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THE BEST

Aftermarket Suppliers for Fighters, Helicopters and Transports

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE Sustainment and Modernization

Airbus A400M: Millstone or Marvel? Has its Troubled Progress Turned it Into an Expensive Liability?

The C-5 Galaxy: An Idea Too Big to Fail Emblematic of the Challenges of Creating and Maintaining a Massive Airlifter

Putting the "Super" in Galaxy Outfitting Lockheed's C-5M Strategic Lifter for Flight into the Future

The Quest to Control the Boundary Layer The Behavior of the Air Around an Aircraft Makes a Big Difference

Tooling: The Jig is Up, the Fixture is In It Takes More than Aircraft Parts and Labor to Produce Airplanes

FROM: A.A.D./P.O. Box 477/ Ardsley, NY 10502/USA

CHALLENGES OF ELECTRICAL FAULTS Why are Aircraft Electrical Systems So Hard to Understand?

2016 VOL. 12, NO. 3

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WORDS FROM THE WISE

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE

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C0-PUBLISHER Richard Greenwald C0-PUBLISHER Alan Greenwald EDITOR Laura Brengelman EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Ron Swidler GENERAL MANAGER Rose Candido CIRCULATION Judi Grondin CONTRIBUTORS Susan Burke Andrew Drwiega Hank Hogan Donna Kelly John Likakis Tracy Martin Pat Walsh James Wynbrandt FRONT COVER Image courtesy of U.S. Air Force. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Joseph Swafford. ADVERTISING For more information, please contact us at 914-242-8700 A Publication of Air Service Directory, Inc. P.O. Box 477, Ardsley, NY 10502 Ph: 914-242-8700 • Fax: 914-242-5422 www.abdonline.com • abd@abdonline.com

AAD -Aviation Aftermarket Defense is published quarterly by Air Service Directory, Inc. Periodicals postage paid at Mt. Kisco, NY and at additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to: AAD, P.O. Box 477, Ardsley, NY 10502.

The data presented herein has been obtained from sources deemed to be reliable. Every effort has been made to insure accuracy, but AAD does not assume responsibility and/or liability for errors. We will be pleased to receive corrections from listed firms and will make changes in or additions to listings. Rights are reserved, however, to add or delete information in any manner we conceive to be of most value to the aviation industry and to AAD. © 2016. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part, in any way, without the express prior written approval of the publishers. PRINTED IN CHINA

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Why Read This? Maybe you get this magazine because you are one of the many partners in industry we have made over the years. You might get it because we feature an advertisement or other listing for your company, or perhaps you expressed an interest in our editorial, information, or product services. This publication could have been passed on to you by a colleague or friend, or maybe you just found it lying around - a case of dumb luck. Before you toss this paper in the recycling bin, use it for litter in a birdcage, or let it sop up an oil leak, here is why you should at least leaf through the pages of Aviation Aftermarket Defense and take a glance at what we have cooked up for you. If you have even a passing interest in aviation history. . . Our aviation scholars pound the Internet, and, yes, dig up the dusty, old texts, to put together some of the more interesting facts, failures, successes, and downright quirks related to the development of aircraft through the years. Mark Twain wrote, "There is no such thing as a new idea. It is impossible. We simply take a lot of old ideas and put them into a sort of mental kaleidoscope. We give them a turn… but they are the same old pieces of colored glass . . ." In every issue, we bring to light some of those bright-shining, scuffed with use, highly honed, or rough and jagged glimmers of ideas. We turn them over and discover where they led inventors, designers, aviators, tactical planners, and the guys who signed the checks. And we follow where those concepts have led—to dead ends or in promising new directions—on the long road to the incredibly high-tech aircraft of today and, of course, tomorrow. If you have even the smallest amount of curiosity, even the slightest interest in what makes aircraft and the industry work… Then you are likely to find something of interest in the various nuts and bolts discussions by our team of industry experts. In this issue, we consider the importance of the tooling used to make and sustain a legacy transport, and what happens to it when the production line stops. We discuss challenges faced by the master sleuths who discover and repair the most elusive of faults, ensuring electrical systems in aircraft remain reliable. In a related article, we look into a future where, as we are seeing in the auto industry, electrical motors in aircraft may supplant—and certainly will further enhance—traditional powerplants. And we delve into an unending quest for engineers, researchers, and airframe designers: to achieve the perhaps possible dream of managing an aircraft's boundary layer. If you are paying attention to what is happening in the domestic and increasing volatile international circus… You likely will be interested in reading about major development and upgrade projects, international efforts, national investments, and related conflicts that will impact global airlift services into the mid-twenty-first century. As we all know, the biggest steps ahead in capability can involve the greatest challenges. The Super Galaxy C-5M strategic lifter has been a poster child for an incredibly capable workhorse that has had an uneven, though invaluable, past, and promises an awesome future. On the international front, we reveal the latest chapters in the ongoing saga of the development of a long-awaited, all-terrain military transport crucial to European and other nations' key missions, the new Airbus Atlas A400M. If you are part of or interested in becoming part of this industry and its robust community . . . This includes all of the hardworking and dedicated individuals involved in military aviation: manufacturers, maintainers, and aftermarket players; the armed forces, from the big brass to fleet operators and flight crews, and all-important support staff; far-thinking dreamers and planners in government and commercial think tanks; and those who share in the information and business synergies that bind us all together. If you are with us in looking ahead to a successful, sustainable future. . . Well, then, I am willing to bet that you are going to be glad that you opened this and forthcoming issues of Aviation Aftermarket Defense. Go ahead, turn the page.

Laura Brengelman AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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CONTENTS | FALL 2016

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE

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FEATURES 6

16 12

Airbus A400M: Millstone or Marvel? Has its Troubled Progress Turned it Into an Expensive Liability? By Andrew Drwiega

16 The Quest to Control the Boundary Layer The Behavior of the Air Around an Aircraft Makes a Big Difference. By John Likakis 23 Challenges of Electrical Faults Why are Aircraft Electrical Systems so Hard to Understand? By Tracy Martin 28 The C-5 Galaxy: An Idea Too Big to Fail Emblematic of the Challenges of Creating and Maintaining a Massive Airlifter, the C-5 has had a Tumultuous History. By Patrick J. Walsh

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32 Putting the "Super" in Galaxy Outfitting Lockheed's C-5M Strategic Lifter for Flight into the Future. By James Wynbrandt 38 Tooling: The Jig is Up, the Fixture is In It Takes More than Aircraft Parts and Labor to Produce Airplanes. By Donna J. Kelly

INDUSTRY'S LEADING PROVIDERS The best in the business are profiled here. Your suppliers should be buying from these sources.

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44 C-130 Providers Who To Turn To First 48 P-3 Providers Who To Turn To First

DEPARTMENTS II Why Read This? Letter from Laura Brengelman 2 News Briefs What You Need to Know, Quickly and Accurately. By Alan Greenwald 12 TECH COLUMN Transports Flying via Electricity By Hank Hogan

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CLASSIFIEDS Firms that specialize in aftermarket aircraft parts distribution, manufacturing & repairs. 49 63 73 81

TRANSPORTS FIGHTERS ROTORCRAFT ADVERTISERS’ INDEX WRITE TO US We welcome your comments, criticisms, praise and suggestions. Please contact us at: AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE PO Box 477, Ardsley, NY 10502 production@abdonline.com Fax: 914-242-5422


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COMPILED BY ALAN GREENWALD Photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin.

Photo courtesy of U.S. Navy. Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kegan E. Kay

Canada Awards Lockheed Martin C-130J Super Hercules Support Contract Lockheed Martin has been awarded a 5-year contract extension worth approximately $504.3 million by the Government of Canada to provide In Service Support (ISS) for the Royal Canadian Air Force's (RCAF) fleet of seventeen C-130J Super Hercules aircraft, known in Canada as the CC-130J. The company has supported the RCAF CC-130J fleet since 2007; this most recent award is an extension of the original contract. Per the contract, Lockheed Martin is the lead, providing all performance-based logistics supporting the operations, sustainment, and maintenance associated with the RCAF's Super Hercules fleet. Lockheed Martin partners with a number of Canada's aerospace companies, including CAE, Cascade, IMP Aerospace, Standard Aero, and Sonovision to support ISSrelated work. "Lockheed Martin Canada takes great pride in witnessing the workhorse of the Royal Canadian Air Force operating in missions around the world—whether it is supporting humanitarian aid operations conducted by the Disaster Assistance Response Team or transporting troops and equipment to Canada's far north. We are committed to keeping the CC-130J fleet mission ready and maintained to the highest operational standards," said Charles Bouchard, Chief Executive, Lockheed Martin Canada. "We are equally committed to ensuring that a majority of maintenance work on RCAF's Hercules fleet is done here in Canada, ensuring that high-value jobs in Canada's aerospace industry are sustained." Beyond the ISS contract, under Canada's Industrial and Technological Benefits Policy, investments equal to the value of the contract also will be made in Canada. This includes research and development and ensuring that work is performed by small and medium-sized enterprises from across Canadian industries. Sikorsky to Provide Black Hawk Parts to Taiwan and Jordan Sikorsky Aircraft, a Lockheed Martin subsidiary, has received an $11 million firm-fixed-price, foreign military sales (FMS) contract to provide Taiwan and Jordan with UH-60M Black Hawk helicopter standard spare parts kits. The U.S. Army Contracting Command is in charge of the contracting activity. The work is expected to be completed by July 2017. Among the Black Hawk's features are balistically tolerant rotor and drive systems, anti-plow keel beams, wire strike protection, and jettisonable cockpit doors. According to Sikorsky, twenty-seven countries use variants of this versatile, medium-lift helicopter. 2

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

Boeing Wins $100 Million Contract for Australian P-8A Maritime Aircraft Parts Boeing has won $100 million contract to provide modifications for long-lead parts associated with the manufacture of four full-rate production Lot 8 P-8A multi-mission maritime aircraft for Australia. According to a U.S. Department of Defense statement, work is expected to be complete by June 2017. Cooperative engagement agreement funds in the amount of $100,423,110 are being obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The U.S. Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is handling the contract activity. EC-130H Compass Call to Receive Avionics Upgrade The U.S. Air Force's Lockheed Martin-BAE Systems EC-130H Compass Call wide-area Photo courtesy of U.S. Air Force. coverage electronic attack and offensive counter information aircraft will receive an avionics upgrade aimed at boosting navigation capabilities. The Compass Call avionics viability program (AVP) upgrade will revitalize the aircrafts' cockpit with liquid crystal displays at a cost of about $45 million over 3 years. The Compass Call was designed to use noise jamming to perform tactical command, control and communications countermeasures missions. Electronic attack on early warning and acquisition radars is a secondary role. Speaking of the upgrade program, Major Gerardo Sanchez, the 42nd Electronic Combat Squadron Assistant Director of Operations, stated, "With the new upgrades, we can grab the information with the push of a button‌ It increases the pilot's situational awareness tenfold." Having entered service in 1982 and combat in 1989, the EC-130H has flown more than 10,400 combat sorties totaling some 64,200 hours. The entire U.S. Air Force fleet of fourteen aircraft is expected to receive the AVP upgrades. To date, two upgraded aircraft have arrived at DavisMonthan Air Force Base in Arizona for operations with the 55th Electronic Combat Group. Two more are currently scheduled for delivery. WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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NEWS BRIEFS

Air Industries Receives Contract for KC-135 Landing Gear Components Air Industries Group has been contracted by Helicopter Tech to produce landing gear components for the KC-135 aircraft. The two contracts, totaling $2.3 million, will require Air Industries Group's subsidiary Nassau Tool Works to produce landing gear parts for the aircraft over a period of 24 months. The company has two facilities where it can produce these complex landing gear and flight safety critical parts. First production deliveries under the contract will begin in early 2018. Air Industries currently supplies complete landing gear and/or landing gear parts for numerous platforms. Helicopter Tech is one of four companies contracted under the U.S. Air Force Landing Gear Prime Vendor (LGPVC) contract worth $1.5 billion. The 10-year contract covers the supply of landing gear components and assemblies for thirty-four different platforms. Air Industries Group president and CEO Dan Godin stated, "This is the first time we are producing a landing gear part for the KC-135, and it is consistent with our strategy to expand our footprint into larger aircraft platforms." Helicopter Tech CEO Rachel Carson said, "This contract is a welcome development in what has become a long and successful relationship between the two companies. The level of service, and the quality of the product are best in class. We look forward to similar collaborations in the future."

Astronics's Night Vision-Compatible Lighting to Upgrade Military F-16s Astronics won a foreign military sales (FMS) contract to design, develop, and produce night-vision-compatible lighting systems for an undisclosed country's fleet of F-16 aircraft. Work on the $5 million contract is expected to be completed over the next 24 months. Ninety percent of the contract's revenue is anticipated in 2017 and 2018. Astronics engineers will develop a complete lighting system that will enable the aircraft to be piloted using night-vision goggles. The system includes exterior and cockpit lighting, as well as related products required to modify the aircraft wiring and control systems. Over the past 20 years, Astronics' lighting systems have been used to modify over 1,200 F-16 aircraft around the world. "This award builds on our strong legacy of providing world-class lighting systems to the global aerospace market," says Astronics President and CEO Peter J. Gundermann. "In addition to our long history with the F-16, we provide lighting systems on virtually every major fighter, rotorcraft, and transport aircraft flown by militaries worldwide." Photo courtesy of U.S. Air Force. Photo by Master Sgt. Andy Dunaway.

IMP Aerospace Delivers Re-Winged Orions to the Royal Norwegian Air Force IMP Aerospace announced the delivery of the final re-winged P-3 Orion aircraft to the Royal Norwegian Air Force, marking the successful completion of this multi-year program. These aircraft are similar to the Canadian CP140 Aurora aircraft, which also are receiving new wings, as well as mission system upgrades as part of a mid-life upgrade being undertaken at IMP Aerospace under a separate contract. The wing replacement is part of the Aircraft Service Life Extension Program (ASLEP), which also includes the replacement of the center wing lower surface and horizontal stabilizer. Under this program, all life-limiting components are replaced with new materials incorporating advanced alloys, yielding a five-fold increase in corrosion resistance, and resulting in a significant reduction in future maintenance and operating costs. Lockheed Martin assembled the replacement wings and other components— some of which were fabricated in Canada—for the Norwegian P-3s at its facility in Marietta, Georgia, USA. The completed assemblies were then shipped to IMP for installation. IMP Aerospace, an operating unit of IMP Aerospace & Defence, is based in Halifax, Nova Scotia. IMP Aerospace & Defence is a business unit of IMP Group Limited. Photo courtesy of U.S. Air Force. Photo by Sgt. Gary Coppage.

Kellstrom and Astra Supplying Spares for South African C-130s Kellstrom Defense Aerospace and South Africa's Astra Aircraft Corporation have been awarded a contract to support the South African Air Force's (SAAF's) C-130BZ transport aircraft. Kellstrom will provide spare parts on an exclusive basis, and Astra Aircraft will provide incountry program and customer relationship management services. "This long-term contract, coupled with our highly experienced resource pool and OEM (original equipment manufacturer) partnerships, brings Kellstrom Defense closer to being the global leader of C-130 aftermarket parts and repair services," said Dean Brady, Kellstrom's President of Global Distribution and Supply Chain. "We look forward to working with Astra Aircraft and supporting the SAAF C-130B fleet readiness." Photo courtesy of U.S. Air Force. Photo by Senior Airman Melissa Sheffield. The SAAF is one of the world's oldest C-130 operators, having flown the Hercules since 1963, and it currently operates nine upgraded C-130BZs. Although these are expected to serve until around 2020, it is possible that their service lives could be extended to 2030. While there are no immediate plans for a successor, Lockheed Martin is offering its C-130J Super Hercules and Airbus its A400M to the South African Air Force. WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

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COMPILED BY ALAN GREENWALD

U.S. Air Force Declares the F35 Ready for War The U.S. Air Force has declared the F-35 ready for service. "I am proud to announce this Photo courtesy of U.S. Air Force. Photo by Master Sgt. Donald R. Allen. powerful new weapons system has achieved initial combat capability," said General "Hawk" Carlisle, Commander of Air Combat Command. "The F-35A will be the most dominant aircraft in our inventory, because it can go where our legacy aircraft cannot and provide the capabilities our commanders need on the modern battlefield." While capable of conducting many different combat missions, the F-35 is particularly well-equipped for command and control functions, using its many sensors and advanced computing systems to pinpoint targets and threats and share that information with older aircraft. The U.S. Marine's variant of the Lightning II, the F-35B with vertical takeoff and landing capabilities, achieved Initial Operational Capability (IOC) last year. A new weapons system reaches IOC when it is in its minimum deployable form. The means that the military will continue to refine the complex computing systems on the F-35 but are officially willing to send the advanced fighter jet into combat if necessary. "The combat ready F-35A is the latest fifth generation fighter aircraft in the Air Force's inventory and provides our nation air dominance in any environment. The F-35A brings an unprecedented combination of lethality, survivability, and adaptability to joint and combined operations, and is ready to deploy and strike well-defended targets anywhere on Earth," said General David Goldfein, Chief of Staff of the Air Force, in a press release. According to Colonel David Smith, 419th Fighter Wing Commander out of Hill Ai Force Base, "We're prepared to take this aircraft wherever it's needed in support of our national defense."

Pacific Propeller Received Coast Guard Contract and Expands Services The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) has awarded Pacific Propeller International (PPI) a support contract to provide overhaul Photo courtesy of U.S. Coast Guard. services for the Hamilton Sundstrand 54H60-117 propeller assembly and components. The 54H60-117 propeller system operates on the U.S. Coast Guard's fleet of C-130 Hercules heavy-lift, search, and rescue aircraft. The 5-year contract consists of a 1-year base, followed by four single-year options. PPI is an Federal Aviation Administration-authorized repair station, certified under Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) 145. For more than a half century, PPI has been recognized as an accomplished global repair and overhaul facility; the company has received several smaller, quantity-specific U.S. Coast Guard 54H60 propeller awards. "This 5-year competitive award contract substantiates the USCG's confidence in PPI's commitment to support their fleet," stated Al Hayward, Vice President and Director of Sales and Marketing. "We have the facility, in-house capabilities and expertise to satisfy customers like the USCG, who require world-class repair and overhaul. We're honored to be of service." With the recent implementation of a new motor test rig and workstation within its 64,00-square-foot facility, Pacific Propeller International (PPI) also has added electric motor testing, repair, and overhaul to its lineup of airframe service capabilities. The company is initially targeting auxiliary motors for military and civilian operators of C-130s and P-3s. It also offers test, repair, and overhaul services for motors up to 55 inch pounds of torque, speeds up to 25,000 revolutions per minute, and a maximum power rating of 3,400 watts. Tim Gellerson, PPI's Vice President General Manager, commented, "PPI currently is repairing/overhauling/testing C-130 Hercules and P-3 Orion auxiliary motors, but welcomes the opportunity to not only work on these auxiliary motors, but to quote PPI's servicing of all motors that fall within the limitations of our newly established test equipment."

KC-46 Completes Flight Tests The KC-46 Pegasus has completed the flight tests required for the Milestone C production decision, the U.S. Air Force has announced. The tests were completed and involved offloading 1,500 pounds of fuel in-air to an A-10 Thunderbolt II. The A-10 mission was the last of six in-flight refueling demonstrations required before the tanker program can Photo courtesy of Ken Fielding. request approval to award production Lots 1 and 2 for 19 of the aircraft. Pegasus has also successfully refueled the C-17 Globemaster II and F-16 using the air refueling boom, the F-18 Hornet and AV-8B Harrier II using the centerline and wing drogue systems, and has played the role of a receiver aircraft. Manufactured by Boeing, the Pegasus is a wide-body, multi-role tanker that can refuel all U.S. allied and coalition military aircraft compatible with international aerial refueling procedures. The aircraft can carry passengers, cargo, and patients, and it can detect, avoid, defeat, and survive threats using multiple layers of protection, enabling it to safely operate in medium-threat environments. 4

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NEWS BRIEFS Odyssey Finalizes Acquisition of Aero Precision Odyssey Investment Partners has been granted all regulatory approvals and has officially acquired Aero Precision Industries. According to a company announcement, the acquisition includes Aero Precision, based in Livermore, California; DAC International, located in Austin, Texas; and NASAM, in San Francisco, California. "We are excited about our new partnership with Aero Precision. We strongly believe this relationship will be additive to the business as we look to provide even better products and service to our existing OEM partners," said Bill Hopkins, Co-President and Managing Principal at Odyssey Investment Partners. "We see this as a very positive step in Aero Precision's growth as an aftermarket distributor and worldwide service provider. We look forward to bringing the benefits of this arrangement to our customers in the military, commercial, and space segments," said Aero Precision's President Frank Cowle. Aero Precision is a leader in aerospace distribution and services and a premier worldwide stocking distributor of aircraft OEM parts; its officers oversee Aero Precision Holdings, a holding company for DAC International, NASAM, and other Aero Precision affiliate companies. DAC International is a worldwide distributor of avionics, test equipment, data converters, and aviation supplies for military and other aircraft. NASAM is an international distributor of high-tech electronics, concentrating in the Japan market. Odyssey Investment Partners is a leading private equity investment firm. It has an established track record of partnering with skilled managers to transform middle-market companies into more efficient and diversified businesses with strong growth profiles.

John Guasto Named Vice President of Aviall Defense John Guasto has been named Vice President, Aviall Defense, for Aviall, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Boeing Company. Guasto brings to Aviall more than 19 years of experience at Boeing. There, he served in various management and technical positions with increasing responsibility, including director of international rotorcraft, business development manager, product support manager, and multiple program management positions across Boeing's defense business. Prior to joining Boeing, Guasto served in the U.S. Air Force for 7 years as a KC-135 aircraft crew chief. Most recently, Guasto served as Director of Attack Helicopter Sustainment for Boeing Integrated Logistics. In his new role, he will provide leadership to Aviall Defense, which supports more than fifty military branches in thirty countries across the world, ensuring fleet operational readiness and peak aircraft performance. "John's vast defense and rotorcraft sustainment experience will assist us in delivering a superior level of service and innovative solutions to our military and defense customers across the globe, while further positioning us for new business opportunities and continued growth," stated Aviall President and CEO Eric Strafel.

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE REACHING THE RIGHT PEOPLE, AT THE RIGHT PLACES, AT THE RIGHT TIME

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AIRBUS A400M

AIRBUS A400M MILLSTONE OR MARVEL? The Airbus A400M Atlas Program Began as a Solution to Europe's Traditional Shortfall in Military Transport Aircraft. Has its Troubled Progress Turned it Into an Expensive Liability? By Andrew Drwiega

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he news that the ill-faring Airbus A400M Atlas military transport program will directly affect the Airbus Group's first half-year results was revealed by company Chief Financial Officer Harald Wilhelm on the third day of this year's Farnborough Airshow. At the show, held July 11 to 17, in the United Kingdom, Wilhelm stated that the most recent problems have been "fundamentally different" from earlier serious issues experienced with this new model—for instance, in 2009 and

Photo courtesy of Airbus Defence and Space.

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on each aircraft. Reports state that the cracks found could lead to metal shards being introduced into the oil system. In extreme cases, this could cause the engine to stall. The discovery of this problem led the German Air Force to temporarily ground two of its three A400M aircraft in June. Meanwhile, a U.K. Royal Air Force (RAF) aircraft needed to perform an in-flight shutdown of one of its engines. Airbus spokesperson Kieran Daly confirmed that both aircraft had "been discovered to have suffered the

Reports state that the cracks found could lead to metal shards being introduced into the oil system. In extreme cases, this could cause the engine to stall.

2010, where cracking of the TP400 propeller hubs was discovered. He also stated that it is unlikely that Airbus will reach its target of delivering twenty A400Ms this year. One of the current problem areas is cracking in the propeller gearbox (PGB) of the A400Ms Europrop International (EPI) TP400 engines made by General Electric's Italian unit Avio Aero. The problem was found on the two engines that rotated clockwise

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propeller gearbox cracking problem." Following a mandate for operators to conduct inspections every 20 hours and replace the affected part every 100 hours, Airbus worked closely with Avio Aero to address the problem. The interim result is a new PGB that has been certified by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). Once installed, this should extend the component life to 650 hours. The team's ambition is to further extend

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Image by Andrew Drwiega.

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TRAGIC DATA ERROR

Just before a planned international media event at A400M's home in Seville, the unthinkable happened on May 9, 2015. An A400M, the third destined for the Turkish Air Force, was making a predelivery test flight near the facility, when the aircrew reported a technical fault. As Airbus investigators later stated, "engines one, two, and three experienced power frozen after lift-off and did not respond to the crew's attempts to control the power setting." During the emergency landing, the aircraft crashed, killing four of the six Airbus personnel onboard. The cause of the crash was attributed by Airbus Chief Strategy Officer Marwan Lahoud to incorrectly installed engine control software, an installation that had taken place during the final assembly of the aircraft. On June, 9, 2015, a report by the Reuters news agency referred to software data that was "accidentally wiped on three engines as the engine software was being installed at Airbus facilities." 8

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

Here is a front view of a French Air Force Atlas at Toulouse, one of nine A400Ms delivered to France to date.

the replacement time to over 1,000 hours with another solution. During Farnborough, Tom Enders, Chief Executive Officer of the Airbus Group confirmed that, despite what has turned out to be "a never-ending saga," he believes that the new platform is still going to be a "great asset" to those who have selected it. There are currently eight customers who, between them, require 174 aircraft. The following is a list of national requirements (with deliveries at time of this writing in summer 2016): Germany 53 (4), France 50 (9), Spain 27 (0), United Kingdom 22 (9), Turkey 10 (3), Belgium 7 (0), Malaysia 4 (3), Luxembourg 1 (0). The delivery schedule should run to 2024, although at the current production rate, this may be a difficult milestone to reach on time. ENTER THE ATLAS, SLOWLY The program was officially launched and integrated into the Organisation for Joint Armament Cooperation (Organisation Conjointe de Cooperation en matiere d'ARmement, OCCAR) in May 2003. OCCAR documentation states that a 1997 joint European Staff

Requirement from eight North Atlantic Trade Organization (NATO) nations found, after the assessment of a number of proposals, that they favored the Airbus A400M proposal for a cost-effective, all-terrain military transport aircraft. It was understood that such a large transport design, incorporating the latest technology, would lead to greater European interoperability, as well as the added benefits of multinational training and support agreements. The problem regarding the slow arrival to market of the four-engine A400M Atlas turboprop military transport aircraft is that it was originally conceived to replace older turboprop transports much sooner and at a faster delivery rate. But delays occurred from the start of the program. The maiden flight, originally scheduled for 2008, did not actually happen until December 2009; it took place at the Airbus Defence and Space facility in Seville, Spain, where the aircraft is manufactured. For the next 2 years, development delays led to cost overruns, and the prospect of cancellation loomed. Six of the aircraft's customers had to provide WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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Photo courtesy of Airbus Defence and Space.

AIRBUS A400M

This first Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) A400M is shown in September 2014 at an advanced stage of manufacture in Seville, Spain.

Airbus with a $3.5 billion bailout (about $3.9 billion U.S.) in 2010. Finally, in March 2013, the EASA awarded the A400M its certification. In August of that year, the first aircraft was delivered to the French Air Force. MAKING DO The A400M's acquisition was timed to replace the aging Transall C-160—a European two-engine transporter similar to the C-130 Hercules—which was first introduced into service in 1967 and is still operated by France and Germany and, to a lesser extent, by Turkey. It also was set to relieve some of the legacy Lockheed Martin C-130 Hercules being operated not just in Europe but across the globe. The A400M was designed for WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

tactical and strategic lift missions, and its utility in both of these missions has been missed in France's recent foreign anti-terrorist deployments to places such as Mali in North Africa. France has received nine aircraft to date—but that number is still far short of the

Super Hercules in 2015 to supplement its lift capacity, particularly in foreign operations. The French Air Force will receive two C-130Js in 2017/2018 and two KC-130Js in 2018/2019 (these will be configured for helicopter refueling). Germany is currently in

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The problem regarding the slow arrival to market of the four-engine A400M Atlas turboprop military transport aircraft is that it was originally conceived to replace older turboprop transports much sooner and at a faster delivery rate.

nation's fifty-unit order Due to the delay of the A400M, the French Air Force ordered four C-130J

negotiations with Airbus over compensation for the late deliveries of its A400Ms. To date, it has only

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Image by Andrew Drwiega.

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This A400M was on display at this year's Farnborough Airshow in the United Kingdom.

received four of the fifty-three A400Ms on order. Defence Minister Ursula von der Leyen stated in June that the German government is looking for Airbus to provide a detailed plan of how it intends to overcome its existing problems and provide a schedule for deliveries. Germany's experience of operations in Afghanistan and also Mali has re-emphasized the immediate need for a longer range, heavy-lift capability. Therefore, like France, Germany has been contemplating buying up to ten C-130Js. In June, it was reported that the German Federal Ministry of Defence was in discussions with other nations about the prospect of jointly operating a small fleet of C-130Js. At the time of this writing, Malaysia is the only non-European country to order the A400M, with 10 AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

the Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) having already received three of its four aircraft, the first being delivered in March 2015. The nation signed up for the aircraft back in 2005.

{

on a visit to the RMAF's base in Subang, Malaysia. The object was to share the RAF's experiences and knowledge of the airframe and its systems. This year, from April 5 to 7, the

Customers who have already received some of their aircraft are reported to be very enthusiastic, but they also have been frustrated by the ongoing issues and groundings.

BUILDING CAPABILITY AND COMMUNITY In October of last year, the U.K. RAF's newest aircraft was taken by crew and engineers of the 70th Squadron and 24th Squadron, based at RAF Brize Norton in Oxfordshire,

}

inaugural A400M User Forum was held in Seville. It was organized by the Airbus Military Sociedad Limitada (AMSL) and OCCAR. Over 150 people attended, including those from OCCAR nations and Malaysia. As with all user groups, this gathering's aim was to build a WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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Photo courtesy of UK MOD.

AIRBUS A400M

The U.K. Royal Air Force's (RAF's) three current transport aircraft at the RAF's Brize Norton base: the Boeing C-17, the Lockheed Martin C-130J, and an Airbus A400M in the foreground.

community of users with discussions on operations, training, interoperability, flight safety, reliability, availability, and maintainability at minimum cost. OCCAR reported that there was a consensus of opinion that, as part of an ongoing development program, the aircraft's capabilities would continue to improve in the coming years. Nicolas Hue, OCCAR-EA A400M Program Manager, made the final presentation. He underlined the importance of the global support strategy, together with in-service event reporting. The A400M User Forum is expected to be held annually, with the next being planned for early 2017. PROGRESS While good news has often been hard to come by as the A400M program has progressed, there was a step forward this past June with the beginning of WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

trials focused on paratrooper delivery capability. Airbus organized the beginning of a test campaign in the Tarbes (Pyrénées) region of southwest France with paratroopers jumping on a static line from the aircraft's lateral door. Jumps were performed at a low altitude (approximately 1,000 feet). In this exercise, the French Air Force was joined by the French Armament Agency (Direction Générale de L'Armement, DGA), which provided parachutes and group installations. Over sixty paratroopers took part in a combined total of fifteen flights. With parachutists dropping from both side exits, the ambition is to be able to quickly deploy more than 100 in a single pass. The campaign has continued over subsequent months, and it is expected to contribute to the development of the aerial delivery mission and its certification. At the same time, the cost of the

Airbus A400M Atlas is currently running at 25 billion (about $28 billion U.S.), around 25 percent over what was originally planned. Plus, the previously mentioned engine problems still have to be successfully overcome with a more permanent solution to reach the desired servicelife goal. There is no doubt that the aircraft is a tremendous step ahead in capability. Customers who have already received some of their aircraft are reported to be very enthusiastic, but they also have been frustrated by the ongoing issues and groundings. With Boeing's C-17 Globemaster III production line now closed, the Atlas is the most attractive offer in performance currently available. But the question remains: at what cost? AAD

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TECH COLUMN - ELECTRIC AIRCRAFT

T R A N S P O R T S F LY I N G V I A

ELECTRICITY By Hank Hogan

A

new future for aviation transport could soon take flight, with the June announcement that the all-electric propulsion X-57 will be airborne in a few years. Designed to be more efficient, quieter, and less polluting than conventional aircraft, the experimental plane will hold only the pilot and have a range of less than 100 miles. Nevertheless, the X-57, a forwardthinking project of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), could blaze a path for transports to follow. As has been the case for ground vehicles, this may be,

at least initially, through the development of hybrid planes that use both electric power and either fossil fuel or an alternative fuel. "There's a lot of potential for these technologies to influence aircraft design already," says Sean Clarke, X-57 co-principal investigator. He's with NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center, which is located at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Clarke notes that the X-57 illustrates a dual-electric hybrid approach. The technology demonstrator will have two propulsion systems. One will be in rotors at the wingtips, while the other

This artist's concept of NASA's X-57 Maxwell aircraft shows the plane's specially designed wing and fourteen electric motors. NASA Aeronautics researchers will use the Maxwell to demonstrate that electric propulsion can make planes quieter, more efficient and more environmentally friendly.

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Image courtesy of NASA. Photo by Ken Ulbrich.

Image courtesy of NASA Langley/Advanced Concepts Lab, AMA, Inc.

The Tecnam P2006T cockpit for the X-57, or Maxwell, will be the first all electric propulsion aircraft once the plane and wing integration is complete.

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Image courtesy of Siemens.

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Thanks to its tube-cage construction, the Extra 330LE's key components, such as the motor, inverter, and batteries, can be easily and flexibly installed.

will be found in a set of fans distributed along the wings. The first system will be used when cruising, while the second will only run during take-off and landing. In flight, the distributed system will be stored away to reduce drag on the wings. Overall, the combination should improve performance, in part because each of the propulsion systems can be optimized for its part of the mission. For instance, mounting the cruise motors out at the wing tip will recover some of the energy that would otherwise be lost to the vortex that forms there. Electric or hybrid electricconventional aircraft have been demonstrated by airframe makers Boeing and Airbus, as well as by Siemens. The industrial equipment manufacturer did so in July 2016 using a newly developed electric engine, one that reportedly delivers five times the power output per pound as compared to previous drive systems. 14 AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

"This advance means that hybrid-electric aircraft with four or more seats will now be possible," Siemens stated in a release. Siemens is reportedly working with Airbus, which could soon have an all-electric aircraft in production. Chinese engineers also are working on plans for an electric-powered light aircraft. Since electric motors are small, lightweight, efficient, and reliable, they can be used in ways that and places where it would not be practical to deploy a conventional fuel-powered engine. NASA has done some work on how this might be applied to transports. One such concept of a potential transport model that benefits from such an application is the StarcABL, or single-aisle, turbo-electric aircraft with a boundary layer propulsor. The size of a Boeing 737, this concept vehicle has standard turbofans under the wings and an electric motor-powered, aft-fan propulsor located at the tail end of

the aircraft. This configuration takes advantage of the boundary layer, a sheet of air right next to the skin of the aircraft. This layer travels at a slower speed along the aircraft than does the air freely flowing past some distance away. In smaller aircraft, the boundary layer is thin. That's not the case for large aircraft, such as transports. "By the time you get to the aft end of the fuselage, you'll have a fairly thick layer of air that's moving much slower than the free stream. So if you could put a fan—a ducted fan or an open rotor—there at the back of the fuselage, it would be seeing much slower airflow that it could accelerate. And so it would be much more efficient than putting that fan somewhere else," Clarke explains. According to NASA studies, exploiting the boundary layer translates to as much as a 12 percent fuel savings over the conventional approach. As Clark WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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Image courtesy of Siemens.

TECH COLUMN - ELECTRIC AIRCRAFT

For the first time ever, a plane in the certification category CS23 flies with Permit-to-Fly purely electric. The plane is powered by a 260 kilowatt Siemens motor that weighs a mere 50-kilograms—a record-setting power-to-weight ratio.

points out, the compactness and other features of electric propulsion make the concept feasible. However, electric-powered flight does have a significant drawback: the need to carry one or more batteries, which with current technology must be of a substantial size. The amount of power that can be stored in the batteries limits the vehicle's range and maximum speed. That is why the X-57 will only be able to carry a single passenger, the pilot. Energy storage density has historically doubled about every 10 years and that interval may have recently dropped almost to 7, thanks to efforts by industry and organizations like the Joint Center for Energy Storage Research at Argonne National Laboratories. Possible future WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

advances include new battery chemistries, such as one using lithium, either with sulfur or oxygen, for potentially a 50 or a 300+ percent storage density improvement, respectively, over today's best lithium-ion technologies. Though the gains might be greater, the lithium oxygen approach would be challenging if not impossible, as adding oxygen to lithium without exacting control makes for a fiery combination. Even without a major breakthrough in battery makeup, steady improvement in the existing storage cell technology should continue to yield greater energy storage than is possible now. Today's batteries, for instance, are six times as energy dense as what were

considered state-of-the-art versions 25 years ago. At the same time, transitioning radically different designs into successful commercial and military applications will not happen overnight. Such major shifts away from proven technology take time. That explains why the X-57 is being developed now. As Clarke predicts, "Battery technology is improving fast enough that, in say 10 years, we expect architectures like this will make a lot of sense. That's why we want to get this research done now." AAD

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Controlling boundary layer at the tail of the aircraft is crucial to both reducing drag and maintaining good handling capabilities. This Rockwell B-1 bomber tail has vortex generators to keep the boundary layer energized around the tail cone.

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BOUNDARY LAYER

Photo by Sam King, Jr., courtesy of the U.S. Air Force.

For large transport aircraft, such as the Boeing C-17, even small reductions in drag can translate into big fuel savings. Controlling the boundary layer flow pays big dividends

T H E

Q U E S T

T O

C O N T R O L

T H E

B O U N D A R Y L AY E R The Behavior of the Air Around an Aircraft Makes a Big Difference.

By John Likakis

Photo by Sam King, Jr., courtesy U.S. Air Force.

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odern military transports sure look sleek and slippery. And designers do their utmost to reduce drag wherever possible and practical. Drag, after all, cuts airspeed, while increasing fuel burn. But one source of drag has been the special target of engineers, researchers, and airframe designers: the aircraft's boundary layer. The boundary layer is the layer of air that lies right against the skin of an aircraft. It can vary in thickness, depending on a number of factors, including airspeed and surface finish; it generally will be thicker on relatively rough surfaces and much thinner on highly polished areas. In flight, this layer of air experiences so much friction with the surface of the aircraft, that, in WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

effect, it "sticks" to the skin. This effectively slows the air enough that the close-lying layer of air molecules can remain almost stationary in relation to the moving aircraft. Those almost stationary molecules dramatically slow down the next layer of air molecules as well. This effect continues for some distance from the exterior of the aircraft, diminishing as you move farther away, until you finally have air moving freely past at whatever speed the aircraft is flying. The presence of the boundary layer prevents what is called "laminar flow," which is air flowing smoothly as a continuous sheet across a wing or other airframe structure. Without getting into too much technical detail, laminar flow is highly desirable, because it

translates directly into low drag and high efficiency—two qualities that are of paramount importance, particularly for large aircraft, such as transports. The boundary layer also causes undesirable secondary effects. Because the boundary layer gets thicker as air flows toward the trailing edge of a wing, a design that does not control the boundary layer can result in poor flight control response. This may include phenomena such as aileron "deadbanding" (where the aileron becomes unresponsive until it deflects beyond a certain point) or even, in extreme instances, aileron "snatching" (when it moves out of control). Given the importance of the boundary layer, engineers have

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Image courtesy of NASA.

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Even in supersonic flight, boundary layer control is critical to reducing drag and aerodynamic heating. This shadowgraph of a pointed spike at Mach 3 clearly shows the transition between laminar flow and turbulent flow.

This wind-tunnel photo shows streamlines of smoke flowing over an airfoil at three different angles of attack. At low angles of attack (top image), the smoke flows smoothly around the airfoil. At high angles of attack (bottom), the air cannot follow the airfoil and separates into turbulent flow - a classic stalled condition.

Image courtesy of NASA.

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spent decades pondering various ways to reduce it, control it, and compensate for it. Some methods have worked well, while others had potential but proved impractical. Today's modern transports use a combination of the tried-and-true and more recently developed methods. At the same time, manufacturers are looking at some truly amazing technologies that may more effectively control the boundary layer. STICK TO IT Controlling the boundary layer on wings not only pays the biggest dividends, it also can solve a host of control and performance problems. So it is not surprising 18

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that so much effort has been focused on this area. Some of the earliest efforts concentrated on preserving laminar flow over as much of the wing as possible. The physics of the boundary layer typically causes the airflow over a wing to separate and become turbulent just past the thickest part of the airfoil. So the goal was keeping the airflow contiguous and moving together smoothly along the surface right to the trailing edge of the wing. Back in the 1940s, at the outset of World War II, the first efforts to streamline military aircraft began with trying to make the wing skin as smooth as possible. Flush rivets, extra-slick paint polished to a high

shine, lapped wing skins with almost nonexistent joining lines, and other tricks were used to try to keep the unbroken airflow moving along. Some 70 years later, much theoretical progress has been made in developing airfoils that have natural laminar flow. (There is actually a series of airfoil shapes carrying the designation NLF.) However, there are still no production aircraft featuring full natural laminar flow wings. Other schemes to achieve laminar flow have included sucking the boundary layer into the wing interior through thousands of tiny holes in the wing's upper surface. That works, but the weight and complexity of such systems currently makes them impractical. The opposite also has been tried—blowing high-speed compressed air across the top of the wing from specially designed slits or ports along the upper surface. Again, the equipment involved in this "active blowing" is too heavy and complex for practical use. Yet another scheme involves specially designed "gloves" to tailor the wing surface shape and smoothness. By carefully selecting the wing surface-finish WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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Courtesy of NASA.

BOUNDARY LAYER

Vortex generators have been around for a long time. This Republic F-84 Thunderchief fighter was used by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in the early 1950s to test vortex generators. Boeing used vortex generators on the B-47 bomber of the same vintage to overcome boundary layer problems.

characteristics, engineers can determine where and how the boundary layer breaks into turbulent flow. As envisioned, this could solve two aerodynamic problems at once: providing precise control of the boundary layer, and limiting the spanwise airflow found on sweptback wings. (The common way to control spanwise airflow is with winglets at the wing tips.) Laminar-flow gloves have been tried on a number of aircraft, but success has been limited, and adaptability to existing aircraft also is, at best, limited. So, as promising as the concept is, researchers have yet to design a practical laminar flow wing.

breaking up the boundary layer to keep the airflow moving along the aircraft's skin. This process is called "energizing" the boundary layer, and the most common method to accomplish this is a deceptively simple part called a vortex generator. Vortex generators are small plates that poke through the boundary

A DISTURBANCE IN THE FORCE If undesirable boundary layer transitions cannot be defeated by making the air flow smoothly over the entire wing, an alternative is

layer into the fast-moving, freestream airflow. As the name implies, these plates generate tiny vortices that pull this airflow down to the wing surface. This breaks up the

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{

boundary layer, reducing the stagnation that would otherwise build up toward the trailing edge of the wing. If you have ever looked out the window of a modern commercial airliner such as a Boeing 737, you have no doubt seen rows of vortex generators along the top of the wing. Vortex generators are efficient

Laminar-flow gloves have been tried on a number of aircraft, but success has been limited, and adaptability to existing aircraft also is, at best, limited.

}

and effective. They have no moving parts, and they do the job of controlling and re-energizing the boundary layer. The result is that the airflow moves smoothly past the AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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FUTURE SHOCK

Reducing or eliminating the shock wave produced during hypersonic flight could make possible aircraft that are more like spacecraft. Twenty years ago, engineers working on a laser-propulsion system also came up with a concept known as a directed energy air spike (DEAS). They hypothesized that adding enough energy to break air down into an ionized plasma at a certain point just ahead of a hypersonic vehicle would cause a dramatic reduction in drag, as well as reducing the shock-wave heating effects of the vehicle's speed. This added energy could take any form—a focused laser beam, microwave radiation, hydrogen injection (burning in air), or even a conventional plasma torch—as long as it produced a plasma ahead of the vehicle at the proper point. In subsequent hypersonic wind-tunnel tests, the DEAS has worked as theoretically predicted. Dr. Leik Myrabo of Lightcraft Technologies, one of the developers of DEAS, told us, "Coupling DEAS to electromagnetic acceleration of air plasma makes it possible to annihilate the hypersonic bow shock wave. Doing so makes overland supersonic flights feasible (if not practical) and totally silent." Myrabo says that his caution regarding the practicality of DEAS for conventional aircraft is due to the formidable energy required to produce such a continuous plasma. He notes that DEAS was originally conceived for use with beamed-energy propulsion (BEP) vehicles that could tap into vast amounts of energy being transmitted from the ground— with near zero mass penalty added onboard. Still, given advances in highpower, millimeter-wave and laser technology (the U.S. Air Force is getting ready to flight test a 150-kilowatt laser weapon), practical DEAS applications may not be too far off.

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Image courtesy of NASA.

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Sucking the boundary layer into the wing has been a favorite method for producing laminar flow. While very effective, the weight and complexity of such systems currently renders them impractical.

wing, and control surfaces, such as ailerons and flaps, work much better. As a bonus, vortex generators lower the aircraft's stall speed by keeping the airflow energized and smooth at higher angles of attack, which, in turn, means that it can land at a lower speed and thus can use shorter runways—a particularly desirable trait for transports. NOT JUST WINGS Boundary layer problems are not limited to the wings of an aircraft. Poor boundary layer conditions anywhere on the airframe can be a significant contributor to overall drag. This can reduce control, potentially requiring larger tail surfaces, with all the extra weight and drag those bring. The aft-most part of an aircraft fuselage is where boundary layer problems are typically the most intense—particularly where the fuselage narrows to the tail cone or where it turns abruptly for an aft cargo ramp and door area. The Lockheed Martin C-130 Hercules is a prime example of an aircraft design that

experienced this kind of problem. Lockheed Martin's engineers were able to tame the boundary layer in this area by adding microvanes along the sides of the aft fuselage. These vanes change the airflow around the aft cargo doors to reduce overall airframe drag, helping the Hercules fly farther on less fuel. The aft end of Boeing's C-17 also has received attention in adjusting the boundary layer. As delivered in conventional configuration, the C-17 features a pair of specially designed strakes (long metal strips) attached to the aft fuselage to improve stability. The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has been conducting flight testing of a number of different devices to further improve airflow around the aft fuselage under the vertical stabilizer. The first set of tests used "finlets" (small fins) produced by Vortex Control Technologies (VCT), of Kennesaw, Georgia. These finlets initially were attached to the fuselage in sets of three on each side; subsequent flight testing WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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Image courtesy of NASA.

BOUNDARY LAYER

Vortex generators have been around for a long time. This Republic F-84 Thunderchief fighter was used by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in the early 1950s to test vortex generators. Boeing used vortex generators on the B-47 bomber of the same vintage to overcome boundary layer problems.

doubled the number. Another set of tests has used Lockheed Martin's microvanes, arranged in the same area. In each case, the objective was to re-energize the boundary layer, thus cutting drag and decreasing fuel consumption. At the time of this writing, flight test results from the program were expected to be released before the end of the year. THE ACTIVE FUTURE Vortex generators are considered a form of passive boundary layer control. Active boundary layer control includes the approaches mentioned above, sucking the layer into the wing skin or blowing compressed air across its surface. For the most part, these approaches have added too much weight and complexity to the airframe, thus rendering them impractical. But Boeing and the National Aeronautics and Space WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

Administration (NASA) have been looking at other applications of actively blown boundary layer control. Working together, they have conducted wind tunnel and flight experiments investigating an actively blown rudder for the Boeing 757. The system uses compressed bleed

{

The long-term aim of the research is to develop design and control parameters that allow the vertical stabilizer and rudder of transport aircraft to be much smaller than these components are in existing aircraft. This approach has the potential of cutting both weight and

The air is cooled in a heat exchanger and then released through a set of slit-like nozzles, just ahead of the rudder hinge line.

air from the aircraft's engines. The air is cooled in a heat exchanger and then released through a set of slitlike nozzles, just ahead of the rudder hinge line. Blowing across both sides of the rudder, this cooled airflow greatly increases the rudder's effectiveness.

}

drag, while maintaining control authority and stability. Another approach to actively controlling the boundary layer that has been accumulating wind-tunnel data is the use of synthetic jet actuators. These use piezoelectric devices to oscillate a patch on top of

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BOUNDARY LAYER

Image courtesy of NASA.

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Another way to handle the boundary layer is to blow high-speed air along a surface. This Boeing 757 tailfin and rudder are being used in a test applying active flow control to improve rudder effectiveness. This approach may allow smaller vertical stabilizers to be used on future aircraft.

the wing. As the wing skin flexes up and down, it alternately pulls down a small amount of air and then expels the air upward. The first part also pulls the boundary layer down, moving more energetic air closer to the wing skin. When the skin flexes back, the little puff of expelled air disrupts the boundary layer, causing a tiny vortex to form that energizes the boundary layer downstream from the actuator. Wind-tunnel testing has shown that synthetic jet actuators can enable aircraft to fly at much higher angles of attack and fly more slowly without danger of stalling. At this point, such synthetic jet systems have not progressed beyond the laboratory. As with some other active approaches, it may turn out that the additional weight and complexity of dozens or hundreds of piezoactuators on each wing will render the system impractical 22

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for most aircraft. Another system being tried uses plasma to control the boundary layer. These systems are known as di-electric barrier discharge (DBD), and they work by creating an intense electric field that ionizes the air passing over the wing. Depending on the configuration and operating mode, a DBD system either can be used to maintain laminar flow much farther back on the wing (operating in a steady state), or it can be used to create micro disturbances in the boundary layer that turn into vortices to energize the boundary layer. Of all the future-tech systems under investigation, the DBD/plasma system shows the greatest promise for active control of the boundary layer. Researchers in Germany have used DBD systems to replace the conventional flight controls on a small flying model. The 6-inch

span flying wing has proven quite maneuverable, even though it lacks movable control surfaces. Researchers in China also have been conducting wind-tunnel tests of advanced di-electric systems. Reportedly, these systems are aimed at controlling boundary layer flow in the trans-sonic and supersonic region. THE QUEST CONTINUES Precise control of the boundary layer has been a top priority for engineers for decades. For most of this time, the dynamics of boundary layers have been very well understood. But controlling the boundary layer with any kind of precision has proven to be much more difficult. Nevertheless, given the benefits such exacting control would produce, engineers continue the quest undaunted. AAD

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ELECTRICAL FAULTS THE VALUE OF HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE

CHALLENGES OF ELECTRICAL

FAULTS Why are Aircraft Electrical Systems so Hard to Understand?

By Tracy Martin

W

e all think we understand the basics of electricity. But its use and diagnosing and repairing problems caused by electrical faults— particularly when talking about the ever more complex systems involved in aircraft—can be a major

challenge. To start with, to be able to diagnosis electrical problems, you have to understand six concepts: charge, current, energy, power, voltage, and resistance; which are measured, respectively, in coulombs, amps, joules, watts, volts, and ohms. As if that is not enough, it is also

Photo by U.S. Air Force/Technical Sergeant James Hodgman

Staff Sergeant Alexander Rex, the 379th Expeditionary Maintenance Squadron avionics intermediate systems team leader, tests an ultra-high-frequency radio transmitter at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar.

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Even those with knowledge of electrical engineering have a difficult time applying their education to real-world electrical problems and applications. An example occurred at the end of the Cold War in the late 1980s, when layoffs of electrical engineers and other highly-skilled workers was rampant in the defense sector within California's aerospace industry. Many laid-off workers enrolled in a California state-sponsored retraining program. This program was designed to utilize their vast electrical system design skills and knowledge and re-train them to be skilled automotive technicians. At that time, there was a shortage of "electrical" talent in the automotive industry. New cars came equipped with electronic fuel injection (EFI) systems that used onboard computers, sensors, and actuators that were, in many ways, similar to modern aircraft electrical systems. There was need for technicians who could diagnose and repair EFI systems, and the laid-off aerospace workers seemed a good fit for these jobs. However, many of these individuals, when presented with a 12-volt direct current circuit (components mounted onto a piece of plywood) and a voltmeter were unable to explain various voltage readings at points within the circuit. Did they not have a grasp of the theory of electricity? That hardly seems the case, since many of them helped design Maverick missile guidance systems and aircraft radar components. The problem with real-world electrical applications and electricity is that it is not enough for a technician to learn theories in a book, or to even design highly complex electrical circuits. To become a competent aircraft electrical technician, you have to be able to apply theoretical concepts to wires, connectors, and other physical components located throughout an aircraft. AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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Photo by 1st Lieutenant Cassie Graham, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade Public Affairs

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Sergeant Jose Esperacion, aircraft electrician, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, troubleshoots a wiring fault on a UH-60 Black Hawk, in Afghanistan. Also at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, 379th Expeditionary Maintenance Squadron electronic systems test set team leader Staff Sergeant Jesse Contreras-Laurel tests a signal data converter. (Photo by U.S. Air Force/Technical Sergeant James Hodgman

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impossible to observe these interrelated concepts in operation. For instance, you cannot see electrons flowing through a wire at the speed of light. About the only thing most of us will ever notice is the end result of a working electrical circuit—the flip of a switch in a darkened room causes a light to come on, or turning on a main battery switch in an aircraft turns on the lights in its instrument panel. Aircraft electronic technicians do not receive enough credit for the knowledge and skills they must possess to successfully diagnose and repair the myriad complex electrical systems found in modern military aircraft. In addition, highly specialized skills often are required. For example, the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force both design their training programs according to types of aircraft and/or the areas of avionics that trainee aircraft electricians will become experts in. Apprentices in the Air Force in the 24

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field of aircraft electrical and environmental systems are encouraged to earn 2-year associates degrees in aviation maintenance technology, as well as a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Airframe and Power Plant (A&P) Certificate, before they work on transport and fighter aircraft. The Army requires 24 weeks of avionics training in the classroom and in field operations. In addition, the Army also requires that all technicians who specialize in attack helicopter avionics and armament systems, in addition to learning basic maintenance and repair of aircraft electrical systems, receive advanced training in weapons' systems maintenance. Troubleshooting aircraft electrical systems can be difficult but can be made easier if the task at hand is broken down into basic steps. An experienced technician will: (1) take appropriate preventative safety measures; (2) review the related system's

operation in the appropriate maintenance instructional manual (MIM) and analyze the symptoms; (3) detect and isolate the problem(s); (4) make the necessary repairs; and (5) upon completion of the repairs, test the system for proper operation. ENSURING SAFETY In addition to receiving specialized training, electrical technicians working on aircraft have to be prepared to handle a wide range of problems that might be encountered. In the course of a day's work, they might have to deal with disconnected and unprotected power cables, hydraulic oil draining from disconnected lines, leaks in high-pressure gas or air lines, and issues related to handling heavy components. To try to reduce the potential danger of such scenarios, technicians take preventive measures. These include using temporary insulation shielding to protect exposed power cables, draining oil lines into labeled containers, bleeding off gas or air lines so there is no pressure contained in systems being worked on, and using special equipment for lifting heavy objects—or, at least, enlisting help in lifting. Warning signs are placed near main power switches, and some jobs even require that the aircraft's batteries be disconnected. WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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(Image by Captain C. Alex Herron, courtesy of the U.S. Marine Corps.

ELECTRICAL FAULTS

Corporals James Majors and Joshua Drummond, both avionics technicians with the U.S. Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 465, inspect the wiring connected to the clutch bottle on a CH-53E in Iraq. The avionics division is the first shop called to troubleshoot most malfunctions with the aircraft.

When dealing with ongoing repairs, technicians also may have to take extra steps to pull and tag protective circuit devices (circuit breakers and other fail-safe items) and notify maintenance control. Imagine what could happen if another technician unknowingly turned on a fuel pump when fuel lines were open, or switched on power to loosened or disconnected electrical cables. ANALYZING It is difficult, if not impossible, to effectively analyze an electrically related problem without a complete understanding of how a system is supposed to work under various conditions. Even experienced techs often refer to the MIM, whether a printed manual or, more frequently these days, a digital file on a laptop or other accessible system. Analysis of symptoms includes a visual inspection of all components, looking for open circuit breakers, improperly installed switches, lose mountings, disconnected components, and burnt, dented, or WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

otherwise damaged equipment. A key step involves checking all circuit breakers that turn on power to the system. It is surprising how many electrical system problems are purportedly fixed by the partial or complete replacement of components and/or wiring, when the actual root cause of many issues is a faulty circuit breaker. DETECTING AND ISOLATING The next logical step for technicians is to detect and isolate the actual problem. In many cases, the detection of a fault takes more time than is required to correct the fault. Collaboration among team members who have addressed similar issues and performed comparable tasks can make a big difference in discovering and carrying out a repair. Experienced technicians study each job before taking action, thinking through each step, formulating a plan, and making a list of tools they will need to perform the job safely. Setup for the repair may include the use of extension lighting to illuminate dark access spaces or

temporarily installing cooling blowers to lower the temperature within aircraft. The MIMs almost always lists tools required for specific activities and describes where components are located, as well as how to gain access to them. The first step in any diagnostic repair process is to trace electrical power to the component that is not operating. Using an applicable MIM helps technicians identify which pin in a connector provides power to which component(s). Voltage readings can be taken at checkpoints illustrated in the MIM. Some of the more commonly encountered faults that interrupt power to a circuit include bad circuit breakers, broken wiring, loose terminals or plug connectors, and faulty relays and switches. Further continuity and resistance checks can identify the type of fault involved, whether opens, shorts, unintentional grounds, or incorrect resistance values at various points within the circuit. By using wiring schematics and information on correct resistance AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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ELECTRICAL MEASURING TOOLS

A discussion of aircraft maintenance is not complete without some mention of necessary tools of the trade. Working on electrical systems with a digital multimeter is the equivalent of using a ratchet and socket set for mechanical maintenance. A digital multimeter is an accurate, reliable measuring instrument used at the organizational, intermediate, and depot levels of maintenance. This instrument is easy to use and read, and some digital multimeters have a battery pack for portable operation. The Fluke model 8808A 5.5 Digital Bench Multimeter is representative portable unit currently used by the U.S. Navy. This compact tool (3.5” x 8.5” x 11.5” and 4.6 pounds) can measure both alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) Image courtesy of Fluke Corporation. voltage, resistance, and both AC and DC amperage. It features a dual, fluorescent display that allows two input signal properties to be viewed simultaneously at measurement rates of 2.5, 20, and 100 samples per second. Saved meter setups can be accessed with a single, front panel set-up key. There is also a "Compare" mode that enables the user to determine if a measurement is within a defined limit. It is smaller in size (1.7” x 3.5” x 7.3” and 0.93 pounds), allowing it to be carried clipped to a technician's belt and used in tight spaces. Model 179 provides the operator with voltage and current measurements, manual and automatic ranging, frequency, capacitance, resistance, Image courtesy of Fluke Corporation. continuity, and diode measurements. While both the Fluke 8808A and 179 multimeters can measure resistance or Ohms, they are not sensitive enough to measure resistance of electrical insulation surrounding wires or cables. For this type of test, a "megohmmeter" (aka "Megger") that can measure very high resistance values is required. Electrical wires or cables running through an aircraft all have insulation surrounding them, and maintaining the insulation's integrity is a performance and safety issue. Much like a leak in a water pipe, an imperfection or deterioration of electrical insulation allows electricity to escape. The U.S. Navy uses the Fluke 1550C Insulation Tester for testing high-voltage equipment. The 1550C sends voltage through a wire and measures how much electricity "leaks" from the conducting wire through the insulation. Testing is accomplished by measuring resistance to Image courtesy of Fluke Corporation. current flow; high resistance means little current is escaping, and conversely, low resistance indicates insulation is breaking down and a significant amount of current is leaking through and along the wire's protective insulation. Keeping records of test results can produce a picture over time of the overall "health" of electrical insulation so that it can be replaced before it becomes a serious issue. 26

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values, both found in the MIM, technicians can trace circuit wiring and components, part by part, wire by wire, until the fault is isolated. Once the fault is discovered, the solution often is a straightforward repair, though this can depend on how extensive and accessible the damage is, whether the damage can be repaired, and, if not, whether replacement components are immediately available. Speaking of components, a lot of interrelated, non-electric components can be found in aircraft electrical systems: mechanical instruments, direct reading gauges, mechanical linkages, and the various hardware that is typically part of an electrical system. Even though this equipment cannot be checked using tools such as digital multimeters and oscilloscopes, the same basic rules and steps for troubleshooting problems apply: (1) take safety precautions; (2) review component operation and analyze; (3) detect; (4) repair; and (5) test. Once any faulty component and/or wiring are discovered, the faulty parts generally must be removed and repaired or replaced. Removal can be tricky, as it is important to remove equipment so that it is not damaged further. In addition to increasing the likelihood of repairing or salvaging some or all parts, this also makes it easier to figure out what went wrong with the faulty component and potentially preventing it from happening again. To complicate matters, working in incredibly tight spaces, it can be difficult to remove one part without damaging nearby components or wiring. A related challenge involves the potential of misplacing or losing small parts, even if they can be easily replaced. Small parts lost in an aircraft are a very real foreign object damage hazard, which can cause serious damage to aircraft systems during operation. INSTALLING THE REPAIRED OR REPLACEMENT PART For the most part, installation procedures are usually the reversal of removal. However, there are a few rules that apply to the installation of new aircraft equipment. Certain new equipment is WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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ELECTRICAL FAULTS

DID THE REPAIR WORK? The final step when performing any electrical repair job is to test the system and all related equipment to confirm that it is fully operational. At a minimum, a technician will simply operate the new component or system to verify that it is working as described in the MIM. Following a successful test of the repair work, however, there usually are a few remaining steps: inspection by qualified personnel, notification to maintenance or production control, and completion of work orders or maintenance action forms. Not until all of the appropriate personnel are notified and the requisite paperwork is completed is the aircraft considered "officially" operable. DOING IT BY-THE-BOOK Personnel in charge of maintaining military aircraft are often no different from those who work on other types of vehicles, especially when shortcuts exist to complete jobs faster. However, taking shortcuts with aircraft maintenance and repair is frowned upon as this practice can increase costs of aircraft operations. In addition, steps intended to save WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

Image courtesy of the U.S. Air Force

packaged with sealing plugs, locking devices, and other measures, all of which has to be removed before installation. When a component requires adjustments, those adjustments may need to be completed before installation. (Again, the MIM is the best source of information.) For example, often when matching a position transmitter to its corresponding position indicator, a process known as calibration, it is easier to perform this task with the wiring connected to the uninstalled actuator, than calibrating the unit after mechanically mounting it. Finally, before mounting any unit, technicians must ensure all mounting hardware is in place and properly tightened. All cables and lines must be routed correctly and all connections made secure.

Airman 1st Class Garrett Britz inspects the avionics equipment bay of a modified F-16 at Spanghahlem Air Base, Germany.

time can lead to further, potentially dangerous, failures that could have been avoided. Unnecessary component replacement is problematic in avionics repair. Each year, countless dollars' worth of instruments and electronic components are returned to overhaul facilities with labels stating that they are faulty. Upon completion of testing by overhaul personnel, many of these components are found to be without defects. A classic example of this is replacing an entire compass amplifier, when the root cause of the problem is a faulty circuit breaker. Another example of unnecessary equipment replacement could occur if a technician replaces a "black box" piece of equipment without performing analysis or diagnostics to determine the real cause of the failure. The new replacement might seem to fix the problem, until it fails as well, and further analysis reveals

that faulty wiring caused the unit to fail twice. When troubleshooting, aircraft technicians have to deal with the fact components often are expensive and, in some instances, scarce. The practice of using parts replacement as a way to troubleshoot/diagnose an electrical fault is wasteful, expensive, and reflects poor maintenance practices. Thus, trained military electrical technicians, like master sleuths, spend the time needed to find the true fault. They make decisions to replace equipment only after thoroughly analyzing system operation and testing components. After all, they know that a lot falls on their shoulders. Not only can a wrong decision cost money, ultimately it could cause a system failure with far more serious consequences. AAD

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THE C-5 GALAXY

THE C-5 GALAXY AN IDEA TOO BIG TO FAIL Emblematic of the Challenges of Creating and Maintaining a Massive Airlifter, the C-5 has had a Tumultuous History. By Patrick J. Walsh

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Image courtesy of U.S. National Archives and Records Administration.

rom the moment the first scant details of its design began to take shape in the early 1960s, the Lockheed (now Lockheed Martin) C-5 Galaxy took on a defining characteristic that has marked every aspect of its long history: everything about the C-5 is big. At its introduction in March 1968, the Galaxy was larger than all of its predecessors. To this day, it provides a massive airlift capability that is greater than successive generations of competitors. In an even larger sense, however, the C-5 has played a huge role in a

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senators and representatives when they turn to their annual task of authorizing spending for the Department of Defense (DOD). For nearly 50 years, the C-5 has represented a military necessity that consistently has outweighed political concerns about the aircraft's design, cost, and deployment. Along the way, the C-5 also presented a series of difficult design and maintenance issues for its manufacturer. These difficulties have been, at least in part, due to the sheer audacity of the capability it represents.

The C-5 has played a huge role in a decades-long debate about U.S. military spending, and how the nation goes about the business of procuring, maintaining, and deploying its military assets.

decades-long debate about U.S. military spending, and how the nation goes about the business of procuring, maintaining, and deploying its military assets. The big transport with the distinctive T-tail has become a cautionary tale for U.S.

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COSTLY CAPABILITIES Few aircraft have been as emblematic of the challenges inherent in creating and maintaining mission capability and reliability as the Galaxy. As the U.S. Air Force's

In both the volume and the types of cargo it can carry, the C-5 Galaxy provides exceptional airlift capability. This look inside a C-5, at Rota Air Force Base in Spain, in August 1984, shows service members unloading a hydrofoil sweep sled. AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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Image courtesy of U.S. Air Force.

THE C-5: ICONIC MOMENTS

With a wingspan of more than 222 feet and a total length of just over 247 feet, the Lockheed Martin C-5 Galaxy provides the U.S. Air Force with an airlift capability that has proven indispensable for nearly 5 decades, despite early concerns by members of the U.S. Congress about the aircraft's reliability and cost. Here, a C-5 Galaxy arrives at Mildenhall Royal Air Force Base in England.

Questions of reliability have dogged the Lockheed Martin C-5 Galaxy throughout the big aircraft's long service life. Over the years, two of the C-5's most high-profile deployments have come to symbolize the contrast between its difficult early years and the progress in making the C-5 more reliable and productive. INCIDENT AT TAN SON NHUT In April, 1975, as American involvement in the Vietnam War neared its end, the administration of U.S. President Gerald Ford launched Operation Babylift—the humanitarian evacuation of South Vietnamese orphans. In addition to its stated mission of transporting children orphaned by the war to the United States, the initiative also was intended to In the aftermath of the crash of the first evacuate U.S. personnel as conditions in "Operation Babylift" flight, the Ford South Vietnam deteriorated. Administration continued its efforts to On the afternoon of April 4, 1975, a evacuate Vietnamese orphans by using other aircraft, including a Boeing 747 that was C-5 Galaxy lifted off from Tan Son Nhut privately leased from Pan American Airways Air Base with the first group of Operation by U.S. businessman Robert C. Macauley. In this photo, President Gerald Ford greets one Babylift evacuees. The flight soon of the children returned from Vietnam. developed serious problems. The aircraft's rear cargo door blew off, resulting in explosive decompression. Remarkably, the crew was able to return the crippled C-5 to the airbase, but the huge plane ultimately skipped past its intended landing site, broke into several pieces, and came to rest in a rice paddy near the Saigon River. The accident resulted in 155 fatalities, including 78 children; there were 173 survivors. Image courtesy of U.S. National Archives and Records Administration.

IN SUPPORT OF DESERT STORM By the time of Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm in the early 1990s, the C-5 Galaxy had solidified its role as an integral part of the U.S. Air Force's strategic airlift capability. Although its crews typically struggled to maintain a mission-capable rate of 65 percent for the big aircraft, the C-5 was The C-5 Galaxy played an important role in considered a vital component in the supporting U.S. and coalition operations build-up of coalition personnel and during the 1990-1991 Gulf War. In this photo equipment during Desert Shield. from Operation Desert Storm in early 1991, a C-5 is loaded with supplies to be delivered to Throughout the Gulf War, the C-5 was U.S. troops in Iraq. operated at a greater-than-usual mission-capable rate (near the standard 75 percent) in its support of ground forces. U.S. Air Force officials would later note that the cargo delivered by C-5 crews during Desert Storm, from mid-January to the end of February 1991, exceeded the entire amount of cargo that U.S. forces had delivered during the 15 months of the Berlin Airlift, from June 1948 to September 1949. Image courtesy of U.S. Air Force.

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preeminent outsize cargo transport, the C-5 was designed to deliver a maximum cargo of 270,000 pounds at intercontinental distances. This combined payload and reach was a key characteristic for its initial deployment, beginning in July 1970, when it was first used to transport and supply U.S. troops during the Vietnam War. The C-5 was embroiled in controversy even before it made its first flights in Southeast Asia. Beginning in November 1968, a series of high-profile congressional hearings were led by Senator William Proxmire (Democrat-Wisconsin), an outspoken critic of U.S. conduct of the war in Vietnam. The investigations produced troubling revelations about the development of the C-5. Design trade-offs intended to reduce the overall weight of the aircraft had resulted in cracks in its wings during fatigue tests. Plus, its innovative landing gear—designed to make driveon loading possible by lowering the aircraft when parked on a runway—had malfunctioned during testing of the first two completed airframes. The biggest headlines emanating from the congressional investigation, however, dealt with the extensive cost overruns the aircraft had incurred in the 3 years since Lockheed had been awarded the initial contract for the program in September 1965. Procured under the parameters of the DOD's "Total Package Procurement" initiative, which sought to combine the projected costs of the design, development, production, and support of major weapons systems in a single (that is, "packaged") contract, the total cost of the C-5 program was revealed during the hearings to be nearly $2 billion more than initially estimated. WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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THE C-5 GALAXY

RETIREMENT RESTRICTIONS Once it overcame the difficulties of its early years, the Galaxy certainly proved it merits in numerous and widely varied missions around the globe. Perhaps the best measure of how things have changed for the big transport—and for military procurement as a whole—was

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Image courtesy of U.S. Air Force. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jeremy Allen.

DEPLOYMENT AND MODERNIZATION Whatever difficulties it might represent in development and production, the basic idea embodied by the C-5 ultimately proved too valuable to discard. Although the technical problems had a direct impact on the aircraft's overall effectiveness (it became necessary to reduce both its cargo capacity and maintenance intervals), the urgency of the U.S. Air Force's need for a large transport trumped congressional concerns about the Galaxy's technical drawbacks and cost. Even as the C-5 began its operational life with the U.S. Air Force in 1970, Lockheed continued to explore ways to address the limitations imposed by the flaws in the wings and landing gear. In the years since, a series of upgrades have seen the airframe retrofitted with fixes for its initial problems. It also has received modern avionics and a new engine capable of keeping it in service for several more decades.

Although the C-5 Galaxy's reputation for being difficult to maintain was initially linked to difficulties with its development in the 1960s, the sheer size of the transport has contributed to maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) challenges over the years. This image of a C-5 maintenance stand, at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware in 1995, gives some idea of the scope and complexity that MRO personnel face when servicing the Galaxy.

(and likely with an eye toward limiting the impact of retiring aircraft based in several member's home states),

Even as the C-5 began its operational life with the U.S. Air Force in 1970, Lockheed continued to explore ways to address the limitations imposed by the flaws in the wings and landing gear.

embodied by congressional reaction to the U.S. Air Force's 2003 announcement that it planned to begin retirement of the oldest members of the C-5 fleet. In an irony befitting the tumultuous history of this transport WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

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Congress passed legislation limiting the U.S. Air Force's ability to retire even the oldest versions of the C-5, until the planned upgrades were more fully implemented. In 2009, Lockheed Martin began

implementing extensive upgrades to fifty-two of the U.S. Air Force's inventory of C-5s. The resulting version of the aircraft, the C-5M Super Galaxy, is expected to extend the service life of the big transport until at least 2040. AAD Sources: Jack Anderson, "Lockheed coverup is alleged," The Free Lance-Star, July 19, 1971.; Peter Carlson, "A. Ernest Fitzgerald," People Magazine, December 9, 1985.; "Congress to Investigate Increase in Cost of C-5A Plane," The New York Times, December 1, 1968.; William J. Coughlin, "C-5A in First S. Viet Flight," Los Angeles Times, July 10, 1970.; Darrell Garwood, "Newest Air Force Planes Grounded," United Press International, January 17, 1970.; Al Moyers, "Another Galaxy, Another Test: Operational Test and Evaluation of the C-5M," Air Force Operational and Test Evaluation Center, August 9, 2007, www.afotec.af.mil.; Berkeley Rice. The C-5A Scandal: An Inside Story of the Military-Industrial Complex. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1971.; John A. Tirpak, "Saving the Galaxy," Air Force Magazine, January 2004.; U.S. Air Force: C-5 A/B/C Galaxy and C-5M Super Galaxy Fact Sheet www.af.mil.; Sharon Weinberger, "Congress Moves To Limit C-5A Retirement," Defense Daily, November 14, 2003.

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C-5 GALAXY

PUTTING THE "SUPER" IN

GALAXY Outfitting Lockheed's C-5M Strategic Lifter for Flight into the Future. By James Wynbrandt Images Courtesy of Lockheed Martin

Image courtesy of U.S. Air Force. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Robert Cloys.

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or almost half a century, the U.S. military has relied on the lifting power of the C-5 Galaxy to support warfighting and humanitarian missions around the globe. With the conversion of the C-5 Galaxy fleet into C-5M Super Galaxys near complete, the platform can now be counted on to fulfill its missions for decades to come. "The life of the aircraft is expected to extend beyond 2040," says Lockheed Martin C-5 Program Senior Manager David Hale. The C-5's importance is difficult to overstate. The largest aircraft in the U.S. Air Force inventory and its only strategic lifter—that is, one capable of rapidly projecting and sustaining U.S. military force worldwide—the Galaxy can carry any air-transportable combat equipment in the U.S. Army's inventory. That includes two 80-ton M1 tanks, with room to spare. Since early in the last decade, the U.S. Air Force and prime contractor Lockheed Martin have been working on what has turned out to be a remarkably smooth and successful plan to bring the C-5 into the twentyfirst century. What makes the C5-M (M for "Modernization") program all the more noteworthy is its contrast with the C-5's original development. THE C-5: THEN AND NOW In the early 1960s, U.S. military

planners grew interested in a heavy jet transport to support the military's expanding rapid response capabilities. The U.S. Army's largest vehicles and equipment were too big for the U.S. Air Force's then-flagship hauler, the Lockheed C-141 Starlifter. When the U.S. Air Force formally opened bidding, several contractors submitted cargo jet designs and budgets. Lockheed's lowest cost proposal won the contract, which was awarded in 1965. But the C-5 became a poster child for defense programs gone wrong. (See Patrick J. Walsh's article "The C-5 Galaxy: An Idea Too Big to Fail," also in this issue.) Moreover, soon after its 1969 entry into service, cracks on the C-5's wings and other structural issues led the U.S. Air Force to restrict its payloads and ultimately necessitated installing a stronger wingbox in the entire fleet. Among additional problems, the "kneeling" landing gear, designed to lower the fuselage and facilitate loading and unloading, often could not get off its knees once deployed. Meanwhile, the overruns on the Galaxy and on Lockheed's indevelopment L-1011 civilian airliner put the company near financial ruin in the early 1970s, requiring a government loan guarantee to avoid bankruptcy. Yet despite its birthing and growing pains, the C-5 Galaxy AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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has played the lead transport role in every major U.S. conflict since its introduction during the Vietnam War. Near the last century's end, as planners considered a next generation strategic lifter, a 1998 U.S. Air Force airframe study determined that the C-5 fleet had more than 60 percent of its service life left. However, neither the original engines nor the legacy avionics were compatible with continued operations. In the cockpit, the analog equipment could not operate in the evolving regulated global airspace, which mandated digital communication, navigation, and surveillance (CNS) and air traffic management (ATM) systems. Meanwhile, the four General Electric (GE) TF39 powerplants under the Galaxy's wings were no longer in production, and Diminishing Manufacturing Sources (DMS) issues threatened the ongoing procurement of 34

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replacement parts. THE PATH TO THE FUTURE: AMP AND RERP The U.S. Air Force and Lockheed Martin (the company created from Lockheed's merger with defense contractor Martin Marietta in 1995) launched a two-phase modernization initiative for the C-5: the Avionics Modernization Program (AMP) and the follow-on Reliability Enhancement and Reengining Program (RERP). When combined in one airframe, the upgrades create the C-5M Super Galaxy. Launched in 1999, Phase I, the AMP avionics upgrade, was designed around a Honeywell avionics suite, adapted from "the flight control system (FCS) used in Boeing 767s and other airliners," says Hale, providing a significant reduction in development costs. The digital, all-weather FCS incorporates flat-panel displays, enhanced navigation (such as an

advanced, embedded global position/inertial navigation system), and autopilot. Communication improvements include Satcom capability via high-frequency datalink. Predictive flight performance cues and situational awareness displays (such as the Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System) on the glass panels ease crew workload and enhance safety. Besides bringing the flight deck up to date, the AMP cockpit, which first flew in 2002, forms the digital backbone of RERP, Phase II of the C-5 modernization initiative. RERP's primary hardware upgrade is the GE CF6-80C2 engine (military designation F138-GE-100). The new powerplant generates 22 percent more thrust than the TF39, producing a 30 percent shorter takeoff roll and 58 percent faster climb rate, and allowing significant increases in payload and range. The first re-engined C-5 flew in 2006. The engine upgrade notwithstanding, "The 'RE' part of the acronym—Reliability Enhancement—makes up the majority of the changes," says Hale. RERP incorporates more than seventy major enhancements. "Part of the enhancements replace out-of-production or historically unreliable components with updated ones, while others add structural strength," Hale, who heads the RERP program, explains. These include changes or modifications to the airframe WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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structure (fifteen items), flight controls (thirteen), environmental and pneumatic systems (eight), landing gear (seven), hydraulic systems (five), fuel system (four), and electrical system (two). Among them are new kneeling motors that improve the reliability of the kneeling system. The cargo area also has received substantial improvements under RERP, starting with enhanced

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alternating current (AC) fluorescent bulb-type lighting assemblies. The incandescent overhead light fixtures utilize 115-volt AC light-emitting diode (LED)-type light assemblies. According to Hale, the new lighting "provides greatly improved operational benefit for safer and more efficient cargo handling, as well as improved reliability and reduced maintenance."

"Part of the enhancements replace out-of-production or historically unreliable components with updated ones, while others add structural strength."

illumination. "The original C-5A and B-model cargo compartment lighting is well known to be below desired illumination levels," states Hale. The former 28-volt direct current (DC) incandescent bulb curb light fixtures and white side light fixtures have been replaced with 115-volt WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

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HEALTH MONITORING TODAY, PREDICTIVE MAINTENANCE TOMORROW To ensure optimum availability and provide a path for predictive maintenance, the legacy diagnostic backbone of the C-5A/B/C—the

Malfunction Detection Analysis and Recording System (MADARS)—has been replaced and upgraded with an embedded diagnostics system (EDS). The EDS enables the aircrew, engineers, and maintainers to view and monitor more than 7,000 test points, and it provides access to the main avionics and systems interface backbone (Mil-Std-1553B and ARINC429 data buses). Fault detection algorithms monitor the health of aircraft systems, via either the system controller or discrete/analog signals. Any system "failed/recovered" fault status is recorded throughout the flight with supporting data relevant to the fault. "The Flight Engineer can access the health data for system management during flight, and for defining failures for maintenance action after the flight," says Hale. Post-flight, "Maintainers and engineers can use ground data analysis software tools, and review the sequence of events and aircraft flight conditions that led to the

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system failure." This accelerates and improves the accuracy of troubleshooting and fault isolation; it also ensures that the proper line replaceable unit (LRU) parts are identified as failed and replaced. A subset of about 200 to 300 of the EDS's 7,000-plus test points are recorded automatically at 1, 10, or 20 Hertz rates continuously throughout flight operations. The data is transferred off-aircraft via a PCMCIA card (a standard memory expansion card; originally from the Personal Computer Memory Card International Association) for later troubleshooting and trend analysis. U.S. Air Force and Lockheed Martin C-5 engineering teams "are now developing ground data analysis software tools to leverage the diagnostics/vehicle health data for fleet health monitoring, trending, troubleshooting, exceedance event analysis, condition-based maintenance, and predictive/prognostics analysis," Hale points out. CONVERSION RESULTS C-5M fleet performance to date has been excellent, as seen in metrics and reported anecdotally. 36

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In deployed airlift operations, the M has achieved departure reliability rates higher than 90 percent, as well as a Wartime Surge missioncapable rate of more than 75 percent. At the same time, its payloads have increased 20 percent over legacy C-5s. RERP results have been particularly impressive, with the new engines showing a ten-fold improvement in time on wing, a twenty-fold reduction of in-flight shutdowns, a more than doubled mean time between failures rate (MTBF), and a 300 percent reduction in maintenance manhours per flight hour. According to the Air Mobility Command (AMC), which operates the Super Galaxy Fleet, White House airlift planners now rely on the C-5M to handle no-fail/highvisibility lift missions supporting the POTUS (President of the United States). Meanwhile, in the field, U.S. Army brigade commanders specifically request the C-5M for transport missions. Though the M upgrade program is nearing completion, "sustainment of the C-5M fleet will be ongoing through the life of the

aircraft," says Hale. That includes "focused reliability and maintainability improvements." As a current example, the weather radar is being replaced due to DMS issues with an enhanced version of a widely available commercial unit. Concurrently, the core mission computer (CMC) is being upgraded to increase computer throughput to accommodate the new radar, as well as to support future planned and anticipated system and software upgrades. Periodic software upgrades also are planned. "The fleet will need to meet the government-mandated CNS/ATM standards as those guidelines evolve; there are some obsolescence issues with the current VIA/AIU (versatile integrated avionics/avionics interface unit) that will lead to a future CMC replacement/ upgrade," says Hale. Studies are underway now, and any CMC replacement plan will likely be in the "2022 timeframe," he predicts. In total, the U.S. Air Force has ordered fifty-two C-5Ms, with the final delivery scheduled for April 2018. A ceremony will mark the WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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milestone, but "details have not been developed," Hale says. Meanwhile, the 439th Airlift Wing at Westover Air Force Base in Massachusetts is scheduled to receive its first C-5M in spring 2017. When fully deployed, the C-5M fleet will operate from the 60th (active duty) and 349th (Reserve Associate) Air Mobility Wings at Travis Air Force Base in California, as well as from Dover (Delaware) Air Force Base's 436th (active duty) and 512th (Reserve Associate); Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland's 433rd; and Westover's 439th Airlift Wings (both Air Force Reserve Command). Perhaps most impressive for a program whose initial development was plagued by cost overruns and unrealistic projections, the AMP and RERP conversions in tandem cut operating costs by 34 percent over the lifespan of the jet. Thus, "the C5-M is expected to save $15 billion in lifecycle costs during the life of the program," concludes Hale. After all, the largest and big-ticket airlifter is paying for itself. AAD

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TOOLING: THE JIG IS UP, THE FIXTURE IS IN It Takes More than Aircraft Parts and Labor to Produce Airplanes.

By Donna J. Kelly

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BOEING C-17 GLOBEMASTER III

DoD photo by Tech. Sgt. Mike Buytas, U.S. Air Force

Three U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III aircraft offload tons of equipment at Keesler Air Force Base, MS for use in support of relief operations.

B

ehind every great airplane is a complex and diverse set of aircraft production tooling, each piece especially designed and crafted to fulfill its own unique purpose. The building of production tooling paves the way toward the manufacture of the actual aircraft, because tooling is needed to facilitate the entire assembly process. Even if the aircraft goes out of production, as the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III did in 2015, much, if WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

not all, of the tooling is maintained for the sustainment process. Depending on the likelihood that production might be restarted, other

{

tooling may be put into storage. Common types of production tools include jigs, fixtures, molds, stretch blocks, and so on. Jigs and fixtures are devices designed to hold production work, and can be designed to fabricate one part or many of the same parts accurately. Use of fixtures and jigs reduces production costs, increases productivity, ensures accuracy of the component being built, and can increase and enhance the capabilities of other machining tools. Production molds are the surfaces within or around which the aircraft components are formed. For example, compare the tail cone on the end of a C-17 with the mold used to construct it (see illustration above). The master model for the C-17 tail cone was produced by Nova-Tech Engineering in Lynnwood, Washington. It is made of carbon foam covered with a carbon/bismaleimide compound. Another common production tool type is known as a "stretch form." It enables the forming of aluminum and other malleable materials into a wide spectrum of shapes and sizes. For instance, stretch forms made by Shelton Industrial Pattern, of St. Louis, Missouri, are used to elongate a sheet of aluminum over a contoured block with a hydraulic stretch press. These processes are used to form many types of aircraft skins—wings, fuselage, flaps, tail, and so on—as well as any other metal parts that require compound contours within strictly defined tolerances.

When selecting materials for tooling, two fundamental questions must be addressed: Will the tooling and/or its part be exposed to heat, as in an autoclave? Will the tooling have to withstand repeated production cycles? AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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WHAT IS A PREPREG?

Image courtesy of Mat2composites.

An example of prepreg after it has been in an autoclave.

Prepreg is a combination of a matrix (or resin) with a fiber reinforcement that is ready to use in the component manufacturing process. Unidirectional prepreg tapes have been the standard within the aerospace industry for many years, and the fiber is typically impregnated with thermosetting resins. The most common method of manufacture is to draw collimated raw (dry) strands into the impregnation machine, where hot melted resins are combined with the strands, using heat and pressure. Tape products have high strength in the fiber direction but little strength across the fibers. The fibers are held in place by the resin, and have a higher strength than woven fabrics. Hexcel of Dublin, California, manufactures HexPrepregs, which are specially formulated resin matrix systems, reinforced with man-made fibers, such as carbon, glass, and aramid. Hexcel has its own in-house supply of carbon fiber and weaving facilities for the development of reinforcement technologies to complement the prepreg resin formulations. Nick Stanage, President and Chief Executive Officer of Hexcel, explains, "Prepreg is the ultimate composite material. The thermoset resin cures at elevated temperature, undergoing a chemical reaction that transforms the prepreg into a solid structural material that is highly durable, temperature resistant, exceptionally stiff, and extremely lightweight."

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Courtesy of Nova Tech Engineering.

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A production mold is used to form the tail cone for the C-17 Globemaster.

MATERIALS AND COSTS Many considerations go into the crafting of production tooling, and often the materials can be costly. Boeing reports that 53,910 production tools valued at $860 million were produced to build and sustain the C-17. When selecting materials for tooling, two fundamental questions must be addressed: Will the tooling and/or its part be exposed to heat, as in an autoclave? Will the tooling have to withstand repeated production cycles? Tooling to be used for production at ambient temperatures may be made of usually less expensive materials: fiberglass, hi-density foams, machinable epoxy boards, and other softer composites. Such tooling, which cannot withstand heat or heavy, repeated use is referred to as "soft tooling." When production tooling will be used many times, and will be heated, only certain materials can be used for what is called "hard tooling." These materials include

carbon fiber/epoxy, monolithic granite, castable granite, various ceramics, harder composites, and metals such as aluminum and steel. Material costs vary, depending on the material, but expenditures for hard tooling tend to be higher than for soft tooling. At the same time, the more durable hard tooling usually can be used for making many more parts. One example of this kind of tool is the HexTool, made by Hexcel of Dublin, California. HexTool is an integral heating tool made of a machinable fiber/bismalemide (BMI) composite. Embedded within the material are randomly distributed "prepreg strips" (see sidebar); when heated, these release other materials to form a larger mat. Once cured, the HexTool will survive up to 500 autoclave cycles, and it has a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) that is roughly equivalent to that of carbon/epoxy parts. This means that the mold and the part being formed will geothermally expand WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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Courtesy of wikicommons

BOEING C-17 GLOBEMASTER III

The tail section of the C-17

at a very close, if not exact, rate during the cure time. CTE is of critical importance in the manufacture of composite parts that require exact tolerances. While some kinds of metals are unsuitable for molding parts made out of composites that do not exhibit thermal expansion, there are types of alloys that have particularly low expansion rates. For example, Invar 36 does not noticeably expand in heated conditions, rather it is relatively "invariable" (hence the name). This alloy was discovered in 1896 by Swiss metallurgist Charles Eduoard Guillaume who was looking for a metal that would not change in length when exposed to different temperatures. By experimenting with nickel-alloys, he discovered that with a nickel level of 36 percent and the WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

balance of the material made of iron, what was to become known as Invar 36 exhibited an extremely low expansion rate. Consequently, it is used for the formation of composite parts where a minimum expansion rate is required.

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Kovar, Alloy 42, Alloy 46, Alloy 48, and Alloy 52. All of these materials vary in attributes, based on the quantity of nickel used, and each is used for unique purposes in aircraft production tooling.

As new materials are created, along with the tools to form them, production lines become more efficient and less expensive to operate.

Also available is Super Invar consisting of 32 percent nickel, 5 percent cobalt, and the balance iron. At room temperature, it exhibits a CTE that is one half of Invar 36's. Other alloys with low CTEs include

}

EVOLUTION OF PRODUCTION LINES AND TOOLING Established production lines are anything but static. As new materials are created, along with the tools to form them, production lines become AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Frank Oliver

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Coming Home: The tail flash of a 445th Airlift Wing C-17 Globemaster III frames the landing of a C-17 upon its completion of a local flight.

more efficient and less expensive to operate. In addition, as production becomes ever more automated, tooling can include highly sophisticated machinery. The C-17 production line underwent such a development with the installation of the first of many giant machining tools. According to Boeing spokesperson David Eastman, the "Torres Mill, a 5-axis computer, is a numerically controlled trimming and drilling machine capable of trimming and drilling skin panels as long as 40 feet, and as wide as 12 feet." In addition, "this machine accommodates a curvature of up to 3 feet, and trims panels at a rate of up to 400 inches a minute." The Torres Mill, manufactured by MTorres America of Bothell, Washington, also "will precisely drill tool coordinating holes for location of detail parts to occur in later assemblies." While the cost of the Torres Mill was $5.8 million, production cost savings have been estimated at $258,000 per aircraft. Another behemoth machining tool added to the line as production continued was an automated ring riveter measuring 42

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

33 feet tall, over 50 feet wide, and more than 200 feet long. This machine was used during C-17 production to combine several smaller skin panels into one large panel. It also added internal ribs by using automated drilling and fastening. Improvements were needed in the production of the C-17's main landing gear pod, which by the way, is longer than an F-15 fighter jet. By redesigning large bulkheads to allow for high-speed machining, the detail parts could be produced

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California, ceased operations in November 2015, decisions had to be made regarding the final disposition of the production tooling. First, everything was separated into two categories, tooling to be used for ongoing sustainment, and tooling that was only useful for actual production and could not be transformed into something else. What happens in such cases to the production tooling is based on an evaluation of the possibility of restarting production of the

While some original tooling supports sustainment of legacy aircraft tooling, other tooling and equipment lies in wait for the potential resurrection of the C-17 and other out-of-production aircraft.

in larger units, thus reducing the number of parts from 72 to 2, and the number of fasteners from 1,720 to 35. WHAT HAPPENS TO THE TOOLING? When the Globemaster III production line in Long Beach,

}

airframe. If production might recommence, even on a limited scale, then retaining the production-only tooling makes sense, because the recreation of this equipment would be expensive. According to a Rand Corporation report: "the higher the perceived probability of production WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Frank Oliver

BOEING C-17 GLOBEMASTER III

C-17 takes to the sky: A 445th Airlift Wing C-17 Globemaster III takes to the sky for a local flight March 22, 2016 as the sun begins to set.

restart, the greater the desirability of retaining production-only tooling." On the other hand, storage is not free. It may be less costly to reproduce certain tooling than to save it, especially when the long-term storage is factored into the equation. At present, the C-17 productiononly tooling is stored at the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) storage and maintenance facility, also known as the "Boneyard," at DavisMonthan Air Force Base in Tucson, Arizona, as well as at its partner facility, the Toole Army Depot, in Toole, Utah. Representatives from the production tooling department at AMARG declined to discuss storage costs, but they did confirm that there currently is no time limit for storing such special tooling and related test equipment. WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

INTO THE FUTURE When Boeing closed the C-17 production line, engineering students at California State University Northridge (CSUN) were happy to receive various pieces of tooling and equipment. Students who study at the Boeing Automation Engineering Laboratory investigate topics such as the finer points of precision drilling through layers of carbon fiber composites and titanium—work associated with the vital job of attaching wings to planes. CSU College of Engineering Dean Forouzan Golshani reports, "Students get involved with their senior projects, and create a senior project around a problem that exemplifies what a typical problem within Boeing would be. If they're the right talent, they immediately have a channel to employment with Boeing."

As the availability of new materials and techniques increase, need and inventiveness harness them for the production of the finest aircraft in the world. Without the aid of production tooling, creating the complex aircraft of today would be impossible. While some original tooling supports sustainment of legacy aircraft tooling, other tooling and equipment lies in wait for the potential resurrection of the C-17 and other out-of-production aircraft. At the same time, it is good to know that not only are advances continually being made in materials and tooling, but the talent of the future will be stepping up to join in this important aspect of aircraft manufacturing. AAD

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INDUSTRY ’ S LEADING

HOLOGRAM PRODUCTS PROGRAM The Hologram Products Program was created to better serve the owners and operators of Lockheed Martin C-130 B-H aircraft. The core of the program is its commitment to quality manufacturing and customer satisfaction. As the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM), Lockheed Martin ensures that the parts used on C-130 B-H aircraft are manufactured in accordance to the appropriate specifications and the highest quality standards. The Hologram Products Program has addressed this issue by qualifying manufacturers and supporting them with the correct and up-to-date technical data needed to produce OEM quality parts. Not only is each part made to the correct data, but each one has a Lockheed Martin source inspection to ensure conformance and certify the part before it ever reaches the customer’s hand. These parts may be identified by the distinctive “hologram” (holographic decal) that can be found on the part itself or the part packaging. Each hologram has a unique serial number that is recorded along with part information for quality checks and customer support. Customers can have confidence that the parts identified with the hologram are manufactured to the appropriate specifications and the highest quality standards. More information, including an updated list of licensees, may be found at www.LMHologram.com


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Your Aerospace Solution a solid source of support In a global economy, sustainment is key. To get things done, it is better to do it a part at a time. For over 60 years, Frazier Aviation, Inc. has been a leader in the manufacturing of spares, supply of aerospace components, overhaul/repair and ground support equipment. Frazier Aviation is also one of the more versatile AS9100 manufacturers and approved FAA/EASA repair centers. On all fronts a solid source of support you can depend on. When it comes to consistent performance and quality, Frazier Aviation is leading the way.

Ask your buyer to specify Frazier Aviation parts. It’s quality you can trust.

445 North Fox Street ~ San Fernando, CA 91340 Phone (818) 898-1998 ~ Fax (818) 837-9546 Recognized Worldwide www.frazieraviation.com


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Keep It Airborne •

LOCKHEED MARTIN HOLOGRAM PRODUCTS PROGRAM LICENSEE FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF F-16 ITEMS

• •

LARGE INVENTORY OF F-16 PARTS AND ASSEMBLIES

STRUCTURAL FABRICATION & ASSEMBLY

PRECISION MACHINING & SHEET METAL FABRICATION

MANUFACTURING

Ph: 805.389.3700 • Fax: 805.389.3708 www.airbornetech.com 999 Avenida Acaso

• P.O. Box 2210 • Camarillo, CA 93012 AS9100 Rev.C:2009/ISO 9001:2008 registered

MANUFACTURING F-16 STRUCTURAL PARTS & ASSEMBLIES FOR OVER THIRTY YEARS

Airborne Technologies Inc. www.airbornetech.com Airborne Technologies carries a very large inventory specializing in C-130 structural aircraft parts. The many years of experience in providing spares for this aircraft has brought forth an inventory comprising thousands of items, many of which Airborne has found to be the most often required for normal maintenance and/or overhaul.

Address: 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo, CA 93012 Phone: Fax: Contact: Email:

805-389-3700 805-389-3708 Paul Siano psiano@airbornetech.com

Frazier Aviation, Inc. www.frazieraviation.com For over 60 years, Frazier Aviation Inc. has been a versatile component manufacturer offering a diversity of services including sheet metal work and overhaul and repair. It was a founding members of the Hologram Products Program and is an approved manufacturer for all of Lockheed's facilities. The company is AS9100 certified and also a PSID supplier to Boeing. 46

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

Address: 445 North Fox St., San Frenando, CA 91340 Phone: 818-898-1998 Fax: 818-837-9546 Email: frazier@frazieraviation.com

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INDUSTRY’S LEADING C-130 PROVIDERS

MHD-ROCKLAND, Inc www.mhdrockland.com MHD-ROCKLAND has one of the largest Lockheed Martin qualified inventory holdings in the world for Fixed wing C-130 and P-3 Aircraft consumable and rotable part numbers and assemblies. We continue to deliver on time solutions to operators Address: 205 Brunswick, Blvd. Suite 100 Pointe-Claire, Québec, Canada and maintenance providers for over 30 years with innovative approaches in supply H9R 1A5 that complements the Air Frames we support. Phone: 514-453-1632 MHD-ROCKLAND is proud to be the only certified C-130 hologram distributor Fax: 514-425-5801 for the CPP parts program and continues to offer dedicated spares part support to Contact: President end users around the globe. Email: info@mhdrockland.com HOLOGRAM PRODUCTS PROGRAM Lockheed Martin Global Supply Chain Services 210 Industrial Park Rd, Ste 120 Johnstown, PA 15904 Tel: 814-262-4483 CERTIFIED PARTS LICENSEES

PPG Aerospace Transparencies 1719 Highway 72E Huntsville AL 35804 Tel: 256-851-1008

Aero Components 5124 Kaltenbrun Rd, Ft. Worth, TX 76119 Tel: 817-572-3003

Williams Aerospace & Mfg. 2820 Via Orange Way Spring Valley, CA 91978 Tel: 619-660-6220

Aero Engineering & Mfg. Co. 28217 Avenue Crocker Valencia, CA 91355 Tel: 661-295-0875 Airborne Technologies Inc. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo, CA 93012 Ph: 805-389-3700 Frazier Aviation 445 North Fox St, San Fernando, CA 91340 Tel: 818-898-1998 GKN Aerospace Bandy Machining, POB 7716, Burbank, CA 91054 Tel: 818-846-9020 GKN Aerospace Svcs - Cowes Ferry Road-East Cowes Isle of Wright PO32 6RA -UK Tel: +44(0) 1983- 294101 Heroux Devtek Inc. 755, Thurber St. Longueuil, Québec, Canada J4H 3N2 Tel: (450) 679-5454 International Precision, Inc. 9526 Vassar Ave., Chatsworth, CA 91313 Tel: 818-882-3933 Loos & Co., Inc. 1 Cable Rd, Pomfret, CT 06258 Tel: 800-533-5667 Nor-Ral, Inc. 164 Hickory Springs Ind Dr Canyon, GA 30115 Tel: 770-720-0526 ext. 274 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

Tactair Fluid Controls, Inc. 4806 West Taft Rd Liverpool, NY 13088 Tel: 315-451-3928

APPROVED REPAIR CENTERS Aeroworx, Inc. 2565 West 237th St Torrance, CA 90505 310-891-0300 Derco Repair Services, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Ave. Milwaukee, WI 53223 Tel: 414-355-7770 Floats and Fuel Cells 4010 Pilot Drive, Suite 103 Memphis, TN 38118 Tel: 901-842-7132 Four Star Accessory Overhaul, Inc. 7711 New Market St. S.W. Tumwater, WA 98501 Tel: 360-956-0800 Heroux Devtek Inc. 755, Thurber St. Longueuil, Québec, Canada J4H 3N2 Tel: 450-679-5454 Kearsley Airways, Ltd. Romeera House, Stansted Airport, Essex CM24 1QL, UK Tel: 44 (0)1279 871000 Lockheed Martin Aeronautics GSCS 210 Industrial Park Rd Ste 120, Johnstown, PA 15904 Tel: 814-262-4516

LICENSED DISTRIBUTORS * MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd., Suite 100 Pointe-Claire, Quebec, H9r1A5 Tel: 514-453-1632

AUTHORIZED C-130 HERCULES SERVICE CENTERS AMMROC PO Box 46450, Abu Dhabi UAE Ph. 971-2-505-7237

Airod Sdn. Bhd Locked Bag 4004; Pejabat Pos Kampung Tunku, 47309 Petaling Jaya, Malaysia Tel: 603-746-3334/3344 Cascade Aerospace 1337 Townline Road, Abbotsford, BC Canda V2T 6E1 Tel: 604-557-2541 DENEL (PTY) Ltd. PO Box 11, Kempton Park, 1620, Rep. of South Africa Tel: 27 (11) 927-4575 Empresa Nacional de Aero. Avenida Jose Miguel Carrera 11087; Paradero 36 1/2, Comuna de El Bosque Santiago Chile Tel: 56-2-383-1919 Fabrica Argentina de Aviones (FADEA) Brig. General San Martin SA Av. Fuerza Aerea Argentina 5500, 5010 Cordoba Tel: 54-351-466-8740, ext 2412 Hellenic Aerospace Industry Tangara, POB 23, GR-320 09, Schimatari, Greece Tel: 30-262-5 3121/2141 Marshall Aerospace The Airport, Cambridge, CB5 8RX, UK Tel: 44-1223-373737 OGMA 2615 Alverca, Portugal Tel: 351-1-958-1000

ST Aerospace Eng. Pte. Ltd. 540 Airport Rd, Paya Lebar, Singapore 539938 Tel: 65-382-7846 Turkish Air Force (TurAF) 2nd Air Supply and Maintenance Center, Kayseri, Turkey Tel: 90-352-351-21-06 ext 5091

AUTHORIZED C-130 QEC SERVICE CENTERS AIROD Sdn. Bhd Locked Bag 4004 Pejabat Pos Kampung Tunku 47309 Petaling Jaya, Malaysia Tel: +603 7846 5112 Rolls-Royce Engine Services Oakland, Inc. 7200 Earhart Road Oakland, CA 94621USA Tel: (510) 615-5033 Segers Aero 8100 McGowin Drive Fairhope, AL 36532 Tel: 251-928-1878 Standard Aero, Canada 33 Allen Dyne Road Winnipeg, MB R3H 1A1 Tel: 204-318-7755 Vector Aerospace International Fleetlands, Fareham Road, Building 140, Gosport Hampshire, PO13 0AA UK Tel: +44 (0)2392 946342 Vector Aerospace International Limited - QEC Facitily Cody Technology Park Old Ively Road, Farnborough, Hants GU14 0LZ Tel: +44 (0) 1252 359816

AUTHORIZED C-130J HEAVY MAINTENANCE CENTERS

Sabena Technics - Brussels Bldg. 24B/304, 1930 Zaventem, Belgium Tel: 32-2-723-4958

Cascade Aerospace 1337 Townline Rd, Abbotsford, BC Canda V2T 6E1 Tel: 604-557-2541

Sabena Technic - BOD Aeroport de BordeauxMerignac,19 rue Marcel Issartier CS 50 008, 33693 Merignac Cedex, France Tel: 33-556-55.22.66

Marshall Aerospace The Airport, Cambridge, CB5 8RX, UK Tel: 44-1223-373737 Updated 2016

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Courtesy of Lockheed Martin.

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P-3 P-3 ORION ORION Lockheed Martin Authorized P-3 Service Centers & P-3 Certified Parts Providers CERTIFIED PARTS AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTORS

Blue Aerospace 6501-B Nob Hill Rd. Tamarac, FL 33321 954-718-4404 MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd. Suite 100 Pointe-Claire, Quebec H9R 1A5 Tel: 514-453-1632 Kellstrom Industries 3701 Flamingo Rd. Miramar, FL 33027 954-538-2164 CERTIFIED PARTS MANUFACTURERS

Aero Engineering & Manufacturing 28217 Avenue Crocker Valencia, CA 91355-1249 661-295-0815

Frazier Aviation Inc. 445 North Fox St. San Fernando, CA 91340 www.frazieraviation.com

Snowline Aerospace 4261 Business Dr. Cameron Park, CA 95682 877-537-0222

Grace Electronics 20 Peachtree Ct. Holbrook, NY 11741 631-699-0131

Williams Aerospace & Manufacturing 2820 Via Orange Way, Suite G Spring Valley, CA 91978 619-660-6220

IMP Aerostructures PO Box 10 Amherst, Nova Scotia, Canada 902-667-1610 IMP Electronic Systems 3101 Hammonds Plains Rd. Hammonds Plains, Nova Scotia, Canada B3Z 1H7 902-835-4433 International Precision, Inc. 9526 Vassar Ave P.O. Box 4839 Chatsworth CA 91313-4839 Ph. 818-882-3933

Beacon Industries 1814 Woody Rd. Dallas, TX 75253-4932 972-557-3494

IMP Group, Ltd. 2651 Dutch Village Road Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada Tel: 902-873-2250 AUTHORIZED P-3 ORION QEC REPAIR CENTERS

Rolls-Royce Engine Services Oakland Oakland International Airport 7200 Earhart Road Oakland, CA 94621-4504 Tel: 510-635-1095

AUTHORIZED P-3 ORION SERVICE CENTERS

Airbus Defence & Space GmbH Rechliner Strasse, D-85077 Manching, Germany airbusdefenceandspace.com Airbus Group Australia Pacific Buildings 46, Corner of East Avenue and Explosives Rd Edinburgh, SA 5111 Australia Tel: +61-8-8256-4529

GA Telesis 3420 NW 53rd Street Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Tel: 954-676-3111 Standard Aero 3525 General Hudnell San Antonio, TX 78226 Tel: 210-334-6000 Wood Group Turbopower, LLC POC: Steven Vernier 14820 N. W. 60th Ave Miami Lakes, FL 33014 Tel: 305-423-2321

In operation since 1959, there are approximately 223 P-3 aircraft in existence, operated by the US, Canada, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Portugal, Spain, Norway, Germany, Greece, Pakistan, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, Australia and New Zealand. Some primary past and current aircraft maintenance issues include: Fatigue Life Management; Center Wing Replacement; Zone 5 modifications and Outer Wing Assembly replacement.*Inclusion in this list does not in any way imply that the companies listed are “Distributors” for Lockheed Martin for this program. Updated April 27, 2016

Courtesy of Lockheed Martin.

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QUICK REFERENCE:

TRANSPORTS Firms that specialize in parts for Transports Distribution / Manufacturing / Repairs

Courtesy of Lockheed Martin. Photography by Andrew McMurtrie.


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QUALITY

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PRODUCTS

SHORT

LEADTIMES

COMPETITIVE

PRICING

EXPERIENCE

AS9100 HOSE MANUFACTURER MOST COMMON C-130 HOSE ASSEMBLIES HELD IN STOCK FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY

RUBBER • METAL • TEFLON

818-841-9258 • Fax: 818-841-2342 28887 Industry Drive, Valencia, CA 91355 www.aerocomponent.com sales@aerocomponent.com celebrating 50 years in business ACCESSORIES & ACCESSORY OVERHAUL Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255 Contact: Rick Weltmann rweltmann@aerokool.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org

AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com

CHARLOTTE AIRCRAFT CORP. 7705 E. Harris Blvd. Charlotte NC 28227 Contact: Marion Hicks 704-537-0212 FAX: 704-537-7910 cacclt@aol.com 16641 Airport Rd. Maxton NC 28364 910-844-5775 Contact: Jenks Caldwell III FAX: 910-844-5705 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 25555 Charlotte NC 28229 Consolidated Aircraft Supply Co., Inc. 55 Raynor Ave. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 631-981-7700 Contact: Steve Matza (President) FAX: 631-981-7706 Toll Free: 800-422-6300 In California: Contact: Rich Noll 818-321-8510 consol1291@aol.com www.consolac.com FAA#GI1R167K

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CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 Northeast Aero Compressor Corp 60 Keyland Court Bohemia NY 11716 631-589-9070 Telex: RCA. TLX 271273 FAX: 631-567-2492 FAA Repair Station #: QNCR 580K www.neacorepair.com peterstauffer@neacorepair.com Contact: Peter Stauffer

PACIFIC PROPELLER INC. PO Box 1187, 5802 S. 228th Street Kent WA 98032 www.pacprop.com 253-872-7767 FAX: 253-872-6557 Contact: Al Hayward ahayward@pacprop.com FAA NQ3R719L / P3 BLADE MANFACTURER Repairtech Int’l, Inc. 16134 Saticoy Street Van Nuys CA 91406 Contact: Kevin Bennet 818-989-2681 FAX: 818-989-4358 www.repairtechinetranational.com

SOI Aviation 23965 Ventura Blvd. Calabasas CA 91302 soifg@aol.com 818-591-3166 FAX: 818-591-3144 www.soiaviation.com Contact: Linda Sandberg Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

ACTUATORS ACTUATORS AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com Aviation Brake Service/Avcenter 7274 NW 34th Street Miami FL 33122 305-594-4677 www.aviationbrake.com FAX: 305-477-5799 Contact: Andres Posse andres@aviationbrake.com Consolidated Aircraft Supply Co., Inc. 55 Raynor Ave. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 631-981-7700 Contact: Steve Matza (President) FAX: 631-981-7706 Toll Free: 800-422-6300 In California: Contact: Rich Noll 818-321-8510 consol1291@aol.com www.consolac.com FAA#GI1R167K WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE: TRANSPORTS CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT ANDEQUIPMENT & REFRIGERATION REFRIGERATION DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801

AIRFRAME & AIRFRAME PARTS AIRFRAME/AIRFRAME PARTS OVERHAUL OVERHAUL Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 www.aerokool.com

305-887-6912 FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255

Contact: Rick Weltmann rweltmann@aerokool.com

Air Spares Incorporated 609 No. Levee Rd Puyallup WA 98371 253-286-2525 SITA: SEASAXD FAX: 253-286-2526 www.airspares.com Contact: Dave Wakefield airspares@airspares.com

AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Aircraft Ducting Repair 101 Hunters Circle Forney TX 75126 972-552-9000 FAX: 972-552-4504 www.acdri.com repairs@acdri.com

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ALTERNATORS ALTERNATORS Consolidated Aircraft Supply Co., Inc. 55 Raynor Ave. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 631-981-7700 Contact: Steve Matza (President) FAX: 631-981-7706 Toll Free: 800-422-6300 In California: Contact: Rich Noll 818-321-8510 consol1291@aol.com www.consolac.com FAA#GI1R167K

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801

ANTENNAS/ANTENNA SYSTEMS AUXILIARY POWER UNITS & APUS OVERHAU AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Viastat Inc 6155 El Camino Road Carlsbad CA USA 92009-1602 www.viastat.com/focus 760-893-2777 mobile.broadband@viastat.com

AUXILIARY POWER UNITS & APUS OVERHAUL CHARLOTTE AIRCRAFT CORP. 7705 E. Harris Blvd. Charlotte NC 28227 Contact: Marion Hicks 704-537-0212 FAX: 704-537-7910 cacclt@aol.com 16641 Airport Rd. Maxton NC 28364 910-844-5775 Contact: Jenks Caldwell III FAX: 910-844-5705 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 25555 Charlotte NC 28229

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com HC Pacific 19844 Quiroz Court Walnut CA 91789 909-598-0509 Contact: Cynthia Tubal/Sylvia Sao FAX: 909-598-1411 www.hcpacific.com hcpac@ix.netcom.com Honeycomb Company Of America (HCOA) 1950 Limbus Ave Sarasota FL USA 34243 FAX: 1+ 941-755-426 +1 941-993-0049 www.hcoainc.com - wbryson@hcoainc.com IMP Aerospace Halifax Stanfield Intl Airport 557 Barnes Rd. Enfield, Nova Scotia Canada B2T 1K3 www.impaerospace.com 902-873-2250 FAX: 902-873-2290 Contact Carl Kumpic email: carl.kumpic@impaerospace.com International Precision, Inc. 9526 Vassar Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 FAX: 818-882-0319 818-882-3933

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ISO Group Inc. 7700 Technology Drive West Melbourne FL 32904 www.iso-group.com Garrett Schiefer 321-773-5710 FAX: 321-777-0499 aviationparts@isogroup.com

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Pemco World Air Services 4102 N. Westshore Blvd Tampa FL USA 33606 www.pemcoair.com 813-322-9631 FAX: 813-549-6039

QUALITY AVIATION INC. 15042 Whittram Ave. Fontana CA 92335 www.qaviation.com 909-829-3031 FAX: 909-350-3630 Contact: Ron Typer ron@qaviation.com R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com TIMCO Aviation Services 623 Radar Rd. Greensboro NC 27410 386-623-5008 www.timco.aero FAX: 336-665-9011

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801

AVIONICS & AVIONICS & AVIONICS OVERHAUL AVIONICSOVERHAUL ASB Avionics 1032 Sabovich Street Mojave CA 93501 www.asbavionics.com 661-824-1005 FAX: 661-824-1006 AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE: TRANSPORTS AOG REACTION, INC. 526 Aviator Drive Ft. Worth TX 76179 817-439-0700 FAA Repair Station TU1R519K FAX: 817-439-9700 www.aogreaction.com Contact: Robert Samson rsamson@aogreaction.com Austin Aerotech, Inc. 2005 Windy Terrace Cedar Park TX USA 78613-3507 Contact: Jeff Bruns 512-335-6000 FAX: 512-335-0541

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K Axnes Inc 15954 Jackson Creek Parkway Suite B609 Monument CO 80132 719-722-1770 www.axnes.com post@axnes.com

BECKER AVIONICS 10376 USA Today Way Miramar FL USA 33025 www.beckerusa.com 954-450-3137 FAX: 954-450-3206

CHARLOTTE AIRCRAFT CORP. 7705 E. Harris Blvd. Charlotte NC 28227 Contact: Marion Hicks 704-537-0212 FAX: 704-537-7910 cacclt@aol.com 16641 Airport Rd. Maxton NC 28364 910-844-5775 Contact: Jenks Caldwell III FAX: 910-844-5705 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 25555 Charlotte NC 28229

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com DAC International 6702 McNeil Drive Austin TX USA 78729 512-331-5323 Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 derco@dercoaerospace.com FAX: 414-355-6129 Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225

Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 www.canfieldelectronics.com FAX: 631-585-4200 info@canfieldelectronics.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Loos & Company Inc. Wire Rope Division 1 Cable Rd. Pomfret CT 06258 860-928-7981 www.loosco.com FAX: 860-928-6167 Toll Free: 800-533-5667 900 Industrial Blvd Naples FL 33942 239-321-5667 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

CARGO HANDLING CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT Air Spares Incorporated 609 No. Levee Rd Puyallup WA 98371 253-286-2525 SITA: SEASAXD FAX: 253-286-2526 www.airspares.com Contact: Dave Wakefield airspares@airspares.com Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com

Cargo Systems, Inc. 2120 Denton Dr., Suite 108 Austin TX 78758 Contact: Harold McElfish 512-837-1300 FAX: 512-837-5320 info@cargosystems.com www.cargosystems.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com L3 Communications - Platform Integration 7500 Maehr Road Waco TX USA 76705 254-867-7001 www.L-3com.com/is FAX: 254-867-7482 aeropens@alliancecoatings.com

CONNECTORS CONNECTORS Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com

BENCHMARK CONNECTOR CORP. 4501 N.W. 103rd Ave Sunrise FL 33351 Contact: Wayne Nelson 954-746-9929 Toll Free: 800-896-7153 FAX: 954-746-9448 www.benchmarkconnector.com info@benchmarkconnector.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200 InAir Aviation Services 8225 Country Club Place Indianapolis IN 46214 FAX: 317-271-0345 317-271-0195 www.inairaviation.com Repair Station #IOVRL072L Contact: Greg Mathias sales@inairaviation.com Innovative Solutions & Support 720 Pennsylvania Drive Exton PA 19341 FAX: 610-646-0146 610-646-9800 www.innovative-ss.com Contact: David Green Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

PACIFIC PROPELLER INC. PO Box 1187, 5802 S. 228th Street Kent WA 98032 www.pacprop.com 253-872-7767 FAX: 253-872-6557 Contact: Al Hayward ahayward@pacprop.com FAA CRS# NQ3R719L /P3 BLADE MANUFATURER

CABLE &CABLE WIRE& WIRE AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com

WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

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Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Symetrics Industries 1615 W. NASA Blvd Melbourne FL 32901 www.symetrics.com 321-254-1500 FAX: 321-308-0796 Contact: Randy Koller rkoller@symetrics.com

ENGINE & ENGINE ENGINE & ENGINE PARTS PARTS AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aero Turbine, Inc 6800 S. Lindbergh St. Stockton, CA 95206 FAX: 209-983-0544 209-983-1112 Contact: Dave Mattson Art Sloan Accessory 116 Bonanza Mine Road Sutherlin OR 97479-9767 541-459-4389 Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com Aviall 2750 Regent Blvd. Dallas TX 75261 972-586-1000 www.aviall.com Contact: Wayne Goodland wgoodland@aviall.com

CHARLOTTE AIRCRAFT CORP. Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Connector Distribution Corp. 2985 E.Harcourt St. Rancho Dominguez CA 90221 www.cdc-online.com 310-632-2466 Toll Free: 800-421-5840 FAX: 310-632-5413 ** Inventory Avialable on abdonline.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Miraj Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS COMPONENTS AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

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American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971

530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247

AOG REACTION, INC. 526 Aviator Drive Ft. Worth TX 76179 817-439-0700 FAA Repair Station TU1R519K FAX: 817-439-9700 www.aogreaction.com Contact: Robert Samson rsamson@aogreaction.com Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000 Austin Aerotech, Inc. 2005 Windy Terrace Cedar Park TX USA 78613-3507 Contact: Jeff Bruns 512-335-6000 FAX: 512-335-0541

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com

BENCHMARK CONNECTOR CORP. 4501 N.W. 103rd Ave Sunrise FL 33351 Contact: Wayne Nelson 954-746-9929 Toll Free: 800-896-7153 FAX: 954-746-9448 www.benchmarkconnector.com info@benchmarkconnector.com Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 www.canfieldelectronics.com FAX: 631-585-4200 info@canfieldelectronics.com

7705 E. Harris Blvd. Charlotte NC 28227 Contact: Marion Hicks 704-537-0212 FAX: 704-537-7910 cacclt@aol.com 16641 Airport Rd. Maxton NC 28364 910-844-5775 Contact: Jenks Caldwell III FAX: 910-844-5705 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 25555 Charlotte NC 28229 Defense Technology Equipment, Inc. 45681 Oakbrook Ct., Unit 107-111 Sterling VA 20166 FAX: 703-766-1701 703-766-1700 www.defense-tech.com sales@defense-tech.com Contact: Frank Benzaria

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Electro-Methods, Inc. 330 Governors Hwy. South Windsor CT 06074 Contact: Kathy Pelletier 860-289-8661 FAX: 860-289-1868 Overhaul & Repair Div. 519 Nutmeg Rd. South Windsor CT 06074 FAX: 860-528-0827 860-528-4722 www.electro-methods.com sales@electromethods.com Golden International 36720 Palmdale Road Rancho Mirage CA USA 92270 Howard Golden 760 568 1912 FAX: 760 324 7596 Herber Aircraft Service Inc. 1401 E. Franklin Ave. El Segundo CA 90245 Contact: Daryl Yeelitt 310-322-9575 Toll Free: 800-544-0050 FAX: 310-322-1875 www.herberaircraft.com sales@herberaircraft.com Higher Source Aviation 908 Upward Road Flat Rock NC 28731 828-698-7490 www.highersourceaviation.com FAX: 828-698-7492 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE: TRANSPORTS ISO Group Inc. 7700 Technology Drive West Melbourne FL 32904 www.iso-group.com Garrett Schiefer 321-773-5710 FAX: 321-777-0499 aviationparts@isogroup.com Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com Pacific Sky Supply, Inc. 8230 San Fernando Rd. Sun Valley CA 91352 FAX: 818-767-6278 818-768-3700 www.pacsky.com Contact: Emilio Perez glen@pacsky.com FAA Repair Station #QQPR566K WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

FASTENERS FASTENERS A & M Maintenance Services, Inc. 134 S.Claw Int’l Parkway, Suite 8 Bolingbrook IL 60490 630-759-8130 FAX: 630-759-0701 Av-Tech Industries P.O. Box 200366 Arlington TX 76006 817-640-4031 www.av-techind.com FAX: 817-649-1355 Shipping: 1180 Corporate Drive W. Arlington TX 76006

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Tim-Co Component Sales Division of Jim-Co Enterprises, Inc. 7001 Eton Ave. Canoga Park CA 91303 818-992-5040 Contact: Jim Clarizio or “JJ” FAX: 818-340-6159 Toll Free: 800-238-4626 www.tim-co.com sales@tim-co.com Transaero, Inc. 35 Melville Park Road, Suite 100 Melville NY 11747-3268 631-752-1240 Telex: 967734 FAX: 631-752-1242 SITA: ISPTXCR www.transaeroinc.com Contact: Lance Human human@transaeroinc.com

FLUIDSFLUIDS - HYDRAULIC - HYDRAULIC

FUEL PUMPS & COMPONENTS

FUEL PUMPS & COMPONENTS RADCO INDUSTRIES

700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968

FLUIDS - SPECIALTY

FLUIDS - SPECIALTY

RADCO INDUSTRIES

700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968

FUEL CELLS

FUEL CELLS

AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aircraft On Ground Inc. 310 Regal Row - Suite 500 Dallas TX 75247 Toll Free: 800-635-9535 214-350-5334 FAX: 214-358-3835 FAA Repair Station #DBER248K www.aoginc.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Floats & Fuel Cells(FFC) 4010 Pilot Drive, Ste: #103 Memphis TN 38118 www.ffcfuelcells.com 901-794-8431 Toll Free: 800-647-6148 FAX: 901-842-7135 FAA Repair Station #TH4R544M Contact: Kevin Brewer kbrewer@ffcfuelcells.com

13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040

GOVERNOR OVERHAUL GOVERNOR OVERHAUL DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

FIRE PROTECION EQUIPMENT & FIRE PROTECION EQUIPMENT OVERHAUL DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

FITTINGS

FITTINGS

AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Excel Aerospace Supply, Inc. 11855 Wicks St. Sun Valley CA 91352 818-767-6867 Telex: 371-7938 FAX: 818-504-2979 www.excelaero.com

FLUIDS - HEATTRANSFER TRANSFER FLUIDS - HEAT RADCO INDUSTRIES 700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968

WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

COMPLETE SUPPLY CHAIN

FOCUSED AIRCRAFT SUPPORT

OBSOLESCENCE MANAGEMENT

A world class supplier in fixed wing aircraft services and support, MHD-ROCKLAND works hard every day to make life easier for ageing commercial and military aircraft operators around the globe. Our continued success is because we stock and work closely with the original equipment manufacturers and other channel partners to find you the solution you deserve.

MHD-ROCKLAND, CANADA 205 Brunswick Blvd., Suite 100 Pointe-Claire, Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 Telephone: 514-453-1632 Fax: 514-425-5801 info@mhdrockland.com

Lockheed Martin C-130, P-3 and F-16 Authorized Distributor AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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HYDRAULIC PARTS & HYDRAULIC PARTS & COMPONENTS COMPONENTS AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801

GROUND POWER/GROUND GROUND POWER/GROUND SUPPORT SUPPORTEQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT Air Spares Incorporated 609 No. Levee Rd Puyallup WA 98371 253-286-2525 SITA: SEASAXD FAX: 253-286-2526 www.airspares.com Contact: Dave Wakefield airspares@airspares.com

AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247 Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com Avionics Specialist, Inc. 3833 Premier Ave. Memphis TN 38118 901-362-9700 FAX: 901-375-8310 Contact: Roger Dahler Repair Station #PK4R443M asinc@avionics-specialist.com www.avionics-specialist.com BESTEK Industries, Inc. 1343 SW 35th St. San Antonio TX 78237 FAX: 210-434-1074 210-434-1071

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com G-H Distributors Inc. 2793 Bristol Pike Bensalem PA USA 19020 ghdist.sh@verizon.net 215-245-0101 FAX: 215-245-4243 Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com Manson Company Inc. 7120 N. Skyway Drive Tucson AZ 85178 FAX: 520-297-4009 520-297-2200 www.c130towbars.com c130manson@aol.com

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Mercury GSE 15915 Piuma Ave Cerritos CA USA 90703 www.mercurygse.com 562 653 0654 FAX: 562 653 0665 Ralmark Company 83 East Luzerne Ave Larksville PA 18704 570-288-9331 Sargent Fletcher Inc. 2734 Hickory Grove Road Davenport IA 52804 563-383-6000

WIN-TECH, INC. 8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net

HOSE & HOSE FITTINGS

HOSE & HOSE FITTINGS AERO COMPONENT ENGINEERING CO. 28887 Industry Drive Valencia CA 91355 www.aerocomponent.com 818-841-9258 FAX: 818-841-2342 Contact: David Bill davidwbill@aerocomponent.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Herber Aircraft Service Inc. 1401 E. Franklin Ave. El Segundo CA 90245 Contact: Daryl Yeelitt 310-322-9575 Toll Free: 800-544-0050 FAX: 310-322-1875 www.herberaircraft.com sales@herberaircraft.com Kitco Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Ron McClean www.kitcodefense.com Parker Hannifin Corp Stratoflex Products Div 220 Roberts Cut-Off Rd Fort Worth TX 76114 www.parker.com/stratoflex 817-738-6543 FAX: 817-738-9920 Contact: Cheryl Simms csimms@parker.com Specialty Hose Grp. 7800 Freedom Ave. NW N. Canton OH USA 44720 Contact: Skip Jenks Toll Free: 800-362-6533 www.specialtyhose.com FAX: 330-497-0415

HYDRAULIC HIGH HYDRAULICFLUIDS FLUIDS --HIGH PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE RADCO INDUSTRIES 700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968

999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com Consolidated Aircraft Supply Co., Inc. 55 Raynor Ave. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 631-981-7700 Contact: Steve Matza (President) FAX: 631-981-7706 Toll Free: 800-422-6300 In California: Contact: Rich Noll 818-321-8510 consol1291@aol.com www.consolac.com FAA#GI1R167K

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Kitco Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Ron McClean www.kitcodefense.com

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 Miraj Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Technolube Products 8015 Paramount Blvd Pico Rivera CA 90660 FAX: 562-776-4004 562-776-4039

IGNITION SYSTEMS IGNITION SYSTEMS Air Parts & Supply Co. 12840 SW 84th Ave. Rd. Miami FL 33156 Contact: Sheri Murray 305-235-5401 FAX: 305-235-8185 sales@apscomiami.com www.apscomiami.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE: TRANSPORTS

INFORMATION SERVICES INFORMATION SERVICES ABDONLINE.COM 116 Radio Circle Dr. Ste 302 Mount Kisco NY 10549 www.abdonline.com 914-242-8700 FAX: 914-242-5422

INVENTORY LOCATOR SERVICE, LLC 8001 Centerview Pkwy - STE: 400 Memphis TN USA 38018 901-794-5000 www.lismart.com FAX: 901-794-1760 NSN-NOW.COM 8200 Republic Airport;Hangar 43, Suite 6 Farmingdale NY 11735 631-847-3504 www.nsn-now.com FAX: 631-847-0264 Pentagon 2000 Software, Inc. 15 West 34th Street New York NY 10001 www.pentagon2000.com 212-629-7521 FAX: 212-629-7513 SOS: Sales Opportunity Services Pentagon 2000 Software 1540 E. Pleasant Valley Blvd Altoona PA 16602 814-949-3327

INSTRUMENTS INSTRUMENT INSTRUMENTS &&INSTRUMENT OVERHAUL OVERHAUL Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000 Austin Aerotech, Inc. 2005 Windy Terrace Cedar Park TX USA 78613-3507 Contact: Jeff Bruns 512-335-6000 FAX: 512-335-0541

WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com DAC International 6702 McNeil Drive Austin TX USA 78729 512-331-5323

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200 Fieldtech Avionics & Instruments Inc. 4151 North Main St. Meachan Field Ft. Worth TX 76106 817-625-2719 www.ftav.com FAX: 817-625-6875 4815 N.W. 79th Ave. Suite 10 Miami FL 33166 FAX: 305-593-0694 305-593-9913 Higher Source Aviation 908 Upward Road Flat Rock NC 28731 828-698-7490 www.highersourceaviation.com FAX: 828-698-7492 InAir Aviation Services 8225 Country Club Place Indianapolis IN 46214 FAX: 317-271-0345 317-271-0195 www.inairaviation.com Repair Station #IOVRL072L Contact: Greg Mathias sales@inairaviation.com Innovative Solutions & Support 720 Pennsylvania Drive Exton PA 19341 FAX: 610-646-0146 610-646-9800 www.innovative-ss.com Contact: David Green

Intercontinental Avionics & Instrument Corp 22 Canfield Road Tyler Hill PA 18469 570-224-6960 FAX: 570-224-6834 Contact: Bob Solimine iaiparts@ptd.net Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith The Strube Company 629 W Market St., P.O. Box 99 Marietta PA 17547 www.strubeinc.net 717-426-1906 FAX: 717-426-1909

INTERIORS & INTERIORS INTERIORS & INTERIORS OVERHAUL OVERHAUL AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com L3 Communications - Platform Integration 7500 Maehr Road Waco TX USA 76705 254-867-7001 www.L-3com.com/is FAX: 254-867-7482

AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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LANDING GEAR PARTS/ ACCESSORIES LANDING GEAR OVERHAUL & OVERHAUL AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com Defense Technology Equipment, Inc. 45681 Oakbrook Ct., Unit 107-111 Sterling VA 20166 FAX: 703-766-1701 703-766-1700 www.defense-tech.com sales@defense-tech.com Contact: Frank Benzaria

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Hawker Pacific Aerospace 11240 Sherman Way Sun Valley CA 91352 Toll Free: 800-443-8302 818-765-6201 carlo.ventittelli@hawker.com FAX: 818-765-2065 www.hawker.com Contact: Brad Curtis Heroux Devtek Inc. 755 Thurber Ave. Longueul, QC Canada J4H3N2 FAX: 450-679-4554 450-679-5454 Contact: Jean Gravel www.herouxdevtek.com jgravel@herouxdevtek.com

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 sales@s3international.com FAX: 414-351-1543 WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

WIN-TECH, INC. 8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net

LIGHTING

LIGHTING

Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Consolidated Aircraft Supply Co., Inc. 55 Raynor Ave. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 631-981-7700 Contact: Steve Matza (President) FAX: 631-981-7706 Toll Free: 800-422-6300 In California: Contact: Rich Noll 818-321-8510 consol1291@aol.com www.consolac.com FAA#GI1R167K

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com

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DIMO CORP.

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC.

46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Specialty Bulb Co. Inc. PO Box 231 Bohemia NY USA 11716 631-589-33089 www.bulbspecialists.com FAX: 631-589-3393 Toll Free: 1-800-331-2852 Contact: Edie Muldoon info@bulbspecialists.com

445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com IMP Aerospace Halifax Stanfield Intl Airport 557 Barnes Rd. Enfield, Nova Scotia Canada B2T 1K3 www.impaerospace.com 902-873-2250 FAX: 902-873-2290 Contact Carl Kumpic email: carl.kumpic@impaerospace.com L3 Communications - Platform Integration 7500 Maehr Road Waco TX USA 76705 254-867-7001 www.L-3com.com/is FAX: 254-867-7482 REBTECH 1500 Brown Trail Bedford TX USA 76022 www.rebtechnvg.com FAX: 817-285-7742 Toll Free: 877-426-4158 TIMCO Aviation Services 623 Radar Rd. Greensboro NC 27410 386-623-5008 www.timco.aero FAX: 336-665-9011

LUBRICANTS LUBRICANTS RADCO INDUSTRIES 700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968 Technolube Products 8015 Paramount Blvd Pico Rivera CA 90660 FAX: 562-776-4004 562-776-4039

METAL FABRICATION

METAL FABRICATION & & ASSEMBLY AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Dynamic Fabrication Inc. 2615 S. Hickory St. Santa Ana CA 92707 FAX: 714-662-1052 714-662-2440 Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Honeycomb Company Of America (HCOA) 1950 Limbus Ave Sarasota FL USA 34243 FAX: 1+ 941-755-426 +1 941-993-0049 www.hcoainc.com - wbryson@hcoainc.com International Precision, Inc. 9526 Vassar Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 FAX: 818-882-0319 818-882-3933 L3 Communications - Platform Integration 7500 Maehr Road Waco TX USA 76705 254-867-7001 www.L-3com.com/is FAX: 254-867-7482

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 *Repairtech Int’l, Inc. 16134 Saticoy Street Van Nuys CA 91406 Contact: Kevin Bennet 818-989-2681 FAX: 818-989-4358 repairtech@repairtechinternational.com www.repairtechinetranational.com

WIN-TECH, INC. 8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net

MODIFICATIONS MODIFICATIONS Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com

MOUNTS

MOUNTS

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801

NAV/COM SYSTEMS NAV/COM SYSTEMS Axnes Inc 15954 Jackson Creek Parkway Suite B609 Monument CO 80132 719-722-1770 www.axnes.com post@axnes.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Fieldtech Avionics & Instruments Inc. 4151 North Main St. Meachan Field Ft. Worth TX 76106 817-625-2719 www.ftav.com FAX: 817-625-6875 4815 N.W. 79th Ave. Suite 10 Miami FL 33166 FAX: 305-593-0694 305-593-9913 Herley Industries, Inc. 3061 Industry Drive Lancaster PA USA 17601 www.herley.com 717-397-2777 FAX: 717-397-7079 InAir Aviation Services 8225 Country Club Place Indianapolis IN 46214 FAX: 317-271-0345 317-271-0195 www.inairaviation.com Repair Station #IOVRL072L Contact: Greg Mathias sales@inairaviation.com Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com Sensor Systems Inc. 8929 Fullbright Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 www.sensorantennas.com 818-341-5366 FAX: 818-341-9059 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE: TRANSPORTS Viastat Inc 6155 El Camino Road Carlsbad CA USA 92009-1602 www.viastat.com/focus 760-893-2777 mobile.broadband@viastat.com

OXYGEN EQUIPMENT & OXYGEN

OXYGEN EQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT OVERHAUL

Cobham Life Support 10 Cobham Drive Orchard Park NY 14127 Contact: John Barone 716-667-6269 FAX: 716-667-0747

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Zodiac Aerospace - AVOX Systems 225 Erie Street Lancaster NY USA 14086 FAX: 716-681-1089 716-686-1551

PAINTSPAINTS & LACQUERS & LACQUERS Alliance Coatings, Inc. 1662 N. Magnolia, Suite G El Cajon CA 92020 www.alliancecoatings.com 619-596-9191 Toll Free: 800-596-9191 FAX: 619-596-9190 aeropens@alliancecoatings.com Deft, Inc. 17451 Von Karman Ave. Irvine CA 92614 Contact: Tracy Garrett Jr. 949-474-0400 Toll Free: 1-800-544-3338 FAX: 949-474-7269 www.deftfinishes.com

WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com PPG Aerospace 12780 San Fernando Rd. Sylmar CA USA 91342 818-741-1687

PLASTIC FABRICATION PLASTIC FABRICATION AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com

PNEUMATIC PARTS & COMPONENTS & PNEUMATIC OVERHAUL OVERHAUL AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255 Contact: Rick Weltmann rweltmann@aerokool.com

Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Repairtech Int’l, Inc. 16134 Saticoy Street Van Nuys CA 91406 Contact: Kevin Bennet 818-989-2681 FAX: 818-989-4358 repairtech@repairtechinternational.com www.repairtechinetranational.com Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

PROPELLERS PARTS & & PROPELLERS/PARTS PROPELLERS/PARTS OVERHAUL PROPELLERS PARTS AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com

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DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Heatcon Composite Systems 600 Andover Park E. Seattle WA 98188 206-575-1333 www.heatcon.com FAX: 206-575-0856 Higher Source Aviation 908 Upward Road Flat Rock NC 28731 828-698-7490 www.highersourceaviation.com FAX: 828-698-7492

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 Miraj Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040

PACIFIC PROPELLER INC. PO Box 1187, 5802 S. 228th Street Kent WA 98032 www.pacprop.com 253-872-7767 FAX: 253-872-6557 FAA CRS# NQ3R719L /P3 BLADE MANUFACTURER Contact: Al Hayward ahayward@pacprop.com FAA CRS# NQ3R719L /P3 BLADE MANUFACTURER Pacific Sky Supply, Inc. 8230 San Fernando Rd. Sun Valley CA 91352 FAX: 818-767-6278 818-768-3700 www.pacsky.com Contact: Emilio Perez glen@pacsky.com FAA Repair Station #QQPR566K

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R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com Segers Aero Corporation 8100 McGowin Drive Fairhope AL USA 36532 sales@segers.aero - www.segers.aero 251-928-1878 FAX: 251-210-1460

RADOMESRADOMES Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com

RATE GYROSCOPES RATE GYROSCOPES Condor Pacific Ind. of California, Inc. 905 Rancho Conejo Blvd Newbury Park CA 91320 www.condorpacific.com 818-889-2150 FAX: 818-889-2160 Contact: Cher Gibson cher.gibson@condorpacific.com

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801

ROTOR BLADE OVERHAUL DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net L3 Communications - Platform Integration 7500 Maehr Road Waco TX USA 76705 254-867-7001 www.L-3com.com/is FAX: 254-867-7482

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

SEALS DIMO CORP.

46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Miraj Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com

WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE: TRANSPORTS

SIMULATORS: FLIGHT & COMPONENTS

SIMULATORS: FLIGHT & COMPONENTS

AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com CAE USA 4908 Tampa West Blvd Tampa FL 33634 FAX: 813-887-1439 813-885-7481 www.cae.com milsim@cae.com Contact: Chris Stellwag

WHEN BUILT WITH PRIDE

SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT & SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT & SURVIVAL SWITCHES EQUIPMENT OVERHAUL Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com Dakota Electronics PO Box 2238 Georgetown TX USA 78627 www.crimptools.com 512-930-9371 FAX: 512-869-4853 H S Electronics, Inc. P.O. Box 126010, 1665 W. 33rd Place Hialeah FL 33012 305-821-5802 FAX: 800-823-6691 Contact: Larry Campbell/Paola-Cara www.hselectronics.com hselectronics@aol.com Leach International, Inc. 6900 Orangethorpe Ave. PO Box 5032 Buena Park CA 90622 714-736-7599 Contact: David Abend FAX: 714-670-1145 www.leachintl.com info@leachintl.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 Triman Industries 1042 Industrial Drive West Berlin NJ 08091 www.trimanindustries.com 856-767-7945 Contact: Donna Virunurm donna@trimanindustried.net

TEST EQUIPMENT TEST EQUIPMENT AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

Specializing in the repair/overhaul of the C-130 Hercules propeller assembly since 1968. • Propeller Assemblies • Blades • Controls • Pump Housings • Valve Housings • Spinners

Recognized as a small business by the U.S. Government, C&S Propeller is sized right to provide personalized service to its growing customer base. Services include: • Tailored Capabilities Designed to Meet our Customer's Needs • Expedited Delivery • Direct Communication • Field Service & Repair

C&S Propeller LLC. 8717 Forum Way - Ste: 121, Ft. Worth, TX 76140 • Ph: 817-708-2125 • Fax: 817-862-9762 Buddy Tobin - General Manager - btobin@c130propeller.com Avionics Specialist, Inc. 3833 Premier Ave. Memphis TN 38118 901-362-9700 FAX: 901-375-8310 Contact: Roger Dahler Repair Station #PK4R443M asinc@avionics-specialist.com www.avionics-specialist.com 3833 Premier Ave. Memphis TN 38118 901-362-9700 FAX: 901-375-8310 Contact: Roger Dahler Repair Station #PK4R443M asinc@avionics-specialist.com www.avionics-specialist.com Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com CK Technologies, Inc. 3629 Vista Mercado Camarillo CA 93012 www.ckt.com 805-987-4801 FAX: 805-987-4811 Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com

Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 SpaceAge Control Inc. 38850 20th St. East Palmdale CA 93550 www.spaceagecontrol.com 661-273-3000 FAX: 661-273-4240 Tactical Flight Services 1800 Airport Rd, Hgr. II Kennesaw GA 30144 FAX: 770-794-3222 678-438-7271 www.tfs2.com

TOOLS

TOOLS

AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Dakota Electronics PO Box 2238 Georgetown TX USA 78627 www.crimptools.com 512-930-9371 FAX: 512-869-4853 AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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DIMO CORP.

DIMO CORP.

46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Nor-Ral, Inc. 164 Hickory Springs Industrial Dr. Canton GA 30115 FAX: 770-720-0527 770-720-0526

USATCO/U.S. AIR TOOL 60 Fleetwood Court Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Toll Free: 800-645-8180 631-471-3300 FAX: 631-471-3308 1218 W. Mahalo Place Rancho Dominguez CA 90220-5446 310-632-5400 FAX: 310-632-3900

WIN-TECH, INC. 8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net

VALVES

VALVES

Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255 Contact: Rick Weltmann rweltmann@aerokool.com

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com

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46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

WHEELS/BRAKES & WHEELS/BRAKES WHEELS/BRAKES & OVERHAUL

WHEELS/BRAKES OVERHAU

Aventure Int’l Aviation Services 108 International Drive Peachtree City GA 30269 www.aventureaviation.com 770-632-7930 FAX: 770-632-7931 Contact: Ron Taylo sales@aventureaviation.com Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith

WINDOWS & WINDSHIELDS

WINDOWS & WINDSHIELDS AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com

MHD-ROCKLAND 205 Brunswick Blvd, Suite 100 Pointe-Claire Quebec Canada H9R 1A5 514-453-1632 Contact: Bryan Dollimore FAX: 514-425-5801 PPG Aerospace 12780 San Fernando Rd. Sylmar CA USA 91342 818-741-1687 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE:

FIGHTERS Firms that specialize in parts for Fighters Distribution / Manufacturing / Repairs

Image courtesy U.S. Air Force. Photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel.


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ACCESSORIES&&ACCESSORY ACCESSORY ACCESSORIES OVERHAUL OVERHAUL - MILITARY FIGHTERS Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255 Contact: Rick Weltmann rweltmann@aerokool.com

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC.

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC.

201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704 Air Parts & Supply Co. 12840 SW 84th Ave. Rd. Miami FL 33156 Contact: Sheri Murray 305-235-5401 FAX: 305-235-8185 sales@apscomiami.com www.apscomiami.com

445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith SOI Aviation 23965 Ventura Blvd. Calabasas CA 91302 soifg@aol.com 818-591-3166 FAX: 818-591-3144 www.soiaviation.com Contact: Linda Sandberg Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com

A Box Wing Transport? Lockheed Martin's advanced-vehicleconcept aircraft seems inspired as much by modernist sculpture as by conventional aerodynamics. The graceful craft has wings that rake backward, their ends nearly reaching the tail assembly. From there, they go vertical, reaching well above the fuselage, and then reach to the rear again, where they join the tail vertical stabilizer near its top. This configuration is called a closed wing—in Lockheed Martin's version, a box wing. Lockheed Martin's concept was created for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project. This program explores the feasibility, benefits, and technical risk of various vehicles and technologies to reduce aviation's impact on the environment. The design provides two main efficiency elements: Much of the drag from a conventional wing arises from tip vortices; the box wing has no tips, so the design reduces drag, thereby decreasing fuel consumption. Its proposed use of two rear-mounted Rolls-Royce Liberty Works Ultra Fan Engines further reduces drag and fuel consumption. The beautifully trim wing shape looks fragile. Looks are deceptive, however. Advanced lightweight composite (nonmetallic) construction provides high strength with light weight. The materials are rugged enough that one of the chief uses envisioned by Lockheed Martin is in military transport. It is estimated that a full-sized model could carry 100,000 pounds of payloads for 6,500 nautical miles with substantial savings in costs, noise, and emissions. Sources: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, www.aiaa.org; NASA, www.nasa.gov; Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org.

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ACTUATORS ACTUATORS Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704 Aviation Brake Service/Avcenter 7274 NW 34th Street Miami FL 33122 305-594-4677 www.aviationbrake.com FAX: 305-477-5799 Contact: Andres Posse andres@aviationbrake.com

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Kearfott Guidance and Navigation Corp Astronautics Corporation of America 2858 US Highway 70W Black Mountain NC USA 28711-9111 828-350-5300 FAX: 828-686-5764 Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com Triman Industries 1042 Industrial Drive West Berlin NJ 08091 www.trimanindustries.com 856-767-7945 Contact: Donna Virunurm donna@trimanindustried.net

AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT & AIR CONDITIONING REFRIGERATION REFRIGERATION AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

AIRFRAME & AIRFRAME PARTS

OVERHAUL OVERHAUL

Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255 Contact: Rick Weltmann rweltmann@aerokool.com

AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Aircraft Ducting Repair 101 Hunters Circle Forney TX 75126 972-552-9000 FAX: 972-552-4504 www.acdri.com repairs@acdri.com

CHARLOTTE AIRCRAFT CORP. 7705 E. Harris Blvd. Charlotte NC 28227 Contact: Marion Hicks 704-537-0212 FAX: 704-537-7910 cacclt@aol.com 16641 Airport Rd. Maxton NC 28364 910-844-5775 Contact: Jenks Caldwell III FAX: 910-844-5705 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 25555 Charlotte NC 28229 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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Defense Technology Equipment, Inc. 45681 Oakbrook Ct., Unit 107-111 Sterling VA 20166 FAX: 703-766-1701 703-766-1700 www.defense-tech.com sales@defense-tech.com Contact: Frank Benzaria

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Eclipse Aeronautical 2503 E. Riverside Spokane WA 99202 509-536-5000 FAX: 509-535-5555 Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Floats & Fuel Cells(FFC) 4010 Pilot Drive, Ste: #103 Memphis TN 38118 www.ffcfuelcells.com 901-794-8431 Toll Free: 800-647-6148 FAX: 901-842-7135 FAA Repair Station #TH4R544M Contact: Kevin Brewer kbrewer@ffcfuelcells.com

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com HC Pacific 19844 Quiroz Court Walnut CA 91789 909-598-0509 Contact: Cynthia Tubal/Sylvia Sao FAX: 909-598-1411 www.hcpacific.com hcpac@ix.netcom.com Honeycomb Company Of America (HCOA) 1950 Limbus Ave Sarasota FL USA 34243 FAX: 1+ 941-755-426 +1 941-993-0049 www.hcoainc.com - wbryson@hcoainc.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com

ANTENNAS/ANTENNA ANTENNAS/ANTENNA SYSTEMS SYSTEMS AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Fieldtech Avionics & Instruments Inc. 4151 North Main St. Meachan Field Ft. Worth TX 76106 817-625-2719 www.ftav.com FAX: 817-625-6875 4815 N.W. 79th Ave. Suite 10 Miami FL 33166 FAX: 305-593-0694 305-593-9913 Herley Industries, Inc. 3061 Industry Drive Lancaster PA USA 17601 www.herley.com 717-397-2777 FAX: 717-397-7079 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

AUXILIARY POWER UNITS & APUS AUXILIARY POWER UNITS & OVERHAUL APUS OVERHAUL AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 www.alturdyne.com Contact: Frank Verbeke BC Systems 200 Belle Meade Rd. Setauket NY 11733 FAX: 631-864-3700 631-864-3700 Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith

AVIONICS AVIONICS AVIONICS & & AVIONICS OVERHAUL OVERHAUL AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704 AHR Avionics Inc. 567 Sandall Rd. San Antonio TX 78216 210-377-3195 ahraviation@att.net FAX: 210-377-1605

AOG REACTION, INC. 526 Aviator Drive Ft. Worth TX 76179 817-439-0700 FAA Repair Station TU1R519K FAX: 817-439-9700 www.aogreaction.com Contact: Robert Samson rsamson@aogreaction.com Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K

BECKER AVIONICS 10376 USA Today Way Miramar FL USA 33025 www.beckerusa.com 954-450-3137 FAX: 954-450-3206

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200 Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Innovative Solutions & Support 720 Pennsylvania Drive Exton PA 19341 FAX: 610-646-0146 610-646-9800 www.innovative-ss.com Contact: David Green Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 SOI Aviation 23965 Ventura Blvd. Calabasas CA 91302 soifg@aol.com 818-591-3166 FAX: 818-591-3144 www.soiaviation.com Contact: Linda Sandberg

BATTERIES/BATTERY BATTERIES/BATTERY CHARGERS & CHARGERS & OVERHAUL OVERHAUL Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Concorde Battery Corporation 2009 San Bernardino Rd. West Covina CA 91790 FAX: 626-813-1235 626-813-1234 www.concordebattery.com Contact: Skip Koss

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net ENERSYS-HAWKER BATTERIES 2366 Bernville Road Reading PA 19605 610-208-1831 FAX: 610-208-1630 www.enersys.com/defense Contact: Frank Metzger frank.metzger@enersys.com

BEARINGS

BEARINGS

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

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Dixie Aerospace Suite 100, 560 Atlanta S. Pkwy. Atlanta GA 30349 Telex: 542141 SITA: ATLDBXD 404-348-8100 Toll Free: 800-241-8471 FAX: 404-763-2577 www.dixieaerospace.com sales@dixieaerospace.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Miraj Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com

CABLE & WIRE

CABLE & WIRE

Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com Dielectric Sciences 88-A Turnpike Rd Chelmford MA 01824 978-250-1507 FAX: 978-250-1699

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 Wire Rope Corporation Of America 609 N. 2nd Street St. Joseph MO USA 64501 FAX: 816-236-5180 816-236-5180

CARGO HANDLING CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com

CHEMICALS CHEMICALS B & B Tritech, Inc. P.O. Box 660776 Miami FL 33266 C & H Chemical 222 Starkey St. St. Paul MN 55107

305-888-5247 FAX: 305-887-4587 651-227-4343 FAX: 651-227-2485

Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com

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PPG Aerospace 12780 San Fernando Rd. Sylmar CA USA 91342 818-741-1687

CONNECTORS

CONNECTORS

Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com

BENCHMARK CONNECTOR CORP. 4501 N.W. 103rd Ave Sunrise FL 33351 Contact: Wayne Nelson 954-746-9929 Toll Free: 800-896-7153 FAX: 954-746-9448 www.benchmarkconnector.com info@benchmarkconnector.com Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Connector Distribution Corp. 2985 E.Harcourt St. Rancho Dominguez CA 90221 www.cdc-online.com 310-632-2466 Toll Free: 800-421-5840 FAX: 310-632-5413 ** Inventory Avialable on abdonline.com Electronic Expediters, Inc. 3700 Via Pescador Camarillo CA USA 93012 Contact: Ira Berns 805-987-7171 FAX: 805-987-3344 www.expediters.com sales@expediters.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Miraj Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

CONSULTANTS

CONSULTANTS

ELECTRICAL ELECTRICAL&&ELECTRONIC ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS COMPONENTS AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704 American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247

AOG REACTION, INC. 526 Aviator Drive Ft. Worth TX 76179 817-439-0700 FAA Repair Station TU1R519K FAX: 817-439-9700 www.aogreaction.com Contact: Robert Samson rsamson@aogreaction.com Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com

DIMO CORP. DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

CORROSION CONTROL CORROSION CONTROL Alliance Coatings, Inc. 1662 N. Magnolia, Suite G El Cajon CA 92020 www.alliancecoatings.com 619-596-9191 Toll Free: 800-596-9191 FAX: 619-596-9190 aeropens@alliancecoatings.com

DIALS, OVERLAYS, DIALS, OVERLAYS, PANELS PANELS DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com

46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200 Electronic Expediters, Inc. 3700 Via Pescador Camarillo CA USA 93012 Contact: Ira Berns 805-987-7171 FAX: 805-987-3344 www.expediters.com sales@expediters.com EMTEQ Family of Companies 5349 S Emmer Drive New Berlin WI 53151 Toll Free: 888-679-6170 262-679-6170 FAX: 262-679-6175 www.emteq.com sales@emteq.com Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Herley Industries, Inc. 3061 Industry Drive Lancaster PA USA 17601 www.herley.com 717-397-2777 FAX: 717-397-7079 Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE: FIGHTERS

Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 SpaceAge Control Inc. 38850 20th St. East Palmdale CA 93550 www.spaceagecontrol.com 661-273-3000 FAX: 661-273-4240 Symetrics Industries 1615 W. NASA Blvd Melbourne FL 32901 www.symetrics.com 321-254-1500 FAX: 321-308-0796 Contact: Randy Koller rkoller@symetrics.com

ENGINE & ENGINE ENGINE & ENGINE PARTS PARTS AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aero Turbine, Inc 6800 S. Lindbergh St. Stockton, CA 95206 FAX: 209-983-0544 209-983-1112 Contact: Dave Mattson American Jet Engine Co., Inc. 37 West 39th St. New York NY 10018 212-398-0400 FAX: 212-398-0190 Art Sloan Accessory 116 Bonanza Mine Road Sutherlin OR 97479-9767 541-459-4389 Aviall 2750 Regent Blvd. Dallas TX 75261 972-586-1000 www.aviall.com Contact: Keith Schlimper keith.schlimper@aviall.com

CHARLOTTE AIRCRAFT CORP. 7705 E. Harris Blvd. Charlotte NC 28227 Contact: Marion Hicks 704-537-0212 FAX: 704-537-7910 cacclt@aol.com 16641 Airport Rd. Maxton NC 28364 910-844-5775 Contact: Jenks Caldwell III FAX: 910-844-5705 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 25555 Charlotte NC 28229 Defense Technology Equipment, Inc. 45681 Oakbrook Ct., Unit 107-111 Sterling VA 20166 FAX: 703-766-1701 703-766-1700 www.defense-tech.com sales@defense-tech.com Contact: Frank Benzaria

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Herber Aircraft Service Inc. 1401 E. Franklin Ave. El Segundo CA 90245 Contact: Daryl Yeelitt 310-322-9575 Toll Free: 800-544-0050 FAX: 310-322-1875 www.herberaircraft.com sales@herberaircraft.com ISO Group Inc. 7700 Technology Drive West Melbourne FL 32904 www.iso-group.com Garrett Schiefer 321-773-5710 FAX: 321-777-0499 aviationparts@isogroup.com Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com Pratt & Whitney 400 Main Street East Hartford CT 06108 www.pw.utc.com 860-565-9654 FAX: 860-353-0447 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com SIMTECH 66 A Floydville Road East Granby CT USA 06026 www.simtech.com 860-653-2408 FAX: 860-653-3857 Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

ENGINEENGINE SERVICES SERVICES Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 www.alturdyne.com Contact: Frank Verbeke Aero Turbine, Inc 6800 S. Lindbergh St. Stockton, CA 95206 FAX: 209-983-0544 209-983-1112 Contact: Dave Mattson OGMA - Industria Aeronautica De Portugal SA Alverca do Ribatejo Alverca P-2615 Portugal FAX: 351-21-9573056 351-21-957-9055 Pratt & Whitney 400 Main Street East Hartford CT 06108 www.pw.utc.com 860-565-9654 FAX: 860-353-0447 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith Wood Group TurboPower, Inc. 14820 NW 60TH Ave. Miami Lakes FL 33014 Toll Free: 800-403-6737 305-423-2300 FAX: 305-820-0404 TWX:810-848-8575 Repair Station #NE4R385M 2828 Donald Douglas Loop N. Santa Monica CA 90405 FAX: 310-392-6644 310-392-8090

FASTENERS

FASTENERS

Airspares International 504 East Meadow Avenue East Meadow NY 11554 info@airspares.net 516-334-0900 FAX: 516-334-4109 Avibank Mfg., Inc. 11500 Sherman Way North Hollywood CA 91609-1909 FAX: 818-255-2094 818-392-2152

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Excel Aerospace Supply, Inc. 11855 Wicks St. Sun Valley CA 91352 818-767-6867 Telex: 371-7938 FAX: 818-504-2979 www.excelaero.com HC Pacific 19844 Quiroz Court Walnut CA 91789 909-598-0509 Contact: Cynthia Tubal/Sylvia Sao FAX: 909-598-1411 www.hcpacific.com hcpac@ix.netcom.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Nylok Aerospace 313 Euclid Way Anaheim CA 92801 714-635-3993 FAX: 714-635-9553

Standard Aero Parts 5100 Maureen Lane Moorpark CA USA 93021 standardaero@earthlink.net 805-531-5410 FAX: 805-531-5419

FITTINGS

FITTINGS

AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Excel Aerospace Supply, Inc. 11855 Wicks St. Sun Valley CA 91352 818-767-6867 Telex: 371-7938 FAX: 818-504-2979 www.excelaero.com

FLUIDS - HEAT TRANSFER

FLUIDS - HEAT TRANSFER RADCO INDUSTRIES 700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968

- HYDRAULIC FLUIDSFLUIDS - HYDRAULIC RADCO INDUSTRIES 700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968

- SPECIALTY FLUIDSFLUIDS - SPECIALTY RADCO INDUSTRIES 700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968

FUEL CELLS FUEL CELLS AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aircraft On Ground Inc. 310 Regal Row - Suite 500 Dallas TX 75247 Toll Free: 800-635-9535 214-350-5334 FAX: 214-358-3835 FAA Repair Station #DBER248K www.aoginc.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Floats & Fuel Cells(FFC) 4010 Pilot Drive, Ste: #103 Memphis TN 38118 www.ffcfuelcells.com 901-794-8431 Toll Free: 800-647-6148 FAX: 901-842-7135 FAA Repair Station #TH4R544M Contact: Kevin Brewer kbrewer@ffcfuelcells.com

FUEL REPAIRS CELLS REPAIRS FUEL CELL Aircraft On Ground Inc. 310 Regal Row - Suite 500 Dallas TX 75247 Toll Free: 800-635-9535 214-350-5334 FAX: 214-358-3835 FAA Repair Station #DBER248K www.aoginc.com AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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FUEL TANK REPAIRS FUEL TANK REPAIR Aircraft On Ground Inc. 310 Regal Row - Suite 500 Dallas TX 75247 Toll Free: 800-635-9535 214-350-5334 FAX: 214-358-3835 FAA Repair Station #DBER248K www.aoginc.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Performance Aircraft Services PO Box 612168 DFW Airport TX 75261 972-574-4250 www.performanceacs.com FAX: 972-574-4248 Sargent Fletcher Inc. 2734 Hickory Grove Road Davenport IA 52804 563-383-6000

FUEL PUMPS & FUEL PUMPS &COMPONENTS COMPONENTS AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901

Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040

GASKETS O RINGS GASKETS & O &RINGS Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Conair Aviation Associates 138 E. Rio Grande Ave. Wildwood NJ 08260 FAX: 609-729-4616 609-729-2624 Cummins NPower LLC 7145 Santa Fe Dr. La Grange IL 60525 815-734-4917 FAX: 815-734-7565

Northern Carrier The grand introduction of Canadair's CL44 was classic. It could not be rolled out of its construction hangar, because the tail assembly was too tall to clear the door. This embarrassment was compounded by many early problems in the construction of both the civilian CL-44 and the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) CC-106 Yukon version. On one occasion, the engines became so loose that they threatened to fall off. Rolls-Royce also had difficulties delivering the four Tyne 515/50 turboprops, designed to deliver a total of 17,080 kilowatts of power to drive four propellers. The early military models sat silently outside awaiting engines. But once the initial problems were overcome, the aircraft performed well for the RCAF. When it first flew in 1959, its fuselage was of a standard design, a cigar-shape with two wide cargo doors on the port side, providing a useful cargo capacity of about 66,000 pounds. Performance was impressive for its period. In 1961, a Yukon set a world record, flying 6,750 miles from Tokyo to a base in Ontario at an average speed of 400 mph. A second record was achieved by staying airborne for 23 hours and 51 minutes. Canadair made a modified version: the CL-44D4 was the first large aircraft with a hinged tail section. The rear portion of the fuselage could be swung to starboard for easy access. When loading, the plane resembled a giant beer stein lying on its side. The U.S. Air Force considered this model, but the deal fell through. Although a considerable success, only thirty-nine CL-44s of any type were constructed. The RCAF retired its Yukons in 1971. Sources: Aviastar, www.aviastar.org; Canadair CL-44 Archives and Preservation Trust, www.cl44.com; Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org.

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DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Excel Aerospace Supply, Inc. 11855 Wicks St. Sun Valley CA 91352 818-767-6867 Telex: 371-7938 FAX: 818-504-2979 www.excelaero.com Lynn Electronics Corp. 154 Railroad Drive Ivyland PA 18974 215-355-8200 FAX: 215-364-2944 Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com National Parts Distributor 3801 E. Roeser Rd Suite 14 Phoenix AZ 85040 FAX: 602-453-9700 602-453-9600 Triman Industries 1042 Industrial Drive West Berlin NJ 08091 www.trimanindustries.com 856-767-7945 Contact: Donna Virunurm donna@trimanindustried.net Valtec International, Inc. Essex Industrial Pk. Box 747 Ivoryton CT 06442 Toll Free: 800-825-8321 860-767-8211 SITA: BDLVTXD FAX: 860-767-2918

GROUND POWER/GROUND SUPPORT GROUND EQUIPMENT POWER/GROUND

SUPPORT EQUIPMENT

AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 www.alturdyne.com Contact: Frank Verbeke American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247 BESTEK Industries, Inc. 1343 SW 35th St. San Antonio TX 78237 FAX: 210-434-1074 210-434-1071

THE BOEING COMPANY Spares Services P.O. Box 3707 Seattle WA 98124-2207 206-662-7200 Telex: 329606 SITA: BVUBOCR FAX: 206-662-7145 100 N. Riverside Plaza Chicago IL 60606 FAX: 312—655-1177 312-544-2000 Engineering Division N. 8th & Park Ave. Renton WA 98055 425-234-9987 FAX: 425-237-8893 Fabrication Division 1102 15th St., S.W. Auburn WA 98002 253-931-5716 FAX: 253-931-2144 Long Beach Division 3855 Lakewood Blvd. Long Beach CA 90846 FAX: 562-496-8720 562-593-9033 Aircraft & Missile Systems P.O. Box 516 St. Louis MO 63166-0516 314-232-0232 FAX: 314-777-1096 Defense Technology Equipment, Inc. 45681 Oakbrook Ct., Unit 107-111 Sterling VA 20166 FAX: 703-766-1701 703-766-1700 www.defense-tech.com sales@defense-tech.com Contact: Frank Benzaria

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Dixie Air Parts Supply Inc. 2202 W Malone St. San Antonio TX 78224 FAX: 210-924-4901 210-924-5561 PO Box 3583 San Antonio TX 78211 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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Dutch Valley Supply Co. 970 Progress Center Ave Lawrenceville GA 30043 FAX: 770-513-0716 770-513-0612 Dynamic Fabrication Inc. 2615 S. Hickory St. Santa Ana CA 92707 FAX: 714-662-1052 714-662-2440 Equipment & Supply, Inc. 4507 Highway #74-West Monroe NC 28110 FAX: 704-283-1206 704-289-6565

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com G-H Distributors Inc. 2793 Bristol Pike Bensalem PA USA 19020 ghdist.sh@verizon.net 215-245-0101 FAX: 215-245-4243 ISO Group Inc. 7700 Technology Drive West Melbourne FL 32904 www.iso-group.com Garrett Schiefer 321-773-5710 FAX: 321-777-0499 aviationparts@isogroup.com

ITW MILITARY GSE 11001 US HWY 41 North Palmetto FL USA 34221 http://www.itwmilitarygse.com 941-721-1094 FAX: 941-721-1138 Contact: Ann Roberts aroberts@itwmilitarygse.com Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com Mercury GSE 15915 Piuma Ave Cerritos CA USA 90703 www.mercurygse.com 562 653 0654 FAX: 562 653 0665

WIN-TECH, INC. 8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net YAMA Manufacturing, Inc. 13102 Lookout Ridge San Antonio TX 78233 FAX: 210-656-7552 210-656-1066

HOSE & HOSE FITTINGS

HOSE & HOSE FITTINGS AERO COMPONENT ENGINEERING CO. 28887 Industry Drive Valencia CA 91355 www.aerocomponent.com 818-841-9258 FAX: 818-841-2342 Contact: David Bill davidwbill@aerocomponent.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Herber Aircraft Service Inc. 1401 E. Franklin Ave. El Segundo CA 90245 Contact: Daryl Yeelitt 310-322-9575 Toll Free: 800-544-0050 FAX: 310-322-1875 www.herberaircraft.com sales@herberaircraft.com Kitco Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Ron McClean www.kitcodefense.com

HYDRAULIC FLUIDS - HIGH HYDRAULIC FLUIDS - HIGH PERFORMANCE

PERFORMANCE RADCO INDUSTRIES

700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

HYDRAULIC PARTS & HYDRAULIC PARTS & COMPONENTS COMPONENTS AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704

NSN-NOW.COM 8200 Republic Airport;Hangar 43, Suite 6 Farmingdale NY 11735 631-847-3504 www.nsn-now.com FAX: 631-847-0264 Pentagon 2000 Software, Inc. 15 West 34th Street New York NY 10001 www.pentagon2000.com 212-629-7521 FAX: 212-629-7513 SOS: Sales Opportunity Services Pentagon 2000 Software 1540 E. Pleasant Valley Blvd Altoona PA 16602 814-949-3327

INSTRUMENTS &&INSTRUMENT INSTRUMENTS INSTRUMENT OVERHAUL OVERHAUL

AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Defense Technology Equipment, Inc. 45681 Oakbrook Ct., Unit 107-111 Sterling VA 20166 FAX: 703-766-1701 703-766-1700 www.defense-tech.com sales@defense-tech.com Contact: Frank Benzaria Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Kitco Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Ron McClean www.kitcodefense.com Miraj Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Supersonic Services, Inc. 12399 SW 53RD St. Suite 103 Cooper City FL 33330 FAX: 954-680-0317 954-680-6707 Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 Technolube Products 8015 Paramount Blvd Pico Rivera CA 90660 FAX: 562-776-4004 562-776-4039

INFORMATION SERVICES

INFORMATION SERVICES ABDONLINE.COM 116 Radio Circle Dr. Ste 302 Mount Kisco NY 10549 www.abdonline.com 914-242-8700 FAX: 914-242-5422

INVENTORY LOCATOR SERVICE, LLC 8001 Centerview Pkwy - STE: 400 Memphis TN USA 38018 www.lismart.com

901-794-5000 FAX: 901-794-1760

AUTOPILOTS, AVIONICS & INSTRUMENTS

FAA# CM2R747K

www.autopilotscentral.com Hangar 23, Tulsa Int’l Airport, Tulsa, OK 74115 Phone: 918-836-6418 Fax: 918-832-0136

Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704 Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith Triman Industries 1042 Industrial Drive West Berlin NJ 08091 www.trimanindustries.com 856-767-7945 Contact: Donna Virunurm donna@trimanindustried.net

INTERIORS & INTERIORS INTERIORS & INTERIORS OVERHAUL OVERHAUL AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC.

999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Defense Technology Equipment, Inc. 45681 Oakbrook Ct., Unit 107-111 Sterling VA 20166 FAX: 703-766-1701 703-766-1700 www.defense-tech.com sales@defense-tech.com

445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Hawker Pacific Aerospace 11240 Sherman Way Sun Valley CA 91352 Toll Free: 800-443-8302 818-765-6201 www.hawker.com FAX: 818-765-2065 Contact: Brad Curtis carlo.ventittelli@hawker.com International Precision, Inc. 9526 Vassar Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 FAX: 818-882-0319 818-882-3933 Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com Kitco Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Ron McClean www.kitcodefense.com Nassau Tool Works, Inc. 34 Lamar St. West Babylon NY 11704 631-643-5000 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 sales@s3international.com FAX: 414-351-1543

DIMO CORP.

WIN-TECH, INC.

INVERTERS INVERTERS CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

LANDING GEAR OVERHAUL LANDING GEAR PARTS/ ACCESSORIES & OVERHAUL AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net

The Maxim Gorky The Soviet Union was possibly unwise to name the first of its heavy transport Tupolev ANT-20s after the author of The Lower Depths. The Maxim Gorky first flew in 1934, and that year set two records by lifting a weight of 10,000 kilograms (about 22,046 pounds) and 15,000 kilograms (33,069 pounds) to a height of 5,000 meters (16,404 feet). At 63 meters (nearly 207 feet), the ANT-20's wingspan has seldom been exceeded. The massive plane was powered by eight Mikulin AM-34 V-12 engines, producing a total of 5,368 kilowatts (7200 horsepower). It was the first Soviet aircraft to feature a functioning autopilot. The ANT-20 was designed for cargo hauling, but the Maxim Gorky was converted to a propaganda machine to bring the Soviet message to remote areas. It was equipped with a powerful radio broadcast transmitter, a printing facility, a library, a photo lab, and a movie theater. Almost exactly one year after its first flight, the Maxim Gorky was struck by one of its escort fighters and plunged into a Moscow residential area, killing forty-five people. A second aircraft, the ANT-20bis, was fitted out to carry up to sixty-four passengers. This may have been ill advised as well. In 1942, its pilot allowed one of the passengers to sit in the pilot's seat. The passenger turned off the autopilot, and the ANT-20bis took a nosedive into the ground. The crash killed all thirty-six on board.

Sources: Tupolev, www.tupolev.ru; Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org

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LIGHTING

LIGHTING AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 www.canfieldelectronics.com FAX: 631-585-4200 info@canfieldelectronics.com

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net REBTECH 1500 Brown Trail Bedford TX USA 76022 www.rebtechnvg.com FAX: 817-285-7742 Toll Free: 877-426-4158 Specialty Bulb Co. Inc. PO Box 231 Bohemia NY USA 11716 631-589-33089 www.bulbspecialists.com FAX: 631-589-3393 Toll Free: 1-800-331-2852 Contact: Edie Muldoon info@bulbspecialists.com

LUBRICANTS LUBRICANTS RADCO INDUSTRIES 700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968 Technolube Products 8015 Paramount Blvd Pico Rivera CA 90660 FAX: 562-776-4004 562-776-4039

FABRICATION METALMETAL FABRICATION & & ASSEMBLY ASSEMBL AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247 Dynamic Fabrication Inc. 2615 S. Hickory St. Santa Ana CA 92707 FAX: 714-662-1052 714-662-2440 Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Honeycomb Company Of America (HCOA) 1950 Limbus Ave Sarasota FL USA 34243 FAX: 1+ 941-755-426 +1 941-993-0049 www.hcoainc.com - wbryson@hcoainc.com International Precision, Inc. 9526 Vassar Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 FAX: 818-882-0319 818-882-3933

WIN-TECH, INC. 8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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METALS

METALS

Airspares International 504 East Meadow Avenue East Meadow NY 11554 info@airspares.net 516-334-0900 FAX: 516-334-4109 Bralco Metals 15090 Northam St La Mirada CA 90638 Toll Free: 800-628-1864 714-7369-4800 FAX: 714-736-4840 Contact: Don Gonzales dgonzales@bralco.com Albuquerque 6718 Jefferson, NE. Albuquerque NM 87109 11sa;es@bralco.com 505-345-0959 Toll Free: 800-999-8405 FAX: 505-345-1187 Dallas 410 Mars Drive Garland TX 75040 972-276-2676 08sales@bralco.com FAX: 972-272-4485 Toll Free: 800-442-3529 Seattle 7416 S. 228th St Kent WA 98032 253-395-0614 73sales@bralco.com FAX: 253-395-0696 Toll Free: 866-285-9984 Phoenix 929 E. Jackson St Phoenix AZ 85034 602-252-1918 53sales@bralco.com FAX: 602-252-7813 Toll Free: 800-544-8052 Wichita 3400 N. Topeka Ave. Wichita KS 67219 316-838-9351 14sales@bralco.com FAX: 316-838-9230 Toll Free: 800-729-6772 www.bralco.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com SUPRA Alloys, Inc TITAN Metal Fabricators 352 Balboa Circle Camarillo CA 93012 805-388-2138 www.suraalloys.com FAX: 1805-987-6492 Toll Free: 800-647-8772

MODIFICATIONS

MODIFICATIONS

AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com Airspares International 504 East Meadow Avenue East Meadow NY 11554 info@airspares.net 516-334-0900 FAX: 516-334-4109 Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com Essex Cyrogenics of Missouri, Inc. 8007 Chiwis Dr. St. Louis MO 63123 314-832-8077 FAX: 314-832-8208 Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC. 445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com REBTECH 1500 Brown Trail Bedford TX USA 76022 www.rebtechnvg.com FAX: 817-285-7742 Toll Free: 877-426-4158 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

MOUNTS DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

NAV/COM SYSTEMS

NAV/COM SYSTEMS

Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704 Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com Symetrics Industries 1615 W. NASA Blvd Melbourne FL 32901 www.symetrics.com 321-254-1500 FAX: 321-308-0796 Contact: Randy Koller rkoller@symetrics.com

OXYGEN EQUIPMENT & OXYGEN EQUIPMENT & OXYGEN EQUIPMENT OVERHAUL OVERHAUL

PAINTING

PAINTING

Deft, Inc. 17451 Von Karman Ave. Irvine CA 92614 Contact: Tracy Garrett Jr. 949-474-0400 Toll Free: 1-800-544-3338 FAX: 949-474-7269 www.deftfinishes.com

PLASTIC FABRICATION

PLASTIC FABRICATION

AIRBORNE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. 999 Avenida Acaso Camarillo CA 93012 805-389-3700 Contact: Gary Ferris FAX: 805-389-3708 Repair Station #WY2R283L P.O. Box 2210 Camarillo CA 93011 www.airbornetech.com sales@airbornetech.com

PNEUMATIC PARTS & PNEUMATIC PARTS & COMPONENTS COMPONENTS AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

RADOMES

RADOMES

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Cobham Life Support 10 Cobham Drive Orchard Park NY 14127 Contact: John Barone 716-667-6269 FAX: 716-667-0747

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Zodiac Aerospace - AVOX Systems 225 Erie Street Lancaster NY USA 14086 FAX: 716-681-1089 716-686-1551

PAINTS & LACQUERS

PAINTS & LACQUERS

Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT & SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT OVERHAUL OVERHAUL Cobham Life Support 10 Cobham Drive Orchard Park NY 14127 Contact: John Barone 716-667-6269 FAX: 716-667-0747

DIMO CORP. Alliance Coatings, Inc. 1662 N. Magnolia, Suite G El Cajon CA 92020 www.alliancecoatings.com 619-596-9191 Toll Free: 800-596-9191 FAX: 619-596-9190 aeropens@alliancecoatings.com Deft, Inc. 17451 Von Karman Ave. Irvine CA 92614 Contact: Tracy Garrett Jr. 949-474-0400 Toll Free: 1-800-544-3338 FAX: 949-474-7269 www.deftfinishes.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com PPG Aerospace 12780 San Fernando Rd. Sylmar CA USA 91342 818-741-1687

46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Life Support International 200 Rittenhouse Circle Bristol PA 19007 greg@lifesupportintl.com 215-785-2870 www.lifesupportintl.com FAX: 215-785-2880

SWITCHESSWITCHES Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Kellstrom Industries 15501 SW 29th Street Miramar FL 33027 FAX: 954-538-3210 954-538-2448 www.kellstrom.com Contact: Hayley Armstrong info@kellstrom.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com

TEST EQUIPMENT TEST EQUIPMENT AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247 Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 www.canfieldelectronics.com FAX: 631-585-4200 info@canfieldelectronics.com CK Technologies, Inc. 3629 Vista Mercado Camarillo CA 93012 www.ckt.com 805-987-4801 FAX: 805-987-4811

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

TOOLS

TOOLS DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Nor-Ral, Inc. 164 Hickory Springs Industrial Dr. Canton GA 30115 FAX: 770-720-0527 770-720-0526 www.norral.com jessica.mcwhorter@norral.com

USATCO/U.S. AIR TOOL 60 Fleetwood Court Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Toll Free: 800-645-8180 631-471-3300 FAX: 631-471-3308 1218 W. Mahalo Place Rancho Dominguez CA 90220-5446 310-632-5400 FAX: 310-632-3900

WIN-TECH, INC. 8520 Cobb Center Drive Kennesaw GA 30152 www.win-tech.net 770-423-9358 FAX: 770-499-9164 Contact: Dennis Winslow sales@win-tech.net

VALVES

VALVES

Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255 Contact: Rick Weltmann rweltmann@aerokool.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901

CONTINENTAL AIRCRAFT SUPPORT 13960 NW 60th Ave Miami Lakes FL 33014 FAX: 305-817-9323 305-883-6100 Contact: Jose Paez jpaez@continentalaircraft.com www.continentalaircraft.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

WHEELS/BRAKES & WHEELS/BRAKES OVERHAUL WHEELS/BRAKES AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aviation Brake Service/Avcenter 7274 NW 34th Street Miami FL 33122 305-594-4677 www.aviationbrake.com FAX: 305-477-5799 Contact: Andres Posse andres@aviationbrake.com derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC.

Twin Otter Sometimes, it seems the versatile C-130 Hercules can do anything. But one job it cannot handle is midwinter medical rescue from the South Pole. This treacherous feat has been successfully undertaken only three times, by a popular but relatively lowly STOL utility plane, the Twin Otter. In winter, South Pole temperatures routinely hover around -70° Fahrenheit with high winds and continuous darkness. The Twin Otter can fly in temperatures as low as -103° F, if fuel is warmed and special lubricants used. Jerry Macala, who oversaw a rescue in 2001, had instructed his crew to set up oil drums to be lit along the runway as a landing guide in the darkness. But temperatures were so cold that the gasoline would not ignite. "We had to use acetylene torches to light those things," he said. The most recent Twin Otter medical rescue was completed in June 2016. The Twin Otter was originally developed as the de Havilland Canada DHC-6; it is currently produced by Viking Air as the DHC-6 Twin Otter. The twin-engine propeller driven plane is powered by two Pratt and Whitney Canada PT6. It has short-take-off-and-landing (STOL) capability, a fixed tricycle undercarriage, and achieves a fast rate of climb. Configured for cargo, the Twin Otter has a cabin capacity of 384 cubic feet and a range of over 980 nautical miles. These capabilities have made the craft popular for bush plane use, utility cargo transportation, and even skydiving and parachute training. It also has been configured for regional passenger travel with seating for up to twenty. Sources: Associated Press, www.apnewsarchive.com; NPR, www.npr.org; Viking Air, www.vikingair.com.

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445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com Honeywell International P.O. Box 2245, 101 Columbia Rd. Morristown NJ 07962 973-455-2000 www.honeywell.com FAX: 973-455-4807 Turbocharging Systems & Power Systems Honeywell Ceramic Components 2525 W. 190th St. Torrance CA 90504-6099 FAX: 310-512-1561 310-323-9500 Polymers P.O. Box 1039, 101 Columbia Rd. Morristown NJ 07962 FAX: 973-455-6045 Toll Free: 800-934-5679 Honeywell Control Products 11 W. Spring St. Freeport IL 61032 815-235-5500 Toll Free: 800-537-6945 FAX: 815-235-6545 Hydro-Aire A Division of Crane Company 3000 Winona Ave. Burbank CA 91504 818-526-2409 Fax: 800-544-9140 FAX: 818-842-6117 Toll Free: 800-544-9376 JDC Industries, Inc. 99 Cherry St. Centerville TN 37033 931-670-2175 FAX: 931-670-3123 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE:

ROTORCRAFT Firms that specialize in parts for Rotorcraft Distribution / Manufacturing / Repairs

Courtesy of Air National Guard. Photo by Staff Sgt. Edward Eagerton. .


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ACCESSRIES &&ACCESSORY ACCESSORIES ACCESSORY OVERHAUL RHAUL - ROTORCRAFT AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 Accu-Seal Design & Engineering, LLC. 420 Westwoods Road Hamden CT 06518 FAX: 203-230-1997 203-230-1997 Aero Kool Corporation 1495 SE 10th Ave. Hialeah FL 33010 305-887-6912 www.aerokool.com FAX: 305-885-2828 Toll Free: 800-458-4255 Contact: Rick Weltmann rweltmann@aerokool.com

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org Air Parts & Supply Co. 12840 SW 84th Ave. Rd. Miami FL 33156 Contact: Sheri Murray 305-235-5401 FAX: 305-235-8185 sales@apscomiami.com www.apscomiami.com Brown Helicopters Inc. 10100 Aileron Ave. Pensacola FL 32506 850-455-0971 FAX: 850-456-8231

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Essential Turbines 443 Meloche Street Dorval, QC H9P 2W2 Canada www.essentialturbines.com 514-633-4458 FAX: 514-633-6308 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith SOI Aviation 23965 Ventura Blvd. Calabasas CA 91302 soifg@aol.com 818-591-3166 FAX: 818-591-3144 www.soiaviation.com Contact: Linda Sandberg Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

ACTUATORS ACTUATORS AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Aerospace Maintenance Solutions 8759 Mayfield Rd Chesterland OH USA 44026 www.aerospacellc.com 440-729-7703 FAX: 440-729-7704

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

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Kearfott Guidance and Navigation Corp Astronautics Corporation of America 2858 US Highway 70W Black Mountain NC USA 28711-9111 828-350-5300 FAX: 828-686-5764 Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com Select Helicopter Services Ltd. 6295A Airport Way Kelowna, BC Canada V1V 2V7 www.selecthelicopter.com 250-765-3317 FAX: 866-389-9878 info@selecthelicopter.com Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

AIR AIR CONDITIONING CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT & REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT AND Brown Helicopters Inc. 10100 Aileron Ave. Pensacola FL 32506 850-455-0971 FAX: 850-456-8231

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

AIRFRAME/AIRFRAME PARTS & AIRFRAME & AIRFRAME PARTS AIRFRAME/AIRFRAMEEHAU OVERHAUL AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 Brown Helicopters Inc. 10100 Aileron Ave. Pensacola FL 32506 850-455-0971 FAX: 850-456-8231

CHARLOTTE AIRCRAFT CORP. 7705 E. Harris Blvd. Charlotte NC 28227 Contact: Marion Hicks 704-537-0212 FAX: 704-537-7910 cacclt@aol.com 16641 Airport Rd. Maxton NC 28364 910-844-5775 Contact: Jenks Caldwell III FAX: 910-844-5705 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 25555 Charlotte NC 28229

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Floats & Fuel Cells(FFC) 4010 Pilot Drive, Ste: #103 Memphis TN 38118 www.ffcfuelcells.com 901-794-8431 Toll Free: 800-647-6148 FAX: 901-842-7135 FAA Repair Station #TH4R544M Contact: Kevin Brewer kbrewer@ffcfuelcells.com

ISO Group Inc. 7700 Technology Drive West Melbourne FL 32904 www.iso-group.com Garrett Schiefer 321-773-5710 FAX: 321-777-0499 aviationparts@isogroup.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith Rotair Industries 964 Crescent Ave. Bridgeport CT 06607 203-576-6545 FAX: 203-576-6804 Contact: Christine M. Kudravy, President sales@rotair.com www.rotair.com S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com United States Aviation Corporation Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. 6900 Main St. Stratford CT 06614 203-386-4000

ANTENNAS/ANTENNA ANTENNAS/ANTENNA SYSTEMS SYSTEMS AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Electro-Tec Corp. 1501 N. Main St. Blacksburg VA 24060 540-552-2111 FAX: 540-951-3832 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 Sensor Systems Inc. 8929 Fullbright Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 www.sensorantennas.com 818-341-5366 FAX: 818-341-9059 Contact: Dave Brooks dbrooks@sensorsantennas.com

AUXILIARY POWER UNITS & APUS AUXILIARY POWER UNITS & OVERHAUL APUS OVERHAUL

FRAZIER AVIATION, INC.

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC.

445 North Fox Street San Fernando CA 91340 FAX: 818-837-9546 818-898-1998 FAA Repair Station #QN3R795L & JAA #5409 www.frazieraviation.com kfrazier@frazieraviation.com HC Pacific 19844 Quiroz Court Walnut CA 91789 909-598-0509 Contact: Cynthia Tubal/Sylvia Sao FAX: 909-598-1411 www.hcpacific.com hcpac@ix.netcom.com Honeycomb Company Of America (HCOA) 1950 Limbus Ave Sarasota FL USA 34243 FAX: 1+ 941-755-426 +1 941-993-0049 www.hcoainc.com - wbryson@hcoainc.com IMP Aerospace Halifax Stanfield Intl Airport 557 Barnes Rd. Enfield, Nova Scotia Canada B2T 1K3 www.impaerospace.com 902-873-2250 FAX: 902-873-2290 Contact Carl Kumpic email: carl.kumpic@impaerospace.com

201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 www.alturdyne.com Contact: Frank Verbeke Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith

AVIONICS & AVIONICS AVIONICS & AVIONICS OVERHAUL OVERHAUL

SOI Aviation 23965 Ventura Blvd. Calabasas CA 91302 soifg@aol.com 818-591-3166 FAX: 818-591-3144 www.soiaviation.com Contact: Linda Sandberg

BATTERIES/BATTERY BATTERIES/BATTERY CHARGERS & CHARGERSOVERHAUL & OVERHAUL

AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 FAX: 516-357-2709 Contact: Glenn Meyers New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org

Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 www.canfieldelectronics.com FAX: 631-585-4200 info@canfieldelectronics.com ENERSYS-HAWKER BATTERIES 2366 Bernville Road Reading PA 19605 www.enersys.com/defense 610-208-1831 FAX: 610-208-1630 Contact: Frank Metzger frank.metzger@enersys.com

AOG REACTION, INC.

46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Dixie Aerospace Suite 100, 560 Atlanta S. Pkwy. Atlanta GA 30349 Telex: 542141 SITA: ATLDBXD 404-348-8100 Toll Free: 800-241-8471 FAX: 404-763-2577 www.dixieaerospace.com sales@dixieaerospace.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Miraj Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com

526 Aviator Drive Ft. Worth TX 76179 817-439-0700 FAA Repair Station TU1R519K FAX: 817-439-9700 www.aogreaction.com Contact: Robert Samson rsamson@aogreaction.com Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K Axnes Inc 15954 Jackson Creek Parkway Suite B609 Monument CO 80132 719-722-1770 www.axnes.com post@axnes.com

BECKER AVIONICS 10376 USA Today Way Miramar FL USA 33025 www.beckerusa.com 954-450-3137 FAX: 954-450-3206 Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200 EMTEQ Family of Companies 5349 S Emmer Drive New Berlin WI 53151 Toll Free: 888-679-6170 262-679-6170 FAX: 262-679-6175 www.emteq.com sales@emteq.com IMP Aerospace Halifax Stanfield Intl Airport 557 Barnes Rd. Enfield, Nova Scotia Canada B2T 1K3 www.impaerospace.com 902-873-2250 FAX: 902-873-2290 Contact Carl Kumpic email: carl.kumpic@impaerospace.com Innovative Solutions & Support 720 Pennsylvania Drive Exton PA 19341 FAX: 610-646-0146 610-646-9800 www.innovative-ss.com Contact: David Green Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

BEARINGS BEARINGS DIMO CORP.

CABLE FITTINGS

CABLE FITTINGS

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Loos & Company Inc. Wire Rope Division 1 Cable Rd. Pomfret CT 06258 860-928-7981 www.loosco.com FAX: 860-928-6167 Toll Free: 800-533-5667 900 Industrial Blvd Naples FL 33942 239-321-5667

CABLE & CABLE WIRE & WIRE Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 www.canfieldelectronics.com FAX: 631-585-4200 info@canfieldelectronics.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com Continental Cable Company 253 Monument Rd. Hinsdale NH 03451 603-256-3136 FAX: 603-256-6003

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

Loos & Company Inc. Wire Rope Division 1 Cable Rd. Pomfret CT 06258 www.loosco.com

860-928-7981 FAX: 860-928-6167 Toll Free: 800-533-5667 900 Industrial Blvd Naples FL 33942 239-321-5667 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089

CARGO HANDLING CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Triman Industries 1042 Industrial Drive West Berlin NJ 08091 www.trimanindustries.com 856-767-7945 Contact: Donna Virunurm donna@trimanindustried.net

CHEMICALS CHEMICALS Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com PPG Aerospace 12780 San Fernando Rd. Sylmar CA USA 91342 818-741-1687

CONNECTORS

CONNECTORS

Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com

BENCHMARK CONNECTOR CORP. 4501 N.W. 103rd Ave Sunrise FL 33351 Contact: Wayne Nelson 954-746-9929 Toll Free: 800-896-7153 FAX: 954-746-9448 www.benchmarkconnector.com info@benchmarkconnector.com Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 www.canfieldelectronics.com FAX: 631-585-4200 info@canfieldelectronics.com Connector Distribution Corp. 2985 E.Harcourt St. Rancho Dominguez CA 90221 www.cdc-online.com 310-632-2466 Toll Free: 800-421-5840 FAX: 310-632-5413 ** Inventory Avialable on abdonline.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Electronic Expediters, Inc. 3700 Via Pescador Camarillo CA USA 93012 Contact: Ira Berns 805-987-7171 FAX: 805-987-3344 www.expediters.com sales@expediters.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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Miraj Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 Williams RDM 200 Greenleaf Street Ft. Worth TX USA 76107 tmoulton@wmsrdm.com 817-872-1599

CORROSION CONTROL CORROSION CONTROL

Alliance Coatings, Inc. 1662 N. Magnolia, Suite G El Cajon CA 92020 www.alliancecoatings.com 619-596-9191 Toll Free: 800-596-9191 FAX: 619-596-9190 aeropens@alliancecoatings.com

DIALS, OVERLAYS, PANELS DIALS, OVERLAYS, PANELS

Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200 Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com

ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC

ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247

AOG REACTION, INC. 526 Aviator Drive Ft. Worth TX 76179 817-439-0700 FAA Repair Station TU1R519K FAX: 817-439-9700 www.aogreaction.com Contact: Robert Samson rsamson@aogreaction.com Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K Avnet Electro Air 400 Franklin Road Ste 260 Marietta GA 30067 em.avnet.com/electroair 800-241-7530 FAX: 770-799-4945 Contact: Beth Boedeker beth.boedeker@avnet.com Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 www.canfieldelectronics.com FAX: 631-585-4200 info@canfieldelectronics.com

Silent Delivery One of the most widely effective aircraft of World War II is rarely mentioned today. That's not surprising. It was made of plywood; it was ugly; and it didn't even have an engine-silent, it produced no exiting, powerful roar. Yet the Waco CG-4 transport glider (known as the "Hadrian" in England) played a major role in invasions of Sicily and Normandy and for crossing the Rhine at Arnhem. It also supplied troops in Burma and China. Nearly 14,000 of the ungainly craft were built from 1942 to 1945. The CG-4 was designed by and named for the Waco Aircraft Company of Troy, Ohio, formerly best known for its biplane production. Fifteen other companies also had production contracts. Notably, the Ford Motor Company devoted its entire Kingsford plant to making the gliders. At one point, some 4,500 workers were turning out eight of them per day. The gliders, made of wooden structures with a light metal frame, were 48 feet 8 inches long, 15 feet 4 inches high, and had a wingspan of 83 feet 8 inches. They were usually towed by Douglas C-47 Skytrains, attached with a 350-foot nylon rope. The CG-4 could take off under tow power like conventional gliders do today, but it also had a separate looped pickup cable that could be snatched from above by a tow plane. Pre-release normal flight speed was typically 110 to 130 mph. A descent speed of 72 mph was ideal, as was a final landing speed about 60 mph. These speeds were critical, because the glider stalled at 49 mph and, without an engine, could not recover. A crew of two piloted a CG-4. Cargo loads might include thirteen equipped troops; a Jeep with a crew of four, plus equipment; a 75mm Howitzer with its gun crew of three, ammunition, and supplies; a small bulldozer with operator; or six stretcher patients with medical personnel. Sources: Air Mobility Command Museum, http://amcmuseum.org; Military Factory, www.militaryfactory.com; Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org.

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Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Ducommun Technologies, Inc. 23301 S. Wilmington Ave. Carson CA 90745 FAX: 310-513-7298 310-513-7200 Electronic Expediters, Inc. 3700 Via Pescador Camarillo CA USA 93012 Contact: Ira Berns 805-987-7171 FAX: 805-987-3344 www.expediters.com sales@expediters.com EMTEQ Family of Companies 5349 S Emmer Drive New Berlin WI 53151 Toll Free: 888-679-6170 262-679-6170 FAX: 262-679-6175 www.emteq.com sales@emteq.com Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com IMP Aerospace Halifax Stanfield Intl Airport 557 Barnes Rd. Enfield, Nova Scotia Canada B2T 1K3 www.impaerospace.com 902-873-2250 FAX: 902-873-2290 Contact Carl Kumpic email: carl.kumpic@impaerospace.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 Sensor Systems Inc. 8929 Fullbright Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 www.sensorantennas.com 818-341-5366 FAX: 818-341-9059 Contact: Dave Brooks dbrooks@sensorsantennas.com SpaceAge Control Inc. 38850 20th St. East Palmdale CA 93550 www.spaceagecontrol.com 661-273-3000 FAX: 661-273-4240 Symetrics Industries 1615 W. NASA Blvd Melbourne FL 32901 www.symetrics.com 321-254-1500 FAX: 321-308-0796 Contact: Randy Koller rkoller@symetrics.com

ENGINE & ENGINE PARTS ENGINE & ENGINE PARTS

AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 www.alturdyne.com Contact: Frank Verbeke American Jet Engine Co., Inc. 37 West 39th St. New York NY 10018 212-398-0400 FAX: 212-398-0190 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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Art Sloan Accessory 116 Bonanza Mine Road Sutherlin OR 97479-9767 541-459-4389 Aviall 2750 Regent Blvd. Dallas TX 75261 972-586-1000 www.aviall.com Contact: Ty Genteman tgenteman@aviall.com

R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith

FASTENERS

FASTENERS

CHARLOTTE AIRCRAFT CORP. 7705 E. Harris Blvd. Charlotte NC 28227 Contact: Marion Hicks 704-537-0212 cacclt@aol.com FAX: 704-537-7910 16641 Airport Rd. Maxton NC 28364 910-844-5775 Contact: Jenks Caldwell III FAX: 910-844-5705 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 25555 Charlotte NC 28229

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Essential Turbines 443 Meloche Street Dorval, QC H9P 2W2 Canada www.essentialturbines.com 514-633-4458 FAX: 514-633-6308 Herber Aircraft Service Inc. 1401 E. Franklin Ave. El Segundo CA 90245 Contact: Daryl Yeelitt 310-322-9575 Toll Free: 800-544-0050 FAX: 310-322-1875 www.herberaircraft.com sales@herberaircraft.com ISO Group Inc. 7700 Technology Drive West Melbourne FL 32904 www.iso-group.com Garrett Schiefer 321-773-5710 FAX: 321-777-0499 aviationparts@isogroup.com Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith Rotair Industries 964 Crescent Ave. Bridgeport CT 06607 203-576-6545 FAX: 203-576-6804 Contact: Christine M. Kudravy, President sales@rotair.com www.rotair.com S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 FAX: 414-351-1543 sales@s3international.com SIMTECH 66 A Floydville Road East Granby CT USA 06026 www.simtech.com 860-653-2408 FAX: 860-653-3857 Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

ENGINEENGINE SERVICES SERVICES Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 www.alturdyne.com Contact: Frank Verbeke Essential Turbines 443 Meloche Street Dorval, QC H9P 2W2 Canada www.essentialturbines.com 514-633-4458 FAX: 514-633-6308 Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 OGMA - Industria Aeronautica De Portugal SA Alverca do Ribatejo Alverca P-2615 Portugal FAX: 351-21-9573056 351-21-957-9055 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

Distributors - Aircraft Parts & Supplies

Airspares International 504 East Meadow Avenue East Meadow NY 11554 info@airspares.net 516-334-0900 FAX: 516-334-4109 Av-Tech Industries P.O. Box 200366 Arlington TX 76006 817-640-4031 www.av-techind.com FAX: 817-649-1355 Shipping: 1180 Corporate Drive W. Arlington TX 76006 Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 www.canfieldelectronics.com FAX: 631-585-4200 info@canfieldelectronics.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Excel Aerospace Supply, Inc. 11855 Wicks St. Sun Valley CA 91352 818-767-6867 Telex: 371-7938 FAX: 818-504-2979 www.excelaero.com HC Pacific 19844 Quiroz Court Walnut CA 91789 909-598-0509 Contact: Cynthia Tubal/Sylvia Sao FAX: 909-598-1411 www.hcpacific.com hcpac@ix.netcom.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Nylok Aerospace 313 Euclid Way Anaheim CA 92801 714-635-3993 FAX: 714-635-9553 Piedmont Aviation Services 3821 N. Liberty St. Winston Salem NC 27105 FAX: 336-776-6091 336-776-6060 Standard Aero Parts 5100 Maureen Lane Moorpark CA USA 93021 standardaero@earthlink.net 805-531-5410 FAX: 805-531-5419 Transaero, Inc. 35 Melville Park Road, Suite 100 Melville NY 11747-3268 631-752-1240 Telex: 967734 FAX: 631-752-1242 SITA: ISPTXCR www.transaeroinc.com COntact: Lance Human human@transaeroinc.com

FLUIDS - HEAT FLUIDS - HEATTRANSFER TRANSFER RADCO INDUSTRIES 700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968

FLUIDSFLUIDS - HYDRAULIC - HYDRAULIC RADCO INDUSTRIES 700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968

AVIATION INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION 5555 N.W. 36th Street • Miami Springs, FL 33166

FASTENERS

AN • NAS • MS MIL SPEC MATERIAL TEMPO • G.E. LAMPS CRC • KRYLON • WD-40 • LPS CHEMSEAL

PILOT SUPPLIES

BOOKS • TEACHING AIDS COMPUTERS • PLOTTERS • MAPS CHARTS IFR/VFR • RADIOS SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT • FLIGHT BAGS • GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS ASA • JEPPESEN • APR • RAYBAN TAB BOOKS • ONC/WAC CHARTS KILGORE • EASTERN AERO MARINE SOFT COM • DAVID CLARK

1-800-741-6486 Telephone: 305-888-6486 FAX: 305-884-8045 E-mail: avico@bellsouth.net

AOGs Welcomed FUEL CELLS FUEL CELLS AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Aircraft On Ground Inc. 310 Regal Row - Suite 500 Dallas TX 75247 Toll Free: 800-635-9535 214-350-5334 FAX: 214-358-3835 FAA Repair Station #DBER248K www.aoginc.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Floats & Fuel Cells(FFC) 4010 Pilot Drive, Ste: #103 Memphis TN 38118 www.ffcfuelcells.com 901-794-8431 Toll Free: 800-647-6148 FAX: 901-842-7135 FAA Repair Station #TH4R544M Contact: Kevin Brewer kbrewer@ffcfuelcells.com

FUEL CELLS REPAIRS

FUEL CELL REPAIRS FLUIDSFLUIDS - SPECIALTY - SPECIALTY RADCO INDUSTRIES 700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968

Aircraft On Ground Inc. 310 Regal Row - Suite 500 Dallas TX 75247 Toll Free: 800-635-9535 214-350-5334 FAX: 214-358-3835 FAA Repair Station #DBER248K www.aoginc.com

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FUEL FUEL SYSTEM REPAIRS SYSTEMS REPAIR Aircraft On Ground Inc. 310 Regal Row - Suite 500 Dallas TX 75247 Toll Free: 800-635-9535 214-350-5334 FAX: 214-358-3835 FAA Repair Station #DBER248K www.aoginc.com

FUEL TANK REPAIRS FUEL TANK REPAIR Aircraft On Ground Inc. 310 Regal Row - Suite 500 Dallas TX 75247 Toll Free: 800-635-9535 214-350-5334 FAX: 214-358-3835 FAA Repair Station #DBER248K www.aoginc.com Floats & Fuel Cells(FFC) 4010 Pilot Drive, Ste: #103 Memphis TN 38118 www.ffcfuelcells.com 901-794-8431 Toll Free: 800-647-6148 FAX: 901-842-7135 FAA Repair Station #TH4R544M Contact: Kevin Brewer kbrewer@ffcfuelcells.com Performance Aircraft Services PO Box 612168 DFW Airport TX 75261 972-574-4250 www.performanceacs.com FAX: 972-574-4248

FUEL PUMPS & COMPONENTS FUEL PUMPS & COMPONENTS

AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

Essential Turbines 443 Meloche Street Dorval, QC H9P 2W2 Canada www.essentialturbines.com 514-633-4458 FAX: 514-633-6308 Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040

GROUND POWER/GROUND GROUND SUPPORT SUPPORT EQUIPMENT

EQUIPMENT

AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 Alturair 660 Steele Street El Cajon CA 92020 619-440-5531 FAX: 619-442-0481 American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247 Axnes Inc 15954 Jackson Creek Parkway Suite B609 Monument CO 80132 719-722-1770 www.axnes.com post@axnes.com BESTEK Industries, Inc. 1343 SW 35th St. San Antonio TX 78237 FAX: 210-434-1074 210-434-1071

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Equipment & Supply, Inc. 4507 Highway #74-West Monroe NC 28110 FAX: 704-283-1206 704-289-6565 G-H Distributors Inc. 2793 Bristol Pike Bensalem PA USA 19020 ghdist.sh@verizon.net 215-245-0101 FAX: 215-245-4243

Straight Up Innovative aircraft designers and users both have long yearned for a craft that can take off straight up, orient to level flight, and land straight down. A helicopter can do that, but earlier models could not match transport users' demand for large cargo payloads, high cruising speeds, and extended flight ranges. In the early 1960s, the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, and U.S. Air Force established the Tri-Service Assault Transport Program. Its goal was to provide designs and prototypes to achieve cargo, range, and speed goals in a vertical-take-off-and-landing (VTOL) aircraft to be used by all three forces. Vought Aircraft won the contract. By 1961, when it was purchased by the conglomerate Ling-Temco-Vought, the company was on its way toward creating the rotating-wing LTV XC-142. Connected to a relatively standard medium transport fuselage was a high-mounted wing capable of rotating to 100 degrees, past vertical, enabling it to hover in a tailwind. The tilt-wing held four General Electric T64 turboshaft engines turning out 3,080 horsepower each, cross-linked on a common drive-shaft. The plane had a cargo capacity of 8,000 pounds. Despite numerous early-test mishaps, especially hard landings, the plane was successfully tested in a total of 488 flights in a wide range of operational situations. It achieved a forward top speed of 400 mph. One daring and unnamed test pilot even achieved a backward speed of 35 mph. But the model was never funded. The last one was flown to the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, where it remains today. Sources: Aviastar, www.aviastar.org; National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, www.nationalmuseum.af.mil; Plane Talk, www.war-eagles-air-museum.com; Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org.

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ISO Group Inc. 7700 Technology Drive West Melbourne FL 32904 www.iso-group.com Garrett Schiefer 321-773-5710 aviationparts@isogroup.com FAX: 321-777-0499 Mercury GSE 15915 Piuma Ave Cerritos CA USA 90703 www.mercurygse.com 562 653 0654 FAX: 562 653 0665 Ralmark Company 83 East Luzerne Ave Larksville PA 18704 570-288-9331

HELMETS

HELMETS

Transaero, Inc. 35 Melville Park Road, Suite 100 Melville NY 11747-3268 631-752-1240 Telex: 967734 FAX: 631-752-1242 SITA: ISPTXCR www.transaeroinc.com COntact: Lance Human human@transaeroinc.com

& HOSE FITTINGS HOSEHOSE & HOSE FITTINGS AERO COMPONENT ENGINEERING CO. 28887 Industry Drive Valencia CA 91355 www.aerocomponent.com 818-841-9258 FAX: 818-841-2342 Contact: David Bill davidwbill@aerocomponent.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Herber Aircraft Service Inc. 1401 E. Franklin Ave. El Segundo CA 90245 Contact: Daryl Yeelitt 310-322-9575 Toll Free: 800-544-0050 FAX: 310-322-1875 www.herberaircraft.com sales@herberaircraft.com Kitco Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Ron McClean www.kitcodefense.com Parker Hannifin Corp Stratoflex Products Div 220 Roberts Cut-Off Rd Fort Worth TX 76114 www.parker.com/stratoflex 817-738-6543 FAX: 817-738-9920 Contact: Cheryl Simms csimms@parker.com

HYDRAULIC FLUIDS HIGH HYDRAULIC FLUIDS -- HIGH PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE RADCO INDUSTRIES 700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968

HYDRAULIC PARTS & HYDRAULIC PARTS & COMPONENTS COMPONENT AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 derco@dercoaerospace.com FAX: 414-355-6129 Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Hawker Pacific Aerospace 11240 Sherman Way Sun Valley CA 91352 Toll Free: 800-443-8302 818-765-6201 www.hawker.com FAX: 818-765-2065 Kitco Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Ron McClean www.kitcodefense.com WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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Miraj Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

INFORMATION SERVICES

INFORMATION SERVICES ABDONLINE.COM 116 Radio Circle Dr. Ste 302 Mount Kisco NY 10549 www.abdonline.com 914-242-8700 FAX: 914-242-5422

INVENTORY LOCATOR SERVICE, LLC 8001 Centerview Pkwy - STE: 400 Memphis TN USA 38018 901-794-5000 www.lismart.com FAX: 901-794-1760 NSN-NOW.COM 8200 Republic Airport;Hangar 43, Suite 6 Farmingdale NY 11735 631-847-3504 www.nsn-now.com FAX: 631-847-0264 Pentagon 2000 Software, Inc. 15 West 34th Street New York NY 10001 www.pentagon2000.com 212-629-7521 FAX: 212-629-7513 SOS: Sales Opportunity Services Pentagon 2000 Software 1540 E. Pleasant Valley Blvd Altoona PA 16602 814-949-3327

INSTRUMENTS & INSTRUMENT

OVERHAUL INSTRUMENTS & AUL

AOG Reaction Inc.

Accessory Class I, II, and III Test/Repair “EXPENDABLE” Switches, Sensors, Controllers Specialists In Unusual Accessories 526 Aviator Drive Ft. Worth, TX 76179-5426

Ph: (817) 439-0700 Fax: (817) 439-9700

AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 Aero Technology, Inc. 3333 East Spring Street Long Beach CA 90806 www.aerotechnology.org 562-595-6055 FAX: 562-595-8416 Contact: Henry Koy henry@aerotechnology.org Astronautics Corp of America 4115 N Teutonia Ave. Milwaukee WI 53209 FAX: 414-447-8231 414-449-4000

AUTOPILOTS CENTRAL INC. 3112 N. 74th E. Ave., Hgr. 23 Tulsa Int’l Airport Tulsa OK 74158 918-836-6418 Contact: Barry Sparks FAX: 918-832-0136 REPAIR STATION NO: CM2R747K

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Innovative Solutions & Support 720 Pennsylvania Drive Exton PA 19341 FAX: 610-646-0146 610-646-9800 www.innovative-ss.com Contact: David Green Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith

LANDING GEAR LANDING GEAR PARTS/ ACCESSORIES & OVERHAUL & PARTS/ACCESSORIES AEREX Manufacturing, Inc. 34 S. Satellite Rd South Windsor CT 06074 860-643-7627

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Hawker Pacific Aerospace 11240 Sherman Way Sun Valley CA 91352 Toll Free: 800-443-8302 818-765-6201 www.hawker.com FAX: 818-765-2065 Kitco Defense 1625 North 1100 West Springville UT 84663 FAX: 801-489-2034 801-489-2019 Contact: Ron McClean www.kitcodefense.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith Rotair Industries 964 Crescent Ave. Bridgeport CT 06607 203-576-6545 FAX: 203-576-6804 Contact: Christine M. Kudravy, President sales@rotair.com www.rotair.com S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 sales@s3international.com FAX: 414-351-1543 Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919 WESCO Manufacturing, Inc 299 Duffy Avenue Hicksville NY 11801 516-933-1900 www.wescomfginc.com FAX: 516-933-4300

LIGHTING LIGHTING AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901 Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net REBTECH 1500 Brown Trail Bedford TX USA 76022 www.rebtechnvg.com FAX: 817-285-7742 Toll Free: 877-426-4158 Specialty Bulb Co. Inc. PO Box 231 Bohemia NY USA 11716 631-589-33089 www.bulbspecialists.com FAX: 631-589-3393 Toll Free: 1-800-331-2852 Contact: Edie Muldoon info@bulbspecialists.com

LUBRICANTS

LUBRICANT

RADCO INDUSTRIES 700 Kingsland Drive Batavia IL 60510 630-232-7966 www.radcoind.com FAX: 630-232-7968

Technolube Products 8015 Paramount Blvd Pico Rivera CA 90660 FAX: 562-776-4004 562-776-4039

FABRICATION METALMETAL FABRICATION & & ASSEMBLY AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971 530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247 Dynamic Fabrication Inc. 2615 S. Hickory St. Santa Ana CA 92707 FAX: 714-662-1052 714-662-2440 Honeycomb Company Of America (HCOA) 1950 Limbus Ave Sarasota FL USA 34243 FAX: 1+ 941-755-426 +1 941-993-0049 www.hcoainc.com - wbryson@hcoainc.com IMP Aerospace Halifax Stanfield Intl Airport 557 Barnes Rd. Enfield, Nova Scotia Canada B2T 1K3 www.impaerospace.com 902-873-2250 FAX: 902-873-2290 Contact Carl Kumpic email: carl.kumpic@impaerospace.com Rotair Industries 964 Crescent Ave. Bridgeport CT 06607 FAX: 203-576-6804 203-576-6545 Contact: Christine M. Kudravy, President sales@rotair.com www.rotair.com

METALS

METALS

Airspares International 504 East Meadow Avenue East Meadow NY 11554 info@airspares.net 516-334-0900 FAX: 516-334-4109 Bralco Metals 15090 Northam St La Mirada CA 90638 Toll Free: 800-628-1864 714-7369-4800 FAX: 714-736-4840 Contact: Don Gonzales dgonzales@bralco.com Albuquerque 6718 Jefferson, NE. Albuquerque NM 87109 11sa;es@bralco.com 505-345-0959 Toll Free: 800-999-8405 FAX: 505-345-1187 Dallas 410 Mars Drive Garland TX 75040 972-276-2676 08sales@bralco.com FAX: 972-272-4485 Toll Free: 800-442-3529 Seattle 7416 S. 228th St Kent WA 98032 253-395-0614 73sales@bralco.com FAX: 253-395-0696 Toll Free: 866-285-9984 Phoenix 929 E. Jackson St Phoenix AZ 85034 602-252-1918 53sales@bralco.com FAX: 602-252-7813 Toll Free: 800-544-8052 Wichita 3400 N. Topeka Ave. Wichita KS 67219 316-838-9351 14sales@bralco.com FAX: 316-838-9230 www.bralco.com Toll Free: 800-729-6772 Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com SUPRA Alloys, Inc TITAN Metal Fabricators 352 Balboa Circle Camarillo CA 93012 805-388-2138 www.suraalloys.com FAX: 1805-987-6492 Toll Free: 800-647-8772

MODIFICATIONS MODIFICATIONS Airspares International 504 East Meadow Avenue East Meadow NY 11554 info@airspares.net 516-334-0900 FAX: 516-334-4109 AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE | FALL 2016

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Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com Essential Turbines 443 Meloche Street Dorval, QC H9P 2W2 Canada www.essentialturbines.com 514-633-4458 FAX: 514-633-6308 Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com REBTECH 1500 Brown Trail Bedford TX USA 76022 www.rebtechnvg.com FAX: 817-285-7742 Toll Free: 877-426-4158

MOUNTS DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

NAV/COM SYSTEMS

NAV/COM SYSTEMS

Axnes Inc 15954 Jackson Creek Parkway Suite B609 Monument CO 80132 719-722-1770 www.axnes.com post@axnes.com Cobham Antenna Systems, Inc. 596 Lowell Street Methuen MA 01844 978-557-2497 www.cobham.com FAX: 978-557-2800 Joy Leuis jouy.leuis@cobham.com

Zodiac Aerospace - AVOX Systems 225 Erie Street Lancaster NY USA 14086 FAX: 716-681-1089 716-686-1551

PAINTSPAINTS & LACQUERS & LACQUERS Alliance Coatings, Inc. 1662 N. Magnolia, Suite G El Cajon CA 92020 www.alliancecoatings.com 619-596-9191 Toll Free: 800-596-9191 FAX: 619-596-9190 aeropens@alliancecoatings.com Deft, Inc. 17451 Von Karman Ave. Irvine CA 92614 Contact: Tracy Garrett Jr. 949-474-0400 Toll Free: 1-800-544-3338 FAX: 949-474-7269 www.deftfinishes.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com PPG Aerospace 12780 San Fernando Rd. Sylmar CA USA 91342 818-741-1687

PAINT TOUCH UP UP PAINT TOUCH Alliance Coatings, Inc. 1662 N. Magnolia, Suite G El Cajon CA 92020 www.alliancecoatings.com 619-596-9191 Toll Free: 800-596-9191 FAX: 619-596-9190 aeropens@alliancecoatings.com

PAINTING

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Moog, Inc. Seneca & Jamison Rd. East Aurora NY 14052 FAX: 716-687-7643 716-687-4331 www.moog.com Contact: Jeff Markel jmarkel@moog.com Sensor Systems Inc. 8929 Fullbright Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 www.sensorantennas.com 818-341-5366 FAX: 818-341-9059 Contact: Dave Brooks dbrooks@sensorsantennas.com Symetrics Industries 1615 W. NASA Blvd Melbourne FL 32901 www.symetrics.com 321-254-1500 FAX: 321-308-0796 Contact: Randy Koller rkoller@symetrics.com

NIGHT VISION GOGGLES NIGHT VISION GOGGLES

Transaero, Inc. 35 Melville Park Road, Suite 100 Melville NY 11747-3268 631-752-1240 Telex: 967734 FAX: 631-752-1242 SITA: ISPTXCR www.transaeroinc.com COntact: Lance Human human@transaeroinc.com

OXYGEN EQUIPMENT OXYGEN SYSTEMS&&OXYGEN OXYGEN EQUIPMENT OVERHAUL EQUIPMENT OVERHAUL Cobham Life Support 10 Cobham Drive Orchard Park NY 14127 Contact: John Barone 716-667-6269 FAX: 716-667-0747

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

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PROPELLERS/PARTS && PROPELLERS/PARTS PROPELLERS/PARTS OVERHAUL PROPELLERS/PARTS HAUL AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930 Brown Helicopters Inc. 10100 Aileron Ave. Pensacola FL 32506 850-455-0971 FAX: 850-456-8231

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Miraj Corporation 345 Route 17, P.O. Box 70 Hasbrouck Heights NJ 07604 201-288-8877 Contact: Fred Scheps - Sales Mgr. FAX: 201-288-7356 www.mirajcorp.com mirajcorp@aol.com Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 R & B Aircraft Supply Inc. 6848 Farmdale Ave. N. Hollywood CA 91605 Repair Station #ZW3R039M 818-764-3910 FAX: 818-765-2436 sales@rbaircraft.com Contact: Max Meredith S3 International, LLC. 6110 N Flint Road Milwaukee WI 53209-3716 www.s3international.com 414-351-1506 sales@s3international.com FAX: 414-351-1543

RADOMES

RADOMES

DIMO CORP. PAINTING

Deft, Inc. 17451 Von Karman Ave. Irvine CA 92614 Contact: Tracy Garrett Jr. 949-474-0400 Toll Free: 1-800-544-3338 FAX: 949-474-7269 www.deftfinishes.com IMP Aerospace Halifax Stanfield Intl Airport 557 Barnes Rd. Enfield, Nova Scotia Canada B2T 1K3 www.impaerospace.com 902-873-2250 Contact Carl Kumpic FAX: 902-873-2290 email: carl.kumpic@impaerospace.com Sensor Systems Inc. 8929 Fullbright Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 www.sensorantennas.com 818-341-5366 FAX: 818-341-9059 Contact: Dave Brooks dbrooks@sensorsantennas.com

PNEUMATIC PARTS & PNEUMATIC PARTS & COMPONENTS COMPONENTS AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 FAX: 414-355-6129 derco@dercoaerospace.com Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Nell-Joy Industries, Inc. 8 Reith St. Copiague NY 11726 631-842-8989 www.nelljoy.com FAX: 631-842-8040 Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 Sensor Systems Inc. 8929 Fullbright Ave. Chatsworth CA 91311 www.sensorantennas.com 818-341-5366 FAX: 818-341-9059 Contact: Dave Brooks dbrooks@sensorsantennas.com

ROTOR BLADE OVERHAUL ROTOR BLADE OVERHAUL

AAR Aircraft Services-Melbourne PO Box 61740 Palm Bay FL USA 32906-1740 www.aarcorp.com 252-435-0826 FAX: 252-435-1930

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Heatcon Composite Systems 600 Andover Park E. Seattle WA 98188 206-575-1333 www.heatcon.com FAX: 206-575-0856

SEATING - SEAT MATERIALS MATERIALS SEATING - SEAT Jet Repair Center 7501 N. W. 52nd Street Miami FL USA 33166 www.jetgroup.net 786-845-3053 FAX: 786-845-3057

SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT & SURVIVAL SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT OVERHAUL OVERHAU Axnes Inc 15954 Jackson Creek Parkway Suite B609 Monument CO 80132 719-722-1770 www.axnes.com post@axnes.com WWW.ABDONLINE.COM


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QUICK REFERENCE: ROTORCRAFT

DIMO CORP.

USATCO/U.S. AIR TOOL

46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Survival Products Inc. 5614 SW 25th St. Hollywood FL 33023 954-966-7329 Contact: Donna Rogers/V.P. FAX: 954-966-3584 www.survivalproductsinc.com sales@survivalproductsinc.com Transaero, Inc. 35 Melville Park Road, Suite 100 Melville NY 11747-3268 631-752-1240 Telex: 967734 FAX: 631-752-1242 SITA: ISPTXCR www.transaeroinc.com COntact: Lance Human human@transaeroinc.com

TEST EQUIPMENT TEST EQUIPMENT AAR Aircraft Component Services-New York 747 Zeckendorf Blvd. Garden City NY 11530 www.aarcorp.com 516-222-9000 Contact: Glenn Meyers FAX: 516-357-2709 New York glenn.meyers@aarcorp.com Canfield Electronics, Inc. 90 Remington Blvd. Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Contact: Ray Zaun 631-585-4100 FAX: 631-585-4200 www.canfieldelectronics.com info@canfieldelectronics.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Field Aerospace 6400 S.E. 59th Street Oklahoma City OK 73135 www.arinc.com/defense 405-605-7184 FAX: 405-601-6029 Contact: Alex Thagard athagard@arinc.com Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com Northrop Grumman Corporation 19382 Baywatch Lane Huntington Beach CA 92646 www.northropgrumman.com 818-715-3290 FAX: 818-598-2089 SpaceAge Control Inc. 38850 20th St. East Palmdale CA 93550 www.spaceagecontrol.com 661-273-3000 FAX: 661-273-4240 Tactical Flight Services 1800 Airport Rd, Hgr. II Kennesaw GA 30144 FAX: 770-794-3222 678-438-7271 www.tfs2.com

TIRES

TIRES

Aviation Brake Service/Avcenter 7274 NW 34th Street Miami FL 33122 305-594-4677 www.aviationbrake.com FAX: 305-477-5799 Contact: Andres Posse andres@aviationbrake.com

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Michelin Aircraft Tire Corp. One Parkway South P.O. Box 19001 Greenville SC 29615 864-458-5000 FAX: 864-422-7071

TOOLSTOOLS - AIR- POWER AIR POWER Nor-Ral, Inc. 164 Hickory Springs Industrial Dr. Canton GA 30115 FAX: 770-720-0527 770-720-0526 www.norral.com jessica.mcwhorter@norral.com WWW.ABDONLINE.COM

60 Fleetwood Court Ronkonkoma NY 11779 Toll Free: 800-645-8180 631-471-3300 FAX: 631-471-3308 1218 W. Mahalo Place Rancho Dominguez CA 90220-5446 310-632-5400 FAX: 310-632-3900

VALVES

VALVES

ADVERTISERS’ INDEX Aero Component Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Aero Precision Industries, LLC.

AERO PRECISION INDUSTRIES,LLC. 201 Lindbergh Ave Livermore CA 94551 925-455-9900 www.aeroprecision.com FAX: 925-455-9901

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Tactair Fluid Controls 4806 W. Taft Rd. Liverpool NY 13088 315-451-3928 www.tactair.com FAX: 315-451-8919

WHEELS/BRAKES & WHEELS/BRAKES OVERHAUL

WHEELS/BRAKES OVERHAUL

Aviation Brake Service/Avcenter 7274 NW 34th Street Miami FL 33122 305-594-4677 www.aviationbrake.com FAX: 305-477-5799 Contact: Andres Posse andres@aviationbrake.com Derco Aerospace, Inc. 8065 West Fairlane Milwaukee WI 53223 www.dercoaerospace.com 414-355-3066 derco@dercoaerospace.com FAX: 414-355-6129 Mailing Address: POB 250970 Milwaukee WI 53225

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net

WINDOWS & WINDSHIELDS

Airborne Technologies . . . . . . 46 AOG Reaction, Inc. . . . . . . . . . 79 Auto Pilots Central, Inc. . . . . . 69 Aviation International Corp. (AVICO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Becker Avionics . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Benchmark Connector Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 C&S Propeller . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Continental Aircraft Support . 51

WINDOWS & WINDSHIELDS

Dimo Corp. . . . . . . . . Back Cover

DIMO CORP. 46 Industrial Blvd New Castle DE 19720 www.dimo.net 302-324-8100 FAX: 302-324-8277 Contact: Omid Naghshineh omid@dimo.net Mecanex Usa Inc 119 White Oak Drive Berlin CT 06037 860-828-6531 www.mecanexusa.com FAX: 860-828-6533 Contact: Patricia Saglimbeni sales@mecanexusa.com

HARNESS TESTING WIREWIRE HARNESS TESTING American Valley Aviation 550 Orion Way Quincy CA 95971

Frazier Aviation, Inc.. . . . . . . . . 45 Inventory Locator Service . . . . 57 Lockheed Martin Corp. . . . . . . 60 MHD-Rockland. . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Pacific Propeller International . 59

530-283-0711 FAX: 530-283-4247

CK Technologies, Inc. 3629 Vista Mercado Camarillo CA 93012 www.ckt.com 805-987-4801 FAX: 805-987-4811

WIRE ROPE FITTINGS WIRE ROPE FITTINGS Loos & Company Inc. Wire Rope Division 1 Cable Rd. Pomfret CT 06258 www.loosco.com

860-928-7981 FAX: 860-928-6167 Toll Free: 800-533-5667 900 Industrial Blvd Naples FL 33942 239-321-5667

WIRELESS WIRELESS COMMUNICATION COMMUNICATIONS Transaero, Inc. 35 Melville Park Road, Suite 100 Melville NY 11747-3268 631-752-1240 Telex: 967734 FAX: 631-752-1242 SITA: ISPTXCR www.transaeroinc.com COntact: Lance Human human@transaeroinc.com

Radco Industries . . . . . . . . . . . 54 USATCO - U.S. Air Tool Co.. . . 62 Win-Tech, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

We welcome your comments, criticisms, praise and suggestions. Please contact us at: AVIATION AFTERMARKET DEFENSE P.O. Box 477, Ardsley, NY 10502 production@abdonline.com Fax: 914-242-5422

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