Page 1

DAILY NEWS IN ENGLISH

European Parliament approves controversial new copyright law in blow to tech firms A multi-year battle that saw media organizations and creative individuals seeking content protection face off against against big tech and internetfreedom activists came to a head in Strasbourg on Wednesday, when the European Parliament voted toupdate copyright legislationfor the age of content-sharing platforms. MEPs voted 438-226 with 39 abstentions in favor of the EU Copyright Directive that is set to give more power to artists, news and traditional media companies as opposed to tech giants like Facebook, Microsoft and Google. "This is a good sign for Europeʼs creative industry," said German MEP Axel Voss, who helped move the bill along through parliament. MEPs voted on a range of conflicting amendments prior to the vote, making the make-up of the final draft law not immediately clear.

China: German theater group barred from staging Ibsen play Berlinʼs famous Schaubühne theater troupe has been barred from continuing to perform a play by Norwegian master Henrik Ibsen in China, German public broadcaster ARD reported on Wednesday. The Schaubühne team was told that the stages they were meant to perform on in the city of Nanjing are broken, but the theatre is suspicious that it has something to do with the content of the play. "An Enemy of the People,"written by Ibsen in 1882, deals with how truths and ideas of morality are manipulated for public consumption. The troupe was meant to conduct a discussion about the playʼs themes after the performances.After the Schaubühneʼs outings in Beijing, members of the audience openly criticized the Chinese government, and reportedly complained about state censorship.

210/2018 • 13 SEPTEMBER, 2018

ʼCredible deterrenceʼ needed to prevent gas attack in Syria German defense minister:

The possibility of German troops joining airstrikes in Syria if chemical weapons are used is causing a rift in Angela Merkelʼs government. The conflict has reached the Bundestag — and the statements are getting stronger. Germanyʼs executive coalition showed strains on Wednesday as politicians from the governing parties voiced opposing opinions on a possible German military mission in Syria. Standing before German lawmakers in the Bundestagon a day earmarked for budget debate, German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leye (above), a member of Chancellor Angela Merkelʼs Christian Democratic Union (CDU), began her speech by highlighting the past repeated use of chemical weapons by Syrian President Bashar Assad. In April,US, UK and French forces retaliatedwith airstrikes. Along with diplomacy, von der Leyen said, "credible deterrence" is alsoneeded to prevent the future use of chemical weapons. Germany "cannot continue to act as if this doesnʼt affect us," von der Leyen went on, adding that as part of the international community, the country "must be prepared, because we do not know what concrete situation we will face." Read more: Syriaʼs Idlib: UN warns of chemical weapons, jihadis and humanitarian catastrophe The defense minister comments came days afterthe mass-

circulation Bild newspaper published a reportthat the Defense Ministry was in talks with the US, UK and France to join possible airstrikes in Syria in case of a chemical attack. The report unleashed a flurry of political and public opinions, which often occurs in cases of potential German combat participation due to historically-rooted reluctance against sending the countryʼs troops into combat. Read more: German army shows off ailing NATO helicopter Showdown between the CDU and the SPD The CDU backs taking part in a future Syria mission, should chemical weapons be used once again. Von der Leyenʼs words echoed those of Merkel, who had said earlier in her parliamentary speech that "to simply say we can look away if somewhere chemical weapons are being used and international conventions are not kept, that canʼt be the answer." The defense ministerʼs statement were a sharp rebuke of the CDUʼs junior governing partner, the Social Democrats (SPD), whose key members have voiced strong opposition to any potential Germany military involvement in Syria.

Israelis and Palestinians lament Oslo Accord deadlock, 25 years on In September 1993, people across Israel and Palestinian territories celebrated in newly gained hope that they would have a permanent peace agreement within five years. "We were dreaming, we were fighting," said Munther Amira, a Palestinian activist now in his 40s. "We wanted peace and to have our own state like any other nation, to have our determination. We thought Oslo would do all these things for us." Read more: ʼDeal of the centuryʼ: US pushes IsraeliPalestinian plan Oslo, shorthand for the Oslo Accord, brokered by Norway and signed between the Israeli government and thePalestinian Liberation Organization(PLO) on September 13, 1993, established a framework intended to resolve the IsraeliPalestinian conflict.

Vladimir Putin: Skripal poisoning suspects were ʼciviliansʼ Speaking at an economic forum in the port city of Vladivostok, President Putin rejected suspicions of Kremlin involvement in the poisoning former double agent Sergei Skripal. His daughter Yulia was also poisoned in the attack, which took place in the English city of Salisbury in March. Last week,British prosecutors identified two alleged Russian military officials, who they said were operating under aliases – Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov.

weather today BUDAPEST

16 / 28 °C Precipitation: 0 mm


210/2018 • 13 September, 2018

Pakistan: Imran Khan promises change amid rigging complaints In his"victory speech" on Thursday, Prime Minister-elect Imran Khan promised wide-ranging reforms to build a "new Pakistan." He touched upon a number of pressing issues, including better governance, security affairs and ties with global powers and neighboring countries. Khan spoke from the heart during the speech. He promised to end rampant corruption, nepotism, and pledged that economic benefits would trickle down to the masses under his government. Khan spoke from the heart during the speech. He promised to end rampant corruption, nepotism, and pledged that economic benefits would trickle down to the masses under his government.

Ceasefire on Israel-Gaza border largely holds as UN warns sides are on ʼbrink of warʼ

A ceasefire announced by Hamas largely held along the Israel-Gaza border on Sunday, a day after the most intense exchange of fire between Israel and the Palestinian group since the 2014 Gaza war. Israeli warplanes carried out dozens of airstrikes in the densely populated Gaza Strip on Saturday on what it said were Hamas military, training and supply targets, while Hamas and Islamic Jihad fired nearly 200 rockets and mortars at Israel. Read more: Israel and Gazaʼs militant groups agree to ceasefire The Israeli airstrikes wounded more than 20 people and killed two teenage boys, Palestinian health officials said, while a Hamas rocket injured four Israelis. Hamas, which has ruled the Gaza Strip since 2007, and Islamic Jihad announced the Egyptian and UNbrokered ceasefire late Saturday. The Israeli military said its response would depend on the situation on the ground. After the ceasefire announcement, four mortars were fired into Israel early Sunday. In response, Israeli planes destroy at least one launch site. Israel also carried out three airstrikes later in the day on what it said were Hamas squads launching incendiary balloons and kites across the border. 2

Ryanair faces turbulences as strike actions hit The Irish low-cost carrier also faces an autumn of discontent elsewhere

Iraq braces for more unrest as Basra protests gather pace An estimated 200 protesters gathered on Monday morning at the main gate leading to three of Iraqʼs major oil fields in the southern oil-exporting city of Basra. Protests in Basra, Iraqʼs second-largest city, started last Tuesdaywhen security forces opened fire, killing one person and wounding five. They soon spread to other provinces. Read more: Iraq hangs 13 ʼISʼ prisoners as PM Haidar al-Abadi calls for ʼjust retributionʼ The oil hub of Basra and other parts of the Shiʼite south have long been neglected, first by Sunni dictator Saddam Hussein and then by Shiʼite-led governments. But an ongoing political crisis and the recent rhetoric of Grand Ayatollah alSistani, the top Shiʼite cleric in the country have also clearly aggravated the situation.

Ryanair passengers are suffering travel disruptions as German pilots and cabin crew have launched a 24-hour strike over better pay and conditions. The one-day strike by Ryanair pilots and cabin crew in Germany began at 3 a.m. (0100 UTC) on Wednesdayand grounded 150 flights out of 400 scheduled to depart from or land at the budget carrierʼs 19 bases in this country. German pilotsʼ union Vereinigung Cockpit (VC) said shortly after the walk-out was launched that all major Ryanair bases, including Frankfurt/Hahn,

Trade tensions hit Chinese growth Chinese growth slowed slightly in the second quarter as the worldʼs number two economy faced a snowballing trade fight with the United States, after Washington and Beijing slapped new tariffs on $34 billion (€29 billion) of each othersʼ goods earlier this month, with threats of further tariffs on goodsworth an additional $200 billion. Despite this escalation, the Chinese economy expanded by 6.7 percent in the second quarter from a year ago. This is down from 6.8 percent in the first quarter, according to official figures released on Monday by the National Bureau of Statistics. Nonetheless, the growth was still higher than the gov-

Cologne/Bonn and Berlinʼs two airports Schönefeld and Tegel, had been affected and that "participation is good." VC Vice-Chairman Markus Wahl said he expected the strike to become a success, and would force Ryanair back to the negotiating table. "This [strike] shows how precarious the situation at Ryanair has obviously become," he added. ernmentʼs annual target of around 6.5 percent. China faced an "extremely complex environment both at home and abroad," said Mao Shengyong, a spokesperson for the national statistics bureau, noting that growth nonetheless remained strong.

UK reveals fighter jet ʼTempestʼ for post-Brexit era Williamson said the "world-beating" jet can be used unmanned, as a drone, or with pilots. It is scheduled to be operational by 2035. The UK is to invest 2 billion pounds ($2.7 billion, €2.3 billion) to 2025 in the stealth warplane, which will involve British companies BAE Systems and Rolls-

Royce as well as Anglo-Italian Leonardo and pan-European MBDA. Aiming to ensure UK leadership in defense Williamson said the program was designed to ensure Britainʼs continued leadership in fighter technology and control of airspace in future conflicts. Last year,France and Germany signed an agreementto develop Europeʼs next-generation fighter jet to replace the aging Rafale and Eurofighter jet by 2040, involving Europeʼs Airbus and Franceʼs Dassault Aviation. Following the 2016 Brexit referendum, Airbus moved to partner with Dassault at the expense of Britainʼs BAE Systems. There are concerns in Britain that its defense industry may be shut out from EU plans for next-generation fighter jets, although, officially, both projects have invited other companies to join.


210/2018 • 13 September, 2018

Lehman Brothers: Looking back at the basics The demise of Lehman Brothers shook the finance world and had enormous knock-on effects globally. Even those who had never heard of the investment bank were impacted. Ten years on, we answer some fundamental questions. The collapse of the US investment bank, Lehman Brothers, 10 years ago was a shock that still reverberates today. It was itself an escalation of the financial crisis that started a year earlier and its massive repercussions cannot be downplayed. "The crisis shook the foundations of the Western financial system," says Axel Weber, the former president of Germanyʼs central bank, the Bundesbank, and

How dangerous are Austriaʼs farright hipsters?

It was the middle of the night when a group of young Austrians used a crane to dress Viennaʼs 65-foot (20meter) statue of Empress Maria Theresa in a niqab. The stunt was accompanied by a poster that read "Islamization? No thanks!" The act was committed by the Austrian branch of the Identitarian movement, branded Europeʼs "hipster right." Identitarians are the new, media-friendly face of far-right nationalism and Europeʼs answer to the USʼs alt-right. But where the altright has succeeded online, Austriaʼs Identitarians use the internet to promote their actions on the streets — imitating the tactics of leftist activist groups such as Greenpeace and generating news headlines in the process. But where the alt-right has succeeded online, Austriaʼs Identitarians use the internet to promote their actions on the streets — imitating the tactics of leftist activist groups such as Greenpeace and generating news headlines in the process.

current chairman of Swiss banking giant UBS. What led to the bankruptcy? Like many other banks, Lehman Brothers was hit by the real estate crisis that had been going on for well over a year. On September 10, 2008, Lehman CEO Richard Fuld announced a loss of $3.9 billion (€3.3 billion) for the third quarter. This increased worries about insolvency; soon all trust was gone.

Europeans live longer but smoke too much: WHO

Europeans are healthier and living longer compared to five years ago, according to the European health report published Wednesday. However, the study by the World Health Organization (WHO) warned thatsmoking and rising obesitycould reverse the gains if left unchecked, and revealed "significant" discrepancies between countries with the highest and lowest life expectancy. Key findings: Europeans live on average more than one year longer when compared to five years ago. But there is still over a decade of difference between countries with the highest and lowest life

expectancy.Premature deaths have fallen since the beginning of the millennium.Premature deaths caused by cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes mellitus and chronic respiratory diseases are falling at a higher rate than aimed for.Smoking, alcohol, rising obesity and under-vaccination are hindering progress in some countries.Tobacco use is the highest in the world, with one in three people aged 15 and above smoking.Alcohol consumption has gone down, but adult drinking remains the highest in the world.Over half of Europeans are overweight, with obesity i

UN details possible war crimes in Yemen conflict "[We have] reasonable grounds to believe that the governments of Yemen, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia are responsible for human rights violations," UN experts said Tuesday in their first report on possible war crimes in the conflict for the Human Rights Council. Saudi Arabia, in a military coalition with the UAE, has been engaged in a bombing campaign against Houthi rebels since 2015. The conflicthas resulted in the worldʼs worst humanitarian crisis.The Human Rights Council asserts that airstrikes by the coalition on civilian infrastructure such as marketplaces and fishing boats raise "serious concerns about the targeting process applied by the coalition."

3


210/2018 • 13 September, 2018

Will new train boost trade in Southeast Asia?

Itʼs slow and not as comfortable yet as trains in developed countries, but Cambodians were nonetheless proud when the first train in decades left the Cambodian capital Phnom Penh for border town Poipet last month, effectively connecting the northern part of Cambodia with the south. This rail line will soon cross the border and connect with Thailand. Itʼs expected to become popular among travelers and boost trade between Thailand and Cambodia. Read more: Cambodian girls defy gender barriers to excel in technology Sitting in the train to Poipet on a quiet Sunday morning, music teacher Hang Sothanun said that heʼs happy that he can now take the train. "I have to travel all over the country, most of the time by bus or by car. But the train is really nice. Itʼs relaxing and it offers a very nice view of the countryside," he told DW. During decades of war and poverty, Cambodiaʼs railway lines, which were initially built at the time of the French colonial rule, were severely damaged and neglected. Only two years ago, the first line in the country was reopened, connecting Phnom Penh to the coastal city Sihanoukville.

US loses its shine as investment location for German firms Presenting the results of a poll among its member companies, the American Chamber of Commerce in Germany on Tuesday said German firms had become less confident in doing business in the United States. It said that over two-fifths of the companies polled stated the US had become less attractive as a business location in the wake of a transAtlantic trade conflictthat looks defused for the moment, but by no means resolved. While 82 percent of respondents acknowledged that economic relations between the US and Germany were still "strong or very strong," 42 percent of the German firms polled said the US had lost some of its former attractiveness to them. Only 20 percent of the US firms polled said the same about Germany. While 82 percent of respondents acknowledged that economic relations between the US and Germany were still "strong or very strong," 42 percent of the German firms polled said the US had lost some of its former attractiveness to them. Only 20 percent of the US firms polled said the same about Germany. 4

Anti-corruption watchdog: Top exporters fail to punish bribery About two dozen countries accounting for almost half of global exports impose "little or no enforcement" of foreign bribery laws, Transparency International report. The worldʼs top exporter received particular criticism. Countries that account for nearly 40 percent of global exports fail to enforce laws and conventions against bribery, anti-corruption group Transparency International (TI) said in report on Wednesday. The Berlin-based watchdog assessed enforcement of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Developmentʼs (OECD) Anti-Bribery Convention, which commits signatories to criminalize bribery of foreign officials. Read more: More than two-thirds of all countries corrupt, TI report says Key findings The report focused on 44 countries that account for 65 percent of world exports and found: 22 countries accounting for about 40 per-

Visiting Kenya a year into its plastic bag ban

US trade official hopes for breakthrough in NAFTA talks

In 2013, student and photographer James Wakibia was so sick of seeing the plastic bags that littered the route between his house and the town of Nakuru, some 150 kilometers northwest of the Kenyan capital of Nairobi, he felt he had to take action. "They were everywhere, in the trees, in the puddles and on the road. They were like air, just everywhere," he recalls. Two years later, he launched a social media campaign with the hashtag #ISupportBanPlasticsKE, calling for an end to single-useplastic bags. Wakibiaʼs activism attracted widespread attention, including from the government in Nairobi, which put a ban at the top of its to-do list. Plastic carrier bags and their smaller, thinner counterparts used for packaging fruit and vegetables have now been outlawed for a year. Read more: Plastic fantastic: Nigeriaʼs carrier bag fashionistas "Kenya has come a long way and has taken a very bold step," Wakibia said. "Most other governments donʼt dare to take this step because they are very connected to the industry."

On the eve of the resumption of high-level talks between US and Mexican officials on Friday, US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said he was hopeful that "in the next several days weʼll have a breakthrough" innegotiations. Speaking during a White House cabinet meeting with US President Donald Trump on Thursday, Lighthizer however also noted that there was still "some difficult issues to work on." At the same time, he indicated that Canada could rejoin the talks soon. "Iʼm hopeful with Mexico. And then I hope once we get one with Mexico, that Canada will come along," he said. Read more: Donald Trumpʼs trade spats with Europe, China and NAFTA ― What you need to know Lighthizerʼs optimism comes about a year after renegotiations began followingTrumpʼs threat to exit the free trade pact with Mexico and Canadabecause it was a "disaster" and an unfair deal to American workers.

Hotel Moments Budapest H-1061 Budapest, Andrássy út 8. T.: +36 1 611 7000 reservation@hotelmoments.hu www.hotelmomentsbudapest.hu

Published by: Mega Media Kft. 1075 Budapest, Madách I. út 13-14. +36 1 398 0344 www.hotelujsag.hu

cent of global exports had "little or no enforcement" to deter foreign bribery.Some of the worst enforcers were Mexico, Finland, Japan, South Korea, Turkey and Russia, as well as non-signatories to the OECD convention, China and India.Seven countries accounting for 27 percent of global exports were deemed "active" enforcers of anti-bribery laws. The US, Germany, Britain, Israel, Switzerland, Norway and Italy received this highest rating. Australia, Brazil, Portugal and Sweden were the four countries that had "moderate enforcement."Eleven countries accounting for 12.3 percent of global exports had "limited enforcement."

Migrant adults less likely to be employed in Germany — OECD

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) published itsextensive annual education studyon Tuesday. "Education at a Glance" covers the state of education around the world, including the 36 OECD countries, as well as a number of partner countries such as China, Russia, India, Saudi Arabia and South Africa. The report reveals that in most OECD countries, foreign-born adults are more likely to be neither employed nor in education or training (NEET). Austria and Germany are the two countries with the largest differences in the share of NEETs among foreign-born and indigenous 15-29 year-olds: In Germany, 24 percent of foreign-born 15-29 year-olds are NEET, compared with 7 percent of German native 15-29 year-olds.


210/2018 • 13 September, 2018

The worldʼs deadliest hurricanes, typhoons and cyclones DW ranks some of the worst and fiercest ever

Climate finance poses hurdle ahead of COP24 This yearʼs UN global climate talks in Katowice, Poland are being billed as the most important Conference of the Parties (COP) since Paris in 2015, when the landmarkParis Agreement on climate changewas agreed upon. In the French capital, almost 200 countries pledged to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit). How the worldʼs nations will actually do that is supposed to be decided in Katowice this year. Member states are expected to adopt a rule book outlining how countries monitor their greenhouse gas emissions and report their climate protection efforts, as well as how much money industrialized nationswill give to poorer countriesto help them reduce their emissions and adapt to a warmer world.

Leo Budapest Bar the best panoramic view of the city!

Tropical storms are seasonal weather events. But they never fail to shock us with the destruction they wreak. Thereʼs a reason some parts of the world get hit by hurricanes more than others — itʼs built into the weather system. Places in the US like Galveston, Texas, or New Orleans in Louisiana have seen their fair share of tropical storms. The same is true for other parts of the American eastern seaboard and beyond — from Florida down to the Bahamas, Mexico, andPuerto Rico. In the Pacific and Indian Oceans, the usual targets are Bangladesh, the Philippines, Myanmar, Laos, Vietnam, Japan and India. And

weʼll get to some of the worst storms in a moment. First, though, a word about our terms and weather conditions: We often talk abouthurricanes and typhoons as though they were the same thing. And technically, they are the same. Read more: Japan slowly cleans up Typhoon Jebi damage Meteorologists use the

term tropical cyclone to describe any rotating system of clouds and thunderstorms that originates over tropical or subtropical waters and which has a closed, low-level circulation.

Climate finance poses hurdle ahead of COP24 This yearʼs UN global climate talks in Katowice, Poland are being billed as the most important Conference of the Parties (COP) since Paris in 2015, when the landmarkParis Agreement on climate changewas agreed upon. In the French capital, almost 200 countries pledged to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit). How the worldʼs nations

will actually do that is supposed to be decided in Katowice this year. Member states are expected to adopt a rule book outlining how countries monitor their greenhouse gas emissions and report their climate protection efforts, as well as how much money industrialized nationswill give to poorer countriesto help them reduce their emissions and adapt to a warmer world.

Hotel Clark, at the Buda foot of Chain Bridge, houses two outlet. Beefbar on the ground floor and, on the roof terrace, Leo Budapest named after the famous lions guarding the bridge. At the panoramic bar, you can admire the breathtaking vista of Buda Castle, the Danube, Chain Bridge and the rooftops of the riverfront while sipping on a refreshing drink. Leo offers a wide variety of wines and cocktails, and the kitchen is led by talented young chef András Sipos, also responsible for downstairs.

Weather

Fri

17 / 27

Sat

Sun

15 / 26

16 / 24

Hungary Budapest: Debrecen: Eger: Hévíz:

16/28 17/27 18/26 16/25

Athens: Berlin: Bratislava: Bucharest: London: Madrid:

21/32 11/24 21/26 17/26 13/22 22/29

Kecskemét: Keszthely: Siófok:

18/26 17/27 20/28

Europe Moscow: Paris: Prague: Rome: Varsaw: Vienna:

11/24 12/20 22/27 18/26 14/26 15/27

Culture

Events Horizon: what’s happening in Budapest – August 2018

Festivals, cool concerts, cultural events and amazing parties – Budapest is always buzzing. Every month, we bring together all of the important happenings taking place in and around Hungary’s capital, so you can plan ahead. In August, the Sziget Festival, WAMP Design Fair and fantastic fireworks are all among the many exciting events you shouldn’t miss. Whether you would like to shake it to the coolest beats, immerse yourself in culture or give in to guilty pleasures, we present a bunch of events for the upcoming weeks. Get out there and enjoy everything that Budapest has to offer! A38 Concerts WAMP Design Fair Rigoletto Liberty Bridge Picnics Jason Derulo Sziget Festival Festival of Folk Arts CityMatiné Saint Stephen’s Day The Budapest Short International Film Festival A38 Concerts WAMP Design Fair Rigoletto Liberty Bridge Picnics Jason Derulo Sziget Festival Festival of Folk Arts CityMatiné Saint Stephen’s Day The Budapest Short International Film Festival

5


210/2018 • 13 September, 2018

Gennady Golovkin v Saul ʼCaneloʼ Alvarez Golovkin relishes rematch

Gennady Golovkin says Saturdayʼs rematch with Saul ʼCaneloʼ Alvarez is "100% the biggest fight of my career". The middleweight pairʼs first fight, in September 2017, wascontroversially scored a draw,with Golovkin landing more punches and considered the stronger fighter by many pundits. "I hope it is going to be a better fight than the first one," said the 36-yearold Kazakh. A May rematch was postponed after Alvarez, 28, failed two drugs tests. The Mexican blamed his positive test for clenbuterol - an asthma medication that can also help build muscle and burn fat -on eating contaminated meat. The drug is sometimes illegally mixed into livestock feed to make meat leaner.

Rafael Benitez & Manuel Pellegrini: Newcastle & West Ham bosses adjust to life at bottom

Aleksandar Kolarovʼs free kick stunner secures Serbia win over Costa Rica A brilliant second half free kick from captain Aleksandar Kolarov led Serbia to a deserved win over Costa Rica. Serbia were wasteful in front of goal but did enough to secure three vital points in Group E. Another World Cup day, another sublime freekick. If Cristiano Ronaldo’s ice-cold effort tosnatch a point against arch-rivals Spain on day two was the current goal of the tournament front-runner, the Portuguese may have just met his match. Aleksandar Kolarov, take a bow. A combination of poor finishing and sublime goalkeeping had kept the scores level until Serbia’s no.11 produced his moment of magic. Kolarov’s powerful left foot is no secret, but few inside the stadium would have expected such a thunderous strike when the Roma defender stood over a free kick midway through the second half. His shot was unstoppable; a side-footed missile which screamed into the top corner of the Costa Rica net.

Serena Williams ʼout of lineʼ in US Open final but umpire ʼblew itʼ Says Billie Jean King

Serena Williams was "totally out of line" for her US Open final outburst, but umpire Carlos Ramos "blew it", says tennis legend Billie Jean King. Williams,beaten in straight setsby Naomi Osaka, was docked a game for verbal abuse, having already had a point penalty for smashing her racquet and a code violation for coaching. The American, 36, later said it was "sexist" to have been penalised a game. "Serena was out of line, thereʼs no question," said compatriot King. King, one of the founders of the Womenʼs Tennis

Association (WTA), initially backed the 23-time Grand Slam champion, saying in the aftermath of Saturdayʼs final: "When a woman is emotional, sheʼs ʼhystericalʼ and sheʼs penalised for it. When a man does the same, heʼs ʼoutspokenʼ and there are no repercussions. "Thank you, Serena Williams, for calling out this double standard. More voices are needed to do the same."

Great North Run 2018: Mo Farah wins for record fifth time Britainʼs Mo Farah won a record fifth Great North Run on Sunday in Newcastle. Rafael Benitez and Manuel Pellegrini are two managers used to living the high life who now find themselves stranded in the Premier Leagueʼs bottom three with Newcastle and West Ham after poor starts to the season. Benitez, a Champions League winner with Liverpool in 2005, has also collected European trophies with Valencia and Chelsea, while Pellegrini won the Premier League with Manchester City. 6

Farah clocked 59 minutes and 26 seconds for his fifth win in a row in the race, with New Zealandʼs Jake Robertson 31 seconds back in second. London Marathon champion Vivian Cheruiyot from Kenya won the womenʼs race for a second time in three years. Briton David Weir set a new course record to win the menʼs wheelchair race for the seventh time, with Pole Martyna Snopek taking the

womenʼs race. Farah narrowly missed out on his half marathon personal best - which he set in winning his second title in 2015 - after fading inside the final 200 metres, having pulled clear of Robertson with about two miles to go. Robertson, who finished a close second to Farah last year, clocked 59:57, with Belgiumʼs Bashir Abdi third in 60:43. "Trainingʼs different now as Iʼm not in the track season, Iʼve been doing a lot more long runs and in terms of endurance Iʼm definitely fitter," said four-time Olympic champion Farah.

title  
title