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THE BEST

Aftermarket Suppliers for Fighters, Helicopters and Transports

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE Sustainment and Modernization

BATTERIES 101

All About Helicopter Batteries, Present and Future

FROM: A.A.D./P.O. Box 477/ Ardsley, NY 10502/USA

Long Live the King! Sikorsky's CH-53K King Stallion

VERTREP Pioneer The Sikorsky SH-3 Sea King

The Puma Prowls Again The Modernization of the RAF's Puma Fleet

The Future of Vertical Lift Preparations for the Joint Multi-Role Technology

WINTER 2016/17 VOL. 12, NO. 4

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WORDS FROM THE WISE

AVIATION D AFTERMARKET

Incredible, Astonishing, and More

DEFENSE

WINTER 2016/17 V o l . 1 2 , N o . 4

C0-PUBLISHER Richard Greenwald C0-PUBLISHER Alan Greenwald EDITOR Laura Brengelman EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Ron Swidler GENERAL MANAGER Rose Candido CIRCULATION Judi Grondin CONTRIBUTORS Susan Burke Andrew Drwiega Hank Hogan Donna Kelly John Likakis Tracy Martin Pat Walsh James Wynbrandt FRONT COVER Image courtesy of Lockheed Martin. ADVERTISING For more information, please contact us at 914-242-8700 A Publication of Air Service Directory, Inc. P.O. Box 477, Ardsley, NY 10502 Ph: 914-242-8700 • Fax: 914-242-5422 www.abdonline.com • abd@abdonline.com

AAD -Aviation Aftermarket Defense is published quarterly by Air Service Directory, Inc. Periodicals postage paid at Mt. Kisco, NY and at additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to: AAD, P.O. Box 477, Ardsley, NY 10502.

The data presented herein has been obtained from sources deemed to be reliable. Every effort has been made to insure accuracy, but AAD does not assume responsibility and/or liability for errors. We will be pleased to receive corrections from listed firms and will make changes in or additions to listings. Rights are reserved, however, to add or delete information in any manner we conceive to be of most value to the aviation industry and to AAD. © 2017. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, in any way, without the express prior written approval of the publishers. PRINTED IN CHINA

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uring the preparation of this issue of Aviation Aftermarket Defense, focusing on helicopters, I had the unusual, for me, experience of taking a ride in one. Perhaps even more unusual was where I enjoyed this scenic flight. The helicopter, a Bell 206, operated by an able pilot from Hudson Bay Helicopters, took us on a tour of the landscape adjacent to, you guessed it, Hudson Bay, home to what is arguably the greatest land-based predator on earth after man, the polar bear. We took off in front of headquarters for our stay, the Churchill Northern Studies Centre, a research facility providing topnotch educational programs and support to scientists who come to study this subarctic region of Manitoba. As we lifted off and headed out over the rugged terrain, the incredible experience was more like floating than flying. Even understanding the rudimentary aspects of the technology and acknowledging the deft handling of the seasoned pilot, the seamless operation, angular agility, and remarkable versatility of the machine struck me as astonishing. Due to climate change, the ice was late this year. As we flew over the coast, along the seaweed-strewn shores we found lounging, resting, hungry polar bears, conserving their energy after months of fasting. They lay in wait for the day the bay would solidify and they could head out onto the ice to resume hunting their primary sustenance, seals. Later in our trip, we witnessed another helicopter airlifting a tranquilized polar bear, maybe weighing 1,000 pounds, removing it from a situation where it threatened human inhabitants - possibly saving lives on both sides. Again, I was struck by the myriad capabilities of rotorcraft and how they ably perform so many key missions. This issue of AAD is filled with a continuation of these thoughts, as we explore the past, present, and future potential of helicopters. For a start, renowned historian Patrick Walsh takes us back to the Cold War, when there was "a novelty to every aspect of the process of using a helicopter to supply ships at sea," in the early days of vertical replenishment, or VERTREP. Aerospace genius John Likakis walks us through the challenges posed to vertical lift by the laws of physics and aerodynamics. He provides a glimpse into how the apparent simplicity of rotorcraft systems belies their overwhelming complexity, outlining research by NASA, the armed forces, and industry leaders that holds promise for the evolution of existing designs and revolutionary new concepts. Batteries used in helicopters start engines and auxiliary power units, provide backup power for essential systems, and support maintenance and preflight checks. Tracy Martin covers applicable battery types, key concepts and concerns, and considerations for safe, reliable power sources in future aircraft. In a related discussion, Hank Hogan talks with researchers and developers about the endurance limitations of mid-sized drones and innovative solutions. As hybrid powertrains are increasingly used in automobiles, improvements in batteries and related research could boost vertical flight capabilities. What are the potential limitations, tradeoffs, and possibilities of such technology for small- to medium-sized unmanned aerial vehicles? Industry expert James Wynbrandt examines the other end of the scale, a heavy-lift helicopter that integrates the latest technologies and achieves major advances in performance. The Sikorsky CH-53K King Stallion features increased power, more onboard cargo room, and far greater total lift. Add improved maintainability and systems designed to increase mission-readiness, even in extreme environments, and you have a winner for the U.S. Marines. On the international front, Andrew Drwiega discusses the modernization of the U.K. Royal Air Force's Puma MK2 helicopter fleet, explaining the upgrades that have resulted in a profound leap in capabilities. At the same time, he reveals how focusing on necessities rather than "nice to haves" has extended the model's out-of-service date, perhaps as far as 2025. Finally, Donna Kelly explores the brave new world of the next generation rotorcraft. She delves into how the superior aircraft will provide more efficient, effective systems, resulting in even more vertical magic for military crews performing diverse missions worldwide. Thus in the following pages, you will find fascinating information to support my recent impressions: helicopters are incredible, astonishing, and far more.

Laura Brengelman AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | WINTER 2016/17

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CONTENTS | WINTER 2016/17

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE

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WINTER 2016/17 V o l . 1 2 , N o . 4

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FEATURES 5

Long Live the King! Sikorsky's CH-53K King Stallion is a New Breed of Heavy Lifter, in Ascension By James Wynbrandt

2 News Briefs What You Need to Know, Quickly and Accurately. By Alan Greenwald

14 Fighting Physics for Faster Helicopters In an Age When Fixed-Wing Aircraft Routinely Operate at Better Than Mach 2, Helicopters Have Yet to Break the 300-Knot Mark By John Likakis

10 TECH COLUMN Hybrid UAVs For Small Helicopters, Going Electric Could Bring Benefits By Hank Hogan

20 Batteries 101 All About Helicopter Batteries, Present and Future By Tracy Martin

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33 The Puma Prowls Again The Modernization of the RAF's Puma Fleet By Andrew Drwiega

CLASSIFIEDS

INDUSTRY'S LEADING PROVIDERS

41 51 59 65

The best in the business are profiled here. Your suppliers should be buying from these sources. 38 C-130 Providers Who To Turn To First 40 P-3 Providers Who To Turn To First

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II Words from the Wise Letter from Laura Brengelman

12 VERTREP Pioneer The Sikorsky SH-3 Sea King By Patrick J. Walsh

26 The Future of Vertical Lift Preparations for the Joint Multi-Role Technology Demonstration are Underway By Donna J. Kelly

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DEPARTMENTS

Firms that specialize in aftermarket aircraft parts distribution, manufacturing & repairs. TRANSPORTS FIGHTERS ROTORCRAFT ADVERTISERS’ INDEX WRITE TO US We welcome your comments, criticisms, praise and suggestions. Please contact us at: AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE PO Box 477, Ardsley, NY 10502 production@abdonline.com Fax: 914-242-5422


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COMPILED BY ALAN GREENWALD

RECENT SIGNINGS Harris Receives $55 Million Contract for B-52 and C-130 Electronic Warfare Technology Harris has secured a $55 million contract to help the U.S. Air Force sustain an electronic warfare system designed to protect B-52 strategic bombers and C-130 military transport aircraft against radar-guided threats. The company will redesign a line-replaceable unit of the ALQ-172 self-protection system, as well as provide software development and testing support under the 4-year contract. "Hostile air defense systems are becoming more sophisticated and accessible in global conflict zones," stated Ed Zoos, President of Harris' electronic systems business. Zoos believes that equipping the aircraft with electronic warfare technology will mitigate future threats. In recent years, Harris has booked multiple orders to redesign ALQ-172 subsystems. S3 International Signs Distribution Agreement with Cobham S3 International, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, announced that it has entered into a distribution agreement with Cobham Mission Systems. As a Cobham Authorized Distributor, S3 provides support of oxygen systems, tactical control systems, weapons carriage and release equipment, and thermal management control systems for military and dual-use applications, spanning regions in South America, Africa, and the Middle East. "We have enjoyed a longstanding relationship with Cobham, and this agreement exemplifies the continued, strategic development of our partnership," said Aksel Sidem, General Manager of S3 International. "It plays an integral role in ensuring our customers receive comprehensive support in the most cost-effective and expeditious way possible. S3 has always been committed to offering our customers with world-class products and services, and we are pleased to team with Cobham to continue the high-quality standards our customers have come to expect from both Cobham and S3." Boeing Awarded $196.6 Million Contract to Supply Spare Parts for F-18s According to a report from the Pentagon, Boeing has been awarded a $196.6 million contract related to spare parts for the U.S. Navy's F/A-18 Super Hornet aircraft. Work will be performed in Missouri and is expected to be completed in December 2019. The first operational F/A-18 Super Hornet squadron formed in June 2001. It was deployed in combat aboard the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln in July 2002. IMP Aerospace Awarded Chilean Navy Orion Modernization Contract Following an international competitive bidding process, IMP Aerospace, a worldclass provider of in-depth aircraft services, has been awarded a contract by the Chilean Navy (ACH) for the service life extension, depot maintenance, and avionics upgrade of the force's P-3 Orion Maritime Patrol Aircraft. These aircraft play a critical role the nation's submarine and littoral/overland surveillance, search and rescue missions, and economic zone and shipping lane protection. The ACH Orion III Program includes the Lockheed Martin P-3 Structural MidLife Upgrade modification on two ACH P-3A aircraft, as well as the design and installation of a state of the art glass cockpit, installation of upgraded engines, and a Phased Depot Maintenance inspection package. Avionics installation design, avionics kit procurement, aircraft nacelle refurbishment, and other work will be completed at IMP Aerospace's facilities in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Tom Galley, IMP Aerospace Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, stated, "We are very pleased to be awarded this contract for the Chilean Navy to modernize their P-3 Orion fleet with advanced avionics and a full structural upgrade. IMP Aerospace has a well-established capability in performing extensive aircraft modifications of this nature, and we are proud to support the Chilean Navy on this important upgrade to their strategic fleet of maritime patrol aircraft." 2

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | WINTER 2016/17

Kellstrom Defense Supports C-130 Upgrade in Asia-Pacific According to Kellstrom Defense Aerospace, a Merex Group company, its Engineering Field Service Team recently supported AIROD in completing the installation and testing of the first C-130 Short-Pod APU and E2H ECS upgrade kits for the Indonesian Air Force. These Kellstrom Defense proprietary aircraft technology updates enhance ground power autonomy, flight deck cooling, pressurization, safety, and reliability of the upgraded aircraft. The successful test flight of the first upgraded aircraft represents a milestone for AIROD and the Indonesian Air Force's C-130 fleet modernization program. Chris Celtruda, Chief Executive Officer of Kellstrom Defense, said, "With this upgrade, the Indonesian Air Force aircraft join an expanding family of legacy C-130 aircraft modernized with Kellstrom Defense's APU and ECS technology. These systems will enhance the utilization and mission readiness of these aircraft for decades to come. We look forward to maintaining our long-term relationship with AIROD and the Indonesian Air Force by ensuring support for our products as they fly into the future." WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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NEWS BRIEFS

PPI and C&S Set to Support 54H60 Propellers Pacific Propeller International (PPI) has been designated as the primary maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) center for the 54H60 propeller system by UTC Aerospace Systems (UTAS). All related tools and equipment will be acquired by PPI and relocated to its 64,000-square-foot facility in Kent, Washington. PPI will have complete access to UTAS technical publications and technical support for the 54H60 product. "Being selected by UTAS is a real distinction and honor for PPI and its affiliates, C&S Propeller and PPI Technical Services. The agreement enables PPI and UTAS to take C-130/P-3 propeller maintenance and technical development to the next level," said Al Hayward, PPI's Vice President of Sales. Over the past 60 years, PPI has earned a solid reputation for quality and workmanship through focus on knowledge, relationships, and solutions, with an emphasis on safety and customer service. Affiliate C&S Propeller has completed relocation to its new 18,000-square foot facility in Fort Worth, Texas, and the corresponding Federal Aviation Administration repair station certificate has been issued, so its operations and services are all set for peak capacity. Founded in 1968, C&S Propeller is a foremost expert in the MRO of the 54H60 propeller system, and it serves military, government and civilian C-130/L-100 operators around the globe.

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Ontic Acquires Part of GE Aviation's Avionics Business Ontic, a BBA Aviation company and leading provider of Extended Life Solutions for original equipment manufacturer's legacy products, has reached an agreement to acquire a portfolio of legacy avionics products from GE Aviation, servicing the military and commercial aviation markets. The portfolio includes electro mechanical, barometric, gyroscopes, and electronics products for key platforms, such as the Sikorsky Sea King and Leonardo AW101 helicopters, Boeing 737, Lockheed C130/J, and BAE Systems's Hawk. According to Gareth Hall, Ontic President and Managing Director, "Ontic has been leading the way in supporting the maturing aerospace platforms, and this acquisition allows us to expand and to provide sustenance in legacy avionics products to these platforms." With significant experience of acquisitions, including buying a similar business from GE Aviation in 2011, Ontic has experience with ensuring the seamless integration of new product lines, and this acquisition will be supported by a transition services agreement with GE Aviation. At the time of this writing, it was expected to be completed early in 2017, subject to the satisfaction of certain conditions.

Skycore and Unical Reach Agreement Skycore Aviation and Unical Defense have announced an agreement to jointly market their combined services for the sale, modification, operations, maintenance, training, and parts for UH-60A Black Hawk helicopters to customers worldwide. In this collaboration, Unical will provide UH-60A aircraft and parts, while Skycore will deliver phase maintenance, mission equipment, and navigation/communication modification services, aircrew and maintenance training, aircraft operations, and export compliance services. "This unique collaboration will provide international customers quick and affordable helicopter solutions for a quality, long-term lift program," explained Skycore President Chris Burgess. "We are very pleased to form a strategic collaboration by combining the two companies' expertise in leveraging international UH-60A markets for one-stop helicopter solutions and define exciting new opportunities for international UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter customers," said Unical Defense President Mercy Tan. AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | WINTER 2016/17

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NEWS BRIEFS COMPILED BY ALAN GREENWALD

Philippines Receives Multi-Role C-130 The Philippines received a second C-130 transport from the United States. The plane departed from a U.S. Air Force facility in Tucson, Arizona, and made several stopovers for refueling, before heading to the Philippines. This latest delivery was one of two U.S. C-130s acquired by the nation's defense and military establishment, under the Excess Defense Articles Program, for $35.61 million. The first aircraft was delivered earlier last year. C-130s serve as the workhorse of the Philippine military in the transport of its personnel and supplies. They are also used by the military for maritime patrol and to deliver relief goods for disaster relief. The Philippine Air Force currently has several other transport planes in its inventory, including three C-295 and three Fokker models, classified as medium-lift aircraft.

Japanese F-35A Rolled Out Japan received its first F-35A Lightning II at a rollout ceremony attended by 400 guests in Lockheed Martin's production facility in Fort Worth, Texas. The event marked a milestone for Japan's Air Self Defense Force as it accepted the fifth generation fighter aircraft. Japan has ordered 42 F-35A aircraft. Four will be built in Fort Worth, and the remaining thirty-eight aircraft will be built at the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries facility in Nagoya, Japan. The United States has already begun related maintenance training for the first Japanese F-35A technicians at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida. With its low observability, network capabilities, and other cutting-edge features, the F-35A could be a crucial tool for Japan in dealing with the neighboring nuclear armed nations of North Korea and China. In addition to a significant asset for the defense of Japan, the aircraft acquisition and related training and support also has been identified as an enhancement of the Japanese-U.S. alliance.

AAR Names Kabra Vice President for International OEM Aftermarket Solutions Global aviation aftermarket leader AAR has named Noreen Kabra as Vice President, International Business Development for the OEM Aftermarket Solutions-Defense group. Kabra, who brings to her new role extensive sales experience in the defense aviation aftermarket, will focus on expanding AAR's footprint via direct sales to foreign militaries. Kabra has spent the last 9 years developing relationships with military procurement organizations in Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Pakistan, Malaysia, Indonesia, and other regions. Before joining AAR, she led and significantly grew the military distribution business at Intertrade, a Rockwell Collins subsidiary. Prior to that, she spent 6 years at Aero Precision, a leading foreign military aviation parts distributor, where she led business development programs worldwide. Currently offering products from such manufacturers as Crane, Eaton, Pratt and Whitney, and Unison, AAR ranks among the world's leading providers of aircraft and engine parts, including factory-new OEM components, as well as inventory management and component repair. 4

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | WINTER 2016/17

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CH-53K King Stallion

Photo courtesy Sikorsky.

SIKORSKY'S CH-53K KING STALLION

LONG LIVE THE KING! Sikorsky's CH-53K King Stallion Is a New Breed Of Heavy Lifter, In Ascension By James Wynbrandt

T

he airframe appears virtually identical, the model designation varies by just a single letter, and even their names are almost interchangeable. But the Sikorsky CH-53K King Stallion, now in development, is a breed apart from the CH-53E Super Stallion it is scheduled to replace, and represents major advances in rotorcraft performance, safety, maintainability, and design process. It is well known that the Super Stallion is already the largest and undisputed heaviest-lifting helicopter in the U.S. military. So why replace it? "The straight and simple answer is, WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

the [troop] support equipment has gotten a lot heavier," says Colonel Hank Vanderborght, U.S. Marine Corps Program Manager for the Naval Air Systems Command's Heavy Lift Helicopter Program. "Part of what drove the gear to become heavier," Vanderborght adds, "was going into Afghanistan and Iraq, and contending with the IEDs (Improvised Explosive Devices)." Today, Humvees, which once weighed as little as 5,500 pounds, can tip the scales at 14,000 pounds. Another impetus for replacement is that the theaters that these helicopters now operate in present high and hot

environments for which the original CH-53s were not originally designed. THE STALLION REBORN Early in the last decade, after concluding life extension or upgrade programs for the CH-53E could not provide the necessary improvements, Pentagon planners published a new set of specifications. These included a 300 percent increase in payload over the original model, as well as a request for proposal (RFP) for a replacement helicopter. Sikorsky Aircraft based its solution for the new platform on the existing CH-53 configuration. "Our challenge," says Dr. Michael

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U.S. Marine Corps pilots maneuver a CH-53K King Stallion as it delivers a 12,000 pound external load after completing a 110 nautical mile mission during the twoweek initial operational test (OT-B1) conducted at Sikorsky.

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AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | WINTER 2016/17

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Photo courtesy Sikorsky.

SIKORSKY'S CH-53K KING STALLION

Photo courtesy Sikorsky.

Not only can it cruise at altitude efficiently, the aircraft aced its first flight test event hovering for 30 minutes at 25 feet while the test team assessed basic aircraft controllability and landing.

Torok, Vice President CH-53K Programs at Sikorsky, "was how do we use new technology conservatively to triple the lift of the Echo, and get additional lift capability in more austere conditions, while still fitting it into the same size box?" Sikorsky proposed incorporating and integrating technology improvements in four key aircraft systems—the engines, transmission, rotor blades, and use of composites— to achieve program requirements. In 2004, the U.S. Department of Defense awarded Sikorsky a development contract for the new platform, designated the CH-53K, or Kilo model, also known as the King Stallion. Utilizing three engines, like all CH-53s, the King Stallion is powered by Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) T-408s. Though roughly the same size as the Super Stallion's, they produce nearly 7,500 shaft horsepower each versus the Echo model's 4,380 shaft horsepower. The new engines also contain roughly 50 percent of the parts count, an improvement that is expected to result in increased reliability and lower lifecycle costs. Sikorsky engineers also redesigned the transmission that delivers this increased power to the rotor, eliminating the Echo's planetary gear system, which, if scaled up, would WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

have been too big and heavy for the application. To enhance lift, the King Stallion's fourth generation allcomposite rotors incorporate a new blade airfoil, twist, and anhedral tip design, resulting in more performance from the same 79-foot diameter rotor span. Composites, in addition to forming the blades, are used in place

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rectify issues before construction began, and ensured proper fit and functionality from the first test article. This helicopter's primary mission is delivering heavy lift, and here the K model, which can lift an external load of 36,000 pounds, proves itself King. The CH-53E is a single-load aircraft, hauling external loads one at a

"...how do we use new technology conservatively to triple the lift of the Echo, and get additional lift capability in more austere conditions, while still fitting it into the same size box?"

of metal throughout the airframe, reducing empty weight and expanding the useful load. In a first for helicopters, the King Stallion was completely digitally designed. The process required first "decomposing" all mandated performance requirements and specifications into interface control documentation; this allowed the integration of physical and functional elements across all design platforms. Thus, any change introduced to the hydraulics system, for example, reflect its impact on all other aspects of the design. This forward-thinking approach enabled engineers to identify and

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time between ship and drop zones. The new model can carry up to three individual loads, and service three different landing zones in one sortie. "That's a huge step increase in function, not to mention the 53K has triple the lift capability," Vanderborght notes. Moreover, specifications call for the aircraft to deliver 100 percent performance in 103-degree Fahrenheit heat at sea level, and at 91.5 degrees F at a 3,000-foot elevation. Internally, a new high-speed cargo system can accommodate standard U.S. Air Force 463L pallets. (These are too big for the CH -53E, currently requiring loads to be re-palletized

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Photo courtesy Sikorsky.

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U.S. Marine Corps aircrew load a High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle onto a CH-53K King Stallion with ease during the two-week initial operational test (OT-B1) conducted at Sikorsky's Flight Center in West Palm Beach, Fl.

Photo courtesy Sikorsky.

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after drop-off at forward bases by C-5 and C-17 cargo jets.) Room for the pallets was made by a redesign of the CH-53's baseline sponson and external auxiliary fuel tank, allowing the cabin to be widened by 12 inches, even as the overall external airframe width has been reduced by 2 inches. In the cockpit, the Rockwell Collins glass panel and fly-by-wire flight controls support a variety of automated modes. This capability improves stability, enables more precise, efficient, and safe operations, and allows pilots to focus on the mission, rather than on the finer points of flying the helicopter. Throughout the development process, the emphasis has been on collaboration. Sikorsky and the U.S. Marine Corps created and maintain parallel teams that stay in daily contact. "From systems engineering lead and logistics lead on down, everybody on my team has a Sikorsky counterpart," says Vanderborght. A FOCUS ON MAINTAINABILITY Improved maintainability was a key design objective. To meet specifications, the U.S Marine Corps established a Design for Maintainers working group, composed of senior 8

level maintainers from the Super Stallion fleet, which met quarterly with the Sikorsky design team at the company's Stratford, Connecticut, headquarters. There, maintainers provided direct input on design, and the two groups reviewed the evolving K model on computers. The "hundreds" of resulting suggestions that were incorporated into the King range from the way avionics are mounted in an electronics bay under the cockpit, to a simplified gearbox assembly for the outboard engines' drive trains. The combined impact of these many changes is a significant improvement in maintainability, Vanderborght says. The King also requires only half the support equipment - almost 150 fewer pieces—than the Echo, acing the design specifications' logistics footprint requirements. Data collection sensors embedded throughout the airframe, avionics, electrical systems and components feed an Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) system on the aircraft. The data, once downloaded, populates a Fleet Common Operating Environment (FCOE), a derivative of an operating system Sikorsky uses in its S-92 commercial helicopters servicing the North Sea oil field platforms. The information

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | WINTER 2016/17

The most powerful helicopter in the Department of Defense, the CH-53K is a new-build helicopter that will expand the fleet’s ability to move more material, more rapidly throughout the area of responsibility using proven and mature technologies. Designed to lift nearly 14 tons at a mission radius of 110 nautical miles in Navy high/hot environments, the CH-53K is designed to lift triple the baseline CH-53E lift capability with an equivalent logistics shipboard footprint, lower operating costs per aircraft, and less direct maintenance man hours per flight hour. The USMC’s procurement objective is 200 helicopters.

can be leveraged for diagnostics and preventive maintenance across the entire fleet. Says Torok, "We can monitor the fleet, and if we see in the vibration data that a customer has a seal that's starting to wear, we can inform them they have a pending fault that might occur in 100 hours, but they have maintenance scheduled in 20 hours, and recommend they change the part then." For individual aircraft, the data also can extend the life limits of major components, which are conservative by design and based on worst-case normal wear. "We can now monitor the data and say, 'You don't need to take this [component] out at 5,000 hours, you can wait until it reaches 7,000 hours,'" Torok points out. The system also meets "default isolation requirements," which mandate that the IVHM system verify the cause for a minimum percentage of system alerts displayed in the cockpit to a single ambiguity group. Contemporary systems typically provide alerts without pinpointing the fault, and sometimes without cause, often requiring maintainers to "hunt and peck" for the problem. As Torok confirms, "It's time consuming, and it takes good equipment out of service in many WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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SIKORSKY'S CH-53K KING STALLION

Photo courtesy u.S. Navy.

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Members of the Blue-Green Team pose for group photo in front of an MH-53E during a tour at Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadrons (HM) 14 in Norfolk, Va. The team met to tackle mission readiness issues related to H-53 helicopters shared between the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, such as maintenance processes, procedures, and training. From the left: Lt. Cmdr. Michael Lanzillo, HM-14 maintenance officer; Lt. Col. Enrique Azenon, Marine Aircraft Group (MAG) 29 Personal Support Detachment commanding officer; Capt. Melissa DePriest, Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron (MALS) 29 assistant aircraft maintenance officer; Maj. Paul Herrle, MALS-29 aircraft maintenance officer; Lt. Col. Brian Taylor, Naval Air Systems Command H-53 Heavy Lift Helicopter Program In-Service Integrated Product Team co-lead; Cmdr. Grady Duffey, wing maintenance officer Helicopter Sea Combat Wing Atlantic Fleet; Col. Sean Salene, MAG-29 commanding officer; Cmdr. Derek Brady, HM-14 commanding officer.

cases." The Kilo's default isolation system detects and notes flaws in the maintainer's log, pinpointing exactly what needs to be fixed. "It saves costs tremendously, eliminating false removals, and also reduces mean time to repair," says Torok. "When we sell this aircraft to the Marine Corp, we want them to have them available." FLIGHT TESTING AND SERVICE ENTRY The first flight of the CH-53K, in October 2015, was more than a year behind schedule, due to a gearbox problem and "other technical issues," according to Sikorsky. But development continued during the delay, and by that first official flight, a fully flyable test vehicle anchored to the ground had accumulated more than 400 hours of operation. Those tests helped Sikorsky "mitigate a lot of risks to the flight test program, and resolve a lot of issues," according to Torok. In the time since, most critical milestones have been achieved, including the U.S. Marine Corps's initial operational testing of WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

external lift scenarios of 27,000 pounds in hover, and a 12,000 pounds in a 110-nautical mile radius mission. Ground events included embarkation and debarkation of combat-equipped troops, internal and external cargo rigging, tactical bulk fuel delivery system (TBFDS) operation, and MEDIVAC litter configuration. The CH-53K King Stallion program of record, budgeted at approximately $30 billion, calls for production of 200 CH-53Ks. This includes the first six system development test articles (SDTA), which also will serve as operational evaluation aircraft at the conclusion of the flight test program. An integrated team from Sikorsky, the U.S. Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR), and the U.S. Marines, including active duty test pilots and maintainers, is conducting the final portions of the flight test program at Sikorsky's Development Flight Center in West Palm Beach, Florida. "This is the earliest [in a flight test program] that active duty Marines have been involved," notes Vanderborght. As for the maintainers' role: "Their job is to provide early warning on deficiencies,

so we can take action," he says. "It's been very valuable in helping prove the concepts of how [the platform] might be supported and maintained in the field." Despite these outstanding trials, at the time of this writing, the team was "equally focused on the transition to production," Torok says. Assuming tests are concluded successfully and the DOD does grants approval, Sikorsky will receive a low rate initial production (LRIP) contract, and commence King Stallion production deliveries in 2020 in parallel with the conclusion of the development program. "The key to the overall design, if I could sum it up," concludes Torok, "is taking the latest of technologies and figuring out how to integrate them all together. We've had good results so far." Adds Vanderborght, "War requires having an upper hand with logistics. That's why the -53K is such a key enabler." AAD

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Courtesy of Aurora Flight Sciences.

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A subscale demonstrator of a larger version of the hybrid electric-internal combustion powered vertical take-off and landing vehicle, which can be quieter than current aircraft. This is because it can fly with internal combustion engines shut off.

HYBRID UAVS For Small Helicopters, Going Electric Could Bring Benefits By Hank Hogan

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nmanned aerial vehicles, commonly known as UAVs or drones, are in the news. For instance, they have been talked about as a way to deliver packages, a fix to the "last mile" problem of getting goods to people quickly. They also can provide services that are of interest to first responders, as well as law enforcement and military personnel, particularly in urban settings. A UAV, for instance, could carry cameras and provide

needed tactical intelligence, doing so in a confined space by taking off vertically, flying around the subject of interest, perhaps hovering for some amount of time, and then returning to land vertically. For the most part, however, such missions are not currently being undertaken, due to a key technical issue faced by the smallto medium-sized category of UAVs. According to John Wissler, Vice President of Research and

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Development at the Cambridge, Massachusetts, research and development center of Aurora Flight Sciences, "The problem with this class of vehicles has always been endurance." The challenge for these UAVs comes down to the physics of the flight profile chosen, Wissler explains. The issue is: "How much energy you need to take off vertically and then fly any distance and then land vertically really limits the mission you can do, how much weight you can carry, and how long you can fly for." Aurora is in the process of developing and demonstrating a solution as part of a Phase II National Aviation and Space Administration (NASA) SBIR (small business innovation research) award that the company won in 2015. The company's solution exploits the fact that the mission profile for small- and medium-sized UAVs requires a lot of thrust and energy when the aircraft needs to WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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make vertical ascents and descents, while other portions of the flight, such as when the vehicle is cruising, require much less power. Aurora's proposed answer is a hybrid powertrain, a mixture of electric motors and internal combustion engines. Both powerplants would be used for vertical movement, and either the electric or internal combustion part could be turned off when the UAV needs less energy. Part of the solution might be the kind of start/stop technology for internal combustion engines that is being successfully applied to advanced hybrid cars today. In the case of the UAVs under development, there also could be other configuration changes, such as using tilting rotors or other surfaces to improve lift. One possibility would be an arrangement of six or eight rotors, with two designated for use during normal flight and the rest only utilized during vertical takeoff and landing. It should be noted that tradeoffs for any of these approaches may include increased complexity, weight, and cost. Hence, any possible configuration has to be carefully analyzed and modeled during the design phase of the project. Today's small to medium UAVs might carry a 5- to 10-pound payload. However, they are only able to fly for 15 to 20 minutes, which limits their range for a round trip to a few miles. Aurora's calculations show that a hybrid design that cleverly combines efficient internal combustion and electric engines with intelligent use of the latest in battery and starter/generator motor technology

potentially could up that endurance figure by as much as 40 percent. Aurora has some experience with such an approach, having developed several hybrid powertrain demonstration vehicles for the U.S. Department of Defense. One of the attributes that most intrigued the military was the ability of the aircraft to fly almost silently. "They were very interested in a quiet mode, where they could shut off the IC (internal combustion) engine and perform their mission," Wissler says. He notes that many possible reconnaissance missions are actually not flown because the noise of the aircraft, along with its speed and closeness to the ground, mean that it would be easily discovered and shot down. Notably, the demonstrator that Aurora is putting together for NASA is being built almost entirely using off-the-shelf parts. The only major item that might be custom made is the starter-generator, largely due to a need for improved performance. There will have to be some careful engineering to ensure that the control strategy for the aircraft and its components are sound and that all of the components work well together. The generator, for instance, produces alternating current, but the battery and motors use direct current. So some switching between the two types of electricity will be necessary. This has to be done in such a way, though, that the electronics and other components are not damaged. The Aurora program runs through 2018, with the expected outcome being a bench-top demonstration of flight capability. After that, there very well could be follow-on work leading

to a flight test of an actual vehicle. If and when that happens, the use of off-the-shelf components could pay off in terms of being able to leverage incremental advances in sub-systems. The continuing improvement of a few percent a year in battery technology, for instance, could boost the UAV's performance in the future. As Wissler concludes, "One of the really nice things about this is, as batteries get better—either higher capacity or lighter weight— everything gets better. It just makes everything we're doing better. It's not as if we're counting on that happening, but we're certainly able to take advantage of that if and when it does." AAD

Multirotor_Concept - A rendering of a hybrid electric motor internal combustion engine helicopter concept vehicle that would have more endurance than current vehicles of this size. A demonstration program focused on the propulsion architecture is underway. The concept should be extensible for a variety of different vehicle configurations.

Courtesy of Aurora Flight Sciences.

Courtesy of Aurora Flight Sciences.

TECH COLUMN - HYBRID UAVS

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Service Force ship of the U.S. Navy to deliver 1 million pounds of cargo via vertical replenishment— that is, by helicopter.

helicopter in the U.S. arsenal to be designed to serve as both a "hunter" and "killer" of enemy submarines. (Before this model, these tasks were assigned to separate aircraft.) Its state-of-theart ASW equipment included dipping sonar and sonobuoys that enabled its specially trained crew members to locate Soviet submarines and track their movements. It was also equipped with various armaments capable of destroying enemy submarines in combat conditions. As a result, the Sea King was a key Cold War asset for the U.S. Navy from the moment of its introduction in September 1961. The versatile rotorcraft also quickly proved well-suited for the Navy's initial experiments in vertical replenishment.

COLD WAR HERO In those pioneering days, there was a novelty to every aspect of the process of using a helicopter to supply ships at sea. In the case of the Altair, the ship's helicopter flight deck had only been added in 1959. And its brand-new SH-3 Sea King, which came equipped for anti-submarine warfare (ASW), was adapted for such deliveries. The innovative SH-3 was the first

EXPANDING REPLENISHMENT OPTIONS Conventional "UNREP," as underway replenishment is commonly described in military terms, involves the ship-to-ship transfer of all the materials necessary to support the mission and crew of a ship at sea. From the moment the two ships raise the "Romeo flag," indicating their readiness to begin the process, this

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The Sikorsky SH-3 Sea King By Patrick J. Walsh Images courtesy of the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

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earching the sky for some sign of the Sikorsky SH-3 Sea King—their helicopter—the crew of the USS Altair (AKS-32) waited eagerly. Then, they heard it, the sound of the rotors cutting the air, as the distinctive helicopter with the orange nose neared the flight deck on the ship's fantail. As an underway replenishment stores ship responsible for supplying the U.S. Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean, the Altair typically delivered some 800 tons of supplies a month to ships at sea. At that moment in spring 1962, however, the Altair became the first

The versatile Sikorsky SH-3 Sea King was the first U.S. helicopter capable of performing the entire spectrum of antisubmarine warfare (ASW) tasks, from detecting and tracking enemy submarines to destroying them. In this photo, a Sea King takes off from the USS Peterson in June 1988.

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VERTREP PIONEER

An SH-3 Sea King helicopter carries out a vertical replenishment flight in the Pacific in December 1979, transferring supplies from the oiler USS Passumpsic to the aircraft carrier USS Midway.

From its first use for the task in November 1964, the UH-46 Sea Knight was closely identified with the development of vertical replenishment procedures. In this 1988 photo, two Sea Knights transfer cargo between the ammunition ship USS Nitro and the aircraft carrier USS Independence. The flexibility of vertical replenishment makes it a particularly good option for the delivery of high priority items to ships at sea. Here, a UH-46 Sea Knight delivers mail to a ship during Operation Desert Shield in 1990.

direct transfer requires careful adherence to a well-established set of procedures designed to ensure safety and efficiency. Both ships must maintain a constant speed and position while the rigging used to move pallets of supplies is physically linked from one ship to the other. At the end of the process, similar procedures govern the process of disconnecting the rigging and separating the delivery ship and receiving ship. The introduction of the helicopter delivery option—or "VERTREP," for vertical replenishment—broadened the logistical capabilities of supply ships by enabling the direct transfer of supplies from ship to ship or between ship and shore. Whether used in conjunction with traditional UNREP procedures or on its own, vertical replenishment soon became a common method of delivering ammunition, food, supplies, spare parts, and personnel to ships at sea. ENTER THE SEA KNIGHT The U.S. Navy's early VERTREP experiments utilized the SH-3 aboard the Altair and the fleet oiler USS Mississinewa (AO-144) in 1962 and 1963. Once those deployments proved the concept sound, the process was formalized with the use of a Boeing Vertol UH-46 Sea Knight WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

aboard the USS Sacramento, beginning in November 1964. The U.S. Navy's UH-46 was a modified version of the CH-46, the U.S. Marine Corps helicopter that saw heavy use in a variety of missions throughout much of America's involvement in the Vietnam War. By the late 1960s, the UH-46 had become the primary helicopter associated with the vertical

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Administration's (NASA's) Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo space programs. Ultimately, both the Sea Knight and the Sea King were replaced by versions of the Sikorsky Seahawk. The Sea Knight gave way to the MH-60 Seahawk in 2004, and the Sea King was replaced by the SH-60 Seahawk in 2006. AAD

"In those pioneering days, there was a novelty to every aspect of the process of using a helicopter to supply ships at sea."

replenishment role. (The SH-3 and other rotorcraft were still used for the task in situations where a Sea Knight was not readily available.) OTHER USES AND MODELS In addition to its pioneering roles in the development of vertical replenishment and anti-submarine warfare, the SH-3 Sea King also was used for combat search and rescue during the Vietnam War. This workhorse also served to retrieve manned space capsules during the National Air and Space

Sources:

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Boeing Historical Snapshot: CH-46 Sea Knight. www.boeing.com. Conley, Timothy E. "Analysis of Pacific Fleet Underway Replenishment data." Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA, September 1988. Naval History and Heritage Command. "USS Altair (AKS-32)." www.history.navy.mil. "Our Navy's Ship of the Month: USS Altair (AKS 32)," Our Navy magazine, July 1962. Norman Polmar. The Naval Institute Guide to the Ships and Aircraft of the U.S. Fleet. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2005. "Romeo is Always Close Up: USS Altair AKS-32." www.ussaltairaks32.org. Jay P. Spenser. Whirlybirds, A History of the U.S. Helicopter Pioneers. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press, 1998. Orvelin Valle. "These Intense Photos Show How The US Navy Keeps Its Warships Supplied At Sea," Business Insider, January 16, 2015. U.S. Naval Air Systems Command: H-46 Sea Knight Fact Sheet. www.navair.navy.mil. U.S. Navy: H-3 Sea King helicopter Fact Sheet. www.navy.mil.

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FASTER HELICOPTERS

F I G H T I N G

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FASTER HELICOPTERS

In An Age When Fixed-Wing Aircraft Routinely Operate At Better Than Mach 2, Helicopters Have Yet To Break The 300-Knot Mark By John Likakis

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elicopters are amazing pieces of technology. The ability to take off and land vertically enables a helicopter to operate out of nearly any space large enough to accommodate its rotor blades. And that ability has made helicopters an integral part of most countries' armed forces for the last half century. Whether the mission is bringing in troops or much-needed disaster relief supplies, the helicopter's unique ability to land almost anywhere helps it get the job done.

But the very design feature that enables vertical flight also holds helicopters back. The whirling rotor blades that provide the lift to take off and land vertically succumb to the laws of physics and aerodynamics as the helicopter's speed increases. In an age when fixed-wing aircraft routinely operate at better than Mach 2, helicopters have yet to break the 300-knot mark. (See the "Going Forward" sidebar.) IN A WHIRL Helicopter rotor blades look quite

simple. They are basically very long, very narrow, and very thin wings (what engineers would refer to as "high aspect ratio" wings). Instead of flying in a straight line, they whirl around in a circle to produce lift—hence the nickname "whirlybirds" for early helicopters. But such apparent simplicity belies the overwhelming complexity of the system. Long, thin airfoils do not allow for large internal stiffening structures. Yet the rotor blades must be strong enough to carry more than the total weight of the helicopter and

Helicopters are great at getting into and out of tight operating areas, but the dynamics of the rotor blades keeps these versatile machines from going as fast as fixed-wing aircraft. The Apache pictured here has a top speed of less than 160 knots.

Photo courtesy of U.S. Navy.

Photo by Peter Davies, U.K. Ministry of Defence.

Engineers have been battling the inherent dynamics of rotor systems since the first autogyros flew back in the 1920s. This McDonnell XV-1 was a composite design with wings for lift at higher speeds. The rotor used compressed-air jets at the tips for power, while a small radial engine drove the pusher propeller. Like the British Fairey RotorDyne, the XV-1 proved to be extremely noisey. While the design was capable of a relatively fast 200 knots, it was abandoned after two prototypes were built.

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GOING FORWARD

After overcoming the engineering challenges of making rotor blades stiff enough and strong enough to lift a helicopter off the ground, the next major hurdle is actually flying someplace. As the helicopter moves forward, it enters a flight regime called "translational lift." This is where the physics of helicopters really start to impose limitations. Picture a helicopter viewed from above with the rotor spinning counter-clockwise. As the helicopter flies forward, a blade swinging around the right side of the helicopter (the "advancing blade") is moving in the same direction as the helicopter. When the same blade comes around the front of the helicopter and swings around the left side, it is moving in the opposite direction (the "retreating blade"). The result is that the rotor blade encounters different airspeeds as it swings around the helicopter. Thus, if the rotor blade tip is traveling around the helicopter at, say, 100 mph, and the helicopter is flying forward at 50 mph, the blade tip has an airspeed of 150 mph on the right side of the helicopter but only 50 mph on the left side. As you might imagine, this results in a serious imbalance in lift, and the helicopter would roll over and crash if engineers did not do something about it. The answer lies in decreasing the rotor blade's angle of attack (the angle at which it meets the wind) on the right side of the helicopter, while increasing the angle of attack on the left side. In this manner, the lift on both sides is equalized. That is, up to a point. Once the helicopter gets above a certain speed, it is no longer possible to compensate for the differences in airspeed between the advancing and retreating blades. Consider a rotor with a blade tip moving at 100 mph around the helicopter. When the helicopter tries to fly at 100 mph, the advancing blade is moving through the air at a brisk 200 mph, but the retreating blade has an airspeed of zero. With no air flowing over it, the retreating blade produces no lift at all (a condition known as "retreating blade stall"), and the helicopter is doomed. But what if we just spin the rotor faster? If the blade tips are whizzing around at, say, 300 mph, then the advancing blade has an airspeed of 400 mph and the retreating blade has an airspeed of 200 mph. In this scenario, we can still compensate for the difference by varying the angles of attack for each blade, just like we did in the first example. However, this trick also has its limits. When our helicopter is flying at 200 mph, the retreating blade experiences a leisurely 100 mph airspeed. But the advancing blade tip now has an airspeed of 500 mph. As the helicopter flies faster, portions of the air flowing around the advancing tip begins to go supersonic, which in turn leads to great increases in drag and a loss of lift due to shockwave formation. Meanwhile, the retreating blade once again experiences retreating blade stall. Courtesy of the U.S. Army

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its cargo (to account for the extra loading imposed by maneuvering). To an extent, a rotor blade gains stiffness as the rotor spins due to centrifugal force. Otherwise, achievable strength and stiffness is limited by the innate design properties of the blade, including the materials from which the rotor is made. Most modern rotor blades are made with a combinations of composite materials, such as Kevlar, carbon fiber, and fiberglass, with some type of foam or honeycomb material used for the blade core and a metal spar for added strength to support the flight loads. Long, thin airfoils also tend to flutter— a type of aerodynamic instability that can rob the blade of much or even all of its lifting ability. Severe flutter can lead to the rotor blades self-destructing. While stiffness can prevent flutter, the long, thin aspect of rotor blades means that there is only so much structural stiffness available from today's materials. BEATING THE LIMITS Over the years, a number of different schemes have been tried to overcome retreating blade stall and the supersonic challenges of the advancing blade. One idea that seemed to hold great promise was turning the rotor into a wing for highspeed flight. The concept is simple enough: Make a four-blade rotor that can be stopped in flight with two blades pointing forward and two pointing aft to form an "X" atop the helicopter— and make the blades wide enough so that they can act as wings. Back in the 1970s, U.S. Navy engineers began exploring the concept. By the late 1970s, Lockheed was contracted to perform feasibility studies and then build a working wind-tunnel model. In 1982, Connecticut-based Sikorsky was selected to develop a flying aircraft. Sikorsky's S-72 X-wing rotorcraft was to be the first aircraft to try this concept, and Sikorsky's engineers worked wonders. They WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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(Photo courtesy of Sikorsky Aircraft

FASTER HELICOPTERS

Sikorsky's S-72 X-Wing was an attempt to overcome the limitations of rotors by stopping the rotors in flight and having them act as wings. This design is shown here on the Sikorsky RSRA rotor research aircraft. However, the X-wing rotor project was cancelled before its first flight when funding was cut.

developed hollow rotor blades with slits molded into the trailing edges of each blade. Instead of varying the actual angles of the blades, a sophisticated valving system allowed compressed air to blow out the slit of any given blade. Taking advantage of something called the Coanda effect, the air forced out of the slit entrained the air flowing around the blade, causing much more air to follow the contour of the blade's trailing edge. By causing such a large mass of air to flow around and down at the trailing edge, the rotor blade could produce substantially increased amounts of lift. And by varying the amount of air being blown out the slit, the amount of lift produced by each blade could be precisely controlled. WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

If all of this sounds hideously complex, that is only because it is. Sikorsky engineers actually managed to design the entire system, as well as design a special aircraft, the Rotor

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TWO ROTORS, ONE 'COPTER Another way to beat the problem of retreating blade stall is to use two main rotors and have each turn in opposite directions. This puts an

Taking advantage of something called the Coanda effect, the air forced out of the slit entrained the air flowing around the blade, causing much more air to follow the contour of the blade's trailing edge.

Systems Research Aircraft ( RSRA), that could test the system in flight. By 1987, the RSRA was ready for flight testing. Unfortunately, government funding was cut before the X-wing concept could make its first flight.

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advancing blade on each side of the helicopter, thus balancing the forces. While this seems like a straightforward solution, the engineering needed to make it work is daunting.

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Several designs have used two counter-rotating rotors to overcome retreating blade stall. The Boeing CH-47 Chinook mounts the rear rotor higher than the front to avoid interference between the two.

The S-97 Raider by Sikorsky uses two co-axial rotors and a pusher propeller to achieve high top and cruise speeds. Reducing rotor rotational speed as airspeed increases helps this advanced helicopter avoid aerodynamic issues that can occur when the rotor tips reach supersonic speeds. Photo by Staff Sergeant William Tremblay, courtesy of the U.S. Army

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An early attempt that involved putting a main rotor at each end of the aerial vehicle was pioneered by Frank Piasecki with the HRP Rescuer tandem-rotor helicopter of 1945. Nicknamed the Flying Banana (due to both its shape and the fact that the U.S. Coast Guard painted their versions bright yellow), it proved to be a very efficient lifter. Piasecki kept the two rotors from interfering with each other by making the fuselage very long and mounting the rear rotor higher than the front one. Piasecki's concept was (and is) sound. After Boeing acquired his Pennsylvania-based company, the Piasecki Helicopter Corporation (renamed Boeing Vertol), the bestknown incarnation of the tandemrotor helicopter, the Boeing CH-47 Chinook, was developed and first flew in the early 1960s. Capable of a top speed of 170 knots, the Chinook is still one of the fastest production helicopters in service today. (It is worth noting that in 1955, Piasecki and members of his team started the offshoot Piasecki Aircraft Corporation, which continues to work with vertical takeoff and lift, or VTOL, aircraft.) 18

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While tandem-rotor helicopters can be fast, they also tend to be rather large. So another way to get two rotors onto one fuselage is to put both of them up front, but angle them slightly off to the sides so that the blades intermesh. Kaman Aircraft, of Bloomfield, Connecticut, has been building such designs for decades. The company's latest in the line of socalled synchro-copters (for the intermeshed and synchronized rotors) is the Kaman K-Max. These designs are powerful lifters, but not terribly fast. The latest scheme for two counter-rotating rotors is to use coaxial rotor shafts with one rotor mounted directly above the other. Such schemes have long been used in conventional aircraft (the Russian TU-95 Bear bomber is a prime example), but developing a practical version for helicopters has proved a bit more challenging. Sikorsky, a part of Lockheed Martin since 2015, has been leading the charge in this area. Its first co-axial design was the S-69, which first flew back in 1973. The model successfully proved the coaxial concept and Sikorsky's

engineering. The company has used much of the knowledge gained from that program in developing the X2 co-axial helicopter. In test flights, which began in 2008, the X2 hit level-flight speeds of 250 knots, and 260 knots (almost 300 mph) in a shallow dive. The helicopter is driven forward by a pusher propeller mounted on the tip of the tail. The tail rotor conventional helicopters require to counter torque is not needed with co-axial rotors, as the torque generated by each rotor cancels out the torque from its counterrotating counterpart. While co-axial rotors overcome the problem of retreating blade stall, the problem remains of the advancing blade tips traveling too fast. Sikorsky engineers overcame this in the X2 by slowing the rotational speed of the rotors to 360 RPM when the helicopter exceeded 200 knots of airspeed. The lessons learned on the X2 have since been incorporated in Sikorsky's S-97 Raider. Intended as a contender for the Future Vertical Lift (FVL) light scout/attack helicopter, the S-97 first flew in early 2015. Flight testing is still underway, and a second S-97 prototype was built late in 2015. The S-97 has a projected cruise speed of 220 knots with a full weapons load. FUTURE FLIGHT The flexibility and utility of rotorcraft makes their continued development a national priority. The U.S. Army, one of the largest WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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Photo courtesy of Sikorsky Aircraft.

FASTER HELICOPTERS

users of helicopters, has been working with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in an effort known as "Vertical Flight 2025." According to NASA, the program participants are examining every

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and the need for structural simplicity and operational reliability. As a consequence, the significant performance benefits of high-lift airfoils . . . have not been exploited for rotorcraft." So NASA is looking into new rotor blade designs that

"Unlike fixed-wing aircraft, helicopter rotors have traditionally relied upon relatively simple airfoils because of the conflicting aerodynamic requirements, aeroelastic constraints, and the need for structural simplicity and operational reliability.

conceivable area of design to identify ways to further improve helicopter performance. One rather surprising area of inquiry is the design of rotor blade airfoils. According to NASA, "Unlike fixed-wing aircraft, helicopter rotors have traditionally relied upon relatively simple airfoils because of the conflicting aerodynamic requirements, aeroelastic constraints, WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

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incorporate variable-geometry airfoils (think ailerons, trailing-edge flaps, and/or leading-edge slats) to both improve lift and create dynamically controlled rotor systems. Other areas under study include electrostatically controlled boundary layer control (see the previous issue of Aviation Aftermarket Defense for a discussion of advanced boundary layer control technologies), micro-size

active control units embedded in rotor blades to drive tiny control surfaces, rotor-tip sweep-back and airfoil optimization to allow rotor tip speeds in excess of Mach .9, changes in rotor tip geometry to increase a helicopter's maximum payload without increasing the aircraft's available power, and potential advances in materials science to produce rotor blades that are stiffer, lighter, and stronger. There is even research into using so-called "smart materials" to create rotor blades that can employ active control along their entire length. In the not too distant future, helicopters may have normal cruise speeds more like those of fixed-wing aircraft. Research by NASA, the U.S. Army, and industry leaders, such as Sikorsky, holds great promise for both the evolutionary development of existing designs and the revolutionary employment of entirely new rotorcraft technologies. AAD

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BATTERIES 101 All About Helicopter Batteries, Present and Future

By Tracy Martin

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otary-wing aircraft and automobiles do not have all that much in common, except for the fact that they both use an on-board battery. The job a battery performs in a car or truck is simple: starting the engine and providing power to accessories, such as the lights or power windows, when the engine is not running. By contrast, batteries used in helicopters are used to start engines or auxiliary power units

(APUs), provide emergency backup power for essential avionics equipment and lighting systems, ensure uninterrupted power for navigation units and fly-by-wire computers, and provide ground power capability for maintenance and preflight checks. Not all helicopters use batteries in the same way. For example, the U.S. Navy's Sikorsky MH-60R Seahawk has two GE T700-GE-401 turbine engines that are too large

Photo courtesy of Concorde Battery Corporation

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to start with any battery. To start its main engines, the Seahawk uses an APU, which is started using power from an onboard battery or a plugin from a ground-based electrical source. The APU produces air pressure that is used to start one of the main engines, which, in turn, produces bleed air to start the second main engine. In another example, the U.S. Navy's single-engine Bell TH-57 Sea Ranger is powered by an Allison 250-C20BJ turbofan engine. Because the engine is relativity small, the onboard battery is able to supply enough electrical energy to spin the rotor fast enough to start the engine. HOW A BATTERY WORKS It is important to understand that a battery does not actually store electricity. Rather, it only stores chemical energy that is converted to produce electricity. To explain this process, let's start by taking a look inside aircraft batteries that use lead plates and sulfuric acid. Batteries that use this technology are known as "flooded" and "maintenance-free" batteries. We also will discuss lithium-ion batteries, which use a different chemical process. The battery case is divided in sections called cells, with a 24-volt battery having twelve cells that produce approximately 2.2 volts each (depending on the battery type) for a total of just over 26 volts. The cells consist of lead plates, half of which have a positive charge, while the other half have a negative charge. Within each cell, the plates are stacked alternately: negative, positive, negative. Insulators or separators (usually made from fiberglass or treated paper) are placed between the plates to prevent contact. The alternating plates in each cell are connected at the top into two groups, one positive and one negative. Each cell's groups of WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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plates are then connected in series (positive to negative) to those in the next cell. The "active material" (lead peroxide on the positive plate and metallic sponge lead on the negative plate) in these positively and negatively charged groups of plates produce electricity when immersed in an electrolytic solution of sulfuric acid and water, often called battery acid. The potential to produce electrical energy is directly related to the amount of active material and total plate surface area—the larger the plate surface, the higher the battery's capacity to produce electrical current. An aircraft battery's capacity is rated in ampere hours (Ah) or the flow of electrical energy. One ampere hour is defined as a current flow of 1 ampere for a period of 1 hour. The capacity of an aircraft battery is usually based on a 1-hour discharge rate. So a 17 Ah battery will supply a current of approximately 17 amperes for a period of 1 hour. A 34 Ah battery will deliver twice that amount of current over the same period of time. CHARGING AND DISCHARGING Batteries are constantly charging or discharging. During either process, ions (both positively or negatively charged) are transferred between the positive and negative groups of cell plates. The insulators or separators between the plates are permeable and non-conductive and thus allow this transfer of ions. During charging and discharging, the ratio of acid to water changes. This ratio is expressed as "specific gravity" or SG. The SG for pure water is 1.000, and sulfuric acid has an SG of 1.835. Combined, their SG ranges around 1.275 to 1.300. As the battery discharges, and ions move from the positive plates to the negative plates, there is less sulfuric acid and more water, the specific gravity of the electrolyte solution is lowered as well. The process is reversed when the battery is charged. The SG becomes higher WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

Photo courtesy of Concorde Battery Corporation

BATTERIES

as the ratio of acid to water changes back to mostly acid. When a battery discharges, and the SG ratio reflects more water and less acid, a chemical byproduct called lead sulfate is produced and starts coating the cell plates, reducing the surface area over which the chemical reactions occur that produce electrical current. This is the reason that an engine's starter motor cannot be cranked indefinitely and other electrical loads cannot be left on for

long periods of time without the battery going dead. Recharging the battery reverses this process. However, if the battery becomes too discharged, the lead sulfate deposits cannot be removed, no matter how much the battery is charged, resulting in total failure of the battery. Besides sulfation concerns, other detrimental chemical reactions take place inside the battery while it is in a discharged condition. The corrosive effect caused by acid on the lead

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and connecting welds to fail. This creates an open circuit within the battery, resulting in sudden battery failure. Another condition that frequently occurs in a discharged battery is freezing of the electrolyte solution. In a deeply discharged battery, the specific gravity is lowered, resulting in a higher percentage of water than sulfuric acid. During this condition, the battery can freeze at temperatures of 32 degrees Fahrenheit (F) and below, while the electrolyte solution in a fully charged battery will not freeze until temperatures drop to -75 degrees F. During a 500-hour phase maintenance inspection on a Boeing AH-64D Apache attack helicopter, located at Camp Taji, Iraq, Specialist David Reed, an Apache mechanic in the 1st Cavalry Division, works on the engine compartment of the helicopter. During the 500-hour maintenance, the aircraft is stripped of all major components and thoroughly inspected, including battery testing. Photo by Sergeant Travis Zielinski, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Division of Public Affairs

This 24-volt, AGM battery manufactured by Concorde Battery is maintenance-free, so no water needs to be added to its twelve cells. As it does not contain and cannot leak liquid electrolyte (battery acid), it is safer to use in aircraft than the traditional flooded types of batteries.

plates and connections within the battery is increased due to the reduced specific gravity of the electrolyte. This corrosion can result in a gradual reduction in battery performance; corroded connectors may lead to reduced discharge current that is enough to power low-drain accessories, such as lights and instruments, but insufficient for engine starting. If the corrosion is bad enough, it also can cause the inter-cell connectors

Photo courtesy of Concorde Battery Corporation

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FLOODED BATTERIES "Wet-cell" or "flooded" batteries can be identified by the cell fill caps located on the top of the battery case. These types of batteries used to be common in automobiles. Gas stations even had battery fillers, containing tap water, located at the pumps, which customers could use to top off the batteries when electrolyte levels became low. When this type of battery is discharged or charged, it outgases a highly flammable mixture of hydrogen and oxygen. Therefore care was required when jumpstarting a car, as a spark from the jumper cables could cause an explosion. When a battery is charged, and especially when excess voltage is applied, some of the water in the electrolyte is converted to gaseous hydrogen and oxygen, which exits through the vents in the battery fill caps. Out-gassing causes some of the electrolyte solution to be lost to the atmosphere, thus the normal requirement to replenish the water in the cells. (Only distilled water should be added to aircraft flooded batteries.) Aircraft battery caps have additional internal stoppers to help prevent excessive loss of electrolyte solution when flying at extreme altitudes. WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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Photo by U.S. Navy Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Liam Kennedy/Released

BATTERIES

U.S. Navy Aviation Machinist Mate Vasya Mstislavski conducts maintenance on a Sikorsky MH-60S Seahawk helicopter assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS George Washington in the South China Sea. General maintenance items on helicopters include servicing the on-board batteries.

Individual battery cells also may feature a pressure relief valve (PRV) that is designed to open when the internal pressure of a cell is approximately 1.5 pounds per square inch (psi) above the external pressure. The PRV prevents excessive pressure buildup when the battery is being charged, and it automatically reseals once the pressure is released. A bulge in the battery case may be present when the internal pressure increases slightly but is not enough to open the PRV. Alternatively, if the PRV opens at altitude, and the battery is then returned to the ground, the external pressure can be greater than the internal pressure, resulting in a concave battery case. Both of these conditions are normal and do not affect the battery's operation. Not all aircraft batteries use vented cell caps, and those that do not are often called "maintenance-free" batteries. MAINTENANCE-FREE BATTERIES To reduce aircraft battery maintenance, and to eliminate the WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

needs for external battery vents, absorbed glass mat (AGM) sealed battery technology was developed around 1980. Introduced in 1985 for military aircraft, where power, weight, safety, and reliability were paramount considerations, the AGM design was an improvement over wet-cell battery designs. AGM batteries are also known as Valve Regulated Sealed Lead-Acid Battery or VRSLAB. Within an AGM battery, both positive and negative plates are sandwiched between layers of mats constructed from glass micro fibers of varying length and diameters. Unlike a flooded battery, the electrolyte is not suspended in a liquid form; instead, it is absorbed and held in place by the capillary action between the fluid and the AGM fibers. The plate separators used in an AGM battery are only saturated around 90 percent with electrolyte, providing space to allow oxygen to travel from the positive to the negative plates. When the oxygen reaches the negative plates, it reacts with lead to form lead oxide and water.

This reaction at the negative plate suppresses the generation of hydrogen gas and eliminates virtually all of the out-gassing from the battery. At the same time, the lead/acid cells are sealed with a pressure relief valve that regulates the internal cell pressure and prevents gases from escaping, and the design recombines the water inside the cells. The result is a battery that never needs to have water added, and thus is maintenance-free. LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES First developed in the 1970s, lithiumion batteries (often referred to as LIB) are common in consumer electronics. LIB cells use positive and negative electrodes that transfer ions between them during discharge and charging modes. The chemistry features a cathode material made of lithium iron phosphate, which is more chemically stable than the oxide-based cathodes used in lead-acid batteries. Lithiumion batteries do not use an electrolyte solution (battery acid) and have no lead plates, so they are

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BATTERIES THAT ARE OUT OF THIS WORLD

A group of engineers and technicians work on the rover's warm electronics box that houses the avionics, or “brains,” which are crucial electronics that control rover movement and instrument deployment. This box-like feature is located in the center of the rover.

Throughout the years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA's) long-term program of robotic exploration of Mars has depended on the use of batteries to power its robots. The scientists working on this application have come across numerous obstacles along the way.

Most batteries, as other components used in the Mars mission, initially were not designed to survive the extremely cold Martian nights. The batteries needed to be kept above -4 degrees Fahrenheit (-20 degrees Celsius) for when they are supplying power and above 32 F (0 C) when they are being recharged. The solution was putting the batteries inside a warm electronics box that uses a combination of heater units. The heat given off by other components and also houses systems key to the rover's operation. Another problem occurred when using solar panels to charge the batteries. The Mars Exploration Rovers carried two 8-amp-hour lithium batteries. During the rovers' prime missions, their solar arrays were able to produce about 900 watt-hours of energy per Martian day, or sol. Well into the extended mission, efforts to drive the robots through and toward solar-rich areas provided up to 410 watt-hours per Martian sol. The power systems also provided energy when the sun was not shining, especially at night. Unfortunately over time, the batteries gradually degraded and were not be able to recharge to full capacity. With the next few explorations, NASA explored other options. One rover carried a 40-amp-hour lithium battery. And a nuclear battery enabled another unit to operate year-round and farther from the equator than would be possible with only solar power. For more information on this and other aspects of Mars exploration, visit http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov. This image is a bird's eye view of a group of engineers and technicians who are working on placing solar cells on the Spirit rover's “wings” in JPL's spacecraft assembly facility.

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about one quarter of the weight of a leadacid battery of the same capacity, making them an attractive choice for aircraft applications. Because safety is paramount, these batteries use a microprocessor-based Battery Monitoring System (BMS) that tracks individual cell activity and protects the battery from abnormal conditions, such as excessive electrical current during charging or discharging, over/under voltage, and extreme operating temperatures. The BMS on some batteries controls battery heating for operation in cold environments, or the system may provide cooling if battery's internal temperature becomes too high. In addition, the system balances the battery's cells to maximize usable capacity and monitors overall battery health. It also can interface with both digital and analog output controls for chargers and other external devices. USE OF LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES IN AIRCRAFT Lithium-ion batteries generally work well in laptops, cell phones, portable power tools, and such. Though there have been notable exceptions, including the recent issues with Samsung's Galaxy Note S7's battery meltdown and subsequent worldwide recall. There also have been problems with larger applications, particularly in aircraft. For instance, Boeing's new 787 Dreamliner had issues with lithium-ion batteries catching on fire, and aircraft were grounded in January 2013 following two LIB incidents. Battery fire containment solutions and other safeguards were put into place in April of that year, and the planes were returned to service. Another issue is that the service life of lithium-ion batteries installed in aircraft has not yet been established. Many battery manufacturers project a service life of 5 years or more, but these projections are based on laboratory data and not field experience. Lithium-ion batteries for consumer products typically last around 2 to 3 years, but aircraft applications operate in more extreme environments, so battery service life may be significantly less. The cost for lithium-ion batteries also can be three to six times that of a lead-acid battery. Given the possibility of a shorter service life, it may be difficult to justify the WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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Photo by U.S. Navy photo by Seaman Nolan Kahn/Released

BATTERIES

Sailors assigned to the Black Knights of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron HS-4 perform maintenance on three MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopters aboard the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan. During routine maintenance, the helicopter's APU starting batteries are inspected and tested.

price. Nevertheless, the weight savings offered by LIB designs, even with additional safeguards in place, may offset its increased cost. The U.S. Navy is using a lithiumion battery, supplied by Concorde Battery, in the new, heavy-lift CH-53 helicopter made by Sikorsky. The application calls for a high-dischargerate battery designed for APU starting and emergency power. According to John Timmons, Vice President of Engineering for Concorde Battery, "Concorde lithium-ion batteries for aircraft are based on the safest chemistry so far developed for lithium-ion technology, featuring a cathode material of lithium iron phosphate, which precludes oxygen generation. Oxygen generation is one of the main contributors to the fire hazard in lithium-ion batteries. The lithium-ion WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

battery for the CH-53K will be part of an integrated design with the control software and electronics of the aircraft system. Redundant safety systems built into the helicopter as well as into the battery are required to control the lithium-ion battery. The protection systems and monitoring of the battery will provide safe reliable power for this next generation of CH53 helicopters." LITHIUM-ION, BATTERY OF THE FUTURE? Safety, or the perception of safety, remains a major concern for aircraft designers faced with deciding whether or not to adopt LIB technology. Only through proper design, testing, and increased data based on use in the field can LIB safety issues, as well as concerns about battery life, be fully addressed.

Bell Helicopter engineers have chosen to use a 17 Ah LIB to start the engine of the 505 Jet Ranger X. The battery used weighs less than 16 pounds, which is about 45 percent lighter than lead-acid alternatives, and is said by the manufacturer to require 60 to 90 percent less maintenance. Though this rotorcraft is not currently used in military applications, it may be predictive of the use of LIB technology for defense force rotary-winged aircraft. Lighter weight, smaller footprint, and less maintenance are factors that are likely to drive the use of lithium-ion batteries in aircraft of the future. AAD

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The Bell V-280 Valor is conceptualized as a replacement to legacy helicopters, such as the Sikorsky MH60 Seahawks and Bell UH-1Y Venom and AH-1Z Viper helicopters.

THE FUTURE OF VERTICAL LIFT

Preparations for the Joint Multi-Role Technology Demonstration are Underway. By Donna J. Kelly

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Image courtesy of Bell Helicopter

JOINT MULTI-ROLE TECHNOLOGY

The Bell V-280 Valor in production.

Image courtesy of Bell Helicopter

repeated requests of both the American Helicopter Society (AHS) International and industry, Congress and the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) made the move to initiate the long process of conceptualizing, designing, and creating the next generation of vastly superior rotorcraft. These new aircraft will enable aviators to fly faster, longer, quieter, with less vibration, and will embody a host of other improvements designed to overcome the limitations of legacy rotorcraft.

I

gor Sikorsky (1889-1972) once said that the helicopter is "probably the most versatile instrument ever created by man. It approaches closer than any other to fulfillment of mankind's ancient dreams of the flying horse and the magic carpet." The next generation of rotorcraft in the works right now will provide even more vertical magic to military crews performing diverse missions worldwide. In 2008, after years of urgent and WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

THE PROGRAM Intense service in Iraq and Afghanistan has resulted in a rapidly aging legacy fleet of helicopters with glaring deficiencies and gaps in needed capabilities. The overarching program to address these needs is being administered by the U.S. Army for all of the military services and is called Future Vertical Lift (FVL). The real powerhouse of the FVL program, however, is the Joint Multi-Role Technology Demonstration (JMR TD). Here, many diverse concepts are being developed and tested that will hopefully find their place in the world of rotorcraft‌ or maybe not. The U.S. Army has made it perfectly clear that everything being tested is for evaluation only. Even the two biggest entries of JMR TD, demonstrator rotorcraft Bell V-280

BETTER POWERPLANTS

Two major engine manufacturers are working toward major powerplant improvements to service the existing fleets of Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk and Boeing AH-64 helicopters. These improvements will enable these helicopters to fly faster and further, while using less fuel and maintenance. The Advanced Turbine Engine Company (ATEC), a joint venture formed between Pratt & Whitney and Honeywell, was recently awarded a contract worth $154 million for its HPW3000. Meanwhile, The General Electric Company GE Aviation of Lynn, Massachusetts, was awarded $102 million to improve the GE3000 engine. (GE Aviation is the producer of the T700 engines currently used in the Black Hawk and the Apache.) The two companies are funded for 24 months through a preliminary design review in 2018. The new powerplant is expected to produce 3,000 shaft horsepower, an improvement over the 2,000 shaft horsepower generated by the T700 engine. Engine development takes a long time, however, and things do not move quickly in the world of government procurement. The first test engine is not expected to arrive until 2021, with full-rate production expected to begin 5 years after that.

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Image courtesy of Sikorsky Aircraft

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In preliminary flight testing, Sikorsky's hub-mounted vibration sensor, which works in conjunction with LORD's Active Vibration Control Systems (AVCS), significantly reduces vibration.

Valor, and the Sikorsky-Boeing SB>1 Defiant, are not guaranteed a production contract if they do not come out at the top in the flight demonstration scheduled for next year. Since many of the designs and concepts are theoretical and have only been tested at small scale, the U.S. Army is being very thorough in reviewing all of the potential approaches before deciding upon systems. The result may very well end up being an amalgam of several selected ideas presented by different producers. As Dan Bailey, Program Director of the JMR/FVL explains, "the intent of

the JMR TD effort is to maximize the knowledge gain and risk reduction toward an anticipated Future Vertical Lift Acquisition Program." According to AHS International Executive Director Mike Hirschberg, the FVL Program proposes the creation of a multirole family of rotorcraft in three overarching sizes and capability sets: Light, Medium, and Heavy. Unifying all three categories will be commonalities in training, cockpit layout, system requirements, reduced overhead, mission flexibility, and the use of common sustainment and maintenance

FILLING THE GAP BETWEEN LEGACY AND FUTURE VERTICAL LIFT HELICOPTERS

The delivery of Sikorsky's last MH-60S Seahawk in January of 2016 and the last MH-60R to be delivered to the U.S. Navy in 2018 signals the end for those airframes. However, a variety of newer production models, such as 112 HH-60W Combat Rescue helicopters, will be delivered to the U.S. Air Force from 2021 through 2029. A total of 200 CH-53K heavy-lift replacement helicopters also will be delivered to the U.S Marine Corps in a contract that delivers until 2031. Still under consideration is a U.S. Army decision regarding CH-47 Block II Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) that provides another upgrade to the Chinook once Boeing completes current production. Also on the horizon is a new Presidential helicopter to be called the Sikorsky VH-92A. 28

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facilities. It is important to note that FVL is a joint initiative between the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Army, U.S. Marines, U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and U.S. Special Operations Command, with each branch of the service having input into the requirements needed to fulfill their specific missions. The U.S. Army's Center of Excellence at Ft. Rucker, Alabama, collected and analyzed the reported needs of each military service between the years 2009 and 2012. Using those results, the Army created what is called "capability sets." These are the requirements stipulated for the individual rotorcraft, such as speed requirements and fuel range. An example of the needs of a specific service would be that the U. S. Marine Corps will need bigger seats, and therefore a bigger cabin, to accommodate the troops of the future, who are estimated to weigh a total of 335 pounds each with their equipment. The first category, "Light," is designed to include missions such as reconnaissance, security, marine interdiction, surface warfare, direct and close combat attack, close air support, and more. The "Medium" category is split into three different capability sets that vary in nature but include recon, surface warfare, air assault, logistics, humanitarian assistance, and others. The "Heavy" class is proposed to perform missions such as air and amphibious assault, MEDEVAC, and other jobs that would necessitate a larger air vehicle. TWO FVL CONTENDERS The Bell V-280 Valor and the Sikorsky-Boeing SB>1 Defiant, which will be flight tested next year, were targeted for the original requirements for the Medium class. Under this proposal, these helicopters would fall under Capability Set 3 and would be outfitted for such missions as mine/counter mine, air and WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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AHS International; Mike Hirschberg.

JOINT MULTI-ROLE TECHNOLOGY

This graphic illustrates the evolution of both the Sikorsky Boeing>Defiant and the Bell Valor. On the left we can see that the beginnings of this line was the X2 Technology Demonstrator in 2008, followed by the larger S-97 Raider, and finally the JMR Demonstrator, the SB>Defiant.. Likewise, the right column shows how Bell built off of lessons learned from the V-22 Osprey, Leonardo AW 609, and culminating in the Bell Valor.

amphibious assault, logistics, humanitarian assistance and disaster response, noncombatant evacuation operations, and MEDEVAC. The Bell Helicopter V-280 Valor is a tiltrotor design that was built upon the lessons learned from the Boeing V-22 Osprey. It boasts full-authority digital fly-by-wire flight control systems, flight envelope protection in the form of structural load limiting, and conversion corridor protection. Designed to be manufactured at a low-cost, the Valor uses commonly available broad goods (assembled fibers) for skin lay-up and yoke assemblies, a large cell carbon core, and bonded skin assemblies. It has been designed for performance and meets all Level 1 Handling Qualities for yaw, pitch, and roll quickness. WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

The Valor is sized to carry eleven to fourteen troops and has a target speed of 280 knots or higher (a gain over the Osprey's top cruising speed of 250 knots). Its two engines will be fixed horizontally on its wingtips, with the engines housed in nacelles located at the tip of the wing. Vince Tobin, Bell Vice President for advanced tiltrotor systems and leader of the V-280 design team points out, "The troops will have an 8-foot clearance under the wing for field of fire and unfettered ability to egress out of side doors and establish a perimeter." The Sikorsky-Boeing entrant in the JMR TD is the SB>1 Defiant. Building on recent flight testing of Sikorsky's X2 Technology Demonstrator and S-97 Raider light tactical helicopter

demonstrator, the SB>1 has been scaled up to meet the requirements of the FVL Medium class of rotorcraft. While the X2 and S-97 development programs were self-funded by Sikorsky and its suppliers, over sixty partners are involved in the Defiant production. The Defiant features full-authority digital fly-by-wire flight control system and will be configured with a lift offset coaxial rotor, pusher prop, and variable RPM drive system. It is expected to have a cruise speed of 250 knots, and excellent low- and medium-speed maneuverability. The Defiant demonstrator is being assembled and will be tested at the Sikorsky Development Flight Center near West Palm Beach, Florida, reports Hirschberg. LORD of Cary,

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This illustration shows the AVX JMR Utility Transport with a cutaway revealing the configuration of troop seating.

North Carolina, has developed an Active Vibration Control Systems (AVCS) that uses Circular Force Generators (CFG) to give the helicopter omnidirectional vibration suppression, rather than linear vibration suppression. Swift Engineering of San Clemente,

(Image courtesy of AVX Aircraft

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(Image courtesy of AVX Aircraft

The cutaway view of the attack configuration shows weapons storage.

California, is manufacturing a major part of the SB>1 frame. RUNNERS UP Two other rotorcraft companies were not selected for the JMR Technology Demonstration but have been funded for further

research and development. AVX Aircraft of Benbrook, Texas, was awarded a Technology Investment Agreement to refine its uniquely designed Compound Coaxial Helicopter (CCH). Under this agreement, AVX will continue with CCH development with design,

This illustration shows the OH-58D conversion process.

(Image courtesy of AVX Aircraft

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Image courtesy of the U.S. Army at www.army.mil

JOINT MULTI-ROLE TECHNOLOGY

Though not selected to produce a demonstrator for the trials in 2017, this drawing expresses Karem Aircraft's concept for a Joint Multi-Role (JMR) aircraft.

analysis, and subscale testing to validate the aircraft's ability to meet expected goals in speed, hover, and cruise efficiency, while also accomplishing a wide variety of military missions.

The AVX features a unique configuration of a conventional coaxial compound rotor, with ducted fans for auxiliary propulsion. According to Hirschberg, "further technology demonstrations will

include scaled wind tunnel testing and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), as well as the development and evaluation of control laws to reduce rotor loads, vibration, and vertical spacing of rotors."

THE HOLY GRAIL OF ROTOR DESIGN?

Individual Blade Control (IBC) is a state of the art technology that enables a small portion of the rotor blade to morph in reaction to mechanical or electrical forces. When the rotor blade is able to make these fine adjustments, the efficiency of the whole process is improved, resulting in major benefits, including noise reduction and vibration control. In addition, fuel consumption is lessened by the increased effectiveness of the rotor surface traveling through air. Several methods are under investigation, including blade root actuation, discrete trailing edge flaps, integrated active trailing edge concept, and the active twist concept. Eurocopter (now Airbus) conducted the first IBC demonstration using a BO105 helicopter with electro-hydraulic pitch blade actuators. This test yielded impressive reductions in noise and vibration. While this electro-hydraulic system was promising, an even more exciting way to achieve IBC is through the use of piezo-actuated trailing edge flaps. This next-generation technology has been in development for over 15 years and is being extensively tested, and has "demonstrated that discrete trailing edge flaps actuated by smart piezo materials provide good system feasibility and efficiency and practical design," according to the engineers and scientists of Airbus Helicopters Deutschland in Germany. Ultimately, the Holy Grail is to have sufficient control through IBC to obviate the need for a swashplate. Karem Aircraft has developed its proprietary IBC actuators for its OSTR concept, which it plans to demonstrate without a swashplate. WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

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JOINT MULTI-ROLE TECHNOLOGY

Image courtesy of U.S. Air Force, Arnold Air Force Base, photo by Jeff Johnson

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National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex mechanics Rick Mcllmoil and Jose Rosario are shown conducting preflight checks of the Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk's rotor before individual blade control testing in the facility's 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel.

Karem Aircraft of Irvine, California, also is receiving further funding to continue development of a suite of technologies that the company believes will dramatically

increase the performance of tiltrotors. Karem has patented what it calls the "optimum speed tiltrotor" (OSTR) configuration. In theory, this approach of greatly

varying the rotational speed of the rotor blades from 100 percent at hover to around 50 percent when cruising will provide maximum efficiency in both flight modes and enable the configuration to deliver a speed of over 300 knots. The Karem lightweight, stiff rotor design will be further evaluated, as will be the multispeed transmissions and individual blade control with electromechanical actuation. All of these systems will be integrated and checked in a rotor test at the top of a tower. A BRAVE NEW WORLD Superior vertical aircraft will soon be aloft. New designs with more efficient systems will promote rotorcraft's use across more areas of aviation. Most important, they will provide the world's best fighting forces with the world's best rotorcraft. AAD

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Image courtesy of the RAF.

AÉROSPATIALE SA 330 PUMA

An RAF Puma Mk2 taking off from its home base, Royal Air Force Benson airbase in the United Kingdom.

THE PUMA P R O W L S

A G A I N

The Modernization Of The RAF's Puma Fleet Proved Many Detractors Wrong. Limiting Upgrades To Necessities Rather Than "Nice To Haves" Resulted In An Impressive Extension To The Model's Out-Of-Service Date. By Andrew Drwiega

E

very nation wants to be armed with the newest and the best aircraft and equipment. A highly capable modern force not only contributes toward a nation's military being an effective deterrent, it also builds national pride among the populace of the country. But buying new does not always have to be the only option. Even in the context of the incredible cost of today's high-tech military systems, sometimes, a new WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

model is the most appropriate choice. And sometimes new is justified when an aviation platform passes the point where proposed upgrades cannot produce an outcome that justifies the investment. The latter was the case for the U.S. Army's Bell Helicopter OH-58D Kiowa Warrior. After years of the Army trying to replace it, the combined impact of sequestration and the cost of the proposed life-extension program finally resulted in it no longer being

feasible to justify the cost of additional upgrades. By contrast, Boeing's CH-47 Chinook, even though it first flew in 1961, five years before the OH-58D, has been successfully adapted and upgraded over time. The model's size and role add to the difficulty of designing a replacement that would not be prohibitively expensive. Thus, it has continued to serve as the U.S. Army's front-line, heavy-lift rotorcraft. At the same time, the CH-53, a rival helicopter made by Sikorsky (now owned by Lockheed Martin), is being further refined in its newest version, the CH-53K King Stallion. Development work was approved by the U.S. Congress at the end of 2005 for a replacement for the CH-53E used by the U.S. Marine Corps. At the end of 2005, Congress approved Research Development Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) efforts during the Fiscal Year 2007. Yet the project has been drawn out, due to engineering difficulties and government concerns regarding rising costs, to the extent that production deliveries are not expected to begin until 2020. There are occasions, however, where extending an older platform initially is met with objections and dissent, but actually is managed in a way that ultimately justifies the cost

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Image Courtesy of Airbus Helicopters.

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One of the four initial Puma Mk1s undergoing engine replacement work at Airbus Helicopters's Marignane facility in the south of France. A Royal Air Force (RAF) Puma Mk2 is being loaded onto a C-17 Globemaster transport aircraft at Brize Norton RAF airbase in the United Kingdom, for the 3,608 mile journey to Kabul, following declaration of Initial Operating Capability (IOC) in 2015.

of providing an interim solution. Such is the case with the upgraded Puma Mk2 fleet flown by the U.K.'s Royal Air Force (RAF). PUMA PROJECTED FROM 1970s TO 2025 The U.K.'s Ministry of Defence (MoD) started taking delivery of its first AĂŠrospatiale SA 330 Pumas in 1971, with the first squadron (No. 33) becoming operational at RAF Odiham in June of that year. Over its life, this reliable workhorse has been involved in many operational theaters, often in support of the U.K.'s Special Operations Forces (SOF), due to its small rotor diameter, which allows entry into tight landing zones, including urban areas. Used extensively during "The Troubles" in Northern Ireland, it also served in Belize, Bosnia, Iraq, and more recently and sparingly in Afghanistan, where it was used to support the SOF. The original out-of-service date for the Puma was 2005, and that was initially extended to 2008. However, in December 2009, U.K. Secretary of State for Defence Bob Ainsworth announced the Future Rotary Wing Strategy, which confirmed a ÂŁ300 million (about $374 million U.S.) decision to 34 AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | WINTER 2016/17 34

extend the Puma's out-of-service date to 2022 through a Life Extension Program (LEP). This strategy included driving the U.K's. armed forces toward operating a maximum of four helicopter types: the Boeing CH-47 Chinook and AH-64 Apache, the Leonardo (then Westland) Lynx, and the AugustaWestland (now Leonardo) AW101 Merlin. There was significant objection to the Puma LEP, even from within the government's own ranks. In 2010, the Defence Select Committee declared, "We remain unconvinced of the financial or operational merits of the Puma Life Extension Programme. We believe that the MoD has underestimated the technical and operational challenges of the Puma programme, and that there is insufficient evidence to support the MoD's assurances of the crashworthiness and the likely delivery dates of the updated aircraft." The Ministry of Defence countered the select committees arguments, stating that the Puma was chosen for the LEP specifically to leverage investments that had already been made to the model. Adding to the fact that the Puma

fleet "has only flown half of the Service Life for which the original designer, Eurocopter, has cleared the airframe," the government stated, "the modifications under the LEP, in particular the new engines, will provide 35 percent more engine power delivering far greater performance in the high altitudes and hot summer temperatures as currently experienced in Afghanistan; they will also provide a 25 percent improvement in fuel efficiency, providing greater range. The new cockpit will bring the aircraft up to date with digital displays and modern navigation and communication equipment." Replying to the issue of "poor survivability," the MoD stated that the improved engine power and the addition of digital avionics "will address the principal safety hazards WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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AÉROSPATIALE SA 330 PUMA

associated with the platform…" leading to "… a significant step change in capability, specifically enabling the aircraft to perform very well in Afghanistan's exacting 'hot and high' environment." The initial plan was for twentyeight Puma Mk1s to be converted to Puma Mk2s; this was cut back to twenty-two but rose again to the final figure of twenty-four. The Puma LEP was to be contracted to the Airbus Group (then Eurocopter), which would conduct the redesign and development of the first four aircraft at its Marignane facility in the south of France. Once the testing and design was approved, the remaining conversions would be carried out at the company's Romanian facility. While Romania was initially viewed as a strange location for this work to take place, in 2002, a partnership WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

agreement had been signed between the Airbus Group and IAR, a Romanian aircraft builder with extensive experience in heavy maintenance. According to Ian Morris, Vice President of Defence at Airbus Helicopters U.K., the Romanian partner was selected for the majority of the conversations as it had "a long and illustrious career, especially with the SA330, in building this specific type. They had done conversions like this for other customers so were suitable for the task." Morris also explains that the fundamental requirement stipulated by the MoD for the whole project was that it had to be "a low-cost, lifeextension programme [which would] take out obsolescence. The direction was that there should be no capability increases other than those that came about by the avionics and

engine upgrades." NOT AN UPGRADE AT ANY COST The obvious change was taking out the analog cockpit and installing digital avionics that had already been qualified by Airbus on other models within the class, which would significantly reduce the qualification time. "This was using known components that all hung together with each other but not necessarily on the same platform. You can do this on the basis that they have worked together on other platforms, although they still had to be qualified on the Puma Mk2," points out Morris. "An audit was taken of what would become obsolete or run into obsolescence during that period, and this drove what needed to be changed," he continues. "Under the Puma Mk1 Through Life Support (TLS) contract, the team was already

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Photo by Andrew Drwiega

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Taken during the European Defence Agency's Hot Blade Exercise in Portugal 2014, this photo shows the Puma MK2's digital glass cockpit.

aware of what was becoming more difficult to maintain, and we were also providing guidance for what would not be maintainable in the future and what the options for change were." The other big issue was the engines, twin Turbomeca Turmo IVC turboshafts (1,560 shaft horsepower each). At the time, these were considered too underpowered to continue though the LEP. The new Makila 1A1 that were selected to replace them deliver a take-off power of 1,820 shaft horsepower. They also have anticipators, which provide more instantaneous power, as well as an additional safety feature. The digital glass cockpit also means 36

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that pilots now used a heads-up digital display that increased their situational awareness. The original, simple Flight Management System (FMS) has been replaced with the Esterline CMA-9000 system. The new FMS uses proprietary software that enables it to interface with the new Puma Mk2 avionics. "But the constant behind every upgrade suggestion was that the more new items that you add, the greater the cost and the time which would be required. The decision was take to upgrade the aircraft out to a certain point, and I think that was vindicated," states Morris. "The Mark 2 could also have been fitted with a full authority digital

engine control (FADEC), but that was not required to allow it to do its job. It has a part mechanical, part electrical engine control system, which is very effective," he adds. When the first four aircraft proceeded to Marignane, Morris notes, "It was all about speeding up delivery. Key individuals from within the organization transferred to work inside the hangar to be close to the project." There were differences in build standard between aircraft, as some had been made by Westland (now Leonardo) in the United Kingdom, and others were South African Air Force helicopters that had previously been reconfigured for the RAF in Romania. According to Morris, the selection criteria used to identify which Puma helicopters within the existing fleet would be upgraded included those with longer airframe life but also those that had been recently modified for MoD equipment, such as defensive aide suites. Designers worked alongside engineers during this initial period to develop the kit package and the manual that would be needed by the Romanians during their conversion of the remaining twenty aircraft. Before leaving the United Kingdom, the Puma Mk1s were stripped of any MoD-sensitive equipment, as well as the old engines, as the new, more powerful Turbomeca Makila 1A1 turboshaft engines were due to take their place. Each individual Puma then was transported via the MoD's own movement system to either Marignane or Romania by road. Once the conversion was completed and initial flight tests had been successfully concluded, RAF aircrews flew the rotorcraft back. "When they returned to the U.K., Airbus Oxford refitted all the MoD-sensitive equipment," says Morris.

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AÉROSPATIALE SA 330 PUMA

Although representing only 12 percent of the allied helicopter force in Kabul, the U.K.'s Puma Mk2's provided 24 percent of the allies' total lift capability in the region in 2015.

PUMA TRANSFORMED The Puma Mk1s were stripped down. This involved taking out all the old cable looms, which were replaced and repositioned to provide redundancy in case of battle damage. The change from analog to digital avionics and the new engines still allowed Airbus to requalify the helicopter for airworthiness under the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration's FAR (Federal Aviation Regulations) 29 as well as to meet the U.K. Ministry of Defence's DEF STAN (Defence Standards) 00-970. The first aircraft completed at Marignane was used for flight testing and confirmation of the qualification requirements. A further improvement was the upgrade of the self-sealing fuel tanks from being able to withstand punctures by 7.62mm rounds to damage by the larger caliber 12.7mm ammunition. Extended range fuel tanks also were included as part of the upgrade, as was improved ballistic protection, a more modern communications suite, and better defensive aides. "Weapons mounts were changed and made more flexible. There was also a requirement to change the position of the winch, WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

so that it was positioned externally rather than internally," describes Morris. The first Puma Mk2s were delivered to the RAF during 2012, with the final aircraft arriving in 2015. The RAF was able to declare IOC by February 2015, ahead of schedule and within budget. Full Operational Capacity (FOC) was declared almost a year later in January 2016. Following the completion of the Puma LEP, a further defense review concluded that the out-of-service date for the upgraded Puma Mk2 could be extended to 2025. Finally, a 3-year interim support arrangement (ISA) was established, including logistical support and crew/maintainer training, at a facility at Airbus Oxford (located close to the home of the Puma fleet at RAF Benson). Airbus is now in discussions with the MoD over the next stage of logistical support to determine the scope of a full support arrangement (FSA), which should take the aircraft through to its out-of-service date. Reports from aircrew who have flown the Puma Mk2 have been very positive regarding the aircraft's improved operating envelope. The

upgraded Pumas, now able to tackle the rigors of flying in Afghanistan, were deployed in March 2015 to Kabul to support Operation TORAL, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's (NATO's) training and support mission in that region. Not long thereafter, RAF flight crews declared that they had exceeded 10,000 flight hours in the upgraded Pumas as part of the U.K.'s contribution, named Resolute Support. As Morris points out, "The aircraft has been such a success in Afghanistan that, of all the various international nations that contribute to rotorcraft around Kabul, while the Puma force equates to [just] 12 percent of the fleet last year, [it] delivered 24 percent of [the total] lift capability." Speaking earlier in 2016, Group Captain Simon Paterson, the U.K.'s Puma Force Commander commented, "While it may still look like the original Puma Mk1 to the untrained eye, the leap in capability has been profound and has made a real difference to the operational output of the Puma Force." AAD .

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INDUSTRY’S LEADING C-130 PROVIDERS HOLOGRAM PRODUCTS PROGRAM Lockheed Martin Global Supply Chain Services 210 Industrial Park Rd, Ste 120 Johnstown, PA 15904 Tel: 814-262-4483

CERTIFIED PARTS LICENSEES Aero Components 5124 Kaltenbrun Rd, Ft. Worth, TX 76119 Tel: 817-572-3003 Aero Engineering & Mfg. Co. 28217 Avenue Crocker Valencia, CA 91355 Tel: 661-295-0875 Airborne Technologies Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo, CA 93012 Ph: 805-389-3700 Frazier Aviation 445 North Fox St, San Fernando, CA 91340 Tel: 818-898-1998 GKN Aerospace Bandy Machining, POB 7716, Burbank, CA 91054 Tel: 818-846-9020 GKN Aerospace Svcs - Cowes Ferry Road-East Cowes Isle of Wright PO32 6RA -UK Tel: +44(0) 1983- 294101 Heroux Devtek Inc. 755, Thurber St. Longueuil, Québec, Canada J4H 3N2 Tel: (450) 679-5454 International Precision, Inc. 9526 Vassar Ave., Chatsworth, CA 91313 Tel: 818-882-3933 Loos & Co., Inc. 1 Cable Rd, Pomfret, CT 06258 Tel: 800-533-5667 Nor-Ral, Inc. 164 Hickory Springs Ind Dr Canyon, GA 30115 Tel: 770-720-0526 ext. 274

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PPG Aerospace Transparencies 1719 Highway 72E Huntsville AL 35804 Tel: 256-851-1008 Snowline Aerospace 4261 Business Drive Cameron Park, CA 95682 530-677-2675 x 403 Tactair Fluid Controls, Inc. 4806 West Taft Rd Liverpool, NY 13088 Tel: 315-451-3928 Williams Aerospace & Mfg. 2820 Via Orange Way Spring Valley, CA 91978 Tel: 619-660-6220

APPROVED REPAIR CENTERS Aeroworx, Inc. 2565 West 237th St Torrance, CA 90505 310-891-0300 Derco Repair Services, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Ave. Milwaukee, WI 53223 Tel: 414-355-7770 Floats and Fuel Cells 4010 Pilot Drive, Suite 103 Memphis, TN 38118 Tel: 901-842-7132 Four Star Accessory Overhaul, Inc. 7711 New Market St. S.W. Tumwater, WA 98501 Tel: 360-956-0800 Heroux Devtek Inc. 755, Thurber St. Longueuil, Québec, Canada J4H 3N2 Tel: 450-679-5454 Kearsley Airways, Ltd. Romeera House, Stansted Airport, Essex CM24 1QL, UK Tel: 44 (0)1279 871000 Lockheed Martin Aeronautics GSCS 210 Industrial Park Rd Ste 120, Johnstown, PA 15904 Tel: 814-262-4516

LICENSED DISTRIBUTORS * MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd., Suite 100 Pointe-Claire, Quebec, H9r1A5 Tel: 514-453-1632

AMMROC PO Box 46450, Abu Dhabi UAE Ph. 971-2-505-7237

Merignac Cedex, France Tel: 33-556-55.22.66 ST Aerospace Eng. Pte. Ltd. 540 Airport Rd, Paya Lebar, Singapore 539938 Tel: 65-382-7846

Airod Sdn. Bhd Locked Bag 4004; Pejabat Pos Kampung Tunku, 47309 Petaling Jaya, Malaysia Tel: 603-746-3334/3344

Turkish Air Force (TurAF) 2nd Air Supply and Maintenance Center, Kayseri, Turkey Tel: 90-352-351-21-06 ext 5091

AUTHORIZED C-130 HERCULES SERVICE CENTERS

Cascade Aerospace 1337 Townline Road, Abbotsford, BC Canda V2T 6E1 Tel: 604-557-2541 DENEL (PTY) Ltd. PO Box 11, Kempton Park, 1620, Rep. of South Africa Tel: 27 (11) 927-4575 Empresa Nacional de Aero. Avenida Jose Miguel Carrera 11087; Paradero 36 1/2, Comuna de El Bosque Santiago Chile Tel: 56-2-383-1919 Fabrica Argentina de Aviones (FADEA) Brig. General San Martin SA Av. Fuerza Aerea Argentina 5500, 5010 Cordoba Tel: 54-351-466-8740, ext 2412 Hellenic Aerospace Industry Tangara, POB 23, GR-320 09 Schimatari, Greece Tel: 30-262-5 3121/2141 Marshall Aerospace The Airport, Cambridge, CB5 8RX, UK Tel: 44-1223-373737 OGMA 2615 Alverca, Portugal Tel: 351-1-958-1000 Sabena Technics - Brussels Bldg. 24B/304, 1930 Zaventem, Belgium Tel: 32-2-723-4958 Sabena Technic - BOD Aeroport de BordeauxMerignac,19 rue Marcel Issartier CS 50 008, 33693

AUTHORIZED C-130 QEC SERVICE CENTERS AIROD Sdn. Bhd Locked Bag 4004 Pejabat Pos Kampung Tunku 47309 Petaling Jaya, Malaysia Tel: +603 7846 5112 Rolls-Royce Engine Services Oakland, Inc. 7200 Earhart Road Oakland, CA 94621USA Tel: (510) 615-5033 Segers Aero 8100 McGowin Drive Fairhope, AL 36532 Tel: 251-928-1878 Standard Aero, Canada 33 Allen Dyne Road Winnipeg, MB R3H 1A1 Tel: 204-318-7755 Vector Aerospace International Fleetlands, Fareham Road, Building 140, Gosport Hampshire, PO13 0AA UK Tel: +44 (0)2392 946342 Vector Aerospace International Limited - QEC Facitily Cody Technology Park Old Ively Road, Farnborough, Hants GU14 0LZ Tel: +44 (0) 1252 359816

AUTHORIZED C-130J HEAVY MAINTENANCE CENTERS Cascade Aerospace 1337 Townline Rd, Abbotsford, BC Canda V2T 6E1 Tel: 604-557-2541 Courtesy of Lockheed Martin.

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Marshall Aerospace The Airport, Cambridge, CB5 8RX, UK Tel: 44-1223-373737 Updated Dec. 2016

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P-3 P-3 ORION ORION Lockheed Martin Authorized P-3 Service Centers & P-3 Certified Parts Providers CERTIFIED PARTS AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTORS

Blue Aerospace 6501-B Nob Hill Rd. Tamarac, FL 33321 954-718-4404 MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd. Suite 100 Pointe-Claire, Quebec H9R 1A5 Tel: 514-453-1632 Kellstrom Industries 3701 Flamingo Rd. Miramar, FL 33027 954-538-2164 CERTIFIED PARTS MANUFACTURERS

Aero Engineering & Manufacturing 28217 Avenue Crocker Valencia, CA 91355-1249 661-295-0815 Beacon Industries 1814 Woody Rd. Dallas, TX 75253-4932 972-557-3494

Frazier Aviation Inc. 445 North Fox St. San Fernando, CA 91340 www.frazieraviation.com

Snowline Aerospace 4261 Business Dr. Cameron Park, CA 95682 877-537-0222

Grace Electronics 20 Peachtree Ct. Holbrook, NY 11741 631-699-0131

Williams Aerospace & Manufacturing 2820 Via Orange Way, Suite G Spring Valley, CA 91978 619-660-6220

IMP Aerostructures PO Box 10 Amherst, Nova Scotia, Canada 902-667-1610 IMP Electronic Systems 3101 Hammonds Plains Rd. Hammonds Plains, Nova Scotia, Canada B3Z 1H7 902-835-4433 International Precision, Inc. 9526 Vassar Ave P.O. Box 4839 Chatsworth CA 91313-4839 Ph. 818-882-3933

AUTHORIZED P-3 ORION SERVICE CENTERS

Airbus Defence & Space GmbH Rechliner Strasse, D-85077 Manching, Germany airbusdefenceandspace.com Airbus Group Australia Pacific Buildings 46, Corner of East Avenue and Explosives Rd Edinburgh, SA 5111 Australia Tel: +61-8-8256-4529

IMP Group, Ltd. 2651 Dutch Village Road Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada Tel: 902-873-2250 AUTHORIZED P-3 ORION QEC REPAIR CENTERS

Rolls-Royce Engine Services Oakland Oakland International Airport 7200 Earhart Road Oakland, CA 94621-4504 Tel: 510-635-1095 GA Telesis 3420 NW 53rd Street Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Tel: 954-676-3111 Standard Aero 3525 General Hudnell San Antonio, TX 78226 Tel: 210-334-6000 Wood Group Turbopower, LLC POC: Steven Vernier 14820 N. W. 60th Ave Miami Lakes, FL 33014 Tel: 305-423-2321

In operation since 1959, there are approximately 223 P-3 aircraft in existence, operated by the US, Canada, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Portugal, Spain, Norway, Germany, Greece, Pakistan, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, Australia and New Zealand. Some primary past and current aircraft maintenance issues include: Fatigue Life Management; Center Wing Replacement; Zone 5 modifications and Outer Wing Assembly replacement. *Inclusion in this list does not in any way imply that the companies listed are “Distributors” for Lockheed Martin for this program. Updated April 27, 2016

Courtesy of Lockheed Martin.


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QUICK REFERENCE:

TRANSPORTS Firms that specialize in parts for Transports Distribution / Manufacturing / Repairs

Courtesy of Lockheed Martin


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PRODUCTS

SHORT

LEADTIMES

COMPETITIVE

PRICING

EXPERIENCE

AS9100 HOSE MANUFACTURER MOST COMMON C-130 HOSE ASSEMBLIES HELD IN STOCK FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY

RUBBER • METAL • TEFLON

818-841-9258 • Fax: 818-841-2342 28887 Industry Drive, Valencia, CA 91355 www.aerocomponent.com sales@aerocomponent.com celebrating 50 years in business ACCESSORIES ACCESSORY OV ACCESSORIES & &ACCESSORY OVERHAUL ERHAUL - TRANSPORT AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Consolidated Aircraft Supply Co., Inc. 55 Raynor Ave. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 631-981-7700 Contact: Steve Matza (President) FAX: 631-981-7706 Toll Free: 800-422-6300 In California: Contact: Rich Noll 818-321-8510 consol1291@aol.com www.consolac.com FAA#GI1R167K

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com DIMO Corp. 44 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 Contact: Sohrab Naghshineh 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 www.dimo.net sales@dimo.net Frazier Aviation, Inc. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com

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Pacific Sky Supply, Inc. 8230 San Fernando Rd. Sun Valley CA 91352 FAX: 818-767-6278 818-768-3700 www.pacsky.com Contact: Emilio Perez glen@pacsky.com FAA Repair Station #QQPR566K WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

ACTUATORSACTUATORS AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com Frazier Aviation, Inc. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Heroux Devtek Inc. 755 Thurber Ave. Longueul, QC Canada J4H3N2 FAX: 450-679-4554 450-679-5454 Contact: Jean Gravel www.herouxdevtek.com jgravel@herouxdevtek.com MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | WINTER 2016/17

Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

AIRFRAME & AIRFRAMEPARTS PARTS AIRFRAME/AIRFRAME OVERHAUL PARTS OVERHAUL Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255 Defense Technology Equipment, Inc. 45681 Oakbrook Ct., Unit 107-111 Sterling VA 20166 FAX: 703-766-1701 703-766-1700 www.defense-tech.com sales@defense-tech.com Contact: Frank Benzaria FIELD Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Frazier Aviation, Inc. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com HC Pacific 19844 Quiroz Court Walnut CA 91789 909-598-0509 Contact: Cynthia Tubal/Sylvia Sao FAX: 909-598-1411 www.hcpacific.com hcpac@ix.netcom.com Higher Source Aviation 908 Upward Road Flat Rock NC 28731 828-698-7490 www.highersourceaviation.com FAX: 828-698-7492 Honeycomb Company of America (HCOA) 1950 Limbus Ave Sarasota FL USA 34243 FAX: 1+ 941-755-426 +1 941-993-0049 www.hcoainc.com - wbryson@hcoainc.com WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE: TRANSPORTS Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com L3 Communications - Platform Integration 7500 Maehr Road Waco TX USA 76705 254-867-7001 www.L-3com.com/is FAX: 254-867-7482 MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith TIMCO Aviation Services 623 Radar Rd. Greensboro NC 27410 386-623-5008 www.timco.aero FAX: 336-665-9011

ANTENNAS/ANTENNA SYSTEMS ANTENNAS/ANTENNA SYSTEMS ASB Avionics 1032 Sabovich Street Mojave CA 93501 www.asbavionics.com 661-824-1005 FAX: 661-824-1006

AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Herley Industries, Inc. 3061 Industry Drive Lancaster PA USA 17601 www.herley.com 717-397-2777 FAX: 717-397-7079

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L3 Communications - Platform Integration 7500 Maehr Road Waco TX USA 76705 254-867-7001 www.L-3com.com/is FAX: 254-867-7482 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

AUXILIARY POWER POWER UNITS & APUS AUXILIARY UNITS & OVERHAUL APUS OVERHAUL AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901

Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith

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L3 Communications - Platform Integration 7500 Maehr Road Waco TX USA 76705 254-867-7001 www.L-3com.com/is FAX: 254-867-7482 Meggitt Avionics, Inc. 7, Whittle Avenue, Segensworth West Fareham, Hampshire UK PO15 5SH 44 1489-483-330 www.meggitt.com FAX: 44 1489-483416 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 Pacific Propeller Inc. PO Box 1187, 5802 S. 228th Street Kent WA 98032 www.pacprop.com 253-872-7767 FAX: 253-872-6557 FAA CRS# NQ3R719L /P3 BLADE MANUFATURER Contact: Al Hayward ahayward@pacprop.com FAA CRS# NQ3R719L /P3 BLADE MANUFATURER Sensor Systems Inc. 8929 Fullbright Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 www.sensorantennas.com 818-341-5366 FAX: 818-341-9059 Contact: Dave Brooks dbrooks@sensorsantennas.com

BATTERIES/BATTERY CHARGERS BATTERIES/BATTERY CHARGERS & OVERHAUL & OVERHAUL

AVIONICS & AVIONICS AVIONICS & AVIONICS OVERHAUL OVERHAUL

Becker Avionics 10376 USA Today Way Miramar FL USA 33025 www.beckerusa.com 954-450-3137 FAX: 954-450-3206

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org

AOG REACTION, INC. 526 Aviator Drive Ft. Worth TX 76179 817-439-0700 FAA Repair Station TU1R519K FAX: 817-439-9700 www.aogreaction.com Contact: Robert Samson rsamson@aogreaction.com

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K Avionics Specialist, Inc. 3833 Premier Ave. Memphis TN 38118 901-362-9700 FAX: 901-375-8310 Contact: Roger Dahler Repair Station #PK4R443M asinc@avionics-specialist.com www.avionics-specialist.com

AXNES INC 15954 Jackson Creek Parkway Suite B609 Monument CO 80132 719-722-1770 www.axnes.com post@axnes.com

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13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com FIELD Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Fieldtech Avionics & Instruments Inc. 4151 North Main St. Meachan Field Ft. Worth TX 76106 817-625-2719 www.ftav.com FAX: 817-625-6875 4815 N.W. 79th Ave. Suite 10 Miami FL 33166 FAX: 305-593-0694 305-593-9913 InAir Aviation Services 8225 Country Club Place Indianapolis IN 46214 FAX: 317-271-0345 317-271-0195 www.inairaviation.com Repair Station #IOVRL072L Contact: Greg Mathias sales@inairaviation.com Innovative Solutions & Support 720 Pennsylvania Drive Exton PA 19341 FAX: 610-646-0146 610-646-9800 www.innovative-ss.com Contact: David Green Intercontinental Avionics & Instrument Corp 22 Canfield Road Tyler Hill PA 18469 570-224-6960 FAX: 570-224-6834 Contact: Bob Solimine iaiparts@ptd.net Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | WINTER 2016/17

Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Concorde Battery Corporation 2009 San Bernardino Rd. West Covina CA 91790 FAX: 626-813-1235 626-813-1234 www.concordebattery.com Contact: Skip Koss ENERSYS-HAWKER BATTERIES 2366 Bernville Road Reading PA 19605 610-208-1831 FAX: 610-208-1630 www.enersys.com/defense Contact: Frank Metzger frank.metzger@enersys.com Herley Industries, Inc. 3061 Industry Drive Lancaster PA USA 17601 www.herley.com 717-397-2777 FAX: 717-397-7079

BEARINGS

BEARINGS

Dixie Aerospace Suite 100, 560 Atlanta S. Pkwy. Atlanta GA 30349 Telex: 542141 SITA: ATLDBXD 404-348-8100 Toll Free: 800-241-8471 FAX: 404-763-2577 www.dixieaerospace.com sales@dixieaerospace.com MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com MIRAJ Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com Pacific Sky Supply, Inc. 8230 San Fernando Rd. Sun Valley CA 91352 FAX: 818-767-6278 818-768-3700 www.pacsky.com Contact: Emilio Perez glen@pacsky.com FAA Repair Station #QQPR566K

CABLE & WIRE CABLE & WIRE Airborne Technologies, Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE: TRANSPORTS Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com Continental Cable Company 253 Monument Rd. Hinsdale NH 03451 603-256-3136 FAX: 603-256-6003 FIELD Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Fieldtech Avionics & Instruments Inc. 4151 North Main St. Meachan Field Ft. Worth TX 76106 817-625-2719 www.ftav.com FAX: 817-625-6875 4815 N.W. 79th Ave. Suite 10 Miami FL 33166 FAX: 305-593-0694 305-593-9913 H S Electronics, Inc. P.O. Box 126010, 1665 W. 33rd Place Hialeah FL 33012 305-821-5802 FAX: 800-823-6691 Contact: Larry Campbell/Paola-Cara www.hselectronics.com hselectronics@aol.com L3 Communications - Platform Integration 7500 Maehr Road Waco TX USA 76705 254-867-7001 www.L-3com.com/is FAX: 254-867-7482 Loos & Company Inc. Wire Rope Division 1 Cable Rd. Pomfret CT 06258 860-928-7981 www.loosco.com FAX: 860-928-6167 Toll Free: 800-533-5667 900 Industrial Blvd Naples FL 33942 239-321-5667 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

CONNECTORS CONNECTORS Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com

BENCHMARK CONNECTOR CORP. 4501 N.W. 103rd Ave Sunrise FL 33351 Contact: Wayne Nelson 954-746-9929 Toll Free: 800-896-7153 FAX: 954-746-9448 www.benchmarkconnector.com info@benchmarkconnector.com Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Connector Distribution Corp. 2985 E.Harcourt St. Rancho Dominguez CA 90221 www.cdc-online.com 310-632-2466 Toll Free: 800-421-5840 FAX: 310-632-5413 ** Inventory Avialable on abdonline.com

ELECTRONIC EXPEDITERS, INC. 3700 Via Pescador Camarillo CA USA 93012 Contact: Ira Berns 805-987-7171 FAX: 805-987-3344 www.expediters.com sales@expediters.com H S Electronics, Inc. P.O. Box 126010, 1665 W. 33rd Place Hialeah FL 33012 305-821-5802 FAX: 800-823-6691 Contact: Larry Campbell/Paola-Cara www.hselectronics.com hselectronics@aol.com WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com MIRAJ Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS COMPONENTS AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247

AOG REACTION, INC. 526 Aviator Drive Ft. Worth TX 76179 817-439-0700 FAA Repair Station TU1R519K FAX: 817-439-9700 www.aogreaction.com Contact: Robert Samson rsamson@aogreaction.com

Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000 Austin Aerotech, Inc. 2005 Windy Terrace Cedar Park TX USA 78613-3507 Contact: Jeff Bruns 512-335-6000 FAX: 512-335-0541

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K Av-Tech Industries P.O. Box 200366 Arlington TX 76006 817-640-4031 www.av-techind.com FAX: 817-649-1355 Shipping: 1180 Corporate Drive W. Arlington TX 76006 Avionics Specialist, Inc. 3833 Premier Ave. Memphis TN 38118 901-362-9700 FAX: 901-375-8310 Contact: Roger Dahler Repair Station #PK4R443M asinc@avionics-specialist.com www.avionics-specialist.com Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com

BENCHMARK CONNECTOR CORP. 4501 N.W. 103rd Ave Sunrise FL 33351 Contact: Wayne Nelson 954-746-9929 Toll Free: 800-896-7153 FAX: 954-746-9448 www.benchmarkconnector.com info@benchmarkconnector.com

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Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200

ELECTRONIC EXPEDITERS, INC. 3700 Via Pescador Camarillo CA USA 93012 Contact: Ira Berns 805-987-7171 FAX: 805-987-3344 www.expediters.com sales@expediters.com EMTEQ Family of Companies 5349 S Emmer Drive New Berlin WI 53151 Toll Free: 888-679-6170 262-679-6170 FAX: 262-679-6175 www.emteq.com sales@emteq.com FIELD Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Genelco Industries, Inc. 90 13th Ave Ronkonkoma NY 11779 631-981-6670 sales@genelcoindustries.com FAX: 631-981-7725 Contact: Anthoy T. Valone ** Inventory Available on abdonline.com H S Electronics, Inc. P.O. Box 126010, 1665 W. 33rd Place Hialeah FL 33012 305-821-5802 FAX: 800-823-6691 Contact: Larry Campbell/Paola-Cara www.hselectronics.com hselectronics@aol.com Herley Industries, Inc. 3061 Industry Drive Lancaster PA USA 17601 www.herley.com 717-397-2777 FAX: 717-397-7079 IMP Aerospace Halifax Stanfield Intl Airport 557 Barnes Rd. Enfield, Nova Scotia Canada B2T 1K3 www.impaerospace.com 902-873-2250 FAX: 902-873-2290 Contact Carl Kumpic email: carl.kumpic@impaerospace.com

JACON FASTENERS & ELECTRONICS 9539 Vassar Ave Chatsworth CA 91311 818-700-2901 sales@jacon.com FAX: 818-709-7426

K & R FASTENERS, INC. 8216 Kristel Cirle Port Richey FL 34668 727-842-9222 sales@k-rfastenersinc.com FAX: 727-842-9056 Leach International, Inc. Symetrics Industries 1615 W. NASA Blvd Melbourne FL 32901 www.symetrics.com 321-254-1500 FAX: 321-308-0796 Contact: Randy Koller rkoller@symetrics.com

ENGINE & ENGINE PARTS ENGINE & ENGINE PARTS AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aero Turbine, Inc. 6800 S. Lindbergh St. Stockton CA 95206 Contact: Dave Mattson 209-983-1112 FAX: 209-983-0544 American Jet Engine Co., Inc. 37 West 39th St. New York NY 10018 212-398-0400 FAX: 212-398-0190

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AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | WINTER 2016/17

Art Sloan Accessory 116 Bonanza Mine Road Sutherlin OR 97479-9767 541-459-4389 Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com Aviall 2750 Regent Blvd. Dallas TX 75261 972-586-1000 www.aviall.com Contact: Wayne Goodland wgoodland@aviall.com Pacific Sky Supply, Inc. 8230 San Fernando Rd. Sun Valley CA 91352 FAX: 818-767-6278 818-768-3700 www.pacsky.com Contact: Emilio Perez glen@pacsky.com FAA Repair Station #QQPR566K

PRATT & WHITNEY 400 Main Street East Hartford CT 06108 www.pw.utc.com 860-565-9654 FAX: 860-353-0447 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com Segers Aero Corporation 8100 McGowin Drive Fairhope AL USA 36532 sales@segers.aero - www.segers.aero 251-928-1878 FAX: 251-210-1460 WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

ENGINE SERVICES ENGINE SERVICES Aero Turbine, Inc. 6800 S. Lindbergh St. Stockton CA 95206 Contact: Dave Mattson 209-983-1112 FAX: 209-983-0544 Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 OGMA - Industria Aeronautica De Portugal SA Alverca do Ribatejo Alverca P-2615 Portugal FAX: 351-21-9573056 351-21-957-9055

Av-Tech Industries P.O. Box 200366 Arlington TX 76006 817-640-4031 www.av-techind.com FAX: 817-649-1355 Shipping: 1180 Corporate Drive W. Arlington TX 76006 Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Excel Aerospace Supply, Inc. 11855 Wicks St. Sun Valley CA 91352 818-767-6867 Telex: 371-7938 FAX: 818-504-2979 www.excelaero.com HC Pacific 19844 Quiroz Court Walnut CA 91789 909-598-0509 Contact: Cynthia Tubal/Sylvia Sao FAX: 909-598-1411 www.hcpacific.com hcpac@ix.netcom.com

JACON FASTENERS & ELECTRONICS 9539 Vassar Ave Chatsworth CA 91311 818-700-2901 sales@jacon.com FAX: 818-709-7426

K & R FASTENERS, INC. 8216 Kristel Cirle Port Richey FL 34668 727-842-9222 sales@k-rfastenersinc.com FAX: 727-842-9056 MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Nylok Aerospace 313 Euclid Way Anaheim CA 92801 714-635-3993 FAX: 714-635-9553 UFC Aerospace Corp. 25 Drexel Drive Bay Shore NY 11706 631-435-3535 www.ufcaero.com FAX: 631-435-3533 Toll Free: 800-645-5850

FITTINGS

FITTINGS

Airborne Technologies, Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Excel Aerospace Supply, Inc. 11855 Wicks St. Sun Valley CA 91352 818-767-6867 Telex: 371-7938 FAX: 818-504-2979 www.excelaero.com

PRATT & WHITNEY 400 Main Street East Hartford CT 06108 www.pw.utc.com 860-565-9654 FAX: 860-353-0447 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith Segers Aero Corporation 8100 McGowin Drive Fairhope AL USA 36532 sales@segers.aero - www.segers.aero 251-928-1878 FAX: 251-210-1460 Wood Group TurboPower, Inc. 14820 NW 60TH Ave. Miami Lakes FL 33014 Toll Free: 800-403-6737 305-423-2300 FAX: 305-820-0404 TWX:810-848-8575 Repair Station #NE4R385M 2828 Donald Douglas Loop N. Santa Monica CA 90405 FAX: 310-392-6644 310-392-8090

FASTENERS FASTENERS A & M Maintenance Services, Inc. 134 S.Claw Int’l Parkway, Suite 8 Bolingbrook IL 60490 630-759-8130 FAX: 630-759-0701

FUEL CELLSFUEL CELLS AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aircraft On Ground Inc. 310 Regal Row - Suite 500 Dallas TX 75247 Toll Free: 800-635-9535 214-350-5334 FAX: 214-358-3835 FAA Repair Station #DBER248K www.aoginc.com Floats & Fuel Cells(FFC) 4010 Pilot Drive, Ste: #103 Memphis TN 38118 www.ffcfuelcells.com 901-794-8431 Toll Free: 800-647-6148 FAX: 901-842-7135 FAA Repair Station #TH4R544M Contact: Kevin Brewer kbrewer@ffcfuelcells.com

PUMPS COMPONENTS FUELFUEL PUMPS & &COMPONENTS AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

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QUICK REFERENCE: TRANSPORTS AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040

GROUND POWER/GROUND GROUND POWER/GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT SUPPORT EQUIPMENT Air Spares Incorporated 609 No. Levee Rd Puyallup WA 98371 253-286-2525 SITA: SEASAXD FAX: 253-286-2526 www.airspares.com Contact: Dave Wakefield airspares@airspares.com Airborne Technologies, Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247 Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com Avionics Specialist, Inc. 3833 Premier Ave. Memphis TN 38118 901-362-9700 FAX: 901-375-8310 Contact: Roger Dahler Repair Station #PK4R443M asinc@avionics-specialist.com www.avionics-specialist.com

AXNES INC 15954 Jackson Creek Parkway Suite B609 Monument CO 80132 719-722-1770 www.axnes.com post@axnes.com BESTEK Industries, Inc. 1343 SW 35th St. San Antonio TX 78237 FAX: 210-434-1074 210-434-1071 Defense Technology Equipment, Inc. 45681 Oakbrook Ct., Unit 107-111 Sterling VA 20166 FAX: 703-766-1701 703-766-1700 www.defense-tech.com sales@defense-tech.com Contact: Frank Benzaria Dixie Air Parts Supply Inc. 2202 W Malone St. San Antonio TX 78224 FAX: 210-924-4901 210-924-5561 PO Box 3583 San Antonio TX 78211 Sargent Fletcher Inc. 2734 Hickory Grove Road Davenport IA 52804 563-383-6000 Win-Tech, Inc. 8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net

Herber Aircraft Service Inc. 1401 E. Franklin Ave. El Segundo CA 90245 Contact: Daryl Yeelitt 310-322-9575 Toll Free: 800-544-0050 FAX: 310-322-1875 www.herberaircraft.com sales@herberaircraft.com Hoses Unlimited, Inc. 402 Hester St. San Leandro CA 94577 510-483-8520 FAA Repair Station #HS3R564L FAX: 510-483-8524 Toll Free: 800-229-4541 shanson@hosesunlimited.com www.hosesunlimited.com Contact: Sandy Hanson KITCO Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Doug NewComb www.kitcodefense.com Parker Hannifin Corp Stratoflex Products Div 220 Roberts Cut-Off Rd Fort Worth TX 76114 www.parker.com/stratoflex 817-738-6543 FAX: 817-738-9920 Contact: Cheryl Simms csimms@parker.com Specialty Hose Grp. 7800 Freedom Ave. NW N. Canton OH USA 44720 Contact: Skip Jenks FAX: 330-497-0415 Toll Free: 800-362-6533 www.specialtyhose.com

HYDRAULIC PARTS & HYDRAULIC PARTS & COMPONENTS COMPONENTS

747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Airborne Technologies, Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Frazier Aviation, Inc. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Hawker Pacific Aerospace 11240 Sherman Way Sun Valley CA 91352 Toll Free: 800-443-8302 818-765-6201 FAX: 818-765-2065 www.hawker.com Contact: Brad Curtis carlo.ventittelli@hawker.com Heroux Devtek Inc. 755 Thurber Ave. Longueul, QC Canada J4H3N2 FAX: 450-679-4554 450-679-5454 Contact: Jean Gravel www.herouxdevtek.com jgravel@herouxdevtek.com Higher Source Aviation 908 Upward Road Flat Rock NC 28731 828-698-7490 www.highersourceaviation.com FAX: 828-698-7492 KITCO Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Doug NewComb www.kitcodefense.com MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801

INFORMATION SERVICES INFORMATION SERVICES ABDONLINE.COM

28887 Industry Drive Valencia CA 91355 www.aerocomponent.com 818-841-9258 FAX: 818-841-2342 Contact: David Bill davidwbill@aerocomponent.com WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

INSTRUMENTS INSTRUMENTS&& INSTRUMENT INSTRUMENT OVERHAUL OVERHAUL Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000 Austin Aerotech, Inc. 2005 Windy Terrace Cedar Park TX USA 78613-3507 Contact: Jeff Bruns 512-335-6000 FAX: 512-335-0541

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK

HOSE & HOSE FITTINGS HOSE & HOSE FITTINGS AERO COMPONENT ENGINEERING CO.

NSN-NOW.COM 8200 Republic Airport;Hangar 43, Suite 6 Farmingdale NY 11735 631-847-3504 www.nsn-now.com FAX: 631-847-0264 Pentagon 2000 Software, Inc. 15 West 34th Street New York NY 10001 www.pentagon2000.com 212-629-7521 FAX: 212-629-7513 SOS: Sales Opportunity Services Pentagon 2000 Software 1540 E. Pleasant Valley Blvd Altoona PA 16602 814-949-3327

116 Radio Circle Dr. Ste 302 Mount Kisco NY 10549 www.abdonline.com 914-242-8700 FAX: 914-242-5422 Inventory Locator Service, LLC 8001 Centerview Pkwy - STE: 400 Memphis TN USA 38018 901-794-5000 www.lismart.com FAX: 901-794-1760

3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K Avionics Specialist, Inc. 3833 Premier Ave. Memphis TN 38118 901-362-9700 FAX: 901-375-8310 Contact: Roger Dahler Repair Station #PK4R443M asinc@avionics-specialist.com www.avionics-specialist.com

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com DAC International 6702 McNeil Drive Austin TX USA 78729 512-331-5323 Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200 Fieldtech Avionics & Instruments Inc. 4151 North Main St. Meachan Field Ft. Worth TX 76106 817-625-2719 www.ftav.com FAX: 817-625-6875 4815 N.W. 79th Ave. Suite 10 Miami FL 33166 FAX: 305-593-0694 305-593-9913 Higher Source Aviation 908 Upward Road Flat Rock NC 28731 828-698-7490 www.highersourceaviation.com FAX: 828-698-7492 InAir Aviation Services 8225 Country Club Place Indianapolis IN 46214 FAX: 317-271-0345 317-271-0195 www.inairaviation.com Repair Station #IOVRL072L Contact: Greg Mathias sales@inairaviation.com Innovative Solutions & Support 720 Pennsylvania Drive Exton PA 19341 FAX: 610-646-0146 610-646-9800 www.innovative-ss.com Contact: David Green Intercontinental Avionics & Instrument Corp 22 Canfield Road Tyler Hill PA 18469 570-224-6960 FAX: 570-224-6834 Contact: Bob Solimine iaiparts@ptd.net Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith

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The Strube Company 629 W Market St., P.O. Box 99 Marietta PA 17547 www.strubeinc.net 717-426-1906 FAX: 717-426-1909

LANDING GEAR LANDING GEAR PARTS/ ACCESSORIES & OVERHAUL& PARTS/ACCESSORIES Airborne Technologies, Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com Defense Technology Equipment, Inc. 45681 Oakbrook Ct., Unit 107-111 Sterling VA 20166 FAX: 703-766-1701 703-766-1700 www.defense-tech.com sales@defense-tech.com Contact: Frank Benzaria Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

Win-Tech, Inc. 8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net

LIGHTING

LIGHTING

Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Consolidated Aircraft Supply Co., Inc. 55 Raynor Ave. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 631-981-7700 Contact: Steve Matza (President) FAX: 631-981-7706 Toll Free: 800-422-6300 In California: Contact: Rich Noll 818-321-8510 consol1291@aol.com www.consolac.com FAA#GI1R167K

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com L3 Communications - Platform Integration 7500 Maehr Road Waco TX USA 76705 254-867-7001 www.L-3com.com/is FAX: 254-867-7482 REBTECH 1500 Brown Trail Bedford TX USA 76022 www.rebtechnvg.com FAX: 817-285-7742 Toll Free: 877-426-4158 Specialty Bulb Co. Inc. PO Box 231 Bohemia NY USA 11716 631-589-33089 www.bulbspecialists.com FAX: 631-589-3393 Toll Free: 1-800-331-2852 Contact: Edie Muldoon info@bulbspecialists.com Triman Industries 1042 Industrial Drive West Berlin NJ 08091 www.trimanindustries.com 856-767-7945 Contact: Donna Virunurm donna@trimanindustried.net

As Simple as Possible, but No Simpler Intentionally, there was not much to it. In the late 1950s, the U.S Army wanted a "flying jeep," and Curtiss-Wright responded with the VZ-7. It consisted of a 17-foot-long rectangular box containing fuel and lubricant tanks and a single Turbomeca Artouste IIB turboshaft engine, producing 430 horsepower. Atop the box was an exposed pilot's seat with flight controls. Four 80-inch diameter rotors, arranged in a square configuration, surrounded the fuselage. Directional movement was controlled by varying the thrust of each propeller. Movable vanes over the engine exhaust provided additional yaw control. Simple and well designed, the VZ-7 largely "worked out of the box." Initial testing went smoothly. Yet the design ultimately was too simple. The U.S. Army required a maximum speed of 50 mph, but the VZ-7 only achieved 32. Its service ceiling of 200 feet also was disappointing. The project was canceled in 1960. Sources: Aviastar, www.aviastar.org; Global Security, www.globalsecurity.org; Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org

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NAV/COM SYSTEMS NAV/COM SYSTEMS AXNES INC 15954 Jackson Creek Parkway Suite B609 Monument CO 80132 719-722-1770 www.axnes.com post@axnes.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com DAC International 6702 McNeil Drive Austin TX USA 78729 512-331-5323 FIELD Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Fieldtech Avionics & Instruments Inc. 4151 North Main St. Meachan Field Ft. Worth TX 76106 817-625-2719 www.ftav.com FAX: 817-625-6875 4815 N.W. 79th Ave. Suite 10 Miami FL 33166 FAX: 305-593-0694 305-593-9913 Herley Industries, Inc. 3061 Industry Drive Lancaster PA USA 17601 www.herley.com 717-397-2777 FAX: 717-397-7079 InAir Aviation Services 8225 Country Club Place Indianapolis IN 46214 FAX: 317-271-0345 317-271-0195 www.inairaviation.com Repair Station #IOVRL072L Contact: Greg Mathias sales@inairaviation.com L3 Communications - Platform Integration 7500 Maehr Road Waco TX USA 76705 254-867-7001 www.L-3com.com/is FAX: 254-867-7482 Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com Sensor Systems Inc. 8929 Fullbright Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 www.sensorantennas.com 818-341-5366 FAX: 818-341-9059 Contact: Dave Brooks dbrooks@sensorsantennas.com Symetrics Industries 1615 W. NASA Blvd Melbourne FL 32901 www.symetrics.com 321-254-1500 FAX: 321-308-0796 Contact: Randy Koller rkoller@symetrics.com VIASTAT INC 6155 El Camino Road Carlsbad CA USA 92009-1602 www.viastat.com/focus 760-893-2777 mobile.broadband@viastat.com

PAINTS & LACQUERS PAINTS & LACQUERS Alliance Coatings, Inc. 1662 N. Magnolia, Suite G El Cajon CA 92020 www.alliancecoatings.com 619-596-9191 Toll Free: 800-596-9191 FAX: 619-596-9190 aeropens@alliancecoatings.com DEFT, INC. 17451 Von Karman Ave. Irvine CA 92614 Contact: Tracy Garrett Jr. 949-474-0400 Toll Free: 1-800-544-3338 FAX: 949-474-7269 www.deftfinishes.com MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com PPG Aerospace 12780 San Fernando Rd. Sylmar CA USA 91342 818-741-1687

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QUICK REFERENCE: TRANSPORTS PNEUMATIC PAROVERHAUL PNEUMATIC PARTS & COMPONENTS & OVERHAUL AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255 Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225 Repairtech Int’l, Inc. 16134 Saticoy Street Van Nuys CA 91406 Contact: Kevin Bennet 818-989-2681 FAX: 818-989-4358 repairtech@repairtechinternational.com www.repairtechinetranational.com Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

PROPELLERS/PARTS PROPELLERS PARTS & & PROPELLERS/PARTS OVERHAUL OVERHAUL AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com DIMO Corp. 44 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 Contact: Sohrab Naghshineh 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 www.dimo.net sales@dimo.net Heatcon Composite Systems 600 Andover Park E. Seattle WA 98188 206-575-1333 www.heatcon.com FAX: 206-575-0856 Higher Source Aviation 908 Upward Road Flat Rock NC 28731 828-698-7490 www.highersourceaviation.com FAX: 828-698-7492 MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 MIRAJ Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Pacific Propeller Inc. PO Box 1187, 5802 S. 228th Street Kent WA 98032 www.pacprop.com 253-872-7767 FAX: 253-872-6557 FAA CRS# NQ3R719L /P3 BLADE MANUFACTURER Contact: Al Hayward ahayward@pacprop.com FAA CRS# NQ3R719L /P3 BLADE MANUFACTURER WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

Pacific Sky Supply, Inc. 8230 San Fernando Rd. Sun Valley CA 91352 FAX: 818-767-6278 818-768-3700 www.pacsky.com Contact: Emilio Perez glen@pacsky.com FAA Repair Station #QQPR566K R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com Segers Aero Corporation 8100 McGowin Drive Fairhope AL USA 36532 sales@segers.aero - www.segers.aero 251-928-1878 FAX: 251-210-1460

ROTOR BLADE OVERHAUL ROTOR BLADE OVERHAUL L3 Communications - Platform Integration 7500 Maehr Road Waco TX USA 76705 254-867-7001 www.L-3com.com/is FAX: 254-867-7482

SEATING, BELTS, SEATS,SEAT TRACKS, SEAT TRACKS BELTS Airborne Technologies, Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Cargo Systems, Inc. 2120 Denton Dr., Suite 108 Austin TX 78758 Contact: Harold McElfish 512-837-1300 FAX: 512-837-5320 info@cargosystems.com www.cargosystems.com

SECURITYSECURITY SYSTEMS SYSTEMS L3 Communications - Platform Integration 7500 Maehr Road Waco TX USA 76705 254-867-7001 www.L-3com.com/is FAX: 254-867-7482

SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT & SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT & SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT OVERHAUL OVERHAUL Air Cruisers Co. Highway 34 South Wall Township NJ 07719 FAX: 732-681-9163 732-681-3527 www.aircruisers.com Contact: Lou Perdoni 15556Dupont Ave. Bldg. 3 Chino CA 91710 FAA Repair Station #RX3D831L 909-597-9399 FAX: 909-597-9378 Contact: Sales Dept. info@aircruisers.com 1740 Highway 34 Wall Township NJ 07719 FAA Repair Station #PX1R416K 732-681-3527 FAX: 732-681-9163 P.O. Box 180 Belmar NJ 07719 732-681-3527 FAX: 732-681-9163

AXNES INC 15954 Jackson Creek Parkway Suite B609 Monument CO 80132 719-722-1770 www.axnes.com post@axnes.com Life Support International 200 Rittenhouse Circle Bristol PA 19007 Telex: greg@lifesupportintl.com 215-785-2870 www.lifesupportintl.com FAX: 215-785-2880 Survival Products Inc. 5614 SW 25th St. Hollywood FL 33023 954-966-7329 Contact: Donna Rogers/V.P. FAX: 954-966-3584 www.survivalproductsinc.com sales@survivalproductsinc.com

SWITCHES

SWITCHES

Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 beth.boedeker@avnet.com

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com Dakota Electronics PO Box 2238 Georgetown TX USA 78627 www.crimptools.com 512-930-9371 FAX: 512-869-4853 H S Electronics, Inc. P.O. Box 126010, 1665 W. 33rd Place Hialeah FL 33012 305-821-5802 FAX: 800-823-6691 Contact: Larry Campbell/Paola-Cara www.hselectronics.com hselectronics@aol.com Leach International, Inc. 6900 Orangethorpe Ave. PO Box 5032 Buena Park CA 90622 714-736-7599 Contact: David Abend FAX: 714-670-1145 www.leachintl.com info@leachintl.com MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

TEST EQUIPMENT TEST EQUIPMENT AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247 Avionics Specialist, Inc. 3833 Premier Ave. Memphis TN 38118 901-362-9700 FAX: 901-375-8310 Contact: Roger Dahler Repair Station #PK4R443M asinc@avionics-specialist.com www.avionics-specialist.com 3833 Premier Ave. Memphis TN 38118 901-362-9700 FAX: 901-375-8310 Contact: Roger Dahler Repair Station #PK4R443M asinc@avionics-specialist.com www.avionics-specialist.com Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com CK Technologies, Inc. 3629 Vista Mercado Camarillo CA 93012 www.ckt.com 805-987-4801 FAX: 805-987-4811 FIELD Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong

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QUICK REFERENCE: TRANSPORTS

MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

TIRES - * TIRES Aviation Brake Service/Avcenter 7274 NW 34th Street Miami FL 33122 305-594-4677 www.aviationbrake.com FAX: 305-477-5799 Contact: Andres Posse andres@aviationbrake.com Michelin Aircraft Tire Corp. One Parkway South P.O. Box 19001 Greenville SC 29615 864-458-5000 FAX: 864-422-7071

TOOLS

TOOLS

Airborne Technologies, Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Dakota Electronics PO Box 2238 Georgetown TX USA 78627 www.crimptools.com 512-930-9371 FAX: 512-869-4853

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Nor-Ral, Inc. 164 Hickory Springs Industrial Dr. Canton GA 30115 FAX: 770-720-0527 770-720-0526 www.norral.com jessica.mcwhorter@norral.com

WHEELS/BRAKES & WHEELS/BRAKES & WHEELS/BRAKES OVERHAUL WHEELS/BRAKES OVERHAUL

USATCO/U.S. AIR TOOL 60 Fleetwood Court Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Toll Free: 800-645-8180 631-471-3300 FAX: 631-471-3308 1218 W. Mahalo Place Rancho Dominguez CA 90220-5446 310-632-5400 FAX: 310-632-3900 Win-Tech, Inc. 8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net

VALVES

VALVES

Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225 Frazier Aviation, Inc. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801

Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255

WINDOWS & WINDSHIELDS WINDOWS & WINDSHIELDS

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT

Airborne Technologies, Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com DIMO Corp. 44 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 Contact: Sohrab Naghshineh 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 www.dimo.net sales@dimo.net

13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

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QUICK REFERENCE:

FIGHTERS Firms that specialize in parts for Fighters Distribution / Manufacturing / Repairs

Image courtesy U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Corey Hook


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ACCESSORIES ACCESSORY ACCESSORIES &&ACCESSORY OVERHAUL OVERHAUL - MILITARY FIGHTERS AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704 Air Parts & Supply Co. 12840 SW 84th Ave. Rd. Miami FL 33156 Contact: Sheri Murray 305-235-5401 FAX: 305-235-8185 sales@apscomiami.com www.apscomiami.com Airborne Technologies, Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com DIMO Corp. 44 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 Contact: Sohrab Naghshineh 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 www.dimo.net sales@dimo.net Frazier Aviation, Inc. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith SOI Aviation 23965 Ventura Blvd. Calabasas CA 91302 www.soiaviation.com 818-591-3166 Contact: Linda Sandberg FAX: 818-591-3144 Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

ACTUATORS ACTUATORS AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704

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Aviation Brake Service/Avcenter 7274 NW 34th Street Miami FL 33122 305-594-4677 www.aviationbrake.com FAX: 305-477-5799 Contact: Andres Posse andres@aviationbrake.com

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com Frazier Aviation, Inc. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com

CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT & AIRAIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT REFRIGERATION AND REFRIGERATION AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901

AIRFRAME & AIRFRAMEPARTS PARTS & A AIRFRAME/AIRFRAME OVERHAUL OVERHAUL

ANTENNAS/ANTENNA SYSTEMS ANTENNAS/ANTENNA SYSTEMS AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com Fieldtech Avionics & Instruments Inc. 4151 North Main St. Meachan Field Ft. Worth TX 76106 817-625-2719 www.ftav.com FAX: 817-625-6875 4815 N.W. 79th Ave. Suite 10 Miami FL 33166 FAX: 305-593-0694 305-593-9913 Herley Industries, Inc. 3061 Industry Drive Lancaster PA USA 17601 www.herley.com 717-397-2777 FAX: 717-397-7079 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

AUXILIARY POWER UNITS & APUS

Aero Components Inc. PO Box 15730, 5124 Kaltenbrun Rd Ft. Worth TX 76119 817-572-3003 FAX: 817-563-1097 Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255 Airborne Technologies, Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Aircraft Ducting Repair 101 Hunters Circle Forney TX 75126 972-552-9000 FAX: 972-552-4504 www.acdri.com repairs@acdri.com Defense Technology Equipment, Inc. 45681 Oakbrook Ct., Unit 107-111 Sterling VA 20166 FAX: 703-766-1701 703-766-1700 www.defense-tech.com sales@defense-tech.com Contact: Frank Benzaria Honeycomb Company of America (HCOA) 1950 Limbus Ave Sarasota FL USA 34243 FAX: 1+ 941-755-426 +1 941-993-0049 www.hcoainc.com - wbryson@hcoainc.com International Precision, Inc. 9526 Vassar Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 FAX: 818-882-0319 818-882-3933 ISO Group Inc. 7700 Technology Drive West Melbourne FL 32904 www.iso-group.com 321-773-5710 Garrett Schiefer FAX: 321-777-0499 aviationparts@isogroup.com Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | WINTER 2016/17

AUXILIARY POWER UNITS & OVERHAUL APUS OVERHAUL AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK

747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 www.alturdyne.com Contact: Frank Verbeke BC Systems 200 Belle Meade Rd. Setauket NY 11733 FAX: 631-864-3700 631-864-3700 Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith

AVIONICS & AVIONICS AVIONICS & AVIONICS OVERHAUL OVERHAUL AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 www.aeroprecision.com

925-455-9900 FAX: 925-455-9901 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704 AHR Avionics Inc. 567 Sandall Rd. San Antonio TX 78216 210-377-3195 ahraviation@att.net FAX: 210-377-1605

ENERSYS-HAWKER BATTERIES 2366 Bernville Road Reading PA 19605 610-208-1831 FAX: 610-208-1630 www.enersys.com/defense Contact: Frank Metzger frank.metzger@enersys.com Herley Industries, Inc. 3061 Industry Drive Lancaster PA USA 17601 www.herley.com 717-397-2777 FAX: 717-397-7079

American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971

CONNECTORS

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC.

CONNECTORS

AOG REACTION, INC. 526 Aviator Drive Ft. Worth TX 76179 817-439-0700 FAA Repair Station TU1R519K FAX: 817-439-9700 www.aogreaction.com Contact: Robert Samson rsamson@aogreaction.com Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K Becker Avionics 10376 USA Today Way Miramar FL USA 33025 www.beckerusa.com 954-450-3137 FAX: 954-450-3206

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225 Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200 FIELD Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Innovative Solutions & Support 720 Pennsylvania Drive Exton PA 19341 FAX: 610-646-0146 610-646-9800 www.innovative-ss.com Contact: David Green Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 SOI Aviation 23965 Ventura Blvd. Calabasas CA 91302 soifg@aol.com 818-591-3166 FAX: 818-591-3144 www.soiaviation.com Contact: Linda Sandberg

BATTERIES/BATTERY CHARGERS BATTERIES/BATTERY CHARGERS & & OVERHAUL OVERHAUL Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Concorde Battery Corporation 2009 San Bernardino Rd. West Covina CA 91790 FAX: 626-813-1235 626-813-1234 www.concordebattery.com Contact: Skip Koss WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com

BENCHMARK CONNECTOR CORP. 4501 N.W. 103rd Ave Sunrise FL 33351 Contact: Wayne Nelson 954-746-9929 Toll Free: 800-896-7153 FAX: 954-746-9448 www.benchmarkconnector.com info@benchmarkconnector.com Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Connector Distribution Corp. 2985 E.Harcourt St. Rancho Dominguez CA 90221 www.cdc-online.com 310-632-2466 Toll Free: 800-421-5840 FAX: 310-632-5413 ** Inventory Avialable on abdonline.com

ELECTRONIC EXPEDITERS, INC. 3700 Via Pescador Camarillo CA USA 93012 Contact: Ira Berns 805-987-7171 FAX: 805-987-3344 www.expediters.com sales@expediters.com MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com MIRAJ Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 Williams RDM 200 Greenleaf Street Ft. Worth TX USA 76107 tmoulton@wmsrdm.com 817-872-1599

ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS COMPONENTS AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704

530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247

AOG REACTION, INC. 526 Aviator Drive Ft. Worth TX 76179 817-439-0700 FAA Repair Station TU1R519K FAX: 817-439-9700 www.aogreaction.com Contact: Robert Samson rsamson@aogreaction.com Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200

ELECTRONIC EXPEDITERS, INC. 3700 Via Pescador Camarillo CA USA 93012 Contact: Ira Berns 805-987-7171 FAX: 805-987-3344 www.expediters.com sales@expediters.com EMTEQ Family of Companies 5349 S Emmer Drive New Berlin WI 53151 Toll Free: 888-679-6170 262-679-6170 FAX: 262-679-6175 www.emteq.com sales@emteq.com FIELD Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Herley Industries, Inc. 3061 Industry Drive Lancaster PA USA 17601 www.herley.com 717-397-2777 FAX: 717-397-7079

JACON FASTENERS & ELECTRONICS 9539 Vassar Ave Chatsworth CA 91311 818-700-2901 sales@jacon.com FAX: 818-709-7426

K & R FASTENERS, INC. 8216 Kristel Cirle Port Richey FL 34668 727-842-9222 sales@k-rfastenersinc.com FAX: 727-842-9056 MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 SpaceAge Control Inc. 38850 20th St. East Palmdale CA 93550 www.spaceagecontrol.com 661-273-3000 FAX: 661-273-4240 Symetrics Industries 1615 W. NASA Blvd Melbourne FL 32901 www.symetrics.com 321-254-1500 FAX: 321-308-0796 Contact: Randy Koller rkoller@symetrics.com

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ENGINE & ENGINE PARTS ENGINE & ENGINE PARTS AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aero Turbine, Inc. 6800 S. Lindbergh St. Stockton CA 95206 Contact: Dave Mattson 209-983-1112 FAX: 209-983-0544 Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 www.alturdyne.com Contact: Frank Verbeke American Jet Engine Co., Inc. 37 West 39th St. New York NY 10018 212-398-0400 FAX: 212-398-0190 Art Sloan Accessory 116 Bonanza Mine Road Sutherlin OR 97479-9767 541-459-4389

Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com

PRATT & WHITNEY 400 Main Street East Hartford CT 06108 www.pw.utc.com 860-565-9654 FAX: 860-353-0447 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com SIMTECH 66 A Floydville Road East Granby CT USA 06026 www.simtech.com 860-653-2408 FAX: 860-653-3857 Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

ENGINE SERVICES ENGINE SERVICES Aero Turbine, Inc. 6800 S. Lindbergh St. Stockton CA 95206 Contact: Dave Mattson 209-983-1112 FAX: 209-983-0544 Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 www.alturdyne.com Contact: Frank Verbeke Essential Turbines 443 Meloche Street Dorval, QC H9P 2W2 Canada www.essentialturbines.com 514-633-4458 FAX: 514-633-6308 OGMA - Industria Aeronautica De Portugal SA Alverca do Ribatejo Alverca P-2615 Portugal FAX: 351-21-9573056 351-21-957-9055

PRATT & WHITNEY 400 Main Street East Hartford CT 06108 www.pw.utc.com 860-565-9654 FAX: 860-353-0447 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith Wood Group TurboPower, Inc. 14820 NW 60TH Ave. Miami Lakes FL 33014 Toll Free: 800-403-6737 305-423-2300 FAX: 305-820-0404 TWX:810-848-8575 Repair Station #NE4R385M 2828 Donald Douglas Loop N. Santa Monica CA 90405 FAX: 310-392-6644 310-392-8090

Backward Thinking The Boeing CH-47 Chinook shares with the C-130 the distinction of having been designed and produced more than 55 years ago but remaining in active production and front-line use. One prototype produced in the early 1970s had its flexibility tested and stretched in unexpected ways. Boeing Vertol, working with the U.S. Army, used a CH-47A, its fuselage stretched to 110 inches, to test a number of innovations for potential use in future heavy-lift helicopters. Designated the BV-347, the craft flew reliably for 734 hours between 1970 and 1972. The most apparent addition was a large set of removable hydraulic wings that could be rotated 90 degrees. They were locked vertically for hovering and rotated to horizontal for level forward flight. The wing design provided added lift, resulting in faster forward flight with reduced fuel consumption. The BV-347 was even noticeably quieter. Other tested changes included longer rotor blades, retractable landing gear, a higher aft pylon, an advanced fly-by-wire control system, and updated Lycoming T55-L-11 engines. One novel element that had not been tried before was installed forward in the main cabin. This was a rectangular box or gondola that could be lowered below the helicopter fuselage while in flight. It featured transparent panels aft to allow a view outside and was equipped with a complete set of flight controls, so a third pilot could control the craft while facing directly backward. Tests of the BV-347 were unusually successful. Any problems were ironed out by engineers and verified during testing. The prototype was retired in 1972, but it remains a favorite among those who flew it or observed its flights. Sources: Diseno-Art.com, www.diseno-art.com; chinook-helicopter.com, www.chinook-helicopter.com; Jim Hughes, Command Information Officer, U.S. Army, "Soldiers provide facelift for 'winged Chinook,'" January 2016, www.army.mil; Travel for Aircraft, travelforaircraft.wordpress.com U.S. Army photo by Spc. Glenn M. Anderson, USAREUR Public Affairs / Released

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FASTENERS FASTENERS Airspares International 504 East Meadow Avenue East Meadow NY 11554 info@airspares.net 516-334-0900 FAX: 516-334-4109 Avibank Mfg., Inc. 11500 Sherman Way North Hollywood CA 91609-1909 FAX: 818-255-2094 818-392-2152 Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Excel Aerospace Supply, Inc. 11855 Wicks St. Sun Valley CA 91352 818-767-6867 Telex: 371-7938 FAX: 818-504-2979 www.excelaero.com HC Pacific 19844 Quiroz Court Walnut CA 91789 909-598-0509 Contact: Cynthia Tubal/Sylvia Sao FAX: 909-598-1411 www.hcpacific.com hcpac@ix.netcom.com

JACON FASTENERS & ELECTRONICS 9539 Vassar Ave Chatsworth CA 91311 818-700-2901 sales@jacon.com FAX: 818-709-7426

K & R FASTENERS, INC. 8216 Kristel Cirle Port Richey FL 34668 727-842-9222 sales@k-rfastenersinc.com FAX: 727-842-9056 MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Nylok Aerospace 313 Euclid Way Anaheim CA 92801 714-635-3993 FAX: 714-635-9553 Standard Aero Parts 5100 Maureen Lane Moorpark CA USA 93021 standardaero@earthlink.net 805-531-5410 FAX: 805-531-5419 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE: FIGHTERS

FUEL CELLS

FUEL CELLS

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aircraft On Ground Inc. 310 Regal Row - Suite 500 Dallas TX 75247 Toll Free: 800-635-9535 214-350-5334 FAX: 214-358-3835 FAA Repair Station #DBER248K www.aoginc.com Floats & Fuel Cells(FFC) 4010 Pilot Drive, Ste: #103 Memphis TN 38118 www.ffcfuelcells.com 901-794-8431 Toll Free: 800-647-6148 FAX: 901-842-7135 FAA Repair Station #TH4R544M Contact: Kevin Brewer kbrewer@ffcfuelcells.com ** Inventory Available on ABDOnline.com

FUEL TANK REPAIR

FUEL TANK REPAIRS

Aircraft On Ground Inc. 310 Regal Row - Suite 500 Dallas TX 75247 Toll Free: 800-635-9535 214-350-5334 FAX: 214-358-3835 FAA Repair Station #DBER248K www.aoginc.com Floats & Fuel Cells(FFC) 4010 Pilot Drive, Ste: #103 Memphis TN 38118 www.ffcfuelcells.com 901-794-8431 Toll Free: 800-647-6148 FAX: 901-842-7135 FAA Repair Station #TH4R544M Contact: Kevin Brewer kbrewer@ffcfuelcells.com ** Inventory Available on ABDOnline.com Performance Aircraft Services PO Box 612168 DFW Airport TX 75261 972-574-4250 www.performanceacs.com FAX: 972-574-4248 Sargent Fletcher Inc. 2734 Hickory Grove Road Davenport IA 52804 563-383-6000

FUEL PUMPS FUEL PUMPS&&COMPONENTS COMPONENTS AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez j paez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040

FUEL & LUBRICANTS

FUEL & LUBRICANTS

Technolube Products 8015 Paramount Blvd Pico Rivera CA 90660 FAX: 562-776-4004 562-776-4039 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

GASKETS & O RINGS GASKETS & O RINGS Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Conair Aviation Associates 138 E. Rio Grande Ave. Wildwood NJ 08260 FAX: 609-729-4616 609-729-2624 Cummins NPower LLC 7145 Santa Fe Dr. La Grange IL 60525 815-734-4917 FAX: 815-734-7565 Excel Aerospace Supply, Inc. 11855 Wicks St. Sun Valley CA 91352 818-767-6867 Telex: 371-7938 FAX: 818-504-2979 www.excelaero.com Lynn Electronics Corp. 154 Railroad Drive Ivyland PA 18974 215-355-8200 FAX: 215-364-2944 MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com National Parts Distributor 3801 E. Roeser Rd Suite 14 Phoenix AZ 85040 FAX: 602-453-9700 602-453-9600 Triman Industries 1042 Industrial Drive West Berlin NJ 08091 www.trimanindustries.com 856-767-7945 Contact: Donna Virunurm donna@trimanindustried.net Valtec International, Inc. Essex Industrial Pk. Box 747 Ivoryton CT 06442 Toll Free: 800-825-8321 860-767-8211 SITA: BDLVTXD FAX: 860-767-2918

GROUND POWER/GROUND SUPPORT GROUND POWER/GROUND EQUIPMENT SUPPORT EQUIPMENT Airborne Technologies, Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 www.alturdyne.com Contact: Frank Verbeke American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247 BESTEK Industries, Inc. 1343 SW 35th St. San Antonio TX 78237 FAX: 210-434-1074 210-434-1071

THE BOEING COMPANY Spares Services P.O. Box 3707 Seattle WA 98124-2207 206-662-7200 Telex: 329606 SITA: BVUBOCR FAX: 206-662-7145 100 N. Riverside Plaza Chicago IL 60606 FAX: 312—655-1177 312-544-2000 Engineering Division N. 8th & Park Ave. Renton WA 98055 425-234-9987 FAX: 425-237-8893 Fabrication Division 1102 15th St., S.W. Auburn WA 98002 253-931-5716 FAX: 253-931-2144 Long Beach Division 3855 Lakewood Blvd. Long Beach CA 90846 FAX: 562-496-8720 562-593-9033 Aircraft & Missile Systems P.O. Box 516 St. Louis MO 63166-0516 314-232-0232 FAX: 314-777-1096 Defense Technology Equipment, Inc. 45681 Oakbrook Ct., Unit 107-111 Sterling VA 20166 FAX: 703-766-1701 703-766-1700 www.defense-tech.com sales@defense-tech.com Contact: Frank Benzaria

Dixie Air Parts Supply Inc. 2202 W Malone St. San Antonio TX 78224 FAX: 210-924-4901 210-924-5561 PO Box 3583 San Antonio TX 78211 Dutch Valley Supply Co. 970 Progress Center Ave Lawrenceville GA 30043 FAX: 770-513-0716 770-513-0612 Dynamic Fabrication Inc. 2615 S. Hickory St. Santa Ana CA 92707 FAX: 714-662-1052 714-662-2440 Equipment & Supply, Inc. 4507 Highway #74-West Monroe NC 28110 FAX: 704-283-1206 704-289-6565 Frazier Aviation, Inc. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com G-H Distributors Inc. 2793 Bristol Pike Bensalem PA USA 19020 ghdist.sh@verizon.net 215-245-0101 FAX: 215-245-4243 ISO Group Inc. 7700 Technology Drive West Melbourne FL 32904 www.iso-group.com Garrett Schiefer 321-773-5710 FAX: 321-777-0499 aviationparts@isogroup.com

ITW MILITARY GSE 11001 US HWY 41 North Palmetto FL USA 34221 http://www.itwmilitarygse.com 941-721-1094 FAX: 941-721-1138 Contact: Ann Roberts aroberts@itwmilitarygse.com Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com Mercury GSE 15915 Piuma Ave Cerritos CA USA 90703 www.mercurygse.com 562 653 0654 FAX: 562 653 0665 Qualified Manufacturing Co., Inc. 4802 Roosevelt Ave San Antonio TX 78214 Ralmark Company 83 East Luzerne Ave Larksville PA 18704 570-288-9331 Sargent Fletcher Inc. 2734 Hickory Grove Road Davenport IA 52804 563-383-6000 TransTechnology Corp. 700 Liberty Ave Union NJ 07083 908-686-4000 FAX: 908-686-9292 Win-Tech, Inc. 8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net YAMA Manufacturing, Inc. 13102 Lookout Ridge San Antonio TX 78233 FAX: 210-656-7552 210-656-1066

HOSE & HOSE FITTINGS

HOSE & HOSE FITTINGS

AERO COMPONENT ENGINEERING CO. 28887 Industry Drive Valencia CA 91355 www.aerocomponent.com 818-841-9258 FAX: 818-841-2342 Contact: David Bill davidwbill@aerocomponent.com Herber Aircraft Service Inc. 1401 E. Franklin Ave. El Segundo CA 90245 Contact: Daryl Yeelitt 310-322-9575 Toll Free: 800-544-0050 FAX: 310-322-1875 www.herberaircraft.com sales@herberaircraft.com

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KITCO Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Doug NewComb www.kitcodefense.com Parker Hannifin Corp Stratoflex Products Div 220 Roberts Cut-Off Rd Fort Worth TX 76114 www.parker.com/stratoflex 817-738-6543 FAX: 817-738-9920 Contact: Cheryl Simms csimms@parker.com

HYDRAULIC PARTS & HYDRAULIC PARTS & COMPONENTS COMPONENTS AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 Frazier Aviation, Inc. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com

Hawker Pacific Aerospace 11240 Sherman Way Sun Valley CA 91352 Toll Free: 800-443-8302 818-765-6201 FAX: 818-765-2065 www.hawker.com Contact: Brad Curtis carlo.ventittelli@hawker.com KITCO Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Doug NewComb www.kitcodefense.com MIRAJ Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Supersonic Services, Inc. 12399 SW 53RD St. Suite 103 Cooper City FL 33330 FAX: 954-680-0317 954-680-6707 Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 Technolube Products 8015 Paramount Blvd Pico Rivera CA 90660 FAX: 562-776-4004 562-776-4039

INFORMATION SERVICES INFORMATION SERVICES ABDONLINE.COM 116 Radio Circle Dr. Ste 302 Mount Kisco NY 10549 www.abdonline.com 914-242-8700 FAX: 914-242-5422 Inventory Locator Service, LLC 8001 Centerview Pkwy - STE: 400 Memphis TN USA 38018 901-794-5000 www.lismart.com FAX: 901-794-1760 NSN-NOW.COM 8200 Republic Airport;Hangar 43, Suite 6 Farmingdale NY 11735 631-847-3504 www.nsn-now.com FAX: 631-847-0264 Pentagon 2000 Software, Inc. 15 West 34th Street New York NY 10001 www.pentagon2000.com 212-629-7521 FAX: 212-629-7513 SOS: Sales Opportunity Services Pentagon 2000 Software 1540 E. Pleasant Valley Blvd Altoona PA 16602 814-949-3327

INSTRUMENTS INSTRUMENTS&& INSTRUMENT INSTRUMENT OVERHAUL OVERHAUL AUTOPILOTS, AVIONICS & INSTRUMENTS

FAA# CM2R747K

www.autopilotscentral.com Hangar 23, Tulsa Int’l Airport, Tulsa, OK 74115 Phone: 918-836-6418 Fax: 918-832-0136

The Flying Cobra The birth of the modern helicopter gunship was conceptually marked by Bell Helicopter's proposed Design D-255 "Iroquois Warrior" in 1962. This modified UH-1C-based small, aerodynamic helicopter was equipped with significant firepower. The two-person crew operated from a stepped cockpit, with the gunner in front of and below the pilot. The gunner had access to a ball-turret in the nose and a streamlined gun compartment under the fuselage. Various weapons, such as French SS-11 missiles and 2.75-inch Folding-Fin Aerial Rocket (FFAR) pods, were mountable externally. However, despite its promise, the D-255 and its improved derivative, the D-262, were rejected for further development by the U.S. Army. Instead, in 1964, the Advanced Aerial Fire Support System competition was launched, eventually choosing the Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne as the U.S. Army's first dedicated attack helicopter. The Cheyenne had a four-blade, rigid-rotor system and was actually a compound helicopter with low-mounted wings and a tail-mounted thrusting propeller driven by a General Electric T64 turboshaft engine. As the AH-56 was a complex aircraft faced with a long development cycle, planners sought a simpler interim gunship for use in the Vietnam War. Luckily for the team at Bell, they had continued company-financed development of their gunship design. First flown in 1965, the helicopter, then known as the Bell 209, was selected for the interim role in a 1966 competition with Kaman, Boeing Vertol, Piasecki, and Sikorsky. The U.S. Army designated it as the AH-1G Huey Cobra, and it entered combat in 1967. Perhaps ironically, this model, whose forbears had been rejected, became popular and successful. More than 1,100 have been made, and the U.S. Marine Corps is still using an improved two-engine design. For the AH-56, "delayed" turned into "never." The project was canceled in 1972. Sources: aviastar.org, www.aviastar.org; Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org Photo Courtesy of United States Army

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Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704 Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200 Innovative Solutions & Support 720 Pennsylvania Drive Exton PA 19341 FAX: 610-646-0146 610-646-9800 www.innovative-ss.com Contact: David Green Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith Triman Industries 1042 Industrial Drive West Berlin NJ 08091 www.trimanindustries.com 856-767-7945 Contact: Donna Virunurm donna@trimanindustried.net WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE: FIGHTERS

INVERTERS

INVERTERS

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com

LANDING GEAR PARTS/ ACCESSORIES LANDING GEAR PAROVERHAUL & OVERHAUL

Airborne Technologies, Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Defense Technology Equipment, Inc. 45681 Oakbrook Ct., Unit 107-111 Sterling VA 20166 FAX: 703-766-1701 703-766-1700 www.defense-tech.com sales@defense-tech.com Contact: Frank Benzaria Frazier Aviation, Inc. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Hawker Pacific Aerospace 11240 Sherman Way Sun Valley CA 91352 Toll Free: 800-443-8302 818-765-6201 FAX: 818-765-2065 www.hawker.com Contact: Brad Curtis carlo.ventittelli@hawker.com International Precision, Inc. 9526 Vassar Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 FAX: 818-882-0319 818-882-3933 Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com KITCO Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Doug NewComb www.kitcodefense.com Nassau Tool Works, Inc. 34 Lamar St. West Babylon NY 11704 631-643-5000 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 Win-Tech, Inc. 8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net

LIGHTING

LIGHTING

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com REBTECH 1500 Brown Trail Bedford TX USA 76022 www.rebtechnvg.com FAX: 817-285-7742 Toll Free: 877-426-4158 Specialty Bulb Co. Inc. PO Box 231 Bohemia NY USA 11716 631-589-33089 www.bulbspecialists.com FAX: 631-589-3393 Toll Free: 1-800-331-2852 Contact: Edie Muldoon info@bulbspecialists.com

METAL FABRICATION & METAL FABRICATION ASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY Airborne Technologies, Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247 Dynamic Fabrication Inc. 2615 S. Hickory St. Santa Ana CA 92707 FAX: 714-662-1052 714-662-2440 FIELD Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Frazier Aviation, Inc. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Honeycomb Company of America (HCOA) 1950 Limbus Ave Sarasota FL USA 34243 FAX: 1+ 941-755-426 +1 941-993-0049 www.hcoainc.com - wbryson@hcoainc.com International Precision, Inc. 9526 Vassar Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 FAX: 818-882-0319 818-882-3933 Win-Tech, Inc. 8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net

METALS

METALS

Airspares International 504 East Meadow Avenue East Meadow NY 11554 info@airspares.net 516-334-0900 FAX: 516-334-4109 Bralco Metals 15090 Northam St La Mirada CA 90638 Toll Free: 800-628-1864 714-7369-4800 FAX: 714-736-4840 Contact: Don Gonzales dgonzales@bralco.com Albuquerque 6718 Jefferson, NE. Albuquerque NM 87109 11sa;es@bralco.com 505-345-0959 Toll Free: 800-999-8405 FAX: 505-345-1187

Dallas 410 Mars Drive Garland TX 75040 972-276-2676 08sales@bralco.com FAX: 972-272-4485 Toll Free: 800-442-3529 Seattle 7416 S. 228th St Kent WA 98032 253-395-0614 73sales@bralco.com FAX: 253-395-0696 Toll Free: 866-285-9984 Phoenix 929 E. Jackson St Phoenix AZ 85034 602-252-1918 53sales@bralco.com FAX: 602-252-7813 Toll Free: 800-544-8052 Wichita 3400 N. Topeka Ave. Wichita KS 67219 316-838-9351 14sales@bralco.com FAX: 316-838-9230 Toll Free: 800-729-6772 www.bralco.com MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com SUPRA Alloys, Inc TITAN Metal Fabricators 352 Balboa Circle Camarillo CA 93012 805-388-2138 www.suraalloys.com FAX: 1805-987-6492 Toll Free: 800-647-8772

MODIFICATIONS MODIFICATIONS Airborne Technologies, Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Airspares International 504 East Meadow Avenue East Meadow NY 11554 info@airspares.net 516-334-0900 FAX: 516-334-4109 Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com Essex Cyrogenics of Missouri, Inc. 8007 Chiwis Dr. St. Louis MO 63123 314-832-8077 FAX: 314-832-8208 FIELD Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Frazier Aviation, Inc. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com REBTECH 1500 Brown Trail Bedford TX USA 76022 www.rebtechnvg.com FAX: 817-285-7742 Toll Free: 877-426-4158

NAV/COM SYSTEMS NAV/COM SYSTEMS Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704 Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com

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FIELD Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com

OXYGEN & OXYGENEQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT & OXYGEN EQUIPMENT OVERHAUL OVERHAUL AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Cobham Life Support 10 Cobham Drive Orchard Park NY 14127 Contact: John Barone 716-667-6269 FAX: 716-667-0747 Zodiac Aerospace - AVOX Systems 225 Erie Street Lancaster NY USA 14086 FAX: 716-681-1089 716-686-1551

PNEUMATIC PARTS & PNEUMATIC PARTS & COMPONENTS COMPONENTS AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255 Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225

Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

SWITCHES

SWITCHES

Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

TEST EQUIPMENT TEST EQUIPMENT AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247

Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com SpaceAge Control Inc. 38850 20th St. East Palmdale CA 93550 www.spaceagecontrol.com 661-273-3000 FAX: 661-273-4240

TOOLS

TOOLS

Nor-Ral, Inc. 164 Hickory Springs Industrial Dr. Canton GA 30115 FAX: 770-720-0527 770-720-0526 www.norral.com jessica.mcwhorter@norral.com

USATCO/U.S. AIR TOOL 60 Fleetwood Court Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Toll Free: 800-645-8180 631-471-3300 FAX: 631-471-3308 1218 W. Mahalo Place Rancho Dominguez CA 90220-5446 310-632-5400 FAX: 310-632-3900 Win-Tech, Inc. 8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net

VALVES

VALVES

Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT

Combat Egg Beater The German navy describes the Flettner Fl 282 rotor system as "similar to a 'kitchen mixer.'" But this beater power did not produce fluffy omelets or light-textured cakes. The Fl-282 became the first helicopter to enter service in a combat role. Developed by Germany's Anton Flettner in the late 1930s, the Fl 282 was a small helicopter propelled by two counter-revolving, 39-foot-3-inch-diameter rotors with no tail rotor. The craft, also known as the "Kolibri," powered its rotors with a center-mounted 7-liter-displacement, 7-cylinder Siemens-Halske Sh 14 radial engine producing 150 to 160 horsepower. The fuselage was constructed of tube steel covered with doped fabric. Two prototypes were made with an enclosed cockpit made of a series of optically flat Plexiglas panels; all subsequent models did away with this enclosure and placed the pilot open to the elements seated at the fore of the aircraft. One advanced feature of the propulsion system was an automatic transition to autorotation in the event of engine failure. Twenty-four of the craft were built. Original use of the Fl 282 was to be moving items from ship to ship and reconnaissance, but actual applications were more directly combat related. As early as 1941, the rotorcraft were used for artillery spotting and convoy protection in the Baltic and Mediterranean Sea. A German navy order of 1,000 units was never filled, because Allied bombing destroyed both the aircraft and the engine-production factories. Sources: Aviastar, www.aviastar.org; Helis.com, www.helis.com; Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org

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13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

WHEELS/BRAKES & WHEELS/BRAKES & WHEELS/BRAKES OVERHAUL WHEELS/BRAKES OVERHAUL AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aviation Brake Service/Avcenter 7274 NW 34th Street Miami FL 33122 305-594-4677 www.aviationbrake.com FAX: 305-477-5799 Contact: Andres Posse andres@aviationbrake.com Chem-Fab Corp. 1923 Central Ave. Hot Springs AK 71901 FAX: 501-624-4287 501-624-4140 Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225 JDC Industries, Inc. 99 Cherry St. Centerville TN 37033 931-670-2175 FAX: 931-670-3123 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE:

ROTORCRAFT Firms that specialize in parts for Rotorcraft Distribution / Manufacturing / Repairs

Courtesy of U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Molly A. Gilliam. .


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ACCESSORIES & ACCESSORY OVERHAUL AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 Accu-Seal Design & Engineering, LLC. 420 Westwoods Road Hamden CT 06518 FAX: 203-230-1997 203-230-1997 Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org DIMO Corp. 44 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 Contact: Sohrab Naghshineh 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 www.dimo.net sales@dimo.net Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

ACTUATORSACTUATORS AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Kearfott Guidance and Navigation Corp Astronautics Corporation of America 2858 US Highway 70W Black Mountain NC USA 28711-9111 828-350-5300 FAX: 828-686-5764 Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com Select Helicopter Services Ltd. 6295A Airport Way Kelowna, BC Canada V1V 2V7 www.selecthelicopter.com 250-765-3317 FAX: 866-389-9878 info@selecthelicopter.com Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

AIRFRAME & AIRFRAME PARTS & AIRFRAME/AIRFRAME PARTS OVERHAUL OVERHAUL

ANTENNAS/ANTENNA SYSTEMS ANTENNAS/ANTENNA SYSTEMS

AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 Brown Helicopters Inc. 10100 Aileron Ave. Pensacola FL 32506 850-455-0971 FAX: 850-456-8231

AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK

Meeting of Eons In life, the cute youngster was roughly the size and judging by appearance - temperament of a rhinoceros. The juvenile pentaceratops, a lateCretaceous herbivore dinosaur, lived 76 million to 73 million years ago. But the unusually complete fossil of this particular specimen proved to be a problem for the scientists who sought to study it. The ancient bones were discovered in 2011 in the Bisti De-Na-Zin Wilderness in New Mexico. After 4 years of excavation, paleontologists carefully protected the original orientations of the find by encasing three large sections in a thick layer of plaster. Each section weighed about 1,500 pounds, and that is where the problem arose. Bisti De-Na-Zin is a protected wilderness; no vehicles are allowed within its boundaries. Workers had already faced this issue when they had to pack in hundreds of pounds of plaster, countless jugs of water, and a battery of heavy tools to prepare the specimen. Clearly, they would be unable to remove the encasing chunks of protective plaster the same way. So they called in the U.S. National Guard. After some paperwork, the Guard was authorized to use one of its Black Hawk helicopters to ferry the plaster chunks to trucks outside the wilderness, which transported them to a museum for further preparation and study of the fossil. Thus, the remains of the land-bound Cretaceous native was transported via air in a very Anthropocene vehicle. Sources: Brooks Hays, "National Guard airlifts baby pentaceratops fossil out of New Mexico badlands, " UPI, www.upi.com; "Rare baby dinosaur fossil airlifted from New Mexico desert wilderness," The Guardian (via AP), www.theguardian.com; Prehistoric Wildlife, www.prehistoric-wildlife.com.

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Floats & Fuel Cells(FFC) 4010 Pilot Drive, Ste: #103 Memphis TN 38118 www.ffcfuelcells.com 901-794-8431 Toll Free: 800-647-6148 FAX: 901-842-7135 FAA Repair Station #TH4R544M Contact: Kevin Brewer kbrewer@ffcfuelcells.com Frazier Aviation, Inc. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com HC Pacific 19844 Quiroz Court Walnut CA 91789 909-598-0509 Contact: Cynthia Tubal/Sylvia Sao FAX: 909-598-1411 www.hcpacific.com hcpac@ix.netcom.com Rotair Industries 964 Crescent Ave. Bridgeport CT 06607 FAX: 203-576-6804 203-576-6545 Contact: Christine M. Kudravy, President sales@rotair.com www.rotair.com S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com United States Aviation Corporation Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. 6900 Main St. Stratford CT 06614 203-386-4000

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | WINTER 2016/17

747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com Electro-Tec Corp. 1501 N. Main St. Blacksburg VA 24060 540-552-2111 FAX: 540-951-3832 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 Sensor Systems Inc. 8929 Fullbright Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 www.sensorantennas.com 818-341-5366 Contact: Dave Brooks FAX: 818-341-9059 dbrooks@sensorsantennas.com

AUXILIARY POWER UNITS & AUXILIARY POWER UNITS & APUS APUS OVERHAUL OVERHAUL

AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 www.alturdyne.com Contact: Frank Verbeke Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith

SOI Aviation 23965 Ventura Blvd. Calabasas CA 91302 soifg@aol.com 818-591-3166 FAX: 818-591-3144 www.soiaviation.com Contact: Linda Sandberg

AVIONICS & AVIONICS AVIONICS & AVIONICS OVERHAUL OVERHAUL

CONNECTORS CONNECTORS

AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org

AOG REACTION, INC. 526 Aviator Drive Ft. Worth TX 76179 817-439-0700 FAA Repair Station TU1R519K FAX: 817-439-9700 www.aogreaction.com Contact: Robert Samson rsamson@aogreaction.com Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K

AXNES INC 15954 Jackson Creek Parkway Suite B609 Monument CO 80132 719-722-1770 www.axnes.com post@axnes.com Becker Avionics 10376 USA Today Way Miramar FL USA 33025 www.beckerusa.com 954-450-3137 FAX: 954-450-3206 Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225 Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200 EMTEQ Family of Companies 5349 S Emmer Drive New Berlin WI 53151 Toll Free: 888-679-6170 262-679-6170 FAX: 262-679-6175 www.emteq.com sales@emteq.com IMP Aerospace Halifax Stanfield Intl Airport 557 Barnes Rd. Enfield, Nova Scotia Canada B2T 1K3 www.impaerospace.com 902-873-2250 FAX: 902-873-2290 Contact Carl Kumpic email: carl.kumpic@impaerospace.com Innovative Solutions & Support 720 Pennsylvania Drive Exton PA 19341 FAX: 610-646-0146 610-646-9800 www.innovative-ss.com Contact: David Green Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com

BENCHMARK CONNECTOR CORP. 4501 N.W. 103rd Ave Sunrise FL 33351 Contact: Wayne Nelson 954-746-9929 Toll Free: 800-896-7153 FAX: 954-746-9448 www.benchmarkconnector.com info@benchmarkconnector.com Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Connector Distribution Corp. 2985 E.Harcourt St. Rancho Dominguez CA 90221 www.cdc-online.com 310-632-2466 Toll Free: 800-421-5840 FAX: 310-632-5413 ** Inventory Avialable on abdonline.com

ELECTRONIC EXPEDITERS, INC. 3700 Via Pescador Camarillo CA USA 93012 Contact: Ira Berns 805-987-7171 FAX: 805-987-3344 www.expediters.com sales@expediters.com MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com MIRAJ Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 Williams RDM 200 Greenleaf Street Ft. Worth TX USA 76107 tmoulton@wmsrdm.com 817-872-1599

ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS COMPONENTS AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247

AOG REACTION, INC. 526 Aviator Drive Ft. Worth TX 76179 817-439-0700 FAA Repair Station TU1R519K FAX: 817-439-9700 www.aogreaction.com Contact: Robert Samson rsamson@aogreaction.com Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200

ELECTRONIC EXPEDITERS, INC. 3700 Via Pescador Camarillo CA USA 93012 Contact: Ira Berns 805-987-7171 FAX: 805-987-3344 www.expediters.com sales@expediters.com EMTEQ Family of Companies 5349 S Emmer Drive New Berlin WI 53151 Toll Free: 888-679-6170 262-679-6170 FAX: 262-679-6175 www.emteq.com sales@emteq.com FIELD Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com IMP Aerospace Halifax Stanfield Intl Airport 557 Barnes Rd. Enfield, Nova Scotia Canada B2T 1K3 www.impaerospace.com 902-873-2250 FAX: 902-873-2290 Contact Carl Kumpic email: carl.kumpic@impaerospace.com

JACON FASTENERS & ELECTRONICS 9539 Vassar Ave Chatsworth CA 91311 818-700-2901 sales@jacon.com FAX: 818-709-7426

K & R FASTENERS, INC. 8216 Kristel Cirle Port Richey FL 34668 727-842-9222 sales@k-rfastenersinc.com FAX: 727-842-9056 MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 Sensor Systems Inc. 8929 Fullbright Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 www.sensorantennas.com 818-341-5366 FAX: 818-341-9059 Contact: Dave Brooks dbrooks@sensorsantennas.com SpaceAge Control Inc. 38850 20th St. East Palmdale CA 93550 www.spaceagecontrol.com 661-273-3000 FAX: 661-273-4240 Symetrics Industries 1615 W. NASA Blvd Melbourne FL 32901 www.symetrics.com 321-254-1500 FAX: 321-308-0796 Contact: Randy Koller rkoller@symetrics.com

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ENGINE & ENGINE PARTS

ENGINE & ENGINE PARTS

Aviall 2750 Regent Blvd. Dallas TX 75261

972-586-1000 www.aviall.com

Contact: Ty Genteman

AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aero Turbine, Inc. 6800 S. Lindbergh St. Stockton CA 95206 Contact: Dave Mattson 209-983-1112 FAX: 209-983-0544 Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 www.alturdyne.com Contact: Frank Verbeke American Jet Engine Co., Inc. 37 West 39th St. New York NY 10018 212-398-0400 FAX: 212-398-0190 Art Sloan Accessory 116 Bonanza Mine Road Sutherlin OR 97479-9767 541-459-4389

tgenteman@aviall.com DIMO Corp. 44 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 Contact: Sohrab Naghshineh 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 www.dimo.net sales@dimo.net Essential Turbines 443 Meloche Street Dorval, QC H9P 2W2 Canada www.essentialturbines.com 514-633-4458 FAX: 514-633-6308 Herber Aircraft Service Inc. 1401 E. Franklin Ave. El Segundo CA 90245 Contact: Daryl Yeelitt 310-322-9575 Toll Free: 800-544-0050 FAX: 310-322-1875 www.herberaircraft.com sales@herberaircraft.com ISO Group Inc. 7700 Technology Drive West Melbourne FL 32904 www.iso-group.com Garrett Schiefer 321-773-5710 FAX: 321-777-0499 aviationparts@isogroup.com Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith

No Heavy Lifting ike losing competitors at Olympic weight-lifting events, U.S. Army aerial equipment planners apparently envied the Russians. Back in the 1970, the Russian Mil Mi-12 helicopter could lift up to 88,000 pounds, while America’s largest helicopter, the CH-47 Chinook, could only handle 28,000. Consequently, in 1973, the Army awarded a contract to Boeing to develop a prototype of a "Heavy Lift Helicopter (HLH)" capable of carrying 20 tons. Boeing began work on the XCH-62, a flying crane design with tandem rotors, each with an impressive diameter of 92 feet. The helicopter's profile featured a bulbous front cabin, a slender, high-trailing fuselage, and a prominently high rear pylon. Its widely spaced, unusually tall landing gear, which would allow for straddling heavy cargoes, such as armored vehicles, gave the craft an insect-like stance. Power was provided by three Allison XT701-700 turboshafts, each rated at 8,079 shaft horsepower. These fed into a combining transmission able to absorb a total of 17,700 shaft horsepower. The capacity differences proved problematical, and the gearbox had to be redesigned, causing the first flight target to be missed. Then, as now, money was tight. Congress cut funding for the program in August 1975, and the nearly complete prototype was stored at the U.S. Army Aviation Museum. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) effort to revive development also failed to attract sufficient funding. The single craft remains a museum piece. Sources: Global Security, www.globalsecurity.org; Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org

Rotair Industries 964 Crescent Ave. Bridgeport CT 06607 203-576-6545 FAX: 203-576-6804 Contact: Christine M. Kudravy, President sales@rotair.com www.rotair.com

ENGINE SERVICES Aero Turbine, Inc. 6800 S. Lindbergh St. Stockton CA 95206 Contact: Dave Mattson 209-983-1112 FAX: 209-983-0544 Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 www.alturdyne.com Contact: Frank Verbeke American Jet Engine Co., Inc. 37 West 39th St. New York NY 10018 212-398-0400 FAX: 212-398-0190 Art Sloan Accessory 116 Bonanza Mine Road Sutherlin OR 97479-9767 541-459-4389 Essential Turbines 443 Meloche Street Dorval, QC H9P 2W2 Canada www.essentialturbines.com 514-633-4458 FAX: 514-633-6308

FASTENERS

FASTENERS

Airspares International 504 East Meadow Avenue East Meadow NY 11554 info@airspares.net 516-334-0900 FAX: 516-334-4109 Av-Tech Industries P.O. Box 200366 Arlington TX 76006 817-640-4031 www.av-techind.com FAX: 817-649-1355 Shipping: 1180 Corporate Drive W. Arlington TX 76006 Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 www.canfieldelectronics.com FAX: 631-585-4200 info@canfieldelectronics.com Excel Aerospace Supply, Inc. 11855 Wicks St. Sun Valley CA 91352 818-767-6867 Telex: 371-7938 FAX: 818-504-2979 www.excelaero.com HC Pacific 19844 Quiroz Court Walnut CA 91789 909-598-0509 Contact: Cynthia Tubal/Sylvia Sao FAX: 909-598-1411 www.hcpacific.com hcpac@ix.netcom.com

JACON FASTENERS & ELECTRONICS 9539 Vassar Ave Chatsworth CA 91311 818-700-2901 sales@jacon.com FAX: 818-709-7426

K & R FASTENERS, INC. 8216 Kristel Cirle Port Richey FL 34668 727-842-9222 sales@k-rfastenersinc.com FAX: 727-842-9056 MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Nylok Aerospace 313 Euclid Way Anaheim CA 92801 714-635-3993 FAX: 714-635-9553 Ontic Engineering & Manufacturing Inc. 20360 Plummer St. Chatsworth CA 91311 FAX: 818-678-6618 818-678-6555 P.O.Box 7044 N Hollywood CA 91609 Transaero, Inc. 35 Melville Park Road, Suite 100 Melville NY 11747-3268 631-752-1240 Telex: 967734 FAX: 631-752-1242 SITA: ISPTXCR www.transaeroinc.com

FUEL CELLS FUEL CELLS AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901

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Aircraft On Ground Inc. 310 Regal Row - Suite 500 Dallas TX 75247 Toll Free: 800-635-9535 214-350-5334 FAX: 214-358-3835 FAA Repair Station #DBER248K www.aoginc.com Floats & Fuel Cells(FFC) 4010 Pilot Drive, Ste: #103 Memphis TN 38118 www.ffcfuelcells.com 901-794-8431 Toll Free: 800-647-6148 FAX: 901-842-7135 FAA Repair Station #TH4R544M Contact: Kevin Brewer kbrewer@ffcfuelcells.com ** Inventory Available on ABDOnline.com

HOSE &HOSE HOSE FITTINGS & HOSE FITTINGS

INSTRUMENTS & INSTRUMENT

INSTRUMENTS & INSTRUMENT OVERHAUL OVERHAUL

AERO COMPONENT ENGINEERING CO.

PUMPS & COMPONENTS FUELFUEL PUMPS & COMPONENTS

28887 Industry Drive Valencia CA 91355 www.aerocomponent.com 818-841-9258 FAX: 818-841-2342 Contact: David Bill davidwbill@aerocomponent.com Herber Aircraft Service Inc. 1401 E. Franklin Ave. El Segundo CA 90245 Contact: Daryl Yeelitt 310-322-9575 Toll Free: 800-544-0050 FAX: 310-322-1875 www.herberaircraft.com sales@herberaircraft.com KITCO Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Doug NewComb www.kitcodefense.com

AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK

HYDRAULIC PARTS & HYDRAULIC PARTS & COMPONENTS COMPONENTS

747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Essential Turbines 443 Meloche Street Dorval, QC H9P 2W2 Canada www.essentialturbines.com 514-633-4458 FAX: 514-633-6308 Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040

GROUND POWER/GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 www.alturdyne.com Contact: Frank Verbeke American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247

AXNES INC 15954 Jackson Creek Parkway Suite B609 Monument CO 80132 719-722-1770 www.axnes.com post@axnes.com BESTEK Industries, Inc. 1343 SW 35th St. San Antonio TX 78237 FAX: 210-434-1074 210-434-1071 Dixie Air Parts Supply Inc. 2202 W Malone St. San Antonio TX 78224 FAX: 210-924-4901 210-924-5561 PO Box 3583 San Antonio TX 78211 Dynamic Fabrication Inc. 2615 S. Hickory St. Santa Ana CA 92707 FAX: 714-662-1052 714-662-2440 Equipment & Supply, Inc. 4507 Highway #74-West Monroe NC 28110 FAX: 704-283-1206 704-289-6565 G-H Distributors Inc. 2793 Bristol Pike Bensalem PA USA 19020 ghdist.sh@verizon.net 215-245-0101 FAX: 215-245-4243 ISO Group Inc. 7700 Technology Drive West Melbourne FL 32904 www.iso-group.com Garrett Schiefer 321-773-5710 FAX: 321-777-0499 aviationparts@isogroup.com Mercury GSE 15915 Piuma Ave Cerritos CA USA 90703 www.mercurygse.com 562 653 0654 FAX: 562 653 0665 Ralmark Company 83 East Luzerne Ave Larksville PA 18704 570-288-9331

WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225 Hawker Pacific Aerospace 11240 Sherman Way Sun Valley CA 91352 Toll Free: 800-443-8302 818-765-6201 FAX: 818-765-2065 www.hawker.com Contact: Brad Curtis carlo.ventittelli@hawker.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Select Helicopter Services Ltd. 6295A Airport Way Kelowna, BC Canada V1V 2V7 www.selecthelicopter.com 250-765-3317 FAX: 866-389-9878 info@selecthelicopter.com Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 Technolube Products 8015 Paramount Blvd Pico Rivera CA 90660 FAX: 562-776-4004 562-776-4039

INFORMATION SERVICES INFORMATION SERVICES ABDONLINE.COM 116 Radio Circle Dr. Ste 302 Mount Kisco NY 10549 www.abdonline.com 914-242-8700 FAX: 914-242-5422 Inventory Locator Service, LLC 8001 Centerview Pkwy - STE: 400 Memphis TN USA 38018 901-794-5000 www.lismart.com FAX: 901-794-1760 NSN-NOW.COM 8200 Republic Airport;Hangar 43, Suite 6 Farmingdale NY 11735 631-847-3504 www.nsn-now.com FAX: 631-847-0264 Pentagon 2000 Software, Inc. 15 West 34th Street New York NY 10001 www.pentagon2000.com 212-629-7521 FAX: 212-629-7513 SOS: Sales Opportunity Services Pentagon 2000 Software 1540 E. Pleasant Valley Blvd Altoona PA 16602 814-949-3327

AOG Reaction Inc.

Accessory Class I, II, and III Test/Repair “EXPENDABLE” Switches, Sensors, Controllers Specialists In Unusual Accessories 526 Aviator Drive Ft. Worth, TX 76179-5426

Ph: (817) 439-0700 Fax: (817) 439-9700

AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200 Innovative Solutions & Support 720 Pennsylvania Drive Exton PA 19341 FAX: 610-646-0146 610-646-9800 www.innovative-ss.com Contact: David Green Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith

LANDING GEAR PARTS/ ACCESSORIES LANDING GEAR & OVERHAUL & OVERHAUL AEREX Manufacturing, Inc. 34 S. Satellite Rd South Windsor CT 06074 860-643-7627 Brown Helicopters Inc. 10100 Aileron Ave. Pensacola FL 32506 850-455-0971 FAX: 850-456-8231 Hawker Pacific Aerospace 11240 Sherman Way Sun Valley CA 91352 Toll Free: 800-443-8302 818-765-6201 FAX: 818-765-2065 www.hawker.com Contact: Brad Curtis carlo.ventittelli@hawker.com KITCO Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Doug NewComb www.kitcodefense.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith

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Rotair Industries 964 Crescent Ave. Bridgeport CT 06607 203-576-6545 FAX: 203-576-6804 Contact: Christine M. Kudravy, President sales@rotair.com www.rotair.com S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

LIGHTING

LIGHTING

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com REBTECH 1500 Brown Trail Bedford TX USA 76022 www.rebtechnvg.com FAX: 817-285-7742 Toll Free: 877-426-4158 Specialty Bulb Co. Inc. PO Box 231 Bohemia NY USA 11716 631-589-33089 www.bulbspecialists.com FAX: 631-589-3393 Toll Free: 1-800-331-2852 Contact: Edie Muldoon info@bulbspecialists.com

METAL FABRICATION & METAL FABRICATION ASSEMBLY & ASSEMBLY AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247 Dynamic Fabrication Inc. 2615 S. Hickory St. Santa Ana CA 92707 FAX: 714-662-1052 714-662-2440 Honeycomb Company of America (HCOA) 1950 Limbus Ave Sarasota FL USA 34243 FAX: 1+ 941-755-426 +1 941-993-0049 www.hcoainc.com - wbryson@hcoainc.com IMP Aerospace Halifax Stanfield Intl Airport 557 Barnes Rd. Enfield, Nova Scotia Canada B2T 1K3 www.impaerospace.com 902-873-2250 FAX: 902-873-2290 Contact Carl Kumpic email: carl.kumpic@impaerospace.com Rotair Industries 964 Crescent Ave. Bridgeport CT 06607 203-576-6545 FAX: 203-576-6804 Contact: Christine M. Kudravy, President sales@rotair.com www.rotair.com

METALS

METALS

Airspares International 504 East Meadow Avenue East Meadow NY 11554 info@airspares.net 516-334-0900 FAX: 516-334-4109

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Bralco Metals 15090 Northam St La Mirada CA 90638 Toll Free: 800-628-1864 714-7369-4800 FAX: 714-736-4840 Contact: Don Gonzales dgonzales@bralco.com Albuquerque 6718 Jefferson, NE. Albuquerque NM 87109 11sa;es@bralco.com 505-345-0959 Toll Free: 800-999-8405 FAX: 505-345-1187 Dallas 410 Mars Drive Garland TX 75040 972-276-2676 08sales@bralco.com FAX: 972-272-4485 Toll Free: 800-442-3529 Seattle 7416 S. 228th St Kent WA 98032 253-395-0614 73sales@bralco.com FAX: 253-395-0696 Toll Free: 866-285-9984 Phoenix 929 E. Jackson St Phoenix AZ 85034 602-252-1918 53sales@bralco.com FAX: 602-252-7813 Toll Free: 800-544-8052 Wichita 3400 N. Topeka Ave. Wichita KS 67219 316-838-9351 14sales@bralco.com FAX: 316-838-9230 Toll Free: 800-729-6772 www.bralco.com MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com SUPRA Alloys, Inc TITAN Metal Fabricators 352 Balboa Circle Camarillo CA 93012 805-388-2138 www.suraalloys.com FAX: 1805-987-6492 Toll Free: 800-647-8772

MODIFICATIONS MODIFICATIONS

Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com Sensor Systems Inc. 8929 Fullbright Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 www.sensorantennas.com 818-341-5366 FAX: 818-341-9059 Contact: Dave Brooks dbrooks@sensorsantennas.com Symetrics Industries 1615 W. NASA Blvd Melbourne FL 32901 www.symetrics.com 321-254-1500 FAX: 321-308-0796 Contact: Randy Koller rkoller@symetrics.com

PAINTING

PAINTING

DEFT, INC. 17451 Von Karman Ave. Irvine CA 92614 Contact: Tracy Garrett Jr. 949-474-0400 Toll Free: 1-800-544-3338 FAX: 949-474-7269 www.deftfinishes.com IMP Aerospace Halifax Stanfield Intl Airport 557 Barnes Rd. Enfield, Nova Scotia Canada B2T 1K3 www.impaerospace.com 902-873-2250 FAX: 902-873-2290 Contact Carl Kumpic email: carl.kumpic@impaerospace.com Sensor Systems Inc. 8929 Fullbright Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 www.sensorantennas.com 818-341-5366 FAX: 818-341-9059 Contact: Dave Brooks dbrooks@sensorsantennas.com

Airspares International 504 East Meadow Avenue East Meadow NY 11554 info@airspares.net 516-334-0900 FAX: 516-334-4109 Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com Essential Turbines 443 Meloche Street Dorval, QC H9P 2W2 Canada www.essentialturbines.com 514-633-4458 FAX: 514-633-6308 IMP Aerospace Halifax Stanfield Intl Airport 557 Barnes Rd. Enfield, Nova Scotia Canada B2T 1K3 www.impaerospace.com 902-873-2250 FAX: 902-873-2290 Contact Carl Kumpic email: carl.kumpic@impaerospace.com Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com REBTECH 1500 Brown Trail Bedford TX USA 76022 www.rebtechnvg.com FAX: 817-285-7742 Toll Free: 877-426-4158

PNEUMATIC PARTS & PNEUMATIC PARTS & COMPONENTS COMPONENTS

NAV/COM SYSTEMS NAV/COM SYSTEMS

AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 Brown Helicopters Inc. 10100 Aileron Ave. Pensacola FL 32506 850-455-0971 FAX: 850-456-8231 MIRAJ Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com

AXNES INC 15954 Jackson Creek Parkway Suite B609 Monument CO 80132 719-722-1770 www.axnes.com post@axnes.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis j ouy.leuis@cobham.com

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | WINTER 2016/17

AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225 Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

PROPELLERS/PARTS & PROPELLERS/PARTS OVERHAUL PROPELLERS/PARTS OVERHAUL

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QUICK REFERENCE: ROTORCRAFT

Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com

ROTOR BLADE OVERHAUL ROTOR BLADE OVERHAUL AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 Heatcon Composite Systems 600 Andover Park E. Seattle WA 98188 206-575-1333 www.heatcon.com FAX: 206-575-0856

SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT & SURVIVAL SURVIVAL & EQUIPMENT OVERHAUL OVERHAUL

MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com SpaceAge Control Inc. 38850 20th St. East Palmdale CA 93550 www.spaceagecontrol.com 661-273-3000 FAX: 661-273-4240 Tactical Flight Services 1800 Airport Rd, Hgr. II Kennesaw GA 30144 FAX: 770-794-3222 678-438-7271 www.tfs2.com

TOOLS - TOOLS AIR POWER - AIR POWER

USATCO/U.S. AIR TOOL 60 Fleetwood Court Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Toll Free: 800-645-8180 631-471-3300 FAX: 631-471-3308 1218 W. Mahalo Place Rancho Dominguez CA 90220-5446 310-632-5400 FAX: 310-632-3900

TEST EQUIPMENT TEST EQUIPMENT AAR AIRCRAFT COMPONENT SERVICES-NEW YORK 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247 Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com CK Technologies, Inc. 3629 Vista Mercado Camarillo CA 93012 www.ckt.com 805-987-4801 FAX: 805-987-4811 FIELD Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

Loos & Company Inc. Wire Rope Division 1 Cable Rd. Pomfret CT 06258 www.loosco.com

860-928-7981 FAX: 860-928-6167 Toll Free: 800-533-5667 900 Industrial Blvd Naples FL 33942 239-321-5667

Transaero, Inc. 35 Melville Park Road, Suite 100 Melville NY 11747-3268 631-752-1240 Telex: 967734 FAX: 631-752-1242 SITA: ISPTXCR www.transaeroinc.com COntact: Lance Human human@transaeroinc.com

Services . . . . . . . . . . . Back Cover

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

WHEELS/BRAKES & WHEELS/BRAKES WHEELS/BRAKES & OVERHAUL WHEELS/BRAKES OVERHAUL Aviation Brake Service/Avcenter 7274 NW 34th Street Miami FL 33122 305-594-4677 www.aviationbrake.com FAX: 305-477-5799 Contact: Andres Posse andres@aviationbrake.com Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com

WIRE ROPE WIREFITTINGS ROPE FITTINGS

AAR Aircraft Component

VALVES

AXNES INC 15954 Jackson Creek Parkway Suite B609 Monument CO 80132 719-722-1770 www.axnes.com post@axnes.com Life Support International 200 Rittenhouse Circle Bristol PA 19007 Telex: greg@lifesupportintl.com 215-785-2870 www.lifesupportintl.com FAX: 215-785-2880 Survival Products Inc. 5614 SW 25th St. Hollywood FL 33023 954-966-7329 Contact: Donna Rogers/V.P. FAX: 954-966-3584 www.survivalproductsinc.com sales@survivalproductsinc.com Transaero, Inc. 35 Melville Park Road, Suite 100 Melville NY 11747-3268 631-752-1240 Telex: 967734 FAX: 631-752-1242 SITA: ISPTXCR www.transaeroinc.com COntact: Lance Human human@transaeroinc.com

ADVERTISERS’ INDEX

WIRELESS COMMUNICATION WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS

Nor-Ral, Inc. 164 Hickory Springs Industrial Dr. Canton GA 30115 FAX: 770-720-0527 770-720-0526 www.norral.com jessica.mcwhorter@norral.com

VALVES

CK Technologies, Inc. 3629 Vista Mercado Camarillo CA 93012 www.ckt.com 805-987-4801 FAX: 805-987-4811

ABD50, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Aero Component Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Aero Precision Industries, LLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 AOG Reaction, Inc. . . . . . . . . . 63 Auto Pilots Central, Inc. . . . . . 56 Axnes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Benchmark Connector Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Contact: Max Meredith

Continental Aircraft Support . 43

WINDOWS & WINDSHIELDS WINDOWS & WINDSHIELDS MECANEX USA Inc. 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com PPG Aerospace 12780 San Fernando Rd. Sylmar CA USA 91342 818-741-1687

WIRE HARNESS TESTING WIRE HARNESS TESTING American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971

530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247

USATCO - U.S. Air Tool Co.. . . 50

We welcome your comments, criticisms, praise and suggestions. Please contact us at: AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE P.O. Box 477, Ardsley, NY 10502 production@abdonline.com

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