Issuu on Google+

AAH ALL ABOUT HORSHAM MAGAZINE

February 2013


Thinking of extending or Improving your home? ( ! #

!

"

!

!

"

# $

!

$

) "

# % !

! $ #

%

#$ !

#

#

#

#

%

& ! #

#

#

%

Your choice $!

! # #

##

Interior design

! %

%

'

'

#! ! #

' '

#

!

# $

%%%

#

! !

#

Architecture &

! !

#

" %

" #

!

+

%

#

# #

$! "

*

!

&

# "

$ % # + # # % )

% !

'

!

!

! "

%%%

#%

Build "

,

#

# )

#

%

#$

# ! !

##

%

#

&! % #

! #$ !

$! # !

%

Call 01293 851913 Email: info@abmbuilding.co.uk Website: abmbuilding.co.uk Liston House, Faygate Lane, Faygate, RH12 4SJ


Now delivering to 13,000 Homes and Businesses in the District

Taking the Positives I normally ensure that AAH is packed full of positive news, but January has a unique way of sapping optimism! I cannot remember a more miserable month. Traditionally, January is depressing enough, what with Christmas debt, the short daylight hours, potholes, frozen rail lines and the kids round the corner smashing down your snowman whilst you pop back home for two minutes to get a carrot. But the recent High Street casualties added an additional sprinkling of gloom that doesn’t do much for hopes of anything other than a tough 2013! HMV, Jessops and Blockbuster all went into administration. Should there be an epidemic that makes housewives allergic to Caffè Latte, it would surely be the end of town centres. There are certainly businesses that may have to adapt or die because of the online threat - I certainly wouldn’t like to be in print journalism right now! But we live in a world where a quality product can still lead to success, without it having been stolen and placed online as a free download. Take Bangers Galore, which had the most humble of beginnings but has become an award-winning business, with even the world’s pop elite eating its sausages at the BRIT Awards. We’ve featured the company in this edition. Most of the magazine though has been

Cover Story

Toby Phillips (All AAH Photography) and Ben Morris (All AAH Editorial & Advertising)

devoted to features with a connection to William Penn, one of the most interesting figures from Horsham’s History. For a man that spent so much time in jail, he achieved a great deal. We’ve been to Warminghurst Church, once owned by Penn but now one of the district’s hidden gems, and visited The Blue Idol Quaker group, which Penn founded in the 17th Century. I hope you can make sense of it all - we sometimes get carried away with these features and just hope that the odd reader sticks with it.

We had looked at using a photo related to Warminghurst Church or The Blue Idol, but the right shot never presented itself. So instead we opted for champions sausage maker David Bell of Bangers Galore. The image was taken in a refrigerated area where the sausages hang overnight, so Toby had to set up his camera lights whilst shut in a room where the temperature was set at 1.5 degrees. Ben was enjoying a cup of tea in the office. Sometimes there are several rows of sausages hanging up, but we had to make

You have to look at Page 66 too. Toby was captivated by this ‘face’ and insists he can see a beard too! If you visit Warminghurst Church off the back of the feature please do leave a few pounds in the collection box, as the roof of this magical building does need repairing! Run out of room - can’t even explain the guitar picture. You can gather though that we’re not a riveting live act.

Ben, Editor do with the one row. It still provided a colourful backdrop. David does well not to show the strain, as he was having to hold a not inconsiderable amount of pork for over a minute whilst Toby snapped several images. Thankfully, the photography equipment didn’t seize up in the cold, leaving us with a good shot which Toby knew would be a front page contender. As a thank you for our efforts, David did give us both a couple of packets of sausages, proving that we can absolutely be bought. Bribes are most welcome here.


Visit our website at www.aahorsham.co.uk To discuss advertising in AAH call Ben on 01403 878026. View our advertising rates on Page 58...

CONTENTS 6 News Round-Up What’s making headlines, including a report from the Horsham Rotary Club

10 My Story So Far Violet Phillips recalls the days when she worked with General Eisenhower

14 One to Watch Sarah Chorlton has grown her business through VW Beetles and moustaches

16 Fantasy Fiction Young author Sam Leeves of Horsham has seen his first book published

21 Music Stan’s Showcase is attracting good live acts to The Anchor Pub

25 William Penn The incredible life of the man who founded the state of Pennsylvania

AAH Editor: Ben Morris editor@aahorsham.co.uk 01403 878026 / 01903 892899 Advertising: Kelly Morris advertising@aahorsham.co.uk 01403 878026 / 01903 892899 Photography: Toby Phillips tobyphillipsphotography.co.uk info@tobyphillipsphotography.co.uk 07968 795625 Contributors Jeremy Knight (Historic text for article on William Pann and Blue Idol Quakers) Additional thanks to...

34 Warminghurst The charming church has barely been changed in 300 years

45 Broadbridge Heath Jonathan England has written a book on the village after 10 years of research

50 Bangers Galore Why we can’t get enough of David Bell’s award-winning sausages

56 Meal Review The Hare and Hounds has gone back to basics and is winning over customers

61 Group Discussion How the Aiming High sessions promote social integration

66 How Interesting The ‘face’ hidden in the pews of Warminghust Church

This month we welcome new readers in West Parade and Collingwood Road in Horsham

The bands at Stan’s Showcase for letting us use their guitar and mic-stand; Bel Signs, Rachel Webster from Warminghurst, Allan Cook at The Blue Idol, Nick Jenkins and Helen Crooks, Jonathan England. Door-to-Door Delivery team The Paterson family, Geoff Valentine, Andrew Price, Trish Fuller, Sarah Guile, Amy Rogers, Laura Harding, Alex Bland and Cara Cocoracchio (all Horsham rounds), Anna Laker and Alex Besson (Billingshurst), Jamie Towes, Shaun Bacon and Eddie Robinson (Southwater), Jack Barnett (Monks Gate/Mannings Heath), Karen Parnell (Warnham), Will Smith (Ashington), Roger Clark (Partridge Green and Cowfold), Reece Elvin (Slinfold), Ben Morris (Tower Hill, Rookwood, Dial Post, Crabtree), Toby Phillips (Town Centre),

AAH

February 2013

ALL ABOUT HORSHAM MAGAZINE

Herbie Whitmore (West Grinstead), Ben’s Grandma (Wisborough Green) AAH is available to pick up for free in stands at Sakakini (Carfax ), Artisan Patisserie (Market Square), CoCo’s salons (Lintot Square in Southwater and High Street, Billingshurst) and Horsham Museum. Website Run by Mi-Store of Brighton. Read all of our editions at www.aahorsham.co.uk AAH Magazine is an independent publication owned by B. Morris and is based in Ashington Copies of past editions of AAH are available for £3 each (this includes postage). Many are sold out, so please email Ben for availability.


6

Thinking of extending or Improving your home? 1

( ! #

!

"

!

! # $

!

"

$

)

2

"

# % !

Evarcha arcuata by Graeme Lyons

8

! $ #

%

#$ !

#

#

#

#

%

& ! #

#

#

%

6

7 Your choice $!

! # #

##

Interior design

! %

%

'

'

#! ! #

' '

#

!

# $

%%%

#

! !

#

Architecture 11

&

! !

#

"

&

# "

$ % # + #

% $!

!

12

# #

! # % " % ) the!Council in May 2003 %%%as Member for the Bramber, Upper Beeding and Woodmancote ward #% and served until May 2011. During his time on the Council, Alan was Vice Chairman of the Scrutiny and Overview Committee from 2006 to 2007.

" " # 1: The dates of the Goodwood Festival of * Business ! +Awards’. Eleven % #awards ! were handed ' Speed have been changed to avoid a clash out for the most voted for Christmas displays with the revised German Grand Prix. The ! during the evening with winners including Festival, celebrating its 20th anniversary, will Woodlands (Best Property Agent), Accessorize now take place on 12th-14th July. Tickets (Best Fashion), Pretty Things (Best Eating already purchased remain valid. Contact BuildPlace), Horsham Museum & Art Gallery (Best 01243 755 055/ticket.office@goodwood.com Non-Retail), The Linen Shop & Gallery (Best Independent)," La Source (Quirkiest), and% The 6: Horsham Microbiz, run by Horsham District # #$ went to C&H Fabrics. # ! Council, is being held on Saturday 9th March 2: The Rotary Club of Horsham thanks those Most Voted For prize # stall display# award # ! % who contributed to its Christmas Collections Horsham Market’s best in Horsham town centre at The Drill Hall, # #by Forget Me Not Plants and a and supported the Charity Christmas Market, ) was claimed Denne Road, at 10am - 4pm. The free event &new ! ‘Dressed for Web Success’ ! prize was won $! which together raised over £5,000. The features over 40 exhibitors offering a wide % # money has enabled the Rotary Club to help by Crompton’s at The Olive#$Branch. variety of business products and services, free # ! ! % business workshops and good networking about 50 individuals and families as well as making donations to the Horsham Night 4: Jim Hills Sports has moved to a Warehouse opportunities. For more details visit Shelter Project and the ARK Project. Last year at Hillside Farm in Coolham, RH13 8WN. After www.horshammicrobiz.co.uk or call 01403 was a record year, with £41,000 donated. Much 39 years in Billingshurst, Jim decided to move 215264. of that has gone to the ‘Making a Difference away from the village as the lease was coming to Horsham’ scheme which helps local people to an end and he was frustrated by the parking 7: Four new species of spider to Sussex have and organisations such as CAB, Social Services, situation in Jengers Mead. Considerable been discovered by Sussex Wildlife Trust Debt Advisory Services and the Y Centre. Visit investment has been made at the Warehouse, ecologist Graeme Lyons and Sussex County www.horshamrotary.org.uk which is open Monday to Saturday at 9amRecorder (for spiders) Andy Phillips. The spiders 5.30pm. Call 01403 741116 or visit were discovered at Stedham Common, an 3: Many Horsham retailers and key stakeholders www.jimhillssports.co.uk SWT nature reserve near Midhurst. They were Email: info@abmbuilding.co.uk of the local business community gathered at a wolf spider called Hygrolycosa rubrofasciata Website: abmbuilding.co.uk South Lodge Hotel on 15th January for the 5: Alan Fisher, a former Horsham District (Na), Zelotes petrensis (Nb), a crab spider ‘2012 Horsham Unlimited Dressed for Success Councillor, has died. Alan was first elected to called Philodromus praedatus (Nb) and a

Call 01293 851913

Liston House, Faygate Lane, Faygate, RH12 4SJ


AAH News Round-up 4

5

3

Picture by Gemma Harding

9

10 13

14 money spider called Satilatlas britteni (Nb). You can read Graeme & Andy Phillips’s blog at www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/blog/ 8: Partridge Green brewery Dark Star has increased its brewing capacity by 50% to cope with demand for its beers. Managing Director Paul Reed, said: “Our recent expansion will mean that we can start to consider supplying more customers throughout the south east without losing touch with our long standing regulars, some of which have been with us ever since our early days of producing a barrel or two out of the cellar of the Evening Star pub in Brighton.” For more visit www.darkstarbrewing.co.uk 9: Horsham band Mainly Madness, a tribute to the popular band but also a celebration of 2-Tone and Ska, will be playing live at The Holbrook Club in Horsham Saturday 23rd February. Tickets are available now from The Holbrook Club on 01403 751150 or visit www.theholbrookclub.co.uk 10: Sussex Wildlife Trust has carried out essential maintenance work to its lake at

Woods Mill nature reserve near Henfield. Water levels have been lowered in order to carry out improvements to the lake which is an important habitat for wildlife including dragonflies, damselflies, aquatic plants, toads, frogs and kingfishers. For more information visit www.sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk 11: Simon Day brings his ‘Comedy and Error’ to the Capitol on Sunday, 10th February at 7.30pm. He tells the story of his troubled youth to his career as a stand-up comedian and his days on The Fast Show. Tickets cost £13 from 01403 750220 or www.thecapitolhorsham.com 12: Businesses and organisations are invited to enter teams (preferably in fancy dress) to compete in the fifth annual Horsham Charity Pancake Race to be held from midday in the Carfax on Tuesday, 19th February. The day, organised by The Rotary Club of Horsham in partnership with Horsham District Council, includes a real Mascot Egg and Spoon Race. Teams compete in an 80metre relay race, using their own frying pan and cups and prizes awarded to the winners. To enter visit

www.horshamrotary.org.uk or email horshamrotary@btconnect.com 13: Broadbridge Heath Cricket Club has secured Olympic Legacy Funding from Sport England’s Inspired Facilities Fund. Thanks to a £50,000 investment, the club will be able to upgrade facilities including enlarging and improving the changing facilities, installing new showers and hot water system, modernising the toilet facilities and installing new drainage. 14: Slinfold and Cranleigh Golf & Country Clubs have announced the winners of their Rising Young Sports Star Competition. They are Horsham siblings Luke and Lorna Harty (both from the Kenagi Academy of Martial Arts), Guy Macey from Wisborough Green (Pulborough Rugby Club), Leila Rahmatallah from Loxwood (dressage competitor and dance enthusiast) and Rebecca Gould from Cranleigh (Guildford and Godalming Athletics Club). They have each been awarded annual membership to Slinfold Golf & Country Club and were presented with a certificate by Andy McNiven, manager at Slinfold.


Thinking of extending or Improving your home? Open: Monday - Saturday: By Appointment

( ! #

!

"

!

!

"

# $

!

$

) "

# % !

! $ #

%

#$ !

#

#

#

#

%

& ! #

#

#

%

Your choice $!

! # #

##

Interior design

! %

%

'

'

#! ! #

' '

#

!

# $

%%%

#

! !

#

Architecture &

! !

#

" %

" #

!

+

%

#

# #

$! "

*

!

&

# "

$ % # + # # % )

% !

'

!

!

! "

%%%

#%

Build "

,

#

# )

#

%

#$

# ! !

##

%

#

&! % #

www.phk.co.uk Email: info@abmbuilding.co.uk Website: abmbuilding.co.uk

! #$ !

$! # !

%

Call 01293 851913

Scan This Code to View our Online Gallery

Liston House, Faygate Lane, Faygate, RH12 4SJ


10

‘Not many people can say they’ve worked with

the President’ I was born in 1923, in Hanover Square in London. We lived in a big house but we shared it with many other people. I lived there for the first eleven years of my life. My Dad worked in County Hall near Westminster and we needed to live near his work. When I was eleven, we bought a house in Barnehurst in Kent. I left school when I was 14. My parents could not afford to buy grammar school uniform so I thought ‘this is it, I’ll go out and get a job’. There was no point fretting about it. I went to the Labour Exchange and I got a job in what was supposed to be a fruit and vegetable shop. When I got there, it happened to be a stall in the market place. I didn’t tell my mum and dad that I was working at a market stall. Then one day they popped along and were horrified to see me on a market. I was too scared not to take the job, as I needed the money. But my mum and dad said ‘you’re coming home with us’. I got a job in a tiny laundry in Kent. It was an office role and a bit mundane, but when the manager went out on business the girls used to bring me in to the laundry area and show me how to iron shirts. I was earning 17 shillings every week. My parents were poor as there was a Depression for much of the 1930s, so my mum would take my wages and leave me enough to buy my own toothpaste. My parents were taking the money but I was learning a trade and I was happy about that. I learned how to iron and press shirts and you wouldn’t see a 14-year-old doing that these days. The war started when I was 16. We lived near a golf course where there was a big shelter that had been built. During the Blitz, we were rushing over to the shelter, and a German bomber was shot down by a Spitfire and the pilot crashed near us on the course. The pilot was only young and of course he was killed, as were

Violet Phillips, 89, from Horsham

his crew. Some people rushed out to get souvenirs from the bomber and it blew up, and many of them were hurt. These were people that we knew. Everyone had to help the war effort. If you

were not working or at college, when you were 18 you were recruited into a munitions factory. That scared me as I didn’t want to make bombs, so I volunteered for the Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS) when I was 17.


My Story: Violet Phillips We all went to Queensbury, near Halifax, for a six week course to see what our skills were, after which I was chosen for the Royal Corps of Signals. During the training, local people would adopt the young ATS girls. I was adopted by Wilfred Pickles, a famous television and radio presenter, and his wife. We went to them once a week for a bath and a hot meal. I was a fast learner, but because I was the baby of the group the others would mother me. They used to tuck me in at night and say ‘poor little Violet’ but I absolutely loved it in the Forces. It was one of the best times of my life as I became independent and made many friends. One of the American soldiers even taught me how to fire a gun! I passed the B1 test in Teleprinter operating, which was the highest level and included field training. Then one day I was told I had been chosen, along with 72 other ATS girls, to work on the D-Day Landings serving Dwight D. Eisenhower, then the Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces. They said that we were the cream of the ATS. The work was for the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Forces (SHAEF) and was based at Bushy Park. All our work was underground and secretive. We weren’t allowed to talk to people about it and could not mention Eisenhower’s name. I didn’t even tell my parents where I was. We stayed at Bushy Park and travelled by underground train to Goodge

John and Violet wed in 1955.

An American soldier gave teenager Violet some tips on firing a gun


Do you have a story to tell? If you think your ‘story so far’ would make an interesting read, please do get in touch with us on 01403 878026. A visit may cost you a cup of tea for Ben and Toby (or in Violet’s case some of her famous Rock Cake!)

‘One of the American soldiers even taught me how to fire a gun’

Street Station. From there we would enter a secret door, which led to an elevator that took five minutes to go 300 feet into General Eisenhower's bunker. It was around that time that the Germans starting dropping buzz bombs (V-1 Flying Bomb) so in a way we were lucky to be so far below ground.

General Eisenhower would often come through and see how we were doing. He was quite a shy man, but he was sweet. We all thought he was in love with his driver (Kay Summersby) too. She was a lovely girl and she was very attractive.

Nobody knew about us. We were girls beavering around under there, and people didn’t know what we did. With the landings, it was all about the men and the pilots, but nothing was said about the women sending secret messages to the front line.

It wasn’t until later I realised the importance of the job we did. I always had this proud feeling about it, and I had done something that probably nobody else has done around here; I’ve worked with a President of the United States of America. It’s something you can tell

people and I’ve always been proud of that.

Mark Grainger Landscaping and driveway construction Established since 1989

I became very good as a teleprinter and could type 100 words a minute, which was good for me as it got me a job in the bank after the war. I put my name down with several agencies. I briefly worked with the Ministry of Food on the Groundnut Scheme, but I wanted something permanent so I put my name down for six jobs. One was for the Standard Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, based in the City.

"' !!

!

"

" $

"

"

&"

" "

% !

driveway/block paving drainage pathways patios tree work turfing groundworks ponds

"

!

$ "

#!" ' " #

! #

#

"'

!#

01403 822512/07779 583868 email: mark.grainger4@hotmail.co.uk

%%%

"

#


My Story: Violet Phillips

One of the girls I was in the services with came along too and we both got a job. I was there for 15 years. They were delighted as we were ready-trained. I worked on the accountancy machines and eventually I became a supervisor, looking after seven girls. I went to London at Marble Arch to see the Queen’s Carriage during the Coronation. I slept up there the night before. You had to go up early to get a good spot, but that’s when I was a little devil. I met my husband that same year. John needed a partner to dance with and he asked me as I did ballroom dancing. I was quite a good dancer and I would put them all to shame on Strictly Come Dancing. John couldn’t dance a step so I had to teach him. John couldn’t go in the Forces as he had a kidney removed when he was eight. But he was very interested in the War and with what I did with SHAEF. He used to join me on all the commemorative events I was invited to.

Violet at a tree planting event in 1994, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of SHAEF

7229(<Âś6 $17,48( ),1($57$8&7,21((56 9$/8(56

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of SHAEF, there were 100 American Oaks planted at Bushy Park, along with 100 English Oak. They asked me if I would like to plant a tree and I agreed. The American Ambassador and his wife were there and I had my photo taken with them. When John died, we had been married 56 years. He had been ill for a couple of years and I looked after him for eight years at home. He had kidney trouble and eventually everything went. It was awful watching him die. After that, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel like I would want to go on but my carers are wonderful and I see two of my children regularly. My third child, Pam, died when she was 47 and I still miss her. I did keep in touch with some of the other girls but of course they are dying out, as we are so old. I will be 90 in August and I wonder if there any of the 73 still alive, aside from me. I could be the only one left of the girls as I was very young when I joined. I do think of them, as it was a very important part of my life. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve thoroughly enjoyed my life. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never regretted not going to grammar school as I probably wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have done any of the things I have done.

$XFWLRQHGDW6SULQJ*DUGHQVODVW\HDUaDQWKFHQWXU\&KLQHVHFDUYHGMDGH OLEDWLRQYHVVHODQGFRYHUVROGWRDVSHFLDOLVWEX\HULQ+RQJ.RQJIRUÂ&#x2026;

+RUVKDPRQO\HOHYHQPLOHV7KHZRUOG VWRS VSHFLDOLVWDQWLTXHEX\HUV  MXVWDFOLFNDZD\ 

)UHH YDOXDWLRQV DQG SURIHVVLRQDO DGYLFH RQ VHOOLQJ \RXU DQWLTXH IXUQLVKLQJV DQG FROOHFWDEOH WUHDVXUHV E\ DXFWLRQ  0RQWKO\VSHFLDOLVWVDOHVPDUNHWHGRQOLQHDURXQGWKHJOREH 1H[WDXFWLRQVWKWKVW QG)HEUXDU\

6SULQJ*DUGHQV$:DVKLQJWRQ:HVW6XVVH[5+%6 DXFWLRQV#WRRYH\VFRP

ZZZWRRYH\VFRP


14

Keeping the Creative

Juices Flowing For young people finishing full-time education, it is increasingly difficult to land a good job. For creative Horsham residents Sarah Chorlton and Sam Leeves there was only one solution...do it yourself! was full, so I started to concentrate a little more on the online market. Then in January 2012 I re-applied to go on to the market and was successful. Last year it was really good for my business.”

Does that cushion have a moustache? It does indeed, but it’s not something that a plain cushion has grown naturally and subsequently groomed, as that skill is beyond them. It is the work of Sarah Chorlton, who has set up her own business called Bonny Boutiques, specialising in quirky gifts.

What is it that people like about Bonny Boutiques? Sarah says: “The products are all hand made, so each one is slightly different. Some people would rather spend a few extra pounds to order a cushion that is hand-made, matches your interior or your mood and character, as opposed to buying a mass-produced cushion. I like to make something that is personal to the customer.”

Why did she set up her own business? Sarah went to Winchester School of Art and studied fine art, but like many graduates found work difficult to come by. She said: “When I left University I felt a bit lost and didn’t know what to do when I returned to Horsham. As most people who leave University find, it’s very hard to get into what you want to do. It seemed as though I would have to work for free for a year to have any chance of finding a job I wanted.” And home furnishings was her calling? Working part-time at Waitrose, Sarah would put out the magazines and look in the homes and lifestyle sections. These designs would inspire a business. “I decided to make cushions and bunting to begin with just to try it out,” said Sarah. “I see my cushions as a canvas, and I collect fabrics and put it together, so it is still a creative process with colour, shape, patterns, and so it feels like I am utilising the skills I gained at University.” What does Sarah make? It started with bunting, with Sarah using her mum’s old sewing machine and a cutting board belonging to her grandmother, and this led on to cushions, bags and even quirky greetings cards. The best sellers have been the cushions with moustaches or VW Campervans and Beetles. Sarah said: “A lot of it is experimentation – sometimes it doesn’t work and sometimes it does.”

Is there a Bonny Boutiques shop? Not at the moment. Sarah’s first event was at a crafts fair at Loseley Park near Guildford, but her first local stockist was Dixey CB Opticians in West Street, Horsham. Now, Bonny Boutiques sells products at New House Farm, Iris & Arlo in Petworth, Old Mill Café in Wisborough Green, as well as La Vida and Rosie Lee & Me in Piries Place, Horsham. Sarah is on the market too. The market in Horsham town? Officially called the Local Produce Market, it’s become a great way for Sarah to meet new customers. She said: “I couldn’t get on to the market initially as it

Presumably moustaches are personal to a lot of people... They are the best sellers. Sarah sold items in a pop-up shop in Richmond close to Christmas, and the cushions were flying off the shelf. She said: “On one Saturday, I had people rushing in and asking about our Campervan and Beetle cushions, but I completely sold out! I was surprised – I must have sold 20 cushions on one Saturday, so every night I would come home and make a few new products. With the moustache cushions, people have run up squealing, grabbing the cushion and saying that they have to have it!” And it’s just a moustache? Not pictures of anyone cool like Burt Reynolds or Tom Selleck? No, although it is the traditional aviatorstyle moustache shape, like the one sported by Daniel Day Lewis in Gangs of New York, as opposed to a bushy Freddie Mercury style moustache or the short, neat Charlie Chaplin fashion. Sarah said: “That was an idea that just popped into my head, and it just worked. I thought ‘someone must have done this before’ but I could not find anything so I seem to


have come up with a unique product.”

lished by Netherworld Books.

What’s next - London, Paris, New York? Sarah said: “The pop-up shop has made me realise that I want to be up in London a lot more. I want to go into the Victoria pop-up shop next. The plan is to go into London, concentrate on the best-selling products, and see if we can grow.”

So it’s about a monk waving a stick at the sea at sunset? I’m sure there’s some old phrase about not basing an opinion on a novel by its outer sleeve, but it’s not coming to me at the moment. Endless Tides is about the adventures of Captain Laike Skyheart during a war between the great nations of Mandro and Genko.

Where can I find out more about the business then? Pop along to the market or visit the website at www.bonny-boutique.co.uk And what of this chap above.. Sam Leeves has written a fantasy fiction story called ‘Endless Tides’ which has been pub-

This is set in another world then? Yes, a world where heroes have suitably striking names. But this isn’t a Tolkien-inspired story of elves, goblins, wizards and fairies. Sam says: “There are not any wizards or anything; it’s mainly soldiers. There is a hint

of magic, but the characters are human. There is a magic sword and a mythological jewel, which is a weapon of mass destruction, but that’s all. There is no scope given as to when or where this world is set. I didn’t want to go into the astrophysics! I’ve always thought of Endless Tides as more of a character study. When people have asked me what the book is about I’ve replied that it’s a fantasy version of Catcher in the Rye.” No idea what that means - I find James Patterson a challenge. So how did Sam come to write a fantasy book? He reads a lot, typically two hours a day, and has always been into fantasy stories. He said: “I tried writing a book when I was about eight about ninjas as I had been watching a


17 ‘I tried writing a book when I was eight about ninjas’ lot of Teenage Mutant Hero Turtles. I’ve always played a lot of music and read a lot of books so I was always going to do something like this at some point.” Did he study English as well as animated shelled reptile violence? Sam studied English Language and Literature at Collyer’s College, and it was a text transformation of an extract from ‘Cat on a Hot Tin Roof’ which led to the book. Sam said: “I had written a conversation between Brick and Maggie but in the style of Cormac McCarthy, as a short story. My teacher read it and said I was good at growing characters. He said I had a bit of flair for writing and should send something to a publisher. I’ve always been interested in fantasy fiction so I thought I would sit down and try and write a short story of my own. I did that, and it was only a couple of pages long, but it was based on the character Captain Laike Skyheart. I thought there was a little bit of mileage in the character and the story, so I planned a story out.” Isn’t Captain Skyheart the name of a Jude Law flop? No, that’s Sky Captain and the World of

Tomorrow. But there isn’t a great deal of meaning in the name. Whilst writing the short story, he was called Captain Skylark, and whilst writing Endless Times Sam inadvertently called him Skyheart and stuck with it! It took nine months for Sam to write Endless Tides. If it’s not Tolkien-inspired, what influences are there? Sam lists the likes of Mervyn Peake, who is best known for the Gormenghast books, and Brandon Sanderson’s Mistborn series amongst his favourites, but video games such as Final Fantasy have also shaped his style and imagery. Did Sam always know it would be published? He said: “I didn’t think I would be able to get it published, especially when I actually started sending it to people and got a steady flow of rejection letters back. I was under no illusions that getting published would be easy, but that wouldn’t stop me trying. I was sending over the first three chapters, a synopsis and a bit of an author biography.”

Personalised

phone covers ª iPhone 3, 4, 5 ª iPod Touch (4th gen) ª Galaxy S2, S3 ª Blackberry Bold (9700/9900) ª Blackberry Curve (8520/9360) The ideal way to personalise and protect your mobile device, printed on hard plastic with a scratchproof coating.

Gift vouchers available

www.unique-phonecovers.co.uk


18 But eventually someone took it on? Netherworld Books, a fantasy story specialist, saw potential and asked for the rest of the book. Then they said they would publish Endless Tides. Sam said: “The achievement didn’t really hit me until the book was released.” Now he just needs to sell it! And that is proving difficult. Sam said: “A lot of the marketing and publicising is down to me, so I’ve set up a Captain Skyheart Twitter account. There’s a surprising amount of fantasy networks on the Internet. Finding them is easy, but getting involved in it all is difficult. I’m finding that publicising it is harder than actually writing the book.” Will there be more from Sam Leeves? Endless Times was intended to be just a one off, so the book has a proper ending, but Sam admits he is writing another book set in the same world as Endless Times. He said: “They are not sequels; there are new characters, new stories, but based in the same world. I’ve written the second story and I will send that to my publisher and I have plans for a further five after that.” What is new in this second story?

Sam has introduced a new race but they are still ‘basically human’. But he said the biggest change is the improvement in his prose. Does Sam have desires to be the next great fantasy author? As he tries to generate followers for a Twitter account, the seven movie deal and worldwide merchandising must seem further away than, well, Mandra and Genko. But Sam does

hope to make a living out of writing. “If I got to the point in my life where I could write and earn enough from my books that I would not have to work, that would be fantastic,” he said. Where can I find a copy? You can buy it on Amazon, or order it through Waterstones and the WH Smith website.

info@strandshairsalon.co.uk

01403 249990 For New Customers with any stylist Strands hair salon has a reputation for its innovative, cutting edge styling. Located in the heart of Horsham, Strands prides itself on its friendly service, which stems from the extensive experience of its stylists. Strands has gone from strength to strength over 15 years and recently Helen, Tracey and Nicole joined advanced stylists Jenni and Brooke to create a dynamic new team!

RECEIVE A FREE BLOW DRY When you book in for a Wash and Cut during the month of February. New Customers Only.

5B East Mews, East Street, Horsham, West Sussex, RH12 1HJ


$ No matter what kind of year you’ve had, Valentine’s Day is the perfect opportunity to prove that romance is not dead! We are, deep down, a romantic nation, and this year we will spend about £1.5billion on flowers, chocolates and other gifts, with an estimated 25 million cards being sent. In America, cynics call it ‘Hallmark holiday’ as they believe it exists primarily for commercial purposes, rather than to commemorate a traditionally significant event. Certainly as time has passed more and more types of businesses have realised the financial benefit of Valentine’s Day. But despite commercialism, it’s hard to be too cynical about anything that promotes a little love and affection! There are various theories on the origin of Valentine's Day, but the most popular dates back to the Roman Empire during the reign of Claudius II, 270 AD. Claudius didn't want men to marry during wartime because he believed single men made better soldiers. Bishop Valentine went against his wishes, performing secret weddings. For this, Valentine was jailed and executed on February 14th. While in jail, he wrote a love note to the jailor's daughter signing it, "From your Valentine.” The modern phenomenom really began to explode in the 19th Century when people exchanged love letters. The letters then gave way to greetings cards, and in the second half of the 20th Century, the practice of exchanging cards was extended to gifts such as roses and chocolates. In the 1980s, the diamond industry finally paid attention

!!!

# " too. Valentine’s Day makes some people go crazy in love, and others plain crazy; Verona, where Romeo and Juliet lived, receives about 1,000 letters addressed to Juliet each year! Here at Sakakini’s, we have pendants, necklaces, bracelets and earrings, but we also offer a special service for those men who are thinking about popping the question. A proposal is seldom a decision taken lightly, and it’s vital to get the right ring. It can be daunting for men when risking a considerable sum of money on something so individual, so

$

we offer people a sample ring, made of cubic zirconia rather than diamond set. That way, if it transpires that the ring is not to your lady’s liking, or -sadly it happens - your marriage proposal is turned down, the ring can be returned or altered. If she falls in love with the ring, we can set it with diamond and of course ensure it is the right fit. If you would like more information on this or any of our other services, do visit us at 45 The Carfax in Horsham or visit our website at www.sakgems.com


20

Mailman delivers

Acoustic showcase Live music event at The Anchor promotes local singer/songwriters

Simon King

Just a couple of years ago, American chat show host Ellen DeGeneres predicted live on her chat show that Ellie Lawson would become 'the hugest, hugest star.’ Despite live TV appearances, a deal with Atlantic Records, an ambassador role for the clothing brand Quiksilver Women and even tracks produced by William Orbit, Ellie just fell short of making a significant breakthrough. But she remains a polished live act with beautifully constructed,vibrant folk songs. We see Ellie performing on a cold and wet Sunday night at The Anchor Pub in Market Square, Horsham. Only a handful of people are there to see

The Mailman

Ellie, accompanied by Dave Harewood on guitar and mandolin, give a sublime acoustic rendition of the Trance Single ‘Place In The Sun’ by Menno de Jong featuring Ellie Lawson. Ellie, from South London, is one of four performers on a night of live music put together by Jamie Stanley, commonly known as Stan. As a music lover and a singer/songwriter himself (usually performing under the name The Mailman or in his band ‘The Tandem’) Stan puts on a monthly showcase of live, primarily original music. It has been a struggle to generate big crowds

Ellie Lawson

as the event is always held on a Sunday (the last of the month) and most of the material is original music, so crowd-pleasing classics are kept to a minimum. Stan said: “I’ve only been in Horsham for about five years, but I’ve always been in and around music. When I came here I was pleased to find there was a thriving ‘open mic night’ scene, and I was keen to get involved. “But whilst there are plenty of venues locally for covers bands to play at, there are limited options for people wishing to sing their own songs. “So I created Stan’s Showcase and The Anchor was the obvious home as there is a


Stan’s Showcase ready-made stage. “The management took a little persuading initially, but the manager now really enjoys live music and is very supportive. We’ve now been going for almost two years. “It was hard to book acts to start with but now I get people that I have never met contacting me and asking if they can play. “It has had to be mainly acoustic because of licencing issues and because there are neighbours to consider. But I would like some more rock bands in the future as the rock acts we had on at the special end of year concert went down really well. “We are fortunate that there are some fantastic singer-songwriters in Horsham and Crawley. If you go to an open mic night you normally end up seeing someone who is really good. “I think Horsham had a tradition long before I arrived of putting on good nights of music and championing original music. It’s not something I started – I’m just giving it a bit of a kick.” And kicking us off tonight was Simon King, a founding member of former Horsham Battle of the Bands winners and local favourites The Collector. Simon has recently started recording and performing solo and acoustic.

!

#

Ed Reed Band

‘We are fortunate that there are some fantastic singer-songwriters in Horsham and Crawley. If you go to an open mic night you normally end up seeing someone who is really good’

"

We are an official dealership for Stihl and Honda. Stihl is a leading manufacturer of home and professional garden and forestry machinery. We stock a wide range of chain saws, strimmers, blowers, vacuum collectors and hand tools. For the perfect lawn then look no further than our huge range of Honda mowers for every garden size.

Garden Machinery Arborist Equipment Full Service Backup Stihl and Honda Dealership Brighton Road, Lower Beeding, West Sussex, RH13 6NQ

01403 891580 www.ats-machinery.co.uk

Don’t be afraid of the Mouse! A little computer knowledge can make a big difference. Our friendly tutors come to you. They teach popular topics such as emailing and shopping online. One to one tuition, one step at a time.

Call us FREE on 0800 862 0666


22 Ed Reed

He performed a mix of songs by The Collector, new material, and even a stripped down version of Joy Division’s ‘Love Will Us Apart’. It’s not strictly original music only at Stan’s Showcase, so the odd cover is thrown in! But as a singer/songwriter, Simon is grateful for any opportunity to perform his own material. “It is important we have these nights,” said Simon. “There are very few opportunities for original bands to play as pubs are full of cover bands at the weekend. “Stan’s Showcase is great as there is real variety. It is frustrating when people just want to hear covers. I play the occasional cover but I’m not the best singer in the world and I’m not the best guitarist in the world, so if I cover a track I do

it in my own style.” With Rachel Hawker pulling out of the gig, Stan himself (as The Mailman, although sadly he did not change into a delivery uniform) proceeded to confidently belt out a couple of his feisty, acoustic rock songs. He performed a couple of classics too by the likes of Pearl Jam and Red Hot Chili Peppers, before Ziggy Stardust went down well with some casual drinkers at the opposite end of the pub. Ed Reed recently returned home from a ten year sabbatical in Melbourne where he wrote and recorded his debut solo album 'One Good Roll'. His rousing, feel-good, Primal Scream inspired band gave the dwindling audience (it was gone

‘There are very few opportunities for original bands to play as pubs are full of cover bands at the weekend’ Dave Harewood plays alongside Ellie Lawson


Stan’s Showcase

Acoustic version of Place in the Sun Scan on the QR Codes in some of the images to watch videos of some of the live acts, including the Mailman below...

Horsham. “We have a really good mix of acts here, with people just setting out as well as experienced acts, and it would be good if more people came along to support them as they might be surprised by what they see.” For details of Stan’s Showcase as well as other local gigs visit the excellent Horsham Rocks website at www.horsham-rocks.co.uk

% 5 BRIX offers the complete solution for your building or property development project. We have over 20 years’ experience of end-to-end management, from conversions and refurbishments to new developments for individuals, businesses and organisations. Brix has established a network of trusted, accredited tradespeople to call upon to make sure your requirements are met. At Brix, services do not end at the design and development stage. As a Gas Safe registered business, Brix Plumbing & Heating are the first point of call for repairs, maintenance

or installation. We are experts in plumbing, oil fired boilers, gas fired boilers, LPG fired boilers, domestic or commercial air conditioning, ground source heat pumps, home extensions, bathrooms, kitchens. We also offer a professional Solar (PV) Panel installation service. Brix Solar will advise you on the best system for your property and give you specific and comprehensive information on the outlay and benefits of changing to this ecofriendly method. Please contact us on 01403 788985 or 07979 537342 for more information on any of our services.

BRIX

10pm on a Sunday night) a spirited performance which deserved a more lively setting. Their stand-out track, Another Night, was extended by a brilliant instrumental finale . Hopefully, more local people will be willing to give local acts a fair go at Stan’s Showcase. Stan said: “I like to give new acts a platform, but we do this professionally. This isn’t amateur hour – Ellie was signed in America and did a tour across the States – and we’re bringing these acts to

ECO HOMES | LOFT & ROOFING | EXTENSIONS & REFURBISHMENT | DAMP & TIMBER | DRAINS

SERVICES


THE

SQUARE HIGHWOOD Horsham

INTRODUCING THE SQUARE A beautiful formal garden, manicured hedges and a stunning work of art form the impressive centerpiece of The Square, the jewel in the crown of the already hugely successful Highwood in Horsham, offering an exclusive collection of just seventeen 4 bedroom Georgian-style townhouses. Early registration is strongly recommended to ensure you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss out on this eagerly awaited release. Off plan opportunities are available with a chance to personalise your home on selected plots.* Prices from ÂŁ475,000 Sales Suite open daily 10am - 5pm. Call us to book an appointment: 01403 334 334 Highwood, Hills Farm Lane, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 1EP

www.highwoodhorsham.co.uk/the-square Proud to be a member of the Berkeley Group of companies Our vision for your future

*Subject to building schedule. Prices correct at time of going to press.


A Royal Penn In the Backside As a prominent Quaker, William Penn defied a Monarchy before he established the state of Pennsylvania. Today, his legacy lives on at the Blue Idol in Coolham. William Penn is among Horsham’s most notable historical characters He is certainly the only former resident to have founded an American state, and if it is true that Penn was the inspiration for the Quaker Oats cereal box, well that’s something to boast about too. We’ll talk about Pennsylvania later. We’ll also talk about his imprisonment, his expulsion from Oxford, the impact he would have on religion in England, the historic documents he would draw up at Warminghurst and his long association with The Blue Idol at Coolham. But we’ll start with some background material... The 17th century saw significant social and religious change We had executed our King, Charles I, for treason, and there was great unrest as Oliver

Cromwell became the country’s first Lord Protector. During this time, a man called George Fox toured England preaching a simpler, more reflective faith, still within the Christian family, but outside the Church of England, which he believed was corrupt. He rapidly built up a following known as the Society of Friends. In March 1655, he held a meeting in Steyning and recorded in his journal that he ‘journeyed into Sussex and came to a Lodge near Horsham’. He would end up staying longer than anticipated - in April he was imprisoned in Horsham Gaol for three months. That same year, the Baptist Matthew Caffyn debated with Fox in Bryan Wilkinson’s house, Sedgwick Lodge.

local churches and disrupting services. Before the people had time to leave, they would evangelise to the congregation. Thomas Leycock attacked John Chatfield, the Horsham Minister "before he was come out of the pulpit and poynting to him sayd Thou lyar and that he was a ravening wolfe in sheepes cloathing". A judge used the term ‘Quaker’ as a term of abuse for the Society of Friends and that is what they came to be known as. Some believe the term relates to Fox’s injunction to ‘quake at the Word of the Lord’. Either way, Quakers would hold open air meetings, waiting for a member to speak when they felt the need to do so - a form of worship that they continue to this day.

The Society of Friends didn’t make many friends, particularly at other churches The Society was renowned for attending

Despite their reputation, Quakers were relatively strict Christians They refused to bow or take off their hats to


social superiors, believing all men equal under God, and they also refused to swear oaths of loyalty to the King. Quakers followed the command of Jesus not to swear, reported in the Gospel of Matthew, 5:34. Chris Knott, a current member of the Blue Idol Meeting Group, says: “Our form of worship is peaceful, so we sit in silence and we only speak when we feel led to speak. We can and do sit here for an hour in silence. If I stand up and speak I feel it’s something that I have to do, and I call it a prompting. Quakers believe there is ‘that of God’ in us all and for me it’s the ‘that of God’ element that brings me to my feet. There is no structure to the meetings. It is very peaceful and our basic beliefs around peace, equality and simplicity appeal to some people. It works for some and not for others.”

Back in the 17th Century, such beliefs could get you in hot water In 1656, the Quaker Thomas Leycock was imprisoned in Horsham, but Major-General Geoff reported that people flocked to see him. He distributed copies of a Quaker book, before he attacked the local gentry on the Bench at his trial. The local JPs often used the law to keep in goal Quakers whose influence threatened the social and religious stability of the shire. One famous local Baptist was Matthew Caffyn who preached in 1656 a sermon called 'the deceived and the deceiving Quakers discovered'. Quakers were filling up the local gaol In 1662, Ambrose Rigge was sent to Horsham goal and would stay there for ten

years and four months for refusing to take the oath of allegiance, with the monarchy now re-established under the reign of Charles II. A prolific author, he published pamphlets from his prison cell and even married a fellow inmate, Mary Luxford, in 1664. During his imprisonment, a certain William Penn distributed some of Ambrose’s pamphlets in Ireland. William Penn’s dad was a much admired man As the son of an Admiral, Penn was in so many ways an ‘establishment’ figure. After the death of Oliver Cromwell, Admiral Penn was sent on a secret mission to bring back the exiled Prince Charles. For his role in restoring the monarchy, the Admiral; was knighted and gained a powerful position as Commissioner of the Navy. He


50% OFF As a thank you to our regular customers, recommend a friend (or two) and you can both enjoy 50% off your next Cut & Finish* At Look Fantastic in Horsham, we are renowned for sharp, contemporary styles, with our experienced team offering unique cutting and colouring skills. We also provide Balmain 100% human hair additions and extensions. We are located in the scenic area of Piries Place close to Waitrose. Pop in soon for a free consultation!”

had high hopes for his son, William, who was sent to Oxford University. There, he found that the student body was a volatile mix of Cavaliers, Puritans, and Quakers. Because of his father’s high position and social status, young Penn was firmly a Cavalier but his sympathies lay with the persecuted Quakers. When William was 15, his family had become friends with Thomas Loe, a Quaker missionary, and he had left an impression on young Penn. What followed was a classic case of youth rebellion Now under favour of the King, The Admiral had great hopes for his son’s career. But at Oxford, when the Dean was fired for his free-thinking, Penn and other open-minded students rallied to his side. Penn was reprimanded, and the despairing Admiral pulled his son away from the University, sending him back to a school


28 ‘Threatened with a life sentence, he responded "My prison shall be my grave before I will budge a jot: for I owe my conscience to no mortal man”

which imposed stricter religious requirements including daily chapel attendance. Penn rebelled against enforced worship and was expelled. His father, in a rage, attacked young Penn with a cane. The Admiral’s career was being threatened by their son’s behaviour, so at 18, young Penn was sent to Paris to get him out of view and improve his manners. The Prodigal son returned a different man Penn presented to his parents a mature, sophisticated gentleman and enrolled in law school, before joining his father at sea for a time. Their relationship improved. In 1665, London was gripped by the plague, and Penn observed how Quakers on errands of mercy were arrested by the police and demonized by other religions, even accused of causing the plague. He was sent to Ireland in 1666 to manage the family landholdings, but during his time away King Charles further tightened restrictions against all religious sects other than the Anglican Church. The Quakers were especially targeted and their meetings were deemed as criminal. But that was not to put off Penn A chance second meeting with Thomas Loe confirmed Penn’s attraction to the Quakers, and a short time later he was arrested for attending meetings. Rather than state that he was not a Quaker to dodge any charges, he publicly declared himself a member at the age of 22. His family’s rank meant he was quickly released, and was immediately recalled to London by his father. The Admiral was severely distressed by his son’s actions and took the conversion as a personal affront. He felt he had no option but to order his son out of the house and to withhold his inheritance. Penn became homeless and began to live with Quaker families.

Chris Knott is Co-Clerk at The Blue Idol Quakers During these times many new sects besides Quakers were founded There were the Seekers, Ranters, Antinomians, Soul Sleepers, Adamites, Diggers, Levellers, Antibaptists, Behmenists, Muggletonians, and many others. The King responded with harassment and persecution of all religions and sects other than Anglicanism. Penn became the first theorist and legal defender of Quakerism but it was his branding of the Catholic Church as "the Whore of Babylon" and Puritans as "hypocrites and revelers in God" that really got him into hot water. The Bishop of London ordered that Penn be held indefinitely in solitary confinement in an unheated cell until he publicly recanted his written statements. Threatened with a life sentence, he responded "My prison shall be my grave before I will budge a jot:

for I owe my conscience to no mortal man.” He was released after eight months of imprisonment and his religious views effectively exiled him from high society. But he proved to be a resilient character He was arrested again in 1670, but the jury found him ‘not guilty’. When the judge asked them to reconsider their verdict, the jury refused and were sent to a cell over several nights to mull over their decision. The Lord Mayor sent Penn to Newgate Prison and the full jury followed him! The members of the jury fought their case from prison in what became known as Bushel's Case, and managed to win the right for all English juries to be free from the control of judges. This case shaped the future concept of American freedom.

$& T O B Y P H I L L I P S P H O T O G R A P H Y. C O . U K • I N F O @ T O B Y P H I L L I P S P H O T O G R A P H Y. C O . U K • 0 1 4 0 3 2 5 8 2 1 8 / 0 7 9 6 8 7 9 5 6 2 5

!

Capture life...

* &

&' $ ,% & # + ( & &# "$ ( #( & $& $#* &' $#' )& ,% &( ' "'$ $* &' " # ' # + + ""' % &( ( $#' &- " # # # ( ! #

Toby Phillips Photography specialise in capturing life’s essence, creating and delivering images that freeze frame memorable moments, true personalities and natures natural beauty. Your life. Your surroundings. Your memories.

( &

Studio shoots or on location, our photography preserves memories in time for you to relive and cherish forever. For more information, details on photographic tuition or pricing please contact us. 10% DISCOUNT ON SELECTED PORTRAIT PACKAGES *

10% DISCOUNT ON SELECTED WEDDING PACKAGES *

>PORTRAITURE

>WEDDINGS

$"



#"

>ART PRINTS

* S E E W E B S I T E F O R F U L L D E TA I L S

%%% 

""!

#

" !

!$

$&

-

( &


The Blue Idol The Admiral respected the integrity of his son But he knew that after his death, young Penn would become more vulnerable. His own personal favour with the King could not save William after he was gone. So, in an act which would not only secure his son’s protection but also set the conditions for the founding of Pennsylvania, the Admiral wrote to the Duke of York, the successor to the throne. Following Admiral Penn’s death, William did indeed inherit his fortune and, following another stint in jail, wrote to the King with a solution to the problem of continuous religious turmoil. He planned a mass emigration of English Quakers. In 1677, a group of prominent Quakers that included Penn purchased the colonial province of West Jersey, half of the current state of New Jersey, and in 1682, they bought East Jersey too. In 1682, Penn set sail for America He was aboard a ship called ‘Welcome’ with around 100 ‘Friends’ including at least 16 from the Billingshurst area. It would be a place where they could escape persecution at home. Warminghurst Place had by now become a centre for Quaker activity, with famous visitors such as George Fox and Robert Barclay visiting Penn’s home. On the 12th July 1677, a huge open air meeting was held there attracting several hundred people. It was here that Penn drafted a constitution with Algernon Sydney for their new state. This would eventually form the basis of the Constitution of the United States. As legacies go, it’s not bad. Penn first called the area New Wales But then he thought about Sylvania, which is Latin for ‘forests’ or ‘woods'. It was King Charles II who changed it to Pennsylvania in 1681, in honour of Admiral Penn. The King, surprisingly, granted Penn more land west of New Jersey and north of Maryland to make Penn the world’s largest private nonRoyal landowner, with over 45,000 square miles to his name, and he gained sovereign rule of the territory. In return, the Crown was freed of a debt to Admiral Penn of £16,000. To attract settlers in large numbers, he wrote a glowing prospectus, and within six months assigned 300,000 acres to about 250 prospective settlers. Penn returned to Warminghurst two years later He spent the following years writing and promoting his faith. In 1691, he helped set up a Quaker meeting house attached to a farmhouse in Oldhouse

The Blue Idol Quakers meet in this small room every Sunday


20 The 58 Blue Idol

Mailman delivers

Lane, Coolham. The building today is known as ‘The Blue Idol’. In 1693, Penn received assurances from the King that he could preach without persecution so he became an itinerant preacher and an author. In 1696, he remarried and brought his second wife to Warminghurst Place. Penn sold his estate in 1707 and today nothing exists of the house, as the purchaser, James Butler, was determined ‘not to leave a trace of the old Quaker’.

Acoustic showcase

But the Blue Idol is still going strong The Blue Idol Group meets every Sunday and infrequently have other meetings too. In terms of numbers, there are about 30-40 members, with typical attendance around 20 people. The meeting lasts for an hour. Chris Knott, co-clerk for the Blue Idol group, said: “I’m personally very proud to be a Quaker. It has a wonderful history and the values really matter to me. I wasn’t born a Quaker, I became one in my thirties and I’m Simon King The Mailman nearly 70 now. I went to my first Ellie meeting at Lawson A famous image of Penn’s arrival in America and, below, a barn dedicated to him at University as one of our lecturers, a social the Blue Idol historian, was a Quaker. When I married, my husband had a Pentecostal background and I had a Church of England background and we wanted to try something different, so we thought we would try a Quaker meeting.”

Live music event at The Anchor promotes local singer/songwriters

There are other Quaker groups in the area In addition to the Blue Idol group, there is a Horsham Quaker group too, and they meet in Worthing Road. Other Quaker groups exist in Ifield, Capel, Dorking, Reigate, Oxted and at Claridge House near East Grinstead. The Blue Idol was initially a farm house called Little Slatters but has been used by the Quakers since 1691. The building is owned by the Quakers, but Allan and Pauline Cook, who are not members of the group, are wardens of the Blue Idol. They are employed by the Quakers to look after the building and grounds. Chris said: “I think this building shows what we are about. It is simple but has integrity.”

‘The King, surprisingly, granted Penn more land west of New Jersey and north of Maryland to amake world’s largest private Just couple ofPenn years ago,the American chat Ellie, accompanied by Dave Harewood on guitar and mandolin, give a sublime acoustic show host Ellen DeGeneres predicted live on non-Royal over 45,000 her chat show that landowner, Ellie Lawson would with rendition of the Trancesquare Single ‘Place In The become 'the hugest, hugest star.’ Sun’ by Menno de Jong featuring Ellie miles to his name’ Lawson. Despite live TV appearances, a deal with Atlantic Records, an ambassador role for the clothing brand Quiksilver Women and even tracks produced by William Orbit, Ellie just fell short of making a significant breakthrough. But she remains a polished live act with beautifully constructed,vibrant folk songs. We see Ellie performing on a cold and wet Sunday night at The Anchor Pub in Market Square, Horsham. Only a handful of people are there to see

Ellie, from South London, is one of four performers on a night of live music put together by Jamie Stanley, commonly known as Stan. As a music lover and a singer/songwriter himself (usually performing under the name The Mailman or in his band ‘The Tandem’) Stan puts on a monthly showcase of live, primarily original music. It has been a struggle to generate big crowds

Just occasionally, people are married at the Blue idol Chris said: “A Quaker marriage will be a meeting in silence but of course, the couple have to go through the vows. We say as the event is always held on a Sunday (the ‘In the presence of God and these our last of the month) and most of the material is Friends, I take thee to be my wife or original music, so crowd-pleasing classics are husband, promising with Divine assistance kept to a minimum. to be unto thee a loving and faithful wife or Stan said: “I’ve only been in Horsham for husband as long as we both shall live.” They about five years, but I’ve always been in and around music. When I came here I was pleased to find there was a thriving ‘open mic night’ scene, and I was keen to get involved. “But whilst there are plenty of venues locally for covers bands to play at, there are limited options for people wishing to sing their own songs. “So I created Stan’s Showcase and The Anchor was the obvious home as there is a

Read our great motoring features at www.aahorsham.co.uk


58

31

are not held here very often but we did have two last year. That was a bit of a miracle, as before then we hadn’t held a wedding for years. Everybody who attends signs a wedding certificate. We have one framed on the wall which has William Penn’s signature.” The Quakers can still cause a stir “The latest issue to come up concerning marriage is same sex marriage,” said Chris. “Quakers are at the forefront of that. We are pushing for same sex marriages to be celebrated in a religious setting. The issue has been around for years amongst Quakers and you have to wait until members feel it is the right thing to do. We don’t vote – we agree. We find, in religious terms, the will of God. So the will of God amongst Quakers at the moment is that there should be same sex marriages. I think one or two have felt they couldn’t go along with that, but mostly Quakers can as it is basic equality.” Lots of people do not know the Blue Idol exists The Quakers host an open week in October and welcomes new members. Chris said: “I think dwindling numbers is a major concern for most non-evangelical Christian groups. We are pretty buoyant to say the meeting house is in the back of nowhere.

' &$

)' , (

.+, +0 .+($-.+ $,-+) +)(/)+%

)' "+)/(

(,$ , (

#$

Pauline and Allan Cook are wardens of The Blue Idol Lots of people do not know we are here. We get people who say ‘I’ve driven by that sign for years and didn’t know what it was’. I don’t think Quakers, as a Society, are very good at promoting our ideas and marketing ourselves. But if you wanted to talk to us we are here.” There is an issue with the roof

)-( + + (,

+ '$ , $!-,

+$'.&

' &$ )-( + )' , + (, $, ,$-. - $( $--& /)+-# ( )!! -# )/!)& .+ & +" (.+, +0 # , "+ , & -$)( )! *& (-, -+ , # "$(" ,#+. , $(" # ("$(" ,% -, ( '. # ')+ -) )&).+ 0).+ " + (

, & ,

' &$ )-( + )'

///

' &$ )-( + )'

It is leaking. Having been patched up over the years, the Trustees felt it was time permanent repairs were made. English Heritage was willing to provide £47,000, but the estimate for the project was £152,000, meaning that the Quakers had to raise the rest. Chris said: “We have been in fundraising mode and have just about done it. The response to the campaign has been very humbling. We sent a leaflet out to all of the Quakers,


32 58

Horsham Museum has in its collection works belonging to William Penn, who died penniless despite founding Pennsylvania and as individuals they have donated to the cause. We set up the Blue idol Runners and we raised quite a bit through that too. We are nearly there, and we will get a new roof. There are some issues with the far wall as it’s a bit rocky. William Penn took the beams out to make it a two story room and 300 years ago that’s causing a problem!” Don’t mention the bats… The Quaker meeting room is decorated with bats drawn by children from the William Penn School in Coolham village. Two groups of protected bats reside in the Blue Idol and the roof work cannot be carried out until they

have moved on. William Penn is gone, but not forgotten. The Blue Idol has its own William Penn Memorial Garden, with information about his life. There are also many letters and information boards about his life in a small barn in the front garden. The Quakers there are linked to the Central Philadelphia Monthly Meeting and Quakers from America have visited the Blue Idol. Chris said: “We’ve even had people come in with the name Penn, from America and Britain, wanting to find out more about the family history.”

William Penn died penniless in 1718. He died at his home in Berkshire and was buried in an unmarked grave next to his first wife in the cemetery of the Jordans Quaker meeting house near Chalfont St Giles. Horsham Museum does though have a couple of works by William Penn in its collection. AAH would like to thank Jeremy Knight and the staff of Horsham Museum and Art Gallery for providing historial information on William Penn, Quakers and Religion in the 17th Century. We also thank Chris Knott, Allan and Pauline Cook for their time and patience!

www.southerncountieshomeimprovements.co.uk

SOUTHERN COUNTIES home improvements We are a local, family-run company, and all of our work is guaranteed and competitively priced. We are fully insured and offer FREE quotations and advice. References are available on request

EPDM Rubber Flat Roofing Flat Felt Roofing uPVC Fascias, Soffits & Guttering Re-roofing & Alterations Chimney Maintenance All new Cement Work Dormer & Velux Windows Etc Loft Conversions

Tel: 01403 255792 Mob: 07825 180303


Mark Antony Windows www.markantonywindows.co.uk

Windows

Doors

At Mark Antony Windows, our aim is to provide the best service supplying and installing PVC-U and aluminium products in the South East and all at competitive prices. Company Directors Mark Edwards and Antony Deakin have more than 30 years of experience in the industry. We cater to all needs with every aspect covered from complete conservatories - including design, project oversight and planning regulation - to minor repairs, locks and condensed units. Our windows are manufactured using the WHS Halo Profile, using a unique technology of a five chamber thermal system to give extra protection against the outside elements. They undergo extensive testing to ensure maximum

Conservatories

01403 732800

Soffits & Fascias

insulation. All of our frames are calcium organic and recycled. All products come with our 10 year guarantee. Mark Antony Windows has also been recognised by the Double Glazing & Conservatory Ombudsman Scheme (DGCOS).

“I strongly recommend you use a member of

DGCOS” The DGCOS is supported by TV’s consumer champion Nick Ross, who said: “The double glazing industry doesn’t exactly have the best reputation in the world.

Repairs

We’ve all heard stories about aggressive sales tactics, poor standards of workmanship, problems never being rectified, and installers going out of business, leaving worthless guarantees. “The DGCOS is trying to clean up the industry. There are a lot of trade bodies in the double glazing industry but however impressive they sound most offer little protection to consumers. We’re trying to change that and get real consumer protections. When buying double-glazing or a conservatory I strongly recommend you use a DGCOS member.” Mark Antony Windows is also a Checkatrade supported business, and is backed by FENSA. For more details contact Mark or Antony on 01403 732800 or emarkantonywindows@fsmail.net

Email markantonywindows@fsmail.net


35

The Wonder Of Warminghurst It’s been three decades since services ended, but thanks to its untouched beauty, The Church of the Holy Sepulchre remains a true hidden gem of the Horsham District

Warminghurst Church is far from being one of the wonders of the world. But sat in an 18th Century pine box pew on a cold winter’s day, any visitor to the church will be in little doubt that they have found one of the great hidden treasures of the Horsham district. It’s been 33 years since the tiny community of Warminghurst, close to Ashington, lost a regular service at The Church of the Holy Sepulchre. But its door is still open, and anyone visiting cannot help but be affected by the untouched beauty, the remarkable history, and an enchanting atmosphere that has a contradicting effect of being both haunting and charming. An intense search might even lead to you spotting a ‘face’ in the wood of a pew box. Perhaps one for Bishop Brennan to take a closer look at… Today, the church is one of 340 in the country in the care of The Churches Conservation Trust – a national charity protecting historic churches at risk. However, a small group of Friends of Warminghurst Church keep a close eye on the building and report to the Trust. Living next door, Rachel Webster is one of the key members of this group. Rachel said: “There are about 20 people involved, with a core group of five or six. Some live here, and others love the church for its special charm and character. “The work of the Trust is essential to keep these historic churches open and in a fit state to visit, and even though funding is now extremely difficult for them, they provide a back-up for the volunteer and Friends groups. “During the winter we only have a dozen or so visitors to Warminghurst Church every week but it’s far more popular in the summer. A lot of people know the church and have driven past it before but they have never taken a look inside.

“There are people who have lived in the area for years and have never walked through the door. But when people do visit they realise it’s very special. People are very moved by it. “Most people like the fact that it hasn’t been touched. You walk in and see these box pews, the Royal Arms of Queen Anne and the 16th century iron chest, and you feel this sense of timelessness. There’s a genial, peaceful air to it. They may not be religious but the church does have a very special atmosphere, and of course some are simply fascinated by the history.” The Church of the Holy Sepulchre has a princely, elevated position, overlooking farmland that stretches undeveloped across to the South Downs and Chanctonbury Ring. Its origins go back to the 13th Century, but a church may have existed on the site in the 11th century or earlier. The beams you see today are

believed to date back to 1158. Its greatest appeal is that it was not restored during Queen Victoria’s reign, leading one book, Sussex Churches and Chapels, to call it ‘the finest example in Sussex of how many must have looked before the Victorian restorers.’ The present church was built in about 1220 and for a time was owned by the Benedictine abbey at Fécamp in Normandy. Above the west end, the wood and shingled bell-turret is the oldest part of the building. The bell was cast in about 1200 but it is, frustratingly yet rather wonderfully, beyond reach. It may well be some years since anyone has seen the bell, but visitors can at least ring it. The church even took part in ‘All the Bells’ when thousands of churches rang bells simultaneously to mark the start of the London Games. The Church was later in the hands of the


36 ‘Edward Shelley Junior has had his head cut off deliberately. This would have been done after he brought shame on the Shelley family by being executed in 1588 for harbouring a Catholic priest’

The 17th Century altar rails have interesting turned wooden balusters; Rachel Webster is one of a group of Friends of the Church that looks after the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, on behalf of the Churches Conservation Trust Earl of Arundel, then Sion College Nursery, before the Shelley Family took over. Perhaps the most important historical feature at the church is a brass monument to the Shelley family, set on the north wall of the Chancel. It commemorates Edward Shelley and depicts his wife and children kneeling. The children are identified by the first letter of their Christian names. The boy on the far left, Edward Shelley Junior, has had his head cut off deliberately. This would have been done after he brought shame on the Shelley family by being executed in 1588 for harbouring a Catholic priest. In the 1930s, the three Coats of Arms on the Shelley monument were stolen. One was returned, only to be stolen again, and

their whereabouts remains a mystery. In 1619, a vault and private chapel was built for the Shelley family, before the church fell into the hands of the renowned Quaker William Penn in 1676. Penn lived close by in Warminghurst House, and it was here that he drafted the first Constitution for the American state of Pennsylvania. His house was bought by James Butler in 1707. Butler swiftly demolished the house and built a huge new building in its place. He also made many improvements to the church. On the south wall of the chancel there is a large monument to Dame Elizabeth Benet, Butler’s wife, who died in 1721. Another large monument commemorates

Kim Sawyers has been a Nail Technician for 20 years, graduating from the Creative Nail Academy in London with the title of Master Nail Technician. Kim has establised a new salon at her home, offering a range of treatments using CND products to provide strong, natural looking nails.

John Riches, a trustee of Butler, who also lived at Warminghurst Place. Near the beginning of the 18th Century, a pine screen of three arches, topped by the Royal Arms of Queen Anne, was added to divide the chancel and the nave. The Royal Arms were repainted in 1845 by E. Martin and remain in very good condition. Then in about 1770, a set of box-pews was installed, with high backs and lockable ends. These also remain in excellent condition, as does the three decker pulpit of pine and oak. For a period between the two World Wars, vandals caused considerable damage, but repairs were carried out before the church re-opened. Then in 1959-1960, John Leopold Denman of the firm Denman & Sons carried

ARCHITECTURE & + A B BUILDING SERVICES New buildings - Extensions - Garage Conversions Refurbishments - Loft Extensions - Kitchens A+B is a team of Architectural Designers and General Builders who can take you from the design stages through to work completion

13 Mill Mead, Ashington, RH20 3BE 07799 881810 | kim@salon13.co.uk

6 Saxon Close, Billingshurst, RH14 9SA

ab.arch.build@gmail.com

Project Management Energy efficient passive design Planning Permission Building regulations

Tel: 01403 785690 Mob: 07980 304045


Stan’s Showcase ready-made stage. “The management took a little persuading initially, but the manager now really enjoys live music and is very supportive. We’ve now been going for almost two years. “It was hard to book acts to start with but now I get people that I have never met contacting me and asking if they can play. “It has had to be mainly acoustic because of licencing issues and because there are neighbours to consider. But I would like some more rock bands in the future as the rock acts we had on at the special end of year concert went down really well. “We are fortunate that there are some fantastic singer-songwriters in Horsham and Crawley. If you go to an open mic night you normally end up seeing someone who is really good. “I think Horsham had a tradition long out a sensitive series of works during which before I arrived of putting on good all parts of the building were inspected and nights of music and championing origistructural defects corrected. The east nal music. It’s not something I started – window was improved and the ceiling was I’m just giving it a bit of a kick.” stripped down to reveal its original timbers. And kicking us off tonight was Simon Twenty years later, however, the Diocese of King, a founding member of former HorChichester decided to make the church sham Battle of the Bands winners and redundant. local favourites The Collector. Simon has Warminghurst has always been an isolated recently started recording and community – the Domesday Book recorded performing solo and acoustic.

Ed Reed Band

The are Diocese of Chichester placed the church ‘We are fortunate that there some fantastic into the care of the Redundant Churches Fund, and and that later became the Churches singer-songwriters in Horsham Crawley. If you Conservation Trust. It is one of only 38 Grade go to an open mic night you normally end up seeing I listed buildings in the district of Horsham, and despite its isolated location attracted someone who is really good’ nearly 2,000 visitors from all over the world

a population of 52 and in nearly a thousand years the population has grown by about a dozen – and there were not enough people to keep the church vibrant. Services had been held there one Sunday every month during the summer but that ended in 1979. A report in the West Sussex Gazette quotes residents highlighting the importance of establishing a group of Friends to look after the church.

last year. There are occasionally events held at the church. Rachel said: “The Friends look after

#$'#& %$$($# ! "

!

#

We are an official dealership for Stihl and Honda. Stihl is a leading manufacturer of home and professional garden and forestry machinery. ! of chain We stock a wide range saws, strimmers, ! blowers, vacuum collectors and hand ! tools. ! For the perfect lawn then look no ! our huge further than # range of Honda ! " mowers for every garden size. !

"

#

! " " " " # "

Brighton Road, Lower Beeding, West Sussex, RH13 6NQ !

www.ats-machinery.co.uk

! !

Don’t be afraid of the Mouse! "

A little computer knowledge can make a big difference.

!

Our friendly tutors come to you. They teach popular topics such as emailing and shopping online. One to one tuition, one step at a time.

Garden Machinery Arborist Equipment Full Service! Backup Stihl and Honda Dealership

01403 891580

! !

Call us FREE on 0800 862 0666


38

Visitors to the suitably eerie graveyard are few and far between; the three Coat of Arms on the Shelley Monument have been stolen, whilst

activities and fundraising. We have to limit what we do here as we are relying on people’s goodwill and time to come and help, but Derek Spencer, the Reverend at Thakeham Church, will come here for key services. “Our next event will be the very popular Plant, Cake and Produce sale on the first Bank Holiday in May and the Harvest Festival and biennial Christmas Tree Festival are also well attended. “A Choral Workshop is held in June. It was started by my parents, Jessica and Daniel Aggs, in 1983 and was held annually until 2003. We revived it last summer with conductor David Lawrence returning and we hope to repeat it every year. “We could rent the church to other groups. You could, if you wanted to, have a yoga class, not that it would be appropriate! But the Churches Conservation Trust is not restricting what goes on here, within means. “If it is handed over to another group, we would charge something like £30 and just stand back and be a presence. For musical events, the acoustics are beautiful, but of course you have to put up with the cold! “If there is a service here, such as a wedding, we ask for a retiring collection. Weddings are difficult though as there must be a link to Warminghurst or through the Friends of the Church. I was married at Warminghurst in 1986 and I think there have only been three since then with one coming up this year.” But this is a critical time for the church. The snow has found a way through the roof, and could be seen resting on oak beams that have been there for nearly 900 years. Rachel said: “We have snow coming in and that took us by surprise. We knew it was draughty and I’m going to go to the Churches Conservation Trust and say ‘is this the moment in which we can start a campaign?’


Warminghurst Church

the head of disgraced Edward Shelley Junior was removed; A fine 16th Century iron Chest at the Church; the Royal Arms of Queen Anne

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;This is a critical time for the Church. The snow has found a way through the roof, and could be seen resting on oak beams that have been there for nearly 900 yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The tiles have slipped to a degree, and the paper that was put down to keep the draught and the elements at bay has deteriorated and is peeling off. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m quite worried about it deteriorating any further as we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want it damaging the beams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are heritage funds and Lottery funds that we may be able to approach as the Churches Conservation Trust cannot do it all by themselves. They rely heavily on donations from visitors. If everyone who visited put ÂŁ2 in the box then we would probably be covered.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some Conservation churches have needed heating and have started heating funds, but perhaps we will start a roof fund.â&#x20AC;? If you would like to know more about Friends of Warminghurst Church, or enquire about using the Church, contact Rachel on 01903 891312/ rjw.web@gmail.com or Roger Colebrook on 01903 744849 / colebrook@btinternet.com. Anyone interested in joining for ÂŁ5 per annum will be welcomed wholeheartedly. For more on The Churches Conservation Trust visit http://www.visitchurches.org.uk

Can you see the face? See the full picture on Page 66...

Your life, your way, our care. Horsham Home Care. After 9 months of careful planning and reparation, Horsham Home Care starts delivering care services on March 5th. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve spent a lot of time creating and developing their bespoke service â&#x20AC;&#x201C; getting the business registered with the Care Quality Commission and recruiting the very best care staff. Horsham Home Care understands the importance of LQGHSHQGHQFH,WOLHVDWWKHKHDUWRIDPRUHIXOáOOLQJOLIHVW\OH 7KDWĂ&#x161;VZK\WKHLUFDUHVHUYLFHIRFXVHVRQSURYLGLQJWKHVXSSRUW \RXQHHGWRPDLQWDLQ\RXULQGHSHQGHQFHDQGFRQWLQXHWKH DFWLYLWLHV\RXHQMR\ 7KH\FDQDVVLVWZLWKDZLGHUDQJHRISHUVRQDOWDVNVLQDZD\ WKDWVXLWV\RXDQG\RXUFLUFXPVWDQFHV<RXPD\UHTXLUHRQJRLQJ FDUHWRDVVLVW\RXZLWKORQJWHUPFRQGLWLRQV2U\RXPLJKWQHHG UHVSLWHRUVKRUWWHUPFDUHDIWHUDQDFFLGHQWRULOOQHVV:KDWHYHU \RXQHHGWKH\FDQKHOS 7KH\WDNHWKHWLPHWRJHWWRNQRZ\RXSHUVRQDOO\Ă&#x2014;WRXQGHUVWDQG \RXULQWHUHVWVOLIHVW\OHDQGQHHGV7KH\FROODERUDWHZLWK\RX DQG\RXUIDPLO\IULHQGVRURWKHUDGYRFDWHVWRFUHDWHDVXSSRUW SODQWKDWFRQWLQXHVWRSURPRWH\RXULQGHSHQGHQFHDQGHQKDQFH \RXUOLIHVW\OH7KH\DOVROLDLVHZLWKRWKHUVWDNHKROGHUVDQGFDUH SURIHVVLRQDOVWRPDNHVXUHWKHLUVHUYLFHLVLQWHJUDWHG

The care you want. At a price you can afford.

Being part of the community. +RUVKDP+RPH&DUHZDVIRUPHGE\WZRORFDOUHVLGHQWV=DQH 6WXUWDQG*X\+DQQHOO7KH\ZDQWHGWRPHHWWKHJURZLQJDQG HYROYLQJGHPDQGIRUKRPHFDUHVHUYLFHVIRUSHRSOHOLYLQJLQWKH +RUVKDP'LVWULFW7KH\DOVRZDQWHGWRSURYLGHHPSOR\PHQW opportunities for local people too. 7KHLUFRPELQDWLRQRI&DUHLQGXVWU\H[SHULHQFHDQGEXVLQHVV H[SHUWLVHKDVJLYHQWKHPDVROLGXQGHUVWDQGLQJRIZKDWFDUH UHDOO\PHDQV1RWMXVWKHOSLQJRXWZLWKWKHPRUHPXQGDQHWDVNV EXWVXSSRUWLQJ\RXZLWK\RXULQWHUHVWVSDVWLPHVDQGVRFLDO DFWLYLWLHV6RKDYLQJXVHGWKHLUORFDONQRZOHGJHWRGHYHORS VWURQJOLQNVZLWKDZLGHUDQJHRIRUJDQLVDWLRQVZKRDUHDFWLYH LQWKHFRPPXQLW\DQGZKRVXSSRUWROGHURUYXOQHUDEOHSHRSOH WKH\FDQOHW\RXNQRZZKDWĂ&#x161;VJRLQJRQLQWKHDUHDDQGVXSSRUW \RXWRSDUWLFLSDWHLQORFDODFWLYLWLHV

Care Quality Registered $VD&DUH4XDOLW\&RPPLVVLRQUHJLVWHUHGSURYLGHURI GRPLFLOLDU\FDUHVHUYLFHV+RUVKDP+RPH&DUHĂ&#x161;VVHUYLFHVPHHW WKHUHTXLUHPHQWVRIWKH+HDOWK 6RFLDO&DUH$FW7KH UHJLVWUDWLRQSURFHVVXVXDOO\WDNHVDWOHDVWHLJKWZHHNVEXWWKH\ PDQDJHGWKLVLQMXVWWZRĂ&#x153;7KHWLPHDQGHIIRUWZHVSHQWVHWWLQJ XSRXUV\VWHPVDQGSURFHVVHVUHDOO\SDLGGLYLGHQGV7KH&4& LQVSHFWRUZDVLPSUHVVHGZLWKRXUDSSURDFKZKLFKVKRXOGJLYH FOLHQWVFRQáGHQFHLQWKHTXDOLW\RIRXUFDUHĂ?=DQH6WXUW &RIRXQGHUDQG5HJLVWHUHG0DQDJHU

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very excited to be providing care to new clients, to ensure that they enjoy an independent lifestyle and are able to maintain strong links with the wider community.â&#x20AC;? Zane Sturt, Co-founder and Registered Manager

,I\RXĂ&#x161;GOLNHWRGLVFXVV\RXUFDUHQHHGVRUUHTXLUHPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQSOHDVHFDOOXVRQ RUYLVLWRXUZHEVLWH www.horshamhomecare.co.uk


!

"

$ ' !' # C ! % # $% # # $ # !! # !! (% % " &" #

!# ! # $ '

44 892,.: 26,4<-. ' %

!!

!# ! &# %&# ? 201 (*44 9775 *+26.; 55 ? 779 55 201 (*44 *+26.; ? 779 55 *:. *+26.; ? 9*>.9 "*,3 55 ? 9*>.9 26. *:. 55 ? .60;1 7/ "426;1 (!# %!" 5? 55? 55 "" $ #*60.5*:;.9 # $ #*60.,773.9 *61256.@ 77- $263 %*8 "*,3

#

"92,.: +*:.- 76 8*,3*0. :;*;.- *+7=. 2625<5 /<962;<9. 79-.9 *: *+7=. *6<*/,;<9.9 9.:.9=.: ;1. 9201; ;7 >2;1-9*> ;1. 7//.9 *; *6@ ;25. >2;17<; 67;2,. "*,3*0. 892,. -7.: 67; 26,4<-. 26:;*44*;276 79 *::.5+4@ !

$%)

>>> :<::.?32;,1.6-.:206: ,7 <3 B

*6</*,;<9.- +@

97>6 "97-<,;:

.6; 4;

>>> 42/.:;@4. /<962;<9. +2A

B

9201;76 #7*-

79:1*5 #


Breakthrough treatment

for Neuropathic pain Watch video case studies and read patient testimonials at

www.horshampainrelief.co.uk Suggested Applications for Upper body • Shoulder and neck pain • Frozen shoulder • Facial Pain and TMJ • Bell’s Palsy • Tension headaches • Thoracic back pain • Repetitive Strain injury • Tennis/golfer’s elbow • Rheumatoid arthritis and other joint pain • Sporting injuries • Post operative pain • Phantom and Stump Pain (for amputees) • Complex Regional Pain syndrome • Other nerve related pain A local Horsham therapist is offering a pain relief treatment that has been called ‘a breakthrough for nerve pain relief’. The innovative Stimpod 460 gives relief for chronic neuropathic pain and studies suggest its use brings long lasting therapeutic benefits. The Pain Management Centre at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospitals in London did a clinical test on the product and noted a ‘dramatic reduction in pain’. In 19 of 35 cases, the hospital reported a 100% improvement with pain reduced to zero. All these patients were suffering from chronic neuropathic pain. The treatment is called External Neuromodulation and is well established in certain NHS pain clinics and recently became available to physiotherapists and other health professionals. Keith Atkinson of the Horsham Nerve Pain Practice, is pioneering the use of the Stimpod NMS 460 in the UK, and has already seen remarkable results. He indicated: “When one considers that about a third of all GP appointments are linked to neuropathic pain, then you can appreciate that that there are many people suffering in pain that can be relieved. Chronic neuropathic pain is described as nerve pain that has established itself for more than 3 months. The treatment looks to break the pain cycle and neutralise the pain. The relief is very fast and very effective. Where there is a physical abnormality, then the pain may return but in many cases we find that when the pain is eased, the individual is able to regain their normal posture and the problem eases away.” The Stimpod uses a variable pulse frequency

Suggested Applications for Lower body • Sciatica lower back and leg pain • Femoral back and leg pain • Hip pain • Knee pain • Achilles tendonitis • Rheumatoid arthritis and other joint pain • Ankle and feet pain including gout • Plantar fasciitis • Sporting injuries • Post operative pain • Phantom and Stump pain (For amputees) • Complex Regional Pain Syndrome • Other nerve related pain

Keith showing one of the treatment sites for the sciatic nerve with a current that can be manipulated to focus via a special probe onto the affected nerve or pain site. Two waves are harnessed by the device, a square wave and a high frequency radio frequency wave. The overall effect is to close the pain gateway and block the pain transmission. At the same time the body’s natural painkillers, enkephalin and endorphins are transmitted to the pain site. Keith Atkinson said: “This is a breakthrough product and is now licensed for chronic

Free Review Consultation! After its remarkable trial at Guy’s and St Thomas’Hospitals in London, the innovative Stimpod 460 is now available at Horsham Nerve Pain Practice.

Contact Keith Atkinson at Horsham Nerve Pain Practice, 46 Depot Road, Horsham, on 01403 256332 or 07768 537846.

www.horshampainrelief.co.uk l katkin0504@gmail.com

neuropathic pain relief. Very importantly it is considered safe and non-invasive. I’m very pleased to be able to offer this treatment for pain sufferers in Horsham. During our pilot studies, we found it to be beneficial in many different scenarios. I would really suggest to anyone interested that they look at the website where video case studies and other testimonials can be viewed. I am also prepared to offer a free review consultation to anyone considering its use for their particular pain condition.”


Advertisement

A Year in the Life of...

A School Like

No Other #

$

Christ’s Hospital is celebrating not only 460 years since it first opened its doors to children in 1552, but also the granting of its Royal Charter by King Edward VI in 1553. The anniversary was marked last year by the whole school travelling up to London in September for a Thanksgiving Service at St Paul’s Cathedral and a Royal visit from the President of Christ’s Hospital, HRH The Duke of Gloucester in November. In addition, an exhibition ‘460 years in the making’ is running at Horsham Museum and Art Gallery until 23rd February. The exhibition places particular emphasis on the last 110 years at Horsham.

%"

Highlights to commemorate the anniversary ran alongside the many opportunities and events that happen in the normal school year to enrich the lives of the pupils. To mention a few – 2012 began with pupils excelling themselves in a national chemistry competition ‘Top of the Bench’ when Florence Carr-Smith (16) achieved the highest mark for the practical test in the competition. The Fives Team from CH did exceptionally well in the South Eastern Regional Fives Championships at Tonbridge, walking away with U18 Single Champion (Andea Gemade), U18 Doubles Champions (Andea Gemade and Rory Keddie) and the U16 Singles Plate (Conor Morgan).

!

The annual Bluecoat Concert at St John’s Smith Square, London, last February was a magnificent venue to showcase talented musicians who performed to their usual high standard to a packed audience. This year’s concert takes place on Monday, 11th February.

In March, the Model United Nations Team at $

!

%

CH was placed second in the nationwide MUN Tournament. Debating the topic ‘Building a Peaceful and Better World through Sport’ the competition was held on the international soil at the UN’s International Maritime Organisation in London. Individual prizes were also won by Finn McMahon, recognised with a Best Delegate Award, and Charles JamesCheesman, who won an Honourable Mention Award. During the summer term, hard work also paid off for Hockey girls when 34 girls ranging from Year 10 to the Lower Sixth toured Valkenburg in Holland for five days. The tour included master class coaching sessions and a tournament. The 28,000 spectators in the auditorium at Lord’s 1st Test West Indies v England were roused when the Band marched onto the pitch during the interval. Every

‘Examination results were excellent. At GCSE, 94.4% of all grades awarded were a A*, A or B’


band member contributed to a “wonderful display” resulting in an invitation to return this May. The first round of the England Schools Athletics Association Track and Field cup held at K2 Crawley was the setting for two fantastic team performances by the CH junior and intermediate boys. Both teams comfortably won the county round. In June, two CH pupils were honoured to receive invitations to celebrate The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee at Westminster Hall. Coralie Strong, 16, and Mary McMann, 15, were guests of the Worshipful Company of Grocers and Salter’ Company respectively. CH is proud of its association with Livery Companies who have supported generations of children since its foundation. Moving into the summer holidays, last year’s examination results were excellent with an A* to B pass rate of 78.5% and an A* / A pass rate of just under 50%. Some 37 pupils (ie 30% of the year group) gained three A grades or better. At GCSE, 94.4% of all grades awarded were a A*, A or B and the overall percentage

of grades at A or A* was 78.2%, which was sufficient to place CH 15th in The Times’ national league table for co-educational schools.

was delighted to welcome a fellow holder of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, Fleur Adcock, for a reading and discussion of her work.

The new academic year in September was marked not only by 460th anniversary celebrations but also by the 125th anniversary of the birth of Old Blue Sir Barnes Wallis. Members of the Barnes Wallis family were joined by a number of representatives of the RAF, the RAF Benevolent Fund, Old Blues and others at a special service in Chapel. Squadron Leader George ‘Johnny’ Johnson, in his nineties and one of the last surviving members of 617 squadron – the ‘Dambusters’ – was amongst the guests and enjoyed talking with pupils about his experiences.

Music, sport and the media were blended together when the Barns Green Half Marathon threaded its way through the School’s Quad to the sound of the Band and the Choir, along with the whole school community, sung on BBC Radio 2’s ‘Sunday Half Hour’.

The annual St Matthew’s Day thanksgiving Service in London was transformed into a very special occasion for the 460th anniversary by being held at St Paul’s Cathedral. The whole school was also invited by the Lord Mayor of the City of London to Guildhall for lunch. Following a wonderful reading from Jo Shapcott in 2011, the English Department

In October, Henry VIII and his six wives, along with other monarchs of the period, came to life when CH organised a Tudor Living History Day for children in Year 5 to share the School’s facilities and teaching with other schools by offering an extension to national curriculum activities. Over 200 children and their teachers from schools across the region travelled back in time by participating in a range of Tudor period themed activities. History Department teachers, who hosted the event, joined in by dressing in 16th Century style finery. A Tudor extravaganza in the afternoon included a magnificent display of Birds of Prey. In addition to the visit by HRH The Duke of Continued...

‘28,000 spectators at Lord’s 1st Test West Indies v England, were roused when the band marched on to the pitch during the interval’


‘Pupils excelled themselves in a national chemistry competition ‘Top of the Bench’. Florence Carr-Smith achieved the highest mark for the practical test’ Gloucester, Art was the high point in November with an exhibition launched at Horsham’s Capitol and another by Martin Parr in the Art School at CH. Martin Parr, a world renowned photographer, has been photographing the School from time-to-time over a period of two years. His images were featured in an article about Christ’s Hospital written by Jessica Salter in The Telegraph magazine in October, which has given the School much recognition about all aspects of its philanthropic work. The School was buzzing with excitement when it was announced that Joe Launchbury (a popular Old Blue) came on as replacement in the England v Fiji game at Twickenham. Joe went on to receive the QBE Man of the International Series award. College of Humanities. Luke Stevens, 18, received an award to acknowledge his outstanding performance, achieving one of the highest marks in a new competition called the Cambridge Chemistry Challenge, which was taken by 4300 students in 300 schools across the country, and Rory Keddie gained a full scholarship to The New

To round off the year at the ‘School Like No Other’, the Senior School’s production of ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ was a sell-out. The pupils raised over £11,000 for the Royal Marsden and pupils were treated to a visit by Tom Stoppard ‘In Conversation’.

Families are warmly invited to the School’s Admissions Open Morning on Saturday, 2nd March 2013 for entry into Year 7, Year 9 and Sixth Form. Contact us on 01403 246555, fjd@christs-hospital.org.uk or visit www.christs-hospital.org.uk

OPEN MORNING Saturday 2 March 2013 for Year 7, Year 9 and Sixth Form Entry Our Open Mornings are designed to give you a flavour of what CH is really like and to meet pupils and staff. Full details are available by visiting the School’s website or by contacting the Admissions team. T 01403 246555 E fjd@christs-hospital.org.uk W christs-hospital.org.uk

CHRIST’S HOSPITAL AN INDEPENDENT CO-EDUCATIONAL BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL RIGHT IN THE HEART OF SUSSEX Horsham, West Sussex, RH13 0YP Registered Charity No. 1120090


45

A Broad History After 10 years of research, Jonathan England has published a fascinating book on the history of Broadbridge Heath.

Broadbridge Mill stands behind its pond, frozen during the hard winter of 1946/7

In recent years, Broadbridge Heath has attracted more than its fair share of headlines, much if it negative. The village has seen the closure of its two prominent car dealerships, fought the proposed destruction of its leisure centre, and of course new housing developments now underway will dramatically change its landscape. But one resident has written a book, reminding us that Broadbridge Heath is a village with a colourful past, as well as a controversial present. Jonathan England’s book ‘There’s More There Than You Think - A Detailed History of Broadbridge Heath’ goes back to the days of

William the Conqueror, highlights the characters who established a village community, and covers the major developments and events of the 20th century. Jonathan said: “My interest in Broadbridge Heath history and local affairs began when I moved from Horsham into an old house in the village in 2002. “Annabelle Hughes, a well-respected local historian, had compiled a brief account of the house’s construction and history for previous owners and this piqued my interest and posed questions which I wanted to find out about. “I could not find a book in Horsham Library specifically about Broadbridge Heath, so I

realised that I would have to do the research myself. This journey led me to join the Local History Group of Horsham Museum Society, and eventually to become Chairman of the Friends of Horsham Museum.” Jonathan discovered that the first occupants of his house had been significant local landowners, which inspired him to dig deeper to discover all he could about the village. During a ten year period, when not working for a firm in Boston, Massachusetts, Jonathan devoted his spare time to the book. Much of the writing has taken place at 38,000 feet during trans-Atlantic flights. Far from being an nondescript village


46

The ‘New’ Post Office (now flats) photographed before the west extension was built around 1911; The north wing of Broadbridge Farm in early 20th century when it was inhabited by three families occupied by simple country folk, digging into the archives has uncovered some fascinating stories and links to influential people; hence the title of the book. The first recorded owners were Norman knights who came over with William the Conqueror, before the Covert family owned the village for nearly half a millennium. In Elizabethan times, Sir Walter Covert fought with Roger Gratwick, his tenant at Broadbridge Farm, over the local rights to operate in the lucrative iron industry.

Later, the village was sold to the Onslows, a Surrey-based family which supplied two speakers of the House of Commons. Their tenant, Matthew Caffyn, became the leader of the Baptist Church, led non-conformist worship at Broadbridge Farm and held baptisms in its mill pond. William Stanford married Elizabeth Caffyn and their grandson ultimately earned enough money from farming and milling so that he could buy the Broadbridge Farm Estate, which included most of today’s

village, from the Onslows. It was Matthew Stanford who built Jonathan’s house in the then isolated part of the village in the 1840s. Broadbridge Farm became the Sewage Farm when Horsham needed to improve its sanitation in the late 19th century. Broadbridge Heath is also associated with the Shelley Family of Field Place, although technically it is just inside the neighbouring parish of Warnham. The poet Percy Bysshe Shelley grew up there but his brother, John, had stronger village links as he owned land in the


Broadbridge Heath History

The Village Room (the first school) and Old Post Office Cottages in 1914; No longer there, Alfred Goring and his wife and daughter (both Emily) pose in front of the Smithy and Wheelwright Shop

‘If the book is popular perhaps there will be a second edition’ village, including The Shelley Arms. Percy Bysshe did take moonlit walks to visit his grandfather at Arun House in Horsham and he was said to have sheltered in a Broadbridge Heath barn, which was later to become the club house for the golf club, which later relocated to Mannings Heath. In 1752, Broadbridge Heath was the location for an execution by burning at the stake

when Anne Whale was executed on the Heath after she had murdered her husband in the village. Her accomplice and cousin, Sarah Pledge, was hanged nearby. Surprisingly, the golf links were used for early aircraft flights, and there were a few notable aircraft crashes, including an RAF bomber in the 1920s and a German Focke Wulf that had been shot down over Horsham in 1943. The

Army Camp (located where Tesco is today) certainly attracted attention from the Luftwaffe, and a doodlebug blew up in nearby fields. The book also highlights the importance of iron working during the Elizabethan period. Large ‘sows’ and smaller ‘pigs’ of iron were extracted from local ironstone in furnaces fanned by air fed by water wheel driven


48

Jonathan has finally completed an extensive history on Broadbridge Heath after ten years of research and writing bellows and fuelled by charcoal produced in the extensive local forests. The iron was then hardened in forges using huge, water powered hammers. At the time of the Spanish Armada in 1588, Roger Gratwick, Edward Caryll, and Sir Walter Covert each contributed £100 for the Armada defences. They were engaged in multiple legal fights in the highest courts of the land and violent confrontations over iron business rights in the Horsham district. Two of these protagonists

are strongly linked to Broadbridge Heath. The Gratwick Family included many yeoman farmers located throughout Sussex, and records suggest that part of the family moved from Cowfold to Broadbridge Farm in Broadbridge Heath sometime before 1552. Roger Gratwick made his fortune in the iron industry, owning a forge at Ifield and leasing two forges at Hawkin’s and Hammer Ponds in St Leonards Forest. When he died in 1570 the business was passed down to his son, also Roger of Broadbridge

Farm. Roger Gratwick’s landlord was Sir Walter Covert, who owned Broadbridge Manor along with Slaugham, Ashington and Twineham Benfield. Covert co-tenanted St Leonard’s Forest with Gratwick, and the two went to court in a dispute over rent. Edward Caryll, a rival iron master in the Horsham area, also started a fierce, sometimes violent, confrontation with Gratwick just as several new furnaces were being built and the local iron ore started to become scarce. This strife appears to have been too much for Gratwick. He left the iron industry to Caryll and Covert and moved away from Broadbridge Farm. Jonathan said: “As well as finding out about notable historic events, analysing census and directory records, people’s reminiscences allowed me to build up a picture of how the village developed, when houses were built, who lived in them, who ran the various shops and businesses and how the clubs and societies evolved. “I have had the opportunity to talk with many people associated with Broadbridge Heath who have kindly shared their knowledge, pictures and newspaper cuttings with me, especially during meetings of the Broadbridge Heath History Club which I held for several years. “In particular, Charles Weston has collected information about Broadbridge Heath all his life, and kindly gave


Broadbridge Heath History

No longer there, the Alfred Goring and his wife and daughter (both Emily) pose in front of the Smithy and Wheelwright Shop; The crash of an RAF bomber on Granny’s (Byfleet’s) Lane in 1927 me access to all of his archive, including a huge collection of pictures and recorded interviews of residents, which he has now donated to Horsham Museum. “One Sunday morning, a lady visiting from Devon knocked on my door and said that she was looking into the history of her family, which are related to the Stanfords. She later shared her research notes and previously unseen pictures of my house and Broadbridge Mill which are reproduced in the book. “Robert Hull, whose relatives rented Broadbridge Farm from Horsham Urban District Council around World War Two, also shared his research about the Farm and Mill. “Of course, history continues to be made, and as a Parish Councillor I get insights into some of it, so if this book is popular enough perhaps there will be a second edition in a few years. “More could be recounted about the prelude to the massive new development, which is now underway. The future of the District Sports Centre, which is in Broadbridge Heath, has recently caused major controversy and the Broadbridge Heath Quadrangle development proposals have yet to be fully disclosed. “I have not yet included the 1911 census records or transcripts of the oral histories, and I am sure lots of people will tell me where I have made mistakes and be able to add facts. Finding out about the local history of the village in which I live has certainly helped my feeling of well-being by giving me a sense of place. I hope that this book will help others in the district find theirs.”

01403 211133 66 North Street, Horsham, RH12 1RD www.shawsglass.co.uk

Shaws Glass has been part of the business landscape in West Sussex for over 15 years and is now firmly established as the region’s independent choice for all things glass

The Shaws Glass showroom in North Street, Horsham hosts a wide selection of products from a single sheet of glass to glazed windows and doors. We also have a range of conservatories or garage doors. You’ll have all the help and advice you need from friendly staff with a wealth of experience. Conservatories Double Glazing Front Doors Back Doors Composite Doors Fascias and Soffits Replacement Hinges Cat Flaps Table Tops Shop Fronts Cut Glass Toughened Safety Glass Supply only windows Glass Balustrades for staircases Acoustic Glass ‘We would have no hesitation in recommending Shaws to anyone" T & G Willett

There’s More There Than You Think - A Detailed History of Broadbridge Heath, published by The Friends of Horsham Museum is available for purchase at Horsham Museum. The Friends of Horsham Museum charity will receive all of the profits from its sales.


50

From Butcher’s Boy

To the BRIT Awards The Story of Bangers Galore, Horsham’s Award-Winning Sausage Business

David Bell with some of his award-winning sausages

It’s harder than you think to make the perfect sausage. It’s not just a matter of using good quality meat. You need to ensure there are no air cavities; that the herbs and flavours are distributed evenly throughout the sausage; somehow during cooking you need to prevent the sausage’s natural curve to ensure it is consistently cooked. Master all of this and perhaps you too have the potential to be National Sausage Making Champion. It’s a title bestowed on David Bell not just once, but twice. This recognition has seen sausages made by his Horsham-based company Bangers Galore feature on the menu at 10 Downing Street. Pop royalty have been treated to his bangers on two occasions at the BRIT Awards.

But whilst national recognition and celebrity customers help creates headlines, the day to day running of the business is very different. David still heads down to the local produce market in the Carfax on a Saturday to promote his award-winning sausages. David said: “The best sellers are the plain flavour traditional pork sausages and chipolatas. Other popular varieties are Cumberland and Lincolnshire, Pork and Apple, and the The Pork and Wild Mushroom sell well at the market, along with Sage and Red Onion. “We do sausage tasting at the Horsham market and that works very well. “Selling in shops is different to the market, as of course customers can’t taste it first, so you get the odd adventurous type that

might take a risk but most will play it safe and stick to the popular sausages. But down on the market, they can obviously taste it before they buy it. “This gives us the chance to try out flavours. We tried a chocolate chilli, which most people turned their nose up at initially. But when they tried it they found they liked it. At Christmas we added orange zest, but the feedback was not great as the orange was too powerful. We do sundried tomato and basil in the summer but rest it in winter, so we always have the popular ones and a few surprises. “That is what is great about the market – we get brilliant feedback from our customers. They support us week in, week out, and it’s increasing all the time down there for us and word is spreading about the sausages. Attitudes to local produce have changed, particularly in the past two years. People want something different, and the supermarkets have realised this.” It is 21 years since David first won the title of National Sausage Making Champion, yet he is still winning awards. Just a few months ago, a Bangers Galore Pork and Wild Mushroom sausage was named ‘Best in Show’ at the South Eastern Prime Stock Winter Fayre at Ardingly. Yes, there really is such a competition! It all started for David working as a Saturday lad for a butcher in Surrey. David said: “I worked for Ken Davey in Bookham, as that’s where I grew up and went full time when I was 16. “Ken had a very good reputation so I learnt a lot from him. He would properly trim and bone the ham before he made his sausages. He did it very well, and while I was there we won the National Sausage Championships twice, in 1992 and 1994. “We had a number of years when we were winning competitions all of the time. I just enjoyed making the sausages and


gradually began to understand what made a good competition sausage. Sometimes we would go and not get a look-in and I asked the judges why they didn’t score well. “Whereas the public will go by flavour, the judges are looking for air cavities. You have to make sure the herbs are distributed evenly throughout the sausage, and they look at shrinkage too. You present six cooked sausages and six raw to show you only lose a small percentage of weight during cooking. “The quality of the skin is important too, as it has to be cooked all the way round the sausage. They tend to naturally curve, meaning you get two brown strips where they cook first. Judges like it to be brown all the way around, so during competitions we hold the meat down initially so the curve doesn’t develop. It’s crazy really, but you need these rules to separate the good from the very good. “It meant a lot to me to get it right. In 1992, we won with a plain sausage that was just well made. The taste is the last thing that they look for as everyone has their own preference. In 1994, we won with garlic and herb sausages, which are not to everyone’s taste, so that was a surprise.” After the 1994 Award, David appeared on a Saturday morning children’s television show. He remembers: “They had a game which was like the Generation Game. I went on the programme with my sausage machine and did a demonstration. The children then had to try linking the sausages and I then had to mark them!” He was enjoying his time working at an award-winning butcher, but after 15 years working at Ken Davey’s, David was looking to move on. He moved to Horsham with his wife, and took a leap of faith and set up his own business,


52

After the meat is delivered, it is properly trimmed, then placed in the mixer, when the bread rusk and seasonings are added. Once it is

Bangers Galore. He approached a friend, Stuart Pearce, who ran South Street Butchers in Dorking, to ask if he could use the butcher’s equipment to make Bangers Galore sausages. David said: “The idea was that I would make competition winning sausages, with Bangers Galore getting a reputation as the maker, and his butchers being known as the place to buy them from. So that is what happened and the first competition I went to as Bangers Galore in 1998 I won the Supreme Sausage Maker. “As well as selling the sausages at South

+

$*(

'"

!

+++ # + $*(

% # * (

' +! , $

, )

Street Butchers, I would make up batches of samples and go to restaurants, pubs, hotels and sell them too. I was enjoying working for myself, and another job driving taxis gave me the finances to be able to make sausages.” “After a time there, I moved on to another butcher in Bookham, run by my friend Keith Weston, making sausages to their own recipes. After a while, Keith said ‘make six of your best flavours, we’re going to put them on sale’. “So we did, and it really took off. I spent eight years with Keith at Rawlings and Kensett. It

$'(

"

'"( $% $ * -

,

*#

, )

"

%" !

'"

$% $$"( # &* )( )' + '', ! (

grew steadily, and I gave up the taxi driving and concentrated on the sausages, invested in a labelling machine and built the business. David was selling to farm shops, convenience stores, pubs and restaurants, making perhaps half a tonne of sausages a week. But his big break came from Budgens. “I got a call from the Fetcham store and they were looking to sell my sausages. Sales went really well and the word spread. Eventually, I was supplying 15 Budgens stores. “I’ve supplied Budgens in Billingshurst for about six years. This meant that, three years


Bangers Galore

minced through, the meat is then hand-pressed (see below) to remove air cavities before it is squeezed into the skin. The sausages hang in a

‘Judges like a sausage to be brown all the way around, so during competitions we hold the meat down initially so the natural curve doesn’t develop’

ago, I was able to move into my own premises in Horsham.” On a weekly basis, Bangers Galore now produces about two tonnes of sausages each week. They use premium Maldon pork from Wicks Manor Farm in Essex. David and two employees,Ryan Botting and Steven Smith, then trim the meat to ensure there is no gristle. David said: “If you’re getting good quality meat and trim it well before it goes in the mincer, then you are nearly there. That is the foundation of a good sausage.

PHOENIX FIRE RISK ASSESSMENT www.phoenixfireriskassessment.com

“You then weigh it to ensure you get every flavour consistently tasting the same, then add the bread rusk with the seasonings and flavours before mixing it together and mincing it through. “We then take the sausage meat and pack it down to get all of the air out, before it is pushed into the natural skin casing, which we buy in from a farm in Scotland. “We hang them overnight, and that brings out a bit of colour. They are chopped, packed and wrapped and then they go out to the shops.

C&M Fire Alarms www.cmfirealarms.com

In partnership to provide a complete solution for all your FIRE SAFETY requirements

01903 893491

01403 268178

info@phoenixfireriskassessment.com

admin@cmfirealarms.com

Accredited Fire Risk Assessments

All types of Fire Detection Systems

Accredited Fire Safety Training

Fire Alarms and Emergency Lighting

Provision and Maintenance of Fire Fighting Equipment

Service and Maintenance of Fire Alarm and Emergency Lighting Systems


54 ‘Down on the market, people can taste before they buy. This gives us the chance to try out new flavours’

fridge overnight before they are placed in packets of six, packaged, labelled and sent to shops

“As well as making the sausages, we have to keep logs on cleaning schedules, maintain temperatures for the fridges, and record where the meat has come from and where it has gone to.” Currently, Bangers Galore supply Budgens and Southern Co-Op stores, as well as The Olive Tree in North Heath Lane, Old Barn Nurseries in Dial Post and New House Farm in Faygate. The next step is increasing output, without impacting quality. A new but very expensive machine on the market, which includes a vacuum for cutting air cavities, may allow David’s business to grow without losing its award-winning qualities. He hopes that the sausages we buy will remain as good as those tasted by the competition judges. “The only difference between our competition sausages and those you buy at the shop is that we don’t come around to your house and ensure they don’t curve when you cook them!” For more on Bangers Galore visit www.bangersgalore.com or call 01403 262233

Sausages by David Bell Made using only British Quality Assured Pork. Available from our Horsham outlet or many other quality stockists We are a family run business & pride ourselves on using only the finest ingredients for all our sausages. We are continually creating new varieties to complement the more traditional flavours. Some of our most popular sausages include: Traditional Pork Cumberland Pork & Leek Pork, Sage & Red Onion Pork Garlic & Herb Pork & Apple

Of for something a little different, why not try... Chorizo Style Chilli & Chocolate Pork & Wild Mushroom We also make sausages to your own unique recipes.

Find us at the local Produce Market in the Carfax every Saturday

facebook.com/bangersgalore www.bangersgalore.co.uk 01403 262233

Unit 10, Blatchford Close, Horsham, West Sussex RH13 5RG


Lifestyle Europe keeps your business moving Businesses are more mobile than ever, relying heavily on vehicles to get from A-to-B. Lifestyle Europe understands the varying company requirements, and therefore presents customers with a vast range of vehicle solutions from its dedicated commercial and fleet departments. “We understand how important vehicles and traveling is in business, which is why we have a dedicated team of staff on hand to help you with your motoring needs,” explains Tony Feldon, Lifestyle Europe’s Group Business Manager. “From our Horsham site, we have a large selection of new and used commercial vehicles, plus a great range of fleet options available.” Situated on the Bishopric, Horsham, Lifestyle’s Commercial Vehicle forecourt has an extensive range of vehicles, including the latest Ford Transit range. All-New Transit Custom Ford’s new Transit Custom is the mid-sized model of the Transit van range. It has been designed with comfort and practicality in mind, with many new features added to the latest model. The durable and stylish interior incorporates features to give you an office on the move, with central seat in dual-front seating folding into a table, ideal for laptops and completing paperwork. The flexible payload also allows users to customise how they use their vehicle, and the type of luggage they carry. As with many of the new vehicles, Ford SYNC

With the flexibility and the ability to move and flatten seats, it provides businesses with the ability to carry extra cargo securely and safely. Both Transit vehicles are available in a variety of engines and powers, as well as long and short wheel lengths. This allows you to customise your vehicle so that it meets your needs entirely.

comes as standard, keeping drivers and passengers connected with voice control over the telephone and entertainment system. As part of SYNC, Emergency Assist is included on the latest Transit, which will remotely call the emergency services in the event of an accident. Other technology to assist and ease driving includes a Lane Keeping Alert, Hill Start Assist and even Driver Alert – which will alert the driver should the vehicle sense they are becoming fatigued. Rear parking sensors and a camera are also available. This model also includes the fuel-saving technology, ECOnetic which provides Auto-Start-Stop and smart regenerative charging. Ford Transit Connect For a more compact solution, Ford’s Transit Connect offers the same level of comfort as the Transit Custom, but on a smaller scale.

Fleet When looking for stylish new business vehicles, Lifestyle Europe holds the key with a range of fleet leasing options that are competitively priced. “Fleet hire charges start from only £154+VAT per month, allowing worry-free, cost-effective motoring for all,” continues Tony. “If you are looking to upgrade your existing fleet, we can offer you a comprehensive service that will ensure you opt for the right vehicles for your individual needs. We can also provide you with branding and other customisable options, if you require it.” For information on Lifestyle Europe’s range of fleet and commercial vehicle options, please visit the Bishopric-based dealership or call 01403 282272. Alternatively, see www.lifestyleeurope.co.uk where a full list of new or used vehicles, dealership locations and contact details are available.


56

The Secret to Success

is Simple Review The Hare and Hounds, Cowfold Confucius remarked that ‘Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated’. When Wendy Keating took over the Hare and Hounds pub in Cowfold two and a half years ago, it’s unlikely that Chinese philosophy inspired her direction. But she was aware of the importance of simplicity. “When I came here there were glass top tables, a Big Screen TV, a pool table and lots of live rock music,” said Wendy. “I took a gamble and took it all out, brought in wooden tables and chairs, in an attempt to make it a little more traditional. As it turned out many locals were grateful for that. “I used to come and eat here 10 years ago, when the Hare and Hounds served good food and there was a warm atmosphere and that is what I wanted to return to. Before I came, the pub did offer food, but it was only light bites. “Straight away I knew I wanted to serve good food, so we had professionals come in and clean the kitchen, which took four days, and then we were up and running. “We introduced a menu with more traditional, home-made pub food, like Bangers and Mash, Steak and Kidney Pudding and Fish and Chips. I also wanted to offer good value for money, so

nearly all of our dishes are available as a lighter portion, which is really popular as some older people cannot eat a big meal and it’s more affordable.” When we visit on a Thursday lunch time, we are surprised to find the pub full. There are a number of drinkers just enjoying a pint near the bar, with a dog curled up near the open fire. The only table free is the one reserved for AAH. It is apparent by the age of most customers, that it is the OAP menu that is drawing in most of the business. Written out on a small chalk board were three main courses, including a Hot Pot, for £5 each, two desserts for £2.75 and tea/ coffee for £1. Its success is down to its simplicity, but that does not come without experience. Wendy has worked at various pubs in the area. She was manager of The Plough Inn in Henfield for a few years, and also worked at the Cat and Canary, and The George Inn, in the village. When the opportunity came up at the Hare and Hounds, it felt like a natural progression for Wendy. Initially, her best friend, Sophie Ping, helped Wendy cook the food, before a full-time chef was brought in. However, that did not work out, and so 14 months ago, Michael Dunne came in as a chef. Michael said: “I’ve worked in various


Review: Hare and Hounds

hotels and restaurants, and for a while I was Head Chef at British Caledonian. Later, I ran The Sportsman in Goddards Green, but the hours did get a little too much for me. “I’ve worked for Wendy before, and when the previous chef at the Hare and Hounds went on holiday and Wendy needed a new chef, I would come in. Then when he left, I spoke to Wendy and it all fell into place. “With the Coach House closing down, the Hare and Hounds has become even more important to the people of Cowfold. But I think we have pitched it right, serving honest food with a modern twist. “I keep it simple because that’s key as people like good wholesome food, so we

have big portions and the value for money is excellent. Most of our food is home-made, and I make as much as I can fresh.” The drinkers at the Hare and Hounds can also take their share of the success, as they are the ones that choose the beers! Being a free House, with no association to a brewery, The Hare and Hounds can pick and choose the beers it sells. Wendy said: “We always keep a Dark Star because they are based in Partridge Green, and the Harvey’s Sussex is very popular so we leave that on too. We have a core group of drinkers and they actually choose what will go on the guest pump. “They tell me what they would like next,

and if I can I will bring it in. When somebody from a brewery comes in and wants to talk about bringing their beers in, I always tell them ‘sorry, you have to talk to the boys!’ “It works out brilliantly as we get some excellent beers in. They are not always local beers, and we bring some in from quite far away, but it keeps it interesting. The first year I was here, CAMRA (Campaign for Real Ale) put us in the good beer guide and to celebrate we put on a beer festival. “I had never even been to a beer festival, but people were telling me I should do it, and it ended up being excellent. We had 15 beers, a jazz band and a barbecue and the place was really busy. It’s gone so well that


58

AAH

ALL ABOUT HORSHAM MAGAZINE

Call Ben Morris on 01403 878026 advertising@aahorsham.co.uk www.aahorsham.co.uk

ABOUT US AAH Magazine is an independently-owned monthly magazine for the Horsham district. AAH has become renowned for its interesting features and beautiful photography by Toby Phillips. AAH is an A4 publication, printed on high quality, 90gsm gloss paper with a 150gsm gloss cover. We promote the best of the district’s music and arts, review the finest restaurants, bring to life historic tales from Horsham’s past, and highlight the most interesting and unusual businesses. AAH has brought you great features on places such as Knepp Castle

DISTRIBUTION AAH Magazine is delivered directly to homes free of charge on a monthly basis. Our print run is currently 13,000 and our year-on-year circulation has increased by 25%. A team of about 30 people deliver AAH each and every month to 11,149 homes in the district. These include 5,437 homes in Horsham, 2,003 in Southwater, 1,114 in Billingshurst, and 865 in Partridge Green and Cowfold.

AAH provides features for young readers too, including features on sports clubs

We also deliver to the surrounding villages including Ashington (600), Warnham (275), Slinfold (284), Mannings Heath (326) as well as the smaller villages of Monks Gate, Dial Post, West Grinstead and Tower Hill. Businesses in Horsham, Billingshurst and Southwater receive the magazine whilst our spring-loaded, stylish stands with lids are extremely popular in Horsham town, Southwater and Billingshurst.

ADVERTISING Eighth Page (93mm x 63mm)

One Edition £55 plus VAT

Quarter Page (93mm x 133mm)

£100 plus VAT

Half Page (190mm x 133mm)

£175 plus VAT

Full Page (210mm x 297mm)

£300 plus VAT

Double Page (210mm x 297mm)

£500 plus VAT

Six Editions £275 plus VAT (one free)

AAH has an excellent reputation for producing stunning advertisements

AAHORSHAM.CO.UK

£500 plus VAT (one free)

£875 plus VAT (one free)

£1500 plus VAT (one free)

£2500 plus VAT (one free)

we carried it on and we’ll have one this year as well.” As you might expect, there’s no need for French accents on the simple menu. There’s no Foie Gras, Vanilla Scallops or Buffalo Milk Curd with on a Broth of Grilled Onions. But we do have Classic Prawn Cocktail, Creamy Garlic Mushrooms, Crispy Fried Whitebait and Chicken Goujons. As an example of the pub’s efforts to provide value for money, only one breaks the £5 barrier, with the Smoked Salmon costing £5.35. If you’re the sharing type, a Seafood Platter (£10.95) and Mixed Olives and Stuffed Peppers (£8.95) are available) We chose the Whitebait (£4.25) and the Garlic Mushrooms (£4.75). The whitebait, coated in Cayenne pepper, was served with a lime and coriander mayonnaise and a varied side salad. As promised, it was good, honest food and such a large portion offers very good value for money. Toby too was very pleased with his garlic mushrooms, which came with plenty of lightly toasted Ciabatta and again gave satisfaction rather than surprise. There are ten main courses on the menu, ranging from £7.95 (Leek, Mushroom and Pesto Pasta) to only £10.95 (Homemade Fresh Fish Pie and the Homemade Steak and Kidney Pudding), with lighter appetite dishes available for £6.95 for six of the courses. If you were on Family Fortunes and had to name the top 10 main courses at a typical English pub, the answers would, most likely, match the Hare and Hounds menu. There’s Ham, Eggs and Chips, Burger, Liver and bacon, Fish Pie, Cod and Chips, Chicken Curry, Sausage and Mash, and Scampi and Chips. You can also opt for Jacket Potato with a range of fillings, Ploughman’s Lunch, or a number of sandwiches.


Review: Hare and Hounds

‘I think we have pitched it right, serving honest food with a modern twist’ I went for the Steak and Kidney Pudding with New Potatoes and Vegetables served in side dishes. For £10.95, it was simply great value. Strictly frill-free, it’s a classic recipe cooked and presented well with enough potatoes and vegetables to question whether Wendy has ever heard of the term ‘profit margin’, let alone understand what it means. Toby chose the Fresh Cod in Beer Batter served with Chips, Peas and Tartare Sauce

(£9.95). Of course, you could state that the chips are not twice fried in virgin olive oil, but the fish was fresh, grease-free and generously battered, and the chunky chips were well cooked. We chose our desserts after browsing around the pub, which is small but feels warm and welcoming, with a selection of framed from days gone of the nearby St Hugh’s Charterhouse, Tidey’s Garage and Cowfold village

suggesting a sense of community at the pub. In truth, I was full and was hoping, against all the odds, for a small pudding. What arrived was a slice of Mint Chocolate Cheesecake fit for someone who lives at the top of a giant beanstalk. To say it cost less than £5, some care had gone into it. There was a liberal sprinkling of chocolate drops, and a strawberry had been tenderly sliced through five times so it could attractively fan out across the cream.

ROMANTIC DINNER FOR TWO? VALENTINE’S DAY IS THE MOST ROMANTIC DATE IN THE CALENDAR

Here’s a chance to really ‘wow’ your loved one with two dazzling restaurants to choose from... The Pass: Michelin starred eight-course dinner for two - £99 per person Camellia: five-course à la carte dinner for two - £75 per person

CALL US 01403 891711 southlodgehotel.co.uk

EMAIL US enquiries@southlodgehotel.co.uk

|

VIEW ALL WEDDING OFFERS southlodgehotel.co.uk/valentines

South Lodge Hotel, Brighton Road, Lower Beeding, Nr. Horsham, West Sussex, RH13 6PS


20 60

Mailman delivers

Acoustic showcase Live music event at The Anchor promotes local singer/songwriters

Toby went for a delicious crumble off the specials board, whilst other desserts include Simon King Bakewell Tart, Lemon meringue, Treacle Tast, Chocolate Brownie Pudding and Bailey’s and Raspberry Panna Cotta. Some of the desserts, which all cost less than £5, are prepared by Scrumdiddlyyum, based in the nearby village of Bolney. All in all, we found the Hare and Hounds to be a very pleasant pub, with an atmosphere that installed a false impression that I had eaten there many times before!

10%

With The Coach House in Cowfold now closed, the Hare and Hounds has The become all Mailman the more important to the village, but it has enough charm and character to fulfil the needs of the villagers. By doing little else aside from keeping it simple, the pub seems to have become a place where people young and old can feel jointly at home, and enjoy each other’s company. Wendy said: “We are a small pub, and it does help us as even with just a few people in here it feels cosy and we always make sure it’s

off your table bill with this voucher

Just a couple of years ago, American chat Ellie, accompanied by Dave Harewood on guitar and mandolin, give a sublime acoustic show host Ellen DeGeneres predicted live on Valid at Sanmae 31ST March 2013In The her chat show that Ellie Lawson would rendition of the until Trance Single ‘Place become 'the hugest, hugest star.’ Sun’ by Menno de Jong featuring Ellie Lawson. Despite live TV appearances, a deal with a delicious Atlantic Records, an ambassadorSanmae role for the serves Ellie, from South London, is one of four of flavours from clothing brand Quiksilver Womenfusion and even performers on a night of live music put tracks produced by William Orbit,Eastern Ellie just Asia. together by Jamie Stanley, commonly known fell short of making a significant breakthrough. as Stan. Like As afamilies, music lover and a singer/songwriter But she remains a polished live act withall Asian beautifully constructed,vibrant folk songs. serves himself (usually under the name Sanmae food in performing the Thetable Mailman or an in his band ‘The Tandem’) We see Ellie performing on a coldmiddle and wet of the for Sunday night at The Anchor Pub enjoyable in Market Stan puts on a monthly showcase of live, pridining out Square, Horsham. marily original music. experience for all It has been a struggle to generate big crowds Only a handful of people are there to see

warm. “I really love it here, and I wouldEllie be really Lawson happy if we just kept carrying on as we are. I don’t want to change anything because we have a good thing here. We have some great characters that come in, and we are popular in the village, so it’s enjoyable.” I’m sure, critically speaking, a top chef might be able to make a few suggestions. But that would just be making it complicated…

01403 261222 as the event is always held on a Sunday (the

Springfield Road, Horsham last of35-37 the month) and most of the material is original music, so crowd-pleasing classics are kept to a minimum. Stan said: “I’ve only been in Horsham for 100in and about fivePick years,from but I’venearly always been sumptuous dishes from around music. When I came here I was pleased to find there was a thriving ‘open mic China, Vietnam, night’ scene, and I was Japan, keen to get involved. Thailand, “But whilst there are plenty venues locally Malaysia and of Mongolia. for covers bands to play at, there are limited options for people wishing to sing their own Call us today to book a songs. night you’ll remember! “So I created Stan’s Showcase and The Anchor was the obvious home as there is a

www.sanmae.co.uk


61

Keeping the Paralympic

Flame burning The Aiming High/Reaching Higher programme is striving for greater integration in society Excitable television presenters and newspaper journalists were quick to dismiss the achievements of the 13 previous Paralympic Games as they declared London 2012 to be the ‘best ever’. This may well be the case, although it would appear such boastful claims had more than a hint of patriotism about them. But for many of us, it was the first time we had witnessed sports such as Wheelchair Basketball, and certainly the Paralympics was much more than a hastily-organised support show to the Olympics. After its undoubted success, it was assumed that the Paralympics would inspire many more people with disabilities or additional needs to take up a new sport. But is that really the case? Aiming High/Reaching Higher provides inclusive sports and arts courses in Horsham. Its busy weekly calendar includes dance, trampoline, rebound therapy, table tennis, athletics, cricket, badminton, cycling, DJ workshops, drumming, archery and video

production, with wheelchair basketball starting soon. They also run sensory days and multi-sport days during the school holidays in partnership with QEII School in Horsham and Manor Green Primary School in Crawley. Most participants are aged between 5-18, but a few people are a year or two older, and venues include Broadbridge Heath Leisure Centre, QEII School, Collyer’s, Forest School and QM Studios. Most of the schools provide the facilities free of charge. What makes Aiming High/Reaching Higher unique is that sessions are available not only for children and young people with additional needs, but also their friends and siblings. Helen Crooks, AHDC Project Co-ordinator, said: “We’ve been running for about four years. It started when a group of parents who had children with a variety of disabilities or additional needs were finding that they could not access after-school sports clubs. “Some were going to mainstream schools but were turned away from school sports clubs

because the schools could not provide the extra staffing the children would often require. When this happens, the children don’t feel included in society. “The parents came together to establish ‘You Can Do It!’ The group organised activities and did a terrific job, but because they were a parent-led group they struggled to take it to another level. Gradually, with the backing of local authorities, Aiming High took those sessions on. “We are trying to evolve each activity to create a totally inclusive group where the children with disabilities or additional needs are skilled enough to integrate into the mainstream group. Our table tennis group started off as a disability session run alongside a mainstream session, in the same venue at the same time. Now we are able to integrate the two. “It was never about keeping disability in its own, isolated bubble. “It’s about supporting the young people, allowing them to engage in activities that


62 their mainstream siblings and friends can do, and provide them with access to sport and equal opportunities. But when they can move into the mainstream group, additional support staff will be provided. “I thought that integration may be problematic, and perhaps more of a concern for their parents of children who do not have special needs, but it has been very successful. One parent told me that she felt it helped her child become more accepting of children with disabilities.” Despite the success of the Paralympics, funding continues to be a concern. Helen runs Reaching Higher under the umbrella of Horsham District Council’s community development and Leisure Link programme, but funding comes from West Sussex County Council. This covers highly experienced support workers who can support the children and young people we work with in all aspects of their care. Helen said: “We have staff trained to handle any situation that may arise. The whole idea is that we give the parents a break, so we can take total responsibility for the children. “We do charge for sessions, but we only charge what you would pay for a mainstream event. So it’s only £3 or £4 per session, and with a Leisure Access Card it’s cheaper still. There is a much greater level of staffing so it’s never going to be an activity you can break even on, financially. But it would not be fair

Amy Jode, Adam Gellibrand and Helen Crooks to put those costs on to parents. You shouldn’t pay more because you have a child with a disability.” What of that Paralympics legacy? Helen said the Games hasn’t led to an influx in the number of participants, but it has put new sports in the spotlight. “We have a young girl who wants to do wheelchair athletics and there’s already a waiting list for the new wheelchair basketball sessions. That has all come about due to the coverage those sports had in London. “I think as a society we did the Paralympics

very well and we’ve given ourselves a pat on the back, but it does take a lot of follow up work to keep that light burning.” If you wish to obtain a booking form or book a taster session, or for details on how businesses can support the sessions, please contact Helen Crooks on 07734 231052 or email helen.crooks@horsham.gov.uk. AAH spoke to several people with a variety of disabilities, as well as support staff, about their experiences with Aiming High/Reaching Higher...


Group Discussion John Bird, 17 “My Nan put me forward for the Aiming High sessions about two years ago. As well as the drumming session at QM Studios I do the DJ session, and I’ve done video production too. I’ve always loved music – it means everything to me. I’m a drummer myself, and drumming with the samba group is different to the standard drum beats I am used to. I like the DJ sessions too as we mix tracks together and that gives me an insight into what it is like on a radio station as. I’ve performed with the Boom Tribe (a community samba band run on a Tuesday night, with close

links to Aiming High sessions) and we’ve been to London, Brighton and the Isle of White too. We were given the chance to play at the Olympic Park last summer. Playing there gave me a great sense of achievement. We were playing to thousands of people and they were stopping and filming us on their phones. I actually got to lead the band for a while which was a proud moment for me. It’s a good friendly group here with fully qualified staff and everything runs smoothly. The projects are amazing and to be a part of it is very helpful to me. “

‘Playing at the Olympic Park gave me a great sense of achievement. People were stopping and filming us on their phones’

Chloe Dicken, 15 “I like the drumming sessions as I like the beats! I’ve been coming here since September and I go to the trampoline sessions too. At trampoline I play ‘Crack the Egg’ and if you get cracked you are out. I have two friends at trampoline and

they are both in Year 11 at school. They are lovely girls as they are so giggly. I have friends here at the drumming too as everyone is very nice, and it’s not always like that at school. I want to do the DJ sessions too as I like music!”

‘At trampoline I play ‘Crack the Egg’ and if you get cracked you are out’


64 Nicola Gardner, Mum of Louis, 12 “Louis has Autism, and he makes a lot of noise but cannot talk. We attend the drumming session together and Louis also goes to a few other Aiming High activities. He also attends dance, athletics and trampoline sessions, where he has a support worker helping him. He learns just as much outside of school as he does at school, and it’s important for him socially to come somewhere different. It’s difficult to gauge how much he is enjoying an activity as he cannot tell me, but I can tell when he is distressed and unhappy. I can judge by his body language and mannerisms, but I know he likes music, so drumming is great for him. I speak to the support workers and they give me good feedback from the other activities. He seems to get a lot from all of the sessions, and they are important to me too as I have the chance to meet staff and other parents. I have a daughter too who does not have a disability, and it’s good for her to have some free time at home whilst Louis is out of the house.”

‘It’s difficult to gauge how much Louis is enjoying an activity as he cannot tell me, but I can tell when he is distressed and unhappy’ Amy Jode, Support Worker

Jamie Lee, 19 “I play table tennis and cricket with Aiming High as well as archery and I like them all. I’ve just scored 28 with is my highest score so far (in an archery game called ‘Bow Poker’ where playing cards are randomly placed on the target and your score depends on the cards you hit). I go to QE2 School in Horsham and these sessions are really good for me as I make new friends who are not at my school. I’m good at archery and I’m good at table

tennis too. I like cricket and do both batting and bowling, but I like to bowl as I can do spin. I struggled with archery initially but now I’ve got the hang of it. I have been here for two terms, and it took a couple of weeks to learn properly. It was quite frustrating at the start as I was annoyed when I missed a shot. I said to my mum that I would like to join the tennis club as well, so that is next for me I hope!”

“I work as a support worker for the drumming sessions and assist at the rebound therapy sessions too when I am needed. I really enjoy the role because you feel you are giving parents a break. The Friday group of drumming and DJ skills is especially nice as everyone socialises together and people of all abilities feel equal. They are all friends and there is a really good vibe to the group. I’m also a member of the Boom Tribe. It’s a community samba band that is funded separately and meets on a Tuesday, also at QM Studios. Some of Friday’s group are involved in that too. Last year, we did some amazing work with the Boom Tribe and joined a big parade in Hackney. We were also in the Blue Touch Paper Carnival on the Isle of Wight. We hold a film workshop each Saturday too. When we did it last year, we gave each member of the group a camera to take home and film whatever they wanted before we showed them some basic editing techniques. What was great was that some of the people we work with will generally be non-verbal, but give them a camera and a whole story comes out. It was brilliant as it gave them an opportunity to communicate in a different way. This year, we are making a film which will be entered into an international film festival which is open to everyone.”


Horshamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Complete Hearing Care Serviceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

By Jonathan Ormerod of Horsham Hearing Centre Who are we? Having originally started the Horsham Hearing Centre back in Worthing Road, Horsham, back in 1995, I returned in 2012. Hearcentres Limited operates seven centres in the South, including Horsham, but each one retains an independent identity.

our ears as much as we need our eyes and I would recommend everyone to have a hearing check every couple of years. We offer a complimentary initial consultation and the results can be life changing.

What do we do? We offer the only â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;complete hearing care serviceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in Horsham. We have three Hearing Aid Audiologists based in the town, with over 60 years experience between them. We even provide an ear irrigation service, which is basically wax removal. There are only 20 dispensers in the country qualified to do this job and five of them are at Hearcentres Limited.

What hearing aids do we provide? SeboTek hearing instruments are recognised around the world for their magnificent sound quality and their patented receiver in the canal design. These hearing aids are only available through our hearing centres and you will not find them elsewhere in Horsham. SeboTek have recently created a new HD device, which pick up a far greater range of sounds. It is also very comfortable and people wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even notice you are wearing anything.

Do you need a check-up? Many people are unaware they have hearing loss. One of the reasons for that is that hearing loss can be a gradual process and it can be years between the time that people start needing help to when they actually seek help. We need

What other new devices are available? Mobile phone technology is also helping to improve

hearing aids. The Horsham Hearing Centre is the sole local provider of the SurfLink Mobile, a device which streams your TV, music or mobile phone straight to your hearing aid. This will mean people with hearing difficulties can use a mobile phone. It is also an exciting product for anyone looking for a true â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hands-freeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mobile phone device. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to try it call us to arrange a free demonstration.

&Z FT  $IFD LFE 5 FFU I $IFD LFE )FBS J OH $IFD LFE

%PO U  OFHM FD U  Z PVS  FBS T   #PPL B '3&& IFBS J OH D IFD L U PEB Z  The Horsham Hearing Centre

01403 218700

22 Worthing Road, Horsham, West Sussex, RH12 1SL

horsham@hearcentres.com


66

The ‘things you probably didn’t know about Horsham that are really quite interesting’ page...

The ‘Face’ hidden in the 18th Century pews at an

historic church Can you see it? Look closely and you may see a face hidden within one of the 18th Century pews at Warminghurst Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The Church, in the tiny, isolated parish near Ashington, has been closed for over 30 years. Today it is maintained by the Churches Conservation Trust. You will not find any reference to the hidden face in any of the information leaflets available, but the ‘face’ is known to those who frequent the church. If you can’t initially see anything, try focusing at the centre of the image as if you were solving a ‘Magic Eye’ puzzle. If there’s still nothing, then you can assume the image doesn’t photograph well! Admittedly, it’s not as impressive as the Turin Shroud, a linen cloth bearing the image of a man who appears to have been

crucified. The Shroud is kept at the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist in Turin and has been the subject of intense debate among theologians and historians. There are hundreds of cases of people claiming to have seen the face of Jesus in food, furniture, animals and domestic appliances around the world. A Florida woman claimed that an image of Christ appeared on a power box while she was praying. In Australia, Christ appeared in a pizza and the restaurant that made the pizza put it on eBay where it was sold for $153 Australian Dollars. That’s not even the biggest eBay purchase . When Christ appeared on a type of Polish dumpling called Pierogi, its owner sold it for $1,775. In 2005 a piece of plaster from a Pittsburgh bathroom with a very impressive image of Christ on it was sold for $1,999.

There is a whole website devoted to such images at www.stuffthatlookslikejesus.com with fascinating pictures of Christ appearing on guitars, apples, bananas, grilled cheese sandwiches and even the back of a Stingray! However, the face of Christ is not a regular occurrence at actual places at worship. However, The Chapel at Ursuline Academy in New Orleans drew in more than a thousand visitors a day when a striking shadow appeared in the sanctuary that many said looks like the face of Jesus. Whilst it would be hard to argue that the ‘face’ at Warminghurst Church bears any particular resemblance to Christ (and it should be noted that no-one AAH has spoken to at the Church made any such suggestion) it does at the very least add to the mystery of this historic and charming church.


Lettings Department 01403 282500


AAH February 2013