Albuquerque The Magazine, August 2022

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F E AT U R E

Donut Deny... ...that ABQ loves them! We’re talking about donuts, the only things more fluffy, sweet and lovable than puppies. Our city now boasts several shops dedicated to

popping out these treats hot and fresh daily—part of a decade-long trend of local donut spots competing with the old corporate dough boys (and yes, we’re talking about you, Dunkin’). Here’s a primer on our city’s hip, sugary donut joints. p.74 STORIES BY ATM STAFF

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PHOTOS BY DON JAMES

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DEPARTMENTS 22 Publisher’s Note 25 Tapas

P. 122

Where to get your fresh green chile roasted (and how to do it at home); sunflowers for the picking; ABQ is ranked a top city for Recreation; a fun pizza photo-op.

36 Faces and Places 51 Datebook

111 People

112 Albuquerque the Interview Philanthropy in ABQ has been engrained in Beverly Bendicksen’s persona for three decades, which serves her well as the chair of the Albuquerque Community Foundation.

118 Personality

Carla Sinopoli has dug in archaelogical sites around the world. Now she brings her scientific passion to the University of New Mexico.

P. 118 P.112

122 Behind the Scenes

As a kid, Phil Mayhew used to come to the ABQ BioPark to check out the animals. Now he’s helping care for them, as a zookeeper at the BioPark.

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DEPARTMENTS

P. 138 P. 130 125 Culture 126 Creatives

P. 144

When local movie and TV productions need custom set pieces, they often reach out to the metal ingenuity of Five Ton Monkey.

128 Shelflife

The confluence of ABQ’s cultures continues to be wonderfully narrated by Hakim Bellamy, whose new book of poems is aptly titled “Commissions y Corridos.”

130 Tiempo

A monthly check-in with longtime Tiempo editor Mel Minter on the new performers — and familiar faces — making waves in ABQ’s thriving local music scene.

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140 From the Vine

133 Dish

P. 146

146 A Recipe for Success

134 Eats Review

ABQ Pride’s first female president shares a traditional take on Albondigas Soup y Meatballs.

Ajiaco Columbian Bistro

138 Eats, Etc.

A visual tour of some of the city’s more recent bar and lounge patios and outdoor expansions—a trend that has grown rapidly since Covid-19.

Demacios Bar & Tapas; Hot Tamales New Mexican Kitchen; El Cotorro Taqueria y Heladeria

148 Bites

Info-filled nuggets about the city’s restaurants to take with you on the go.

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AUGUST 2022 Volume 19 Number 4 PHOTO DIRECTOR

Don James don@abqthemag.com ART DIRECTOR

Jared Lambert jared@abqthemag.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Candice Callado candice@abqthemag.com DATEBOOK EDITOR

Lori Wilding datebook@abqthemag.com CONTRIBUTORS

Ryan Flanagan Tristen Critchfield Mel Minter Ashlee Olsen Heather Hunter Emma Trevino

Albuquerque The Magazine (ISSN 1936-4350) is published monthly except January by Albuquerque The Media Corporation, 1550 Mercantile Ave. NE, Top Floor, Albuquerque, NM 87107. Periodicals Postage Paid at Albuquerque, NM 87101, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Albuquerque The Magazine, 1550 Mercantile Ave. NE, Top Floor, Albuquerque, NM 87107.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR We welcome letters to the Editor. You may e-mail yours to editor@abqthemag.com, or submit it directly from our website, or via snail mail. EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS Our editorial calendar is available online at www.abqthemag.com/MediaKit.pdf. No phone calls, please. Unsolicited manuscripts require a SASE.

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DEPARTMENTS 175 Fun

176 ‘Til You Drop

Getting freshened up for that big night out; modern gadgets to enhance your RV trips; re-live the musical revolutions at Vinyl Composition.

182 Paws Button

Everything you need to know about local beehives and honey, including where to rent your own hive to become a honey farmer

184 Pet of the Month This month’s winner: Oreo

187 Piece of the Past The historic building known as La Glorieta is older than the United States, and has seen more than a few revolutions.

188 Passenger Window The fierce roadrunner near Downtown was created by a sculptor who loves to create our official state bird.

P. 187

191 Photo Contest

This month’s winner: Hazy Sunset, by George Kapalka.

192 A Few Things

The pieces continue to fall into place for Mesa del Sol, the master-planned community on the city’s southeastern corner.

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AUGUST 2022 Volume 19 Number 4 PUBLISHER

Larryl Lynch larryl@abqthemag.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Gena Salazar gena@abqthemag.com

PUBLISHING DIRECTOR

Dakota-Lynn McCaffrey dakota@abqthemag.com SENIOR ADVERTISING EXECUTIVES

Philip Kjelland philip@abqthemag.com Megan Life megan@abqthemag.com BUSINESS MANAGER

Jill Morris business@abqthemag.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER EMERITUS

Scott Davis (1966–2004)

SUBSCRIBE!

Annual subscriptions to Albuquerque The Magazine are $19 for 11 issues. You may subscribe directly from our website. Send check or money order to:

Albuquerque The Magazine 1550 Mercantile Ave. NE, Top Floor Albuquerque, NM 87107 phone: 505-842-1110 • fax: 505-842-1119 www.abqthemag.com

©2017 Albuquerque The Magazine All Rights Reserved


PUBLISHER’S NOTE

T

his is one of those times that I’m happy to be wrong. About 10 years ago, someone on our magazine staff came back to the office with a box of donuts from a new local donut place in ABQ. As I ate one of their yummy donuts, I couldn’t help but think that their business concept was doomed. There’s no way a local donut maker can compete with places like Dunkin’ Donuts and Krispy Kreme, was my thought. Well, fast-forward to 2022, and apparently Nostradamus I’m not. Not only did Rebel Donut thrive, but numerous other local shops have risen up, giving our city a sprinkling of options for the dreamy, fried (or baked) mix of flour, water and sugar. (Note: local bakeries have long made their own donuts, too — and delicious ones at that — but I’m talking about shops that go all-in on just donuts.) On page 74, we take a peek at the shops, their owners, and their best-selling creations that have ushered in this golden-brown age of donuts. (There may be a donut spot or two not included, and for this, we apologize; our intent was to include all of them, but some were either a bit evasive or late in responding to our request.) We also took pleasure in bringing you a sidebar story you don’t want to miss: we asked 6 local donut ‘experts’ for their opinions on those trendy, crazy-topping donuts that seem to find their way into Instagram feeds. The fun part? Our experts are between ages 5 and 11. You’ll love their thoughts; check them out on page 88. Also, a special thanks to owner Bennie Martinez and his team at Glazed Grinders. Their donut crew was kind enough to let our photo team document the step-by-step process that does into the daily creation of donuts, from measuring to mixing, and frying to icing. Martinez, who owns more than a dozen companies in all sorts of industries, opened the shop on a whim because he had extra space in one of his warehouses—and because he loves donuts. Talk about a success story: if you’ve ever seen the enormous Glazed Grinders donut trailer—available for private parties or special events—you’ll know they are SERIOUS about donuts.

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And even though the star of this issue is donuts, we didn’t forget that Albuquerque The Magazine is all about people, such as Phil Mayhew, who grew up going to the ABQ BioPark, where he’s now a Zookeeper who helps care for the reptiles that fascinated him as kid. Read about him on page 122. Or, in our Personality profile, check out our story of Carla Sinopoli, who has traveled the globe on her path to becoming an archaeological expert. Now she’s part of our world, as the overseer of the millions of historic artifacts housed at the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology on the UNM campus. Speaking of our world, few know the culture and vibe of ABQ better than Hakim Bellamy. Once bestowed with the honor of being Albuquerque’s first Poet Laureate, he has continued to use his prose to generate feelings of love and mystique toward our city. On page 128, we talk to Bellamy about his latest book of poetry—and what it means to be a voice in today’s complicated world. We hope that you enjoy this issue of ATM; we’re already working on the next one for you!

Sincerely,

Larryl Lynch Publisher

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TINY BITES OF EVERYTHING TO SEE, DO AND BUY IN ALBUQUERQUE

PIZZAWINGS

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

za heaven. Managers at Richie B’s handed Darren a few internet photos of similar winged paintings, and he went to work. The team at the Northeast Heights eatery says working with a local artist was a positive experience, and in the future they plan on filling up their empty walls with artwork from other local talent. —EMMA TREVINO

PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

Richie B’s Pizza unveiled an original, graffiti-style mural last month—a perfect backdrop for kids to take pics worth posting. The mural was hand painted by local artist Darren G (@custom_sicknezz on Instagram). After deciding to revamp the look of the restaurant, Richie B’s found Darren through a recommendation, and it was a match made in piz-

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START BR A GGING

ABQ

Jonnie Storm

Capacity Builder Public Ally at New Mexico Community Capital “I absolutely adore the vibrancy the murals bring to our ABQ streets. One of my favorites is at Central Avenue and 7th Street downtown, a colorful work by Lynnette Haozous. I highly recommend doing a mural walk. We have some really talented artists in this city.” Start Bragging ABQ is a campaign to tell everyone what you love about our city. Got a brag about ABQ? Send it to us at editor@abqthemag.com.

Though many countries have independently developed their own version of doughnuts, the Dutch are widely credited with bringing the fried pastry to America prior to the Revolutionary War, originally calling them olykoeks, meaning “oily cakes”.

ABQ’s outdoor fun is as varied as our beautiful surroundings, from the rugged Sandia Mountains to the lush bosque along the Rio Grande. That wide array has landed our city a huge distinction: a #7 ranking as the “Best City for Recreation” by WalletHub’s 2022 listing. “It’s wonderful to see Albuquerque appear so highly on this ranking,” says Tania Armenta, President & CEO of Visit Albuquerque. “Our weather, 310 days of annual sunshine, abundant recreation opportunities and bucket-list experiences are part of what make Albuquerque a great place to live and a top destination to visit any time of year.” The ranking by WalletHub, a personal-finance website, was aimed at the 100 largest cities in the U.S., and considered four factors: the number of entertainment and recreation facilities, cost, quality of parks, and weather. Only ABQ and Scottsdale, AZ scored in the top 40 in all four areas. Local spots like Tiguex Park and Rio Grande Nature Center State Park make for lazy summer afternoons or brisk walks, as both offer several paths and amenities. Tiguex, located next to the Albuquerque Museum, offers dozens of picnic tables, full-size basketball courts, plenty of play equipment for kids, a full soccer field, and even outdoor workout stations. The Nature Center is an abundant, reserve-like recreational facility that’s home to wide walking trails and incredible scenery. The welcome center offers info on the bosque—and the wildlife you might see. The city has nearly 300 parks, which were ranked as 11th best in quality by WalletHub. By comparison, the parks of the ranking’s top overall city, Las Vegas, NV, ranked only #22.

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MASON ALARID

AGE: 7 SCHOOL: St Charles Elementary School TOTALLY INTO: running, the outdoors, his little brother, his dog, and playing Roblox NOT A FAN OF: doing anything slow, long drives, going to the store, mushrooms FUTURE PLANS: Would like to be a pilot when he grows up! HIS STORY: “Mason has long been referred to as the fastest kid in class!” says his father Gabe Alarid. He is only seven years old and is already such a passionate runner willing to go for miles at a time. Last year he ran cross country beating all kids his age, even most of the 8 year olds. Mason not only excels at running, but school as well. “He is an honor roll student known to have such an amazing heart to all, so much so that he was awarded the prestigious Cardinal Virtue Award at his school,” says his father. His teacher said, “Because he is always polite, a kind friend, and a great helper!” —DLM

Submit your Incredible Kids at incrediblekids@abqthemag.com

Pick Your Sunshine Flowers are one of the best ways to brighten up a home or someone’s life, but all too often we find ourselves picking through the stale selections offered by a grocery store. What better way to ensure you get the best flowers than by picking them yourself? It’s also a great way to spend time outdoors this summer and fall, with Big Jim Farms holding the Sunflower U-Pick event everyday. Here are the most important things to know about this sunny season. When and where is it? Every day from 8am-6pm through the end of October at 4515 Rio Grande Blvd, Los Ranchos NM. Is it just sunflowers? As of August 1, Big Jim Farms will offer U-Pick for zinnias, dahlias, cosmos and special variety flowers along with sunflowers. U-Pick green chile also starts in August, with red chile U-Pick and red chile ristra classes starting in September, all going through the end of

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October. The pumpkin patch goes from September to Halloween, with several varieties of pumpkins available to cut from the vine. Do I have to bring my own tools? Big Jim Farms provides flower clippers and a mason jar for keeping your flowers safe on the way home. How much does it cost? Picking your own sunflowers is free! You only have to pay for the flowers, produce, and green chile. How big is the U-Pick farm? The U-Pick farm is nine acres and home to friendly farm animals like their famous chile chickens. Big Jim Farms also provides children’s play areas, educational farm stations, and live entertainment on some weekends. All this information and more can be found on bigjimfarms.com. - Emma Trevino


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Cast your BALLOTS

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MARK YOUR CALENDARS TO PARTICIPATE IN EACH OF OUR ONLINE POLLS.

Feb. 1 – March 1

HEALTHCARE HEROES & TOP-NOTCH NURSE AWARDS If we didn’t already know, 2020 has shown us the true heroism and value of our local nurses. HOW TO NOMINATE: Go to abqthemag.com

TOP DENTISTS: VOTING BY DENTISTS ONLY

April 1 – may 1

There are few things more important than proper dental care, and so every year we ask local dentists to vote on those they trust most to care for a loved one. HOW TO VOTE: Go to abqthemag.com

BEST OF THE CITY

May 1 – AUGUST 1

It’s your city, so who better than you to tell us the best places to eat, shop, play and spend in ABQ? More than 6 million votes have been cast since Best of the City launched in 2005, and we feature the winners in our huge annual December/January Double Issue. HOW TO VOTE: Go to abqthemag.com

sept. 1 – oct. 1

ALBUQUERQUE’S HOT SINGLES Upload a photo and a brief description of the eligible single you think would make one of ABQ’s HOTTEST Singles.

Kelly R. Stephens

Wife, Mom, and Registered Nurse “I love all the outdoor activities our city offers for families. The kids can join in for adventures like skiing, snowboarding, hang gliding, or hiking La Luz Trail. Even for laid back walks, we have parks, the Rio Grande, and trailheads along the base of the Sandias.” Start Bragging ABQ is a campaign to tell everyone what you love about our city. Got a brag about ABQ? Send it to us at editor@abqthemag.com.

HOW TO NOMINATE: Go to abqthemag.com

TOP DOCS: VOTING BY DOCTORS ONLY

oct. 1 – nov. 1

How do you get to know a good healthcare provider? Every year we ask the city’s doctors to vote for their peers, and we publish the list of winners, just for you. HOW TO VOTE: Go to abqthemag.com

NOV. 1 – DEC. 1

ABOVE & BEYOND TEACHER AWARDS We shine some recognition on the amazing classroom mentors who make sure our students are learning. HOW TO NOMINATE: Go to abqthemag.com

T 30 O NOMINATE AND VOTE, LOG ON TO ABQTHEMAG.COM

Back in the 1950s, police officers on the graveyard shift would stop by doughnut shops—which were among the few establishments open late. Doughnut shop owners welcomed the protection of police officers, and police officers liked having a place to chow down late at night, so the association stuck around.


DOES YOUR RETIREMENT PLAN NEED A REMODEL?

LET US HELP YOU REBUILD YOUR RETIREMENT PLAN 505-892-3300 • www.nmwmg.com 2409 Manzano Loop NE Rio Rancho, NM 87144 Securities and advisory services offered through Commonwealth Financial Network®, Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser. Fixed insurance products and services offered through CES Insurance Agency.

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ABQ

IF YOUR POSTS OF ABQ ARE AWESOME ENOUGH TO PRINT,

TAG THEM!

Hayley Shadle

Human Resources Tech University of New Mexico “I really enjoy hiking or running in our scenic foothills. I also love walking in the Alameda open space. And after working up an appetite, there’s nothing like our local food, like pretzel bites at Canteen Taproom, or fries at Stripes Burrito Company.” Start Bragging ABQ is a campaign to tell everyone what you love about our city. Got a brag about ABQ? Send it to us at editor@abqthemag.com.

Renée Zellweger needed to gain weight fast to reprise her role as the eponymous heroine in 2004’s Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason. The actress ate “a Big Mac and chips, potatoes swimming in butter, pizza, milkshakes, and 20 doughnuts” every day to hit her weight goal in time for shooting.

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KAILEY PORTER

AGE: 10 SCHOOL: 5th grade at Explore Academy Elementary TOTALLY INTO: Boba tea, mac and cheese, clothes NOT A FAN OF: bugs, snakes, and cruelty in the world FUTURE PLANS: She wants to be a professional baker HER STORY: “Kailey is our ray of sunshine!” exclaims her mom, Kelly Porter. Her nickname is “Nature” because she is a force to be reckoned with. She might even be Harry Potter’s biggest fan. “Everything she does is done with kindness, empathy, and an enthusiasm that is contagious to those around her,” says Porter. Kailey has several creative hobbies including making anything crafty, baking treats for her family, building with legos and drawing. She loves to rock climb, cuddle her guinea pig, Snickers, and play her ukulele. One day, Kailey would love to compete on a baking show. She loves school and learning. —DLM

Submit your Incredible Kids at incrediblekids@abqthemag.com THE FUTURE OF CHILE ROASTING IS BRIGHT– SOLAR, TO BE EXACT Green chile roasting season emits approximately 7,800 metric tons of carbon dioxide annually, and local Sandia National Labs engineer Kenneth Armijo set out to see if he could find a more sustainable way of making New Mexico’s favorite fall ingredient. Armijo discovered that hightemperature food roasting was possible with solar power instead of the toxic carbon dioxide traditionally used. A few years ago, Armijo was asked off-handedly if he had ever combined his work and culture, and his answer was no. According to Mollie Rappe, who covers energy research at Sandia, Armijo then thought about his work in studying concentrated solar technology and the 200-foot tower with 212 mirrors Sandia Labs has for working with solar energy. With the help of several donated bags of green chile from his dad, Armijo added a rotating chile roaster to Sandia’s testing resources. He discovered that roasting green chiles using solar power was possible and also extremely effective last fall. He is currently in the process of presenting this exciting research to his peers, says Rappe. Armijo is working on a patent, but because a 200-foot tower isn’t a feasible option for public consumption, he envisions a dish-like concentrator reminiscent of a satellite surrounded by mirrors which would be small enough to attach with a trailer hitch. Armijo’s dream is for this technology to be designed and built in New Mexico and make its way to New Mexico farmer’s markets. - Emma Trevino

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Fruit Basket

El Super Market

Sprouts Farmers Market

Smith’s

5112 Lomas Blvd. NE 7 am to 10 pm (505) 268-5127

1000 Rio Rancho Dr. SE 6 am to 10 pm (505) 892-1791

Albertson’s

Rosales Produce

Farmers Chile Market

Whole Foods

6343 4th Street NW 8 am to 7 pm (505) 344-0885

2910 Juan Tabo NE 6 am to 10 pm (505) 299-3800

4201 Central Avenue NW 7 am to 10 pm (505) 544-2919

7331 4th St NW 7am to 5 pm (505) 615-2220

2010 Eubank NE 9 am to 5 pm (505) 262-3058

5815 Wyoming Blvd. NE 7am to 10 pm (505) 856-0474

La Montanita Co-op 2400 Rio Grande NW 7am to 9 pm (505) 242-8800

Nelson’s Meats

929 Old Coors Drive SW Tuesday through Saturday 7 am to 5:30 pm Closed Sunday and Monday (505) 836-3330

LET THE HOME FIRES BURN An expert guide to roasting fresh green chiles in your own kitchen.

Our fall ritual of green chile roasting is upon us! Above, we’ve researched a few retailers that will roast your batch for you. But in case you like roasting it in small batches at home, we reached out for some expert advice from Dave DeWitt, ABQ’s undisputed king of chile (he’s published more than 56 books—mostly on chile—and founded ABQ’s epic annual National Fiery Foods and Barbecue Show). It’s safe to say he has a special relationship with our Official State Vegetable (a title chile shares with pinto beans). “Roasting is important because the chiles have a tough skin. So for culinary purposes, it must be removed,” says DeWitt, who had the nickname “The Pope of Peppers” bestowed upon him by the New York Times. “A flame is the best way to do this, and grilling the chiles adds that special outdoor cooking flavor.” So, after you get your bag (or gunnysack) of fresh green chile, follow these simple steps from DeWitt to home-roast your bounty: 1. Puncture a hole in each chile near the stem to let the steam escape, or the delicate chiles might explode. Seriously. 2. Grill the chiles with heat. Popular methods involve tumblers with propane heat, but you can use an outdoor grill or even your oven (don’t forget to turn them for an even roast). 3. Keep the heat on high until the chiles start to blister and even start to slightly blacken in spots. 4. Then remove the chiles to a plastic bag with a wet paper towel in it, and let the chiles “steam” and then cool for 30 minutes. 5. You can then scrape or peel off the skins, remove the stems and seeds, and either chop or bag whole. 6. Your fresh-roasted chile will keep for a week in the fridge, or you can freeze them.

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Bartender of the Year 2022 On June 5, 2022 The Library Bar & Grill hosted ABQ’s most talented bartenders to compete in the Bartender of the Year Competition. Each bartender was judged based off of overall taste, their skill level, time needed, and presentation. 1. Michael Conforti, Rick Washington 2. James Hemphill, Nick Woodall 3. Victor Acosta, Eric Banda 4. Dale Romine, Juztin Lynn 5. Kelly Ann Kailer, Sabine Otero, Nohelani Ader 6. Lydia Newton, Aurora Black 7. Christian Barradas, Janeth Palma, Ivan Sanchez

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Fathers New Mexico Father’s Day Event

Fathers New Mexico along with Explora hosted a day full of food, games, music, and of course - fun! The event was held at Tiguex Park on June 19th. 1. Ivy Alefante, Rod Alefante, Miracle Alefante 2. Tzachai Givens, Ray Givens, Rayn Givens, Ta-Ziyah Givens 3. Kauri Wilson, Donovan Perea 4. Arthur Salgagl, Cathy Salgagl 5. Keanu Esparza, Monica Esparza, Joanie Esparza 6. Charles Chavez, Angelique Romero

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Open Space Nature Festival

This outdoor nature festival took place at Phil Chacon Park on June 18th. There was both live and interactive musical entertainment, plus a bilingual storytime held by Michelle Adam. 1. Thomas McOwiti, Amelia Cardeña, Dave Simon 2. Brian Boney, Laurel Ladwig, Hannah Rodriguez, Katelin Fisher 3. Rebecca Vigil, Sharon Carbonnea 4. Emily Moore, Mila Romero, Alex Van Why 5. Dave Rivera, Sean Goodyear, Noah Martinez 6. Alex Rubi, Endiona Jones, Isaac Lacerda, Bob (just Bob) 7. Steven Chavez, John Bartlit

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Gathering of the Pack

On June 18th, the Southwest Canine Corps of Volunteers held their annual Gathering of the Pack event at the Bosque Community Center in Bosque Farms. 1. Anthony Ortiz with dog Brea, Donna Collins with dog Nellie 2. Lance Hale with dog Gaia, George Schoen 3. Linda Mason, Georgianne Huff with dog Asta, Barbara Tener 4. Kathy Espey with dog Dan, Linda Jones with dog Cowboy 5. Julie McVay with dog Zach, Sherry Mangold with dog Perkins, Katherine Jackson 6. Karen Green with dog Leia, Michelle McKenzie

7. Melinda Rodgers, Becky Koster, Peggy Cox

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Alzheimer’s Association Purple Carpet Gala: “Havana Nights”

On June 11th, the Alzheimer’s Association hosted a tropical night of fun at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center. They celebrated the advancement and support of research for Alzheimer patients and their loved ones. 1. Rebecca Tafoya, Sheryl Cheahan, Pam Rehmings 2. Ernie Marquez, Susan Marquez, Patrick Gonzales, Tori Rohrer 3. Shane Westhoelter, Michelle McMullan, James McMullan, Aprilyn Chavez-Geissler 4. Dr. Joseph Sanchez, Dr. Lena Ernst, Katrina Hotrum-Lopez, Mark Goodman 5. Maria Geissler, Elaine Geissler, Mike Geissler, Caroline Geissler 6. Tim Sheahan, Dr. Janice Knoefel, Dr. Craig Coleman 7. Nicolette Garcia, Ariel Langford

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Senior Living

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PARTNER CONTENT

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THE BUZZ AROUND ALBUQUERQUE: YOUR GUIDE TO EVERYTHING HAPPENING THIS MONTH

TOP PICK Monday 1 - September 3 12 – 5 pm closed Sunday and Monday Nathaniel Tetsuro Paolinelli: Downtown. This is a collection of recent images photographed in and around Downtown Albuquerque between 2018 and 2022, spotlighting intimate portraits of people and places from nightlife to families to lowrider culture. Info: 516 ARTS, 516 Central Ave SW, 516arts.org, (505) 242-1445. Free.

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monday 1 through sunday 7 | 10 am–6 pm Closed monday and tuesday Rome Comes to Albuquerque. Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel: The Exhibition. You no longer must travel to Europe to experience the wonders of the Sistine Chapel. Info: The visit takes around 60–90 minutes. Bring your own earphones. Creative Arts Center at EXPO New Mexico. Wheelchair accessible. All ages. Tickets: $20.20 to $30.20 at chapelsistine. com/exhibits/ Albuquerque.

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tuesday 2 6:30–8:30 pm

wednesday 3 6/7 pm

sunday 7 1–4 pm

saturday 6 5–10 pm

Twilight Tour at the Zoo. Observe interesting animal behavior while taking a tour of the zoo in a small group led by your personal guide. Please note that not all animals are out at night. Info: Tours start promptly at 6:30 pm, rain or shine. Info: 903 10th Street SW, (505) 848-7180. $15 adults, $10 youths, and seniors. On-line preregistration required. Holdmyticket.com.

Lemon Bucket Orkestra. ¡Globalquerque! and the City of Albuquerque present members of this multicultural group who are led by Ukranian-Canadian couple Mark and Marichka Marczyk. The group will perform and present a timely pre-show talk and Q&A on Ukraine’s rich music traditions and culture and how it informs their contemporary music and work. 25% of net proceeds will go to support World Central Kitchen’s efforts in the region to feed Ukrainian refugees and families in Ukraine via their #ChefsForUkraine effort. Info: Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Road NW, (505) 243-7255, albuquerquemuseum.org. Tickets: $20.

Dorothy Bunny Bowen: Branching Out. Wild Hearts Gallery, an artist’s collective of 16 local artists, presents the opening reception for this artist who executes wax resist paintings on silk. Info: Exhibit runs until August 28. wiildheartsgallery.com, 221 Homestead Village, Hwy 165 Placitas, (505) 361-2710.

Downtown Summerfest. Celebrate warm weather and outdoor fun at a free community gathering during this Albuquerque Summerfest. This concert series features an Artisan Market, food trucks, entertainment by local talent, and a production by Yacht Rock Revue, a national headliner. Info: Civic Plaza, 301 Tijeras Avenue NW. Pets on leashes welcome. Rain or shine. visitalbuquerque.org/ event/downtownsummerfest. Free.

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Trust us, these are but a few ABQ events YOU CAN'T MISS.

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tuesday 23 10–11 am

thursday 25 7:30 pm

Understanding Alzheimer’s and Dementia. This webinar of the NM Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association will teach participants about the difference between Alzheimer’s and dementia, including stages, risk factors, and more. Info: nmprograms@alz.org or (800) 272-3900. Free.

Jimmie Vaughan at Fusion Meadow. This four-time Grammy winner has helped breathe new life into the music that has been his lifeline, country and blues, which he considers to be same thing. Info: Presented by AMP Concerts at Fusion’s outdoor performance space, Fusion Meadow, at 706 1st Street NW, (505) 766-9412, fusionnm.org. Tickets are $39 in advance, $44 day of show (including all service charges) by phone at Hold My Ticket, (505) 886-1251.

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

friday 26 to sunday 28 | friday 4 pm to midnight; saturday 10 am to midnight; sunday 10 am to 5 pm Bubonicon 53 Convention. New Mexico’s original annual science fiction convention focuses on the literature of science fiction, fantasy and horror, allowing fans to come together to meet favorite authors, socialize, admire artwork, play games, have fun, and celebrate Science Fiction. Info: Albuquerque Marriott Uptown, 2101 Louisiana Blvd NE (at I-40). Call (505) 559-0931 or (505) 266-8905, email bubonicon@gmail.com, or visit bubonicon.com. Allweekend and one-day passes available, discounts for youths under 17 years of age.

tuesdays through sundays 11 am–5 pm Chasing Light: New Photography. Featuring landscape and portrait photography by Chelsea A. Benally, David Duplessie, Boderra Joe, Matt Mesibov, and Bryce Risley. Info: Gallery Hózhó located in Hotel Chaco, 2000 Bellamah Avenue NW, (505) 306-2977. Free.

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registering now

New Mexico Young Actors. Classes for Fall 2022 will begin August 11 with registration open after June 6. New students can join us in Drama I, and current and returning students will register for Advanced Drama, featuring auditions for the musical “The Jungle Book” and the play “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.” Info: nmyoungactors.org.

now through august 31

Planet Fitness. High school students ages 14 to 19 are invited to work out FREE at any of its local clubs as part of its High School Summer Pass to improve students’ mental and physical health. Info: To register, visit planetfitness.com/summerpass.

monday 1 through saturday 13 | 10 am–5 pm

Pastel Society of New Mexico. The Signature Show will feature only members who have achieved certain criteria of artistic excellence may become signature members. Info: Los Lunas Museum of Heritage and Arts, 251 Main Street. SE, Los Lunas. The museum is open 10–5 Tuesday–Saturday and is closed Sundays and Mondays. Free to the public and everyone is welcome.

monday 1 through august 31 | 11 am–6 pm, monday–saturday sundays 12–5 pm

Downstairs: “4 sided FUTURE and distracted dreams of realization in the direction of a line.” Abstract paintings by Thomas TJ Meade. Upstairs: “Garden of Earthy Delights.” Collages by Jennifer DeSantis. Info: Mariposa Gallery, 3500 Central Avenue SE, (505) 268-6828, mariposa-gallergy.com. Free.

monday 1 through September 3 | 12–5 pm closed sunday and monday

Art Meets History: Technologies of the Spirit. This project looks at how the divergent histories of race, conflict, and colonialism in New Mexico inform how we imagine our futures. Info: 516 ARTS, 516 Central Ave SW, 516arts.org, (505) 2421445. Free.

tuesday 2 | 6:30 pm

Wiz Khalifa and Logic: Vinyl Verse Tour 2022. Wiz Khalifa released a new album, “Rolling Papers 2”, his sixth LP and first since 2014. It also markes 12 years that he has been recognized as a noted rapper–he’s had his dream job for almost half his life. Logic’s persona is built on compassion, and on album six the Maryland rapper offers a sense of peace and closure that honors his storied career. Info: Isleta Amphitheater, 5601 University Blvd. SE. Tickets: concerts.livenation.com, $29–$410 (VIP) plus fees.

thursday 4 6 pm

Chatter at the Albuquerque Museum. String quartets by two contemporary Navajo composers, Michael Begay and Juantio Becenti, alongside two works by renowned Mexican composers, Mario Lavista and Julián Carrillo. Info: Chatter at the Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Rd NW. Free admission.

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thursday 4 | 7:30 pm

Guitar Lab Trio. Guitarists Michael Anthony, Vic Romanelli and Micky Patten have gotten together to practice their guitar skills for several years. Patten eventually switched over to bass and the trio took on more of a performance vibe. They will share their favorite jazz classics, incorporating elements of swing, bebop, and Latin music with Donald O. Bailey on drums and Rodolfo Gonzales on flute and percussion. Info: Outpost Performance Space, 210 Yale SE. Tickets: $20 general and $15 for Outpost members and students, online only at outpostspace.org.

friday 5 | 4–7 pm

A Fusion of Color Artists Reception. Carol Lutz, with a degree in Studio Arts, is hooked on fused glass. Assorted vibrant colors of art glass are hand cut and assembled into designs including flowers, geometric shapes, and more. Vera Russel is an oil painter of many different subjects, especially the glorious landscapes of New Mexico. She has added watercolor, pastels, and acrylics to her media choices. Both fuse their colors and subjects into masterful displays of artistic merit. The show will run through August. Info: Amapola Gallery, 205 Romero NW on the Plaza in Old Town. Free.

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friday 5 | 5–8 pm

Vivid Abstracted Landscapes. Lisa Zawadzki, artist, expresses her love of New Mexico through vivid abstracted landscapes, some in impulsive exuberance, while other paintings stem from the process of using laminated newsprint to create collage ‘paintings’ which become sources for larger acrylic works. Info: Matrix Fine Art, 3812 Central SE, Free.

friday 5 | 7 pm

Cruisin’ the 505. Concert featuring Ramon Ayala, WAR, MC Magic, Jo Bataan, Trinere, Little Joe Y La Familia, Brenton Wood, Malo, and Baby Bash. Info: Tingley Coliseum, EXPO New Mexico, 300 San Pedro NE. Tickets: $30 plus fees, ticketmaster.com.

friday 5 through sunday august 14 | friday and saturday 7:30 pm sunday 2 pm

friday 5 9 pm

Chatter Late Works. A late-night concert for the adventurous at Chatter’s new downtown warehouse performance space, with cash bar. Info: Chatter at 912 3rd Street NW. Tickets at chatterabq.org/ boxoffice, $16 general admission.

friday 5 through September 3 | 7:30 pm thursdays, fridays, saturdays, and sundays

“King Lear” and “As You Like It.” The New Mexico Shakespeare Festival presents two shows. Info: New Mexico Veterans Memorial Park, 1100 Louisiana SE. Preshow entertainment starts at 7 pm. All tickets are free, and reservations are not necessary. Newmexicoshakespearefest. org.

The Sweet Delilah Swim Club. Another Jones Hope Wooten comedy. A “girls” swim club meets every year to catch up, laugh, and meddle in each other’s lives, as only old friends can do. Info: The Adobe Theater, 9813 Fourth Street NW, adobetheater.org, (505) 898-9222. Tickets: $17-20.

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friday 5 | 1 pm–6 pm; saturday 6 | 9 am–5 pm; and sunday 7 | 10 am–4 pm

Great Southwestern Antique and Vintage Show. Shop & visit with over 150 quality antique dealers from across the U.S. Learn about the art of collecting and investing in fine art and antiques, ethnographic tribal and Native American art, historic photos, rare books, jewelry, and more. Info: EXPO New Mexico, Manuel Lujan, Jr. Exhibit Complex, 300 San Pedro NE. exponm. com/events. Tickets: $100 Donation, Friday Sneak Preview; $12 Saturday or Sunday; $20 two-day pass.

saturday 6 | 10–11 am

Engaging Our Senses in the Garden. Docent Sunel Vanderswalt will present a tour of Xeric’s Wildlife Habitat Garden, discussing how to create a habitat garden in your backyard. Habitats help support both the environment and wildlife as well as helping to prevent climate change. Info: Albuquerque Garden Center, 10120 Lomas Blvd. NE, xericgardenclub.org. Free.

saturday 6 | 10 am–noon

Writing Your Family History. SouthWest Writers presents genealogy expert Margaret Shannon live. Includes field trip. Info: Cost: $120/members; $160/nonmembers. Contact info@SWWriters.com.

sunday 7 | 10:30 am

Chatter Sunday. Music by Louise Farrenc and Valerie Coleman. Info: Chatter at 912 3rd St NW. Tickets at chatterabq. org/boxoffice, $16 adults, $9 students/ under-30, $5 under-13.

sunday 7 | 1–3 pm

Bobcats Swing/Jazz Trio. The New Mexico Music award-winning Bobcats will be swinging at the Old Town Gazebo as part of the City’s Summer Music Series. Free.

sunday 7 | 1–5 pm

Corrales Bosque Gallery. The theme for the month of August is “Vacation”. Using a variety of mediums and styles, the gallery artists display their artful interpretations of the theme. The display will run the entire month of August. Info: 4685 Corrales Road, (505) 898-7203, corralesbosquegallery.com. Free. Come vacation with us!

sunday 7 | 2–4 pm and 5–8:30 pm

Albuquerque Summer Scene. Familyfriendly afternoon activities will lead into early evening concerts. This will be the place to hang out on Sunday evenings. Musical performances beginning at 5 pm will be by Dust City Opera and The Timewreckers. Info: Presented by AMP Concerts at Fusion’s outdoor performance space, Fusion Meadow, at 706 1st Street NW, (505) 766-9412, fusionnm.org. Free.

sunday 7 | 6:30 pm

Imagine Dragons: Mercury World Tour. This group has won three American Music Awards, nine Billboard Music Awards, one Grammy Award, one MTV Video Music Award, and one Music Award. They have sold more than 75 million records worldwide, making them one of the world’s best-selling music artists. Info: Isleta Amphitheater, 5601 University Blvd. SE. Tickets: LiveNation.com, $59–$139 plus fees.

tuesdays 9, 16, 23 and 30 7:30–9:30 pm

Social Media. Journalist Elizabeth Layton will discuss social media for four classes. SouthWest Writers presents via Zoom four separate classes regarding Digital Marketing, Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube. Info: Each class costs $40/ members; $50 nonmembers. May attend one or all. To obtain link, info@SWWriters. com.

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thursday 11 | 5–10 pm

Slightly Stoopid. This is their Summer Traditions 2022 tour with special guests Pepper, Common Kings, and Fortunate Youth. Info: Villa Hispana, EXPO New Mexico, 300 San Pedro NE. Tickets: $47– $150 plus fees, ticketmaster.

thursday 11 | 6 pm

saturday 13 12:30–2:30 pm

Last Draft Secrets (and why writers need editors). SouthWest Writers presents veteran editor Susan Katz’s offering via Zoom. Info: SWW members $20; nonmembers $30. Contact info@SWWriters. com.

Chatter at the Albuquerque Museum. Featuring music by Mexican composers José Pablo Moncayo, Mario Lavista, and Arturo Márquez, plus Giacinto Scelsi’s Yamaon, a visionary precognition of the downfall of a Mayan city. Info: Chatter at the Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Rd NW. Free admission.

saturday 13 | 7:30 pm

Theater Grottesco: Survey. This will be a unique, biting performance exploring themes of “Art Meets History”through the lens of physical theatre with an absurdist vision of surveys, social media’s iconic contemporary information gathering tool. Info: Presented by 516ARTS and Outpost Performance Space, 210 Yale SE, (505) 268-0044. Tickets at outpostspace.org, $20 general, $15 members of 516 and Outpost.

thursday 11 | 7:30pm Asher Mundo Project. Albuquerque native, bassist Asher Barreras, who recently returned to his hometown after several years out east, describes the Asher Mundo Project as having “a jazz vision, with the musicians, compositions, and conversations geared towards greater freedom of flow through improvised sound and silence.” The group also features Francisco Dimas on trumpet; Kanoa Kaluhiwa, tenor saxophone; John Funkhouser, piano; and TJ Emerick drums. Info: Outpost Performance Space, 210 Yale SE. Tickets: $20 general and $15 members and students, online only at outpostspace.org.

friday 12 | 7:30 pm

Albuquerque Science Fiction Society. Preview of the Bubonicon 53 programming schedule and artwork, plus a presentation from local skeptic researcher Benjamin Radford about “Ghost Sex: Supernatural Lovers.” This long-running NM science fiction club has author readings, science talks, films, and discussions. Info: Activity Room, St. Andrew Presbyterian Church, 5301 Ponderosa Ave NE (near Erna Fergusson Library), bubonicon.com, (505) 266-8905. Free to newcomers.

saturday 13 | 10 am–noon

Public Speaking to Sell Your Writing. SouthWest Writers presents Ronn Perea, producer and author of six novels, live and via Zoom. Info: Free to members (nonmembers may attend two free meetings). Contact info@SWWriters.com.

saturday 13 |10 am–1 pm

Historic Old Church Tours in Corrales. CHS Docents will open the Old Church for tours. The Old Church, now 154 years old, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980 and is also listed on the New Mexico Register of Cultural Properties. Info: 966 Old Church Road, Corrales. njkimball30@gmail.com, free.

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saturday 13 | 1–3 pm

Land and Water in the Middle East: the Yemen Connection. The infrastructure of acequias is rooted in language and history, and New Mexico can be seen as a direct cultural lineage of Yemen. Speaker: Enrique R. La Madrid who is a Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Spanish at the University of New Mexico. His new book project, “Water for the People: NM Acequia Heritage in Global Context” analyzes the history and meaning of acequias through time. Casa San Ysidro, 973 Old Church Road, Corrales, cabq.gov/casasanysidro, (505) 898-3915, Albuquerque Museum fees.

saturday 13 | 4:30 pm

Family Music Festivals. Bluegrass and Western music shows. The first of two bands begin at 4:30 followed by an amazing raptor show and park visitation. The second band begins at 7 pm. Food trucks will be available. Info: Wildlife West Nature Park, 87 Frontage Road, Edgewood, a non-profit 501(c)3 organization. Advance tickets $20 at (505) 281-7655; 17 and under free. Directions at wildlifewest.org.

saturday 13 | 6:30–8:30 pm Second Saturday Community CoffeeHouse. Kristina Jacobson headlines with folk, Americana, and country songs about family ties; French-born Jacques Dorier opens with a range of musical styles, in emotionally charged songs about love and relationships. Info: Unity Spiritual Center, 9800 Candelaria NE. Donations welcome. uscabq.org/events/2nd-saturdaycommunity-coffee-house/2022-08-13 or email ssccoffeehouse@gmail.com. Free.

saturday 13 | 7:30 pm

Gretchen Peters at Chatter. She is one of Nashville’s beloved and respected artists, accumulating accolades as a songwriter for artists as diverse as Etta James, Bonnie Raitt, the Neville Brothers, Patty Loveless, George Strait, Bryan Adams, and Faith Hill. Info: Chatter, 912 Third Street NW, Tickets $22 in advance, $27 day of show, including all service charges. Also available by phone at Hold My Ticket, (505) 886-1251.

sunday 14 | 2–4 pm and 5–8:30 pm

Albuquerque Summer Scene. Familyfriendly afternoon activities will lead into early evening concerts. This will be the place to hang out on Sunday evenings. Musical performances beginning at 5 pm will be by Joe Tohonnie Jr. and The White Mountain Apache Crown Dancers as well as Ailan. Info: Presented by AMP Concerts at Fusion’s outdoor performance space, Fusion Meadow, at 706 1st Street NW, (505) 766-9412, fusionnm.org. Free.

wednesday 17 5:30–7 pm

100 Women Albuquerque. Join us outside as we socialize, network, and each donate $100 to the same nonprofit. We’ll raise thousands within an hour and hear from the organization we are supporting. If you donate, you get to vote on the nonprofit for next quarter. $100 X 100 Women = $10,000 of community impact in one hour! Info: Rio Bravo Brewing patio, 1912 2nd St NW. 100WomenABQ.org, (505) 5040506.

thursday 18 6 pm

Chatter at the Albuquerque Museum. Music for two pianos and percussion, including Peter Garland’s resplendent “Another Sunrise,” which was composed in Madrid, NM in 1995. Info: Chatter at the Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Rd NW. Free admission.

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thursday 18 | 7:30 pm

Summer Thursday Jazz Nights. Renowned trombonist, percussionist, singer, and bandleader César Bauvallet presents a concert dedicated to romantic Latin music – from Boleros (Latin Ballads) to Peruvian Creole songs, Cha cha cha, Son, and Bossa Novas. With Jackie Zamora and Vicente Griego, vocals; Steve Figueroa, piano; Janet Harman, bass; Víctor Rodríguez, percussion. Info: Outpost Performance Space, 210 Yale SE. Tickets: $20 and $15 Outpost members and students; online only at outpostspace.org.

friday 19 | 7:30 pm

“As You Like It.” New Mexico Shakespeare Festival presents this show at the Westside Openspace Visitors Center, 6500 Coors NW. All tickets are free, and reservations are not necessary. newmexicoshakespearefest.org.

saturday 20 | 9–10 am

Effective Communication Strategies. This webinar of the NM Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association gives participants tips on communicating more effectively with loved ones with dementia. Info: nmprograms@alz.org or (800) 272-3900. Free.

saturday 20 6 pm

Folds of Honor Patriot Dinner. Supporting military families with a lost or disabled member while serving America. Doors open at 6 pm, dinner at 7 pm. Silent and live auction items. Info: Embassy Suites, 1000 Woodward Place NE, (505) 2457100. Website: newmexico.foldsofhonor. org. $150/person and $1,500 for a table of 10. Also, see website for Patriot Golf Day on September 9, 2022.

saturday 20 9 am–1 pm

Riding the CollageWave. In this hands-on workshop, participants will bring images from the past into the present moment and will learn how to work with X-Acto knives to create geometrical shapes and intricate fretwork integrated with historical photos from the Albuquerque Museum Photography Archives and participants’ own photo collections. Info: Presented by Enrique “Kike” Congrains, founder of CollageWave from Lima, Peru. In-person at 516ARTS, 516 Central Avenue SW. Register at 516arts.org/events. $60 general, $50 members.

saturday 20 6–8 pm

Neighborhood Open Space Community Concert. AMP Concerts, in conjunction with a partnership with the City of Albuquerque Open Space Division, will sponsor a concert by The Roswells at this property located along the ephemeral Tijeras Creek which features some beautiful grassy areas surrounded by magnificent cottonwood trees and views of the Sandia foothills. Info: The Tijeras BioZone, 15600 Central Ave SE, just west of Central and Tramway on the Route 66 Frontage Road (just before you get to Carnuel). Reservations are encouraged at ampconcerts.org. Free.

sunday 21 10:30am

Chatter Sunday. Robert Schumann’s Piano Quintet performed by pianist Judith Gordon and Canada’s Rosebud String Quartet. Info: Chatter at 912 3rd St NW, chatterabq.org/boxoffice. Tickets: $16 adults, $9 students/under-30, $5 under-13.

saturday 13 |10 am–1 pm Historic Old Church Tours in Corrales. CHS Docents will open the Old Church for tours. The Old Church, now 154 years old, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980 and is also listed on the New Mexico Register of Cultural Properties. Info: 966 Old Church Road, Corrales. njkimball30@gmail.com. Free.

saturday 20 | 10 am–5 pm

Red and Green VegFest Albuquerque – Shine On. VegFests are community festivals that celebrate plant-based, healthy, ethical, and sustainable living. This VegFest welcomes everyone and promotes plant-based resources. Info: Jewish Community Center, 5520 Wyoming Blvd. NE. Tickets: $10 adults and $5 for 6-15 years old as well as seniors and students. Five and under are free. redandgreenfestabq or contact nancy@ sproutingcompassion.org.

saturday 20 | 2–4 pm

Pastel Society of New Mexico. Member’s Show with Judge Sarah Blumenschein presenting awards. The show runs until September 24th. Info: Los Lunas Heritage and Arts Museum, 251 Main Street, Los Lunas, Tuesday through Saturday, 10 am to 5 pm. Free.

saturday 20 | 5–10 pm

Westside Summerfest. This family-friendly event features fun for everyone, including an Artisan Market, Microbrew Garden, food trucks, and live entertainment by local talent on two stages. Info: Ventana Ranch Community Park, 10000 Universe Blvd. NW. cabq.gov/artsculture/westside Summerfest.

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sunday 21 | 2–4 pm and 5–8:30 pm

thursday 25 6 pm

Albuquerque Summer Scene. Familyfriendly afternoon activities will lead into early evening concerts. This is the place to hang out on Sunday evenings. Musical performances beginning at 5 pm will be by The New Respects as well as another musical artist. Info: Presented by AMP Concerts, this will be at Fusion’s outdoor performance space, Fusion Meadow, at 706 1st Street NW, (505) 766-9412, fusionnm.org. Free.

Chatter at the Albuquerque Museum. Canada’s Rosebud String Quartet performs Haydn’s famous “Joke” Quartet, plus Raven Conspiracy by Carmen Braden, an up-and-coming composer from Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. Info: Chatter at the Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Rd NW. Free admission.

wednesday 24 | 3–4 pm

Corrales Art Studio Tour (CAST) Reception. The Preview Gallery of the Corrales Society of Artists, which has 100+ member artists, is where all artists display their artwork to help visitors choose which artists to visit. The 23rd Annual CAST is one of the largest art studios in the Southwest, attracting 7080 local artists and visitors. Artists show their artwork at studios and venues throughout the Village of Corrales. Info: Old Church in Corrales, 966 Old Church Road, Corrales. carol@rigmark.com. Free.

Ten Warning Signs of Alzheimer’s. This in-person presentation provided by the Alzheimer’s Association helps participants recognize the signs of dementia. Info: The Neighborhood in Rio Rancho Life Plan Community, 900 Loma Colorado Blvd NE, Rio Rancho. Contact: nmprograms@alz. org or (800) 272-3900. Free.

wednesday 24 | 6:30–8:30 pm

Making Dialogue Sing. SouthWest Writers will present via Zoom Santa Fe’s awardwinning writer of westerns, Johnny D. Boggs, who will discuss “Making Dialogue Sing.” Info: Free to members (nonmembers may attend two free meetings). For link contact info@SWWriters.com.

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thursday 25 6 pm

thursday 25 7:30 pm

Summer Jazz Thursday Nights. This performance, featuring vocalist Diane Richardson, is inspired by the work of American jazz saxophonist and composer Steve Lacy, who is recognized as one of the important players of soprano saxophone. She’s joined by Arnold Bodmer, piano; Micky Patten, bass; and Douglas Cardwell, percussion. Info: Outpost Performance Space, 210 Yale SE. Tickets: $20 and $15 for Outpost members and students online only at outpostspace.org.

friday 26 1–4 pm

Corrales Art Studio Tour (CAST) Reception. The Preview Gallery of the Corrales Society of Artists, which has 100+ member artists, is where all artists display their artwork to help visitors choose which artists to visit. The 23rd Annual CAST is one of the largest art studios in the Southwest, attracting 7080 local artists and visitors. Artists show their artwork at studios and venues throughout the Village of Corrales. Info: Old Church in Corrales, 966 Old Church Road, Corrales. carol@rigmark.com. Free.

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friday 26 | 5–9 pm

Last Friday Market. Mariposa Music presents a monthly family-friendly market at Fusion. Join us on the last Friday of each month for live music, local artisan vendors, food, and drinks, indoors and out. Info: 700-708 1st Street NW, (505) 7669412, fusionnm.org.

friday 26 | 7–8:30 pm

Sacred Chants. Join the USC Kirtan Quintet to celebrate the joyful, sacred practice of devotional chanting and sacred songs from many spiritual traditions. Mantra, music, and meditation come together in this creative and timeless vocal spiritual practice. Info: Unity Spiritual Center, 9800 Candelaria NE and Facebook Live. uscabq. org/ministries/music. Free; donations welcome.

friday 26 | 7:30 pm

“King Lear. The New Mexico Shakespeare Festival presents this show at the Westside Openspace Visitors Center. Info: 6500 Coors NW. All tickets are free. Reservations are not necessary. newmexicoshakespearefest.org.

saturday 27 | 9 am–12 pm

Neighborhood Nature Festival. This popup event will provide exciting engagement opportunities for residents and explorers from around the city. Each celebration will feature paletas from Pop Fizz, bilingual nature storytelling and puppet shows, nature-themed carnivale performances, a bosque ecosystem traveling exhibit truck, hands-on science activities, naturebased games, show-n-tell with urban wild animals, a bike repair clinic, live music with Recycleman with Big Daddy, and more. Info: Phil Chacon Park, 7600 Southern Ave SE. Reservations encouraged and more information available at ampconcerts.org. Free.

saturday 27 | 10 am–4 pm

Corrales Art Studio Tour (CAST) Reception. The Preview Gallery of the Corrales Society of Artists, which has 100+ member artists, is where all artists display their artwork to help visitors choose which artists to visit. The 23rd Annual CAST is one of the largest art studios in the Southwest, attracting 7080 local artists and visitors. Artists show their artwork at studios and venues through the Village of Corrales. Info: Old Church in Corrales, 966 Old Church Road, Corrales. carol@rigmark.com. Free.

saturday 27 | 2–4 pm

Rio Rancho Youth Chorus. New member open house. One of Rio Rancho’s best kept secrets! RRYC is looking for male and female singers, ages 11¬–18, and will accept new members until September 17, 2022. No auditions and all are welcome. Info: 4311 Sara Rd SE, second floor. rr-cc. org or email info@rr-cc.org.

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saturday 27 | 4:30 pm

Family Music Festivals. Bluegrass and Western music shows. The first of two bands begin at 4:30 followed by an amazing raptor show and park visitation. The second band begins at 7 pm. Food trucks will be available. Info: Wildlife West Nature Park, 87 Frontage Road, Edgewood, a non-profit 501(c) 3. Advance ticket sales $20 at (505) 281-7655; 17 and under free. Directions at wildlifewest.org.

sunday 28 | 10 am–4 pm

Corrales Art Studio Tour (CAST) Reception. The Preview Gallery of the Corrales Society of Artists, which has 100+ member artists, is where all artists display their artwork to help visitors choose which artists to visit. The 23rd Annual CAST is one of the largest art studios in the Southwest, attracting 7080 local artists and visitors. Artists show their artwork at studios and venues through the Village of Corrales. Info: Old Church in Corrales, 966 Old Church Road, Corrales. carol@rigmark.com. Free.

sunday 28 | 10:30 am

Chatter Sunday. Weber’s Clarinet Quintet performed by clarinetist James Shields and Canada’s Rosebud String Quartet. Info: Chatter at 912 3rd Street NW. Tickets at chatterabq.org/boxoffice, $16 adults, $9 students/under-30, $5 under-13.

sunday 28 | 2–4 pm and 5–8:30 pm

daily | various activities and times

ONGOING:

daily | 11 am–6 pm, 5 pm sundays

Albuquerque Summer Scene. Familyfriendly afternoon activities will lead into early evening concerts. This is the place to hang out on Sunday evenings. Musical performances beginning at 5 pm will be by Chris Dracup: Funk of the West and Chill House Band featuring Hillary Smith. Info: Presented by AMP Concerts at Fusion’s outdoor performance space, Fusion Meadow, at 706 1st Street NW, (505) 7669412, fusionnm.org. Free.

various days various times

Albuquerque Visitor’s Guide. Info: Check out visitabq.org for many great ideas for exploring our city. An official printed Albuquerque Visitor’s Guide can also be obtained.

Jewish Community Center. The Ronald Gardenswartz Jewish Community Center of Greater Albuquerque (JCC) is part of your extended family, your home away from home—providing programs and services for all ages and stages in life. Within our walls or around the world, our members gather to meet, play, learn, celebrate, and be part of the community. Everyone, regardless of age or religious affiliation, is welcome. Info: 5520 Wyoming Blvd. NE, (505) 332-0565, jccabq.org.

Mariposa Gallery. Downstairs: Thomas TJ Meade presents a new body of abstract paintings in a show titled “4 sided FUTURE and distracted dreams of realization in the direction of a line”. Upstairs: Collage artist Jennifer DeSantis exhibits a body of new work entitled “Garden of Earthy Delights.” Info: Through August 31st. 3500 Central Avenue SE, info@mariposa-gallery.com, (505) 268-6828.

daily | various times and locations

Al-Anon Family Groups and Alateen. This is an anonymous fellowship of relatives and friends of problem drinkers. Meetings are held on various days and times throughout Albuquerque and New Mexico. We come together to share our experience, strength and hope to recover from the effects of another person’s drinking. Info: Al-Anon Information Service, aisnm.org, (505) 262-2177.

daily | various times

Lovelace Silver Elite. Informative videos are offered that address health issues such as osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, cardiovascular issues, Parkinson’s disease, and treatment options for male lower UTI’s and BPH, as well as radiology imaging as we age. Presented by Lovelace doctors that are experts in the subject fields. Lovelace Silver Elite also offers free seminars and VIP benefits. Info: lovelacesilverelite.com, (505) 727-5502.

daily

Agora Crisis Center Volunteers. Are you a compassionate, non-judgmental person who wants to help others? Learn new skills, make friends, earn class credit, and be a part of a rewarding organization. Info: Agora Crisis Center, agoracares.org.

daily

Animal Humane’s Free Behavioral Helpline. This free service is available to all pet owners who are experiencing behavior problems with their dogs and cats. Animal Humane New Mexico’s trained behavior coaches answer questions and provide tips on everything from housetraining to living toerther with multiple animals. Info: 938-7900.

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daily

Donate Blood. Someone needs it every day. Please donate if you can. Info: unitedbloodservices.org, 843-6227.

daily

Epilepsy Support and Education Services— Meeting. For meeting time and place, please contact the office at 243-9119 or check the website for more details. Info: epilepsysupportnm.org.

daily

Rattlesnakes. See different species of live rattlesnakes displayed in recreated natural landscapes. We are dedicated to conservation and preservation through education. Info: American International Rattlesnake Museum, 202 San Felipe Road NW, rattlesnakes.com. Tickets: adults, $6; seniors, military, students, teachers $5; children, $4.

daily

Roadrunner Food Bank. Volunteers are needed to help prep food for distribution, repack and sort items, and other activities while helping New Mexico’s hungry. The gift of your precious time helps solve hunger for so many people. Volunteers must register in advance. Shifts are available in two-hour increments, Mondays–Saturdays. Info: 5840 Office Blvd. NE, givetime@rrfb.org, 349-5358.

daily

Ronald McDonald House Charities of New Mexico. We provide a “home-awayfrom-home” for families whose children are in medical treatment. Operating the 30-guest-room Yale House, 20-guestroom Highlands House, and the Ronald McDonald Family Rooms at UNM and Presbyterian Hospitals, volunteers make a vital difference in the lives of the people they serve. Info: Volunteer Coordinator, rmhc-nm.org, 842-8960, volunteer@ rmhc-nm.org.

daily

Explora. The museum brings out new activities in the “Working Together to Build a Village” exhibit area in its Rotary Pavilion, offering hands-on activities related to construction, architecture, and engineering, and Sketch Aquarium and Curious Bubbles in the Explora Theater. Info: Explora, 1701 Mountain Road NW, explora.us, 224-8300. Cost: Included in admission.

daily

“We Are of This Place: The Pueblo Story” Art Exhibit. The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center celebrates its 40th anniversary with this permanent museum exhibit that represents all 19 Pueblos and builds upon the IPCC’s 40-year history of telling the story of Pueblo people in their own voices. Hear stories in Pueblo languages from artists and elders, interact with art and artifacts, learn about the Pueblo people’s history of resilience, and experience traditions that have been passed down for generations. Info: Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, 2401 12th Street NW, indianpueblo.org, 843-7270. Free with museum admission.

daily | 7 am–8 pm

Free Fishing. From sun-up to sun-down, practice your basic fly-tying methods, flyrod casting techniques, fishing etiquette, effective catch-and-release practices and enhancement of advanced skills. Bring your own equipment and refreshments as the store and cafes are currently closed. Info: Tingley Beach, 1800 Tingley Drive SW, call 311 or 768-2000. Free.

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AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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daily | 8 am–5 pm

Albuquerque Art App-led Scavenger Hunt. Albuquerque boasts incredible sculptures. On this fun-filled walking scavenger hunt, journey around downtown’s historic buildings, green spaces and meet the locals who built the city. Info: Let’s Roam Scavenger Hunts, starting point - 391 3rd Street NW, letsroam.com, 833-202-7626. Tickets: $13.

daily | various times

Explora’s STEAM Enrichment Programs. Explora has limited in-person and virtual STEAM enrichment programs happening throughout the year. Info: explora.us for details. Prices vary.

daily | 9 am–3 pm

Veterans Presentation. Listen to veterans tell about historical events or their personal experience in the service to our country. Speakers represent WWII, Korean, Vietnam, and War on Terror experiences. Also tour the museum, gardens and amphitheater. Info: New Mexico Veterans Memorial Park, 1100 Louisiana Blvd. SE, 256-2042. Free admission. Donations requested.

daily | 9 am–5 pm

“The Original Instructions: Pueblo Sovereignty and Governance” Exhibit. This Indian Pueblo Cultural Center exhibit reexamines the role and symbolism of the Lincoln canes in the history of Pueblo people, within a larger discussion about sovereignty, governance, and leadership from a Pueblo perspective. Info: Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, 2401 12th Street NW, indianpueblo.org, 843-7270. Free with museum admission.

daily | 10 am–5 pm

Adopt a Pet. Find your best pet ever. Adopt a dog, cat, puppy or kitten from Animal Humane New Mexico. Adoptions include spay/neuter, vaccinations, and a microchip. Info: 615 Virginia Street SE, and west side at 10141 Coors Blvd. NW, animalhumanenm.org.

daily | 10 am

Watermelon Mountain Ranch Animal Center. New Mexico’s largest no-kill animal shelter seeks loving homes for rescued dogs and cats. Adoptions are at select Petsmart locations and Watermelon Mountain Ranch on various days from 10 am–8 pm. Donations, fosters, and volunteers are always welcome. Info: wmranch.org, wmranchnm@aol.com, 771-0140.

daily | various times

Explora’s Experiment Bar. Fruit and veggie batteries, thaumatropes, invisible writing, electromagnetics, DNA extraction or spin art? Visit Explora’s website to see which of our hands-on activities are happening. Activities change weekly. Mondays through Saturdays at 10 am and Sundays at noon. Info: Explora, 1701 Mountain Road NW, explora.us, 224-8300. Free with general admission.

mondays and sundays | mondays 12 noon–1 pm and sundays 1:30–2:30 pm

Japanese Garden Tours. Join docents on the Hanami Flower Tours through the Sasebo Japanese Garden. Learn about the garden’s many varieties of flowering cherries and other blossoms, and the history of Japan’s Hanami celebrations. Info: ABQ BioPark Botanic Garden, 2601 Central Ave. NW, abqbiopark.com, 311.

mondays | 5–6 pm

Geeks Who Drink. Test your knowledge while enjoying a unique evening’s experience. Free of charge and open to anyone 21 and older. Prizes awarded to winning teams. Only one table allowed per team. Warning: this quiz contains adult themes and adult language. Info: O’Niell’s Heights, 3301 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE, oniells. com, 293-1122.

every second monday | 6:30–8 pm

Outcomes Grandparents Raising Grandchildren. Come for discussion and support groups. Info: Heights Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 8600 Academy Road NE, 243-2551 to reserve a space. Free childcare provided. Free.

every third monday | 6–7:30 pm

Outcomes Grandparents Raising Grandchildren. Attend discussion and support groups. Info: West Mesa Community Center, 5500 Glenrio NW, 243-2551 to reserve a space. Free childcare provided. Free.

every fourth monday | 6:30– 8:30 pm

Bead Society of New Mexico Monthly Membership Meeting. The BSNM’s purpose is to promote the members’ and the public education, appreciation, and involvement in the field of beads and bead-related subjects. No meeting in July or December. Info: North Domingo Baca Multigenerational Center, 7521 Carmel Drive NE, beadsocietynm.org.

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mondays–fridays | various times

Ninja Park Obstacle Course Fitness Center. TAK Fit is Ninja Park’s fun and functional fitness style that utilizes calisthenics exercise, dynamic lifts, and obstacles to create a unique and balanced workout that you will not find anywhere else. Join and have fun getting fit. Ages 16 and older. Classes are 6:30 to 7 am, 12:30 am to 1 pm, and 6:30 to 7 pm. Info: ninjaparkabq.com, 883-9203.

mondays–saturdays | 10 am–5 pm

Exquisite Turquoise in the Castle. This extraordinary German-style castle is the museum setting, featuring rare turquoise specimens, lapidary demos, history and geology, a mine tunnel replica, hands-on activities for kids, and silver smithing. Info: The Turquoise Museum, 400 2nd Street SW, turquoisemuseum.com, 433-3684. Tickets: $16, discounts for AAA, over 55 and military.

tuesdays | 12 noon

Kiwanis Club of Albuquerque Zoom Meeting. Come join us every Tuesday for a lunch meeting with interesting speakers to learn how you can help the children of Albuquerque and surrounding communities live better lives. Info: Currently on Zoom, when meeting in person: Embassy Suites Hotel, 1000 Woodward Pl. NE, facebook.com/Kiwanis-Club-ofAlbuquerque-1495809687323742/

tuesdays | 2–3 pm

Caregiver Support Group. Caregiving for a loved one can be overwhelming and isolating. This group provides a compassionate space for caregivers to gain emotional support and information. Facilitated by Erin Tarica, LMSW. Info: Jewish Community Center, 5520 Wyoming Blvd. NE. Preregistration required, call 348-4451. Free.

tuesdays | 6 pm

ABQ Scrabble Club. We have been playing weekly for over 30 years. Come join us. Info: Chili’s, 6909 Menaul Blvd. NE.

tuesdays | 6:30–9:30 pm

Beginning Square Dance Lessons. Lessons are available for singles, couples, and families. Dress is casual and no experience is required; offered by the Crazy Eights Square Dance Club. Info: Albuquerque Square Dance Center, 4915 Hawkins Street NE, 345-9797, hornytoad@q.com.

tuesdays | 6:30–9:30 pm

Open Drawing with the Model. Info: Harwood Art Studio, 1029 6th Street NW, harwoodartcenter.org. Admission: $10 per session; five sessions for $35.

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tuesdays | 7:30–10 pm

Tango Club of Albuquerque’s Weekly Milonga. This is an Argentine Tango social dance party. Info: Lloyd Shaw Dance Center, 5506 Coal Ave. SE, abqtango.org. Guided Practica, 7:30 to 8 pm; Milonga 8 to 10:30 pm. Tickets: $3-$5.

tuesdays–saturdays | 9 am–5 pm

Art and History Exhibitions at Albuquerque Museum. See our website for the current listing of exhibitions. Info: Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Road NW, cabq.gov, 243-7255. General Museum admission: $3-$6. $5 exhibition surcharge applies.

tuesdays–saturdays | tuesday–fridays 9:30 am, 1:30 pm, saturdays 10:30 am, 12 noon, 1:30 pm

every first tuesday | 1–2:30 pm

wednesdays and saturdays | 11 am

every first and fourth tuesday | 10 am–2 pm

wednesdays | 12 noon–1 pm

Spanish Language Alzheimer’s Support Group. This meeting is for Spanishspeaking individuals caring for a family member with dementia. Info: Alamosa Community Center, 6900 Gonzales Road SW, Suite C, 363-8499 or 800-272-3900.

Rug Hookers Demonstration. Join the Adobe Wool Arts Guild for a monthly demonstration of rug hooking in the Heritage Farmhouse. Info: ABQ BioPark Botanic Garden, 2601 Central Ave. NW, 848-7180, abqbiopark.com. Tickets: Included with admission.

Sculpture Garden Tours at Albuquerque Museum. Enjoy a pleasant stroll in our sculpture garden with a friendly docent who will share stories on the artists and their works. Info: Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Road NW, cabq.gov, 2437255. Tour included with paid general admission. Kiwanis Club of Sandia. Join in for lunch, listen to interesting speakers, and learn how you, too, can help the children of Albuquerque and surrounding communities live better lives. Info: Wecks, 3913 Louisiana Blvd. NE, facebook.com/ sandiakiwanis.

every second tuesday | 11 am–1 pm

wednesdays | 12:30 pm

Stitching Group. Knitting, crocheting, embroidering, tatting, spinning, crossstitching and more. Join in the fun, share ideas, patterns, and experiences. All ages and experience levels welcome. Info: Wyoming/Hillerman Library, 8205 Apache Ave. NE, 291-6264.

Stories in the Sky: Weekly Story Time. Activities for toddlers and parents include stories about science, flight, geography, the seasons, the environment, astronomy and more. For toddlers through age 6. Info: Balloon Museum, 9201 Balloon Museum Drive NE, 768-6020. Admission is free for the children and an adult.

tuesdays–sundays | 10 am–5 pm

every second tuesday | 6–7 pm

wednesdays |

tuesdays, thursdays, fridays, sundays | 11 am

every fourth tuesday | 10 am

Casa San Ysidro Tours. Take a tour of this late 19th century building in Corrales filled with an excellent collection of New Mexico vernacular art. Info: Casa San Ysidro, 973 Old Church Road, Corrales, cabq.gov/ casasanysidro, 898-3915.

National Hispanic Cultural Center Exhibits. See our website for the current listing of exhibitions. Info: National Hispanic Cultural Center, 1701 Fourth Street SW, 246-2261, nhccnm.org.

Historic Old Town Tours. Explore historic Old Town on foot with our informative docents who will provide insight into the people and places that shaped our early community. Info: Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Road NW, cabq.gov, 2437255. Tour included with paid Museum admission, $4-$6, Sundays free.

tuesdays, thursdays, and saturdays | various times

Ninja Park Obstacle Course Fitness Center. First place winner of the 2015 Women’s Area Qualifier in the Ultimate Ninja Athlete Association (UNAA) competition, Personal Trainer and Group Fitness Instructor Jessica Lucero teaches fun and challenging back-to-back classes every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday: Body Blast, 6 to 7 pm; Obstacle Technique and Efficiency, 7 to 7:30 pm; and Foam Rolling and Stretching, 7 to 7:30. Try one, two, or all three classes for free (firsttime participants only). Info: 883-9203, ninjaparkabq.com.

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Outcomes Grandparents Raising Grandchildren. Attend for discussion and support groups. Info: Tijeras-East Mountains, Los Vecinos Community Center, 478 1/2 Old Highway 66, Tijeras, 243-2551 to reserve a space. Free childcare provided. Free. Science Story Time. Sing songs and read stories, some super silly, to learn about different science subjects. Explore the topic of the day with handson demonstrations and perform kid friendly experiments. Ages 0-12. Info: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, 1801 Mountain Road NW, nmnaturalhistory.org, 841-2800.

every fourth tuesday | 7–9 pm

Duke City Story Slam. This monthly storytelling event is where people tell true-life stories, without notes, on that month’s theme. Attendees can reserve a 5-min Open Mic slot between the featured storytellers. A friendly panel of judges scores each story; the winner takes home a prize. Info: Canteen Brewhouse, 2381 Aztec Road NE, storytellersofnewmexico.com, facebook. com/newmexicostorytellers.

every last tuesday | 6–7 pm

Murderinos Book Club. This free true crime book club meets monthly and Book Club purchasers get 10% discount at Bookworks. Info: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd. NW, bkwrks.com, 344-8139. Free to attend.

Rotary Club of Albuquerque Del Norte Club Meetings. The Club welcomes visitors and community partners interested in joining online for fellowship, traditions, songs, and uplifting presentations. New members are welcomed into committees which suit their interests and skills. Hybrid meetings will begin soon. Info and schedule: rotarydelnorte.org, email rotarydelnorteabq@gmail.com for the Zoom link.

wednesdays | 12:30 and 1:30 pm

Music in the Sky: Weekly Music Time. Activities for toddlers and parents include music and movements. Info: Balloon Museum, 9201 Balloon Museum Drive NE, 768-6020. Admission is free for the children and an adult.

wednesdays | 6–9 pm

Albuquerque Dance Club. ADC offers social dancing every Wednesday to a variety of music mix including swing, country, Latin, ballroom, and tango. No partner needed, over 21 only, ID required. Info: The Dirty Bourbon, 9800 Montgomery Blvd. NE, 299-3737. $5 cover.

wednesdays | 9 pm

Geeks Who Drink. Join the best Pub Quiz in town. Bring your friends and create a team of up to six people. Info: O’Niell’s Nob Hill, 4310 Central Ave. SE, 256-0564, geekswhodrink.com/blog, oniells.com.

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wednesdays–sundays | 10 am–4 pm

Natural History Museum. Explore the most dynamic dinosaurs that roamed New Mexico. Learn to balance like Seismosaurus, hunt like Coelophysis, and stomp like Tyrannosaurus. Info: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, 1801 Mountain Road NW, nmnaturalhistory.org, 841-2848. Tickets: see cost information online.

wednesdays–sundays | 11 am–5 pm

Cat adoptions. Come enjoy some drinks, snacks, and time with adorable adoptable cats at Catopia Cat Cafe. Your visit will support their foster home and keep them company until they find their permanent homes, maybe with you. Info: catopiacatcafe.com, 508-4278.

every first wednesday | 9 am–5 pm

Free First Wednesday. Start your month off right with free admission to Albuquerque Museum and sculpture garden tour. $5 additional special exhibit surcharge may apply. Info: Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Road NE, cabq. gov, 243-7255. Free general admission.

every second wednesday | 6–8 pm

Visionary Arts and Crafts Guild Membership Meeting. VACG’s mission is to develop fellowship among craftspeople and facilitate a market for crafts through exhibitions, education, promoting the development and appreciation of craftspeople and their work. Meet monthly. Info: based in Rio Rancho, vacgnm.com, 340-5846.

every second wednesday | 6:30–7:30 pm

Bookworks Book Club. Bookworks Book Club meets monthly and Book Club purchasers receive a 10% discount at Bookworks. Info: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd. NW, bkwrks.com, 344-8139. Free and open to the public.

every second wednesday | 6:30 pm–8:30 pm

Rio Rancho Art Association (RRAA) Monthly Membership Meeting. RRAA’s mission is the cultural and educational enrichment of the community and surrounding areas by providing opportunities for artists and the public to collectively participate in fine art events and programs. Info: Don Chalmers Ford Community Room, 2500 Rio Rancho Blvd., 301-2009, rraausa.org.

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every second and fourth wednesday | 10 am–2 pm

every saturday | 8–11

Quilters Demonstration. The New Mexico Quilters will be working on their Botanic Garden quilt and other projects in the Heritage Farmhouse. Info: ABQ BioPark Botanic Garden, 2601 Central Ave. NW, 848-7180, abqbiopark.com. Tickets: Included with admission.

fridays | 1 pm

Mural Discovery Tour. The IPCC houses 19 murals by Pueblo artists. Our guided tour introduces the art, traditions, and core values of Pueblo culture, and a who’s who of Pueblo artists, such as Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Jose Rey Toledo. Reflect upon the murals and uncover layers of meaning in each, with representations of traditional Pueblo life, including dance, the seasons, and our connection to animals, as well as the contemporary vision of emerging artists. Tours can be scheduled for groups in advance by calling 212-7052. Info: Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, 2401 12th Street NW, 843-7270, indianpueblo. org. Free with museum admission.

fridays | 1–5 pm

Tamarind Institute. See the workshop facility, learn about fine art lithography, the current programs and the history of Tamarind (a division within the College of Fine Arts at UNM), a collaborative process video, and a printing demonstration. The public is welcome, no reservation required; reservation for other times: tamarind. unm.edu. Info: Tamarind Institute, 2500 Central Ave. SE, 277-3901. Free.

fridays | 7–10 pm

Dance Party. Learn a new dance and meet new people each week at ABQ’s newest studio, with three beautiful ballrooms and state-of-the-art floating dance floors. Enjoy refreshments and an introductory dance class from 7–8 pm. Info: Holiday Dance Studio, 5200 Eubank Blvd. NE, 508-4020, call to confirm schedule, holidaydancestudio.com. $10.

Los Ranchos Growers’ Market. Fresh local produce and products, plants, and more. COVID 19 protocols - wear masks, keep social distancing, and no pets. Handicapped accessible, family and pet friendly. Info: 6718 Rio Grande Blvd. NW, 610-9591. Free admission.

saturdays | 10:30 am

Story Time at the Aquarium. Info: ABQ BioPark Aquarium, 2601 Central Ave. NW, abqbiopark.com, 768-2000. Included in admission.

saturdays | 12 noon–1 pm

Watermelon Mountain Ranch Volunteer Orientation. Come to the main facility in Northern Rio Rancho to find out all about the volunteer program and the opportunities to work with the animals in our care. Info: Watermelon Mountain Ranch, 3251 Westphalia Blvd. SE, Rio Rancho, wmranch.org. Reservations required: volunteerwmr@gmail.com.

WANT TO SUBMIT YOUR COMMUNITY EVENT FOR DATEBOOK? Please send an e-mail with the date, time, and event description to datebook@ abqthemag.com. If available, include a high-resolution digital photograph or image. Listing information deadline is the 10th two months prior to publication (e.g.—all MAY events must be submitted by March 10, etc.). All events are subject to change. Please call event organization for final verification on events, times, dates, prices, and ticket availability.

every first friday |

Free Admission Day at Anderson-Abruzzo Albuquerque International Balloon Museum. Check out this award-winning, world-class facility highlighting the art, culture, history, science and sport of ballooning and other lighter-than-air craft. Info: 9201 Balloon Museum Drive NE (North of Alameda), cabq.gov/balloon, 768-6020.

third friday | 7–9 pm

Cactus and Succulent Society of New Mexico. Discuss cacti and succulents; enjoy a program presented on a particular subject relevant to these plants. Program usually involves a slideshow. Not necessary to be a member to attend. Info: Albuquerque Garden Center, 10120 Lomas Blvd. NE, new-mexico.cactus-society.org, 296-6020.

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Time to Make the Donuts A half a century ago, they say, small donut shops were common and beloved. Then Big Donut moved in, and the little guys gave way to Winchell’s, Dunkin’, Krispy Kreme, and the like. Well, guess what? The little guys are back in a big way. In ABQ, the trend seemed to start about a decade ago when Rebel Donut opened, and began offering fun creations like the Maple Bacon Donut. Soon there was another local donut shop, then another, proving that we can’t eat these yummy treats fast enough. Two Boys Donuts, for example, opened in July of 2019, and already has five locations—plus a donut truck. So, get your napkins ready: here’s a roundup of the local spots and fried goodies that have made us all fans, plus some fun reviews of some ‘other’ donuts. Stories by ATM Staff • Photos by Don James

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Simply Sinful Donuts is the result of Karla Moore pulling off the Great American Dream: turning a passion hobby into a profitable business. “I had been making donuts at home for about five years, just because it’s fun and I love to eat them,” said Moore, who had previously been an Albuquerque real estate agent. “When I would go to work downtown, I would make extra donuts and give them out randomly to my co-workers, or homeless people, or even just random people.” Then when COVID-19 hit—and most of the world went into quarantine—a strange thing happened, says Moore. “People started sending me messages on Facebook, asking if they could place an order for my donuts. I was kind of shocked that people wanted to pay me for my donuts,” she says, laughing.

BEST SELLER: Raspberry On A Cloud (vanilla cake donut, vanilla Swiss meringue buttercream, raspberry jam; left). Karla Moore, self-proclaimed New Mexico Donut Kween (below).

So, she began filling orders, and soon realized that she had a true business on her hands. Moore decided to get serious and enrolled in a 12-week course at the Street Food Institute, an ABQ non-profit that provides resources to budding food entrepreneurs. From there she got her business license, then took the leap of creating a brick-and-mortar shop, which opened in the downtown Simms Building last November. “A lot of people gave me advice to open in other parts of town, but this is where I want to be. I’m all about downtown,” says Moore, whose social media handle is the “New Mexico Donut Kween” (with a “K” like her name). Her donut recipe is her own, created from years of experimenting in her home kitchen. She sources flour from Valencia Flour Mill in nearby Jarales (“I believe it’s the only running flour mill left in New Mexico,” she says), and uses local ingredients at every opportunity. Her donuts and fritters come only in bite sizes, about two inches across, so that people can try more varieties, she says. The cake donuts are baked, while the fritters are fried, and each come in 4-, 8- or 16-packs (known as the Donut Kween Dozen). Her shop also has a breakfast and lunch menu, which was created by Moore’s son Zach, a trained chef. And she still gives away free donuts. “I give them out to homeless people at least 2 or 3 times a week,” says Moore. “If I see someone who is down and out, I give them a box of donuts, and it puts a smile on their face.”

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There’s a good reason Blue Door Patisserie has a fancy Crème Brûlée donut on the menu. But first, more about this elegant, yummy treat. It’s made with buttermilk brioche dough, which is prepared a day in advance for good reason. “It’s really rich and hard to work with because it’s so soft, and has so much butter,” says Jove Hubbard, who opened Blue Door inside Sawmill Market food hall in 2020. “So, we let it ferment overnight in the refrigerator, and it’s easier to work with when it’s cold.” After the prep stage, the donuts are fried to a fluffy size, filled with fresh vanilla bean pastry cream, and topped with caramel-flavored turbinado sugar, which is torched so that the melted sugar can cool to a sweet, crunchy crust.

He says his culinary experience can be readily found in his creations for Blue Door, which also offers cookies, pastries and other desserts. “There’s most definitely a huge French influence in my baking from my time in New Orleans,” he says, noting that he left after only nine months when Hurricane Katrina hit the city in 2005. “But Chicago has a great restaurant scene. I was part of the team that opened the James Hotel there.” The acclaimed James property, which debuted in 2006, was viewed as a new class of hotel, particularly with its culinary offerings. Blue Door also makes a buttermilk glazed donut, and a green chile jam filled donut. Hubbard says his team arrives at 4 a.m. each morning to rise the dough, then begin frying the goodies at 7 a.m.

The treat is just one of several fancy creations made by Hubbard, who has spent almost 30 years in the pastry industry. “I had always worked in nice hotels, mostly in Chicago and New Orleans,” says Hubbard, who was an executive pastry chef for hotels in both cities. “I just wanted to strike out on my own, build my own brands.” Hubbard and his wife moved from Chicago to Albuquerque, where the weather and opportunities were to their liking. “Sawmill was looking for a pastry shop, and it just sort of worked out perfectly,” he says.

BEST SELLER: Créme Brûlée Donut (buttermilk brioche donut filled with vanilla bean pastry cream, topped and torched with turbinado sugar; right). Owner Jove Hubbard has worked as a pastry chef for more than 30 years (above).

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Sometimes, the kids know best. Brian Vargas was driving his twin boys to get donuts one day, and he started complaining that there were no donut shops close to their home in North Albuquerque. “I felt like we were driving too far to get mediocre donuts,” says Vargas. “And literally, one of our sons says to me, ‘Dad, you own a business, why don’t you just open a donut place yourself?’” Vargas says the comment made him laugh, but then the wheels began to turn as he pondered the idea. Sure enough, within a year, the family opened Two Boys Donuts—named after the now-12-year-old Vargas twins, Wyatt and Mason—near their home just off Paseo del Norte Boulevard.

bismarcks or bars loaded with two or even three of the fillings, making for a customized treat. Their donut truck’s location can be found on their Facebook page, but Vargas says it’s usually at Paseo and Unser Boulevard, where sales can sometimes do better than some of their stores. As for unsold donuts, the company donates them to non-profits and shelters around the city, plus to police, hospitals, firefighters, and law enforcement. “We want to make sure we’re putting donuts in people’s mouths and not in the trash,” says Vargas, who says he and his wife believe in giving back, since both have family members who work in hospitals and among first responders.

Prior to opening, the family traveled to donut shops in the Western U.S. and found donut styles they liked, then set about replicating some of those recipes. And since they opened in 2019, the venture has quickly expanded to five locations, plus a weekend donut truck. Vargas says the key to their success as donut entrepreneurs has been their experience as donut customers. “Everything we do, we always approach it as a customer, from a customer’s point of view,” says Vargas, who still owns shipping and logistics businesses. “We say, ‘How do they taste? How do they look?’ We look at that first, instead of cost and other things.” One of the specialty offerings is a filled-to-order donut— or bismarcks, as they’re called—featuring your choice of raspberry or lemon filling, or Bavarian cream. “Filling them for each order was important to us,” says Vargas, who grew up in ABQ. “Donuts that are pre-filled can be soggy.” He says customers have taken to getting their

LET’S DOUGH BEHIND THE SCENES

A DAY IN THE SWEET LIFE

Owner Bennie Martinez needed a real pro to make the donuts at Glazed Grinders. So his first hire was Mike Montaño. Not only does Montano have 45 years’ worth of baking experience, but his dad was also a baker—also for 45 years.

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BEST SELLER: Blueberry Cake (cake donut covered with maple cinnamon crumb topping; right) The Vargas twins (left), Wyatt and Mason, sparked the idea for Two Boys, which now has five locations.

GLAZED GRINDERS • STEP ONE

Mixing

The giant, vintage Hobart mixer gets loaded several times each day with 50 to 100 pounds of raw ingredients. “It’s just basically water, flour and yeast,” says Montaño. Then he pauses, laughs, and adds, “And a few other secret ingredients I can’t talk about.”

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It’s hard to think of a donut that’s gained more worldwide fame than the Blue Sky donut from ABQ’s Rebel Donut. Of course, there’s an origin story behind it. “When they were filming Breaking Bad, the production crew ordered donuts from Rebel for Aaron Paul’s birthday,” says Rebel owner Margot Cravens, referring to the star who portrayed blue meth cook Jesse Pinkman on the TV show. “The donut was created for his birthday, even the blue rock candy, which is made in-house. It just went viral from there, and we make those donuts every day now.”

fun. We usually have a lineup of 12 donuts for Harry Potter, like a Golden Snitch, a broomstick, a lightning bolt, and so on,” she says. The shop also makes heart-shaped donuts for Valentine’s Day, and candy corn donuts for Halloween.

That was 2012, and at that time Cravens had yet to become the Rebel owner (she has other business interests, as well). But make no mistake, even back then she was a fan. “I was a Rebel rewards member even before I purchased the shop,” says Cravens, who grew up in ABQ. “I took what the original owner had done, and I incorporated some things of my own.”

The Rebel crew also makes special-shape donuts for weddings and birthdays, and even offers a croissant donut, which requires ordering in advance. And though Breaking Bad has concluded, the TV world is still calling: the show Roswell, New Mexico, which airs on the CW Network, uses Rebel creations for props. “They order special donuts in the shape of UFOs, and use them in the deli scenes,” says Cravens. “They ask for very specific colors, so we make sure they’re perfect.”

The shop offers raised donuts in fun shapes, like sugar skulls. And the bakers get creative when the seasons change, putting out flower-shaped donuts in spring, or cloud-shaped donuts during the rainy season. Eye-catching variety is part of the gameplan, says Cravens. “We like to celebrate whatever wacky things we can. For Margarita Day, we’ll do donuts with lime frosting decorated like a margarita. For Harry Potter’s birthday, we’ll do something

GLAZED GRINDERS • STEP TWO

frying

The giant steel funnel known as a ‘depositor’ releases rings of cake donuts into 375-degree oil, where they float along for one minute before the automated fryer flips them over to finish the journey. “Ingredient and oil temps need to be adjusted every time the weather changes,” says Montaño. “Baking is all about the science.”

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To make sure these fun treats meet Rebel’s standards, Cravens uses a very special focus group. “My kids and my husband get to taste-test the new creations, and pick and choose what we make,” she says, laughing. “Plus, our staff will take things home to test. We’re all donut lovers, so it’s fun.”

The formula is obviously working well: Cravens says she is opening a third location of Rebel by the end of the year in the Enchanted Hills area of Rio Rancho.


BEST SELLER: French Toast Donut (square raised donut tossed in cinnamon sugar, butter-flavored butter cream, maple drizzle; right) Owner Margot Cravens (left) is set to open a third location of Rebel Donut shop.

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Sometimes crazy ideas make the most sense. Like the time Sara Trammel and her family came up with this zany thought: “We had always joked about having a donut truck that drives around neighborhoods like an ice cream truck, but with donuts and coffee,” says Trammel. Combine that thought with the fact that there were few donut shops in Montana, where Trammel lived at the time with her husband, Coy, and their four children. So naturally, they happened across an old English-style, double-decker bus on Craigslist, and immediately the family knew what would come next. “It was perfect for our idea. We didn’t want anything else,” says Sara, who says the family purchased the bus in Montana, moved the family and the bus back to their hometown of ABQ, and began fixing it up. Meanwhile, they launched their donut operation inside Spurline Supply Co. in Old Town. By 2019, the bus was ready, and the Trammels opened its doors—and serving window—in Nob Hill. “(Me and Coy) grew up with moms who cooked and encouraged baking,” says Sara. “Donuts have always been one of our favorite things, so it was kind of a natural to give this a shot.” Bristol’s aim is to make donuts with the best ingredients, says Sara. “Our goal is to create something different, do-

GLAZED GRINDERS • STEP THREE

icing

The key here is sugar—and creativity. For the best-selling Blueberry Crumb donut, the first step out of the fryer is glazing, then while cooling it’s rolled in a delicate mix of butter, flour and sugar. It takes an expert touch, in this case provided by Nancy Haqq, who was Martinez’ very next hire after Montaño. “I totally have,” she says, “the best job.”

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nuts with that elevated quality, with good ingredients,” she says. The basis is a brioche dough, which Sara says is lighter and uses more butter than most donut doughs, and is made with real eggs and milk. Some of their creations include the Prickly Pear donut, which is glazed with a topping made from NM Prickly Pear Jelly, which sources the fruit in Tijeras. “We get all of our prickly pear juice from them, and sometimes, depending on the harvest, the color will change,” says Sara. “Sometimes it’s purple, sometimes it’s pink. But it’s a classic New Mexico flavor.” The truck—with some of the Trammel kids working as servers and dishwashers—did well enough that the family opened a brick-and-mortar location in 2020. That store, in the Northeast Heights, is where the donuts are made. For the summer, the bus is serving from the parking lot of Polks Folly, a butcher shop in Cedar Crest. The shop also sells bombolonis, or Italian-style filled donuts, which are typically loaded with lighter cream than bismarcks. Sara says the fillings usually have whimsical flavors, like tiramisu and rootbeer float.


BEST SELLER: Prickly Pear Donut (brioche donut topped with N.M. prickly pear jelly icing and sprinkles; above). Bristol owners Coy and Sara Trammel with their four kids (left), who occasionally help run the register and clean up.

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If you want to read something into the meaning of their business name, Rise + Roast would welcome it. “We aren’t a coffee shop that serves donuts, and we’re not a donut shop that serves coffee,” says Ian Lowe, the general manager. “We put the same amount of energy into both.” The shop is perfectly suited for on-the-go customers, who zip through the drive-thru in droves at the original store near Sandia Labs. A second store will be open soon in Rio Rancho near the Rust Medical Center, says Lowe, who points out that both locations are in traffic-heavy areas where customers need to get in and out quickly. The donuts are of the classic raised variety, which isn’t the only thing old-school about these treats. “We wanted to make sure there was great value to go with taste,” says Lowe, who has managed the shop since it opened in 2019. “For example, we wanted to make sure when you bite into our Boston Cream (filled) donut, that there is a belligerent amount of Boston cream.” The cinnamon rolls also have outsized value—only two can fit comfortably in their standard donut box.

GLAZED GRINDERS • STEP FOUR

fritters!

There’s a good reason the beloved fritters are the last treats made each day at Glazed Grinders. “The dough is real soft at first, so we use it to make all the other softer donuts. Only at the end, when the dough is more firm, do we use it to make the fritters,” says Montaño. “People like their fritters crispy and crunchy.”

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The concept is the brainchild of owner Doug Adams, who operates a few Jimmy John’s sandwich shops in ABQ. “He wanted to give our city something that he didn’t feel it had from a local perspective, which is what led to the name Rise and Roast,” says Lowe. “We hope to meet the needs of a city that’s always moving, that needs a quick drive-thru and takeout.” The team took about a year to fine-tune their donut-making process, says Lowe, who said Rise + Roast wanted to avoid using brioche or heavy cake donuts (“There are several wonderful shops in town that are already doing those type of donuts,” he says). Their best seller is the classic glazed donut, which they make in the shape of a plus sign. The careful process even extends to their apple fritters, which most shops make after all the other varieties are finished. “We choose to make the fritters first,” says Lowe. “We let the dough rest with the fruit, and then we let it rise to a certain level of fluffiness.”


BEST SELLER: Glazed Donut (top). “We do our glazed in the shape of a plus sign,” says Rise + Roast General manager Ian Lowe. “It’s simple, light, and people really love the shape.” Lowe says a close second is the shop’s Chocolate Glazed Donut (left).

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To counter our blitz on fresh, innovative local donuts, we decided to also throw some sugar on the old standbys, the Dunkins and Krispy Kremes of the world. For this, we needed an honest voice who wouldn’t pull any punches. And someone who could keep things light and fun—just like a donut. We dialed up Albuquerque comedian and college professor Eddie Tafoya, who agreed to sit down and sample what we’re calling ‘corporate donuts.’ And before his first bite, right on cue, the 63-yearold Tafoya admits he hasn’t touched a donut in “probably 20 years.” Something about watching his girlish figure.

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Makes sense, as juxtapositions are Tafoya’s strong suit. Yes, he’s a local stand-up comedian, but he’s also an educated scholar and author who teaches English at New Mexico Highlands University. So, make that Dr. Tafoya, who grew up in ABQ’s North Valley before earning degrees from UNM and Binghamton University. His latest book, “The Marxist Revolution: How Chico, Harpo, Groucho and Zeppo Changed the Way We Laugh,” is due out next year. To make a fair comparison, all the donuts were bought the morning of the tasting. Here’s what Tafoya had to say between mouthfuls: WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2022


DONUT NO. 1

ALBERTSON’S GROCERY STORE, GLAZED DONUT Eddie Tafoya: This is a fine donut. But there’s a kind of slight chemical taste to the sugar glaze. Albuquerque The Magazine: Chemical? As in a metallic taste? ET: Not metallic, but it somehow doesn’t taste like sugar. I don’t want to know why, actually.

DONUT NO. 2

ET: Ohhhh. But it’s worth it. A good donut is a wonderful thing, man. I can’t believe I haven’t eaten one in so long.

DONUT NO. 4

STARBUCKS, GLAZED DONUT ET: This one is dense. (chews) A LOT more dense. ATM: It looks more like a cake donut, but Starbucks calls it a glazed donut.

NEIGHBORHOOD WALMART, GLAZED DONUT

ET: Someone needs to tell them it’s not a glazed donut, it’s a cake donut.

ET: I thought we were going to do a blind tasting. Why are you telling me this is a Walmart donut?

ATM: And the taste?

ATM: Well, all the boxes are right here on the table, so you can probably guess which is which. ET: This donut is a little bland compared to the Albertson’s donut. ATM: How’s the sugar level on this one?

ATM: I thought you didn’t eat donuts. ET: At the beginning of this century, I was dating a woman who was all about Krispy Kreme donuts. ATM: Did you miss them? ET: Only the donuts. Especially when they’re warm, like those Frontier tortillas when they’re freshly minted.

DONUT NO. 7

WHOLE FOODS GROCERY STORE, VEGAN GLAZED DONUT ATM: Lastly, we have vegan donuts.

ET: It’s okay. Probably go better with a twelve-dollar coffee.

ET: You got these from Whole Foods? I’ll bet they were eight dollars a pop.

DONUT NO. 5

ATM: Actually, a six-pack for about eight dollars.

SMITH’S GROCERY STORE, GLAZED SQUARE ET: This one looks like it has enough sugar to kill a small house pet.

ET: These are dense, and quite heavy. ATM: Do they taste like they’re vegan?

ATM: Okay.

ET: I don’t know what vegan tastes like. I think vegan is a lack of taste.

ATM: So, a step down?

ET: There’s a chewiness to it, sort of like light pastry.

ATM: On that note, we’ll thank you for your time.

ET: Yes.

ATM: That’s a 99-cent donut.

DONUT NO. 3

ET: This is a good donut. I’m going to get diabetes by the time I’m done here today.

ET: Wait, do you know how donuts were invented?

ET: The glaze is a bit different. It’s also not as sweet or fresh as the Albertson’s donut.

DUNKIN’ DONUTS, GLAZED DONUT ATM: These are from a donut place. Do you taste the difference? ET: Yes. It’s fresher. And I can taste the years of experience from Dunkin’. ATM: These are three times more expensive than the supermarket donuts.

DONUT NO. 6

KRISPY KREME, GLAZED DONUT ET: Before I bite into this, I need a palate cleanser. Do you have any Spumoni ice cream?

ATM: How? ET: Somebody spilled sugar on a bagel. Not many people know that. ATM: Is this true? ET: Sure, why not? In my reality it’s true. But in my reality, the Lobos won 12 NCAA basketball championships, too.

ATM: No. But here’s the next donut. ET: Mmm, Krispy Kreme is in a class by themselves.

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There are plain donuts, and there are varieties of donuts. And then there’s anything-goes, crazy-topping, imagination-unlimited donuts. We figured since this last category was likely intended for kids (or at least, the kid in all of us), we decided to gather a few members of that target audience for a sample session. For our taste-testing, we chose Amy’s Donuts, a growing Colorado chain that opened shop in ABQ in 2018. Their notoriety, in part, comes from the use of outlandish and fun donut toppings, like cereal, candy bars, fruit—even cotton candy. We picked out 9 of these eye-catching donut creations, and turned loose our excited panel of kid experts to give us their honest opinions.

meet the panel Adrian, 11

BaileyJo, 5

Anthony, 10

Digs football, Frank Sinatra, asparagus and collecting military gear. Good at swimming and riding ATVs. Future job: Fighter pilot.

Into zombies, Spaghetti-o’s, lipstick and taking selfies. Loves seafood and pink lemonade. Future job: Dallas Cowboys cheerleader.

Skilled at skateboarding and making scrambled eggs. Loved the “Top Gun” remake. Reads at a genius level. Future job: CEO.

Elaina, 7

Ryan, 7

Luke, 6

Budding artist specializing in rainbows and flowers. Expert swimmer and dancer. Prefers fruits and veggies over junk food. Future job: Dentist.

Always up for swimming and coloring. Loves mom’s spaghetti and DreamWorks animated films. Future job: Commercial pilot.

Fan of classic Tom & Jerry cartoons. Skilled marksman with a Nerf gun. Way to his heart: corn-on-the-cob. Future job: Engineer.

#1 PB&J Donut

#2 Elvis Donut

Luke wasn’t siding with the planet’s love of peanut butter with jelly. “I really like the jelly,” he said, swallowing another bite, “but I don’t like the peanut butter.”

It didn’t take long for Adrian to switch his favorite after he fell in love with this bacon, banana and peanut butter combo. “Plus, I’m looking forward to seeing the new Elvis movie,” he said.

His brother, Ryan, wasn’t impressed with this donut, either, although he said he generally likes peanut butter & jelly sandwiches. BaileyJo: “It’s good just licking the jelly.” Adrian: “This one is my favorite. Are there any more left?”

Anthony thought the banana should be fresh instead of dried. When it was mentioned that a fresh banana might turn brown, he just shrugged—and kept eating. BaileyJo: “No, I don’t like this one. I don’t like peanut butter.” Ryan: “I like the bacon. It doesn’t taste too sweet.”

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#3 Cookie Monster Donut

#4 Lord of the Pretzels Donut

BaileyJo said it “looks pretty and it tastes like the sprinkles are blueberry.” She thought the frosting was also delicious, especially the Cookie Monster’s eyes.

Anthony was a fan, judging by how he took several seconds to chew, think, and shake his head before he said: “I love how they use the butter; it gave it more flavor. It’s buttery and crunchy at the same time.” When asked if he wanted some milk to counter the dry pretzels, he declined: “My grandma makes us drink milk. I don’t like it.”

Ryan said this was “definitely” his favorite. He was too busy chewing to really explain why, but the blue frosting around his lips told the story.

Elaina: “I don’t normally like pretzels, but this was good because I didn’t taste the salt.”

Luke: “This is yummy… (chews, swallows) …blueberry… (takes a bite) …mmmm.”

Ryan: “Pretzels on a donut? Not good.”

#5 Oreo Cheesecake Donut

#6 Crème Brûlée Donut

BaileyJo, who said this was her favorite, ate through the pile of toppings and left a plain donut on the plate. “It’s really good,” she said with a smile. “I like the chocolate powder, and the top also tastes like lemons.”

Ryan immediately got excited about this donut on his first bite. “This tastes really good,” he said. “It’s like a breakfast donut.”

Interestingly, the panel all had different taste sensations from this donut.

Ditto for Elaina, who said it “tastes like cinnamon rolls. This is verrrrry good.”

Adrian had a similar thought. “It tastes like French toast,” he said. “It’s really sweet. I like it.”

Luke then summed up what most of the panel was feeling: “I want another one of these.”

Luke: “Tastes like lemon.” Ryan: “White chocolate.” Anthony: “Cheesecake.” Adrian: “I have no clue. Chocolate cake with vanilla frosting?” Elaina: “I don’t know, but it’s good.”

#7 Marshmallows Donut

#8 Pistachio Yeast Donut

#9 Nutella Fluff Donuts

The giant cluster of mini marshmallows at first looked exciting to Elaina. But after she took a bite, things changed. “It’s just too much marshmallow,” she said, shaking her head.

Adrian thought all the parts got along nicely. “It’s got fluffy dough, creamy icing, and the pistachio on top is really good,” he said.

Ryan was quick to see that this donut is a copycat of one of his favorite snacks. “Ooh, I love s’mores,” he said. “This is good.”

However, her brother Anthony—who is not a marshmallow fan—liked this donut. “Except you can’t taste any flavors beside the marshmallow,” he said.

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

BaileyJo agreed: “I liked all of the stuff mixed together, especially the pistachio.” Anthony, too: “I didn’t think this would taste good on a donut, but it does.” Elaina: “Yummy.”

The combo was also a hit with BaileyJo, who said “the chocolatey part blends with the white part. I like it a lot.” Luke: “This is kinda weird, but I guess I like it.”

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Just like that bar where everybody knows your name, Donuts, Bagels & More is something of a hangout for regular customers. “We have probably 15 regular customers who come by every single morning,” says owner Marilu Anaya. “Some come and stay for a couple of hours. I love interacting with them.” The cozy Westside shop puts out fresh, house made donuts daily, along with muffins, bagels and croissant sandwiches. Anaya says it all started when her husband, who had experience owning small businesses, came home one day with an unexpected idea. “He said, ‘There’s a donut shop for sale, let’s buy it.’ I said ‘You’re crazy. I don’t deal with donuts,’” says Anaya, who had worked in education prior to being a stay-at-home mom with the couple’s young twin daughters. After some discussion, they bought the shop in 2018, and got a couple of months of training from the previous owner on how to make the donuts. Rule number one? “I have to start mixing and making the donuts at 2:30 every morning,” says Anaya. “My husband will come and help me, and then he goes to his regular job at the water authority and I open the store at 6 a.m.” And after several hours of preparing donuts, she says it’s a welcome break when her regulars (“We call them ‘The Crew,’” she says) show up for coffee and sweets shortly

BESTIES SEATED: Owner Marilu Anaya says her shop is the morning hangout for several regular customers, like the gentlemen in the photo with her (above). She says they eat donuts, drink coffee, laugh, tease, visit, and often ask for her help with paperwork or other small tasks— which she says she enjoys.

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after the doors open. “Most of them are retired, and they just have a blast here, laughing and arguing. Sometimes they’re worse than my kids,” says Anaya, laughing. “I used to be an education assistant for two years, and it’s like I have flashbacks to my classroom days with them.” The regulars love to dish on each other, and have come to appreciate the love and concern that Anaya heaps on them. She’ll playfully warn them against eating too much sugar, and sometimes helps interpret information from their doctors. “Sometimes I’ll help one of them renew their fishing or driving license,” says Anaya. “I tell them, ‘I guess I’m going to have to close down my donut shop and open a nursing home.’” She says her best-selling varieties are her blueberry donuts and apple fritters, and if there are unsold donuts (a rarity), the shop donates then to the police command center around the corner.


Fun Facts About Donuts Doughnuts have existed in different forms for the Dutch, French, Russians, and even Native Americans, with archaeologists uncovering fossilized bits of the treat in prehistoric Native American settlements The first doughnut machine came along in 1920, when a refugee from Russia named Adolph Levitt began selling doughnuts from his bakery. By the 1930’s Levitt was earning over $25 million from his machines.

Doughnuts didn't have holes at first! They were just fried balls of dough. In New York, the city famous for its bagels, you can find an “everything doughnut,” made by The Doughnut Project and covered in sesame seeds, poppy seeds, and a sweet cream cheese icing.

Doughnuts were originally called “olykoeks,” meaning “oily cakes” in Dutch.

In China, Dunkin makes a pork floss doughnut, which is a yeast doughnut covered in dried pork.

New York food vlogger Julia Goolia made the world’s largest doughnut in 2019, coming in at a whopping 11,460 calories.

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HOPE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL TERRY HEISEY · HEAD OF SCHOOL

6731 PALOMAS AVE NE, · ALBUQUERQUE, NM (505) 822-5399 · HOPECHRISTIANSCHOOL.ORG · HOPEFORTHENEXTGEN.COM

Spend some time with HOPE Christian’s Head of School, Terry Heisey, and you will quickly come to know what he is passionate about. There are some ideas that get his heart rate up, like talking about the new high school building, which they are hoping to break ground on next year, and others that cause him to choke up, like one of the school’s newest initiatives—HOPE for the Next Generation—a movement to empower, love and encourage the next generation. Heisey explains, “Today’s youth is growing up in a challenging world with more anxiety and depression than in the generations prior. Through a firm foundation in Biblical truth, HOPE for the Next Generation reassures students they are highly valued, they are worthy and are desperately needed. We believe that each child has been designed in the image of Christ to fulfill a specific purpose. HOPE for the Next Generation is an ongoing mission for every student to know that they are valued and loved and have a life worth living.” HOPE Christian School is a private, co-educational, non-denominational

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PreK – 12th school in NE Albuquerque and the largest private school in the state. Despite its size, on all three campuses you will hear students, parents, teachers and administrators refer to HOPE as a “family.” A GreatSchools.org parent reviewer captured the essence best: “HOPE has the feel of a smaller school where the teachers and staff know and care about the students, yet large enough to provide socialization among classmates, provide excellent athletic opportunities and programs such as music and drama complementing their strong academic program.” One of the common denominators across the HOPE community is students and their families understanding and supporting the teaching of scriptural truths in a curriculum where all subjects are taught through the lens of a Biblical worldview. HOPE educates approximately 1,375 students each year with the mission to pray for, equip and send Christ-centered, passionate leaders to change the world. HOPE provides a safe and technology-savvy educational environment that enables students’ development spir-

itually, physically, academically and socially. The end result is not just academically-prepared college-bound graduates, but well-rounded humans prepared to go out and transform the world for good. HOPE came through the pandemic with much to be thankful for. One, that they had the technology and training infrastructure in place to seamlessly transition to remote learning in the Spring of 2020, and resume daily in-person learning the following year when most schools remained closed. Second, the brand new, state-of-the-art preschool/elementary building you see from Paseo del Norte which was built almost entirely during the pandemic. And most recently, the launch of the HOPE for the Next Generation movement! “As advocates for the next generation, HOPE Christian School is passionate about acknowledging the challenges that students face, and providing the resources and truth they need to establish a firm foundation. We believe that this next generation was made specifically for this moment and will be used by God to achieve His purpose,” says Heisey.

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PARTNER CONTENT THE FACE OF EDUCATION

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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THE FACE OF SECURITY

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PARTNER CONTENT

INTERNATIONAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE AARON T. JONES · PRESIDENT & CEO 4901 MCLEOD RD NE, SUITE B · ALBUQUERQUE, NM (505) 897-2420 · WWW.IPSGLOBAL.COM

Life has a way of leading us to what we do best. Not surprisingly, Aaron T. Jones wasn’t always in law enforcement. In fact, he abandoned his musical career after a friend’s father inspired him to consider law enforcement as a profession. A brief stint in security then directed him to become a bona fide Los Angeles police officer in 1994, which then guided him back to his home state of New Mexico where he spent the last eight years of his law enforcement career as a deputy sheriff in the Violent Crimes/Homicide Bureau before launching International Protective Service (IPS). As they say, all roads lead us somewhere and, in the last 16 years, Aaron has built IPS into a reputable private security company with eight offices around the country and a global reach. The company’s evolution has been interesting and it’s about to get even more exciting as they embark on a path that promises exponential national growth. But it all started with one client, Four Hills, a small golfing community, where the company provided 24-hour a day private security services for residents and guests, IPS

continues to serve this client. Aaron says, “We quickly learned to spread our wings and offer additional services including standing guards and executive protection. Every day, we evolve our business model and provide more services to our growing roster of clients so we can expand our capacity in New Mexico and across the nation.” It seems Aaron has a knack for seeing opportunity long before it knocks. He says, “We eventually launched in Midland, Texas, to serve the oil and gas community, then Phoenix and Scottsdale and then, in 2018, we opened an office in Malibu, California. Then we opened an office in Naples, Florida. Last December, we opened an office in Portland, Oregon, and Vancouver, Washington. We provide service across the states where we do business and we are about to open in Las Vegas, Nevada” he says. When it comes to niches, Aaron says they try to make IPS affordable for everyone. “While we have a lot of A-list celebrities and Fortune 500 corporate executives, we are also proud to provide protection for

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

everyday folks just like you and me. We provide armed security for the film industry and actors across the state and abroad. And we provide service for mom and pop stores, but also serve the big box stores which fills a huge void that the police cannot handle.” As for the company’s growing success, Aaron says it requires “an incredible command staff and support staff as well as officers in the field who are top-notch to handle the day-to-day operations. We have a law enforcement division that is comprised of current, former and/or retired officers or federal agents.” Of his team, Aaron says, “This is a special breed of people who provide protection for others. We believe there is no greater service than you can provide to risk life and limb for your fellow man.” When it comes to security and protection, there is only one New Mexico-born and bred company to call on, and that is International Protection Service. “With what we get, we give back,” he proudly says.

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POWER FORD ROB SNEED · MANAGING PARTNER 1101 MONTANO NE · ALBUQUERQUE, NM (505) 225-7288 · MYFORDDEALER.COM

If you remember Auto Trader magazine, you know cars were once marketed in print long before the Internet, and this is exactly how Power Ford’s Managing Partner Rob Sneed originally got hooked into the auto industry. His first job was selling color photo ads of cars and when he realized he “loved helping people.” That was 25 years ago, but there is likely another reason why Rob fell in love with cars because, as he so eloquently says, “Transportation is an essential part of our lives. Our vehicles give us freedom and independence; they help us express who we are, and more importantly, where we are going in life.” Power Ford, the most awarded Ford dealership in New Mexico, is also a fivetime Dealer of the Year and a Top Rated Carfax dealer, named a “Top Work Place” by the Albuquerque Journal four years running, and the only Ford dealership in the state to hold Ford’s prestigious President’s Award. “Being named ‘Best of the City’ by Albuquerque The Magazine probably means the most to us, because this is a recognition awarded by our com-

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munity. These are people that live where we live and shop where we shop. They understand Albuquerque, so when they say we are ‘Best of the City,’ it means everything,” Rob says. While Ford Motor Company has been adapting to a changing world with Electric Vehicles and putting out the very hot Ford Bronco, Power Ford has also been elevating their approach to car sales by focusing exclusively on the guest experience. He says, “Ford is making EVs for everyone. They are affordable, fast, economical and luxurious. We get to be a part of the future by helping our guests experience the best of what’s next and the best of today.” And if you have been dreaming of buying a Bronco, Power Ford has delivered more Broncos than anyone in the area. “We have dedicated Bronco specialists that know almost everything about them,” Rob proudly says. “If you want one, let Power Ford custom-build one just for you. You can choose every color and option, so it is exactly how you want it.”

It is this dedication and commitment to exceptional customer service that has catapulted Power Ford to the top of everyone’s mind and “Best Of ” lists. Rob lights up when he talks about the new initiative Power Ford has taken to create an extraordinary guest experience. “We have started a One-to-One Concierge Service for Power Ford clients. This may be a first-ever in the industry, but it is definitely a first for New Mexico. Power Ford owners are assigned a dedicated concierge throughout ownership and this single point-of-contact removes all of the stress out of owning a vehicle, which is exciting for our company and really exciting for our clients,” he says. Ask anyone and they will agree, buying a car can be quite challenging and not always pleasant. But, Rob says, “If you don’t love the experience the other guys provide, you need to experience what we do at Power Ford…even if you don’t drive a Ford.”

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PARTNER CONTENT

THE FACE OF AUTOMOTIVE

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PARTNER CONTENT

THE FACE OF MONTESSORI LEARNING

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MONTESSORI ONE ACADEMY TINA PATEL · FOUNDER & CEO 9360 HOLLY AVE. NE · ALBUQUERQUE, NM (505) 822-5150 · MONTESSORIONE.NET

When it comes to education, most parents long for an optimal learning environment for their child where practical life skills are taught and where children develop empathy, critical-thinking skills and a lifelong love of learning. This is what Montessori ONE Academy is all about and this was the impetus behind Tina Patel’s vision for establishing the school in 2007. As the founder and CEO, Tina Patel holds a Master’s degree in architecture and spent years studying the benefits of environmental education under the revered Dr. Ann Taylor. Tina started two charter schools before committing herself to this bold endeavor of establishing her own. Montessori ONE is comprised of three buildings totaling 30,000 square feet, which Tina and her husband designed specifically for children and built from the ground up. She recalls, “My older daughter attended Montessori and her love of learning was palpable. She was excited to go to school and it finally hit me that though I was trying to teach at-risk high school students, it was too late, and I needed to reach them much earlier. So my goal for

starting Montessori ONE is to give the youngest of students a solid academic foundation that instills their love of learning to last a lifetime.” Montessori ONE welcomes babies as young as six weeks through elementary school. Of the importance of Montessori learning, she says, “I think children are much more capable and smarter than we give them credit for. Dr. Montessori believed that children, from newborns to six years, are like sponges. They mimic, role-model and challenge us. We focus on teaching them to write in cursive, to read and mathematics. We set the foundation for them to become creative learners and independent thinkers. We teach critical-thinking skills, so they become much more advanced, and develop executive functioning. Conventional education settings do not allow independent learning and that’s what really sets us apart from other educational models.” The 238 students who attend Montessori ONE are all encouraged to explore, investigate and realize their natural curiosity about the world. Though every child develops at their own pace, they quickly realize that school and learning can be a

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fun and exciting experience. The children are motivated by seeing other students work. This is how the Montessori school creates lifelong learners. Tina describes the learning environment as one where they “follow every child’s individual strength or weakness and work at their capacity. If a child is strong in math, we focus on that. If a child struggles in an area, we work on that. We focus on the whole child—emotional, social, physical as well as academic development.” Montessori ONE Academy is the city’s only Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) Montessori school and consistently ranks as one of the top private schools. She gives all the credit for the school’s success to the team working at Montessori ONE, as well as the amazing support of parents. “It’s a collective effort,” Tina says. “If you want your child to have a love of learning and become an independent thinker, enjoy problem-solving and be empathetic, Montessori is the only education you should be looking at.”

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PARTNER CONTENT

THE FACE OF DENTISTRY

BEAR CANYON ORAL & FACIAL SURGERY

DR. TRAVIS C. RUDD, DDS · OWNER 10151 MONTGOMERY BLVD NE, SUITE 2D ALBUQUERQUE, NM (505) 292-3400 · BEARCANYONOFS.COM After working with the esteemed Dr. Roholt, founder of Bear Canyon Oral and Facial Surgery from 2013 to 2015, Dr. Travis C. Rudd was so impressed with the high level of patient care and the great outdoors Albuquerque offered, he bought the practice when Dr. Roholt retired. Today, Dr. Rudd and his talented team proudly uphold the professional legacy and excellence in patient care as they perform everything from removing wisdom teeth to dental implants. Dr. Rudd focuses on a “team approach.” He says, “I think we are really good about communicating with patients and other doctors and that has helped drive the referral-based nature of our practice. The doctors feel when they refer someone to us, their patients will be treated by a teammate.” Bear Canyon Oral and Facial Surgery is also recognized for staying on the front end of technology. “When people come to our office, they have questions and are very interested in the things we are doing with technology to make our practice and our work even better,” he says. For example, the Navigation Surgery “allows us to make implant placement very precise using a machine that works like a GPS. It’s extremely accurate,” says Dr. Rudd. While Dr. Rudd could have practiced anywhere, he says, “What tipped this place over others was the practice that Dr. Roholt developed, the fact that taking good care of people was his primary motivator and I wanted to emulate what he did.” After surgeries, Dr. Rudd personally calls patients to check on them and he believes this is one of the reasons he has 5-star ratings on both Yelp and Google. When Dr. Rudd and his talented team of experts are not working on improving people’s smiles, he enjoys spending time with his wife and five children, hiking, and getting to bed by 9 p.m.

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PARTNER CONTENT

THE FACE OF MEDICAL SPAS

ALLURADERM MD MEDICAL SPA

DR. NICHOLAS LAM, M.D. · MEDICAL DIRECTOR AND OWNER 9501 PASEO DEL NORTE NE, SUITE B · ALBUQUERQUE, NM (505) 821-9630 · ALLURADERM.COM

Congratulations to AlluraDerm MD Med Spa for being the “Face of Medical Spas” for the last five years. AlluraDerm consistently ranks as New Mexico’s number one provider of Botox® and Juvéderm® collection of fillers and offers a variety of spa treatments including CoolSculpting, Fraxel Restore, etc. “The face is the first thing anyone looks at and is pivotal in human interactions. We feel so privileged that our patients entrust us with the task to help them be the best version of themselves,” says Dr. Lam. Before launching into the medical spa industry, Dr. Lam was an anesthesiologist and Dr. Mancha was a family medicine

doctor before he opened AlluraDerm in 2007. Together, these two talented doctors have built AlluraDerm into what it is today, and they continue to serve the Albuquerque community with exceptional medical spa treatments and aesthetics. The providers at AlluraDerm are a highly trained and qualified team of experts who perform treatments like Fraxel, a skin resurfacing laser, and Thermage, which is a skin tightening laser, on patients of all ages. These treatments can restore a youthful glow, remove scars and help with fine lines and wrinkles. A distinguishing factor of AlluraDerm is their Cosmetic Coordinators who are

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dedicated to establishing a personal relationship with each client and providing a red-carpet experience. This powerful combination ensures each client receives a personable and customized treatment and extraordinary experience. Together, with a team of dedicated skin care specialists including Lori, Kristy, Dori and Kimberly, Dr. Lam and Dr. Mancha help patients successfully reduce the visible signs of aging with cutting-edge technology and optimal safety and efficacy. If you are ready to explore ways you can look and feel younger, let their expertise aid you in this age-defying process..

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PARTNER CONTENT

THE FACE OF CHILDCARE

ABQ CHILDCARE LITTLE CORRAL DAY CARE

10111 CONSTITUTION AVE NE · ALBUQUERQUE, NM (505) 299-0633 · ABQCHILDCARE.COM

With nearly 50 years of commitment and service to the Albuquerque community and three generations of family legacy and leadership, ABQ Childcare has four convenient locations where children from six weeks to 12 years old enjoy a stable and caring learning environment. Through play-based and hands-on learning, ABQ Childcare strives to meet the educational, physical, cognitive and social-emotional needs of students and families. Natalie Aragon, Human Resources and Marketing Director, says, “ABQ Childcare is a nonprofit and was started by my paternal grandmother. Then my father took over and now

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that he is retired, my husband, cousins and I are running the businesses. “Throughout the decades, we have been able to maintain consistency in care with a lot of the same management. We have employees who have worked for all three generations and we also have families who came to us as children and who are now bringing their children and/or grandchildren,” she proudly says. Open Monday through Friday, ABQ Childcare offers both full- and parttime options for families. Because they are part of the New Mexico Free Pre-K program, all 3-5 year old children can attend the Pre-K program at no cost. The centers are also part of the

state-funded food program which avails every child with four free meals a day. Because many ABQ Childcare employees have their own children in the program, Natalie affirms that their mission is “to ensure every child that is with us is treated the way we would hope our own children would be treated.” As for what inspires Natalie and her extended family to continue the legacy their grandmother started almost 50 years ago, she says, “It is amazing to have this deep connection to the community over so many generations. We have a diverse clientele and we love that all children can receive equal education opportunities.”

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PARTNER CONTENT

THE FACE OF ARCHITECTS

MODULUS ARCHITECTS & LAND USE PLANNING REGINA OKOYE

ENTITLEMENTS PROJECT MANAGER 100 SUN AVE NE, SUITE 600 ALBUQUERQUE, NM (505) 338-1499 · MODULUSARCHITECTS.COM

Headquartered in Albuquerque and established in 2007, Modulus Architects & Land Use Planning is a full-service design and planning firm that works exclusively with the private sector. As a multi-award-winning firm, the company executes projects in New Mexico, Texas, Arizona, Colorado and Oklahoma. Regina Okoye, Entitlements Project Manager, says she was attracted to the company because of the culture and ethics. “It is a family environment where we all look out for and support one another and there is a great balance between work and fun. We all have the same common goal and the innovation and creativity within the company is unparalleled.” With an MBA and a degree in Electrical Engineering, Regina is highly qualified and it is her experience in management consultation, team building, professional development, strategic implementation and company collaboration that helps her push through obstacles with property restrictions, zoning and regulatory constraints as well as political realities. Working “hand-in-hand with architects and engineers, they plan and develop a strategy to avoid barriers and obtain approval. Our integrated team approach brings diverse areas of expertise to deliver insights, unique design and a return on investment. That is why our track record for project approvals is unmatched.” As for Regina’s outlook, she is excited about “the continuance of innovative projects in and around Albuquerque. I am excited to continue to offer an unparalleled breadth of services that bring viable solutions to even the most elusive design challenges. It excites me to drive home from work or go out and see the Modulus signs or a building that we renovated that is now bringing vitality to an existing neighborhood.” She is proud to “make a difference in our community” and she loves the “fast-paced environment and diverse projects.” Regina is motivated by the “various strategies and approach to building and design and this really keeps the work challenging, exciting and fulfilling.” AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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PARTNER CONTENT

THE FACE OF EYECARE

THE JULIETTE EYE INSTITUTE

DR. ROBERT F. MELENDEZ FOUNDER & OWNER

6401 HOLLY AVENUE NE · ALBUQUERQUE, NM (505) 355-2020 · JULIETTEEYE.COM

When Robert F. Melendez was a boy, his mother became legally blind from an inherited retinal disease, Retinitis Pigmentosa. Watching his mother struggle as she lost her eyesight changed everything for little Bobby. Not only did this pique his interest to learn more about rare eye diseases, it inspired him to attend medical school, become an ophthalmologist and start The Juliette RP Vision Foundation to “help find a cure for Retinitis Pigmentosa.” Dr. Robert Melendez also established the Juliette Eye Institute, a world-class eye care surgery center in Albuquerque, which he named after his mother, where he performs six customized refractive surgeries, including cataract removal, to correct vision for those ages 60 and over. The Juliette Eye Institute is where he continues to fulfill his mission to “restore vision and help people see better to live better lives.” Depending on a patient’s age and eye health, Dr. Melendez performs three cornea-based and three lens-based surgeries, all of which are highly customizable. Over the years, he has learned that not everyone is a good LASIK candidate, but they may require a different type of surgery. Dr. Melendez is the only doctor in Albuquerque who performs SMILE, the newest version of LASIK eye surgery, which is better for people with dry eyes and an active lifestyle. He shares this example, “As patients over 40 begin to lose their near vision and require reading glasses, LASIK is not always the ideal option. However, a viable and recommended alternative is the Refractive Lens Exchange (RLE) which restores the near, intermediate and distance vision without glasses. Additionally, this prevents the patient from needing cataract surgery in the future.” Dr. Melendez is known for using state-of-the-art technology for vision correction surgery and putting his patients first. The Juliette Eye Institute can customize highly-effective procedures to correct almost anyone’s eyes. Call (505) 355-2020 today to schedule a consultation or visit JulietteEye.com for more information.

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PARTNER CONTENT

THE FACE OF FINANCE

ANTHEM FINANCIAL SERVICES BRENTON L. FEWOX · OWNER

333 RIO RANCHO BLVD NE, SUITE 102 · RIO RANCHO, NM (505) 338-0206 · ANTHEMFINANCIAL.US

It’s hard to overstate the importance of financial planning. People work hard to earn an income, and making the best use of the fruits of that labor takes insight and deliberation. Here, expertise and experience prove invaluable. With over 30 years of professional financial services practice behind him, Anthem Financial Services, Inc. owner Brenton L. Fewox is precisely the sort of person you want in your corner when it comes time to make important decisions about your financial future. Anthem Financial Services is an independent consulting and advisory firm focused on estate preservation and distribution, risk management, and supplemental insurance services. “We have committed ourselves to always making decisions that

are in the best interests of our clients,” explains Fewox. “In turn, we have been able to establish a healthy book of business with loyal clients who continually refer new business to us—something for which we are incredibly grateful.” Life frequently moves at its own rhythm. Anthem Financial Services affords clients the advice they need to navigate important life events—getting married, building a family, preparing for retirement, or retirement proper—with confidence, knowing that, whatever else may come, they are on firm financial footing. “My staff work harder and provide service better than anyone I know,” says Fewox. “We also take a leadership approach with our clients. At the end of the

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day, we believe our clients just want to cut through the noise and have their financial lives protected.” At Anthem Financial Services, Fewox and his team provide guidance to businesses both large and small, as well as individuals, with special emphasis on helping veterans and first responders. “Knowing that what we do here changes people’s lives is what keeps me going every day,” says Fewox. “Planning for the unexpected is crucial. What we do here to educate clients about financial planning for them and their families is imperative, because you just never know what life is going to bring.”

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PARTNER CONTENT

THE FACE OF FUN

ABQ AX

ANGELA ROMERO · THE AX-ECUTIVE DIANA MONTOYA · THE AXPERT 5505 OSUNA RD NE, SUITE J · ALBUQUERQUE, NM · (505) 207-8990 · ABQAX.COM

Some of the funnest things come from the most unexpected places. Recreational ax throwing, for instance, came to Albuquerque by way of Poland. In 2017, Angela Romero and Diana Montoya took a family trip to the Central European country, and it was there they discovered the incomparable thrill of hurling a sharp axe into a solid chunk of wood. It’s an act so easily described that it’s almost misleading. After all, how could something so simple be so fun and satisfying? “At first, we thought we would just play for a few minutes,” says Romero, recalling her and Montoya’s first experience

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with the sport. “We took our axes and— after a little instruction—began hurling them at the targets about 15 feet in front of us. That was it—we were addicted. After an hour of playing, no one wanted to leave. It was at that moment we knew we had to bring an ax throwing range to our home state of New Mexico.” In November 2017, Romero and Montoya did precisely that, opening up Albuquerque’s first ax throwing range—and, as it happened, one of the first half dozen or so ax throwing ranges in the United States. “We are proud to say we, right here in Albuquerque, were amongst the very few

first ax throwing ranges in the country, and that we’re the oldest and largest locally owned and operated ax throwing venue in the city,” says Romero. Now in their fourth year of business, Romero and Montoya attribute their success to a combination of business acumen and experience mixed with raw determination. “We never give up trying, even when we run into roadblocks,” says Romero. “We have been so blessed to be supported by the citizens of our great state and we are very honored to be able to provide the exhilarating sport of ax throwing in the city of Albuquerque.”

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S PAER CT I ANL EAR D VCE O R TN I STI N P E GN STE C T I O N

THE FACE OF REAL ESTATE

JOHN LOPEZ REAL ESTATE JOHN LOPEZ · OWNER

8200 CARMEL AVE, NE · ALBUQUERQUE, NM · (505) 991-3386 JOHNLOPEZREALESTATE@GMAIL.COM · MILLIONDOLLARHOMESALBUQUERQUE.COM

As an educator and real estate broker, John M. Lopez is not focused on making a commission, but on empowering people with knowledge of the market so that when they are ready to purchase or sell, they will be able to make the right choice for their family’s future. “I started as a real estate sales associate in 1997, one month after I graduated from the University of New Mexico with a bachelor of science,” Lopez says. “I have since changed my position from sales associate to an educator/broker of real estate who helps people understand the complicated work of today’s real estate market. The difference between the two is that a ‘sales person’s’ goal is to make a

commission, while an ‘educator’s’ goal is to teach, enlighten, and facilitate.” A native New Mexican, Lopez has a strong entrepreneurial side. “I own Rapid MVD, and Clear Vision Construction Inc.,” Lopez says. “The aspect of my work I enjoy most is the journey my clients and I go through, from the first conversation, to the invitations, to the BBQ after they close on their home. Sometimes we will meet and talk for years before a transaction even arises. During that journey, a friendship develops!” To create those lasting friendships, Lopez combines his positive personality, real estate experience, vast knowledge in construction, and great customer service

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to ensure his customers receive the best service possible. When he isn’t in the office, Lopez can often be found playing golf, basketball, softball, volleyball, cycling, snow skiing, playing the guitar, or spending time with his kids at the lake. “My unbelievable kids keep me focused and motivated,” Lopez says. “Devon, Bryce, Jacqueline, Aidyn, Demetrius, and Johnny are my world, and my everything. I have been so blessed with a career that gives me the time to always be there for field trips, their activities, and whenever they need me!”

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ABQ THE INTERVIEW P. 112 | PERSONALITY P. 118 | BEHIND THE SCENES P. 122

A CENTURY AT HAND Reptile keeper Phil Mayhew, here caring for the ABQ BioPark’s 100+-year-old giant tortoise, talks about his fascination with reptiles, and the safety efforts underway for the BioPark’s blue iguanas. (p. 122)

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

STORIES BEHIND INDIVIDUALS WHO MAKE ALBUQUERQUE GREAT

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UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL WITH OUR LEADERS AND DIFFERENCE-MAKERS

The Right Fit For The Job Years of financial experience—and a long history of living, learning and appreciating New Mexico— provides the framework for Beverly Bendicksen’s work as chair of the city’s centerpiece non-profit.

PHOTOS BY DON JAMES/ATM

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everly Bendicksen may originally hail from California, but she’s a New Mexican at heart. “I feel like a native although I was not born here,” she admits. Over the better part of three decades, Bendicksen has left a lasting imprint on Albuquerque and the rest of the state, both through her work as a financial executive with her own business, Sandia Financial Consulting, as well as through numerous philanthropic endeavors. The latest of those involves serving as a chair for the Albuquerque Community Foundation, which focuses on using endowment funds to benefit nonprofits and other organizations throughout the city. One thing is certain: The bond between Bendicksen and the community runs deep. “Certainly the people that live here and the feeling that you get being part of this community is very unusual. It’s supportive and very rewarding to be involved in a community where you can make a difference as an individual,” she says. “I love the geography. I love the climate. I’ve had a great professional career here. I think I’ve been very lucky to live in a place this beautiful. It makes me happy.” ATM: What originally brought you to Albuquerque? BEVERLY BENDICKSEN: My father

worked for the weather service, and we moved all over in the West primarily when I was a child. Albuquerque was one of the

places that he did fire weather forecasting, and so we lived here for a while. I also returned to New Mexico to go to college. I went to New Mexico Tech in Socorro and to UNM in Albuquerque and graduated from UNM Anderson School of Manag-

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ment with an MBA and a concentration in finance. ATM: Did you have a career or dream job you targeted in your formative years? BB: I don’t think I did until I was in college and immediately out of college. I was always interested in mathematics. I got a bachelor’s degree in math. When I went to graduate school, I became fascinated by finance. My career has been in lots of different financial management roles. I’ve worked as a commercial lender, a private equity investor and also as a financial executive for small and middle market companies. ATM: You are the president at Sandia Financial Consulting, LLC. Can you describe what kind of work you do with this company?

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ABQ BB: That’s my own business that I formed in 2017. I provide financial management consulting services, primarily to small and middle market companies. ATM: What do you enjoy about this field and this type of work? BB: It’s quite varied. When you’re trying to help a company refinance its bank debt, you have a certain set of challenges and opportunities to restructure that, and you work with many interesting people in our local banking community. Also, working with small companies involves cash flow planning, some modeling, which uses some math skills. Helping companies figure out how to become more profitable and grow is a very interesting and varied set of circumstances, and I’ve just always found a lot of challenge and reward in doing financial management work. ATM: What led you to become involved with the Albuquerque Community Foundation? BB: I’ve long been interested in philanthropy. Since 1991, which is when I completed Leadership Albuquerque, I’ve

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served on many boards of non-profit organizations in Albuquerque. All of the organizations I’ve worked with are truly making Albuquerque and New Mexico a better place to live for all of us. I originally got involved with the Albuquerque Community Foundation as a donor, and then a community volunteer on the investment committee. The investment committee manages a large endowment that the Community Foundation uses to make grants in our community. I was connected with the investment committee because of my financial background and experience, particularly in private equity. After serving on the investment committee for a few years, I was invited to join the board of trustees in 2014. This year I am serving as the board chair. ATM: How would you describe the work the Albuquerque Community Foundation does? BB: The primary role, of course, is building and investing endowment funds in order to benefit the community through strategic grant making. Currently, the endowment is about $130 million, and last year in 2021, we made $5.6 million in grants to the community. One of the particular things that I’m proud of, during the beginning of the pandemic, the community foundation raised lots of funds that did not go into the endowment but instead were used to immediately make grants to the community to respond to the challenges of COVID — everything from helping people with healthcare issues, food insecurity, housing challenges and helping small businesses survive through the various closures that occurred. There was really no hesitation on the part of the Community Foundation to jump in and do everything they could to mitigate the very difficult circumstances we faced here in our community. Another very recent program is what’s called DEI United. That is a grant program that was established by the Albuquerque Community Foundation and United Way to support and advance equity, diversity and inclusion in New Mexico. Another area that is relatively new for the Community Foundation that is of interest to me is making impact investments. While the large endowment is invested in a number of different asset classes, we have specifically allocated a portion of our endowment investments to local

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investment opportunities that would provide not only a financial return, but a social return to the community. In addition to earning something on the investment in dollars, we also measure the social returns of things like creating new jobs, helping entrepreneurs start businesses, revitalizing downtown, providing access to loans for individuals that are not served by the commercial banking community and a variety of similar things that are very meaningful in the community and can be done with a relatively small portion of our investments endowment. ATM: How does your background in finance help you with your work in the Albuquerque Community Foundation? BB: The financial management and investment experience certainly helps in the work that the investment and finance committees do. I think it also helps in understanding the financial performance of a non-profit, particularly one such as the Community Foundation that is large and successful and has grown rapidly over the last several years. Being able to look at that growth and help the staff and the other board members understand how to support that and set appropriate financial policies to get the best results for our community is something that I think is related to my skill set and my interests. ATM: As chair, what are your duties? BB: It is a little bit of involvement in all the areas of the Community Foundation. I participate at some level on all of the various committees, and I work with the president and CEO, Randy Royster, on setting the agenda for board meetings, determining policy questions that need to be addressed at the board of trustees level. We are also working on a five-year strategic plan. I am, along with the senior staff of the Community Foundation and the executive committee of the board, working on the first draft of this strategic plan, which we intend to present to the full board later this year. ATM: What’s your favorite part of being involved with this organization? BB: The impact that we have on the community in truly helping people lead more productive, successful lives. Helping businesses meet their challenges and be more

successful. And doing things that result in a better community for me and for all of us. ATM: What other types of ways have you been involved in the community? BB: I am currently a trustee of the Albuquerque Museum. I’m a past president of the Albuquerque Museum Foundation board of directors. The Albuquerque Museum Foundation raises money to support the Albuquerque Museum. I think that the museum is a wonderful cultural resource for locals and for visitors to New Mexico. I have been a member of the museum for many years and am very much enjoying the opportunity to serve as trustee and help the museum feature truly outstanding exhibitions and provide educational programs to students in Albuquerque. Another non-profit that I was active with in the past is WESST. It is a home to entrepreneurs. It provides training and lending to help entrepreneurs, especially women, establish and grow their businesses. I joined that board in 2005 to help with strategic planning and fundraising for their business incubator downtown. I ultimately served as treasurer and board chair for them. ATM: You were named to the University of New Mexico Anderson School of Management Hall of Fame in 2021. What did it mean to you to be recognized? BB: That was a wonderful honor. I very much enjoyed my time at Anderson School of Management. I learned so much from the professors and enjoyed the opportunity to work with the students that were there. I have had a wonderful career in finance all because of the education that I got. Joining the Hall of Fame with all of the very talented, successful individuals that have been elected before me was quite the honor. ATM: When you’re not involved in one of your many endeavors, what do you enjoy doing in your free time? BB: I visit the Albuquerque Museum. I go for bike rides. I hike in Placitas. I’m mostly involved with non-profit organizations and some of those involve music as well. I go to jazz concerts and read lots of books.—TRISTEN CRITCHFIELD

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A LOOK AT THE LIFE & WORK OF ALBUQUERQUEANS WHO DESERVE A TOAST

No Passport Needed in ABQ Carla Sinopoli has traversed the globe in her archaeological work. Now she oversees the three million-plus worldwide artifacts in the collection of UNM’s Maxwell Museum.

F PHOTOS BY DON JAMES/ATM

or someone who spent a significant portion of her life in New York and Michigan, the Land of Enchantment has been a welcome change of pace for Carla Sinopoli. “After living in the Midwest and East for most of my life, having 300 days of sunshine a year is pretty exciting,” she says. “I do love the outdoors and I love New Mexico’s rich cultural life. For a state that does not have a very large population, it’s a (place) with incredible museums and music and national parks and historic sites that one could spend every day seeing something new for years.”

Sinopoli arrived in Albuquerque in October 2018 to take a position as director of the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology and Professor of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico. “Basically, I’m three-quarters director and one-quarter professor,” says Sinopoli, who generally teaches one course per year at UNM. “One of the fun things we do is host UNM classes and provide opportunities for students to research collections, to

handle half a million-year-old artifacts or really provide extra bonuses to the inclass learning they do. It’s been great interacting with UNM students and faculty and researchers,” she adds. “The diversity of UNM and the incredible potential of this University for the state of New Mexico is really important to me.” It wasn’t her first time within the New Mexico border, however. After finishing college, she had a fellowship at what is now known as the School of Advanced

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Research in Santa Fe, which allowed her to fall in love with the state and all its charms. Sinopoli also has a “cluster of relatives” in the Albuquerque area, including a soon to be 97-year-old aunt and numerous cousins. She brings a wealth of experience to her role, particularly as an archaeologist who has traveled the globe for her work. In fact, Sinopoli’s passport is so well worn that she struggles to name the exact number of countries she has visited. “Oh gosh. A lot,” she says with a laugh. “I’ve done archaeology in Morocco, Egypt and India, primarily. I’ve done research on materials from China, Thailand, Japan and Korea. I visited a number of Asian countries. One of the great things about being an archaeologist who works overseas is that a lot of our conferences and gatherings are overseas as well, so I’ve

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gotten to travel to a number of places for those kinds of gatherings in Europe. I’ve only been to Brazil in South America. I’ve been very lucky.” Sinopoli got hooked on the lifestyle while attending Binghamton University in New York, where she was able to participate in an archaeological project in Morocco. Later, while doing graduate work at the University of Michigan, Sinopoli received an opportunity to work in India, which eventually became a focal point for her career. “The site I first went to work at was an incredible place. It’s called Vijayanagara,” Sinopoli says. “At this site was a vast city. It was the third-largest city of the world in the year 1500. It was abandoned quite

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abruptly in 1565 — hundreds of standing monuments, huge landscape. The city as a whole probably had half a million people living in it, so close to the size of Albuquerque both physically and in population. It’s just spectacularly beautiful and fascinating.” Much of Sinopoli’s research at the site didn’t follow the stereotypical guidelines one might usually see regarding an ancient city. “A lot of history of past empires is the history of kings and rulers and wars and battles and things like that, which are important in their own right, but we were interested in everyone else,” she says. “How did this vast city feed itself? How did it provide necessary goods to the peo-

ple who lived there? How did people live their lives at a daily level? That was part of what we were trying to understand in this work. “I started out there working, as a lot of archaeologists do, on pottery — these normal goods of everyday life. That got me into thinking about cuisine and social life and how pots are used in different ways. For us it wasn’t the grand discoveries, though those are always fun, but it was really learning more about the lives of people in the past.” Sinopoli doesn’t have much in the way of jet setting on the agenda these days. As it relates to her past work, she still needs to spend time writing and publishing her research — though a return to India could

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be in the offing at some point. “I should say all of our collections from my work in India remain in India. Nothing leaves the country,” she says. “Some of the work has to be done there.” In the present, Sinopoli is excited about her ongoing duties as director at the Maxwell Museum, which opened its doors in 1932 as the first public museum in Albuquerque and now boasts “more than 3 million archaeological and ethnographic objects from around the world,” according to its website. In addition to permanent exhibits on human evolution and the archaeology of the Southwest — both of which Sinopoli says are in the process of receiving updates — there are temporary exhibits that change throughout the year. “There’s always lots to see,” she says. “We’re constantly changing.”

Sinopoli’s own connection to museums and archaeology began at a young age. Growing up in New York afforded her the chance to visit a number of these institutions, and her father, an Italian immigrant, “was really passionate about the archaeology of Italy and the Roman Empire.” That said, Sinopoli’s career path was not necessarily her family’s first choice. “I don’t think anyone in my family wanted me to go into archaeology,” she says. “They thought it was not gonna end up in a productive career for me. They were a little worried about it. But it worked out well.” Indeed, it has. As an added bonus, Sinopoli considers her current role to be an upgrade over her previous position as professor of anthropology and curator of Asian collections in the Museum of An-

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thropological Archaeology at the University of Michigan. “While I loved teaching and working at the University of Michigan, the museum I worked in there was primarily a research museum. We had amazing collections, but we didn’t have our own exhibition space,” she says. “We didn’t do a lot of the things that more public-facing museums do: develop exhibitions, host (grades) K-12 students, host the general public and share our excitement about anthropology and what we do with larger audiences. “This position both took me to a place that I loved but also gave me the opportunity to work in a museum in a fascinating part of the world that does all the things that great museums do.”—TRISTEN CRITCHFIELD

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BEHIND SCENES THE

YOUR SNEAK PEEK AT JOBS THAT FLY BELOW THE RADAR

Growing Into the Role Phil Mayhew loved coming to the ABQ BioPark as a kid, fascinated by the animals and reptiles. Today his love and care continues for the critters—as a Zookeeper for the BioPark.

A PHOTOS BY DON JAMES/ATM

BQ BioPark zookeeper and animal enthusiast Phil Mayhew is fulfilling lifelong goals by working with the BioPark’s reptiles for the past couple of years and researching the endangered blue iguana. “I’ve always had a passion for wildlife,” Mayhew says. “My end goal was to work at the zoo, (but) I probably would’ve been happy doing anything outdoors.”

Mayhew, who grew up visiting the ABQ BioPark, knew from a young age that he wanted to work with animals hands-on. His favorite BioPark residents are two blue iguanas, 12-year-old Lola and 9-yearold Igor, who he says have the honor of being one of the few “priority recommended breeding pair(s)” designated by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), who create Species Survival Plan Programs for endangered animals like Lola and Igor. The ABQ BioPark is one of 23 AZA-accredited facilities home to the Grand Cayman blue iguana, and one of only two that are a priority recommended breeding pair. By providing them with the best diet

and quality of life in captivity, Mayhew hopes to continue the longevity of the blue iguana, which was downgraded from critically endangered to endangered in 2012. Mayhew told the Albuquerque Journal that the biggest threats to the island’s blue iguanas have feral cats and competition for food and habitat from non-native green iguanas, which “were likely introduced from the pet trade.” In order to gain firsthand experience in recreating the blue iguana’s natural habitat, the New Mexico BioPark Society allocated funds for Mayhew to fly to Grand Cayman and meet with Luke Harding, the manager of the island’s Blue Iguana Conservation program (BIC) which is

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managed by the National Trust for the Cayman Islands. “It’s an incredible amount of work for four people to take care of nearly 300 iguanas,” Mayhew explains. “It was eye-opening coming from a facility with a diet room, maintenance staff and other specialists.” Along with Lola and Igor, the ABQ BioPark is also home to 12-year-old blue iguana Frankenstien. Mayhew plans to incorporate ideas from the Blue Iguana Conservation program into Lola, Igor, and Frankenstien’s routines at the BioPark, including introducing a new type of mulberry into their diets which more accurately reflects the iguanas’ natural diets. Mayhew observed Harding as he ran the facilities, did field work, and watched over the more than 300 iguanas across three facilities. “I didn’t think I would ever have the opportunity to go to a country outside of the U.S. and lend a hand to an endangered

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species,” Mayhew says. “I got to release the 1,018th iguana that the facility has released back into the wild. (It was) very heartwarming to know that I was able to contribute.” In addition, Mayhew worked with Harding and three other employees to process hatchlings, which meant microchipping, tagging, and helping with medical exams. “Everyone there was very welcoming and Luke is a godsend,” he said to the Cayman Loop News. “The amount of work he’s been doing is phenomenal. It’s very eye-opening to see how many directions one person can get pulled and still do an effective job.” Mayhew told the Cayman Loop News that in the future, he hopes to help secure funding for BIC to help build a new nursery for the hatchling iguanas. This will not only help to set a carrying capacity for the facility, but also improve care with updated enclosures for the young iguanas. In Albuquerque, Mayhew is bringing the commitment he saw in Harding and the Grand Cayman team to the BioPark.

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Mayhew and the rest of the reptile keeper staff cover a lot of ground in a day’s work, including checking enclosures, misting the animals, and distributing the animals’ meals. “The dynamic part of working with reptiles is that each species has different environment parameters (like) temperature, humidity, appetites, etc.,” Mayhew says, “so we have to have a lot of knowledge about the animals in our collection.” The BioPark received Lola in 2020, with Mayhew being the iguanas’ primary carer and trainer. Now, it’s been found that Lola is carrying eggs thanks to a series of ultrasounds being done in her enclosure. While it’s unclear if the eggs are fertile, ABQ BioPark staff witnessed mating behavior between Lola and Igor, which is a great sign that there may be some hatchlings in the near future. “(The reptiles) also have very different metabolisms. Some eat daily, some eat every other week,” Mayhew says. “So our days can vary depending on diet schedules.” Mayhew says that children and teenag-

ers will often ask about working with animals and is glad to see people continue to be interested in nature conservation. “I think it’s exciting because (going to the zoo) was what fostered my fascination with wildlife,” Mayhew says. Because reptiles aren’t traditionally cute or generally thought of as pets, Mayhew says that there is a negative stigma surrounding them. Mayhew feels differently, saying that reptiles, including the blue iguana, are incredibly smart animals that quickly pick up on cues and are great at survival. Bringing endangered species to Albuquerque is something Mayhew loves because many New Mexico families won’t get the chance to travel and see animals like the Komodo dragon, the Asian Elephant, and of course Lola and Igor. “These kids can see them in real life before they are gone forever, (and this) has a tremendous effect on the future of conservation.” —EMMA TREVINO

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CREATIVES P. 126 | SHELFLIFE P. 128 | TIEMPO P. 130

CULTURE

IMAGINE IT ON THE BIG SCREEN Local movie productions in need of huge or unusual props often turn to Five Ton Monkey, a local fabrication shop whose work includes more than 40 films—and even face shields during the pandemic. (p. 126)

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PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

A PULSE CHECK ON ALBUQUERQUE’S ART, MUSIC AND THEATER SCENE

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PHOTOS BY DON JAMES/ATM

DIP INTO THE PERFECTLY MIXED PALETTE OF ABQ’S ART AND ARTISTS

BUILDING MAKE-BELIEVE MOVIE SETS— AND MASKS TO MANAGE THE PANDEMIC

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re you an escape room junkie? How about a “MacGruber” fanatic? Ever seen “Stranger Things?” If so, or even if not, chances are that you’ve seen some of Five Ton Monkey’s hyper-realistic props and sets. Helmed by Adam Eisman, Five Ton Monkey is a film industry design and fabrication shop full of prop and set-making materials along with an eager creative staff who have worked tirelessly to help the film and medical communities during the pandemic. Eisman, who has worked in set and prop design professionally since 1991, sees Albuquerque as a great destination for artists to pursue their dreams. Eisman W

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says in the early stages of Five Ton Monkey that the goal was “to create this and it is going to be the best shop (they) had ever worked in.” Eisman has built and managed sets and props in over twenty-five productions that have filmed in New Mexico, including “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs,” “Independence Day: Resurgence,” “El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie,” “Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials,” and many more. The Five Ton Monkey team has more than 40 film credits between them. With these experiences in mind, Eisman wanted to use Five Ton Monkey as a space to “encourage and bring people up,” as opposed to the toxicity he has observed in the movie industry. Eisman believes that the work he has put into the foundation of Five Ton Monkey is a step-

ping stone for the better environment he’s looking to create. “We wanted to build a prop shop where we can make all of the things and have all kinds of materials,” Eisman says. “(We want) to get closer to the decisions (of) the environments of movies.” With the pandemic surging in April 2020, Eisman and the Five Ton Monkey team worked quickly to design, manufacture, and transport protective faceshields. The prototype was constructed using materials they had in the shop for an upcoming project for the Netflix mega-hit show “Stranger Things.” The shields that were produced were inexpensive, strong, and packed flat for bulk transport. “I started heat-forming some materials and just working towards a type of useful face shield and got something that was

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reasonably effective,” Eisman says. “At the end of the day, we get to say, ‘Well, we did something good,’ and that set us on our path.” The path that Eason and Five Ton Monkey set on that day led them to the office of New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham. After a few notes to make the shields suit the needs of the changing landscape, they were officially approved. The entire process, from the first prototype to mass production, happened in the span of a week and a half. “We immediately ripped that prototype apart and started over with something much simpler,” Eisman says. “It was actually a great design exercise, where you had these specific parameters and it wasn’t the most aesthetically pleasing.” As of now, Five Ton Monkey has produced over 240,000 face shields for the medical and film communities of New Mexico. Eisman calls the shield production a “pretty damn elegant process,” as he and Five Ton Monkey worked with the production machinery in the shop and hired motivated Albuquerque residents. What started out as a basic desire to

help others in a time of need afforded Five Ton Monkey the opportunity to learn, problem solve, and find solutions that will help them going forward with future projects. After this illuminating experience, Eisman has a “willingness to do whatever it takes to make it work” mindset for taking on bigger tasks. “It was the greatest charge up in the world (and) it was the perfect puzzle on a number of levels,” Eisman says. When it comes to prop-making itself, Eisman says that there is “a certain sadness to technology rushing forward, there is less making nowadays.” Prop-making is about using what you have and most projects come with their own set of unique challenges, says Eisman. He asks the question, “What are the tools you have at your disposal because this is what drives the mechanical design.” Portions of props need to look a certain way and this is one of the issues Eisman faces. “You inventory your methods in a way to determine what you can do,” says Eisman.

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The projects Five Ton Monkey works on can include over fifty different materials and elements, with the props, sets, and furniture for films coming with added questions like ‘How will the end result look on set vs. in front of the camera?’ Eisman finds these questions fun to play around with when working at Five Ton Monkey. “How is it placed? How close will the actors be? What kind of detail will you need to have? The funny thing about working in film is that even if you can make exquisite things, making everything exquisite is wrong,” Eisman says. Eisman’s pride is closely related to the care and attention he regularly puts into the things he makes, but also knows that props shouldn’t be pristine. “For me personally, I earned the furniture making merit badge before the movies. I made careful things that lasted a long time, I lavished that kind of care into things,” Eisman says. “A perfect thing isn’t a perfectly beautiful thing. The perfect thing is exactly the right amount of ‘nice’ for what it has to be.” —EMMA TREVINO

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SHELFLIFE

TURN A PAGE WITH OUR LOCAL AUTHORS

ANY DAY WAKING UP ALONG THE RIO GRANDE IS A GOOD DAY A

lbuquerque has a long list of orators and storytellers responsible for the historical romance that blesses our city. But in this century, few local voices have resonated as clearly and broadly as that of Hakim Bellamy, who arrived from the East Coast in 2005 to pursue a master’s degree at the University of New Mexico. Just a few months later, he would help UNM win the National Poetry Slam title. He has since gone on to write several books of poetry, many of which tout ABQ as an epicenter of culture, art and harmony. His prose tends to recognize the city’s diversity, yet bind us in ways that inspire pride and fulfillment. His work earned him the title of ABQ’s inaugural Poet Laureate in 2012. Bellamy says his love of language came from listening to Hip Hop music growing up in Philadelphia and New Jersey, and from a Khalil Gibran book given to him by his mother. He has also worked for the City of Albuquerque as the Deputy Director for Arts and Culture, and has plans to enroll in UNM’s law school this fall. “The aspirational piece I’ve done with poetry, I hope to do the same with policy, especially with education,” says Bellamy, who plans to continue writing following law school. ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE: You’re often referred to as “ABQ’s first poet laureate.” How important was that designation, and how did it influence your future writing? HAKIM BELLAMY: It’s extremely important to me as a Black artist in America. Qualifiers like “first Black” (insert honorific here) are often used to both consciously and unconsciously diminish the recognition. Langston Hughes, one of the most prolific and proud writers of the American condition, is still referred

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COMMISSIONS Y CORRIDOS By Hakim Bellamy UNM Press 105 pages $18.95

to as one of the greatest African American poets…as opposed to just a great American poet, which is what he is. I am still humbled that this City would have lil’ old me as it’s first love (as far as poetry is concerned). It’s hard to forget your first love, Albuquerque—and the feeling is mutual. ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE: Your writing seems to embrace every corner of Albuquerque’s multifaceted culture. How did that come about? HB: I think it’s an unintended benefit of writing from a place of profound curiosity and love. I have a deep academic fascination for this magical place called Albuquerque, and what makes us tick. One of my mentors, Levi Romero, gave me some unforgettable advice. He said, “Don’t try to write the poem…that somebody from here would write. You are not from here, and that’s okay.” ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE: “Corridos” is a Spanish word meaning storytelling in a traditional Mexican song style. How did you learn about it, and how does it define the way you

communicate? HB: I became enamored with this idea of history, people and historical events lionized in song. Felt like a subversive combination of storytelling and songwriting, and after that I couldn’t let go of the idea of a modern day corrido… and the resultant Centennial poem “One Hundred Years of Corridos: A Song for the New Mexico Centennial” (also the first poem in the book) was my first attempt. I feel like my style of writing changed after that, and I wanted to give credit where credit is due in the title of the book. I stand on the shoulders of New Mexico’s incomparable legacy of storytelling. ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE: Your poem “Bless Me” is inspired by and written to the late Rudolfo Anaya. Did you know Rudolfo, and if so, what besides his writing inspires you about him? HB: Sadly, I never met el maestro Anaya. I did, however, write that poem in 2018 when the film based on the book came out, and it was used as an activity that ac-

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SHELFLIFE

PHOTO BY KEVIN LANGE

with a healthy distrust of authority and a well-founded fear of police. My Uncle Junior (actually, cousin) was a Baltimore City police officer growing up, so I knew “Cops are people, too,” and all that. But it wasn’t until I was older that I was able to deep-dive into the origin of policing— and its historical predisposition to protect property and privilege, more so than people of all kinds and walks of life. I’d say 60 percent of the words in that piece are a collage of actual oath language, and the rest is connective tissue and aspirational aesthetic. companied screenings of (“Bless Me Ultima”) in schools. His passing in 2020 was a gut punch after four months of a pandemic with no light at the end of the tunnel at the time. He was a literary giant and true champion of New Mexican culture. He gifted us this notion of magical realism, not just as some literary device, but as a way of life. Taught us that if we look for the magic in the mundane, we’ll find it. And if we don’t, we won’t. It is his sense of wonder and ability to be a bonafide grown up who always finds a way to write that harnesses an authentic childlike energy. Harper Lee gets credit for that with Scout in “To Kill a Mockingbird”. I think Rudolfo Anaya should also get credit for that with Antonio in “Bless Me Ultima.” ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE: One of your pieces is written as if a wedding vow between police and community, pledging truth, honor and kindness. Tell us about your personal inspiration to write this poem. HB: That was written for TEDxABQ Salon at the Albuquerque Museum in 2014, in the wake of the extrajudicial killings of Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner and Michael Brown. The original Black Lives Matter was barely a year old at the time. But I’d been Black my whole entire life, raised

ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE: As we all age, we find it’s increasingly harder to find the right words when communicating. Do you ever find yourself experiencing these same problems, particularly during impromptu public speaking? HB: Oooh child, yes! Complicated by the fact that I have a good bit of anxiety about the genetic implications of Alzheimer’s after losing my father to the disease in 2019. Memorizing poetry is not as easy as it used to be, but I also feel like the practice of writing (and the imagination that comes along with it) is routinely working a muscle to slow the atrophy of that muscle. Thankfully, I am not there yet but I’d be lying if I said I don’t fear being there one day. It puts a stopwatch on my creativity, and I often feel the push to produce as much as possible now because tomorrow is not promised. ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE: We note that you’ve written a children’s book. Is there a different challenge in connecting as a writer with that population? What interests do you share or have begun passing on to your child? HB: “Samuel’s Story” was written out of necessity. I had just been named poet laureate in April of 2012. To put food on

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the table, I said yes to EVERYTHING. One of the first contracts offered me was to do a few poetry writing workshops at my son’s pre-K school. I was stoked to do what I love—at my son’s school, of all places. To that point in my career, I’d mostly slammed poems in bars and nightclubs, not nursery schools. So, I quickly had to come up with some “family friendly” content and, as a result, the book was born. I tried to channel Rudolfo Anaya’s sense of writing from the perspective of a child with a Disney-like eye (and ear) for the audience of adults. My son is more into soccer, basketball, and video games, but he has a knack for theater, speaks Spanish better than me, and performed a father-son poem with me on Father’s Day on the field at Isotopes Park. ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE: You came to Albuquerque as a brash student poet nearly 20 years ago, then worked for the City Department of Arts and Culture, and now you’re headed to law school. How has the process of growing up affected what you choose to write about? HB: I can honestly say, after working for two ABQ mayors, and to their credit, I was never asked to not write or not say a particular thing. That would be fundamentally in conflict with who I am as a person and as a poet. I got a better understanding of the government systems at work, and this education better informs my writing. And with a background in journalism, I like to have my facts straight as much as I like to move the crowd, hearts and minds. I think that comes with age. As a younger poet, I felt like the most important thing was saying what needs to be said. Nowadays, I learned that it doesn’t matter unless someone hears you say it. I’m still learning who needs to hear what—and how I need to say it to be heard.—HH

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by mel minter

ABQ’S THRIVING LOCAL MUSIC SCENE

MAKING A MARK

T

he Chachalacas may be the most eclectic and unusual trio in New Mexico. How eclectic? Well, a recent performance featured a medley that included “Exodus” (the movie’s theme song), “Within You Without You (from Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band), and a tune whose name no one in the trio can pronounce from the Greek pop singer Tzenh Banoy. How unusual? Well, how many trios have you encountered with a bassist ( Jared Putnam), a drummer ( Javier Saume Mazzei), and a C6 steel guitarist ( John Eichleay)? This eclectic and unusual mix produces music that is at once accessible, serious, fun, occasionally silly, and always entertaining. Eichleay, the front man, got his professional start in Chicago playing gypsy jazz on guitar with Alfonso Ponticelli and Swing Gitan. Eleven years ago, he was captured by the steel guitar, and that’s been his primary instrument ever since. The Pittsburgh native found his way to New York City, where he worked steadily and, five years ago, cofounded the Steel Guitar Unconvention. He’s toured North America and Europe with Ponticelli and Swing Gitan, the classic country band Blue Steel, and The Tickety Boos, and he’s also recorded or toured with Bob Lanzetti (Snarky Puppy), Dawn Landes, Amy Helm, Flaco Jimenez, Adam Brisbin’s Lovesick, and Max and Josh Baca (Los Texmaniacs)— among others. He and his wife, Giancarla, a former Broadway performer, lived in New York for years, but with high-speed gentrification, the loss of venues, gigs paying less and less, and ever more extreme financial pressures, it became “less of a good idea to be a musician in New York City,” says Eichleay. New Mexico had “mesmerized” him when he was on the road touring, and when he and his wife started looking for a new home, she “fell in love with the physical therapy program at UNM,” Eichleay says, and that helped seal the deal.

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PHOTO BY RYAN FLANNAGAN

STEELING AWAY

Eichleay found his way into the local music scene by checking out different music venues and musicians, and introducing himself. Before long he found himself playing in a variety of bands, sitting in with touring groups, and doing recording sessions in San Antonio. “I thought I had won the lottery,” he says. Then, the pandemic shut it all down. Before the shutdown, Eichleay had found a sympathetic connection with Putnam and Mazzei, and they started working on tunes as the Vinegaroons. “When I came here, I kept finding vinegaroons walking through my house, and I was just blown away to have this little black lobster walking through the house,” he says. When informed that the name was already taken by a long-standing folk group in Socorro, the trio settled on Chachalacas because they liked saying it. The guiding principle for the trio is “let’s just play whatever we want to play,” says Eichleay. He notes that musicians often have to play music required by an em-

ployer or client, and it may not be material that excites their imagination. So to have a haven like the trio where they can satisfy their own interests is a blessing, and Eichleay’s interests, and his bandmates’, are wide. “I’m not a virtuosic musician,” says Eichleay, “but I have big ears, and I love listening to a bunch of different stuff.” The guys bring in songs that interest them, and see if they can fit them into their unusual instrumentation. Some songs work, and many don’t, but the ones that do, work really well. They’ve also been writing and recording original material. You can check out a few tunes and the trio’s schedule at thechachalacas.com, where you can also make contact.

GOING BOOM Woody Guthrie fixed a sign to his guitar that read, “This machine kills fascists.” If pop/rock singer/songwriter Micah Thunder put a sign on his guitar, it might well read, “This machine kills despair.” It’s

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something he knows from his own experience. Just a few years ago, the Albuquerque native was going through a “rough time,” he says. “I’d been living in my car. I had been struggling with substance abuse. I had been kind of at a crossroads in my life. I still had a guitar with me, thankfully, while I was going through that, and it helped me get through that time by making something.” What he’s made is vulnerable, emotionally honest, musically engaging, and well-produced music. His songs address the difficult times, the damaging relationships, the obstacles— self-imposed or otherwise—to self-realization and draw lessons from those experiences and lift the listener to the

possibility of healing. Growing up, Thunder knew there was medicine in music. “I remember feeling seen through the music,” he says. “[This singer] is experiencing something that I have felt. I don’t feel so lonely. They’ve walked through the same kind of devastation and despair, and they’re singing about it. They’re OK, and I can be OK, too.” One challenge he faces is finding an inviting way to present the tough topics. “It tends to go down easier if it goes with a happy beat or some kind of mood that helps soften the blow,” Thunder says. He mentions Billy Joel’s song “Second Wind,” which is about suicide. Joel originally wrote it in a slow, sad rendition, but re-

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

alizing that approach might turn people off, he sped it up, put a bouncy beat under it to capture listeners and make it more digestible. “I just kind of keep that in mind—that I’m trying to cast a wide net. I want people to feel like they get to know me while at the same time having a good time.” Over these last few years, Thunder has been writing and recording nonstop, and the world has been taking notice. His YouTube channel has surpassed 100,000 views. He’s performed for a nationally syndicated music show, and his song “How It Ends” won Best Modern Rock Song at the 2022 New Mexico Music Awards. He’s quick to credit others for the success of his songs, with particular praise for his producer, Edgar Wonder. “The reason why my music sounds the way it does is that I tap into local talent, very very talented musicians and studio engineers,” he says. “They helped me bring that song to life.” They are helping him now with a new album that he expects to release later this year. Meanwhile, Thunder is helping to bring the work of musicians and other artists to life with the Monsoon Music House artist collective, which he and Wonder founded in 2021. The collective provides assistance in getting gigs, music production, networking with other artists, negotiating performance fees, and placing material on curated playlists. “One of the biggest highlights of the collective is being able to get other artists an opportunity to perform in spaces they may not have had the connection to,” says Thunder. “We want to get people paid, too. It’s not the openmic or come-play-for-exposure kind of thing. People are compensated for their time. We’re trying to add to the legitimacy of making music.” What’s certain is that Thunder himself is a legitimate music maker who made peace with himself using a guitar and who looks to pass that peace on to his audience. You can learn more at micahthunder.com, where you can hear his music, tap into his YouTube channel and more, and contact him.

Be sure to check out Musically Speaking, Mel’s online music journal, at www.melminter.com. If you’d like to share something with “¡tiempo!” readers, e-mail tiempo@abqthemag.com.

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EATS P. 134 | EATS, ETC. P. 138 | FROM THE VINE P. 140 | SPIRIT SPOTLIGHT P. 144 | A RECIPE FOR SUCCESS P. 146 | BITES P. 148

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SOUTH AMERICAN FLAIR Since opening in 2014, Ajiaco has served up food native to Colombia, which frequently includes chicken, plaintains, rice and a variety of fruits and vegetables. (p. 134)

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

A TASTE OF WHAT’S HAPPENING IN ABQ’S WORLD OF WINE, SPIRITS, AND CULINARY DELIGHTS

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Eats

PHOTOS BY DON JAMES/ATM

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SOUTH AMERICA MEETS THE SOUTHWEST

Ajiaco Colombian Bistro mixes Albuquerque’s local cuisine with a Latin fare.

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hen it came time for Pedro and Nubia Sabogal to pick a name for their ABQ-based Colombian restaurant, it only made sense to select a moniker that hit close to home. Thanks to a little help from their son, Carlos, Ajiaco Colombian Bistro was born in October 2014. For the uninitiated, “ajiaco” is a soup popular in the Colombian capital of Bogota that is typically made with chicken, corn, three types of potatoes and a local herb known as guascas. It’s also a conversation starter for firsttime diners. “It was my personal choice because it

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was my favorite soup,” Carlos says. “I felt that people would find it interesting in Albuquerque since it’s such a weird word … I think it’s just mostly about nostalgia. I thought it would be something nice to share with people, and it’s really the only soup in the restaurant. Ajiaco is a very hearty soup.” Prior to the inception of Ajiaco, the Sabogals ran a restaurant called El Pollo Real, which Carlos says served primarily Mexican cuisine. “It was just like a way to start a business and my parents always wanted to cook,” Carlos says. “As time went by, I think we

saw an opportunity to introduce some Colombian plates. We noticed that the public was really interested and invested in finding out more about Colombian culture and seeing what it was.” While Pedro serves as general manager and Nubia is the head chef, both Sabogal parents spend time cooking in the kitchen at Ajiaco. Carlos, who was an architecture student at the University of New Mexico, had a major hand in the design of the establishment and also serves as a de facto marketing director for the business. “I think we wanted to do something more contemporary and different, [and]

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FREEDOM REIGNS Colombian Independence Day arrives two weeks after the American version, and Ajiaco has typically celebrated the July 20 event with live music, food specials and dancing at the restaurant. BUSINESS SAVVY Ajiaco co-owner and general manager Pedro Sabogal has always been a businessman. Prior to owning multiple restaurants, he owned an insurance agency in Bogota, Colombia, for more than 30 years. INDUSTRY VETERANS Nubia Sabogal owned her first restaurant in Bogota from 1995 to 2001, while Pedro Sabogal ran three successful restaurants in Colombia before the couple arrived in the United States to open El Pollo Real. ARRIVE TO IMBIBE In addition to a rich variety of Colombian fare, Ajiaco offers five beer and five wine options, with the latter served by the bottle or by the glass.

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at the same time, bring something very traditional,” Carlos says. “Usually in Colombian restaurants, you have a lot of decorations and that was something that we wanted to push away from and be a little bit more modern, simpler, but at the same time bring some of those traditional decorations in a very simple way.” That blend of traditional and contemporary is also found throughout the menu, which uses ingredients such as beef, chicken, pork, rice, maize, potato, cassava, legumes and tropical fruits to create a variety of Colombian fare. “It’s made from scratch, so everything is as fresh as it can be,” Carlos says. “It’s almost like you’re eating with your family or your mom has just made you food.” Diners will enjoy sampling from traditional favorites like patacones (fried green plantains), arepas (corn cakes), empanadas (pastries stuffed with meat and cheese) and of course, ajiaco. The bandeja paisa, a sampler featuring steak, pork rinds, chorizo and plantains is one of the most popular plates at the restaurant. “There are a lot of flavors that you can choose from,” Carlos says. “There are some traditional flavors there, but there’s also a very interesting one, the green chile empanada, which is our own take on what

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Ajiaco Colombian Bistro 3216 Silver Ave SE (505) 266-2305 ajiacobistro.com

Colombian and New Mexican food can be, how they can fusion into one. That’s something we’ve been really interested in, just how to introduce more of a New Mexican touch into Colombian food.” The ties between the two types of cuisine carry over into the holidays, when Ajiaco makes tamales in bulk — just like numerous New Mexican restaurants throughout the state. “I would say they’re different and similar in some ways,” Carlos says. “They are wrapped in banana leaves. They’re made with Colombian spices.” “It’s a really important plate in tradition. It’s a thing where a whole family gets together. Everyone is hands on and some people are getting the leaves ready. Some other people are getting the mixture or the filling ready. There’s another group of people assembling everything and getting it ready to cook. It’s kind of a big event.” Dining at Ajiaco has become an event in itself. Albuquerqueans have been quite receptive to the restaurant, so much so that it can be difficult to find a table on certain days. “I think it’s grown tremendously. If anything, I hear my parents just get busier and busier every week,” Carlos says. “You come to the restaurant and you (usual-

ly can) get a table, but sometimes we’re booked for an entire afternoon. It seems like that’s starting to happen more often. It’s crazy the amount of business there is, even through the pandemic and after the pandemic. It was interesting to see people just wanted to eat Colombian food. They ordered it through any of the apps and it just never slowed down. I think business has been really good through all the different obstacles we’ve gone through.” — TRISTEN CRITCHFIELD

FEATURED DISHES BANDEJA PAISA $23

sampler plate of steak, pork rinds, chorizo colombiano, and plantains, served with avocado slices, beans and a portion of rice topped with a fried egg.

EMPANADAS $4

stuffed pastry with chicken, beef, green chile, cheese, or cheese & ham & pineapple.

AREPA SANDWICH $16

corn cake filled with sauteed shredded chicken and creole sauce, topped with cilantro sauce. served with a salad.

AJIACO $7 & $13 soup with chicken, guasca, rice and corn.

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Eats, Etc.

A quick glance at three local eateries that you may or may not already know about.

Damacios serves up true Spanish tapas, like mushrooms stuffed with spicy cream cheese and proscuitto and topped with walnuts and honey.

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involved a more social aspect to be a little bit more fun and lively,” Zamora says. “We always tell people that they’re American style tapas, not true Spanish style.” The menu features plenty of tapa-style eating, from bacon-wrapped dates to stuffed mushrooms to spicy fried pickles, along with five salad and six flatbread offerings. Another option is the steak of the week, which adds a high-end dining element to the equation. “Every week we source in a cut of meat that’s unique to our market that’s in a very limited quantity,” Zamora says. “One week, if you’re that steak connoisseur, you can get that Wagyu ribeye…and then the next week, you could come in and get a really cool filet from a different part of the country.” The cuisine is only part of the attraction. Zamora wants to provide an atmosphere that will serve to enhance the downtown scene. Damacios often hires

DJs and hosts specially-themed parties — recent brunch events paid homage to Britney Spears and The Notorious B.I.G., for example. “The one thing I always tell people is it’s not your regular Chili’s or Applebees. You’ve got music in the far distance and you’ve got bright lights and stuff everywhere,” he says. “It’s an intimate setting that has energy. Our music is gonna be a little louder. You’re gonna have to speak up a little bit to talk over it. It’s gonna be a little bit (more fun), a little bit faster paced.” —TRISTEN CRITCHFIELD

DAMACIOS BAR & TAPAS 722 Central Ave. SW (505) 595-7383 damacios.com

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PHOTOS BY DON JAMES/ATM

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hen the opportunity to take over the downtown location formerly occupied by Italian restaurant Villa da Capo presented itself in mid-2021, Gerald Zamora didn’t waste any time. He and his wife, Bianca Johnston, both of whom are lifers in the restaurant business, had long coveted the property thanks to its ample patio space and upper-level terrace. By mid-September, Damacios Bar & Tapas, which is coowned by Zamora and Johnston, was offering outdoor service. “Those outdoor spaces are just amazing — they’re hidden gems,” Zamora says. With the new venture, Zamora is hoping to fuse Spanish tapas — and the culture that accompanies it — with New Mexican fare. “We didn’t necessarily want the traditional eating space or the traditional dinner space. We wanted something that


DISH

S

teve Gallegos was a part-owner of O’Hare’s Grille & Pub when the Irish-themed establishment opened in the Rio Rancho area in 1996. But his passion has always remained with New Mexican food. So, it only made sense that he would follow his heart, which led to the inception of Hot Tamales New Mexican Kitchen in 2003. Gallegos has since sold his stake in O’Hare’s and became sole owner of Hot Tamales approximately six years ago. “A lot of it has to do with what you love to do,” Gallegos says. “And I really like New Mexican food.” The chile is a source of pride for Gallegos. The green is a blend of autumn roast and hot diced green chile from two parts of the state, while the red chile production is especially unique because it excludes the skin of the chile. “Most places will blend it until it’s pulverized and the skin is pulverized. The skin is actually mixed in with everything else because they blend it so long,” Galleogs says. “…I feel like our red chile is superior to other places because we don’t use powders or powdered chile, we use pods. And we have that special method

Leftover masa led to the popular Hot Tamale Cakes at Hot Tamales in Rio Rancho.

where we leave the skin behind.” Then, of course, there are the tamales. The restaurant makes 75 dozen each Thursday, but that increases exponentially during the holidays, when up to 1,000 dozen can be sold leading up to Christmas Eve. Gallegos’ cooking background — he became an executive chef through the American Culinary Federation years ago and also learned on the job at the Marriott hotel chain — helped hone his creativity, which shines through with the Hot Tamale Cakes, which are available as breakfast, appetizers, and in salads. “Every time we make tamales, we al-

Craft tacos, like the Braised Oxtail, are the core of the menu at El Cotorro.

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rior to the opening of El Cotorro in 2016, Daniel Boardman needed to properly research the taqueria concept he thought might fit well at the space located on the southwest corner of Copper and Carlisle in Albuquerque’s Nob Hill area. So, he did what any self-respecting restaurant owner would do: He went on a taco-tasting expedition to Mexico. The venture was inspired by nationally-renowned chef Alex Stupak, who made his name as a pastry chef before pivoting to Mexican cuisine. “His whole take was fine dining tacos … how good can you make them?” says

Boardman, who also owns Tia B’s Waffleria and Tia Betty Blue’s. We were going to Mexico and just eating a ton of different tacos and mostly ones from the southern part of the country like the Yucatan.” The menu features 12 types of craft tacos ranging from the traditional (carne asada) to the exotic (braised oxtail) —“It’s got a certain richness, like a marbled meat, that’s distinctive,” Boardman says of the oxtail — and also includes several vegan and vegetarian offerings such as a chard potato guisado taco and a deepfried nopales (cactus pad) taco. All tacos are cooked-to-order in a sauté pan and come with tortillas made in-house from

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

ways have leftover masa because it’s hard to match the meat and masa exactly, especially when you make that much,” he says. “I started blending roasted chicken with green chile and corn in the masa and we were cooking these patties like pancakes. They kind of look like crab cakes, but you cook them on a flat top grill.” — TRISTEN CRITCHFIELD

HOT TAMALES 1520 Rio Rancho Blvd SE (505) 962-0123 hottamalesnmrestaurant.com

locally-sourced masa along with several options of homemade salsas. “We got so much pushback from the beginning because people would come in with a sense of what a taco is and say, ‘That should be $1 or that should be $2.’ That’s just not tenable, Boardman says. “We do a lamb leg barbacoa taco and we spend eight hours preparing the meat and smoking it ourselves. Or the oxtail. We braise that and then we roast it and the whole process is six to eight hours.” After lunch or dinner, customers can enjoy homemade ice cream inspired by the heladerias in Mexico City. The menu features several signature flavors — Azteca, tres leches, Mexican vanilla, horchata, orange — as well as seasonal selections. “I felt like ice cream or gelato in this case is kind of a blank palate and you could do a regional version of it anywhere,” Boardman says. —TRISTEN CRITCHFIELD

EL COTORRO 111 Carlisle Blvd NE 505-503-6202 elcotorroabq.com

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WHAT’S HAPPENING IN ABQ’S BEER, WINE, AND SPIRITS SCENE

INTO THE GREAT OUTDOORS

Patio List

TABLE FOR TWO ON THE PATIO, PLEASE

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PHOTOS BY ATM STAFF

You often hear ABQ visitors rave about our weather. And yes, we have what one might call ‘perfect patio weather’ for most of the year. (If you think every city has it, try eating a burger on a patio in Phoenix, where either you’ll bake in the heat or have to move to find spots where the misting system hits you just right.) And so, patios have long been a divine part of our bars and restaurants, and even moreso since Covid-19. Here’s a glimpse at a few patios that are either new, expanded or just outright cool. —CB

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sour fresh bubbly

smooth

The Drunken Cowgirl, $13 Bourbon & Boots 325 Central Ave. NW 505-717-2056 bandbabq.com

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PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

Sweet, tart, pink, delicious, bubbly. Nope, not champagne. We’re talking about The Drunken Cowgirl, a craft cocktail made by the mixology team at Bourbon & Boots. Freshness is the key, with muddled cucumber and plump raspberries as the base. “I wanted to create something that women can enjoy,” says bartender Krystal Barrera. She explained that she enjoys making whiskey sours and loves agave syrup in a margarita. While in Mexico, she had a cucumber margarita, so all of those factors inspired the drink, which also has agave syrup, fresh lemon, and Bulleit Rye topped off with soda water. And of course, there’s a story behind the name of the cocktail. “I made the drink for my friend one night and she was like, ‘What is this, the Drunken Cowgirl?’” says Barrera, laughing. The Bulleit Rye gives the cocktail a nice balance from the sweeter syrup and fruit, while the cucumber adds a refreshing, light taste. Lastly, all the flavors get a gentle touch of intensity from the carbonized soda water. —DLM

PHOTO BY REECE MARTINEZ/ATM

THE DRUNKEN COWGIRL



DISH

A

o

for Success

with Suzanne Alexander

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lbuquerque Pride was not unaffected by COVID-19. “After the pandemic we were really concerned that Pride was just going to end,” says Suzanne Alexander. “Most of my other seasoned board members were getting ready to retire in 2020 and I wasn’t ready to be president yet.” But the concern of losing the 45-year non-profit that advocates for the LGBTIQ community fueled Alexander’s fire—so she changed her mind. “I’m not going to let this close,” she says. “I decided I wanted to be president.” After two years of volunteering, and three years as board secretary, Alexander became the organization’s first female president in 2020. Albuerque Pride began in 1976, inviting members to network, explore the community, and give LGBTIQ individuals a safe space to express themselves. It emerged into a non-profit in 1997 and began extending its reach across the city through the help of community involvement, sponsors and donations. For Alexander, coming out later in life and family struggles prohibited her from being able to be involved in Pride for many years, she says. Serving as the first female president of the group, she offers a different perspective and wants to expand the organization, she says. “Albuquerque Pride has always been a little bit smaller. The same Expo venue and the same sponsors. Every year kind of struggling to get new sponsors,” she says. “I really want to make it bigger.” Alongside Alexander, Bia Romero serves as vice president. It is the first time Albuquerque Pride has had a female duo for president and vice president. Alexander and Romero recently traveled to a

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Pride convention in Las Vegas, Nevada, where they were able to network with other states’ board members. The convention offered the opportunity for the Albuquerque board members to see where they had room for new growth. “My vice president, who is a teacher, is working on starting an Albuquerque Pride Magazine,” says Alexander. “We have a lot of plans, because we’re thinking about it as women. For years Pride was all about just men, that’s who went to all the events. We’re really trying to get the women back in,” she says. The organizations goal is always to continue to expand. Members are consistently trying to get other community members involved and share their knowledge through the city. Another constant focus of the organization is the youth of Albuquerque, ensuring they know they have a place to go where they can express themselves and feel welcomed. “More than unity, it’s solidarity,” says Alexander. The group its annual Pride Fest this past June, with events for all different age groups, the theme being From Silence to Solidarity. After a few slow years, the board is hoping to be able to host events that can raise participation and community involvement. Being raised in New Mexico, Alexander wanted to share with us what she would call “a true New Mexican dish”, Albondigas Soup and Meatballs. It’s a recipe she remembers making with her mom

and other family members. “I remember chopping up the vegetables with her, helping make the meatballs. I would see the little rice poking out, so I called them porcupine meatballs,” Alexander said with a laugh. The dish reminds Alexander of her mom and her childhood, always cooking a multitude of recipes that had been passed down from generations before. “I remember cooking with her, and it just brings all of these memories back. This recipe is just really warm and wonderful.” For more information about upcoming events, donations, or partnerships, go to abqpride.com. —ASHLEE OLSEN

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PHOTOS BY DON JAMES/ATM

ABQ Pride President


DISH

Albondigas Soup and Meatballs Ingredients Meatballs: 1 lb lean ground beef 1 egg - beaten 2 minced garlic cloves 2 tablespoons milk ½ cup long-grain rice uncooked ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper

Albondingas Soup: 6 cups chicken broth ½ cup white onion - chopped 3 stalks of celery - chopped 1 carrot - chopped 1 large zucchini - sliced 16oz diced tomatoes 1 teaspoon oregano *Garnish Chopped cilantro (optional) Raw jalapeno slices (optional) Lime wedges (optional) Salt and pepper to taste

AUGUST 2022 2022 || ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

Directions Add all meatball ingredients to a bowl and combine thoroughly. Roll the mixture tightly in hands to ensure the meatballs do not fall apart in the soup. The recipe should make approximately 20 meatballs. Set meatballs aside and saute onion, celery, carrots and diced tomatoes in a stock pot with 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil. Once the vegetables are sauteed, add chicken broth and seasonings to the pot. Bring to a slight boil and add the meatballs. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes. After 10 minutes, add sliced zucchini and simmer for another 10 minutes. Season to taste. Plate and serve with optional garnishes. *Rice can be added to the soup if desired.

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BITES

OUR EATS ALUMNI, CONDENSED INTO PERFECTLY SIZED SNACKS TO TAKE WITH YOU ON THE GO

POLICY:

$

AL’S BIG DIPPER

$

5555 Montgomery Blvd. NE, 888-2921 Owner Mohamad Abdel Jalil and his sons run this all-in-one operation—a small grocery store and Middle East restaurant—seven days a week. This family team makes fresh pita bread every day and serves platefuls of their delicious hummus. It’s a great spot for lunch on-the-go.

“Bites” is a guide to Albuquerque-area eating establishments compiled by Albuquerque The Magazine’s editorial staff. These restaurants have been featured previously in the “Eats” department of the magazine. Restaurants may or may not accept reservations or major credit cards,

501 Copper Ave. NW 314-1118, alsbigdipper.com From the beginning, Al’s Big Dipper has been a family affair. Every sandwich is named after a family member, and the owners test every soup they make. Try the 505 Lunch Deal—a cup of soup, a grilled cheese sandwich and a homemade cookie for only $5.05.

so call before visiting.

CORRECTIONS: Please send corrections and suggestions to bites@abqthemag.com.

FIVE STAR BURGERS

ALQUDS MEDITERRANEAN GRILL & GROCERY

$

5901 Wyoming Blvd. NE 821-1909, 5starburgers.com From bison, salmon, turkey and crab to lamb, chicken and Black Angus beef, burger addicts will love Five Star’s 100 percent natural meat. Handformed patties or vegetarian options paired with wine from St. Clair Winery or beer from Marble Brewery are a match made in heaven.

ALDO’S NEW YORK STYLE PIZZERIA

$

ALICEA’S NY BAGELS & SUBS

$

1690 Pat D’Arco Hwy. Unit E plus 1 other metro location 892-2026, aldosalbuquerque.com With handmade lasagna and pizza dough, among other items, Aldo’s New York Style Pizzeria shares family recipes with its customers. From the buttermilk ranch dressing to the Eggplant and Chicken Parmigianas, homemade cooking is not too far away.

1405 Central Ave. NE 247-1421, 66diner.com This blast from the past specializes in burgers, chicken fried steak, liver and onions, and blue-plate specials, including the Pile Up: a mound of pan-fried potatoes, chopped bacon, green chile, two eggs, cheddar cheese, and red or green chile sauce on top.

1009 Golf Course Rd. SE, Ste 103, 896-4555 This East Coast–style deli on ABQ’s Westside is serving up 20 different sandwiches to Rio Rancho’s hungriest diners, using fresh-baked New York–style bagels and meats prepared in house for the likes of its Philly Steak and Cheese or the Cuban. Come hungry, because Alicea’s portions are not for the faint of heart. Can’t get out? Delivery options in Rio Rancho and parts of ABQ are also available when that hunger pang strikes.

ABC CAKE SHOP

AMADEO’S PIZZA AND SUBS

66 DINER

$$

$$

$

1830 San Pedro Dr. NE 255-5080, abccakeshop.com Specializing in custom cakes and baked goods for all occasions, this bakery focuses on freshness and flavor. Everything is made from scratch, including the cupcakes, cookies, pies, Danishes, pastries, and other desserts.

585 Osuna Rd. NE plus 2 other metro locations 344-5555, amadeospizza.com This family-run pizza place believes that there truly are a million different ways to make a pizza. Using fresh, high-quality ingredients, they specialize in pizzas, subs, pasta, and fresh salads.

THE ACRE

AMERASIA-SUMO SUSHI

$$

4410 Wyoming Blvd. NE 299-6973, theacrerestaurant.com The Acre Restaurant specializes in comfort vegetarian cuisine with a goal to challenge meateaters and question what vegetarian food is, all while creating healthy, sustainable dishes.

ABUELITA’S NEW MEXICAN KITCHEN $

6083 Isleta Blvd. SW, 877-5700 Kathy Martinez’s brother, Chris Romero, opened Abuelita’s New Mexican Kitchen in Bernalillo 26 years ago. Since then, nothing has changed. The Huevos Rancheros are a best seller, as is the Kitchen’s signature dish, the Tacopilla.

AJIACO COLOMBIAN BISTRO

$$

3216 Silver Ave. SE 266-2305, ajiacobistro.com Inside the intimate space, you’ll find combination plates, arroz con pollo, arepas, plantains, and of course, a great cup of Colombian coffee. The dishes at Ajiaco combine indigenous Colombian, Spanish, African, and Arab flavors for a truly thrilling experience.

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$

800 3rd St. NW 246-1615, amerasia-sumosushi.net Dim sum—which means “small piece of your heart” in Chinese—takes on a bigger meaning at AmerAsia, where everything is made from scratch daily. Try the fried beef and garlic dumplings, pork and ginger potstickers, or scallion pancakes.

AMORE NEAPOLITAN PIZZERIA

$$

3600 Cutler Ave. NE #3 plus 1 other metro location 554-1967, amoreabq.com After relocating to Albuquerque from Naples, Italy, Gabriel and Kimberly Amador missed Neapolitan pizza. The husband and wife team, certified by the Association of Neapolitan Pizzaiuoli (APN), opened Amore, bringing a slice of Italy to Albuquerque. A Neapolitan brick oven fires delicious pizzas, such as the Margherita and the Zia, for 60 to 90 seconds at 905 degrees Fahrenheit. Local beer and wine compliment the pies perfectly.

ANATOLIA TURKISH MEDITERRANEAN GRILL

$

2132 Central Ave. SE, Ste C, 242-6718 The specialty is the Doner Kebab, seasoned meat in the shape of an inverted cone, slow-cooked to perfection rotisserie style, and always freshly prepared. Whether you choose the Adana Spicy Ground Lamb or the ‘Burque Kebab, try the “baklove-ah” for dessert.

AN HY QUAN VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT

$$

1450 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE, 332-8565 This vegetarian Vietnamese spot is also veganfriendly. Pho fans don’t fret; Thai and wonton soup will satisfy any meat eater.

ANNAPURNA’S WORLD VEGETARIAN CAFÉ

$

ANNIE’S SOUP KITCHEN

$

5200 Eubank NE, Ste E7, plus 2 other metro locations, 275-2424, chaishoppe.com Annapurna offers some of the most enlightened, health-conscious vegetarian and vegan plates in the city, with plenty of options for people suffering from food allergies or Celiac disease. And the menu is world-class, with options from virtually every continent. 3107 Eubank Blvd. NE 296-8601, anniessoupkitchen.com With four homemade soups made fresh every day, and home-style favorites such as avocado and bacon omelets and piles of potatoes topped with melted cheese, chile and eggs, Annie’s specializes in comfort.

ANTIQUITY RESTAURANT

$$$$

112 Romero St. NW 247-3545, antiquityrestaurant.com Antiquity Restaurant is located just off historic Old Town Plaza. Antiquity holds the distinction of being the only restaurant in Albuquerque to serve the Henry IV—a bacon-wrapped filet mignon placed on a bed of artichoke leaves, topped with an artichoke heart and covered with béarnaise sauce.

ARTICHOKE CAFÉ

$$$

424 Central Ave. SE 243-0200, artichokecafe.com This EDo fine-dining spot boasts a Wine Spectator “Award of Excellence,” and for good reason. A veteran of the Duke City’s fine dining scene, Artichoke Café remains the best bet for a great evening out. Innovative dishes and European aperitifs served by staff that takes ownership of the experience, the location is also an ideal launchpad for downtown adventures.

ASIAN NOODLE BAR

$$

318 Central Ave. SW 224-9119, asiannoodlebar.com Every kind of noodle awaits at this Downtown eatery, from spicy sesame udon noodles to chicken pho with cilantro, jalapeños, and lime. Slurping has never been so tasty.

ASIAN PEAR

$

8101 San Pedro Dr. NE, Ste D 766-9405, asianpearabq.com Specializing in healthy, authentic, Korean-style eats, this shop pleases the palate with delicious takes on BBQ chicken, kimchi pancakes, and flavorful bowls.

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2022


BITES

A RACK OF TENDER GOODNESS

El Pinto Restaurant 10500 4th Street NW (505) 898-1771

AZUMA SUSHI & TEPPAN

Red Chile Ribs, Half Rack - $29.99 Full Rack - $37.99

$$

4701 San Mateo Blvd. NE plus 1 other metro location 880-9800 azuma-sushi-teppan-abq.com From flame-flipped teppan grill items to a substantial sushi selection, the menus at Azuma Sushi & Teppan have something for everyone. The green chile-infused New Mexico Roll and Filet Mignon Steak please palates daily and are perfect when washed down with an imported Japanese sake, soda, or beer.

B2B BISTRONOMY

$

3118 Central Ave. SE 262-2222, bistronomyb2b.com Highlighting all-local ingredients (including New Mexico beef and Hatch green chile), B2B serves up a wide variety of tasty burgers—including plenty of veggie options.

BACKSTREET GRILL

$$

1919 Old Town Rd. NW 842-5434, backstreetgrillot.com/home Originally a test outlet for local palates in a tourist mecca (Old Town), word spread fast about the Baja-inspired tacos and creative New Mexicanpeppered dishes (check out the gumbo). This locale is expansive, great for families, and the patio hosts music and dancing on weekends.

BARELAS COFFEE HOUSE

PHOTO BY T. CHERRY/ATM

Since 1962, El Pinto has been feeding hungry New Mexicans and tourists classic New Mexican chile dishes. Though their menu is expansive, El Pinto is seriously famous for one of the restaurant’s OG recipes—Red Chile Ribs. Over the years, El Pinto has captured the national media’s attention and put New Mexico on the culinary map for foodies seeking extraordinarily unique dishes. The Food Network named this dish #3 Ribs in America and it remains a top-selling menu item. “These are not BBQ ribs—they feature the traditional Hatch red chile that we process in-house which completely flavors the pork in a New Mexican way. Our signature ribs are marinated and then slow baked for more than eight hours so the meat falls of the bone. These are one-of-a-kind ribs and there is nothing else like them anywhere in the world. We sell more ribs than anyone in the southwest and they are finger lickin’ good,” says El Pinto’s owner John Thomas. Order a full rack ($37.99) for the table, which will feed 3-4 people, or a half-rack ($29.99) which is enough for 1-2 people and savor one of the dishes that continues to bring national acclaim to New Mexico. — HEATHER HUNTER

$

1502 4th St. SW, 843-7577 This legendary neighborhood restaurant serves New Mexican dishes from the Gonzales family cookbook: menudo, posole, chicharrone burritos, and huevos rancheros -- all smothered with its famous red or green chile.

BASIL LEAF VIETNAMESE RESTAURANT

$$

BEN MICHAEL’S RESTAURANT

$$

1225 Eubank Blvd. NE 323-2594, basilleaf.us Sure, Albuquerque offers a variety of Vietnamese eateries, but Basil Leaf elevates the everyday with healthy and fragrant versions of traditional noodle and soup selections. They’ll even modify for any dietary desire. Celiacs and vegans, rejoice! 2404 Pueblo Bonito Ct. NW, 267-6827 The food at Ben Michael’s is fresh, preservative-free and takes its roots from the owner’s family’s New Mexican recipes. Try the salmon or the steak served with a side of calabacitas, papas, and sautéed mushrooms.

BENNY’S MEXICAN KITCHEN

$

1675 Bosque Farms Blvd. 869-2210 Since 1972, Benny’s has obliged countless stomachs with delicious New Mexican treats, which include red-chile smothered enchiladas and deep-fried burritos. Don’t let the Benny Burger—a doublemeat, double-cheese beauty—intimidate you. And, don’t forget to save room for that vanilla ice-cream shake.

BLACK BIRD SALOON

$

28 Main St., Cerillos, 438-1821, blackbirdsaloon.com Black Bird Saloon is not just a popular Northern New Mexico eatery (located in Cerillos, NM), it’s also a time warp back through the building’s long and varied history. Items like the Miner’s Hand Warmer Breakfast Burrito or the Tumbleweed Salad stick out like a turquoise on a tourist.

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

BLACK MESA COFFEE COMPANY

$

Albuquerque International Sunport 220 Sunport Blvd. SE, 842-4305 With two Sunport locations, flight delays are easier when you’re close to Black Mesa. The house coffee and vanilla latte are sure to perk you up pre-flight. The made-to-order turkey sandwich will fill you up far more reliably than the bag of pretzels you’ll get on the plane. Baked goods, including the popular banana bread, are made in-house daily. Five menu items, including brownies and cookies, are glutenfree.

BLADES’ BISTRO

$$$

221 NM Hwy. 165, Ste L, Placitas 771-0695, bladesbistro.com Owner and chef Kevin Bladergroen’s restaurant offers a culinary journey from his 30-plus years of experience in restaurants across the country and Europe, serving up steak and seafood with a twist.

BLAKE’S LOTABURGER

$

3806 Montgomery Blvd. NE plus 30 other metro locations 883-7615, lotaburger.com Blake’s became an Albuquerque establishment more than 30 years ago, and almost immediately garnered kudos for its out-of-this-world green chile cheeseburgers (the restaurant has since scored spots on National Geographic’s “top hamburgers in the nation” list and Albuquerque The Magazine’s Best of the City list). Everything is made from scratch as soon as it’s ordered—and not a second before.

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BITES BOCADILLOS

$

BOSQUE BREWING CO.

$

200 Lomas Blvd. NW, Suite 110 243-3995, bocadillos505.com Slow-roasted meats are the highlight of the Food Network “Chopped” winner, Marie Yniguez. Open for breakfast, lunch, or dinner on Wednesdays– Saturdays, pop in for a burrito or sandwich filled to the brim with pork, chicken, turkey or corned beef. 106 Girard Blvd. SE, B, plus 1 other location 508-5967, bosquebrewing.com Another favorite on the ever-growing ABQ brewery scene, Bosque Brewing Co. is the product of three NMSU grads’ love for brew. With 10-12 of Bosque’s own sudsy creations on tap every day, the brewery is teeming with options to pair with seasoned fries, daily specials, or an array of other appetizers, soups, salads, and sandwiches.

BUDAI GOURMET CHINESE

$$

6300 San Mateo Blvd. NE, Suite H-1 797-7898, budaigourmet.com The menu features specialties from different regions of China and Taiwan, all painstakingly prepared by chef Hsia Fang. The Crispy Flounder Filet is sure to please diners from both the East and the West. The Mini Steamed Pork Buns shouldn’t be missed.

CAFE 6855

BURGER BOY

$

CAFÉ BELLA COFFEE

THE BURRITO LADY

$

CAFÉ CUBANO

2216 Central Ave. SE 262-2216, brickyardpizza.com Three very important pizza points rule supreme here: quantity, quality, and value. Enjoy handtossed, homemade pizza with fresh sauce in a spicand-span, laid-back atmosphere.

938 Eubank Blvd. NE, 271-2268 The Burrito Lady—otherwise known as Consuelo Flores—cooks every one of her huge burritos herself, made-to-order. That means you should be prepared to wait (the line here can often go out the door). It’s worth it—ask for your burrito smothered if you want to really heat things up.

BRIXENS

BURRITOS ALINSTANTE

$

CAFÉ LUSH

BRICKYARD PIZZA

$$

$$$

400 Central Ave. SW 242-2400, brixens.com A creative spin on American bar fare inspired by New Mexican culture, the restaurant serves 99 bottles of beer, literally on the wall, and a range of food items. Brixens has many unique qualities, but a couple notable qualities include its all-day happy hour on Sundays and 3-6 p.m. daily.

150

12023 New Mexico 14, 281-3949 burgerboynm.com Everything in this tried-and-true staple is made from scratch: enchiladas, breakfast burritos, tacos and burgers (of course!). Fans are especially enamored with the green chile cheeseburger.

2101 Broadway Blvd. SE plus 5 other metro locations 242-0966, burritosalinstante.com A paradise for anyone who loves wrapping tasty things (chicharrones, carne adovada, bacon, cheese, potatoes—you get the picture) up inside of locally made tortillas, this operation maintains a half dozen storefronts between Belen and Albuquerque.

$$

6855 4th St. NW, 890-9150 cafe6855.com A sister restaurant to Vernon’s Speakeasy, Café 6855 has gourmet dishes, expertly prepared and served in an elegant atmosphere. The menu is populated with gourmet sandwiches, salads, and cafe specialties that redeploy Vernon’s ingredients to thrilling effect.

$

2115 Golf Course Rd. SE 306-6974, cafebellacoffee.com With made-to-order panini and tasty salads filled with the freshest seasonal ingredients, this restaurant’s farm-to-table concept is a smart—and delicious—one.

$$

At Laru Ni Hati Salon 3413 Central Ave. NE 255-1575, larunihati.com Who would guess that an upscale hair salon such as Laru Ni Hati would also be home to delicious Cuban food—platanos, Cuban sandwiches, dirty rice, and even espresso and hand-rolled cigars?

$

700 Tijeras Ave. NW 508-0164, cafelushabq.com Located on a quiet neighborhood corner, this café is perfect for a nice brunch or lunch and your wallet will not be hurt after your visit. The menu is glutenconscious, vegetarian-friendly and has some of the best gluten-free red chile in town.

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2022


LA BAREN RESTAURANT

$

CESAR’S MEXICAN & GREEK

$

CHOCGLITZ & CREAM

$

CAKE FETISH

$

CHEBA HUT

$

CHRISTY MAE’S RESTAURANT

$

230 Louisiana Blvd. SE, Ste A 232-6764, labarenrestaurant.com The pho and spring rolls have a die-hard following of Kirtland Airforce Base employees. Located across the parking lot from Talin Market, experience an extensive menu of traditional Vietnamese cuisine inside this dine-in and takeout eatery. 2665 Louisiana Blvd. NE 883-0670, cakefetish.com Cake Fetish specializes in baker’s cups filled with heaven, such as the Sleepless in Albuquerque (chocolate cake with mocha French buttercream frosting) and the Inside-Out German Chocolate Cake (coconut and pecans and crowned with chocolate French buttercream).

CAMPO AT LOS POBLANOS

$$$

4803 Rio Grande Blvd. NW 344-9297, lospoblanos.com Beautifully situated in the heart of Los Ranchos, Campo is the newly renovated and reimagined fine dining establishment at Los Poblanos. A top-of-theline menu mixes with fresh ingredients from the Los Poblanos Farm and a quiet, rustic atmosphere to make for one of the city’s best dining experiences.

CANVAS ARTISTRY

$$

CASA DE BENAVIDEZ

$$

CASA TACO

$$

3120 Central Ave. SE 639-5214, canvas-artistry.com Specializing in international street food with a local twist, expect seasonally rotating artsy fare made with local produce, daily and weekly specials, and art to boot. A great late-night spot with live spinning DJs featuring different genres each night.

5300 Lomas Blvd. NE 256-8017, cesarsmexicanandgreek.com Both the drive-thru and the dining room at Cesar’s are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. On the Mexican menu, try the No. 15, a chile rellenos plate. Popular Greek items include the No. 64 Gyros sandwich and the No. 78 Chicken pita sandwich. 115 Harvard Dr. SE plus 1 other metro location 232-2432, chebahut.com Located next to UNM, Cheba Hut serves up toasted subs made from quality ingredients. Try sandwiches loaded with everything from guacamole, olives, mushrooms, cheeses, meats and much more.

CHEESE AND COFFEE

$$

2679 Louisiana Blvd. NE plus 1 other metro location 883-1226, cheeseandcoffee.com There’s more than just cheese and coffee here— think homemade soups, sandwiches, salads and specials. At lunch, the line often goes out the door, so it’s worth getting there early.

CHEZ AXEL

$$$

6209 Montgomery Blvd. NE 881-8104, chezaxelrestaurant.com At Chez Axel, classical music is played at dinner Tuesday through Saturday, and the food has a decidedly French twist: cassoulet, trout amandine, chocolate mousse, and authentic French onion soup. Reservations are recommended.

10660 Unser Blvd. NW 898-4589, chocglitzandcream.com Certified fair-trade chocolate and a chocolatier with 45 years of experience means you’ll find some of the best sweet-tooth satisfying offerings (including ice cream flavors such as raspberry red chile and Mexican coffee). 1400 San Pedro Dr. NE 255-4740, christymaes.com “Hearty” and “homestyle” are the key words here, a hands-down favorite of early-dinner lovers. Oldfashioned staples are the standards, so look for chicken salad, potpies, country-fried steak with homemade mashed potatoes, and beef stew.

CHURCH STREET CAFÉ

$$

2111 Church St. NW 247-8522, churchstreetcafe.com Calling the oldest residence in Albuquerque its home, this café serves up favorites ranging from natillas to margaritas. They also sell their own bottled salsa and cookbooks with recipes from the restaurant.

CINNAMON SUGAR & SPICE CAFÉ

$

5809 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE plus 1 other metro location 492-2119, cinnamoncafeabq.com Featuring breakfast and lunch options, endless baked goodies, friendly staff and regular cooking classes, this place puts the “everything nice” in the well-worn phrase.

8032 4th St. NW, 898-3311 casadebenavidez.com One of the original New Mexican eateries in the North Valley, this expansive property boasts a lush patio, fabled margaritas and authentic eats, including a trademark on the sopaipilla burger. 5801 Academy Rd. NE plus 1 other metro location 821-8226, casa-taco.com Both Casa Taco locations offer a window into owner James Pecherski’s signature take on the U.S. Southwest—a strange place where you could picture a classic John Wayne character lingering over a plate of Jamaican jerk chicken and Yucatan pork tacos. Casa Taco defies expectations.

CECILIA’S CAFÉ

$

CENTRAL GRILL & COFFEE HOUSE

$

230 6th St. SW, 243-7070 Recognized on the Food Network’s “Diners, DriveIns & Dives,” and ranked No. 45 on the Travel Channel’s “101 Tastiest Places to Chow Down,” Cecilia’s Café offers tasty New Mexican treats, such as their Fireman’s Burrito or homemade chicharrones in a cozy atmosphere. 2056 Central Ave. SW 554-1424, centralgrillandcoffeehouse.com This local favorite on Route 66, adjacent to Old Town, offers a bevy of breakfast and lunch options that will comfort your belly and your wallet. Here, you’ll find traditional New Mexican favorites, serious sammies, and solid caffeine with a staff famous for their classic Southwestern hospitality.

CERVANTES NEW MEXICAN RESTAURANT

$$

5801 Gibson Blvd. SE 262-2253, cervantesabq.com Old-world style meets traditional New Mexican fare at this family-owned restaurant. Go for the madefrom-scratch chile rellenos, tamales, and carne adovada.

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

151


BITES

SOUTHWEST COMFORT FOOD

El Patron North Wyoming 8100 Wyoming Blvd NE (505) 797-3311

COCINA AZUL

Green Chile Chicken Lasagna, $15.95

$

4243 Montgomery Blvd. NE plus 2 other metro locations 831-2600, cocinaazul.com The newest location of the Old Town favorite serves up the same tried and true home-cooked recipes you’ve come to love. Don’t miss location specific specials and local brews amid New Mexican staples.

CORRALES BISTRO BREWERY

$

4908 Corrales Rd. NW 897-1036 cbbistro.com Brews from all over the region make this Corrales bistro a must-visit for the affordable fare, killer atmosphere, and music seven days a week.

THE COUNTY LINE BBQ

$$

230 Louisiana Blvd. SE, Ste C, 232-0085 Wrap your hands around one of Coda Bakery’s unique, Vietnamese-inspired sandwiches. Beyond its popular lineup of sammies, Coda Bakery also puts a distinctive twist on Vietnamese street food, using from-scratch recipes, including the bread, its deli meats, and its desserts.

9600 Tramway Blvd. NE 856-7477 countyline.com It doesn’t take long for the barbecue to arrive at your dinner table, whether it’s wood-burning oven cooked and slow-roasted brisket, ribs, or sausage. Throw in the Rib King Platter, green-chile stuffed pork loin, live music, and two stepping, and at The County Line, everybody wins.

CONCHITA’S CAFÉ

CRACKIN’ CRAB

CODA BAKERY

$

$

400 Gold Ave. SW, Ste 119 339-6774, conchitascafe.com What began as the food truck, Conchita’s Creations became a downtown café with breakfast, sandwiches, and salads. New Mexican favorites shine here, just like abuela made them—including tacos, Frito pie, and burritos.

CORN MAIDEN

$$$

1300 Tuyuna Trail, 771-6060 tamaya.hyatt.com For a special dinner or celebration, look no further. Boasting a view of the Sandia Mountains, this restaurant will leave you breathless as you enjoy three-course meals with sweet potato Granny Smith apple soup, lavender salted shrimp or the classic crème brulee.

152

PHOTO BY T. CHERRY/ATM

When Executive Chef Jose Maldonado developed the menu to open the original El Patron location on Montgomery more than 10 years ago, he wanted to create a dish that everyone would love. Because Italian food is so popular, he gave lasagna a New Mexico spin by adding green chile. The Green Chile Chicken Lasagna ($15.95) continues to be one of the restaurant’s top dishes at both locations. Chef Jose says, “People love pizza and lasagna, so I wanted to come up with something New Mexican.” This special lasagna is layered with Serrano cream, lasagna noodles, green chile, poached chicken, sautéed mushrooms and a blend of Monterey Jack and cheddar cheeses. The layers are repeated five times and topped with ricotta cheese for a bountiful serving. He continues, “So I added green chile and Serrano cream instead of marinara as a little twist. It’s very simple. For the Serrano cream, I use heavy cream blended with fire roasted Serrano peppers. And we poach the chicken breasts and sauté the mushrooms to keep it healthy. It’s wonderful and delicious,” Jose says of the Green Chile Chicken Lasagna. “Cooking is what I love to do and I always come up with new ideas that people will like and give it a southwestern, New Mexican twist,” he says. — HEATHER HUNTER

$$

2100 Louisiana Blvd. NE plus 2 other metro locations 433-4611, crackincrababq.com Their headline seafood boils are super customizable, allowing you to choose from a trio of house combinations or mix and match your own selection of crab, lobster, mussels, scallops, clams, or shrimp by the pound.

CRAVIN’ COOKIES AND MORE

$

10420 4th St. NW 298-2597 cravincookiesandmore.com Serving up specialty cookies, muffins, breads, pies, and pretty much any dessert you can dream of, Cravin’ Cookies and More offers dine-in and to go orders to satisfy any sweet tooth, with coffee and hot tea to match.

THE CROWN ROOM

$$$$

145 Louisiana Blvd. NE 767-7171 abqdowns.com/crown-room Perhaps Albuquerque’s best-kept fine dining secret, this gem is tucked away in the newly remodeled Downs Casino. With an incredible selection of liquors and wines, gourmet dishes, tableside Bananas Foster, and Dom Pérignon palate cleansers, this special occasion hideout is hard to beat, anywhere in the 505.

CURRY LEAF

$

THE DAILY GRIND

$

DELICIAS CAFÉ

$

6910-C Montgomery Blvd. NE 881-3663, curryleafrestaurant.us Curry Leaf is the only restaurant in New Mexico to offer both North and South India cuisine. This means that, while you can get familiar favorites like tandoori chicken, you can also explore the world of chicken chettinad and dosas—a type of crepe made with fermented lentil and rice flour, filled with stuffing like potato, spiced vegetables, or ground lamb. 4360a Cutler Ave. NE 883-8310, dailygrindabq.net This family-friendly restaurant serves breakfast and lunch, including huevos rancheros and a huge assortment of baked goods. On Friday and Saturday, look for spontaneous specials, such as stuffed French toast or steak and eggs. 6001 San Mateo Blvd. NE, 830-6561 Named after the city in Chihuahua, Mexico, Delicias delivers traditional fare of the region, like caldo de res (beef stew), gorditas, carnitas, flautas, and horchata.

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2022


BITES DG’S DELI

$

1418 Dr Martin Luther King Jr Ave. NE 247-3354, dgsdeli.com With 31 cold sandwich options and a wide variety of grilled hot sandwiches—ranging in size from mini to jumbo—there’s something for everyone here. Try the Green Chile Philly or the Lobo Club.

D.H. LESCOMBES WINERY & BISTRO $$

901 Rio Grande Blvd. NW 243-9916, lescombeswinery.com With generations of experience in winemaking coursing through this North Valley staple’s doors, D.H. Lescombes Winery & Bistro specializes in pairing wine with its expertly crafted and entirely house-made menu, with a local twist. Themed events and giving back to its community are big parts of this eatery’s success, not to mention popular dishes such as its Chicken Picado, Mac and Cheese Bites, and Ghirardelli Port Brownie.

DION’S

$

6308 Fourth St. NW plus 14 other metro locations 345-4900, dionspizza.com Launched in 1978, Dion’s aims to keep your wallet and tummy full with build-your-own pizzas, gourmet pizzas, slices, salads, and subs. The ranch and Greek dressings are homemade from secret recipes, and everything on the menu is tried and true.

DOG HOUSE DRIVE IN

$

1216 Central Ave. SW, 243-1019 An ABQ landmark since the 1940s, the eat-inyour-car Dog House serves grilled footlongs and halflongs topped with red chile, cheese, onions, and more. Enjoy your dog with a side of chili-cheese fries and a thick shake.

DONUT MART

$

4501 Montgomery Blvd. NE plus 1 other metro location 292-6278, donutmartusa.com Multiple locations sprinkled around town means a donut lover can always get a sweet fix. Find apple strudels, piñon coffee, green chile bialys, croissants, muffins, and even a Peanut Butter and Jelly donut.

DOWN N DIRTY SEAFOOD BOIL

$$

6100 4th St. NW, 345-0595 Southern transplants who make their way to ABQ have a new spot for traditional seafood boil. From dry rub to a spicy, buttery fusion sauce, your tastebuds will dance with delight when you feast on this eatery’s collection of crawfish, rock shrimp, crab legs, and more.

DUGGAN’S

$

227 Lead Ave. SE 312-7257, dugganscoffeeshop.com This breakfast and lunch spot serves up newsthemed entrees like the Journalist Salad and Fact Checker Green Chile Chicken Soup in an intimate setting. Cups are filled with locally roasted Trifecta coffee.

DURAN’S CENTRAL PHARMACY

$$

1815 Central Ave. NW 247-4141, duransrx.com Where in the city can you get amazing huevos, kitschy printed dish towels, an emergency rubber chicken in a box, and a flu shot? There is only one answer, Duran’s Central Pharmacy.

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

EL BRUNO’S RESTAURANTE Y CANTINA

$$

8806 4th St. NW, 897-0444, elbrunos.com El Bruno’s got its start in Cuba, NM, in 1975. At the Albuquerque location, the tried-and-true family recipes are still the focus of the menu. The Ceviche, Pollo Adovo, and the Deep Fried Spinach are a few items guests can look forward to.

EL CAMINO DINING ROOM

$

EL COTORRO

$

EL PATIO DE ALBUQUERQUE

$

6800 4th St. NW, 344-0448 Those with a bottomless appetite might meet their match with any of El Camino’s breakfast burrito options. These plate-sized behemoths are filled with eggs, hashbrowns or home-fries, and your choice of meat, then smothered in red or green chile. 111 Carlisle Blvd. NE 503-6202, elcotorroabq.com Made to order gourmet tacos are on full display among classic Mexican street food like elotes and ceviche. A full salsa bar lets you spice up your meat, fish, vegetarian, or vegan tacos. Taco Tuesdays feature $2 tacos and bottled Mexican beers. 142 Harvard Dr. SE plus 1 other metro location 268-4245, elpatioabq.com A UNM favorite since 1977, this family-owned restaurant uses local ingredients and makes everything fresh daily in small batches. The No. 10 Green Chicken Enchiladas have won rave reviews for years, as have the tasty salsa and pillow-soft sopaipillas.

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BITES EL PATRON

$$

10551 Montgomery Blvd. NE plus 1 other metro location 275-0223, elpatronabq.com A customer favorite, El Patron’s menu includes dishes such as mouthwatering tacos, enchiladas, chile rellenos, and housemade chips. Wash them down with a tasty margarita.

EL PINTO

$$$

10500 4th St. NW, 898-1771, elpinto.com Food and atmosphere go hand-in-hand at this Duke City staple, ensuring an unforgettable experience. Enjoy fresh salsa, enchiladas, burritos, carne adovada, and many more New Mexican dishes while sipping a margarita on one of the many beautiful patios. Reservations are recommended.

EL SABOR DE JUAREZ

$

3527 Gibson Blvd. SE, 265-3338 Its name means “the flavor of Juarez,” and since 1980, this restaurant has served just that. Try the family recipes for menudo and carne desebrada (shredded roast beef sautéed with jalapeño, tomato, and onions).

EL SARAPE

$$

3248 Isleta Blvd. SW, elsarapeabq.com Specializing in authentic food from all regions of Mexico, you can count on dishes such as nopalitos (cactus sautéed with onions, tomatoes, and garlic), fresh salsa, burritos, chile rellenos, and seafood specials with shrimp, oysters, calamari, and fish.

ELOY’S NEW MEXICAN RESTAURANT $

1508 Wyoming Blvd. NE, 293-6018 Opening 36 years ago, Eloy’s New Mexican Restaurant’s claim to fame is its consistent food and service, offering the same recipes that made it famous all those years ago. Try the No. 1 Eloy’s Deluxe Dinner, with a little bit of everything.

EMBERS STEAK & SEAFOOD

FANO BREAD COMPANY

ONE COMMUNITY... ONE FAMILY... THANK YOU ALBUQUERQUE!

$$$

11000 Broadway Blvd. SE 244-8288, isleta.com Whether you are dining inside or al fresco on the rooftop patio, Ember’s boasts some of Albuquerque’s most beautiful 180-degree views of the Bosque, making for the perfect setting to catch the sunset next to the warmth of the glowing fire pits.

$

4605 McLeod Rd, NE 884-5555, fanobread.com For more than 16 years, Fano has made the freshest bread in the city. Whether it’s the rustic loaf, the green chile cheese bread or raisin cinnamon bread, you’ll think you’re touring the streets of Italy with each bite.

FAN TANG

$$

3523 Central Ave. NE 266-3566, fan-tang.com With authentic family recipes that include coffee chicken (rubbed in Satellite coffee, then stir-fried with flavorful sauce) and creative additions like soul dumplings (made with tofu, kimchi, and cashew pesto), this spot is sure to satisfy.

FARINA ALTO PIZZERIA & WINE BAR $$

10721 Montgomery Blvd. NE 298-0035, farinaalto.com The Northeast Heights version of Farina offers the same urban atmosphere as the East Downtown (EDo) Farina, minus the elbow-to-elbow seating. Alto offers every pizza on the EDo menu, such as the Formaggio di Capra and the Carne, but includes unique dishes—Eggplant Parmesan Napoleon and Oven-Roasted Chicken Wings. Alto’s wine room is stocked with more than 300 bottles of wine.

FARINA PIZZERIA

$$

510 Central Ave. SE 243-0130, farinapizzeria.com Whether you like yours bianco or covered in carne, you’ll get a pie cooked to perfection at this relaxedbut-hip urban eatery.

wall to wall flatscreens bold burgers STONE BAKED pizzas ice cold beer at 33° 33° 4861 Pan American Freeway NE Albuquerque,, NM 87109 Albuquerque 505.. 344 505 344.. 7427 www.. bubbas33 www bubbas33.. com 154

FARM & TABLE

$$$

THE FARMACY

$$

8917 4th St. NW 503-7124, farmandtablenm.com This North Valley eatery’s ever-changing menu features seasonal produce, which often comes from the restaurant’s own farm. If the produce doesn’t come from the farm, it’s sourced from a slew of local vendors. Enjoy grass-and-alfalfa-fed steaks and produce-focused dishes that use local kale, chard, okra, chile, and tomatoes. 3718 Central Ave. SE, 227-0330 The Farmacy takes the idea of organic and local ingredients, and presents them in a way that tastes like comfort. The Farmacy provides a tasty menu of eight breakfast items, as well as eight sandwiches for lunch.

FIESTA’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT & CANTINA

$

4400 Carlisle Blvd. NE, 881-0478 Fiesta’s Restaurant & Cantina has been familyowned and operated since 1986, making it an Albuquerque go-to for quality New Mexican cuisine. With its family dining area, outdoor patio, lively bar and banquet room, Fiesta’s has something for everyone.

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FLIX BREWHOUSE

$$

GARCIA’S KITCHEN

FLYING STAR CAFÉ

$$

GARDUÑO’S OF MEXICO RESTAURANT AND CANTINA $$

3258 La Orilla Rd. NW, B-1 445-8500, flixbrewhouse.com Flix is a one-of-a-kind concept; a movie theater that serves full meals and an in-house brewed beer menu in its stadium-seating “dining rooms.” The dream is real, Albuquerque–you can catch the latest blockbuster in theaters while knocking back a pint and having dinner brought to you. 8001 Menaul Blvd. NE plus 5 other metro locations 293-6911, flyingstarcafe.com With handmade desserts to die for, artisan breads, and a menu filled with everything from eggs to enchiladas, Flying Star offers plenty of options for every meal (and snack time) of the day.

FORQUE KITCHEN AND BAR

$$

330 Tijeras Ave. NW 842-1234, albuquerque.hyatt.com Forque’s multi-level, tastefully decorated dining room features floor-to-ceiling windows and makes it easy to forget you’re dining at a Downtown hotel. The elegant presentation extends to the regional cuisine, which is prepared in the restaurant’s open kitchen by executive chef Eli White and his staff.

FORK & FIG

$$

6904 Menaul Blvd. NE, Ste C 881-5293, forkfig.com Upscale, but surprisingly down-home, Fork & Fig dishes offer up a streamlined menu of favorites, including burgers, sandwiches, and salads, with surprising artistry along the way. Sweet potato tots, anyone?

GIOVANNI’S PIZZERIA

$

GOLDEN CROWN PANADERIA

$

Garduño’s consistently earns enthusiastic kudos for its mouthwatering enchiladas, burritos, salsa, and knockyour-socks-off margaritas. And, with three locations around town, you’re always near a fiesta.

1103 Mountain Rd. NW, 243-2424, goldencrown.biz Golden Crown Panaderia is known for taking creativity in baking to the next level. Try the original biscochitos or cappuccino, chocolate and sugarfree versions. Don’t miss out on homemade green chile bread, pizza, and creative bread sculptures.

GECKO’S BAR AND TAPAS

GRASSBURGER

$

10031 Coors Blvd. NW plus 1 other metro locations 880-0055, gardunosrestaurants.com

$

FRANK’S FAMOUS CHICKEN AND WAFFLES

$

$$

5801 Academy Rd. NE 821-8291, geckosbar.com Plenty of tasty tapas—including Southwestern Krab Taquitos and Red Molé Grilled Sirloin Tacos—and hearty salads and sandwiches, too.

GINO’S NEW YORK STYLE PIZZA

$

3908 San Mateo Blvd. NE 883-6000, ginosnystylepizza.com With handmade lasagna and pizza dough, among other items, Gino’s New York Style Pizza shares family recipes with its customers. From the buttermilk ranch dressing to the Eggplant and Chicken Parmigianas, homemade cooking is not too far away.

Let usLet cater us cater your next yourevent! next event!

FOURTH AND ROMA CAFÉ

$

2924 San Mateo NE plus 5 other metro locations 888-3488, garciaskitchen.com This Albuquerque institution serves up classic New Mexican dishes, from freshly made tortillas to an extensive burrito list. You’ll leave one of the multiple locations with a full belly and content heart.

921 San Pedro Dr. SE, 255-1233 giovannispizzaalbuquerque.com Giovanni’s isn’t easy to spot at first, but once you’ve had a big slice of fold-in-half New York-style pie, you’ll never miss it again. Whether you like it covered in spinach, pesto and tomatoes, cheeseonly, no cheese at all, or plain pepperoni, you’re sure to find your pizza match.

5600 Coors Blvd. NW, Ste C3 plus 1 other metro location 361-2368, eatgrassburger.com There’s a lot that sets the burger joint apart— including its community involvement, its vegan and gluten-free burger options, and its commitment to a no-corn syrup menu.

GREENSIDE CAFÉ

$$$

12165 NM-14, Cedar Crest 286-2684, greenside.cafe This Cedar Crest café offers a casual family atmosphere with large portions of gourmet-quality food: French toast made with orange and vanilla batter, Turquoise Trail Trout, rich homemade ice cream, and a Monte Cristo sandwich with green chile.

500 4th St. NW, #106, 245-7662 Delicious chai, coffee, sandwiches, salads, and occasional East-Indian specials conveniently located in the old Bank of America building downtown.

400 Washington St. SE, 712-5109 franksfamouschickenandwaffles.com Owner and former Lobo basketball player Frank Willis wanted to give Albuquerque the soul food he had while growing up in Los Angeles. He fiddled with flavors, making sure they were perfect, before opening his restaurant to dish out favorites like chicken and waffles, fried pickles, mac ‘n cheese, and collard greens.

FRENCHISH

$$$

3509 Central Ave. NE 433-5911, frenchish.com Envisioned as a casual neighborhood restaurant, frenchish’s menu draws inspiration from an eclectic mix of French and Midwestern U.S. cuisines, with an active focus on clean, simple foods.

Let us cater your next event!

BREAKFAST SERVED ALL DAY! OPEN DAILY

7AM - 2PM

FRIENDS COFFEE & SANDWICH SHOP $

200 3rd St. NW 243-4801, fcass.com Every cup of coffee served at Friends Coffee & Sandwich Shop is from New Mexico Coffee Company, and a different flavor is showcased each day of the week. Local favorites such as the quesadilla and the Taco Burger are dependable lunch choices.

FRONTIER RESTAURANT

$

2400 Central Ave. SE 266-0550, frontierrestaurant.com Famous for its legendary Frontier Rolls, hot-offthe-iron tortillas, burgers, New Mexican favorites, hash browns, fresh-squeezed orange juice, and more, the Frontier is Albuquerque’s melting pot— it’s a guarantee you’ll see someone you know there.

WINNER

2056 Central Ave SW, Albuquerque (Across from Old Town) 505.554.1424 | centralgrillandcoffeehouse.com

Thank You!

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THE GRILL ON SAN MATEO

$

3300 San Mateo Blvd. NE, 872-9772 A choice of mesquite-grilled chicken, rib eye, hot dogs, and burgers (beef and garden) accompany bottomless house-made chips and salsa, complete with sides like classic fries and fried zucchini, and fresh fixings are on a build-your-own basis offering a completely customizable burger.

THE GROVE CAFÉ AND MARKET

$$

600 Central Ave. SE, Ste A 248-9800, thegrovecafemarket.com The brunch and lunch favorite is well-known for its exceptional dishes made from local and organic ingredients, and it now offers a newly expanded menu, with additions such as the French Ham & Cheese with d’affinois cheese, mostarda, and caper mustard sauce.

GYROS MEDITERRANEAN

$

HANNAH & NATE’S MARKET CAFÉ

$

106 Cornell Dr. SE, 255-4401, egyros.com Tried-and-true Greek recipes, such as traditional Kota Reganato (oven-roasted chicken with oregano, garlic and lemon), fresh Greek salads, Patates, and, of course, sweet baklava, served in a friendly, laidback collegial atmosphere. 4512 Corrales Rd, plus 1 other metro location 898-2370 Offering breakfast and lunch, Hannah & Nate’s is all about flavor—whether it’s the flavor of traditional New Mexican cuisine, cuisines from throughout the world or the family recipes served.

HELLO DELI

$$

HIBACHI ONE

$$

HIGH POINT GRILL

$$

7600 Jefferson St. NE 797-3354, hellodeliabq.com Home to one of the most delicious breakfast burritos around, Hello Deli serves sandwiches and even Frontier’s sweet rolls. 3230 Coors Blvd. NE 839-0808, hibachioneabq.com In addition to their tableside teppanyaki service, Hibachi One visitors can take advantage of private rooms. Hibachi options like shrimp, scallops, and filet mignon are available wherever you’re sitting in the house, as is a full menu of sushi, sashimi, and rolls. 9780 Coors Blvd. NW 312-8519, highpointgrill.com Those perpetually on the hunt for the perfect burger will find plenty to love at High Point. With a foundation of 100-percent Akaushi, American Prime Wagyu beef, the burgers at High Point Grill are some of the city’s most popular. Its Southwest burger, for instance, features a red chile crusted patty, extra hot local green chile and cheddar cheese.

HIGH NOON RESTAURANT AND SALOON

$$$

425 San Felipe St. NW 765-1455, highnoonrestaurant.com Located in a 300-year-old house in the heart of Old Town, High Noon has a menu stocked with New Mexican fare such as burritos and enchiladas, but you can also find baked brie and buffalo burgers here. Reservations are recommended.

HOLY BURGER

$

700 Central Ave. SE 242-2991, holyburgernm.com Originally a Route 66 diner with a carport, and later Bob’s Fish and Chips, Holy Burger now boasts some of the juiciest burgers in town, as well as one of the breeziest and most boppin’ patios in the city.

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BIRRIA THAT GOES BEYOND TACOS

La Guelaguetza 816 Old Coors Blvd SW, Suite B (505) 916-0095

Pizza Birria, $23.00

HORSE AND ANGEL TAVERN

$$

HOT PINK THAI

$$

5809 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE, 299-0225 Whether you want a simple sandwich for lunch, appetizers and a beer in the afternoon, or steak and enchiladas at midnight, this Heights tavern is the place to be any time of the day. 2626 San Pedro Dr. NE, 872-2296 For dine in or takeout, at lunchtime, you’ll get $1.50 off dishes over $10 and a free vegetable egg roll. Favorites include pumpkin curry, pad thai, and drunken noodles. Most dishes are customized with your choice of protein and spice level, from no chili at all to Thai hot.

HOT TAMALES

$

1520 Rio Rancho Blvd. SE. Rio Rancho 962-0123, hottamalesnmrestaurant.com This Rio Rancho restaurant serves bona fide New Mexican with hand-blended red chile and fireroasted green chile: Green Chile Stew Omelet, Hot Tamale Bowl, and Fajitas are just a few of the spicy dishes.

HURRICANE’S CAFE

PHOTO BY T. CHERRY/ATM

Brothers Fidel and Roberto Salazar, who are from Oaxaca, Mexico, opened La Guelaguetza in 2019 to share their love of Oaxacan food with Albuquerque. Their amazing cuisine has been recognized by the James Beard Foundation, which named the Salazar brothers finalists for the 2022 Best Chef Southwest category. One of the stars of their menu is the Pizza Birria, also known as Mexican Pizza. The brothers created this shredded beef dish to offer something for the younger clientele, though it’s been adored by people of all ages. The beef is marinated and cooked low and slow for eight hours (it’s super tender). At more than two pounds, the dish is big enough for three or even four people. It begins with a flour tortilla dredged in birria sauce and topped with cheese and meat. Then another tortilla is added with more cheese and meat. A third tortilla is placed on top, drizzled with an avocadotomatillo salsa and sour cream, and sprinkled with chopped onions and cilantro. Cut into eight pieces, the pizza is served with a cup of rich birria broth, which can be used for dipping or sipping. Roberto says the South Albuquerque community has always been supportive of La Guelaguetza, but since the James Beard announcement, the outpouring of attention has been overwhelming. “We are receiving even more support and now more people know we are here in New Mexico and we represent the entire state,” he says. “We are very appreciative to everyone who continues to visit us and enjoy our food.” — HEATHER HUNTER

$

4330 Lomas Blvd. NE, 255-4248 With Route 66 serving as the city’s heart, it’s always good to hop over to a good ol’ fashioned diner. Pick out a classic dish, such as pancakes or omelets from the lengthy breakfast menu, or chow down on a burger, enchilada, or chicken fried steak. Of course, you can take a stab at the hearty Disaster Burrito, but you’d better make plenty of room if that’s on your agenda.

I SCREAM ICE CREAM

$

2000 Carlisle Blvd. NE, 268-0139 The cozy dessert shop is filled with toys, gadgets, board games, and—oh yeah—34 flavors of ice cream and 28 different toppings. Each scoop comes with a free mix-in, and there are fresh mini doughnuts available on weekends.

IL VICINO

$$

3403 Central Ave. NE plus 2 other metro locations 266-7855, ilvicino.com Using wood ovens to bake its thin-crust pizzas, Il Vicino (which means “The Neighbor”) also offers hearty calzones and award-winning brews from its own brewery.

INDIGO CROW CAFÉ

$$$

4515 Corrales Rd. 585-3061, indigocrowcafe.net This café is cozy, thanks to the fact that it’s housed in an old adobe building. When it’s cold, patrons warm up by the indoor fireplace; when it’s warm, they enjoy meals such as lobster ravioli, tarragon chicken salad, and New Mexico chicken fried steak under the stars on the outdoor patio. Reservations are recommended.

IRONWOOD KITCHEN

$$

5740 Night Whisper Rd. NW, Ste 250 890-4488, ironwoodkitchen.com This family operation’s goal: to serve meals made with whole foods at affordable prices. Try the green chile cheeseburger, with freshly-ground chuck, topped with fresh vegetables and roasted green chile.

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

JAPANESE KITCHEN

$$$

6521 America’s Parkway plus 1 other metro location 884-8937, japanesekitchen.com Entertainment is the main course at this teppanyaki grill restaurant. The cooks, who are at your table, can be caught tossing shrimp into their pockets and creating to-die-for dishes from the classic teriyaki chicken, to seafood or steak, and everything in between.

JAVA JOE’S

$$

JC’S NEW YORK PIZZA DEPARTMENT

$$

906 Park Ave. SW 765-1514, downtownjavajoes.com You’ll find all walks of life at this relaxing Downtown joint, enjoying freshly made sandwiches, breakfast burritos, green chile chicken melts, coffee drinks and more.

215 Central Ave. NW, Ste B 766-6973, jcnypd.com New York-style pizza, pasta, salads, and fully-loaded pasta and calzone dishes, all in a laid-back lounge. During lunch hour, the line goes out the door.

JIMMY’S CAFÉ ON JEFFERSON

$

7007 Jefferson St. NE 341-2546 jimmyscafeonjefferson.com The menu here lists more than 100 items, most of them mouthwatering comfort foods: sandwiches, burgers, New Mexican dishes, handmade pizza, and breakfast served all day long.

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BITES JINJA BAR AND BISTRO

$$

JOE’S PASTA HOUSE

$$

8900 Holly Ave. NE, B plus 1 other metro location 856-1413, jinjabistro.com Evoking a vintage ambiance, Jinja serves inspired and mouthwatering pan-Asian cuisine, such as Kung Pow Chicken (a Thai version of the Chinese favorite) and Home-Style Chicken Udon Wok Bowl. 3201 Southern Blvd. SE 892-3333, joespastahouse.com A neighborhood Italian-American joint with an incredible dose of warmth and personality, Joe’s offers a terrific lunch buffet and an expansive dinner menu to please every palate in la mia famiglia: steaks, pasta, and some of the best cannelloni and tiramisu anywhere.

KABAB HOUSE: AUTHENTIC PERSIAN CUISINE $

301 Cornell Dr. SE 312-8949 Authentic, made-to-order Persian food is constantly sizzling on the grill here. The koobideh kabab is made with minced ground beef or ground chicken, onion, and house spices. Each dish is a healthy size and comes with soup, salad, and rice. Top everything off with a glass of delicious banana milk, or majoun, which is banana milk with almonds, walnuts, pistachios, and honey.

KAKTUS BREWING CO.

$

471 S Hill Rd, 818-7285, kaktusbrewery.com Tucked away from it all, Kaktus specializes in European-style pints, and a menu featuring pizzas and apps uniquely topped with game meats like elk, boar, bison, and duck. Special events on weekends abound.

KATHY’S CARRY OUT

$

823 Isleta Blvd. SW, 873-3472 This carry out has been a South Valley favorite for 38 years. Look for the chicharron burrito with egg, fresh hand-cut fries, and the daily special—you just might land on a seems-too-good-to-be-true deal, such as three tacos for $3.

KATRINAH’S EAST MOUNTAIN GRILL $$

150 State Rd. 344 A 281-9111, eastmountaingrill.com This contemporary diner specializes in homemade dishes, such as gyros, hand-cut steaks and burgers, and the best-selling Southern Salad (with fried green beans, bacon, cheddar cheese, tomato, and fried or grilled chicken or steak).

KIMO’S HAWAIIAN BBQ

$

3239 Girard Blvd. NE, 582-2797 kimosabq.com Hawaii comes home. What began as a food truck is now a brick-and-mortar location also. Try freshfrom-the-isles Kalua Pork and Huli Huli Chicken plates served with sides like steamed cabbage, rice, and macaroni salad.

KOLACHE FACTORY

$

8001 Wyoming Blvd. NE, Ste B3 856-3430, locations.kolachefactory.com The Kolache Factory franchise out of Texas focuses on Czech style Kolaches that were traditionally a warm, semi-sweet pastry filled with sausage, cheese, or fruit and originated in Eastern Europe dating as far back as the 1700s.

LA QUICHE PARISIENNE BISTRO

$$

LA REFORMA

$$

5850 Eubank Blvd. NE, Ste 17 242-2808, laquicheparisiennebistro.com Long considered an authentic French staple of downtown ABQ, La Quiche has comfortably settled into the Heights and the baked goods will comfort your lazy weekend brunch cravings with true Parisian cuisine from the mainland. 8900 San Mateo Blvd. NE, Ste I 717-1361, lareformabrewery.com On the taco front, La Reforma is virtually unimpeachable, offering options like braised pork shoulder carnitas, tempura-battered white fish pescado, and rotisserie-broiled al pastor for carnivores, along with tempura-battered avocado (aguacate) for those looking for something plantbased.

LA SALITA

$

LAGUNA BURGER

$

THE LAST CALL

$

1950 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE 299-9968, lasalita.com The name may mean “little room,” but this New Mexican restaurant always has a full house. The chile rellenos, chile con queso, sopaipillas, and shredded beef burrito (a Wednesday special) have earned loyal customers for 37 years. 2400 12th St. NW plus 2 other metro locations 352-8282, thelagunaburger.com Every half-pound burger is made fresh upon ordering, topped with Hatch green chile, and slipped on a butter-toasted bun made specifically for Laguna Burger by Sara Lee. Also on the menu: freshly-cut fries, foot-long chile cheese dogs, and zingy breakfast burritos. 6261 Riverside Plaza Ln. NW, Ste A1 717-1207, lastcallabq.com This late-night eatery specializes in freshly-made Baja Mexican street cuisine (think: carne asada fries). If you’re lucky, you just might run into the “Taco Box” while out on the town: a mobile extension of the restaurant that brings the food to you.

LAVA ROCK BREWING COMPANY 2220 Unser Blvd. NE 836-1022 lavarockbrewpub.com

$$

The casual brewpub on Unser currently has 7 of their own beers available on tap, with several other local guest taps as well. Standard bar fare gets gussied up here, like the housemade hot sauces on the wings and the fries loaded with green chile and queso.

LAZY LIZARD GRILL

$

12480 North Hwy. 14, Sandia Park 281-9122, lazylizardgrill.com From the King Cobra Pizza and made-fromscratch Jalapeño Poppers to their impressive selection of microbrews, the Lazy Lizard Grill has customers always coming back for more— and has the food and atmosphere to back it up.

LE BISTRO VIETNAMESE RESTAURANT $$

1313 San Pedro Dr. NE, 266-6118 Le Bistro Vietnamese Restaurant is just as much a bakery as it is a restaurant, specializing in traditional Vietnamese cuisine.

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BITES

MAC & CHILE

High Point Grill and Taproom 9780 Coors Blvd NW, Suite A (505) 312-8519

Green Chile Mac, $8.29

THE LIBRARY BAR & GRILL

$$

LIMONATA ITALIAN STREET CAFÉ

$$

312 Central Ave. SW 242-2992, library-abq.com Featuring more than a great party, the Library offers drink specials and half-priced appetizers during happy hour, as well as salads, hamburgers, sandwiches, wraps, and specialty items. 3222 Silver Ave. SE 266-0607, limonatanobhill.com Channel your inner Italian at this street foodinspired café, where the breakfast and lunch menus feature perfect pastries, craveable cappuccino and trattoria-inspired lunches. The chef makes every dish from scratch and insists that everything about the restaurant, from the menu to the atmosphere, be done just as it would in Italy.

LINDY’S DINER

$$

500 Central Ave. SW 242-2582, lindysdinerabq.com Lindy’s is a neighborhood joint, through and through. The sort of place where, even if they don’t know your name, you’ll feel like they do anyway. The owners recommend the Ultimate Burger for that classic American diner experience.

LITTLE BEAR COFFEE

$

LOS COMPADRES RESTAURANT

$

2632 Pennsylvania St. NE 917-8902, littlebearcoffeeco.com Located near Uptown, Little Bear is not just serving up quality brew, but also providing an outpost for the neighborhood and coffee community. 2437 Central Ave. NW 452-8091, compadresabq.com Family recipes like the No. 16 Taco Plate, tacos with carne y papas (beef and potatoes) and the restaurant’s Menudo, have kept locals coming back for more than 15 years.

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ATM STAFF PHOTO

Established in 2016, High Point Grill and Taproom is known far and wide for their house made mac’n cheese. With eight different types of mac & cheese on the menu, the favorite among High Point diners is—surprise—the Green Chile Mac’n Cheese. The recipe here calls for “XX” (or hotter than average) Hatch green chiles. Ashley Allan, Executive Sous Chef, says each order comes with 1-2 tablespoons of green chile, although “most customers order the green chile on the side.” To keep up with the demand, the kitchen whips up eight gallons of gooey mac & cheese every day. Ashley says they start with a béchamel sauce that “we thicken with a roux and then add cheddar, provolone and mozzarella cheeses” to make the celebrated cheese sauce. Representing a good portion of total sales, mac & cheese is one of two dishes that remain on the menu since High Point opened and there might be a revolution if they removed it, so it’s there to stay. The kitchen often makes special orders of mac & cheese such as adding broccoli or Cajun sausage and they also make a vegetarian mac that features zucchini, tomatoes and carrots. —HEATHER HUNTER

LOS CUATES

$$

LOYOLA’S FAMILY RESTAURANT

$$

8700 Menual Blvd. NE plus 2 other metro locations 237-2800, loscuatesrestaurants.com Popular since it opened over 25 years ago, Los Cuates serves its own ancho-chile salsa and tons of delicious New Mexican dishes in humongous portions. 4500 Central Ave. SE, 268-6478 loyolasfamilyrestaurant.com You’ll find both American and New Mexican goodies here, from fried chicken, roast beef and sandwiches to tasty local favorites such as burritos and posole.

LUIGI’S RISTORANTE AND PIZZERIA $$

6225 4th St. NW 343-0466, luigisitalianfood.com Enjoy more than 250 made-from-scratch Italian dishes, including pizza, chicken Florentine, spaghetti and meatballs, and green chile chicken lasagna.

M’TUCCI’S ITALIAN

$$

6001 Winter Haven Rd. NW plus 2 other metro locations 503-7327, mtuccis.com The menu at the Westside’s authentic Italian staple features refined comfort food classics, from meatball marinara to pot roast. Other menu items are crafted from choice Berkshire pigs that the eatery imports from northern Iowa and southern Minnesota farms. In fact, a unique pork dish is incorporated into a featured dinner special every night. Wash down your pasta, pizza, or salad with a carefully crafted cocktail from the bar.

MAC’S STEAK IN THE ROUGH

$

4515 Menaul Blvd. NE plus 1 other metro location, 888-3611, macsnm.com Taquitas, onion rings, guacamole salad, and an original “steak in the rough”—slivers of beef served with French fries, coleslaw, a roll, catsup, and a fresh green scallion… these are just a few of the reasons Mac’s has been in business for so many years.

MAGOKORO

5614 Menaul Blvd. NE 830-2061, magokoroabq.com

$$

Magakoro pushes well beyond the bounds of ramen and sushi, treating visitors to a thrilling selection of flavors. They’ve also cultivated a reputation for elevating the bento box—commonly available at Japanese-inspired restaurants throughout Albuquerque—into a sensorial cultural experience.

MANZANO GRILLE AT THE CANYON CLUB AT FOUR HILLS $$ 911 Four Hills Rd. SE 299-9555, canyonclubgolf.com

This newly remodeled property was rejuvenated thanks to its own club members, and now boasts modern décor, floor-to-ceiling windows, and a relaxed and inviting atmosphere. Members can enjoy creative dishes like Pork Alexander, New Mexico Eggs Benedict with green chile Hollandaise sauce, or the Turkey Lurkey, including green chile and Pepper Jack cheese in the dining room or al fresco on its large, shaded patio overlooking the mountain vistas. Dining-only memberships available.

MARIO’S PIZZA

$$

2401 San Pedro NE plus 3 other metro locations 883-4414, mariospizzaabq.com Gourmet pizzas, big bowls of pasta, custom calzones and New York-style sandwiches are the norm at this tasty Italian eatery.

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BITES MARISCOS ALTAMAR

$$

1517 Coors Blvd. NW plus 1 other metro location 831-1496, mariscosaltamarabq.com With live music on the weekends, colorful murals, and authentic Mexican seafood dishes such as tostada de ceviche with shrimp, fish, and snow crab, dining at Mariscos Altamar is well worth the trip.

MARY & TITO’S CAFÉ

$

2711 4th St. NW 344-6266, maryandtitos.com From their famous carne adovada to their authentic New Mexican chips and salsa, Mary & Tito’s Café makes sure guests leave full and happy. This homey café also became the only Albuquerque restaurant to win a James Beard Foundation America’s Classics Award in 2010.

MAZAYA CAFÉ

$

120 Harvard Dr. SE 582-2447, mazayacafe.com Mazaya Café is dedicated to adding an authentic Mediterranean dining experience to the medley of options in the Nob Hill area–without breaking the bank for its diners. If you are looking to fill up, freshgrilled kebabs, a half-dozen wraps, shawarma, and three kinds of fried or steamed dumpling plates headline the restaurant’s entrée menu.

MICHAEL THOMAS COFFEE ROASTERS

$

202 Bryn Mawr Dr. SE plus 2 other metro locations 504-7078, michaelthomascoffee.com Michael Thomas’ fresh-roasted coffees can be purchased in bulk or by the cup. Favorites include the Banda Bear Blend and the Duke’s Runners’ Blend. If you prefer to let them make your cup of Joe, try an espresso-based drink such as a Double Espresso, a Macchiato, or a Cubano.

MILLY’S

$

2100 Candelaria Rd. NE plus 1 other metro location 884-0707, millysrestaurants.com If you’re not sure what to eat, have a little of everything with an American-New Mexican–Greek menu. This breakfast and lunch spot melds salads and sandwiches with traditional New Mexican and Greek entrees.

MONICA’S EL PORTAL RESTAURANT

$

321 Rio Grande Blvd. NW, 247-9625 Traditional New Mexican favorites make up the menu at this Old Town staple that has been around for 34 years. Monica’s roasts its own green chile, makes biscochitos from scratch and offers red chile straight from the pod.

MONROE’S RESTAURANT

$

6051 Osuna Rd. NE plus 1 other metro location 881-4224, monroeschile.com More than 50 years after opening its doors south of Old Town, Monroe’s continues to serve reliable New Mexican favorites to a local fan base, and service around here is a team effort, so no glass goes unfilled.

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MONTE CARLO STEAKHOUSE

$$$

3916 Central Ave. SW, 836-9886 The iconic steakhouse meets liquor store has been featured on the Food Network and boasts some of the best steaks in the city. Since 1971, locals always come back for hand-cut steaks, house-made Greek salad dressing, freshly cut fries, and a mean green chile cheeseburger.

MONTE VISTA FIRE STATION 3201 Central Ave. NE, 255-2424

$

Once an actual working fire station, this second-floor restaurant now offers traditional bar food, wings, and nightly specials. Choose from tasty chicken wings and burgers, or order from the restaurant downstairs— they’ll bring your steak to you.

MR. TOKYO

$$

NEXUS BREWERY

$$

NICK AND JIMMY’S RESTAURANT AND BAR

$$

11200 Montgomery Blvd. NE, 292-4728 Soak up the cool Zen-like atmosphere while enjoying six versions of fried rice, sushi, sashimi, tempura, hibachi, grilled udon, soups, and teriyaki spiced with fiery Thai chili peppers. 4730 Pan American Fwy NE, Ste D plus 1 other metro location, 242-4100 nexusbrewery.com If the made-to-order fried chicken and waffles and mac and cheese has you drooling, reach for one of Nexus’ brewed in-house beers.

5021 Pan American Freeway NE 344-9169, nickandjimmysrestaurant.com Nick and Jimmy’s vision was a comfortable atmosphere with comfortable food. They blend traditional foods with new twists and serve everything from enchiladas to green chile meatloaf.

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BITES NOB HILL BAR AND GRILL

$$$

3128 Central Ave. SE 266-4455, upscalejoint.com This restaurant manages to be simultaneously upscale and laid back, gourmet and down-home, visionary and traditional. Not to mention delicious: the Buffalo Calamari, Dirty “Kobe” Burger, Pineapple Chipotle BBQ Baby Back Ribs, and a slew of amazing cocktails make every visit exceptional.

NOMAD’S BBQ FOOD TRUCK 206-7654

$

Authentic, smoky goodness, Nomad’s BBQ sammies— including pulled pork and hotlink varieties—are succulent and feature its homemade sauce. This roving BBQ hut definitely knows how to do a quality turkey leg and rib tips, too.

OAK TREE CAFÉ

4545 Alameda Blvd. NE 830-2233, cafeoaktree.com

$$$

This hometown café has served a lot of locales over the past 30 years, and the current venue on Alameda is great at the basics, including burgers, sandwiches, and salads, made fresh, in-house every day.

OHANA HUT

$

5740 Night Whisper Rd. NW 508-4439, ohanahut.com Family owned and operated Ohana Hut means “Family Hut.” It specializes in Hawaiian, Japanese, and Korean flavors to create an Asian fusion menu with a New Mexican twist.

OLD TOWN PIZZA PARLOR

$$

108 Rio Grande Blvd. NW 999-1949, oldtownpizzaabq.com This comfy, funky, family-owned restaurant serves tasty pies, huge calzones, and portions of pasta that won’t ever leave you hungry.

OLO YOGURT STUDIO IN NOB HILL

ORCHID THAI CUISINE

$

4300 Central Ave. SE 265-4047, orchidabq.com Orchid Thai has been serving hungry Albuquerqueans traditional dishes like Pad Thai at its Nob Hill location for more than a decade. But this award-winning eatery goes beyond the traditional with unique dishes like deep-fried sesame duck, green tea curry, and Szechwan eggplant, all made from scratch.

PAISANO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT

$$

1935 Eubank Blvd. NE 298-7541, paisanosabq.com Family recipes have kept Paisano’s going for more than 35 years, but the hand-rolled pasta, handstuffed ravioli, homemade sausage and marinara haven’t hurt business, either. It’s also the only place in town to get wheat-free pizza and pasta.

THE PALETA BAR

$

800 Eubank Blvd. NE 291-4900, owlcafealbuquerque.com World-famous green chile cheeseburgers, milkshakes, fajitas, quesadillas, meatloaf, burritos, fries… the list of drool-worthy dishes goes on and on.

2325 San Pedro Dr. NE plus 12 other metro locations 884-0049, thepaletabar.com A hidden Albuquerque gem, The Paleta Bar has taken a tried-and-true, frozen Mexican dessert to new heights. Since 2017, this paleta wonderland has been slinging refreshing Mexican popsicles in endless combinations of flavors.

PACIFIC PARADISE TROPICAL GRILL AND SUSHI BAR $$

PAPA FELIPE’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

$$

PADILLA’S MEXICAN KITCHEN

PAPA NACHOS

$$

THE OWL CAFÉ

$$

3000 San Pedro Dr. NE, 881-0999 pacific-paradise-restaurant-abq.com Faux palms and tiki huts frame a menu filled with more than 100 options: salads, soups, stir-fry, seafood, fried rice, noodles, sushi, and dessert menu. Try the Seafood Rice Pizza or Rock ‘n’ Roll Sushi.

$

1510 Girard Blvd. NE, 262-0115 It might not get any more New Mexican than it does at Padilla’s—from huevos rancheros and tamales to chile rellenos and egg-topped blue corn enchiladas. You may have to shake your head after a taste of the chile just to remind yourself you’re not in your grandmother’s kitchen. A sopaipilla dripping with honey will seal the deal for your traditional meal.

9800 Menaul Blvd. NE 292-8877, papafelipes.com Papa Felipe’s exceeds expectations by offering traditional New Mexican cuisine (enchiladas, stuffed sopaipillas, tacos) as well as simple twists on favorite dishes (green chile carne adovada, Tampico Tacos, Green Tamale Pie). 7648 Louisiana Blvd. NE 821-4900, papanachosfood.com Great homemade Mexican food based on tried-andtrue family recipes is the specialty here: burritos, fish tacos, and the namesake nachos will all make your panza happy.

$

3339 Central Ave. NE, Ste C 718-4656, oloyogurt.com Nothing is as sweet as a guilt-free treat. In the same building as Staples in Nob Hill, Olo features a Candyland-esque interior, complete with 10 flavor choices and a salad-bar-sized toppings bar.

O’HARE’S GRILLE & PUB

$$

O’NIELL’S PUB

$$

4100 Southern Blvd. SE, Rio Rancho 896-0123, oharesgrillepub.com With a menu that is centered around the idea that variety is the key to success, O’Hare’s offers pub fare in a family-friendly atmosphere. Try the Corned Beef and Cabbage special, O’Hare’s Double Decker Reuben, or the staple Fish and Chips, for a truly Irish experience. 4310 Central Ave. SE plus 1 other metro location 255-6782, oniells.com O’Niell’s boasts the same neighborhood feeling, many of the same staffers, and virtually the same menu (including the “weird sandwich,” the “burger in paradise,” and homemade fish and chips). Added: an outdoor patio and more beer choices.

O RAMEN

$

2114 Central Ave. SE, 508-1897 Yes, the Duke City has the real thing. O Ramen’s Tonkotsu (pork bone broth) spends 18 hours on the stovetop before it blesses your bowl; expect plenty of options for vegetarians and Japanese curry lovers, to boot.

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BITES PARS CUISINE

$$

4320 The 25 Way NE, Ste 100 345-5156, parscuisine.us For more than 20 years, Pars has served Persian and Mediterranean menu items in a unique atmosphere. Choose to sit on the floor under a large tent, and enjoy the talents of belly dancers, and enjoy tasty kebabs, gyros and more.

PELICAN’S RESTAURANT

$$$

9800 Montgomery Blvd. NE plus 1 other metro location, 298-7678 pelicansabq.com For 30 years, customers have fallen for Pelican’s— hook, line and sinker. Favorite entrées include Alaskan king crab, Australian lobster tail, and prime rib.

PEREA’S TIJUANA BAR

$$

4590 Corrales Rd., 898-2442 Open for lunch only, the family-owned and -operated business specializes in real, home-cooked New Mexican food that’s consistently earned kudos from customers who can’t say “no” to the Frito pie, carne adovada, and green chile cheeseburgers.

PERICO’S

$

10401 Golf Course Rd. NW plus 3 other metro locations 792-5255 pericosmexicanrestaurant.com Serving delicious New Mexican food at affordable prices made Perico’s instantly popular, and the “home of the ½ lb burrito” is now an Albuquerque institution with three locations, catering services, and 22 different burritos.

PIATANZI

$$

PIZZA 9

$$

1403 Girard Blvd. NE 792-1700 piatanzi.com A neighborhood Italian eatery with artisan flair, Piatanzi serves up big bites on smallish plates that please families and adventurous foodies alike, in a venue that scores big points. 4000 Louisiana Blvd. NE plus 12 other metro locations 883-6463, pizzanine.com Chicago-style pizza at 10 locations around the city, along with the option of gluten-free crust—that’s what Pizza 9 brings to the, er, table. Don’t forget the wings, salads, breadsticks and calzones to complement any meal.

PIZZERIA LUCA

$$

8850 Holly Ave. NE 797-8086, pizzerialuca.com With imported Italian flour, cheese, and pepperoni, Pizzeria Luca offers authentic Italian cuisine. The restaurant has a subway-inspired interior and features delicious and affordable lunch specials.

PLANTY SWEET

$$

2506 Washington St. NE 433-7111, plantysweet.weebly.com Planty Sweet is the city’s first 100% vegan and gluten-free bakery and dessert shop, and the quality of the products available is hard to deny. Not only do their artisanal baked goods taste fantastic, they are impeccably presented, each crafted to please the eye as much as the taste buds.

POKI POKI CEVICHERIA

$$

POLLITO CON PAPAS

$$

3422 Central Ave. NE plus 1 other metro location 503-1077, pokipokinm.com Think deconstructed sushi if you’ve never had the traditionally Hawaiian poké. Completely customizable bowls with Latin and Asian fusion are the specialty here. Seven types of fish, 12 sauces, and 22 toppings make for endless combinations atop rice, chips, or a salad. 6105 Gibson Blvd. SE 765-5486, pollitoconpapas.com Get ready for a punch of Peruvian cuisine. The menu is dotted with combinations of chicken, potatoes, and cilantro rice. The chicken is brined in vinegar and cumin for about 10 hours, then fired on a spit. The traditional drink, chicha, makes the perfect complement to any dish. The southeast part of town just inched a bit closer to South America.

PONDEROSA BREWING CO.

$

1761 Bellamah Ave. NW 639-5941, ponderosabrewing.net A sister brew pub to Pints Brewing in Portland, Oregon, Ponderosa features a wide selection of American and German standard beers, with a classic menu of burgers, salads, and innovative appetizers.

PRAIRIE STAR RESTAURANT

$$

288 Prairie Star Rd. 867-3327, mynewmexicogolf.com Taking a drive past Bernalillo is a pleasure when you know the visit will include amazing made-fromscratch dishes such as herb-grilled ribeye with chipotle cheddar gratin and New Mexico bisonraised tenderloin. Reservations are recommended.

INDIAN PUEBLO KITCHEN

$$$

2401 12th St. NW 724-3510, puebloharvestcafe.com The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center is the perfect backdrop for the Native American-inspired cuisine prepared in the café, serving traditional and innovative dishes for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Reservations are recommended.

PUPUSERIA Y RESTAURANTE SALVADOREÑO

$

QUARTER CELTIC BREWPUB

$$

1701 Bridge Blvd. SW, 243-8194 In El Salvador, pupusas (stuffed corn tortillas) are found on every street corner. In Albuquerque, they can only be found in the South Valley, stuffed with shrimp, calabacitas, cheese, beans, or guacamole and served with a side of fresh salsa and curtidos (a spicy cabbage salad garnish). 1100 San Mateo Blvd. NE, #50, plus 1 other metro location, 503-1387, quartercelticbrewpub.com Irish brews like the Crimson Lass and Rye’t Side of Dublin are paired nicely with Celtic pub fare with a New Mexico twist. Must-tries include the classic fish and chips, ruben, shepherd’s pie, and poutine with green chile.

RANCHERS CLUB OF NEW MEXICO $$$

1901 University Blvd. NE 889-8071, theranchersclubofnm.com With more fine dining awards on their wall than years they’re been in business, the Ranchers Club of New Mexico inside the Crowne Plaza Albuquerque is a meat lovers’ paradise and wine connoisseurs’ promised land. Reservations are recommended.

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BITES THE RANGE CAFÉ

$$

320 Central SE plus 5 other metro locations 243-1440, rangecafe.com Locals flock to The Range Café when they’re in search of good, made-from-scratch comfort food, including meatloaf sandwiches, huevos rancheros, enchiladas, ice cream, and the gooey Life by Chocolate dessert.

REBEL DONUT

$

2435 Wyoming Blvd. NE plus 1 other metro location 293-0553, rebeldonut.com Not only can you find their set flavors, including their raised glazed, chocolate cake glazed, rebel red velvet, birthday cake, and toasted coconut, but you can also order custom-made donuts or choose to experiment with their daily creations.

RELISH GOURMET SANDWICHES

$$

8019 Menaul Blvd. NE 299-0001, relishsandwichesabq.com It’s no wonder this sandwich shop has been voted “best” by publications throughout Albuquerque— it serves only the best Boar’s Head meats and all of their dishes are accompanied by homemade sides or soups. Try the Cubano. You won’t be disappointed.

RESTORATION PIZZA

$

5161 Lang Ave. NE, Ste A 582-2720, restorationpizza.com Here, good food and positive works—delivered simultaneously—is in the very nature of the business. The idea is to provide patrons with top-notch pies and first-rate beers while giving traditionally underemployed individuals work opportunities they would otherwise miss.

RICHARD’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

$$

RICHIE B’S PIZZA

$$

ROMA BAKERY & DELI

$

501 Roma Ave. NW 843-9418, romabakeryanddeli.com You’ll find more than fresh-baked cookies and pastries at this bakery—feast your eyes (and taste buds) on grilled sandwiches and eight fresh deli salads and soups.

ROSEMARY

$$

4565 San Mateo Blvd. NE, Ste A 361-1842, rosemaryabq.com This plant-forward restaurant offers a soothing atmosphere, creative menu, and amazing food. Any menu item can be adaped to meet personal preferences and dietary restrictions.

RUDY’S COUNTRY STORE AND BAR-B-Q

$$

2321 Carlisle NE plus 1 other metro location 884-4000 rudys.com Texas-style slow cooking over oak is what makes Rudy’s brisket, ribs and sausage so mouthwatering—not to mention the “sause.” Every serving comes with paper towels, unlimited sliced onions and pickles, and bread to mop up the leftover BBQ.

RUSTIC BUBBLE TEA CAFE

$

840 Juan Tabo Blvd. Ste B 505-1813 rusticbubbleteacafe.com Rustic Bubble Tea Café has all of the fundamentals of a bubble tea shop down, of course–the hint is in the name, after all–but what sets the independent Albuquerque startup apart is the Vietnameseinspired menu that accompanies its decadent beverages.

RUSTIC ON THE GREEN

$

RUTILIO’S NEW MEXICAN FOODS

$

3600 Cutler Ave. NE 315-1148, rusticburger505.com Rustic simplicity is the key for this burger joint at Green Jeans Farmery, serving up five equallycraveable burger options and two different kinds of fries from its minimalist menu. Don’t let the simplicity fool you: this unique eatery does gourmet burgers that has fans coming back for more, including its Day of the Dead burger with a secret “Diablo” puree and the Divine Intervention, topped with bleu cheese and caramelized onions. 455 N. Main St., Belen 864-0093 Belen Mayor Rudy Jaramillo’s carne adovada is what put Rutilio’s on the map. This hangout serves their perfect pork with rice and beans, stuffed inside burritos and sopaipillas, and layered inside enchiladas and quesadillas. Add Rutilio’s breakfast burritos and classic New Mexican combos, and guests are sure to find something worth campaigning for.

SADIE’S OF NEW MEXICO

$$

15 Hotel Circle NE plus 2 other metro locations 296-6940 sadiesofnewmexico.com A staple in New Mexican cuisine, Sadie’s features enchiladas, carne adovada ribs, tacos, burritos, and of course, world-famous chips and salsa. Reservations are recommended.

3301 Menaul Blvd. NE, 881-1039 Mexican favorites—such as carne adovada, relleño, tacos, and green chile enchiladas—cooked in the healthiest, most nutritious, yummiest way possible. Open for breakfast and lunch. 7200 Montgomery Blvd. NE, Ste A-2 312-8579, richiebsabq.com New York-style pizza has come home to roost in Albuquerque’s Northeast Heights. Whether by the slice or by the pie—some of which measure 25 inches in diameter—you’ll need every bit of your appetite when you visit Richie B’s. Not in the mood for pizza? Wrap your hands around a turkey, cheesesteak, or Italian sandwich, topped with its signature Viper sauce, or tempt your sweet tooth with traditional cannoli or New York-style cheesecake

RIO BRAVO BREWING COMPANY

$

ROCKIN’ TACO

$

1912 2nd St. NW 900-3909 riobravobrewing.com The pub and grill is bright and airy with high ceilings and a modern industrial style, mixed with the cozy rustic feel of a neighborhood bar, with 32 taps, including their award winning La Luz Lager. 3600 Cutler Ave NE 401-1000 greenjeansfarmery.org Rockin’ Taco is housed inside of Albuquerque’s premier indoor/outdoor gathering place, Green Jeans Farmery. With a food truck vibe and an East Coast flare, this hidden gem is elevating the street taco.

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BITES SAHARA MIDDLE EASTERN EATERY

$

2622 Central Ave. SE 255-5400 saharamiddleeasterneatery.com Delectable Middle Eastern plates served up Manhattan-deli style. The chicken shawarma plate, complete with greens, pita, hummus, and awardwinning tabbouleh, is always a good bet. Complete with beer and wine, and belly dancing on weekends, this is a fave of students, locals, and out-of-towners alike.

SAIGON RESTAURANT

$

6001 San Mateo Blvd. D4, NE plus 1 other metro location 884-0706, saigonrestaurantnm.com Vicky Truong’s secret to 12 years of success has been consistency. Truong maintains an extensive menu that caters to every type of eater. From summer dishes such as noodle bowls to winter mainstays like beef noodle soup, Truong will make sure you find your favorites.

SAKURA SUSHI & GRILL

$$

6241 Riverside Plaza NW 890-2838, abqsakurasushingrill.com Favorites at Sakura are the Stone Pot Bibimbap (which is cooked at the table in a stone pot), the Tiger Roll, the Short Rib, the Baked Lobster Roll, the Sushi Tacos, and the impressive list of sake imported from Japan.

SALATHAI

$

3619 Copper Ave. NE, 265-9330 Made-from-scratch, fresh, ingredients and keeping it simple are owner Pitak Pitakkan’s rules to cook by. Pitakkan cooks every menu item himself so don’t go to Salathai in a hurry. Pitakkan’s grandmother taught him to make curry and his curries are a longtime customer favorite.

THE SALT YARD

$$

6001 Osuna Rd. NE plus 1 other metro location 750-9273, thesaltyardnm.com A multi-concept bar and restaurant, The Salt Yard is

equipped with games, dozens of televisions, great food, drinks, and plenty of space to stretch your legs. This unique location is a great place for parties, trying the newest beer and tequila (Blue Agave Republic is now a part of it), or just watching the game.

SAMURAI GRILL AND SUSHI BAR

$$$

9500 Montgomery Blvd. NE 275-6601, abqsamurai.com What’s your pleasure, sushi or teppan? Here, you can have either expertly crafted right in front of you. It’s also where you can get fresh sushi favorites such as the California roll, the dragon roll, and a veggies-and-sushi “Viagra salad” special.

SANTA FE BITE-ABQ

3407 Central Ave. NE 369-1621, santafebite-abq.com

$

At Santa Fe Bite-ABQ, the green chile cheeseburger is treated with the reverence it deserves, presenting a precision crafted recipe. The details, in fact, are so carefully crafted that even the grilling surface needs to meet certain criteria. Absent a turn on the surface of a custom cast iron grill, it’s just not a Santa Fe Bite burger.

SANTIAGO’S NEW MEXICAN GRILL

$

1911 Eubank Blvd. NE, 292-8226 It’s in the sauce—Papa Jim’s Taco Sauce, at least— which comes with items such as burritos, tacos, and salsa. This Santiago Scramble—a pile of scrambled eggs, cheese, corn tortillas, chorizo, and hash browns—is great morning fuel. The tamale and enchilada take-and-bake casseroles will please any partygoer. And take a jar of that taco sauce home— after all, you can.

SAVOY BAR & GRILL

$$$

10601 Montgomery Blvd. NE 294-9463, savoyabq.com Resembling a California wine-country bistro, Savoy Bar & Grill is one of Albuquerque’s premier finedining establishments. Specializing in food and wine pairing, Savoy’s menu is a toast to the art of balance of food and wine.

SCARPAS BRICK OVEN PIZZA

$$

SEARED

$$

5500 Academy Rd. NE 821-1885, scarpaspizza.com That brick oven is cornerstone to this neighborhood favorite, producing pizzas such as the shrimp pesto, the Greek, and the chipotle chicken. But Scarpas also knows pasta, including red chile cream pasta and pasta sorento with oak-roasted chicken. 119 San Pasquale Ave. SW 999-8414, searedabq.com During the day, the space is Cheese & Coffee, but at night, it gets a makeover and becomes Seared, a fine dining establishment serving up steak, pork loin, and Atlantic Salmon among other things.

SEASONS ROTISSERIE AND GRILL

$$$

2031 Mountain Rd. NW 766-5100, seasonsabq.com As the name suggests, Seasons varies its menu in accordance with what’s going on throughout the year, using the finest, freshest ingredients. Depending on what time of year you venture in, you’ll find butternut squash ravioli, grilled Atlantic salmon, and bleu cheese-crusted beef filet. Reservations are recommended.

SERGIO’S LA DOLCE VITA

$

SHARKY’S FISH & SHRIMP

$

2740 Wyoming Blvd. NE, Ste 8, 554-2602 Fresh, made-from-scratch cookies, donuts, breads, pastries, cakes, and cannoli are on the mouthwatering menu at this Italian bakery. 5420 Central Ave. SW, 831-8905 Slip on your flip-flops and enjoy some Baja–inspired seafood, tacos, and carefree beach house ambiance in this roadside outdoor eatery. Sharky’s won acclaim as the little food truck that could, and this brick-and-mortar locale delivers the goods.

SHOGUN JAPANESE RESTAURANT

$$

3310 Central Ave. SE, 265-9166 When your order of sushi comes around the bend on its floating wooden boat, you couldn’t be happier, whether you’ve ordered the “Super Crunch” (shrimp tempura roll), or the “TNT Roll” (fish, zucchini and onion, baked with spicy mayo and smothered on a California roll).

THE SHOP BREAKFAST & LUNCH

$

2933 Monte Vista Blvd. NE, 433-2795 Breakfast and lunch at The Shop guarantees a plethora of flavors and textures that are tough to find in the Duke City. Combining down-home Southern staples with Mexican and New Mexican traditions, you’re bound to discover a new appreciation for bacon and eggs.

SIAM CAFÉ

$$

5500 San Mateo Blvd. NE, Ste 101 883-7334, siamcafeabq.com With its array of freshly-made curries—all made with coconut milk and a wide variety of luscious spices—this restaurant scores high marks with Albuquerqueans who love Thai food.

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BITES SIXTY-SIX ACRES

$$

2400 12th St. NW 243-2230, sixtysixacres.com If you had to boil Sixty-Six Acres down to two words, they would be “casual” and “classy.” Featuring craft cocktails and a wealth of locally sourced, globallyinspired dishes, Sixty-Six Acres is the ideal spot to grab a relaxed, refined meal.

SLAPFISH

$$

SQUEEZED JUICE BAR

7900 San Pedro NE, Ste A-12, plus 2 other metro locations, 821-1437 squeezedjuicebars.com

$

Incredibly innovative, modern mixed juices, smoothies, and other healthy delights for people on the move and looking for exercise recovery. Three to five pounds of fruit are squeezed into every drink, and it’s all extract, no fillers, and sure to brighten your day.

STEEL BENDER BREWYARD

$$

8305 2nd St. NW 433-3537, steelbenderbrewyard.com The 275-seat brewery has an industrial vibe with cozy undertones. But the Los Ranchos brewery stands apart from competitors based on its wide selection of house made beers and its gourmet menu.

6400 Holly Ave. NE plus 1 other metro location 503-1645, slapfishrestaurant.com Have you ever had fish so fresh that it jumped up and tail slapped you in the face? Well, that’s the joke behind the very popular eatery, Slapfish, located in Holly Square. This fast casual gem has gained a great reputation for efficiency, service, flavor combos, and the freshness of their seafood.

SLATE STREET BILLIARDS

$

2003 Southern Blvd., Ste 139 994-0363, slatestreetbilliards.com Come for the pool, stay for the nachos, and the burgers, and the wings. Rio Rancho’s favorite pool hall also offers has great Happy Hour pricing and plenty of special events.

SLATE STREET CAFÉ

$$

515 Slate Ave. NW, 243-2210 slatestreetcafe.com Slate Street Cafe is a sleek, contemporary eatery that combines big city ambience with inspired, modern cuisine. From the smoked salmon frittata to build-your-own bruschetta to mouthwatering Ahi tuna, their culinary flair will tantalize and delight from breakfast through dinner.

SLICE AND DICE PIZZERIA

$

SLICE PARLOR

$

SOO BAK

$

SPINN’S BURGER & BEER

$

5720 McMahon Blvd. Ste B 261-2058, sliceanddicepizzeria.com With both a sweeping library of board games and full menu of hot pies and subs, Slice and Dice is a venue for everyone from seasoned players to wideeyed beginners (or people just hungry for some pizza). They provide a space where you can gather with a few friends and take in the twin delights of pizza and board games. 9904 Montgomery Blvd. NE, plus 1 other metro location, 232-2808, sliceparlor.com Made-from-scratch pizza dough that is hand stretched daily and cooked on a pizza stone. Have a slice of the old faithful pepperoni pizza; try the Pesto Pizza or the House Calzone. Don’t forget to enjoy the local artwork hanging on the walls. 111 Hermosa Dr. SE 268-0017, soobakfoods.com Serving up a style of food known as “koi fusion”, Soo Bak offers a wide variety of delicious entrees including eight different varieties of kimichi. Try the Soy Crunch Kimichi, which comes with pickled chayote squash, onions, some jalapenos, and fish sauce, apple juice, soy sauce, and vinegar. 4411 Montaño Rd. NW 899-6180, spinnsrestaurant.com Every burger served at Spinn’s is made with never-frozen, fresh-ground Angus beef. Try the restaurant’s signature Armadillo Burger. Spinn’s fries are cut and fried when you order them.

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BITES STARR BROS. BREWING

$

5700 San Antonio Dr. NE, Ste B1 492-2752, starrbrothersbrewing.com With dishes ranging from American favorites to Southern fare, Starr Bros. Brewing is more than an award-winning brewery. It’s turned heads with Poutine Burqueño, a New Mexican take on the Canadian, greasy-spoon classic. The house burger, with high-quality beef and homemade green chile aioli, is a customer favorite.

STEVE’S ICE CREAM AND JAVA

$

323 Romero St. NW # 16, 242-8445 In addition to a dozen ice cream flavors and an array of sherbets, the ‘chill’ side of the menu boasts delightfully smooth malts and fountain drinks. For those looking for a good cup of Joe, Steve’s also delivers–offering a broad selection of coffees and a full set of espressos.

STICKY RICE

$

7600 Jefferson St. SE, Ste 5, 797-1288 Likely the only authentic Laotian sticky rice to be found anywhere in ABQ, this simple menu offers moist, slow roasted chicken and a few frills at prices you can’t beat with a chopstick. The family meal is a steal.

STORMING CRAB

$$

5001 San Mateo Blvd. NE 407-2032, albuquerque.stormingcrab.us Specializing in large, customizable seafood boils rich in Cajun and Atlantic coast flavor, Storming Crab’s selection of dinner combos are encouraged to build their own. Black and green mussels, shrimp, crawfish, white clams, and crab legs can be ordered by the pound.

STRAIGHT UP PIZZA

$$

2801 Eubank Blvd. NE, Ste G 796-9343, straightuppizza.com Offering New York style pizza with a New Mexican edge, Straight Up Pizza serves the Northeast Heights with specialty pizzas, unique toppings, and a plethora of options for any pizza connoisseur.

STUFYS

$

1107 Candelaria Rd. NW, plus 2 other metro locations 344-1207, stufys.com Tasty stuffed sopaipillas are on the menu of this customer favorite, which has been around since 1968. Each sopaipilla is made with a custom machine invented by the owners, then stuffed with savory fillings.

SUSHI & SAKE

$$

SUSHI KING

$$

4214 Central Ave. SE 797-8000, abqsushiandsake.com With specialty sushi rolls, select Korean favorites, and a family-friendly atmosphere, Sushi & Sake specializes in Asian food with a Korean flair. Also look for non-sushi options, such as teriyaki chicken. 9421 Coors Blvd. NW, plus 2 other metro locations 890-6200, sushikingnm.com With three locations around Albuquerque, Sushi King proves day-after-day that it is king of the sea, boasting a large variety of specialty sushi rolls, Japanese curry dishes, and monthly menu revisions to keep the options fresh and appealing. Reservations are recommended.

SUSHI XUAN

417 Tramway Blvd NE #3 200-2477, sushixuannm.com

$$

You’ll find more than tasty sushi here. Diners dig into Chinese, Vietnamese, and Thai dishes, too. Sushi Xuan has multiple shipments of fresh fish during the week, and only uses Japanese Kokoro rice, and organic veggies whenever possible.

SUSHIYA

$$

2906 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE, Ste D 275-4777, nmsushiya.com This family-owned and operated restaurant strives to serve up sushi the way you’d find it on the southern California coast. A clean and comfortable atmosphere pairs well with friendly service and some of the thickest cuts of sashimi in the city.

SWISS ALPS BAKERY

$

TAAJ PALACE

$

3000 San Pedro Dr. NE 881-3063, swissalpsbakery.com Desserts rule, but the sandwiches hit it out of the park. Endless flavors of pastries, tiramisu, and over a dozen cookies line the bakery case. Everything is scratch made including the many varieties of bread and authentic Bavarian style pretzels available on Saturdays. Paninis, grilled, and cold sandwiches round out the sweets with a full espresso bar. 1435 Eubank Blvd NE 296-0109, taajpalacenm.com Taaj Palace is a multifaceted field of flavor and texture, built around the fiery core of the tandoor oven, that serves up a variety of delicious curries, including the widely popular chicken makhani (butter chicken), where tandoori chicken is presented swimming in a creamy tomato sauce.

TAJ MAHAL CUISINE OF INDIA

$$

TASTE OF INDIA

$$

THAI BORAN

$$

1430 Carlisle Blvd. NE 255-1994, tajmahalabq.com Taj Mahal is filled with all of your Indian favorites, from fresh naan (try the garlic version) to tasty saag paneer. The line goes out the door for the popular lunch buffet. 1605 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE 294-6342, tasteofindiaabq.com Family recipes modified for American tastes; Taste of India typically dials back the spice a bit. But it’s no misnomer to think of Taste of India as just what the name advertises: a taste of regional flavors, conveyed by people who grew up with them 3236 La Orilla Rd. NW 492-2244, thaiborannm.com Steeped in spicy tradition, Thai Boran has quickly gained traction as one of the top Thai restaurants Albuquerque has to offer. Thai Boran, which means “Old Thai”, features 53 items on its menu, including five soups, six curries, and five unique dishes off the “Chef’s Collection” section.

THAI CUISINE 2

$

THAI KITCHEN

$

4201 Central Ave. NE 232-3200, thaicuisinenm.com thaicuisinenm.com/home2 Housed in perhaps the most curious A-frame along Route 66, this is the second-coming of a muchbeloved Westside Thai staple, and judging by the fandom, it’s simply better. Be wary of the heat in these dishes, and if you’re vegan/vegetarian, be very, very thankful. 10701 Corrales Rd. NW 890-0059, thaikitchenabq.com Art Xaiyasiha is one of two siblings who crafted one of the Duke City’s first great Thai restaurants, Siam Café. Thai Kitchen is his very own venture, featuring his takes on authentic dishes that taste “just like they do back home.”

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THAI TIP RESTAURANT

$$

THAI SPICE

$$

THAI VEGAN

$$

TOMASITA’S

$$

TULLY’S ITALIAN DELI

$$

TURTLE MOUNTAIN BREWING COMPANY

$$

UNCLE T’S SANGWICHES

$$

1512 Wyoming Blvd. NE, Ste E, 323-7447 The folks at Thai Tip make grocery store runs three times a day to ensure they have enough fresh ingredients for their delicious rice, Thai-style noodle dishes, stir-fries, and salads. 7441 Paseo Del Norte NE (505) 503-1521, thaispiceabq.com An extensive menu features authentic Thai favorites like Pad Thai or Thai fried rice. Lunch special includes an egg roll, entrée, and coconut milk tapioca pudding punctuated with an origami rose–topped straw. 5505 Osuna Rd. NE plus 1 other metro location (505) 884-4610, thaivegannm.com Utilizing local organic produce, you’ll get some of the healthiest food around, all without sacrificing taste. This non-vegan favorite has hearty offerings and a soy chicken that satisfies even the pickiest of meat eaters. 4949 Pan American Fwy. NE (505) 344-1204, tomasitas.com Serving family recipes and making traditional dishes with local ingredients, Tomasita’s has been one of the state’s most popular local spots since Georgia Maryol opened it in Santa Fe in 1974. 1425 San Mateo Blvd. NE (505) 255-5370, tullysdeli.com This Italian deli serves two dozen subs for dine-in or pick-up lunch. A fully stocked market features Italian pantry goods from pasta to olive oil. Don’t forget a box of pastries, cookies, biscotti, cake, or a famous cannoli on your way out.

905 36th Pl. SE, Rio Rancho plus 1 other metro location (505) 994-9497, turtlemountainbrewing.com turtlemountainbrewing.com Known for its handcrafted ales and lagers, which are brewed on the premises, this is more than just a place to enjoy a few drinks. It’s also a great place to enjoy wood-fired pizzas and calzones in a relaxed, laid-back atmosphere. 1520 Deborah Rd. SE, Ste O, Rio Rancho (505) 404-9345, allthesangwiches.com Inspired by their grandmother, Uncle T’s has a menu filled with unbeatable sandwiches. Try out their Havana Press which is their version of the Cuban Sandwich. They also have an assortment of fresh pies to end your meal with.

UPTOWN SPORTS BAR

$

URBAN HOTDOG COMPANY

$

6601 Uptown Blvd. NE (505) 884-4714, uptown-sportsbar.com A huge sports venue with wall-to-wall televisions and all the extras—solid American fare alongside a wide selection of local and national beers. 10250 Cottonwood Park NW, Ste. 440 (505) 898-5671, urbanhotdogcompany.com With about 20 choices—and even a vegetarian option—this restaurant has become a dog-lover’s go-to. Look for Chicago and NYC classics, plus adventurous temptations like the Crafty Dog (topped with mac ‘n’ cheese and bacon).

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BITES VIC’S DAILY CAFÉ

$

3600 Osuna Rd. NE (505) 341-9710, vicsdailycafe.com With a full range of breakfast items, New Mexican favorites, and comfort food, this is a one-stop shop for tasty options like breakfast burritos, meatloaf, and coconut cream pie.

VICK’S VITTLES COUNTRY KITCHEN

$

8810 Central Ave. SE (505) 298-5143, vicksvittles.com Rustle up your posse and head to Vick’s for heaping helpings of Texas-New Mexico fusion and breakfast served all day. Country comfort meets southwestern flair in an environment that welcomes suits and cowboys alike. Prepare to be stuffed.

VIET TASTE

$

5721 Menaul Blvd. NE (505) 888-0101, pwbportal.us/viet-taste-abq With more than 100 menu options—noodle and rice dishes, eight varieties of Pho, coconut shakes, and many more—this restaurant is true to its name, offering a real taste of Vietnamese cuisine.

VIET PHO

$$

4208 Menaul Blvd. NE, (505) 717-2359 This Vietnamese-based cuisine restaurant offers a homey feel and Southeast Asian comfort food. Try the popular Beef Pho Soup or go for a lighter dish like the Shrimp Spring Rolls.

VILLAGE PIZZA

$

3200 La Orilla Rd. NW, E-2 plus 1 other metro location (505) 219-3766, villagepizzanm.com Family owned and operated, Village Pizza offers salads, nachos, calzones, pasta, and of course, signature pizzas, along with an all-you-can-eat buffet.

VINAIGRETTE

1828 Central Ave. SW (505) 842-5507, vinaigretteonline.com

$$

Getting in touch with your “green” side has never been as hip as it is at Albuquerque’s newest go-to salad bistro. Vinaigrette offers a menu full of unique salads made with fresh produce from owner Erin Wade’s farm in Nambè. Items like The Nutty Pear-Fessor and the Asian Chopped Salad don’t sacrifice deliciousness just because they’re healthy. Expect one of 17 vinaigrette dressings to be perfectly paired with your salad.

VINTAGE 423

8000 Paseo Del Norte Blvd. NE (505) 821-1918, vintage-423.com

$$

Decorated with plush booths, black and white photos of vintage cars, a glass wine cellar wall, and an outdoor patio with couches and fireplaces, Vintage 423 is a go-to location for good eats and happy hour—all year long.

WECK’S

$$

4500 Osuna Rd. NE, #100 plus 9 other metro locations (505) 344-1472, wecksinc.com For nearly 20 years, Weck’s has served up huge, tasty portions of breakfast and lunch. Examples: The Original comes with one pound of potatoes mixed with eggs, cheese, and chile; the “Scratch Made” Buttermilk Pancakes are more than seven inches wide.

WESTERN VIEW

$$

6411 Central Ave. NW, (505) 836-2200 With a cozy diner feel and a long history, Western View is turning out plates of diner classics and New Mexican staples—finely seasoned with a sprinkling of Greek options—for diners hungry for both hearty home cooked meals and classic countertop service.

WHICH WICH

$

WHOLE HOG CAFÉ

$

8110 Louisiana Blvd. NE plus 2 other metro locations (505) 856-1617, whichwich.com A national brand with local twists, list your favorites on the bag and await a sammie that edges the competition. The UNM location is a student mainstay. 9880 Montgomery Blvd. plus 1 other metro location (505) 323-1688, wholehogcafenm.com Get award-winning Memphis-style barbecue in a family-friendly atmosphere. Can’t-miss items include the pulled pork, potato salad, and the homemade banana pudding.

YANNI’S MODERN MEDITERRANEAN $$

3109 Central Ave. SE (505) 268-9250, yannisabq.com Impeccable Mediterranean cuisine paired with a fresh atmosphere that whisks you away to Grecian shores, you can always count on Yanni’s for savory spanakopita, perfect pasta, and other delicious treats. Reservations are recommended.

YASMINE’S CAFÉ

$

THE YELLER SUB

$

1600 Central Ave. SE, (505) 242-1980 Yasmine’s is one of the few places in Albuquerque with shawarma—pitas filled with marinated chicken or beef that’s been pressed, stacked and cooked slowly on a rotisserie. Also try lamb and beef shish kababs, baba ghanoush, fatah, and four varieties of baklava. 7200 Montgomery Blvd. NE (505) 888-9784, yellersub.com Owner Mark Roerick has been perfecting his sandwiches since 1979 and the customer favorite, Steak & Grilled Onions Sub proves it. The potato chips, fries, and onion rings made from scratch the old-fashioned way sure won’t let you down.

ZINC WINE BAR AND BISTRO

$$$

3009 Central Ave. NE (505) 254-9462, zincabq.com Imaginative, gourmet cuisine (think: duck confit eggrolls, chicken skewer salad, and pine nut spanakopita) and an out-of-this-world wine list meets a friendly, laid-back atmosphere at this Nob Hill favorite. Reservations are recommended.

ZORBA’S FINE GREEK CUISINE

$

11225 Montgomery Blvd. NE (505) 323-2695, zorbasabq.com The family behind University area favorite, Olympia Café, have relocated their tasty homemade Greek food to the Northeast Heights. Try the Southwestern Gyros or the enduring customer favorite, the pork, chicken, or lamb kebob.

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‘TIL YOU DROP P. 176 | PAWS BUTTON P. 182 | PASSENGER WINDOW P. 188 | PHOTO CONTEST P. 191 | A FEW THINGS P. 192

RECORDS, REGGAE, RARE FINDS David Corran boasts an impressive record collection at his vintage music shop, Vinyl Consumption, in Nob Hill and speaks on the role that records might play in the 21st century. (p. 180)

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

OUT AND ABOUT: YOUR GUIDE TO SHOPPING IN THE DUKE CITY

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‘TIL YOU DROP

Look good Feel good

YOUR INSIDER’S GUIDE TO ABQ’S SHOPPING SCENE

Tips to be a better you...

By Dakota-Lynn McCaffrey

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Aysia Felson Owner Beauty Therapy (505) 803-9325

"For a big night out, I would say you could get eyelash extensions as soon as that day! But if you’re getting ready for something like your wedding day or a big event, where there’ll be a lot of pictures, I would recommend getting eyelash extensions 2 to 3 weeks before the big event. That way you can always change it up if you decide you want something different for the big day. To keep them fresh it’s important to wash your eyelash extensions regularly, brush them when you get out of the shower, and get refills every 2 to 3 weeks.”

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Q:

"I HAVE A BIG EVENT COMING UP AND I WANT TO LOOK MY BEST. THINKING A SPRAY TAN, EYELASH EXTENSIONS, EYEBROW SHAPING & TINTING, AND A FACIAL. HOW FAR IN ADVANCE SHOULD I GET THESE DONE AND WHAT ARE SOME GOOD WAYS TO KEEP EVERYTHING FRESH?"

Rick Preiser Owner SunCare Spray Tan & Skin Salon (505) 883-8090

A:

“It is best to get your spray tan the day before your event if possible. You can set your appointment for the day of, however, you get 80% darker in eight hours. So, if you do it the day of your event, make your appointment in the morning. It is recommended to shower the day before and day after, but not the same day. Make sure to prep with a water-based lotion, that way your tan looks even and lasts longer. You don’t have to exfoliate, but it’ll make your tan last longer if you decide to add that step to your prep routine.”

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Conrad Sanchez Owner Conrad Sanchez Skincare (505) 985-8883

“You might think that getting a facial a day or two before your event is a great idea. However, that could be a recipe for disaster. The best time to get a facial is at least one week before you want your skin at its best. This will allow any residual blotchiness to fade and be replaced with a radiant, youthful glow. A HydraFacial with added dermaplaning is a perfect treatment to get you prepared for your big event. It will provide you with a long-lasting radiant and youthful glow with zero downtime. This type of facial minimizes inflammation and post-treatment breakouts due to deep cleaning of the pores. Plus, you can have a beautiful makeup application applied right after the treatment. If you’re not new to the facial game, and you have a few months to prepare for the big event like a wedding or graduation, here is your permission to kick things into high gear. An event is the perfect motivation to go for that “enhancement” you’ve been wanting to try, such as a peel, microdermabrasion or LED light therapy. As always, discuss with your skin therapist to see which enhancement would be most appropriate for your skin.”

Kristin Near Esthetician and Owner Botanica Skin and Brow Studio (505) 235-7254

“In general, I recommend tinting and waxing about 2 days prior to a big night out or special event. This will allow the color to soften a bit and the skin to calm down if any redness occurs from the process of the waxing or tinting. Most clients prefer as much stain as possible to be on the skin which enhances the shape and fill of the eyebrow. I recommend avoiding cleansing or saturating the brows with water for 24 hours. This includes swimming, hot yoga or a long hot shower or bath. Avoid retinols, AHA’s or anything exfoliating for 72 hours. Oily skin will tend to fade faster and need to be touched up more often. Avoid face oils and eye makeup remover containing oil as much as possible. Sun exposure can also fade the tint prematurely. Rocking your favorite pair of big sunglasses will protect your brows (and lashes) from fading prematurely. It’s important for clients to keep in mind that brow tinting is first and foremost about tinting the color of the eyebrow hair and is not a substitute for semi-permanent makeup such as microblading. With so many fun brow trends and procedures available, lots of women and men are opting to dye their eyebrows much lighter or darker than their natural hair color or want to simply cover white/grey hairs within the brows. These services combined with a professional shaping can truly make a huge improvement in the overall appearance of your face while providing a much more youthful look.”

[

[

Want to look good and feel good? Send us your questions, and we’ll ask the city’s experts, lookgoodfeelgood@abqthemag.com

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We Find It FOR YOU QUESTION

ANSWER

What are some essential accessories that will make my RV adventures more comfortable and enhanced?

New add-ons and gadgets come to market each summer designed to make RV life easier and more convenient. Here are four must-haves we found here in ABQ that are perfect for enthusiasts and beginners alike.

EXTENDED VISION Why replace your truck’s mirrors just to have too large mirrors when you aren’t towing your RV? This universal-fit rubber attachment slides on in seconds, clipping directly onto your existing mirrors—extending your towing vision by seven inches. Different models are even designed to fit specific trucks, like a Ford F-150 or Dodge Ram. —EMMA TREVINO Adjustable Clip-On Towing Mirror by CIPA, $26.99

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COURTESY PHOTOS

Rocky Mountain RV and Marine 12700 Central Ave SE (505) 292-7800 rmrv.com

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‘TIL YOU DROP ON THE RIGHT FOOT Shaky stairs on your recreational vehicle are a thing of the past with SolidStep RV Stairs by Lippert. Designed with no springs, these steps eliminate sway and maximize stability. They’re easy to install, extend to two feet, and can be paired with additional compatible handles that attach for extra support. —EMMA TREVINO SolidStep RV Stairs by Lippert, $300-$500 Rocky Mountain RV and Marine 12700 Central Ave SE (505) 292-7800 rmrv.com

CONVENIENT SPACE-SAVER

SIMPLY CLEAN WATER

Space in an RV is valuable–why waste it with loose paper plates? This dispenser holds up to 125 9-inch plates, mounts under any cabinet or shelf, and is easy to install and refill. It’s perfect for the kids to grab at lunch, or for a quick dinner set-up. Creative parents might also find it to be a great essential to add to the kitchen at home. —EMMA TREVINO

RV water hookups means you’re at the whim of the camp spigot. Not anymore, with this versatile, in-line water filter, which reduces the presence of chlorine, sediment, and rust particles among other contaminants. Installing this 1.5 pound filter outside of your RV is simple—it attaches right to the inlet garden hose, and is effective for an entire year. —EMMA TREVINO

Pop-A-Plate Plate Dispenser by Camco, $11.95

Flow-Pur FP12GKE Exterior In-Line Filter, $49

Aloha RV 8212 Pan American Fwy NE (505) 797-8444 aloharv.com

Aloha RV 8212 Pan American Fwy NE (505) 797-8444 aloharv.com

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Vinyl Consumption 5017 Lomas Blvd NE (505) 203-5284

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avid Corran’s love affair with records began at a young age, when he immersed himself in the California punk rock scene. Over the years, he built his collection, went to college and sold it and then rebuilt it again. During that process, he developed an entrepreneurial spirit while buying and selling records online. “I started realizing that this record I bought on eBay, sometimes it sells for $4 and sometimes it sells for $12. I started trying to find deals, people that maybe just don’t know the value of the record,” Corran says. “I was buying and selling pretty much on Ebay, other sites, garage sales, flea markets and other things like that.” That, in turn, laid the foundation for the birth of Vinyl Consumption, which

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Shop Talk

A thoughtfully curated collection of vinyl— centered around a stellar and hard-to-find group of reggae albums—makes this a must-visit shop.

initially opened in a small antique mall in Fairfield, Calif., in 2014 before Corran relocated to Albuquerque with his wife four years later. Vinyl Consumption came along for the ride, and Corran set up shop inside the Past Present & In-Between flea market located at 5017 Lomas Blvd NE. The shared space works out well for Corran, who is allowed to juggle his business with family obligations and his gig as a reggae DJ without having to be a constant presence at the shop. “There’s like 50 different vendors. Mine’s about 300 square feet of the antique mall, but it’s a big space so there’s someone selling vintage pyrex, there’s someone selling vintage stereo equipment, someone selling whatever — a bunch of different stuff,” he says. “What makes it nice for me is I don’t physically

have to be there. I stock the shop, I curate the space and then it’s a family-run business … I’ve built a good relationship with the owners that gives me the opportunity to run around and take care of my kids and my flexibility to do my DJ stuff and all that too.” More importantly, the Duke City location has allowed for the business to thrive in a way it couldn’t do in a small country town in California. “There are a lot of people in Albuquerque that just never stopped buying records,” Corran says. “Albuquerque’s pretty old school in general. You’ve got all the different cultures out here and everybody’s into the music. The music brings everybody together out here. It’s pretty awesome.” Vinyl Consumption boasts an invento-

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PHOTOS BY DON JAMES /ATM

‘TIL YOU DROP


ry beyond its namesake, including CDs, cassettes, cult movies, vintage magazines and “other music rarities,” according to its Facebook page. The majority of the demand for any of the aforementioned product typically comes from collectors, but it’s not the primary focus. The lifeblood of the business is the vinyl. “I think a lot of people are surprised when they come into my shop and it’s not a bunch of junky, scratched Bing Crosby albums,” Corran says. “They come in and they’re like, ‘Oh wow, this is a curated collection.’” Corran claims to have the largest collection of reggae records in the city, a supply which he fortifies during trips to the Bay Area for other DJ events. The rest of the selection is primarily comprised of soul, punk, blues and Spanish music — and while he does carry new releases as well, Corran makes it a point to seek out records that other places don’t have. The curation process has changed over the years now that his business is more established. “I’ve always been pretty good at social media, so now I get a lot of people just calling me [about their collections]. It’s been a lot easier, but I still go out to flea markets, garage sales, estate sales, but less and less because right now I just have a lot of inventory so now it’s more like I’m looking for specific things,” he says. Those looking to build their own collection won’t break the bank while shopping at Vinyl Consumption, either. “I try not to put too much stuff in my shop that’s over $50,” Corran says. “Most of the stuff that’s super high end, I’ll still go online.” Corran acknowledges that his shop is able to thrive in a digital era in part because records are in vogue. Television and movies layered in nostalgia make owning records look cool, and big box stores like Target and Walmart now commonly carry record players, making it easier for fledgling collectors to dip their toes in the water in a new hobby. Once it gets more serious, that’s when they come to Corran. “As people get deeper into it, they want to find the first press of the reissue of what they bought at Walmart. That’s where the independent record stores come in. It’s an addiction,” he says. “There’s a good chance if you buy a record today, it’s going to be worth as much or more than you bought it for. If you take care of it, it is an investment.” —TRISTEN CRITCHFIELD

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THE

PAWS BUTTON SIX LOCAL BEE FARMS THAT ARE SWEET AS HONEY

KEEPING TABS ON ABQ’S FURRY FRIENDS

Honey is a delicious and beloved natural sweetener, as well as a fantastic alternative to traditional sugar. Its versatility and availability make it a kitchen essential. One of honey’s best properties is that if it’s stored in an airtight container, it never spoils! An ingredient enjoyed across the globe, finding a store with local honey anywhere you are is incredibly easy. Listed below are six local bee farms— while all of them carry honey, some also have beekeeping equipment, bee soaps and lotions, and even full-day beekeeping classes to prepare you for a hive of your own! —EMMA TREVINO

ALTURA HONEY

HONEY SHACK NM

Altura Honey is active in making sure that the honey they sell is treatment-free, meaning that they don’t treat their hives or bees with even natural treatments like wintergreen oils. According to Altura and their customers, eating local honey can even help with allergies!

Located in Los Lunas, Honey Shack NM is home to bee products like royal jelly, ointments, soaps and lotions, and of course, honey. The Honey Shack actually started out at regional art festivals and farmers markets. The passion project turned into a fully-fledged retail space.

BEAR CANYON HONEY

BEE’S HONEY

Bear Canyon and the area around it is host to a plethora of wild flowers that are perfect for bee pollination. A few flowers that their bees help to pollinate are Desert Marigold, Firecracker Penstemon, and Whitestem Paperflower.

Bee’s Honey boasts over 22 farms across New Mexico where they keep their bees and hives. A 20-hour beekeeping course where you can handle live bees during a field day is offered as well as raw local honey and other bee products. The course covers basic beekeeping, harvesting honey, and more.

HAYS HONEY AND APPLE FARM Along with selling honey and apples, Hays carries a wide variety of beekeeping supplies like frames, beekeeping suits, and smokers to calm the hive. According to Hays, high-quality honey is rich in antioxidants that are beneficial for heart health.

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ALBUQUERQUE HIVE RENTALS Albuquerque Hive Rentals lets the consumer rent a hive for one year, either with or without honey, and maintenance and checkups are included. Approximately one third of the human diet can be traced in some way to bee pollination, and the annual value of bee pollination to the U.S. is over $15 billion– this is a great way to get your foot in the door!

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THE

PAWS BUTTON

FUN FACTS ABOUT BEES There are 4,000 native bee species in North America. Did you know that there are more than 20,000 species of bees around the world? About 1/5 of them pollinate plants across North America. According to the Center for Biological Diversity, more than half of North America’s 4,000 native bee species are in decline, with 1 in 4 species at risk of extinction. Bees are an essential part of our agriculture, pollinating many fruits, nuts, and vegetables. Their health directly impacts food security. Bees have 5 eyes.

Bees have been here about 30 million years! Bees carry pollen on their hind legs in a pollen basket called a corbicula. An average beehive can hold around 50,000 bees. Foragers must collect nectar from about 2 million flowers to make 1 pound of honey. Average per capita honey consumption in the US is 1.3 pounds. Bees have 2 pairs of wings. The principal form of communication among honey bees is through chemicals called pheromones.

Bees fly about 20 mph.

To produce a kilogram of honey, bees fly the equivalent of three times around the world in air miles.

Female bees in the hive (except the queen) are called worker bees.

The type of flower the bees take their nectar from determines the honey’s flavor.

Male bees in the hive are called drones.

Number of eggs laid by queen: the high end is 2,000 per day. AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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PET OF T H E MONTH

PET OF THE MONTH ATM readers’ furry, fuzzy, feathered, or scaly best friends. This month's winner: Oreo.

F

or eleven years, Oreo has been Andrea Cordero’s baby. She adopted Oreo from a shelter in Houston when she was just 3 months old, and she is still as sweet as ever. The shelter had already given Oreo her name, probably because of her black and white color, and claimed that she is a pointer mix (basically a mutt). When Oreo was younger, she was super active and always wanted Cordero to take her on hikes and active walks. Now that Oreo is older, she prefers a nice liesurely walk. She loves to chew on hard bones, snack on cheese, and of course the “pup-cups” from Starbucks. Oreo is Cordero’s only pet. However, anytime she goes to visit her sister, Oreo tags along and plays with her sister’s two dogs (her cousins). Oreo used to love going on road trips but lately, she’d much rather just stay at home. Even though she is pictured wearing sunglasses, Oreo won’t keep them on long and will paw them off the first chance she gets. —DLM

Is your pet ATM’s next Pet of the Month? Send a photo and short story about why you think your pet belongs in these pages to petofthemonth@abqthemag.com.

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PIECE OF T H E PAST

ALBUQUERQUE’S COLONIAL ARTIFACT

PHOTO BY RYAN FLANNAGAN

La Glorieta’s centuries-long presence in New Mexico.

L

a Glorieta, Albuquerque’s long standing Spanish colonial hacienda, is now just a reminder of the Spanish colonialism that dominated our state for centuries. The building, a beautiful single-story hacienda with threefoot-thick adobe walls, now stands as the centerpiece of Manzano Day School’s campus. 360 years ago, it was built as a Spanish settler’s home. La Glorieta may look unassuming from the outside, as its adobe-style design can be seen in thousands of buildings across Albuquerque, but it comes with a storied past that has shaped our city and culture. La Glorieta was established by a Mexico City soldier named Don Diego de Trujillo around 1662. Eighteen years later, the Pueblo Revolt caused the city to fall into a state of disarray, with 400 Spaniards killed and forcing the remaining 2,000 settlers to leave. La Glorieta was damaged in the chaos of the Trujillo family fleeing. In 1692, the family returned to La Glorieta during the Reconquista and rebuilt. Fast forward almost 200 years to 1861, when German immigrant and Old Town

mercantile owner Franz Huning bought La Glorieta from the Franciscans. The property was actually named La Glorieta, Spanish for arbor, by Huning. The hacienda had eight rooms at this point, but Huning added south and west wings along with an enclosed patio at the center of the building. Huning used the 700 acres he bought with La Glorieta to grow crops and built a sawmill and gristmill. The next year, the Confederate Army of New Mexico occupied La Glorieta while Huning was away on business in St. Louis. Officers lived in the house itself and infantrymen camped on the land. During the Battle of Albuquerque that April, cannons were fired from the grounds of the gristmill built by Huning. After four days, the Confederate force retreated out of Albuquerque, leaving their sick and dead behind. Huning returned to Albuquerque and La Glorieta in 1864 and lived in the hacienda with his family until he built “Huning Castle” in 1883 and moved there. La Glorieta was then deeded to Huning’s daughter Clara after she married lawyer

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

Harvey Butler Fergusson. Author Erna Fergusson, who has an Albuquerque library named in her honor, was one of their four children. North and east wings were added to La Glorieta by the Hunings and Fergussons, mostly turning the 17th century adobe hacienda into what it is today. In 1940, La Glorieta was purchased by Ruth Hanna McCormick Simms to house Manzano Day School. The school was founded by Simms in 1938, who wanted to give her daughter and similar families a proper education as she saw it. Albuquerque’s vitality boost was prompted by the late 19th century’s railroad construction, which left Old Town to exist as primarily a tourist attraction, which still rings true today. La Glorieta’s long history as a place for family, students, and even soldiers makes it not just an artifact, but a historical landmark that holds memories and experiences from people of different generations and different walks of life entirely. —EMMA TREVINO

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THE

PASSENGER WINDOW

RED RUNNER IN REPOSE

New Mexico’s beloved state bird presides gracefully over Wells Park.

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PHOTO BY RYAN FLANNAGAN

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on Kennell has always been artistically inclined, but the cashstrapped life of a college student ultimately prompted him to narrow his focus. “When I was at the University of Houston, I was painting and I was broke and paints are very expensive,” he says. “I looked at the sculptors, and I noticed that a lot of them were working with found materials, working with garbage, things found on the street. It was kind of out of necessity really that drew me to that.” Some 30 years later, Kennell is still going strong. A Wyoming native who is now based in Santa Fe, Kennell runs a shop with his wife, Lisa, who is his design partner, and three full-time fabricators. They’ve been in the Land of Enchantment for 21 years, but their handiwork can be found all over the country, including at the Coachella Music Festival, Burning Man and the Philadelphia Zoo. “A big thing for us is we’re really committed to public space and putting work out in environments and places where they’re accessible and they sort of engage people in that way,” Kennell says. “It’s like a civic conversation or community conversation, and so we love that. Our works are accessible. It’s kind of about bringing joy to people and celebrating nature and the environment. That’s something almost everybody gets behind.” About six years ago, Kennell collaborated with the Wells Park Neighborhood Association and the Albuquerque Arts Commission to create the Redrock Roadrunner, which is a steel, vibrant red version of the state bird that sits atop a stone boulder pedestal on the median located at 519 McKnight Avenue. Kennell estimates that the structure — pedestal included — is about eight feet tall by 12 feet long by five feet wide — quite smaller than the large-scale sculptures for which Kennell and his team are usually commissioned. It took about two months to create the piece, which is reflective of the theme found in quite a bit of his work. “We do a lot of roadrunners because I love them,” Kennel says. “One, because they’re super cool. Two, here in New

Mexico, they really make a connection to people — the state bird. You see them all over Albuquerque...It just seemed like a great hit. The Redrock Roadrunner’s bright color comes from using automotive paint, something Kennell picked up over years of sculpting with recycled car hoods. The colors are durable, and the sculpture is as vibrant as it was six years ago. “What we do is we shoot it with auto paints,” Kennell says. “Just like at a body shop, we prime it and use these automotive colors with metallic flake and then we put these clear coats on it.” Kennell says the sculpture was a hit

from the outset in Wells Park and continues to receive positive feedback to this day. However, he believes one factor above all is evidence of the high regard for the Redrock Roadrunner in the community. “That piece, I think it’s been there six years and it has never been tagged. To me, that lets me know that people respect it,” he says. “I feel like if you make something that really connects to people, they respect it. I take that as a little feedback. The bird is doing its job and people like it because they take care of it.” —TRISTEN CRITCHFIELD

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2022


AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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ADVERTISING REGISTRY 12th Street Tavern................................................................................................37 3 Advertising........................................................................................................36 About Seniors Complete Moving Services, LLC...............................................62 ABQ Ax............................................................................................................. 108 ABQ Childcare................................................................................................. 104 Albuquerque Florist........................................................................................... 58 Albuquerque Isotopes Baseball........................................................................4, 5 All World Travel...................................................................................................39 AlluraDerm Med Spa........................................................................................103 Alzheimer's Association......................................................................................61 Animal Humane New Mexico............................................................................54 Anthem Financial Services................................................................................107 Asian Expo & Marketplace................................................................................162 Assistance League............................................................................................... 56 Bear Canyon Oral and Facial Surgery.............................................................. 102 Beyond Health....................................................................................................60 Bill Stanage Wealth Management Group LLC................................................... 31 Bosque Aesthetics..........................................................................................12, 13 Brew Lab 101.......................................................................................................171 Bubba's 33...........................................................................................................154 California Closets................................................................................................45 Catholic Charities............................................................................................... 48 Central Grill and Coffee House........................................................................155 Chem Dry of New Mexico.................................................................................114 Cinder Cannabis.................................................................................................32 Cornucopia Adult & Family Services................................................................. 48 Coyote 102.5......................................................................................................172 Crafted Cafe at Hotel Chaco.............................................................................. 65 Crystal Springs.................................................................................................. 153

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Dave's Valley Grill..............................................................................................170 Dos Equis Margarita......................................................................................... 137 Duke City Software...........................................................................................156 Ethan Allen Furniture.........................................................................................19 Exhibit Solutions of New Mexico.....................................................................29 Facility Pump Repair..........................................................................................115 Flying Star Cafe..................................................................................................151 Fuego 102.9.......................................................................................................158 Glam Nail Bar & Spa...........................................................................................38 Greater Albuquerque Association of Realtors..................................................110 Hope Christian School.................................................................................94, 95 Houston Wholesale Cars LLC..........................................................................2, 3 Inn of the Mountain Gods................................................................................174 Inspire Salon...................................................................................................... 59 International Protective Service...................................................................96, 97 John Lopez Real Estate.....................................................................................109 KISS 97.3............................................................................................................167 Kubota Tractor Inc............................................................................................. 67 Lee Michaels Fine Jewelry....................................................................Back Cover Lone River Ranch Water....................................................................................132 Los Poblanos Farm Shop....................................................................................43 Mark Pardo Salon & Spa....................................................................................50 Meals on Wheels.................................................................................................47 Menaul School..................................................................................................165 Merry Maids......................................................................................................6, 7 Mesa Tractor........................................................................................................21 Mike's Jerky..........................................................................................................92 Modulus Architects...........................................................................................105 Montessori One Preschool.......................................................................100, 101

National Alliance for Public Charter Schools.....................................................57 New Mexico Jazz Festival....................................................................................71 New Mexico Orthopaedic Surgery Center.........................................................23 New Mexico Sports & Wellness ......................................................................185 New Mexico United......................................................................................... 166 Optimum............................................................................................................68 Passion’s Story.................................................................................................. 169 Power Ford....................................................................................................98, 99 Q Bar....................................................................................................................71 QC Kinetix...............................................................................Inside Front Cover Radiology Associates of Albuquerque................................................................41 Rio Grande Credit Union........................................ 15, 17, 190, Inside Back Cover Route 66 Cleaners..............................................................................................64 Rudy's Country Store & BBQ...........................................................................163 Skrewball Peanut Butter Whiskey....................................................................150 Slate Street Billiards.......................................................................................... 161 Smiles by Design.........................................................................................55, 159 Southern Glazer's Wine & Spirits....................................................................145 Southwest Women's Oncology........................................................................ 8, 9 Southwestern HR Consulting...........................................................................66 Tema Furniture...................................................................................................49 The Juliette Eye Insitute...................................................................................106 The Juliette Foundation..................................................................................... 24 Tikka Spice........................................................................................................164 University of New Mexico Athletic Department...........................................10, 11 West Cocktail & Wine Bar.................................................................................46 Whiptail..............................................................................................................26 Wildlife West Nature Park..................................................................................63 WisePies............................................................................................................189

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2022


PHOTO CONTEST

HAZY SUNSET By George Kapalka

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ne May evening, George Kapalka was out on his terrace when he accidentally captured the sun setting. “Oh! Look at the sun!” exclaimed his wife just in time for Kapalka to grab his Nikon D5 digital camera. “The silhouette of Cabezon Peak, usually clearly visible, seems to be floating above the horizon, as if partly shrouded by fog or mist,” explains Kapalka. The Kapalkas live in Placitas, where they are afforded a breathtaking

view of the sunset every everning—one of the main reasons why they decided to move to New Mexico. Originally from New Jersey, they traveled throughout our state by RV for many years before moving here in 2017. “Each time we visited, it became harder and harder to leave, and so we decided to make it our home,” says Kapalka. He is a prescribing psychologist in Albuquerque who picked up photography as a hobby at a young age. Kapalka

and his father would set up a darkroom in the bathroom of their apartment every Sunday. That led him to love photography and the film developing and printing process. “I loved the experience and later remembering the moment,” he says. For his enchanting photo, he paired his Nikon body with a AF-S Nikkor 70-200 1:2.8G II ED lens. —DLM

Enter ATM’s photo contest and see your photo featured in our PHOTO OF THE MONTH! Submissions should include one high-resolution digital file sent by email. All photos sent to ATM will be property of the magazine and will not be mailed back to sender. All entries should include your name and phone number. Please include a bio and a brief description of how the photo was taken. Email entries to: photocontest@abqthemag.com

AUGUST 2022 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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Mesa del Sol The future has arrived for Mesa del Sol, the 12,000-acre master-planned community growing just inside the ABQ city limits south of the Sunport. Sparked by the renewed vision of Managing Partner—and native New Mexican—Steven B. Chavez, the area continues to boom with new homes and commercial projects, including a grocery store, a school, and even a new soccer practice facility for N.M. United. The area is anchored by several signature properties, including Albuquerque Studios (and its recession-proof lineup of streaming moving productions), as well as the enormous Aperture Center, with its concave glass façade and designation as the community’s hub. Several hundred homes are already built and occupied, with a total of 43,000 single dwelling homes expected to be completed by the year 2038. Here’s some other fun facts and tidbits about ABQ’s burgeoning new neighborhood. —RWF

1. For most of the year, when

the sun rises in Albuquerque, it shines first on Mesa del Sol.

2. You can reach the city cen-

ter of Mesa del Sol on Bobby Foster Road, named for one of ABQ’s most heralded boxers. Foster fought Muhammad Ali in 1972, lasting eight rounds before being knocked out. It was the only fight in which Ali ever suffered a cut. Regarded as one of the best light heavyweight boxers of all time, Foster was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990.

3. Linear, green-space parks

have been planned throughout Mesa del Sol’s residential community all pointing to one of five mountain peaks that surround the Mesa: Mosca Peak in the Manzano Mountains, Sandia Crest and South Sandia Peak in the San-

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dia Mountains, Mount Taylor in the San Mateo Mountains, and Mount Ladron in the Sierra Ladrones.

4.

Leasing begins next year on the area’s next big project: Encantado, an upscale, multi-family apartment complex with 318 units of modern, affordable options for new community members.

5. Netflix chose Mesa del Sol to be the largest North American production hub for the streaming giant when it purchased an additional 300 acres in December of 2020 to expand from the existing 30acre lot.

6.

The coordinates at which Breaking Bad character Walter White buries his money — +34°59’ 20”, -106° 36’ 52” — actually points to Albuquerque Studios at Mesa del Sol, which is now owned by Netflix.

7. Solar streetlights are per-

manent residents at Mesa del Sol, designed to brighten when movement is detected to strengthen community safety and conserve energy at the same time.

8. Mesa Market is an urban market currently under construction to offer residents and professionals at Mesa

del Sol a grocery store with modern convenience providing fresh, natural, and organic options to create a healthier lifestyle for the community. The opening is scheduled for fall of 2022.

9.

Plenty of Netflix movie and TV stars stroll next door to work out at Sol Fitness, a boutique-style gym that opened in 2021 in the Aperture Center.

10. Isleta Pavilion, the out-

door concert venue located at Mesa del Sol, routinely hosts crowds of 15,000 fans for big shows like Journey, Chris Stapleton, and Jason Aldean.

11. Bernalillo County recently opened the Mesa del Sol Regional Outdoor Sports Facility, designed to support youth soccer and football leagues in New Mexico with ongoing improvements and facilities added through 2024 including additional fields, synthetic turf, and lighting. 12. The New Mexico United

soccer team chose Mesa del Sol as the home of their practice facility, where fans can often watch pre-season games or participate in community activities.

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | AUGUST 2022




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