancestral lands to foreign corporations – intensifying local violence. Heʼs an Anuak, an ethnic minority group living in western Ethiopia in the fertile state of Gambela, which borders South Sudan. For decades, the Anuak have experienced government persecution, alongside conflicts with other ethnic groups who were forcibly resettled to the region. Most recently, investment projects, such as sugar cane production, have led to the Anuak losing large areas of ancestral lands to foreign corporations – intensifying local violence.

German Interior Ministry bans biker gang Osmanen Germania BC Germany has banned Turkishnationalist biker gang Osmanen Germania BC, accusing the group of carrying out violent crimes. Officials believe the gang has ties to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoganʼs government. German Interior Minister Horst Seehofer outlawedbiker group Osmanen Germania BC(Germania Ottomans) on Tuesday, banning them from all activity. "The club presents a serious danger for individual legally protected rights and for the general public," the ministry said in a statement. 2

Domestic pigs help protect Serbiaʼs forests Efforts are underway to ensure this ecologically friendly tradition doesnʼt die out

While in many countries, pigs are brought up in confined spaces, Serbia has a long tradition of rearing the animals in the forest. Project aim: The use of traditional agricultural practices to prevent biodiversity loss and improve water management Project size: 17,000 hectares of state forest to be protected from intensive land use Project partners: German development agency, GIZ, Germanyʼs Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), Serbian Ministry for Environmental Protection, Novi Sad Nature Conservation Project budget: €3.5 million ($4.08 million) Time was, Serbian pig farmers kept their domestic animals in the forest, allowing them to feed on the natural bounty offered

Western Balkans are vital to curb migration and fight terrorism in Europe Michael Roth: We want to send a clear signal that the situation in the Balkans is of outstanding importance for the European Union. We remain committed toEU accession prospects, we are drafting expectations, but we also want to assist in practical terms, i.e. help strengthenthe rule of law, most notably help create prospects for the younger generation, and contribute to regional cooperation and, especially, reconciliation. No one should abandon the Western Balkans, particularly not at this point. In this respect, this conference in London is an im-

by the woodland floor. Despite the fact that this approach means they save on feed costs and are producing what could be potentially classed as lucrative organic meat, the practice is dying out, particularly among younger generations of farmers. But the German development agency GIZ is trying to breathe new life into the old tradition on the grounds that forest pigrearing has a positive impact on biodiversity. Itʼs part of a broader project to explore connections between old-fashioned farming techniques and environmental management. portant one. Will there be further com‐ mitments with respect to funding? We have already made a number of financial pledges. Now itʼs important to bring projects already agreed upon to a successful conclusion. Iʼm rather impatient in this regard. On the assets side, there are several positive developments, for example the Regional Youth Cooperation Office, whose primary goal is to bring together members of the younger generation. In this area, I would like to see the implementation of several more projects.

A dark time for democracy in Turkey In the 1990s when he was still the mayor of Istanbul, Recep Tayyip Erdogan supposedly said, "Democracy

Trump lashes out at NYT over report that US opposed breastfeeding resolution The US "strongly supports breast feeding," US President Donald Trump tweeted on Monday, after the New York Times(NYT) published a story claiming the US used threats in an attempt to water down a resolution on breastfeeding earlier this year. According to the NYT, the US pushed back against the document proposed by Ecuador during a World Health Organization meeting in Geneva this spring. The document said "that motherʼs milk is healthiest for children and countries should strive to limit the inaccurate or misleading marketing of breast milk substitutes," the NYT reported. However, the US sought to remove the paragraphs calling on states to "protect, promote and support breastfeeding" and restrict the promotion of food products that could be harmful to young children. When their suggestions were dismissed, an American delegate reportedly threatened Ecuador and other countries that planned to support the resolution. The paper says the US embraced "the interests of infant formula manufacturers." "The Americans were blunt: If Ecuador refused to drop the resolution, Washington would unleash punishing trade measures and withdraw crucial military aid," the newspaper said. "The Ecuadorean government quickly acquiesced."

is like a streetcar. When I arrive at my stop, I get off." The 64-year-old has now reached his stop. Hisenthronement as Turkish president, complete with a personally customizedconstitution, means he can govern the country with nearly unlimited powers — by decree. Going forward, the parliament will barely play a role. Instead, it will be Erdogan appointing and Erdogan dismissing, whether judges, ministers or teachers. The more than18,000 civil servants who he dismissed over the weekendwill not be the last ones to go. Turkey has never been a picture-perfect democracy at any point in its 90-year-long existence. However, the extensive disempowerment of parliament has finally placed the country in the same category as Egypt or Russia. There is one difference, however: The political opposition in Turkey is no small ragtag group but instead is backed by nearly half of the population.


157/2018 • 12 July, 2018

West Balkan leaders, Chancellor Angela Merkel to attend London summit UK Prime Minister Theresa May is hosting leaders from six West Balkan states at a London summit which Angela Merkel is also set to attend. The push to bring the region closer to the EU comes amidst a UK political drama. The UK government pledged to almost double its Western Balkansʼ funding ahead of a Tuesday meeting gathering leaders of Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia, Albania, Kosovo, and Macedonia in London. Top EU officials, including diplomatic chief Federica Mogherini and enlargement commissioner Johannes Hahn were also expected to attend the summit aimed at boosting ties between the EU bloc and the six impoverished countries in southeast Europe. The UK is also preparing to welcome leaders of Austria,

Germany probes huge Iran cash transfer request The €300 million ($350 million) in question is being held by the European-Iranian Trade Bank, which is majority owned by Iranian stateowned banks, but registered in Hamburg with the German central bank, the Bundesbank. According to a report by Germanyʼs Bild newspaper, Iran wants to fly the money out as soon as possibleto avoid the potential freezing of accounts as a result of reimposed US sanctions coming into effect in August. If the operation goes ahead, it is likely to trigger a strong response from Washington. The US ambassador to Germany, Richard Grenell, already told the newspaper that the government of US President Donald Trump was "very concerned" and called on Berlin "to intervene and stop the plan." Bild reported that the money to be flown out would be passed on to Iranians lacking a valid credit card to use while traveling abroad and in need of cash. Under impending US sanctions, Iranian banks will be excluded from the main credit card networks, including VISA and Mastercard.

Poland, Croatia, Bulgaria and other EU nations for the meeting. Most notably, German Chancellor Angela Merkel is scheduled to make an appearance and give a speech. The UKʼs troubled prime minister, Theresa May, is hosting the gathering while facing a political challenge that sawtwo of her ministers, including her foreign secretary, depart in less than 24 hours. "History shows that a stable and secure Western Balkans region means a more stable and secure Europe," May said ahead of the summit.

Germany probes huge Iran cash transfer request

The €300 million ($350 million) in question is being held by the EuropeanIranian Trade Bank, which is majority owned by Iranian state-owned banks, but registered in Hamburg with the German central bank, the Bundesbank. According to a report by Germanyʼs Bild newspaper, Iran wants to fly the money out as soon as possibleto avoid the potential freezing of accounts as a result of reimposed US sanctions coming into effect in August. If the operation goes ahead, it is likely to trigger a strong response from Washington. The

US ambassador to Germany, Richard Grenell, already told the newspaper that the government of US President Donald Trump was "very concerned" and called on Berlin "to intervene and stop the plan." Bild reported that the money to be flown out would be passed on to Iranians lacking a valid credit card to use while traveling abroad and in need of cash. Under impending US sanctions, Iranian banks will be excluded from the main credit card networks, including VISA and Mastercard.

Swiss priest who lost more than €1 million gambling to enter rehab after World Cup Lawyers for a priest with a serious gambling habitconfirmed a figure first reported in the Swiss newspaper Bote der Urschweiz on Tuesday, saying that the casino addict had amassed debts totaling 1.4 million Swiss francs (€1.2 million / $1.1 million). The Diocese of Chur was aware of the manʼs problem, repeatedly offering him help. Church authorities, however, did not notify parishioners tothe problem. The man misled parishioners whom he approached for money, telling them that it was for parish use, such as aid projects in Africa.

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157/2018 • 12 July, 2018

Euroskeptic, far-right EU lawmakers reported to make most from secondary jobs A report by anti-corruption NGO Transparency International published on Tuesday revealed that Euroskeptic members of the European Parliament receive the highest earnings from secondary jobs and private activities. According to Transparencyʼs report based on publicly available disclosures, nearly one third of the European Parliamentʼs 751 members (MEPs) disclosed private income that surpassed their monthly €8,400 ($9,873) net salary and €4,000 allowances. The practice of legislators having a second job has been dubbed "moonlighting" which TI says has the potential for negative consequences, as it can create conflicts of interest and prevent lawmakers from dedicating themselves fully to their elected duties. Read more: More than 40 German lawmakers have second incomes, new figures reveal Additionally, the anti-corruption NGO says, outside income can be used as a potential channel for members to trade insider information or legislative action for money, and serve as a conduit for illicit campaign financing.

Switzerland defends top slot as worldʼs most innovative economy In its annual global ranking of countriesʼ innovation levels, the 2018 Global Innovation Index (GII) has once again given its top slot to Switzerland — a position it has held since 2011. The distinction was based on the Alpine nationʼs first-rate patent and intellectual property rules, its high-tech manufacturing, good universities and also because it is "among global leaders in R&D spending," according to the country auditors who released the report in New York City on Tuesday. Not surprisingly, all of the top-20 most innovative countries are rich economic powerhouses. Behind Switzerland in the ranking are the Netherlands, Sweden, the UK, Singapore, the US, Finland, Denmark, Germany and Ireland. The distinction was based on the Alpine nationʼs first-rate patent and intellectual property rules, its high-tech manufacturing, good universities and also because it is "among global leaders in R&D spending," according to the country auditors who released the report in New York City on Tuesday. Not surprisingly, all of the top-20 most innovative countries are rich economic powerhouses. Behind Switzerland in the ranking are the Netherlands, Sweden, the UK, Singapore, the US, Finland, Denmark, Germany and Ireland. 4

Cradle to Cradle: Living in a world without waste People buy, consume and then discard. But can you imagine a reality where the concept of waste had no meaning? Thatʼs behind the growing "cradle to cradle" movement. econd-hand furniture, repair cafés and cloths swaps are booming — and not just among those canʼt afford brandnew consumer goods. More and more people are looking for alternatives to built-in obsolescence and rampant consumption. Itʼs easy to see why. The more we consume, the more energy we burn, the more garbage we produce and the bigger our carbon footprint. And that’s before you even consider the extraction of resources and human rights abuses that go hand-in-hand

No more BMWs or Mercs on Fifth Avenue? Donald Trump doesnʼt want to see any more BMWs or Mercedes on Fifth Avenue in New York. To that end, he has made different, partly contradictory threats and offers in the trade conflict with the EU. Will it work for him? New York Cityʼs Fifth Avenue is known the world over for luxury brands for the rich and the famous, among them the latest high-end vehicles of BMW and Mercedes.But if President Trump has his way, the popular German cars soon wonʼt be driving down the famous avenue anymore. It all started during Trumpʼs election campaign in 2015 and 2016. Back then, he promised to strengthen the domestic economy by creating jobs and boosting local production. Importing foreign goods, particularly German luxury cars, has been a thorn in his side ever since.Seeing those cars drive by Trump Tower, which is located on Fifth Avenue, was apparently the epitome of everything he does not want. Looking for evidence? In April, Trump reportedly told French President Emmanuel Macron that he will continue the trade war until the day comes when no more Mercedes Benz or BMWs drive by on Fifth Avenue. So how exactly does he intend to achieve his goal?

Hotel Parlament H-Budapest 1054, Kálmán Imre utca 19. T.: +36 1 374 6000 reservation@parlament-hotel.hu www.parlament-hotel.hu

Germany, China seek closer alliance over trade spat with US German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Chinese Prime Minister Li Keqiang held talks on closer economic cooperation in Berlin on Mondayas the two countries seek a coordinated strategy in response to the US administrationʼs protectionist agenda. As part of the talks, the two countries signed a raft of commercial agreements worth some €20 billion ($23.5 billion). The deals, involving German industrial giants like Siemens, Volkswagen and BASF, come as the two exporting powerhouses are being forced into an unlikely alliance in defense of the open global trade on which both of their economies depend. "We both want to sustain the system of World Trade Organization rules," Merkel said at a news conference she gave alongside Li.

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with producing cheap, throwaway goods. The under-30s, in particular, are increasingly into recycling and the sharing economy. Yet, vast quantities of resources are still used once before ending up in landfill or the blast furnaces of waste incineration plants. "From cradle to cradle" refers to the ideal of an end to waste. Advocates want products to be part of a closed cycle. Nature itself is the model — where everything that dies is broken down into nutrients that feed new life.

Trade conflict sees Tesla hiking prices in China

US carmaker Tesla raised prices for some of its electric car models in China, becoming the first manufacturer to do so as trade tensions between Washington and Beijing hit producers. Other firms may soon follow suit. Tesla hiked prices for its Model X and S cars by about 20 percent in China, becoming the first automaker to adapt its price policy in the worldʼs largest automotive marketin response to a severe US-China trade conflict. The move is the first indication of how much higher Chinese tariffs on certain US imports will flow through to showroom floors, with other carmakers likely to follow suit or shift a greater portion of their production to China. Itʼs only the first chapter of this story," said IHS Markit analyst James Chao. He said he expected more companies from around the world to be affected by the current trade skirmish. On Monday, German automaker BMW said it was planning to raise prices on US-built SUVs for the Chinese market due to higher tariffs. China slapped retaliatory tariffs on US car imports in response to the US administrationʼs move to impose higher duties on $34 billion (€29 billion) worth of Chinese goods.


157/2018 • 12 July, 2018

Australian rangers trap giant saltwater crocodile The 600-kilogram reptile is one of the biggest on record

Wildlife rangers in northern Australia have bagged a massive saltwater crocodile after a decade-long hunt for the creature. An enormous crocodile that had long eluded authorities in Australiaʼs northern outback has finally been captured, officials said Tuesday. Rangers found the 5-meter (16.4foot) giant in a trap downstream from the Northern Territory town of Katherine — almost 10 years after it was first spotted in the region. Weighing up to 600 kilograms (1,322 pounds), itʼs the biggest saltwater croc ever to be removed from the remote Katherine River area.

"Weʼve called it a lot of things over the years because itʼs been so hard to catch," senior wildlife officer John Burke told public broadcaster ABC. "It is a bit of a thrill, but youʼve also got to admire the size of the animal and how old it is. Youʼve got to have a bit of respect for it." The animal, which is estimated to be up to 60 years old, was sedated and taken to a nearby crocodile farm, where it will live out the rest of its days away from the local human population.

Scott Pruitt, anti-environment administrator, leaves poisoned legacy The Bible-thumping,climate change denying, public money abusing, fossil fuel zealot Scott Pruitt has resigned as head of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Good riddance! Never has this key agency been run by someone so hostile to the environment. Pruitt had set out on a course to roll back environmental regulations, ranging from attempts to undo Obamaʼs landmark Clean Power Planandtougher emissions standards for cars, toattacks on the Clean Water Rule. All this with the blessing of US President Donald Trump. As Pruitt got busy with his mission, it was uncov-

ered how he time and again blatantly misused government resources for his own personal gain, to the tune of millions of dollars. Among the more ridiculous incidents, Pruitt used his security detail to shop for a special moisturizer available at Ritz-Carlton hotels. Throughout this, President Donald Trump continued to support him. Pruitt only resigned once the weight of a laundry list of ethics violations proved too much for even Trump to defend him. Itʼs a sign of the administrationʼs moral bankruptcy. But beyond that, Pruittʼs legacy will reverberate for decades to come.

Why are there so few insects at sea?

Over a million different insect species have been identified — they can be found in the icy cold of the Antarctic, the searing heat of the Sahara Desert and almost everywhere in between. But despite their tenacity and abundance, the one place youʼll find very few insect species is near water. Of the classified insect types, only 30,000-40,000 are considered aquatic, of which just a hundred or so live in the marine environment. Professor Emeritus Charles Griffiths and Professor Mike Picker, together with entomologist Alan Weaving, are South Africaʼs most respected experts on insects and co-authors of the go-to book on the subject, Field Guide to Insects of South Africa. They   say there are many widely different theories as to why insects have not colonized the ocean.

The Royal Moscow Ballet brings Swan Lake to Budapest

Get your tickets now! The Royal Moscow Ballet is coming to Budapest this December to give a special one-off performance of ‘Swan Lake’ at the Erkel Theatre. Co-choreographed by company founder and artistic director Anatoly Emelianov, the Tchaikovsky classic from 1877 will be presented in all its finery for this event on December 3. Formed in 1997, the RMB has since given 1,000 shows around the world, from Austria to Zambia, touring with evergreen favourites such as ‘Swan Lake’ ‘The Nutcracker’, ‘Romeo & Juliet’ and ‘Cinderella’.

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Hungary Budapest: Debrecen: Eger: Hévíz:

22/27 20/23 22/24 21/23

Athens: Berlin: Bratislava: Bucharest: London: Madrid:

19/33 15/25 21/28 21/31 13/22 22/29

Kecskemét: Keszthely: Siófok:

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Europe Moscow: Paris: Prague: Rome: Varsaw: Vienna:

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Culture

From capers to yuzu – Budapest’s best gin and tonics A G&T is always a good idea. It’s a drink with a long and interesting history: alcohol flavoured with spices and juniper berries was first created in the Low Countries and conquered today’s Holland and Belgium. In the 1700s, the English took a shine to it and there were times when gin consumption in London was out of control. Prohibited in the past, gin is an indispensable part of modern bar culture today. Gin is best mingled with tonic, but more spices and a sprinkle of magic make it it the perfect summer drink. See where to find the best G&Ts in Budapest. Barside BeefBar Budapest Bestia GoodSpirit Whisky & Cocktail Bar Impostor & Baotiful St. Andrea Wine & Skybar St. Andrea goes hand in hand with premium wines and top-notch gastronomy, but here we focus on its bar culture. In the repertoire of the Wine & Skybar on Vörösmarty tér, the cocktails, premium drinks and the best wines and champagnes share equally importance. You might be offered a mixed drink first blessed with a touch of Kaiken malbec wine before it is poured into a big glass, augmented with ice then drowned in BCN gin and Peter Spanton lemongrass tonic. The whole concoction is made complete with some rosemary in the end. The colour is pretty pink and the flavour divine.

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157/2018 • 12 July, 2018

Angelique Kerber into semifinal as top remaining seed

Germanyʼs Angelique Kerber is in to the semifinals at Wimbledon for the third time as she sets her sights on a third Grand Slam win. After a number of shocks, the 30-year-old is the highest ranked woman left in the draw. It took her seven match points to seal the deal but Angelique Kerber finally got past Daria Kasatkina 6-3, 7-5 to set up a semifinal with world no. 12 Jelena Ostapenko on Thursday. Despite her trouble finishing things off, Kerber,a finalist in 2016, looked in fine form for most of the match, racing in to a 4-1 lead in the first set before Kasatkina fought back to 4-3. But the Russian then handed the initiative back to Kerber with a double fault and the German closed out the opener. The second set saw six consecutive breaks of serve before Kerber finally grabbed the advantage at 6-5. An exceptional series of rallies followed as Kasatkina tried to stay alive before a driven forehand from Kerber finally forced the error and booked her spot in the last four.

Aleksandar Kolarovʼs free kick stunner secures Serbia win over Costa Rica A brilliant second half free kick from captain Aleksandar Kolarov led Serbia to a deserved win over Costa Rica. Serbia were wasteful in front of goal but did enough to secure three vital points in Group E. Another World Cup day, another sublime freekick. If Cristiano Ronaldo’s ice-cold effort tosnatch a point against arch-rivals Spain on day two was the current goal of the tournament frontrunner, the Portuguese may have just met his match. Aleksandar Kolarov, take a bow. A combination of poor finishing and sublime goalkeeping had kept the scores level until Serbia’s no.11 produced his moment of magic. Kolarov’s powerful left foot is no secret, but few inside the stadium would have expected such a thunderous strike when the Roma defender stood over a free kick midway through the second half. His shot was unstoppable; a side-footed missile which screamed into the top corner of the Costa Rica net. Kaylor Navas, who kept his team in the game with several crucial saves either side of half time, was nowhere near it.

Roger Federer, Serena Williams & Rafael Nadal play on manic Monday Wimbledon 2018:

Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Serena Williams will all be in action on ʼManic Mondayʼ at Wimbledon. With all of the menʼs and womenʼs last 16 singles ties taking place, it is one of the most exciting days in the tennis calendar. Defending champion Federer faces French 22nd seed Adrian Mannarino while twotime champion Nadal plays Jiri Vesely. Seven-time winner Williams, the favourite for the

womenʼs title, plays Russian qualifier Evgeniya Rodina. Three-time champion Novak Djokovic will play Karen Khachanov while Gael Monfils meets eighth seed Kevin Anderson. Karolina Pliskova, the only remaining womenʼs top 10 seed, plays world number 20 Kiki Bertens.

Divisive Neymar ʼcharms Brazil, but annoys whole worldʼ

Novak Djokovic slammed at home for Croatia World Cup support The headline read: ʼNeymar has charmed Brazil, but annoyed the whole worldʼ. That was how Brazilian newspaper Globo put it, capturing some of the mood around a man who once again combined the sublime and ridiculous like perhaps only he can. Neymar, the worldʼs most expensive player, is arguably the last big global superstar left in this World Cup after exits for Argentinaʼs Lionel Messi and Portugalʼs Cristiano Ronaldo. 6

Serbian tennis star Novak Djokovic has prompted controversy at home after he announced he would be supportingthe Croatian national football teamas they enter the final stretches of the World Cup in Russia. The two neighbors and former Yugoslav nations have had tense relations since Croatia won its independence in 1995 following a bloodly conflict. Although the two established diplomatic ties shortly thereafter, the subsequent two decades have been punctuated by mutual accusations of

war crimes and an intense sports rivalry. "Only idiots can support Croatia. Arenʼt you ashamed Novak?" tweeted politician Vladimir Djukanovic, a member of President Aleksander Vucic’s Serbian Progressive Party. "Djokovic is a national hero and I thank him — but support Croatia, how can he not be ashamed? So many Serbs from Krajina (a region in Croatia where Serbs were once the majority) backed him and yet he supports the country who drove them out."

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